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Sample records for attenuated dengue vaccine

  1. [Dengue vaccines].

    PubMed

    Morita, Kouichi

    2008-10-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito borne virus infection in the tropics. Based on the effects of global warming, it is expected that dengue epidemic areas will further expand in the next decades unless effective and affordable vaccines are made available soon. At the moment, several vaccine developers have utilized live-attenuated live tetravalent vaccines and two of them have already completed phase two trials. However, the risk of antibody-dependent enhancement infection is not well elucidated and thus further and careful evaluation of the safety on proposed candidate vaccines are essential. At the moment, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation strongly support the vaccine development through the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

  2. Clinical evaluation strategies for a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Precioso, Alexander Roberto; Palacios, Ricardo; Thomé, Beatriz; Mondini, Gabriella; Braga, Patrícia; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-12-10

    Butantan Institute is a public Brazilian biomedical research-manufacturer center affiliated to the São Paulo State Secretary of Health. Currently, Butantan is one of the main public producers of vaccines, antivenoms, and antitoxins in Latin America. The partnership between Butantan and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the United Sates has been one of the longest and most successful partnerships in the development and manufacturing of new vaccines. Recently, Butantan Institute has developed and manufactured a lyophilized tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine with the four dengue viruses attenuated and licensed from the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (LID/NIAID/NIH). The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical evaluation strategies of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (Butantan-DV) developed and manufactured by Butantan Institute. These clinical strategies will be used to evaluate the Butantan-DV Phase III trial to support the Butantan-DV licensure for protection against any symptomatic dengue caused by any serotype in people aged 2 to 59 years.

  3. Dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Simasathien, Sriluck; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai

    2005-11-01

    Dengue is an expanding health problem. About two-fifths of the world population are at risk for acquiring dengue with 50-100 million cases of acute febrile illness yearly including about 500,000 cases of DHF/DSS. No antiviral drugs active against the flavivirus exist. Attempts to control mosquito vector has been largely unsuccessful. Vaccination remains the most hopeful preventive measure. Dengue vaccine has been in development for more than 30 years, yet none has been licensed. The fact that enhancing antibody from previous infection and high level of T cell activation during secondary infection contribute to immunopathology of DHF, the vaccine must be able to induce protective response to four dengue serotypes simultaneously. Inactivated vaccine is safe but needs a repeated booster thus, development is delayed. Tetravalent live attenuated vaccine and chimeric vaccine using yellow fever or dengue viruses as a backbone are being carried out in human trials. DNA vaccine and subunit vaccine are being carried out in animal trials.

  4. Short report: immune response and occurrence of dengue infection in thai children three to eight years after vaccination with live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Luxemburger, Christine; Sirivichayakul, Chukiat; Lapphra, Keswadee; Pengsaa, Krisana; Yoksan, Sutee; Sabchareon, Arunee; Lang, Jean

    2006-07-01

    From 1992 to 1997, 140 Thai children 4-15 years of age received an investigational live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (LATDV). These children were contacted 3-8 years later in 2001 to assess humoral immunity and investigate whether they were subsequently at higher risk of developing severe dengue. One hundred thirteen were successfully contacted and participated in this retrospective cohort study with two age- and address-matched controls per vaccinee. The number of vaccinated subjects with neutralizing antibodies increased compared with 3-8 years earlier, which was probably due to subsequent wild-type dengue infections. There were no excess hospitalizations for clinically suspected dengue fever (DF) or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in vaccinees (one with DF and three with DHF) compared with controls (14 with DHF). Results suggest that preexisting dengue antibodies induced by LATDV do not enhance dengue illness, and the use of the vaccine in a dengue-endemic area is safe.

  5. The live attenuated dengue vaccine TV003 elicits complete protection against dengue in a human challenge model.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Whitehead, Stephen S; Pierce, Kristen K; Tibery, Cecilia M; Grier, Palmtama L; Hynes, Noreen A; Larsson, Catherine J; Sabundayo, Beulah P; Talaat, Kawsar R; Janiak, Anna; Carmolli, Marya P; Luke, Catherine J; Diehl, Sean A; Durbin, Anna P

    2016-03-16

    A dengue human challenge model can be an important tool to identify candidate dengue vaccines that should be further evaluated in large efficacy trials in endemic areas. Dengue is responsible for about 390 million infections annually. Protective efficacy results for the most advanced dengue vaccine candidate (CYD) were disappointing despite its ability to induce neutralizing antibodies against all four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. TV003 is a live attenuated tetravalent DENV vaccine currently in phase 2 evaluation. To better assess the protective efficacy of TV003, a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which recipients of TV003 or placebo were challenged 6 months later with a DENV-2 strain, rDEN2Δ30, was conducted. The primary endpoint of the trial was protection against dengue infection, defined as rDEN2Δ30 viremia. Secondary endpoints were protection against rash and neutropenia. All 21 recipients of TV003 who were challenged with rDEN2Δ30 were protected from infection with rDEN2Δ30. None developed viremia, rash, or neutropenia after challenge. In contrast, 100% of the 20 placebo recipients who were challenged with rDEN2Δ30 developed viremia, 80% developed rash, and 20% developed neutropenia. TV003 induced complete protection against challenge with rDEN2Δ30 administered 6 months after vaccination. TV003 will be further evaluated in dengue-endemic areas. The controlled dengue human challenge model can accelerate vaccine development by evaluating the protection afforded by the vaccine, thereby eliminating poor candidates from further consideration before the initiation of large efficacy trials. PMID:27089205

  6. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches.

  7. 78 FR 43219 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Live Attenuated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... et al., ``Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating Dengue Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses... Antigenic Chimeric Dengue Viruses 1,2,3, And 4'', United States Patent Application Number 10/970,640 (now...., ``Mutations which enhance the replication of dengue virus type 4 and an antigenic chimeric dengue virus...

  8. Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Virus Host Range Vaccine Is Immunogenic in African Green Monkeys following a Single Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine M.; Piper, Amanda; Huitt, Emerson; Spears, Carla J.; Quiles, Michelle; Ribeiro, Mariana; Thomas, Malcolm E.; Brown, Dennis T.; Hernandez, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The causative agent of dengue fever, dengue virus (DENV), is transmitted by mosquitoes, and as distribution of these insects has expanded, so has dengue-related disease. DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae family and has 4 distinct serotypes (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4). No lasting cross protection is afforded to heterologous serotypes following infection by any one of the individual serotypes. The presence of nonneutralizing antibodies to one serotype can facilitate the occurrence of more-severe dengue hemorrhagic fever through immune enhancement upon infection with a second serotype. For this reason, the development of a safe, tetravalent vaccine to produce a balanced immune response to all four serotypes is critical. We have developed a novel approach to produce safe and effective live-attenuated vaccines for DENV and other insect-borne viruses. Host range (HR) mutants of each DENV serotype were created by truncating transmembrane domain 1 of the E protein and selecting for strains of DENV that replicated well in insect cells but not mammalian cells. These vaccine strains were tested for immunogenicity in African green monkeys (AGMs). No vaccine-related adverse events occurred. The vaccine strains were confirmed to be attenuated in vivo by infectious center assay (ICA). Analysis by 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) established that by day 62 postvaccination, 100% of animals seroconverted to DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4. Additionally, the DENV HR tetravalent vaccine (HR-Tet) showed a tetravalent anamnestic immune response in 100% (16/16) of AGMs after challenge with wild-type (WT) DENV strains. IMPORTANCE We have generated a live attenuated viral (LAV) vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response in African green monkeys (AGMs) in a single dose. This vaccine is delivered by injecting one of four attenuated serotypes into each limb of the animal. 100% of animals given the vaccine generated antibodies against all 4 serotypes, and this

  9. Progress towards a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Webster, Daniel P; Farrar, Jeremy; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2009-11-01

    The spread of dengue virus throughout the tropics represents a major, rapidly growing public health problem with an estimated 2.5 billion people at risk of dengue fever and the life-threatening disease, severe dengue. A safe and effective vaccine for dengue is urgently needed. The pathogenesis of severe dengue results from a complex interaction between the virus, the host, and, at least in part, immune-mediated mechanisms. Vaccine development has been slowed by fears that immunisation might predispose individuals to the severe form of dengue infection. A pipeline of candidate vaccines now exists, including live attenuated, inactivated, chimeric, DNA, and viral-vector vaccines, some of which are at the stage of clinical testing. In this Review, we present what is understood about dengue pathogenesis and its implications for vaccine design, the progress that is being made in the development of a vaccine, and the future challenges.

  10. Development of TV003/TV005, a single dose, highly immunogenic live attenuated dengue vaccine; what makes this vaccine different from the Sanofi-Pasteur CYD™ vaccine?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is caused by four serotype-distinct dengue viruses (DENVs), and developing a multivalent vaccine against dengue has not been straightforward since partial immunity to DENV may predispose to more severe disease upon subsequent DENV infection. The vaccine that is furthest along in development is CYD™, a live attenuated tetravalent vaccine (LATV) produced by Sanofi Pasteur. Although the multi-dose vaccine demonstrated protection against severe dengue, its overall efficacy was limited by DENV serotype, serostatus at vaccination, region and age. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has developed the LATV dengue vaccines TV003/TV005. A single dose of either TV003 or TV005 induced seroconversion to four DENV serotypes in 74-92% (TV003) and 90% (TV005) of flavivirus seronegative adults and elicited near-sterilizing immunity to a second dose of vaccine administered 6-12 months later. The important differences in the structure, infectivity and immune responses to TV003/TV005 are compared with CYD™. PMID:26559731

  11. The use of Toxorhynchites splendens for identification and quantitation of serotypes contained in the tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jirakanjanakit, N; Khin, M M; Yoksan, S; Bhamarapravati, N

    1999-02-12

    Assurance of identity and quantity is an indispensable part of quality control in the manufacture of vaccines. Dengue-1 PDK13, dengue-2 PDK53, dengue-3 PGMK30F3 and dengue-4 PDK48 in the live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine were assayed by identification and quantitation in a mosquito system (Toxorhynchites splendens). Each serotype of dengue virus was identified by dengue specific monoclonal antibodies in the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Virus content was estimated by calculating the 50% mosquito infectious dose (MID50). Differences from 0 to +/-0.5 log10 were observed between the original monovalent titer and that from the blend which showed no significant difference at 95% confidence limit (P < 0.05). This result indicates that there is no interference between dengue serotypes in mosquitoes infected by intrathoracic inoculation with the virus mixture. It can be also concluded that this mosquito system can be used as an effective measure for infectivity titration of each component in the tetravalent dengue vaccine.

  12. Preparation of an attenuated dengue 4 (341750 Carib) virus vaccine. I. Pre-clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marchette, N J; Dubois, D R; Larsen, L K; Summers, P L; Kraiselburd, E G; Gubler, D J; Eckels, K H

    1990-08-01

    Dengue 4 (DEN-4) virus strain 341750 Carib was modified by serial passage in primary canine kidney (PCK) cell cultures. By the 15th PCK passage, this virus was less infectious for monkeys and resulted in a significantly reduced viremia as compared to the parent DEN-4 virus. The 30th PCK passage of DEN-4 341750 Carib was non-infectious for monkeys. A vaccine prepared at the 20th PCK passage in DBS-FRhL-2 cells stimulated the production of both neutralizing and hemagglutination inhibition antibodies in monkeys; these animals were also protected against challenge with the homologous strain as well as a heterologous strain of DEN-4. An ID50 titration in monkeys resulted in a titer of greater than 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU) for the vaccine virus and 0.5 PFU for the parent virus. Reduced monkey infectivity of this magnitude has been correlated with human attenuation in previous dengue vaccine candidates. The DEN-4 strain 341750 Carib PCK-20/FRhL-4 vaccine has been characterized and sufficiently tested to be considered for safety and immunogenicity trials in humans.

  13. Outlook for a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Norrby, R

    2014-05-01

    Dengue is an increasing medical problem in subtropical and tropical countries. The search for a safe and effective vaccine is complicated by the fact that there are four types of dengue virus and that, if a vaccine is live attenuated, it should be proven not to cause the life-threatening form of dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever. So far one vaccine candidate, a four-valent chimeric vaccine constructed from a yellow fever vaccine strain, has reached large clinical trials and has been shown to offer protection against dengue types 1, 3 and 54 but not against dengue type 2. It is highly likely that an effective vaccine will be available in the next decade.

  14. Early Transcriptional Signatures of the Immune Response to a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Popper, Stephen J.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Relman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of a vaccine against dengue faces unique challenges, including the complexity of the immune responses to the four antigenically distinct serotypes. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling provides insight into the pathways and molecular features that underlie responses to immune system stimulation, and may facilitate predictions of immune protection. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we measured early transcriptional responses in the peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques following vaccination with a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate, TDV, which is based on a DENV-2 backbone. Different doses and routes of vaccine administration were used, and viral load and neutralizing antibody titers were measured at different time-points following vaccination. All 30 vaccinated animals developed a neutralizing antibody response to each of the four dengue serotypes, and only 3 of these animals had detectable serum viral RNA after challenge with wild-type dengue virus (DENV), suggesting protection of vaccinated animals to DENV infection. The vaccine induced statistically significant changes in 595 gene transcripts on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 as compared with baseline and placebo-treated animals. Genes involved in the type I interferon (IFN) response, including IFI44, DDX58, MX1 and OASL, exhibited the highest fold-change in transcript abundance, and this response was strongest following double dose and subcutaneous (versus intradermal) vaccine administration. In addition, modules of genes involved in antigen presentation, dendritic cell activation, and T cell activation and signaling were enriched following vaccination. Increased abundance of gene transcripts related to T cell activation on day 5, and the type I IFN response on day 7, were significantly correlated with the development of high neutralizing antibody titers on day 30. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that early transcriptional responses may be

  15. Live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine in children, adolescents and adults in a dengue endemic country: randomized controlled phase I trial in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Capeding, Rosario Z; Luna, Imelda A; Bomasang, Emily; Lupisan, Socorro; Lang, Jean; Forrat, Remi; Wartel, Anh; Crevat, Denis

    2011-05-17

    A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) is safe and immunogenic in adults and children in dengue-naïve populations. Data are needed in dengue endemic populations. In a phase I, randomized, controlled, blind-observer study in the Philippines, groups of participants aged 2-5, 6-11, 12-17, and 18-45 years received either three TDV vaccinations at months 0, 3.5, and 12 (TDV-TDV-TDV group) or licensed typhoid vaccination at month 0 and TDV at months 3.5 and 12 (TyVi-TDV-TDV group) and were followed for safety (including biological safety and vaccine virus viremia) and immunogenicity. No serious adverse vaccine related events and no significant trends in biological safety parameters were reported. Injection site pain, headache, malaise, myalgia, fever, and asthenia were reported most frequently, as mild to moderate in most cases and transient. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive vaccinations and was no higher in children than in adults and adolescents. Low levels of vaccinal viremia were detected in both groups after each TDV vaccination. After three TDV vaccinations, the seropositivity rates against serotypes 1-4 were: 91%, 100%, 96%, 100%, respectively, in 2-5 year-olds; 88%, 96% 96%, 92% in 6-11 year-olds; 88%, 83%, 92%, 96% in adolescents; and 100% for all serotypes in adults. A similar response was observed after two doses for the TyVi-TDV-TDV group. The safety profile of TDV in a flavivirus endemic population was consistent with previous reports from flavivirus naïve populations. A vaccine regimen of either three TDV vaccinations administered over a year or two TDV vaccinations given more than 8 months apart resulted in a balanced antibody response to all four dengue serotypes in this flavivirus-exposed population, including children.

  16. Safety Overview of a Recombinant Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: Pooled Analysis of Data from 18 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Gailhardou, Sophia; Skipetrova, Anna; Dayan, Gustavo H; Jezorwski, John; Saville, Melanie; Van der Vliet, Diane; Wartel, T Anh

    2016-07-01

    A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) has been shown to be efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue disease, severe dengue disease and dengue hospitalization in children aged 2-16 years in Asia and Latin America. We analyzed pooled safety data from 18 phase I, II and III clinical trials in which the dengue vaccine was administered to participants aged 2-60 years, including long-term safety follow-up in three efficacy trials. The participants were analyzed according to their age at enrollment. The percentage of participants aged 2-60 years reporting ≥1 solicited injection-site or systemic reactions was slightly higher in the CYD-TDV group than in the placebo group. The most common solicited injection-site reactions were pain. Headache and malaise were the most common solicited systemic reactions. In both groups 0.3% of participants discontinued for safety reasons. The most common unsolicited adverse events were injection-site reactions, gastrointestinal disorders, and infections. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive doses of CYD-TDV. The frequency and nature of SAEs occurring within 28 days of any dose were similar in the CYD-TDV and placebo groups and were common medical conditions that could be expected as a function of age. Baseline dengue virus serostatus did not appear to influence the safety profile. No vaccine-related anaphylactic reactions, neurotropic events or viscerotropic events were reported. In year 3 after dose 1, an imbalance for dengue hospitalization, including for severe dengue, observed in participants aged <9 years in the CYD-TDV group compared with the placebo group was not observed for participants aged ≥9 years. In Year 4, this imbalance in participants aged <9 years was less marked, giving an overall lower risk of dengue hospitalization or severe dengue from dose 1 to Year 4 in the CYD-TDV group. These results have contributed to the definition of the target population for

  17. Safety Overview of a Recombinant Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: Pooled Analysis of Data from 18 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Gailhardou, Sophia; Skipetrova, Anna; Dayan, Gustavo H; Jezorwski, John; Saville, Melanie; Van der Vliet, Diane; Wartel, T Anh

    2016-07-01

    A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) has been shown to be efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue disease, severe dengue disease and dengue hospitalization in children aged 2-16 years in Asia and Latin America. We analyzed pooled safety data from 18 phase I, II and III clinical trials in which the dengue vaccine was administered to participants aged 2-60 years, including long-term safety follow-up in three efficacy trials. The participants were analyzed according to their age at enrollment. The percentage of participants aged 2-60 years reporting ≥1 solicited injection-site or systemic reactions was slightly higher in the CYD-TDV group than in the placebo group. The most common solicited injection-site reactions were pain. Headache and malaise were the most common solicited systemic reactions. In both groups 0.3% of participants discontinued for safety reasons. The most common unsolicited adverse events were injection-site reactions, gastrointestinal disorders, and infections. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive doses of CYD-TDV. The frequency and nature of SAEs occurring within 28 days of any dose were similar in the CYD-TDV and placebo groups and were common medical conditions that could be expected as a function of age. Baseline dengue virus serostatus did not appear to influence the safety profile. No vaccine-related anaphylactic reactions, neurotropic events or viscerotropic events were reported. In year 3 after dose 1, an imbalance for dengue hospitalization, including for severe dengue, observed in participants aged <9 years in the CYD-TDV group compared with the placebo group was not observed for participants aged ≥9 years. In Year 4, this imbalance in participants aged <9 years was less marked, giving an overall lower risk of dengue hospitalization or severe dengue from dose 1 to Year 4 in the CYD-TDV group. These results have contributed to the definition of the target population for

  18. Safety Overview of a Recombinant Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: Pooled Analysis of Data from 18 Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Gailhardou, Sophia; Skipetrova, Anna; Dayan, Gustavo H.; Jezorwski, John; Saville, Melanie; Van der Vliet, Diane; Wartel, T. Anh

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) has been shown to be efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue disease, severe dengue disease and dengue hospitalization in children aged 2–16 years in Asia and Latin America. We analyzed pooled safety data from 18 phase I, II and III clinical trials in which the dengue vaccine was administered to participants aged 2–60 years, including long-term safety follow-up in three efficacy trials. The participants were analyzed according to their age at enrollment. The percentage of participants aged 2–60 years reporting ≥1 solicited injection-site or systemic reactions was slightly higher in the CYD-TDV group than in the placebo group. The most common solicited injection-site reactions were pain. Headache and malaise were the most common solicited systemic reactions. In both groups 0.3% of participants discontinued for safety reasons. The most common unsolicited adverse events were injection-site reactions, gastrointestinal disorders, and infections. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive doses of CYD-TDV. The frequency and nature of SAEs occurring within 28 days of any dose were similar in the CYD-TDV and placebo groups and were common medical conditions that could be expected as a function of age. Baseline dengue virus serostatus did not appear to influence the safety profile. No vaccine-related anaphylactic reactions, neurotropic events or viscerotropic events were reported. In year 3 after dose 1, an imbalance for dengue hospitalization, including for severe dengue, observed in participants aged <9 years in the CYD-TDV group compared with the placebo group was not observed for participants aged ≥9 years. In Year 4, this imbalance in participants aged <9 years was less marked, giving an overall lower risk of dengue hospitalization or severe dengue from dose 1 to Year 4 in the CYD-TDV group. These results have contributed to the definition of the target population for

  19. Dengue virus-specific human CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses in a recipient of an experimental live-attenuated dengue virus type 1 vaccine: bulk culture proliferation, clonal analysis, and precursor frequency determination.

    PubMed Central

    Green, S; Kurane, I; Edelman, R; Tacket, C O; Eckels, K H; Vaughn, D W; Hoke, C H; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses to dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses 4 months after immunization of a volunteer with an experimental live-attenuated dengue virus type 1 vaccine (DEN-1 45AZ5). We examined bulk culture proliferation to noninfectious antigens, determined the precursor frequency of specific CD4+ T cells by limiting dilution, and established and analyzed CD4+ T-cell clones. Bulk culture proliferation was predominantly dengue virus type 1 specific with a lesser degree of cross-reactive responses to other dengue virus serotypes, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus. Precursor frequency determination by limiting dilution in the presence of noninfectious dengue virus antigens revealed a frequency of antigen-reactive cells of 1 in 1,686 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for dengue virus type 1, 1 in 9,870 PBMC for dengue virus type 3, 1 in 14,053 PBMC for dengue virus type 2, and 1 in 17,690 PBMC for dengue virus type 4. Seventeen CD4+ T-cell clones were then established by using infectious dengue virus type 1 as antigen. Two patterns of dengue virus specificity were found in these clones. Thirteen clones were dengue virus type 1 specific, and four clones recognized both dengue virus types 1 and 3. Analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restriction revealed that five clones are HLA-DRw52 restricted, one clone is HLA-DP3 restricted, and one clone is HLA-DP4 restricted. These results indicate that in this individual, the CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses to immunization with live-attenuated dengue virus type 1 vaccine are predominantly serotype specific and suggest that a multivalent vaccine may be necessary to elicit strong serotype-cross-reactive CD4+ T-lymphocyte responses in such individuals. PMID:8371350

  20. A Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-06-30

    Denvaxia is the first licensed vaccine for the prevention of dengue. It is a live vaccine developed using recombinant DNA technology. The vaccine is given as three doses over the course of a year and has the potential to prevent hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year. PMID:27368091

  1. A Rapid Immunization Strategy with a Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Elicits Protective Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ambuel, Yuping; Young, Ginger; Brewoo, Joseph N.; Paykel, Joanna; Weisgrau, Kim L.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Haller, Aurelia A.; Royals, Michael; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Capuano, Saverio; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) cause approximately 390 million cases of DENV infections annually and over 3 billion people worldwide are at risk of infection. No dengue vaccine is currently available nor is there an antiviral therapy for DENV infections. We have developed a tetravalent live-attenuated DENV vaccine tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) that consists of a molecularly characterized attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of DENV-1, -3, and -4 expressed in the context of the TDV-2 genome. To impact dengue vaccine delivery in endemic areas and immunize travelers, a simple and rapid immunization strategy (RIS) is preferred. We investigated RIS consisting of two full vaccine doses being administered subcutaneously or intradermally on the initial vaccination visit (day 0) at two different anatomical locations with a needle-free disposable syringe jet injection delivery devices (PharmaJet) in non-human primates. This vaccination strategy resulted in efficient priming and induction of neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes comparable to those elicited by the traditional prime and boost (2 months later) vaccination schedule. In addition, the vaccine induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, and targeting the DENV-2 NS1, NS3, and NS5 proteins. Moreover, vaccine-specific T cells were cross-reactive with the non-structural NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV-4. When animals were challenged with DENV-2 they were protected with no detectable viremia, and exhibited sterilizing immunity (no increase of neutralizing titers post-challenge). RIS could decrease vaccination visits and provide quick immune response to all four DENV serotypes. This strategy could increase vaccination compliance and would be especially advantageous for travelers into endemic areas. PMID:24926294

  2. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  3. Dengue vaccines approach the finish line.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Robert

    2007-07-15

    The spread of dengue virus (DV) via its Aedes mosquito vector throughout most of the tropics has led to a worldwide resurgence of epidemic dengue, including dengue hemorrhagic fever. For the first time in 60 years, the pipeline of dengue vaccines looks promising. Strains of each of the 4 DV serotypes, attenuated by passage in tissue culture or by recombinant DNA technology, have been formulated into tetravalent vaccines and have entered successful phase 1 and 2 clinical trials in the United States and Southeast Asia. Antibody-dependent enhancement of wild-type DV infections by the vaccine represents a unique safety issue, which is under investigation. The Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation), the World Health Organization, industry, the US military, and governments of tropical countries are collaborating to accelerate dengue vaccine development and phase 3 vaccine efficacy trials in countries where dengue is endemic. A protective tetravalent vaccine must be licensed soon if dengue is to be brought under control.

  4. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  5. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Niyati; Khanna, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur's chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals. PMID:27525287

  6. CD8+ T-cell Responses in Flavivirus-Naive Individuals Following Immunization with a Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate.

    PubMed

    Chu, Haiyan; George, Sarah L; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D

    2015-11-15

    We are developing a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) candidate based on an attenuated dengue 2 virus (TDV-2) and 3 chimeric viruses containing the premembrane and envelope genes of dengue viruses (DENVs) -1, -3, and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). In this study, we analyzed and characterized the CD8(+) T-cell response in flavivirus-naive human volunteers vaccinated with 2 doses of TDV 90 days apart via the subcutaneous or intradermal routes. Using peptide arrays and intracellular cytokine staining, we demonstrated that TDV elicits CD8(+) T cells targeting the nonstructural NS1, NS3, and NS5 proteins of TDV-2. The cells were characterized by the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and to a lesser extent interleukin-2. Responses were highest on day 90 after the first dose and were still detectable on 180 days after the second dose. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were multifunctional, producing ≥2 cytokines simultaneously, and cross-reactive to NS proteins of the other 3 DENV serotypes. Overall, these findings describe the capacity of our candidate dengue vaccine to elicit cellular immune responses and support the further evaluation of T-cell responses in samples from future TDV clinical trials. PMID:25943203

  7. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26424605

  8. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics.

  9. Dengue vaccines: Are they safe for travelers?

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Aguiar, Maira

    2016-01-01

    The four dengue viruses (DENV) circulate among nearly one-half of the world's population in tropical and semitropical countries imposing a huge morbidity burden on travelers. Sanofipasteur has developed a tetravalent live-attenuated vaccine, Dengvaxia, recently approved by the World Health Organization and licensed in four dengue-endemic countries. An additional two dengue vaccines, developed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), USA and Takeda, are entering phase III testing. Dengvaxia is composed of four yellow fever 17D-DENV chimeras, the NIAID vaccine contains three mutagenized DENV and one DENV2/4 chimera while the Takeda vaccine contains an attenuated DENV 2 and three DENV 2-DENV chimeras. Which of these vaccines might be useful in protecting travelers against dengue infections and disease? Dengvaxia requires three doses administered over the course of one year but in addition has safety signals suggesting that susceptible individuals should not be vaccinated. The NIAID vaccine is promising as a travel vaccine as a single dose fully protected susceptible adults against live dengue 2 virus challenge. The protective efficacy and safety of the Takeda vaccine remain to be demonstrated. PMID:27343438

  10. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Rederived, Live-Attenuated Dengue Virus Vaccine in Healthy Adults Living in Thailand: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Gibbons, Robert V.; Simasathien, Sriluck; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G.; Kerdpanich, Angkool; Tournay, Elodie; De La Barrerra, Rafael; Dessy, Francis; Toussaint, Jean-François; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Innis, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of two formulations of a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus (TDEN) vaccine produced using rederived master seeds from a precursor vaccine were tested against a placebo control in a phase II, randomized, double blind trial (NCT00370682). Two doses were administered 6 months apart to 120 healthy, predominantly flavivirus-primed adults (87.5% and 97.5% in the two vaccine groups and 92.5% in the placebo group). Symptoms and signs reported after vaccination were mild to moderate and transient. There were no vaccine-related serious adverse events or dengue cases reported. Asymptomatic, low-level viremia (dengue virus type 2 [DENV-2], DENV-3, or DENV-4) was detected in 5 of 80 vaccine recipients. One placebo recipient developed a subclinical natural DENV-1 infection. All flavivirus-unprimed subjects and at least 97.1% of flavivirus-primed subjects were seropositive to antibodies against all four DENV types 1 and 3 months post-TDEN dose 2. The TDEN vaccine was immunogenic with an acceptable safety profile in flavivirus-primed adults. PMID:24865677

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of a rederived, live-attenuated dengue virus vaccine in healthy adults living in Thailand: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Gibbons, Robert V; Simasathien, Sriluck; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G; Kerdpanich, Angkool; Tournay, Elodie; De La Barrerra, Rafael; Dessy, Francis; Toussaint, Jean-François; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2014-07-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of two formulations of a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus (TDEN) vaccine produced using rederived master seeds from a precursor vaccine were tested against a placebo control in a phase II, randomized, double blind trial (NCT00370682). Two doses were administered 6 months apart to 120 healthy, predominantly flavivirus-primed adults (87.5% and 97.5% in the two vaccine groups and 92.5% in the placebo group). Symptoms and signs reported after vaccination were mild to moderate and transient. There were no vaccine-related serious adverse events or dengue cases reported. Asymptomatic, low-level viremia (dengue virus type 2 [DENV-2], DENV-3, or DENV-4) was detected in 5 of 80 vaccine recipients. One placebo recipient developed a subclinical natural DENV-1 infection. All flavivirus-unprimed subjects and at least 97.1% of flavivirus-primed subjects were seropositive to antibodies against all four DENV types 1 and 3 months post-TDEN dose 2. The TDEN vaccine was immunogenic with an acceptable safety profile in flavivirus-primed adults.

  12. Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2015-03-01

    Infection with dengue virus may result in dengue fever or a more severe outcome, such as dengue hemorrhagic syndrome/shock. Dengue virus infection poses a threat to endemic regions for four reasons: the presence of four serotypes, each with the ability to cause a similar disease outcome, including fatality; difficulties related to vector control; the lack of specific treatment; and the nonavailability of a suitable vaccine. Vaccine development is considered challenging due to the severity of the disease observed in individuals who have acquired dengue-specific immunity, either passively or actively. Therefore, the presence of vaccine-induced immunity against a particular serotype may prime an individual to severe disease on exposure to dengue virus. Vaccine development strategies include live attenuated vaccines, chimeric, DNA-based, subunit, and inactivated vaccines. Each of the candidates is in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. Issues pertaining to selection pressures, viral interaction, and safety still need to be evaluated in order to induce a complete protective immune response against all four serotypes. This review highlights the various strategies that have been employed in vaccine development, and identifies the obstacles to producing a safe and effective vaccine.

  13. Dengue vaccines: challenges, development, current status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Dar, L

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. The clinical spectrum of dengue, caused by any of the four serotypes of DENV, ranges from mild self-limiting dengue fever to severe dengue, in the form dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Increased rates of hospitalization due to severe dengue, during outbreaks, result in massive economic losses and strained health services. In the absence of specific antiviral therapy, control of transmission of DENV by vector management is the sole method available for decreasing dengue-associated morbidity. Since vector control strategies alone have not been able to satisfactorily achieve reduction in viral transmission, the implementation of a safe, efficacious and cost-effective dengue vaccine as a supplementary measure is a high public health priority. However, the unique and complex immunopathology of dengue has complicated vaccine development. Dengue vaccines have also been challenged by critical issues like lack of animal models for the disease and absence of suitable markers of protective immunity. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under phases of development, including live attenuated virus vaccines, live chimeric virus vaccines, inactivated virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, DNA vaccines and viral-vectored vaccines. Although some vaccine candidates have progressed from animal trials to phase II and III in humans, a number of issues regarding implementation of dengue vaccine in countries like India still need to be addressed. Despite the current limitations, collaborative effects of regulatory bodies like World Health Organization with vaccine manufacturers and policy makers, to facilitate vaccine development and standardize field trials can make a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine a reality in near future.

  14. Dengue vaccine: a valuable asset for the future.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; S K, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way. PMID:25424928

  15. Dengue vaccine: a valuable asset for the future.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; S K, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way.

  16. Vaccines for the prevention of neglected diseases--dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tikki

    2003-06-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever have spread to all tropical areas of the developing world, but still remain largely neglected diseases. Several promising vaccine candidates in the form of live attenuated and chimeric vaccines have been developed and are currently in human clinical trials. However, significant practical, logistic, and scientific challenges remain before these vaccines can widely and safely be applied to vulnerable populations. Vector control, community education and public health measures must be pursued in parallel with vaccine development.

  17. Influence of FcγRIIa-Expressing Cells on the Assessment of Neutralizing and Enhancing Serum Antibodies Elicited by a Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Anthony M.; Broder, Ryan; Haupfear, Kelly; Timiryasova, Tatyana M.; Hu, Branda T.; Boaz, Mark; Warren, William L.; Jackson, Nicholas; Moser, Janice M.; Guy, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background. Recent trials of recombinant, live-attenuated chimeric yellow fever-dengue tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) demonstrated efficacy against symptomatic, virologically confirmed dengue disease with higher point estimates of efficacy toward dengue virus (DENV)3 and DENV4 and moderate levels toward DENV1 and DENV2. It is interesting to note that serotype-specific efficacy did not correlate with absolute neutralizing antibody (nAb) geometric mean titer (GMT) values measured in a Vero-based plaque reduction neutralization test assay. The absence of Fcγ receptors on Vero cells may explain this observation. Methods. We performed parallel seroneutralization assays in Vero cells and CV-1 cells that express FcγRIIa (CV-1-Fc) to determine the neutralizing and enhancing capacity of serotype-specific DENV Abs present in CYD-TDV clinical trial sera. Results. Enhancement of DENV infection was observed in CV-1-Fc cells in naturally exposed nonvaccine sera, mostly for DENV3 and DENV4, at high dilutions. The CYD-TDV-vaccinated sera showed similar enhancement patterns. The CV-1-Fc nAb GMT values were 2- to 9-fold lower than Vero for all serotypes in both naturally infected individuals and CYD-TDV-vaccinated subjects with and without previous dengue immunity. The relative (CV-1-Fc/Vero) GMT decrease for anti-DENV1 and anti-DENV2 responses was not greater than for the other serotypes. Conclusions. In vitro neutralization assays utilizing FcγRIIa-expressing cells provide evidence that serotype-specific Ab enhancement may not be a primary factor in the serotype-specific efficacy differences exhibited in the CYD-TDV trials. PMID:26719844

  18. A Phase II, Randomized, Safety and Immunogenicity Trial of a Re-Derived, Live-Attenuated Dengue Virus Vaccine in Healthy Children and Adults Living in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kristen; Esquilin, Ines O; Cornier, Alberto Santiago; Thomas, Stephen J; Quintero Del Rio, Ana I; Bertran-Pasarell, Jorge; Morales Ramirez, Javier O; Diaz, Clemente; Carlo, Simon; Eckels, Kenneth H; Tournay, Elodie; Toussaint, Jean-Francois; De La Barrera, Rafael; Fernandez, Stefan; Lyons, Arthur; Sun, Wellington; Innis, Bruce L

    2015-09-01

    This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, phase II clinical trial, two dose study of re-derived, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus (TDEN) vaccine (two formulations) or placebo in subjects 1-50 years of age. Among the 636 subjects enrolled, 331 (52%) were primed, that is, baseline seropositive to at least one dengue virus (DENV) type. Baseline seropositivity prevalence increased with age (10% [< 2 years], 26% [2-4 years], 60% [5-20 years], and 93% [21-50 years]). Safety profiles of TDEN vaccines were similar to placebo regardless of priming status. No vaccine-related serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported. Among unprimed subjects, immunogenicity (geometric mean antibody titers [GMT] and seropositivity rates) for each DENV increased substantially in both TDEN vaccine groups with at least 74.6% seropositive for four DENV types. The TDEN vaccine candidate showed an acceptable safety and immunogenicity profile in children and adults ranging from 1 to 50 years of age, regardless of priming status. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00468858.

  19. A Phase II, Randomized, Safety and Immunogenicity Trial of a Re-Derived, Live-Attenuated Dengue Virus Vaccine in Healthy Children and Adults Living in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristen; Esquilin, Ines O.; Cornier, Alberto Santiago; Thomas, Stephen J.; Quintero del Rio, Ana I.; Bertran-Pasarell, Jorge; Morales Ramirez, Javier O.; Diaz, Clemente; Carlo, Simon; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Tournay, Elodie; Toussaint, Jean-Francois; De La Barrera, Rafael; Fernandez, Stefan; Lyons, Arthur; Sun, Wellington; Innis, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, phase II clinical trial, two dose study of re-derived, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus (TDEN) vaccine (two formulations) or placebo in subjects 1–50 years of age. Among the 636 subjects enrolled, 331 (52%) were primed, that is, baseline seropositive to at least one dengue virus (DENV) type. Baseline seropositivity prevalence increased with age (10% [< 2 years], 26% [2–4 years], 60% [5–20 years], and 93% [21–50 years]). Safety profiles of TDEN vaccines were similar to placebo regardless of priming status. No vaccine-related serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported. Among unprimed subjects, immunogenicity (geometric mean antibody titers [GMT] and seropositivity rates) for each DENV increased substantially in both TDEN vaccine groups with at least 74.6% seropositive for four DENV types. The TDEN vaccine candidate showed an acceptable safety and immunogenicity profile in children and adults ranging from 1 to 50 years of age, regardless of priming status. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00468858. PMID:26175027

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (DENVax) in flavivirus-naive healthy adults in Colombia: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E; Velez, Ivan D; Thomson, Cynthia; Lopez, Liliana; Jimenez, Alejandra; Haller, Aurelia A; Silengo, Shawn; Scott, Jaclyn; Boroughs, Karen L; Stovall, Janae L; Luy, Betty E; Arguello, John; Beatty, Mark E; Santangelo, Joseph; Gordon, Gilad S; Huang, Claire Y-H; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Dengue virus is the most serious mosquito-borne viral threat to public health and no vaccines or antiviral therapies are approved for dengue fever. The tetravalent DENVax vaccine contains a molecularly characterised live attenuated dengue serotype-2 virus (DENVax-2) and three recombinant vaccine viruses expressing the prM and E structural genes for serotypes 1, 3, and 4 in the DENVax-2 genetic backbone. We aimed to assess the safety and immunogenicity of tetravalent DENVax formulations. Methods We undertook a randomised, double-blind, phase 1, dose-escalation trial between Oct 11, 2011, and Nov 9, 2011, in the Rionegro, Antioquia, Colombia. The first cohort of participants (aged 18–45 years) were randomly assigned centrally, via block randomisation, to receive a low-dose formulation of DENvax, or placebo, by either subcutaneous or intradermal administration. After a safety assessment, participants were randomly assigned to receive a high-dose DENVax formulation, or placebo, by subcutaneous or intradermal administration. Group assignment was not masked from study pharmacists, but allocation was concealed from participants, nurses, and investigators. Primary endpoints were frequency and severity of injection-site and systemic reactions within 28 days of each vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the immunogenicity of DENVax against all four dengue virus serotypes, and the viraemia due to each of the four vaccine components after immunisation. Analysis was by intention to treat for safety and per protocol for immunogenicity. Because of the small sample size, no detailed comparison of adverse event rates were warranted. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01224639. Findings We randomly assigned 96 patients to one of the four study groups: 40 participants (42%) received low-dose vaccine and eight participants (8%) received placebo in the low-dose groups; 39 participants (41%) received high-dose vaccine, with nine (9

  1. Dengue vaccine: priorities and progress.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, María G; Muné, Mayra; Kourí, Gustavo

    2004-12-01

    Dengue transmission has increased considerably in the past 20 years. Currently, it can only be reduced by mosquito control; however, the application of vector-control methods are labor intensive, require discipline and diligence, and are hard to sustain. In this context, a safe dengue vaccine that confers long-lasting protection against infection with the four dengue viruses is urgently required. This review will discuss the requirements of a dengue vaccine, problems, and advances that have been made. Finally, new targets for research will be presented. PMID:15566333

  2. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  3. Points for Consideration for dengue vaccine introduction - recommendations by the Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jacqueline Kyungah; Lee, Yong-Seok; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Thiry, Georges; Mahoney, Richard; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a public health problem in the tropics and subtropics. There are several vaccine candidates in clinical development. However, there may be gaps in the new vaccine introduction after vaccine licensure before it becomes available in developing countries. In anticipation of the first dengue vaccine candidate to be licensed, Dengue Vaccine Initiative (DVI) and, its predecessor, Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI) have been working on points for consideration to accelerate evidence-based dengue vaccine introduction, once a vaccine becomes available. In this paper, we review the history of PDVI and its successor, the DVI, and elaborate on the points of consideration for dengue vaccine introduction.

  4. Prospects for dengue vaccines for travelers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sl-Ki; Lee, Yong Seok; Namkung, Suk; Lim, Jacqueline K; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    Travel-acquired dengue cases have been increasing as the overall global dengue burden has expanded. In Korea, imported dengue cases have been reported since 2000 when it first became a notifiable disease. During the first four months of 2016, three times more dengue cases were reported in Korea than during the same period the previous year. A safe and efficacious vaccine for travelers would be beneficial to prevent dengue disease in individual travelers and potentially decrease the risk of virus spread to non-endemic areas. Here, we summarize the characteristics of dengue vaccines for travelers and review dengue vaccines currently licensed or in clinical development. PMID:27489798

  5. Prospects for dengue vaccines for travelers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Travel-acquired dengue cases have been increasing as the overall global dengue burden has expanded. In Korea, imported dengue cases have been reported since 2000 when it first became a notifiable disease. During the first four months of 2016, three times more dengue cases were reported in Korea than during the same period the previous year. A safe and efficacious vaccine for travelers would be beneficial to prevent dengue disease in individual travelers and potentially decrease the risk of virus spread to non-endemic areas. Here, we summarize the characteristics of dengue vaccines for travelers and review dengue vaccines currently licensed or in clinical development. PMID:27489798

  6. Licensed Dengue Vaccine: Public Health Conundrum and Scientific Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    A tetravalent live attenuated vaccine composed of chimeras of yellow fever 17D and the four dengue viruses (chimeric yellow fever dengue [CYD]) manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur has completed phase III clinical testing in over 35,000 children 2–16 years of age. The vaccine was recently licensed in four countries. During the first 2 years of observation, CYD vaccine efficacy ranged between 30% and 79% in 10 different countries with an overall efficacy of 56.8%. During year 3, there was an overall efficacy against hospitalization of 16.7%, but a relative risk of hospitalization of 1.6 among children younger than 9 years and 4.95 in children 5 years of age and younger. Vaccination of seronegative children resulted in universal broad dengue neutralizing antibody responses, but poor protection against breakthrough dengue cases. Unless proven otherwise, such breakthrough cases in vaccinated subjects should be regarded as vaccine antibody-enhanced (ADE). The provenance of these cases can be studied serologically using original antigenic sin immune responses in convalescent sera. In conventional dengue vaccine efficacy clinical trials, persons vaccinated as seronegatives may be hospitalized with breakthrough ADE infections, whereas in the placebo group, dengue infection of monotypic immunes results in hospitalization. Vaccine efficacy trial design must identify dengue disease etiology by separately measuring efficacy in seronegatives and seropositives. The reason(s) why CYD vaccine failed to raise protective dengue virus immunity are unknown. To achieve a safe and protective dengue vaccine, careful studies of monotypic CYD vaccines in humans should precede field trials of tetravalent formulations. PMID:27352870

  7. Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: A Review in the Prevention of Dengue Disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-09-01

    Tetravalent, live-attenuated, dengue vaccine (Dengvaxia(®); CYD-TDV) is the first vaccine approved for the prevention of dengue disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4 in individuals aged 9-45 or 9-60 years living in high dengue endemic areas. This narrative review discusses the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, reactogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV in the prevention of dengue disease. In Latin American and Asian phase 3 trials in children and adolescents (n > 30,000), the recommended three-dose CYD-TDV regimen was efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue (VCD) during the period from 28 days after the last dose (month 13) to month 25, meeting the primary endpoint criteria. Protective efficacy against VCD in the respective individual trials was 60.8 and 56.5 % (primary analysis). During the 25-month active surveillance phase, CYD-TDV also provided protective efficacy against VCD, severe dengue, any grade of dengue haemorrhagic fever and VCD-related hospitalization in children aged 9 years and older. CYD-TDV was generally well tolerated, with no safety concerns identified after up to 4 years' follow-up (i.e. from post dose 1) in ongoing long-term studies. Based on evidence from the dengue clinical trial program, the WHO SAGE recommended that countries with high dengue endemicity consider introducing CYD-TDV as part of an integrated disease prevention strategy to lower disease burden. Pharmacoeconomic considerations will be pivotal to implementing dengue vaccination prevention strategies in these countries. The availability of a dengue vaccine is considered essential if the 2012 WHO global strategy targets for reducing the burden of dengue disease by 2020 are to be attained. Hence, CYD-TDV represents a major advance for the prevention of dengue disease in high dengue endemic regions. PMID:27506852

  8. Advances in dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Defang, Gabriel; Burgess, Timothy; Porter, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    Dengue viruses are the most important arboviruses causing human disease. Expansion of the disease in recent decades to include more geographical areas of the world, an appreciation of the disease burden and market potentials have spurred a flurry of activity in the development of vaccines to combat dengue viruses. Recent progress in this area and some of the obstacles associated with this development are discussed. PMID:19535912

  9. [Dengue fever: from disease to vaccination].

    PubMed

    Teyssou, R

    2009-08-01

    Dengue is a tropical disease affecting 110 countries throughout the world and placing over 3 billion people at risk of infection. According the World Health Organization 70 to 500 million persons are infected every year including 2 million who develop hemorrhagic form and 20,000 who die. Children are at highest risk for death. Due to the absence of specialized laboratories in most endemic regions and to the lack of specifici clinical presentation, the incidence of dengue and its economic costs are certainly underestimated. Dengue iscaused by an arbovirus belonging to the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. There are four dengue virus serotypes and no cross protection between them. The disease is transmitted through the bites of mosquitoes belonging to the Aedes genus, mainly Aedes aegypti. However A. albopictus has played an important role in the spread of the disease and other species may be involved in specific locations (e.g., A. polynesiensis in the South Pacific). There is no specific treatment for dengue. Management of severe forms depends on symptomatic treatment of hemorrhagic complications and hypovolemic shock. Prevention requires control of vector mosquitoes that is difficult to implement and maintain. Dengue is a major emerging infectious disease with a heavy impact on public health. The high human and economic costs as well as the absence of specific preventive measures underscore the need to develop a vaccine. However finding and distributing such a vaccine to populations at risk is hampered by numerous obstacles. The most notable challenges standing in the way of development of a candidate vaccine are as follows: absence of an animal model, which has important implications for the preclinical development strategy; need to develop a live attenuated vaccine; existence of 4 antigenically distinct serotypes with the resulting risk of competition between vaccine strains; immunologic risks related to antibody-dependent enhancement that has been

  10. A Phase II, Randomized, Safety and Immunogenicity Study of a Re-Derived, Live-Attenuated Dengue Virus Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stephen J.; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Carletti, Isabelle; De La Barrera, Rafael; Dessy, Francis; Fernandez, Stefan; Putnak, Robert; Toussaint, Jean-Francois; Sun, Wellington; Bauer, Kristen; Gibbons, Robert V.; Innis, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Two formulations of a new live tetravalent dengue virus (DENV) vaccine produced using re-derived master seeds from a precursor vaccine and that same precursor vaccine as a control were compared in a placebo-controlled, randomized, observer-blind, phase II trial of 86 healthy adults. Two vaccine doses were administered 6 months apart; a third dose was offered to a subset. Symptoms and signs of dengue-like illness reported after vaccination were mild to moderate, transient, and occurred with similar frequency among recipients of the new DENV vaccine and placebo, except for rash. Neither dengue nor vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. The first DENV vaccine dose was moderately immunogenic; the second dose increased the potency and breadth of the neutralizing antibody response. Tetravalent response rates to the new formulations were 60% and 66.7% in unprimed subjects. A third dose did not increase tetravalent antibody rates. The new DENV vaccine candidates merit additional evaluation. PMID:23208878

  11. Recent progress in dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianchun; Chen, Hui; An, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has four distinct serotypes. DENV infection can result in classic dengue fever and life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. In recent decades, DENV infection has become an important public health concern in epidemic-prone areas. Vaccination is the most effective measure to prevent and control viral infections. However, several challenges impede the development of effective DENV vaccines, such as the lack of suitable animal models and the antibody-dependent enhancement phenomenon. Although no licensed DENV vaccine is available, significant progress has been made. This review summarizes candidate DENV vaccines from recent investigations. PMID:25547681

  12. [Advances in the development of a vaccine against dengue].

    PubMed

    Guzmán, M G

    1998-01-01

    There are multiple factors responsible for the increase in the epidemics of dengue/dengue hemorrhagic fever in the tropical and subtropical regions. The characteristics of this disease, plus the absence of effective antiviral drugs; it is imperative to develop a vaccine against the dengue virus. To obtain such a vaccine, it is necessary an antigen that could bring protective immunity through life against the four dengue serotypes. Different strategies have been developed to obtain the vaccine, from the conventional one (attenuated virus), to the second and third generation of vaccines (immunisation with proteins and DNA respectively). The Envelope and the Membrane structural proteins, as well as the non structural NS1 and NS3, had been considered of major interest in the develop of the vaccine. In spite of the advances in this field, it is still much more research to be done, so it is considered that a vaccine against the dengue virus will not be available until the first decade of the next century. PMID:10030053

  13. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge.

  14. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge. PMID:26855170

  15. Country- and age-specific optimal allocation of dengue vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L; Durham, David P; Medlock, Jan; Galvani, Alison P

    2014-02-01

    Several dengue vaccines are under development, and some are expected to become available imminently. Concomitant with the anticipated release of these vaccines, vaccine allocation strategies for dengue-endemic countries in Southeast Asia and Latin America are currently under development. We developed a model of dengue transmission that incorporates the age-specific distributions of dengue burden corresponding to those in Thailand and Brazil, respectively, to determine vaccine allocations that minimize the incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever, taking into account limited availability of vaccine doses in the initial phase of production. We showed that optimal vaccine allocation strategies vary significantly with the demographic burden of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Consequently, the strategy that is optimal for one country may be sub-optimal for another country. More specifically, we showed that, during the first years following introduction of a dengue vaccine, it is optimal to target children for dengue mass vaccination in Thailand, whereas young adults should be targeted in Brazil.

  16. Development of a recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a significant threat to public health worldwide. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for dengue. Takeda Vaccines Inc. is developing a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) that consists of an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the prM and E protein genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome backbone (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). TDV has been shown to be immunogenic and efficacious in nonclinical animal models. In interferon-receptor deficient mice, the vaccine induces humoral neutralizing antibody responses and cellular immune responses that are sufficient to protect from lethal challenge with DENV-1, DENV-2 or DENV-4. In non-human primates, administration of TDV induces innate immune responses as well as long lasting antibody and cellular immunity. In Phase 1 clinical trials, the safety and immunogenicity of two different formulations were assessed after intradermal or subcutaneous administration to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. TDV administration was generally well-tolerated independent of dose and route. The vaccine induced neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes: after a single administration of the higher formulation, 24-67%% of the subjects seroconverted to all four DENV and >80% seroconverted to three or more viruses. In addition, TDV induced CD8(+) T cell responses to the non-structural NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV. TDV has been also shown to be generally well tolerated and immunogenic in a Phase 2 clinical trial in dengue endemic countries in adults and children as young as 18 months. Additional clinical studies are ongoing in preparation for a Phase 3 safety and efficacy study.

  17. Dengue vaccine design: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cardosa, M J

    1998-01-01

    Dengue virus infection is now a global problem affecting tens of millions of people. The spread of the four dengue virus serotypes had led to increased incidence of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) reported and with 2.5 billion people at risk, efforts towards the development of safe and effective vaccines against dengue must be accelerated. This chapter reviews some of the important lessons of pathogenesis which may be learnt from classical studies in the field and place these in the context of current knowledge about the molecular biology of the virus. The issues which have to be addressed in designing a safe vaccine against dengue are raised and the problems of designing subunit as well as whole virus vaccines are pointed out, particularly with regard to the phenomenon of antibody dependent enhancement and, more generally, the problem of immune potentiation of disease. More efforts must be made to understand the basis of pathogenesis in DHF and in finding out what nature has to teach about protection against and recovery from dengue virus infection.

  18. Vaccination Against Dengue: Challenges and Current Developments.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Lang, Jean; Saville, Melanie; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a growing threat worldwide, and the development of a vaccine is a public health priority. The completion of the active phase of two pivotal efficacy studies conducted in Asia and Latin America by Sanofi Pasteur has constituted an important step. Several other approaches are under development, and whichever technology is used, vaccine developers face several challenges linked to the particular nature and etiology of dengue disease. We start our review by defining questions and potential issues linked to dengue pathology and presenting the main types of vaccine approaches that have explored these questions; some of these candidates are in a late stage of clinical development. In the second part of the review, we focus on the Sanofi Pasteur dengue vaccine candidate, describing the steps from research to phase III efficacy studies. Finally, we discuss what could be the next steps, before and after vaccine introduction, to ensure that the vaccine will provide the best benefit with an acceptable safety profile to the identified target populations.

  19. Dengue vaccine: come let's fight the menace.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sumit; Sahoo, Soumya Swaroop; Singh, Inderjeet; Verma, Madhur; Gupta, Vikas; Kumari, Sneh

    2015-01-01

    Although dengue has a global distribution, the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia region together with Western Pacific region bears nearly 75% of the current global disease burden. Globally, the societal burden has been estimated to be approximately 528 to 1300 disability-adjusted life years (DALY) per million to populations in endemic regions Dengue is believed to infect 50 to 100 million people worldwide a year with half a million life-threatening infections requiring hospitalization, resulting in approximately 12,500 to 25,000 deaths. Despite being known for decades and nearly half the world's population is at risk for infection with as many as 100 million cases occurring annually, the pitiable state is that we still have no antiviral drugs to treat it and no vaccines to prevent it. In recent years, however, the development of dengue vaccines has accelerated dramatically in tandem with the burgeoning dengue problem with a rejuvenated vigour. However, recent progress in molecular-based vaccine strategies, as well as a renewed commitment by the World Health Organization (WHO) to co-ordinate global efforts on vaccine development, finally provides hope that control of this serious disease may be at hand. Today, several vaccines are in various stages of advanced development, with clinical trials currently underway on 5 candidate vaccines. Trials in the most advanced stages are showing encouraging preliminary data, and the leading candidate could be licensed as early as 2015. PMID:25695523

  20. Vaccination Against Dengue: Challenges and Current Developments.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Lang, Jean; Saville, Melanie; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a growing threat worldwide, and the development of a vaccine is a public health priority. The completion of the active phase of two pivotal efficacy studies conducted in Asia and Latin America by Sanofi Pasteur has constituted an important step. Several other approaches are under development, and whichever technology is used, vaccine developers face several challenges linked to the particular nature and etiology of dengue disease. We start our review by defining questions and potential issues linked to dengue pathology and presenting the main types of vaccine approaches that have explored these questions; some of these candidates are in a late stage of clinical development. In the second part of the review, we focus on the Sanofi Pasteur dengue vaccine candidate, describing the steps from research to phase III efficacy studies. Finally, we discuss what could be the next steps, before and after vaccine introduction, to ensure that the vaccine will provide the best benefit with an acceptable safety profile to the identified target populations. PMID:26515983

  1. Strategies for the plant-based expression of dengue subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yun-Kiam; Smith, Duncan R

    2010-10-01

    Despite significant efforts in many countries, there is still no commercially viable dengue vaccine. Currently, attention is focused on the development of either live attenuated vaccines or live attenuated chimaeric vaccines using a variety of backbones. Alternate vaccine approaches, such as whole inactivated virus and subunit vaccines are in the early stages of development, and are each associated with different problems. Subunit vaccines offer the advantage of providing a uniform antigen of well-defined nature, without the added risk of introducing any genetic material into the person being inoculated. Preliminary trials of subunit vaccines (using dengue E protein) in rhesus monkeys have shown promising results. However, the primary disadvantages of dengue subunit vaccines are the low levels of expression of dengue proteins in mammalian or insect cells, as well as the added unknown risks of antigens produced from mammalian cells containing other potential sources of contamination. In the past two decades, plants have emerged as an alternative platform for expression of biopharmaceutical products, including antigens of bacterial, fungal or viral origin. In the present minireview, we highlight the current plant expression technologies used for expression of biopharmaceutical products, with an emphasis on plants as a production system for dengue subunit vaccines.

  2. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  3. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, John R

    2005-04-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease.

  4. [Dengue vaccines. A reality for Argentina?].

    PubMed

    Orellano, Pablo W; Salomón, Oscar D

    2016-01-01

    Dengue outbreaks have occurred yearly in Argentina since 1998. A number of candidate vaccines have been tested in endemic countries. The most advanced one was licensed in three countries of Latin America for children over 9 years of age. In the present article the benefits and drawbacks of these vaccines as well as the challenges for the implementation of a vaccination strategy in Argentina are discussed. Furthermore, a risk stratification strategy with new criteria and a multidisciplinary vision is suggested as a possible path for the assessment of the pertinence of a vaccination program in areas showing the highest risk of dengue transmission and/or for people at the greatest risk of developing severe dengue. It is also suggested that the definition regarding the status of endemicity should take into account the local realities. Finally, this paper proposes a broad discussion on the evidences, the expected impact and instrumental aspects that would be involved in the incorporation of a dengue vaccine, marketed or in development, into the national immunization program, and especially which subpopulation should be targeted for the immunization strategy to be cost-effective. PMID:27028058

  5. [Dengue vaccines. A reality for Argentina?].

    PubMed

    Orellano, Pablo W; Salomón, Oscar D

    2016-01-01

    Dengue outbreaks have occurred yearly in Argentina since 1998. A number of candidate vaccines have been tested in endemic countries. The most advanced one was licensed in three countries of Latin America for children over 9 years of age. In the present article the benefits and drawbacks of these vaccines as well as the challenges for the implementation of a vaccination strategy in Argentina are discussed. Furthermore, a risk stratification strategy with new criteria and a multidisciplinary vision is suggested as a possible path for the assessment of the pertinence of a vaccination program in areas showing the highest risk of dengue transmission and/or for people at the greatest risk of developing severe dengue. It is also suggested that the definition regarding the status of endemicity should take into account the local realities. Finally, this paper proposes a broad discussion on the evidences, the expected impact and instrumental aspects that would be involved in the incorporation of a dengue vaccine, marketed or in development, into the national immunization program, and especially which subpopulation should be targeted for the immunization strategy to be cost-effective.

  6. Short report: absence of protective neutralizng antibodies to West Nile virus in subjects following vaccination with Japanese encephalitis or dengue vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kanesa-Thasan, N; Putnak, J R; Mangiafico, J A; Saluzzo, J E; Ludwig, G V

    2002-02-01

    Protection of individuals against West Nile (WN) encephalitis is an emerging concern in the United States and Europe. We investigated whether immunization with licensed inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine or experimental live attenuated dengue vaccines resulted in induction of cross-neutralizing antibodies against WN virus. Protective neutralizing antibody titers to WN virus were not detected in any volunteer despite successful immunization to related flaviviruses. Vaccination against JE or dengue is unlikely to prevent WN virus infection but may still protect against disease.

  7. The dengue vaccine pipeline: Implications for the future of dengue control.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lauren M; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Durbin, Anna P; Longini, Ira M

    2015-06-26

    Dengue has become the most rapidly expanding mosquito-borne infectious disease on the planet, surpassing malaria and infecting at least 390 million people per year. There is no effective treatment for dengue illness other than supportive care, especially for severe cases. Symptoms can be mild or life-threatening as in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Vector control has been only partially successful in decreasing dengue transmission. The potential use of safe and effective tetravalent dengue vaccines is an attractive addition to prevent disease or minimize the possibility of epidemics. There are currently no licensed dengue vaccines. This review summarizes the current status of all dengue vaccine candidates in clinical evaluation. Currently five candidate vaccines are in human clinical trials. One has completed two Phase III trials, two are in Phase II trials, and three are in Phase I testing.

  8. Pediatric Measles Vaccine Expressing a Dengue Antigen Induces Durable Serotype-specific Neutralizing Antibodies to Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brandler, Samantha; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Moris, Arnaud; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Combredet, Chantal; Février, Michèle; Bedouelle, Hugues; Schwartz, Olivier; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Dengue disease is an increasing global health problem that threatens one-third of the world's population. Despite decades of efforts, no licensed vaccine against dengue is available. With the aim to develop an affordable vaccine that could be used in young populations living in tropical areas, we evaluated a new strategy based on the expression of a minimal dengue antigen by a vector derived from pediatric live-attenuated Schwarz measles vaccine (MV). As a proof-of-concept, we inserted into the MV vector a sequence encoding a minimal combined dengue antigen composed of the envelope domain III (EDIII) fused to the ectodomain of the membrane protein (ectoM) from DV serotype-1. Immunization of mice susceptible to MV resulted in a long-term production of DV1 serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies. The presence of ectoM was critical to the immunogenicity of inserted EDIII. The adjuvant capacity of ectoM correlated with its ability to promote the maturation of dendritic cells and the secretion of proinflammatory and antiviral cytokines and chemokines involved in adaptive immunity. The protective efficacy of this vaccine should be studied in non-human primates. A combined measles–dengue vaccine might provide a one-shot approach to immunize children against both diseases where they co-exist. PMID:18160988

  9. Antibody recognition of the dengue virus proteome and implications for development of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Stefan; Cisney, Emily D; Tikhonov, Alexander P; Schweitzer, Barry; Putnak, Robert J; Simmons, Monika; Ulrich, Robert G

    2011-04-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection caused by four distinct serotypes of dengue virus, each appearing cyclically in the tropics and subtropics along the equator. Although vaccines are currently under development, none are available to the general population. One of the main impediments to the successful advancement of these vaccines is the lack of well-defined immune correlates of protection. Here, we describe a protein microarray approach for measuring antibody responses to the complete viral proteome comprised of the structural (capsid, membrane, and envelope) and nonstructural (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5) components of all four dengue virus serotypes (1 to 4). We examined rhesus macaques vaccinated with tetravalent vaccines consisting of live-attenuated virus (LAV) or purified inactivated virus (PIV), followed by boosting with LAV and challenging with wild-type dengue virus. We detected temporal increases in antibodies against envelope proteins in response to either vaccine, while only the PIV/LAV vaccination strategy resulted in anticapsid antibodies. In contrast to results from vaccination, naïve macaques challenged with wild-type viruses of each serotype demonstrated a balanced response to nonstructural and structural components, including responses against the membrane protein. Our results demonstrate discriminating details concerning the nature of antibody responses to dengue virus at the proteomic level and suggest the usefulness of this information for vaccine development. PMID:21270280

  10. Dengue vaccine: hypotheses to understand CYD-TDV-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a human pathogen with a large impact on public health. Although no vaccine against DENV is currently licensed, a recombinant vaccine - chimeric yellow fever virus-DENV tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) - has shown efficacy against symptomatic dengue disease in two recent Phase III clinical trials. Safety observations were also recently reported for these trials. In this Opinion article, we review the data from recent vaccine clinical trials and discuss the putative mechanisms behind the observed efficacy of the vaccine against different forms of the disease, focusing on the interactions between the infecting virus, pre-existing host immunity and vaccine-induced immune responses.

  11. Policymakers' views on dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever and the need for dengue vaccines in four southeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    DeRoeck, Denise; Deen, Jacqueline; Clemens, John D

    2003-12-01

    A survey of policymakers and other influential professionals in four southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam) was conducted to determine policymakers' views on the public health importance of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), the need for a vaccine and the determinants influencing its potential introduction. The survey, which involved face-to-face interviews with policymakers, health programme managers, researchers, opinion leaders and other key informants, revealed an almost uniformly high level of concern about dengue fever/DHF and a high perceived need for a dengue vaccine. Several characteristics of the disease contribute to this high sense of priority, including its geographic spread, occurrence in outbreaks, the recurrent risk of infection each dengue season, its severity and the difficulty in diagnosis and management, its urban predominance, its burden on hospitals, and its economic toll on governments and families. Research felt to be key to future decision-making regarding dengue vaccine introduction include: disease surveillance studies, in-country vaccine trials or pilot projects, and studies on the economic burden of dengue and the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccines. The results suggest favourable conditions for public and private sector markets for dengue vaccines and the need for creative financing strategies to ensure their accessibility to poor children in dengue-endemic countries.

  12. Dengue surveillance in preparation for field vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Letson, G William

    2009-10-01

    Preparations for dengue vaccine trials as well as vaccine introduction strategies require laboratory-based surveillance on an international and coordinated level. The Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative (PDVI) has developed an international consortium of field sites in Latin America and Asia. These sites conduct community- based and enhanced passive laboratory-based surveillance of dengue fever. Through this consortium, PDVI is facilitating harmonized laboratory-based surveillance processes, so that disease incidence can be compared between different regions and countries. This process prepares sites for the rigorous case detection, diagnosis, recording and analysis to meet good clinical practice standards necessary for clinical dengue vaccine trials. In addition to several years of laboratory-based dengue surveillance data, dengue vaccine trial site criteria include low population migration of an endemic disease area, documentation of other local flavivirus epidemiology, good medical infrastructure, political stability, and country and target population commitment to vaccine trials and need for vaccine. Prevention of dengue fever is the most suitable primary end point for a proof-of-concept dengue vaccine trial. However, such trials may provide insufficient information for stratified analysis of outcomes according to varied risk factors and virus serotype. Consequently large community-based demonstration trials may be necessary.

  13. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  14. Current issues in the economics of vaccination against dengue.

    PubMed

    Tozan, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major public health concern in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. The prospects for dengue prevention have recently improved with the results of efficacy trials of a tetravalent dengue vaccine. Although partially effective, once licensed, its introduction can be a public health priority in heavily affected countries because of the perceived public health importance of dengue. This review explores the most immediate economic considerations of introducing a new dengue vaccine and evaluates the published economic analyses of dengue vaccination. Findings indicate that the current economic evidence base is of limited utility to support country-level decisions on dengue vaccine introduction. There are a handful of published cost-effectiveness studies and no country-specific costing studies to project the full resource requirements of dengue vaccine introduction. Country-level analytical expertise in economic analyses, another gap identified, needs to be strengthened to facilitate evidence-based decision-making on dengue vaccine introduction in endemic countries. PMID:26642099

  15. Chimeric flaviviruses: novel vaccines against dengue fever, tick-borne encephalitis, and Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Juh; Monath, Thomas P

    2003-01-01

    Many arthropod-borne flaviviruses are important human pathogens responsible for diverse illnesses, including YF, JE, TBE, and dengue. Live, attenuated vaccines have afforded the most effective and economical means of prevention and control, as illustrated by YF 17D and JE SA14-14-2 vaccines. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology have made it possible to explore a novel approach for developing live attenuated flavivirus vaccines against other flaviviruses. Full-length cDNA clones allow construction of infectious virus bearing attenuating mutations or deletions incorporated in the viral genome. It is also possible to create chimeric flaviviruses in which the structural protein genes for the target antigens of a flavivirus are replaced by the corresponding genes of another flavivirus. By combining these molecular techniques, the DNA sequences of DEN4 strain 814669, DEN2 PDK-53 candidate vaccine and YF 17D vaccine have been used as the genetic backbone to construct chimeric flaviviruses with the required attenuation phenotype and expression of the target antigens. Encouraging results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown that several chimeric flavivirus vaccines have the safety profile and satisfactory immunogenicity and protective efficacy to warrant further evaluation in humans. The chimeric flavivirus strategy has led to the rapid development of novel live-attenuated vaccines against dengue, TBE, JE, and West Nile viruses. PMID:14714441

  16. Implication of vaccination against dengue for Zika outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Xiao, Yanni; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus co-circulates with dengue in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Cases of co-infection by dengue and Zika have been reported, the implication of this co-infection for an integrated intervention program for controlling both dengue and Zika must be addressed urgently. Here, we formulate a mathematical model to describe the transmission dynamics of co-infection of dengue and Zika with particular focus on the effects of Zika outbreak by vaccination against dengue among human hosts. Our analysis determines specific conditions under which vaccination against dengue can significantly increase the Zika outbreak peak, and speed up the Zika outbreak peak timing. Our results call for further study about the co-infection to direct an integrated control to balance the benefits for dengue control and the damages of Zika outbreak. PMID:27774987

  17. Human antibody response to dengue virus: implications for dengue vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, a global health threat, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical countries. Dengue can range from asymptomatic, relatively mild dengue fever to severe and life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. Disease severity and outcome is largely associated with the host immune response. Several candidate vaccines in clinical trials appear promising as effective measures for dengue disease control. Vaccine development has been hampered by safety and efficacy issues, driven by a lack of understanding of the host immune response. This review focuses on recent research findings on the dengue host immune response, particularly in humans, and the relevance of these findings to challenges in vaccine development. PMID:27398060

  18. Live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Montinaro, Valentina; Groppali, Elena; Tenconi, Rossana; Semino, Margherita; Principi, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Annual vaccination is the most effective means of preventing and controlling influenza epidemics, and the traditional trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) is by far the most widely used. Unfortunately, it has a number of limitations, the most important of which is its poor immunogenicity in younger children and the elderly, the populations at greatest risk of severe influenza. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has characteristics that can overcome some of these limitations. It does not have to be injected because it is administered intranasally. It is very effective in children and adolescents, among whom it prevents significantly more cases of influenza than the traditional TIV. However, its efficacy in adults has not been adequately documented, which is why it has not been licensed for use by adults by the European health authorities. LAIV is safe and well tolerated by children aged > 2 y and adults, but some concerns arisen regarding its safety in younger children and subjects with previous asthma or with recurrent wheezing. Further studies are needed to solve these problems and to evaluate the possible role of LAIV in the annual vaccination of the general population.

  19. A Rapid and Improved Method to Generate Recombinant Dengue Virus Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Guan, Liming; Meschino, Steven; Fridman, Arthur; Bagchi, Ansu; Pak, Irene; ter Meulen, Jan; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important mosquito-borne infections accounting for severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, the tetravalent chimeric live attenuated Dengue vaccine Dengvaxia® was approved for use in several dengue endemic countries. In general, live attenuated vaccines (LAV) are very efficacious and offer long-lasting immunity against virus-induced disease. Rationally designed LAVs can be generated through reverse genetics technology, a method of generating infectious recombinant viruses from full length cDNA contained in bacterial plasmids. In vitro transcribed (IVT) viral RNA from these infectious clones is transfected into susceptible cells to generate recombinant virus. However, the generation of full-length dengue virus cDNA clones can be difficult due to the genetic instability of viral sequences in bacterial plasmids. To circumvent the need for a single plasmid containing a full length cDNA, in vitro ligation of two or three cDNA fragments contained in separate plasmids can be used to generate a full-length dengue viral cDNA template. However, in vitro ligation of multiple fragments often yields low quality template for IVT reactions, resulting in inconsistent low yield RNA. These technical difficulties make recombinant virus recovery less efficient. In this study, we describe a simple, rapid and efficient method of using LONG-PCR to recover recombinant chimeric Yellow fever dengue (CYD) viruses as potential dengue vaccine candidates. Using this method, we were able to efficiently generate several viable recombinant viruses without introducing any artificial mutations into the viral genomes. We believe that the techniques reported here will enable rapid and efficient recovery of recombinant flaviviruses for evaluation as vaccine candidates and, be applicable to the recovery of other RNA viruses.

  20. A Rapid and Improved Method to Generate Recombinant Dengue Virus Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Guan, Liming; Meschino, Steven; Fridman, Arthur; Bagchi, Ansu; Pak, Irene; ter Meulen, Jan; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bett, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important mosquito-borne infections accounting for severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, the tetravalent chimeric live attenuated Dengue vaccine Dengvaxia® was approved for use in several dengue endemic countries. In general, live attenuated vaccines (LAV) are very efficacious and offer long-lasting immunity against virus-induced disease. Rationally designed LAVs can be generated through reverse genetics technology, a method of generating infectious recombinant viruses from full length cDNA contained in bacterial plasmids. In vitro transcribed (IVT) viral RNA from these infectious clones is transfected into susceptible cells to generate recombinant virus. However, the generation of full-length dengue virus cDNA clones can be difficult due to the genetic instability of viral sequences in bacterial plasmids. To circumvent the need for a single plasmid containing a full length cDNA, in vitro ligation of two or three cDNA fragments contained in separate plasmids can be used to generate a full-length dengue viral cDNA template. However, in vitro ligation of multiple fragments often yields low quality template for IVT reactions, resulting in inconsistent low yield RNA. These technical difficulties make recombinant virus recovery less efficient. In this study, we describe a simple, rapid and efficient method of using LONG-PCR to recover recombinant chimeric Yellow fever dengue (CYD) viruses as potential dengue vaccine candidates. Using this method, we were able to efficiently generate several viable recombinant viruses without introducing any artificial mutations into the viral genomes. We believe that the techniques reported here will enable rapid and efficient recovery of recombinant flaviviruses for evaluation as vaccine candidates and, be applicable to the recovery of other RNA viruses. PMID:27008550

  1. A Rapid and Improved Method to Generate Recombinant Dengue Virus Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Guan, Liming; Meschino, Steven; Fridman, Arthur; Bagchi, Ansu; Pak, Irene; ter Meulen, Jan; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bett, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important mosquito-borne infections accounting for severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently, the tetravalent chimeric live attenuated Dengue vaccine Dengvaxia® was approved for use in several dengue endemic countries. In general, live attenuated vaccines (LAV) are very efficacious and offer long-lasting immunity against virus-induced disease. Rationally designed LAVs can be generated through reverse genetics technology, a method of generating infectious recombinant viruses from full length cDNA contained in bacterial plasmids. In vitro transcribed (IVT) viral RNA from these infectious clones is transfected into susceptible cells to generate recombinant virus. However, the generation of full-length dengue virus cDNA clones can be difficult due to the genetic instability of viral sequences in bacterial plasmids. To circumvent the need for a single plasmid containing a full length cDNA, in vitro ligation of two or three cDNA fragments contained in separate plasmids can be used to generate a full-length dengue viral cDNA template. However, in vitro ligation of multiple fragments often yields low quality template for IVT reactions, resulting in inconsistent low yield RNA. These technical difficulties make recombinant virus recovery less efficient. In this study, we describe a simple, rapid and efficient method of using LONG-PCR to recover recombinant chimeric Yellow fever dengue (CYD) viruses as potential dengue vaccine candidates. Using this method, we were able to efficiently generate several viable recombinant viruses without introducing any artificial mutations into the viral genomes. We believe that the techniques reported here will enable rapid and efficient recovery of recombinant flaviviruses for evaluation as vaccine candidates and, be applicable to the recovery of other RNA viruses. PMID:27008550

  2. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  3. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  4. Molecular determinants of plaque size as an indicator of dengue virus attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Kenneth Choon Meng; Tang, Choon Kit; Norton, Diana Catherine; Gan, Esther Shuyi; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Sun, Bo; Syenina, Ayesa; Yousuf, Amjad; Ong, Xin Mei; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Cheung, Yin Bun; Gubler, Duane J; Davidson, Andrew; St John, Ashley Lauren; Sessions, October Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2016-01-01

    The development of live viral vaccines relies on empirically derived phenotypic criteria, especially small plaque sizes, to indicate attenuation. However, while some candidate vaccines successfully translated into licensed applications, others have failed safety trials, placing vaccine development on a hit-or-miss trajectory. We examined the determinants of small plaque phenotype in two dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidates, DENV-3 PGMK30FRhL3, which produced acute febrile illness in vaccine recipients, and DENV-2 PDK53, which has a good clinical safety profile. The reasons behind the failure of PGMK30FRhL3 during phase 1 clinical trial, despite meeting the empirically derived criteria of attenuation, have never been systematically investigated. Using in vitro, in vivo and functional genomics approaches, we examined infections by the vaccine and wild-type DENVs, in order to ascertain the different determinants of plaque size. We show that PGMK30FRhL3 produces small plaques on BHK-21 cells due to its slow in vitro growth rate. In contrast, PDK53 replicates rapidly, but is unable to evade antiviral responses that constrain its spread hence also giving rise to small plaques. Therefore, at least two different molecular mechanisms govern the plaque phenotype; determining which mechanism operates to constrain plaque size may be more informative on the safety of live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:27185466

  5. Optimization model of vaccination strategy for dengue transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayani, H.; Kallista, M.; Nuraini, N.; Sari, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is emerging tropical and subtropical disease caused by dengue virus infection. The vaccination should be done as a prevention of epidemic in population. The host-vector model are modified with consider a vaccination factor to prevent the occurrence of epidemic dengue in a population. An optimal vaccination strategy using non-linear objective function was proposed. The genetic algorithm programming techniques are combined with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to construct the optimal vaccination. In this paper, the appropriate vaccination strategy by using the optimal minimum cost function which can reduce the number of epidemic was analyzed. The numerical simulation for some specific cases of vaccination strategy is shown.

  6. Prevention and control of influenza and dengue through vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Gordon, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Influenza and dengue are viral illnesses of global public health importance, especially among children. Accordingly, these diseases have been the focus of efforts to improve their prevention and control. Influenza vaccination offers the best protection against clinical disease caused by strains contained within the specific year's formulation. It is not uncommon for there to be a mismatch between vaccine strains and circulating strains, particularly with regards to the B lineages. For more than a decade, two distinct lineages of influenza B (Yamagata and Victoria) have co-circulated in the US with varying frequencies, but trivalent influenza vaccines contain only one B-lineage strain and do not offer adequate protection against the alternate B-lineage. Quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs), containing two A strains (H1N1 and H3N2) and two B strains (one from each lineage) have been developed to help protect against the four strains predicted to be the most likely to be circulating. The QIV section of this article discusses epidemiology of pediatric influenza, importance of influenza B in children, potential benefits of QIV, and new quadrivalent vaccines. In contrast to influenza, a vaccine against dengue is not yet available in spite of many decades of research and development. A global increase in reports of dengue fever (DF) and its more severe presentations, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), suggest that US physicians will increasingly encounter patients with this disease. Similarities of the early signs and symptoms of influenza and dengue and the differences in disease management necessitates a better understanding of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management, and prevention of DF by US physicians, including pediatricians. The article also provides a brief overview of dengue and discusses dengue vaccine development.

  7. Challenges for the formulation of a universal vaccine against dengue.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2013-05-01

    Dengue is rapidly becoming a disease of an escalating global public health concern. The disease is a vector-borne disease, transmitted by the bite of an Aedes spp. mosquito. Dynamic clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic, flu-like febrile illness, dengue fever (DF) to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without dengue shock syndrome (DSS), make the disease one of the most challenging to diagnose and treat. DF is a self-limited illness, while DHF/DSS, characterized by plasma leakage resulting from an increased vascular permeability, can have severe consequences, including death. The pathogenesis of dengue virus infection remains poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of a suitable animal model that can recapitulate the cardinal features of human dengue diseases. Currently, there is no specific treatment or antiviral therapy available for dengue virus infection and supportive care with vigilant monitoring is the principle course of treatment. Since vector control programs have been largely unsuccessful in preventing outbreaks, vaccination seems to be the most viable option for prevention. There are four dengue viral serotypes and each one of them is capable of causing severe dengue. Although immunity induced by infection by one serotype is effective in protection against the homologous viral serotype, it only has a transient protective effect against infection with the other three serotypes. The meager cross protective immunity generated wanes over time and may even induce a harmful effect at the time of subsequent secondary infection. Thus, it is imperative to have a vaccine that can elicit equal and long-lasting immunity to all four serotypes simultaneously. Numerous tetravalent vaccines are currently either in the pipeline for clinical trials or under development. For those frontrunner tetravalent vaccines in clinical trials, despite good safety and immunogenicity profiles registered, issues such as imbalanced immune responses between serotypes

  8. Dengue vaccines: recent developments, ongoing challenges and current candidates

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Edelman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dengue is among the most prevalent and important arbovirus diseases of humans. In order to effectively control this rapidly spreading disease, control of the vector mosquito and a safe and efficacious vaccine are critical. Despite considerable efforts, the development of a successful vaccine has remained elusive. Multiple factors have complicated the creation of a successful vaccine, not the least of which are the complex, immune-mediated responses against four antigenically distinct serotypes necessitating a tetravalent vaccine providing long lasting protective immunity. Despite the multiple impediments, there are currently many promising vaccine candidates in pre-clinical and clinical development. Here we review the recent advances in dengue virus vaccine development and briefly discuss the challenges associated with the use of these vaccines as a public health tool. PMID:23984962

  9. Dengue vaccines: recent developments, ongoing challenges and current candidates.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Monica A; Sztein, Marcelo B; Edelman, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Dengue is among the most prevalent and important arbovirus diseases of humans. To effectively control this rapidly spreading disease, control of the vector mosquito and a safe and efficacious vaccine are critical. Despite considerable efforts, the development of a successful vaccine has remained elusive. Multiple factors have complicated the creation of a successful vaccine, not the least of which are the complex, immune-mediated responses against four antigenically distinct serotypes necessitating a tetravalent vaccine providing long-lasting protective immunity. Despite the multiple impediments, there are currently many promising vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical development. Here, the recent advances in dengue virus vaccine development are reviewed and the challenges associated with the use of these vaccines as a public health tool are briefly discussed. PMID:23984962

  10. From research to phase III: preclinical, industrial and clinical development of the Sanofi Pasteur tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Barrere, Beatrice; Malinowski, Claire; Saville, Melanie; Teyssou, Remy; Lang, Jean

    2011-09-23

    Dengue vaccine development has reached a major milestone with the initiation, in 2010, of the first phase III clinical trial to investigate the Sanofi Pasteur CYD tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV). The CYD TDV candidate is composed of four recombinant, live, attenuated vaccines (CYD-1-4) based on a yellow fever vaccine 17D (YFV 17D) backbone, each expressing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of one of the four dengue virus serotypes. The vaccine is genetically and phenotypically stable, non-hepatotropic, less neurovirulent than YFV 17D, and does not infect mosquitoes by the oral route. In vitro and in vivo preclinical studies showed that CYD TDV induces controlled stimulation of human dendritic cells, and significant immune responses in monkeys. Scale up and industrialization are being conducted in parallel with preclinical and clinical development to fulfill the needs of phase II/III trials, and to anticipate and facilitate supply and access to vaccine in the countries where the dengue disease burden makes it an urgent public health priority. The vaccine has now been administered to more than 6000 children and adults from dengue endemic and non-endemic areas and no safety concerns have arisen in any of the completed or ongoing trials. A three-dose vaccination regimen induces an immune response against all four serotypes in the large majority of vaccinees. Preexisting flavivirus immunity favors quicker and higher immune responses to CYD TDV, without adversely effecting clinical safety or increasing vaccine viremia. The observed level and nature of the cellular immune responses in humans are consistent with the good safety and immunogenicity profile of the vaccine. Preliminary results of an ongoing, proof-of-concept efficacy and large scale safety study in Thai children are expected by the end of 2012. Here we discuss the different steps and challenges of developing CYD TDV, from research to industrialization, and summarize some of the challenges to the successful

  11. Live attenuated influenza vaccine--a review.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2011-09-01

    Owing to the variability of influenza viruses, vaccine composition needs to be up-dated annually. As many variables can influence their efficacy, vaccines are still considered "sub-optimal". Many studies have been carried out in recent years to improve vaccines. In particular, researchers and vaccine-producing corporations have focused on developing a live vaccine. Among the candidate vaccines, the strain developed by Maassab has recently been licensed in the USA and Europe, after extensive investigation. This vaccine is safe and well tolerated, and has shown very good genetic stability. Although vaccine recipients are able to spread the virus, transmission to close contacts is practically non-existent. Studies on cold-adapted attenuated influenza vaccines have demonstrated that such vaccines are effective, and sometimes more effective than inactivated influenza vaccines. Cold-adapted attenuated influenza vaccines therefore appear to be an important weapon against influenza. However, a more widespread use of these vaccines is to be recommended, especially in children, as the more acceptable way of administration can favour parental compliance.

  12. Financing dengue vaccine introduction in the Americas: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Constenla, Dagna; Clark, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Dengue has escalated in the region of the Americas unabated despite major investments in integrated vector control and prevention strategies. An effective and affordable dengue vaccine can play a critical role in reducing the human and economic costs of the disease by preventing millions around the world from getting sick. However, there are considerable challenges on the path towards vaccine introduction. These include lack of sufficient financing tools, absence of capacity within national level decision-making bodies, and demands that new vaccines place on stressed health systems. Various financing models can be used to overcome these challenges including setting up procurement mechanisms, integrating regional and domestic taxes, and setting up low interest multilateral loans. In this paper we review these challenges and opportunities of financing dengue vaccine introduction in the Americas. PMID:26690087

  13. Preparing for introduction of a dengue vaccine: recommendations from the 1st Dengue v2V Asia-Pacific Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sai Kit; Burke, Donald; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Chong, Chee Keong; Coudeville, Laurent; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Hanna, Jeffrey; Lang, Jean; Lee, Han Lim; Leo, Yee Sin; Luong, Chan Quang; Mahoney, Richard; McBride, John; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge; Ng, Lee Ching; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Ooi, Eng Eong; Shepard, Donald; Smit, Jaco; Teyssou, Rémy; Thomas, Laurent; Torresi, Joseph; Vasconcelos, Pedro; Wirawan, Dewa Nyoman; Yoksan, Sutee

    2011-11-28

    Infection with dengue virus is a major public health problem in the Asia-Pacific region and throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Vaccination represents a major opportunity to control dengue and several candidate vaccines are in development. Experts in dengue and in vaccine introduction gathered for a two day meeting during which they examined the challenges inherent to the introduction of a dengue vaccine into the national immunisation programmes of countries of the Asia-Pacific. The aim was to develop a series of recommendations to reduce the delay between vaccine licensure and vaccine introduction. Major recommendations arising from the meeting included: ascertaining and publicising the full burden and cost of dengue; changing the perception of dengue in non-endemic countries to help generate global support for dengue vaccination; ensuring high quality active surveillance systems and diagnostics; and identifying sustainable sources of funding, both to support vaccine introduction and to maintain the vaccination programme. The attendees at the meeting were in agreement that with the introduction of an effective vaccine, dengue is a disease that could be controlled, and that in order to ensure a vaccine is introduced as rapidly as possible, there is a need to start preparing now.

  14. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-01

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes.

  15. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. PMID:26873054

  16. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed.

  17. Low antibody titers 5 years after vaccination with the CYD-TDV dengue vaccine in both pre-immune and naïve vaccinees.

    PubMed

    Velumani, Sumathy; Toh, Ying Xiu; Balasingam, Shobana; Archuleta, Sophia; Leo, Yee Sin; Gan, Victor C; Thein, Tun Linn; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Fink, Katja

    2016-05-01

    Globally, dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most widespread vector-borne viruses. Dengue disease affects populations in endemic areas and, increasingly, tourists who travel to these countries, but there is currently no approved vaccine for dengue. A phase 3 efficacy trial with Sanofi-Pasteur's recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) conducted in South East Asia showed an overall efficacy of 56% against virologically confirmed dengue infections of any severity and any of the 4 serotypes, but the long-term protection of the vaccine has yet to be demonstrated. To address longevity of antibody titers and B cell memory, we recalled study participants from an earlier CYD immunogenicity study (Phase 2) conducted in Singapore that enrolled healthy volunteers in the year 2009. Depending on the age group, 57-84% of the participants initially generated a neutralizing antibody titer ≥ 10 to all 4 DENV serotypes 28 d after the third and final dose. We observed very low antibody titers in blood samples collected from 23 vaccinees 5 y after the first dose, particularly titers of antibodies binding to virus particles compared with those binding to recombinant E protein. The in vivo efficacy of plasma antibodies against DENV-2 challenge was also tested in a mouse model, which found that only 2 out of 23 samples were able to reduce viremia. Although the sample size is too small for general conclusions, dengue immune memory after vaccination with CYD-TDV appears relatively low. PMID:26889737

  18. Low antibody titers 5 years after vaccination with the CYD-TDV dengue vaccine in both pre-immune and naïve vaccinees.

    PubMed

    Velumani, Sumathy; Toh, Ying Xiu; Balasingam, Shobana; Archuleta, Sophia; Leo, Yee Sin; Gan, Victor C; Thein, Tun Linn; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Fink, Katja

    2016-05-01

    Globally, dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most widespread vector-borne viruses. Dengue disease affects populations in endemic areas and, increasingly, tourists who travel to these countries, but there is currently no approved vaccine for dengue. A phase 3 efficacy trial with Sanofi-Pasteur's recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) conducted in South East Asia showed an overall efficacy of 56% against virologically confirmed dengue infections of any severity and any of the 4 serotypes, but the long-term protection of the vaccine has yet to be demonstrated. To address longevity of antibody titers and B cell memory, we recalled study participants from an earlier CYD immunogenicity study (Phase 2) conducted in Singapore that enrolled healthy volunteers in the year 2009. Depending on the age group, 57-84% of the participants initially generated a neutralizing antibody titer ≥ 10 to all 4 DENV serotypes 28 d after the third and final dose. We observed very low antibody titers in blood samples collected from 23 vaccinees 5 y after the first dose, particularly titers of antibodies binding to virus particles compared with those binding to recombinant E protein. The in vivo efficacy of plasma antibodies against DENV-2 challenge was also tested in a mouse model, which found that only 2 out of 23 samples were able to reduce viremia. Although the sample size is too small for general conclusions, dengue immune memory after vaccination with CYD-TDV appears relatively low.

  19. Dengue vaccine trial guidelines and role of large-scale, post proof-of-concept demonstration projects in bringing a dengue vaccine to use in dengue endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Singhasivanon, Pratap; Fernandez, Eduardo; Abeysinghe, Nihal; Amador, Juan Jose; Margolis, Harold S; Edelman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we consider the issues impacting conduct and design of dengue vaccine trials with reference to the recently published world Health Organization “Guidelines for Conduct of Clinical Trials of Dengue vaccines in endemic Areas.” We discuss logistic, scientific and ethical challenges concerning evaluation and introduction of dengue vaccines; these range from randomized trials that establish “proof of concept” of vaccine efficacy, to post-“proof of concept” trials, particularly demonstration projects likely to be required for licensure or for the introduction of an already licensed vaccine into public use. We clarify and define the meaning of “proof of concept” in the clinical trial context and the meaning of terms “phase 2b”, “phase 3b” and “demonstration project”, which are commonly used but have not been defined well in the clinical literature. PMID:20935506

  20. Challenges in the clinical development of a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Derek; Canouet, Vincent; Garbes, Pedro; Wartel, T Anh

    2013-06-01

    Dengue is a potentially fatal viral disease for which treatment is limited to supportive care, and prevention and control are based on mosquito vector control programs. It is the fastest growing arboviral infection and is currently endemic in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries, placing over 40% of the world's population at risk. At least 50 million infections are thought to occur annually, resulting in approximately 500000 hospitalizations, mainly in children. In the context of an expanding and potentially fatal infectious disease without effective prevention or specific treatment, the public health value of a protective vaccine is clear. This review considers some of the challenges to dengue vaccine development, and in particular the challenges of demonstrating dengue vaccine efficacy.

  1. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T. Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L’Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2–14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14’s active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  2. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions.

  3. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  4. Assessing the interest to participate in a dengue vaccine efficacy trial among residents of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Guerra, Carmen L; Rodríguez-Acosta, Rosa L; Soto-Gómez, Eunice; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Peña-Orellana, Marisol; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Reinaldo; Cruz, R Rhode; Ramírez, Viani; Tomashek, Kay M; Dayan, Gustavo

    2012-07-01

    Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, is a major public health problem. Vaccines are thought the best means to prevent dengue because vector control alone has been largely ineffective. We implemented qualitative studies in 2006 and 2010 to determine the acceptability of conducting placebo-controlled dengue vaccine efficacy trials in Puerto Rican children. Key informant interviews and focus groups with parents and children were conducted in municipalities with high dengue incidence. We used structured open-ended questions to determine motivators and attitudes regarding vaccine trial participation. Knowledge about dengue risk and prevention, and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding vaccines and vaccine trials were assessed. Using grounded theory, we conducted content analysis and established categories and sub-categories of participant responses. All participants were knowledgeable about dengue prevention and perceived children as most affected age groups. Participants were aware of vaccines benefits and they thought a vaccine could prevent dengue. However, most would not allow their children to participate in a placebo-controlled vaccine trial. Barriers included lack of trust in new vaccines and vaccine trial procedures; fear of developing dengue or side effects from the vaccine and lack of information about candidate dengue vaccines. Participants thought information, including results of previous trials might overcome barriers to participation. Motivators for participation were altruism, protection from dengue, free medical attention, and compensation for transportation and participation. Parents would consider children participation if accurate vaccine trial information is provided.

  5. Assessing dengue vaccination impact: Model challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Recker, Mario; Vannice, Kirsten; Hombach, Joachim; Jit, Mark; Simmons, Cameron P

    2016-08-31

    In response to the sharp rise in the global burden caused by dengue virus (DENV) over the last few decades, the WHO has set out three specific key objectives in its disease control strategy: (i) to estimate the true burden of dengue by 2015; (ii) a reduction in dengue mortality by at least 50% by 2020 (used as a baseline); and (iii) a reduction in dengue morbidity by at least 25% by 2020. Although various elements will all play crucial parts in achieving this goal, from diagnosis and case management to integrated surveillance and outbreak response, sustainable vector control, vaccine implementation and finally operational and implementation research, it seems clear that new tools (e.g. a safe and effective vaccine and/or effective vector control) are key to success. The first dengue vaccine was licensed in December 2015, Dengvaxia® (CYD-TDV) developed by Sanofi Pasteur. The WHO has provided guidance on the use of CYD-TDV in endemic countries, for which there are a variety of considerations beyond the risk-benefit evaluation done by regulatory authorities, including public health impact and cost-effectiveness. Population-level vaccine impact and economic and financial aspects are two issues that can potentially be considered by means of mathematical modelling, especially for new products for which empirical data are still lacking. In December 2014 a meeting was convened by the WHO in order to revisit the current status of dengue transmission models and their utility for public health decision-making. Here, we report on the main points of discussion and the conclusions of this meeting, as well as next steps for maximising the use of mathematical models for vaccine decision-making.

  6. Assessing dengue vaccination impact: Model challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Recker, Mario; Vannice, Kirsten; Hombach, Joachim; Jit, Mark; Simmons, Cameron P

    2016-08-31

    In response to the sharp rise in the global burden caused by dengue virus (DENV) over the last few decades, the WHO has set out three specific key objectives in its disease control strategy: (i) to estimate the true burden of dengue by 2015; (ii) a reduction in dengue mortality by at least 50% by 2020 (used as a baseline); and (iii) a reduction in dengue morbidity by at least 25% by 2020. Although various elements will all play crucial parts in achieving this goal, from diagnosis and case management to integrated surveillance and outbreak response, sustainable vector control, vaccine implementation and finally operational and implementation research, it seems clear that new tools (e.g. a safe and effective vaccine and/or effective vector control) are key to success. The first dengue vaccine was licensed in December 2015, Dengvaxia® (CYD-TDV) developed by Sanofi Pasteur. The WHO has provided guidance on the use of CYD-TDV in endemic countries, for which there are a variety of considerations beyond the risk-benefit evaluation done by regulatory authorities, including public health impact and cost-effectiveness. Population-level vaccine impact and economic and financial aspects are two issues that can potentially be considered by means of mathematical modelling, especially for new products for which empirical data are still lacking. In December 2014 a meeting was convened by the WHO in order to revisit the current status of dengue transmission models and their utility for public health decision-making. Here, we report on the main points of discussion and the conclusions of this meeting, as well as next steps for maximising the use of mathematical models for vaccine decision-making. PMID:27461457

  7. Attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 vaccine: defining humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Rabablert, J; Yoksan, S

    2009-01-01

    Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease-dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. Live attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 vaccine was first developed from Mahidol University, Thailand. This vaccine induced both humoral and cell-mediated immunity and lack of reactogeneticity in humans. Infectious cDNA clones of the virulent D2 16681 virus and its attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 were constructed. The attenuated virus elicited neutralizing antibodies in mice and monkeys and developed viremia in monkeys. At molecular level, patterns of cytokines which are immunological mediators released from human mononuclear cells obtained from dengue naïve and immune donors infected with this attenuated virus compared with virulent virus were studied. In dengue naïve PBMC, the virulent and attenuated clones induced alternation in expression of 25 and 24 versus 13 and 18 genes out of 268 genes on day 1 and 3. In dengue immune PBMC, the virulent and attenuated clones induced alternation in expression of 33 and 38 versus 25 and 29 genes on days 1 and 3. Up-regulation of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-alpha, IFNgammaR, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, MIP-2alpha, VEGF and down-regulation of IL-4, IL-4R, IL-RII, MIF, RANTES, IGF-1, GM-CSF-2 were shown. This review pointed out the infectious clones of the attenuated D2 16681-PDK53 was safe and induced both neutralizing antibodies in vivo and cytokine gene expression in vitro at molecular level. Furthermore, the phenotypic markers of ideal dengue vaccine could be included the alteration of cytokine gene expression and cytokine production in human mononuclear cells.

  8. Dengue fever: theories of immunopathogenesis and challenges for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remy, Melissa M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease infecting several hundred million people in tropical and subtropical areas every year. Its clinical manifestations range from mild fever to severe life-threatening shock syndrom. No therapeutics or licensed vaccines are available yet and with half of the world's population already at risk, it represents a major public health concern. The co-existence of four different Dengue virus serotypes renders difficult the obtaining of full protective immunity against each one of them. On the contrary, these serotypes trigger significant cross-reactivities of antibodies and T cells, both of which may lead to disease enhancement when reactivated in the context of reinfection with a heterologous serotype. Several immunological concepts have been developed to explain disease enhancement, and the uncertainty around the topic has consequently slowed down the development of Dengue vaccines. Recent advances however have shed light on key aspects of both the immunoprotective and immunopathological mechanisms. In particular the responses of specific antibodies and T cells have been a focus of many studies. These immunological players are thought to directly influence a cytokine dysbalance that eventually leads to severe disease and vascular leakage. In this review I outline current concepts and ongoing debates on the above topics. A better understanding of Dengue virus immunopathogenesis is critically needed to optimize candidate vaccines including those currently under development. In particular, the results from large-scale human efficacy trials will offer outstanding opportunities to refine correlates of protection and design even more effective vaccines. PMID:25163973

  9. Optimal Control of a Dengue Epidemic Model with Vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Teresa, M.; Monteiro, T.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2011-09-01

    We present a SIR+ASI epidemic model to describe the interaction between human and dengue fever mosquito populations. A control strategy in the form of vaccination, to decrease the number of infected individuals, is used. An optimal control approach is applied in order to find the best way to fight the disease.

  10. Physical Theory of Vaccine Design for Influenza and Dengue Fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. I will introduce a physical theory of the evolutionary dynamics that occurs in the antibody-mediated and T cell-mediated immune responses. The theory will be used to provide a mechanism for original antigenic sin, wherein an initial exposure to antigen can degrade the response of the immune system upon subsequent exposure to related, but different, antigens. A new order parameter to characterize antigenic distance will be introduced from the theory. This order parameter predicts effectiveness of the influenza vaccine more reliably than do results from animal model studies currently used by world health authorities. I will discuss how this order parameter might be a valuable new tool for making vaccine-related public health policy decisions. Next, I will briefly discuss dengue fever. Infection with, or vaccination against, one of the four serotypes of dengue fever typically increases susceptibility to dengue hemorrhagic fever from one of the other three serotypes. I will present a physical theory of this immunodominance and use this theory to quantify the predicted mitigation of immunodominance in a novel formulation of the dengue vaccine.

  11. Next generation dengue vaccines: A review of the preclinical development pipeline.

    PubMed

    Vannice, Kirsten S; Roehrig, John T; Hombach, Joachim

    2015-12-10

    Dengue represents a significant and growing public health problem across the globe, with approximately half of the world's population at risk. The increasing and expanding burden of dengue has highlighted the need for new tools to prevent dengue, including development of dengue vaccines. Recently, the first dengue vaccine candidate was evaluated in Phase 3 clinical trials, and other vaccine candidates are under clinical evaluation. There are also a number of candidates in preclinical development, based on diverse technologies, with promising results in animal models and likely to move into clinical trials and could eventually be next-generation dengue vaccines. This review provides an overview of the various technological approaches to dengue vaccine development with specific focus on candidates in preclinical development and with evaluation in non-human primates.

  12. A role for vector control in dengue vaccine programs.

    PubMed

    Christofferson, Rebecca C; Mores, Christopher N

    2015-12-10

    Development and deployment of a successful dengue virus (DENV) vaccine has confounded research and pharmaceutical entities owing to the complex nature of DENV immunity and concerns over exacerbating the risk of DENV hemorrhagic fever (DHF) as a consequence of vaccination. Thus, consensus is growing that a combination of mitigation strategies will be needed for DENV to be successfully controlled, likely involving some form of vector control to enhance a vaccine program. We present here a deterministic compartmental model to illustrate that vector control may enhance vaccination campaigns with imperfect coverage and efficacy. Though we recognize the costs and challenges associated with continuous control programs, simultaneous application of vector control methods coincident with vaccine roll out can have a positive effect by further reducing the number of human cases. The success of such an integrative strategy is predicated on closing gaps in our understanding of the DENV transmission cycle in hyperedemic locations. PMID:26478199

  13. A role for vector control in dengue vaccine programs.

    PubMed

    Christofferson, Rebecca C; Mores, Christopher N

    2015-12-10

    Development and deployment of a successful dengue virus (DENV) vaccine has confounded research and pharmaceutical entities owing to the complex nature of DENV immunity and concerns over exacerbating the risk of DENV hemorrhagic fever (DHF) as a consequence of vaccination. Thus, consensus is growing that a combination of mitigation strategies will be needed for DENV to be successfully controlled, likely involving some form of vector control to enhance a vaccine program. We present here a deterministic compartmental model to illustrate that vector control may enhance vaccination campaigns with imperfect coverage and efficacy. Though we recognize the costs and challenges associated with continuous control programs, simultaneous application of vector control methods coincident with vaccine roll out can have a positive effect by further reducing the number of human cases. The success of such an integrative strategy is predicated on closing gaps in our understanding of the DENV transmission cycle in hyperedemic locations.

  14. Trials and Tribulations on the Path to Developing a Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen J; Rothman, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    Dengue is a rapidly expanding global health problem. Development of a safe and efficacious tetravalent vaccine along with strategic application of vector control activities represents a promising approach to reducing the global disease burden. Although many vaccine development challenges exist, numerous candidates are in clinical development and one has been tested in three clinical endpoint studies. The results of these studies have raised numerous questions about how we measure vaccine immunogenicity and how these readouts are associated with clinical outcomes in vaccine recipients who experience natural infection. In this review the authors discuss the dengue vaccine pipeline, development challenges, the dengue vaccine-immunologic profiling intersection, and research gaps. PMID:26590433

  15. Trials and Tribulations on the Path to Developing a Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen J; Rothman, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    Dengue is a rapidly expanding global health problem. Development of a safe and efficacious tetravalent vaccine along with strategic application of vector control activities represents a promising approach to reducing the global disease burden. Although many vaccine development challenges exist, numerous candidates are in clinical development and one has been tested in three clinical endpoint studies. The results of these studies have raised numerous questions about how we measure vaccine immunogenicity and how these readouts are associated with clinical outcomes in vaccine recipients who experience natural infection. In this review the authors discuss the dengue vaccine pipeline, development challenges, the dengue vaccine-immunologic profiling intersection, and research gaps.

  16. Trials and tribulations on the path to developing a dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen J; Rothman, Alan L

    2015-11-27

    Dengue is a rapidly expanding global health problem. Development of a safe and efficacious tetravalent vaccine along with strategic application of vector control activities represents a promising approach to reducing the global disease burden. Although many vaccine development challenges exist, numerous candidates are in clinical development and one has been tested in three clinical endpoint studies. The results of these studies have raised numerous questions about how we measure vaccine immunogenicity and how these readouts are associated with clinical outcomes in vaccine recipients who experience natural infection. In this review the authors discuss the dengue vaccine pipeline, development challenges, the dengue vaccine-immunologic profiling intersection, and research gaps.

  17. The successful induction of T-cell and antibody responses by a recombinant measles virus-vectored tetravalent dengue vaccine provides partial protection against dengue-2 infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2016-07-01

    Dengue has a major impact on global public health, and the use of dengue vaccine is very limited. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a dengue vaccine made from a recombinant measles virus (MV) that expresses envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue-1 to 4. Following immunization with the MV-vectored dengue vaccine, mice developed specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses against dengue virus and MV. Neutralizing antibodies against MV and dengue viruses were also induced, and protective levels of FRNT50 ≥ 10 to 4 serotypes of dengue viruses were detected in the MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice. In addition, specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses to dengue viruses were still induced by the MV-vectored dengue vaccine in mice that were pre-infected with MV. This finding suggests that the pre-existing immunity to MV did not block the initiation of immune responses. By contrast, mice that were pre-infected with dengue-3 exhibited no effect in terms of their antibody responses to MV and dengue viruses, but a dominant dengue-3-specific T-cell response was observed. After injection with dengue-2, a detectable but significantly lower viremia and a higher titer of anti-dengue-2 neutralizing antibodies were observed in MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice versus the vector control, suggesting that an anamnestic antibody response that provided partial protection against dengue-2 was elicited. Our results with regard to T-cell responses and the effect of pre-immunity to MV or dengue viruses provide clues for the future applications of an MV-vectored dengue vaccine. PMID:26901482

  18. Investigating the efficacy of monovalent and tetravalent dengue vaccine formulations against DENV-4 challenge in AG129 mice

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jeremy; Chu, Haiyan; O'Day, Peter; Pyles, Richard; Bourne, Nigel; Das, Subash C.; Milligan, Gregg N.; Barrett, Alan D.T.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue (DEN) is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease, with a major impact on global health and economics, caused by four serologically and distinct viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent DEN. We have developed a live attenuated tetravalent DENV vaccine candidate (TDV) (formally known as DENVax) that has shown promise in preclinical and clinical studies and elicits neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENVs. As these responses are lowest to DENV-4 we have used the AG129 mouse model to investigate the immunogenicity of monovalent TDV-4 or tetravalent TDV vaccines, and their efficacy against lethal DENV-4 challenge. Since the common backbone of TDV is based on an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) we also tested the efficacy of TDV-2 against DENV-4 challenge. Single doses of the tetravalent or monovalent vaccines elicited neutralizing antibodies, anti-NS1 antibodies, and cellular responses to both envelope and nonstructural proteins. All vaccinated animals were protected against challenge at 60 days post-immunization, whereas all control animals died. Investigation of DENV-4 viremias post-challenge showed that only the control animals had high viremias on day 3 post-challenge, whereas vaccinated mice had no detectable viremia. Overall, these data highlight the excellent immunogenicity and efficacy profile of our candidate dengue vaccine in AG129 mice. PMID:25239488

  19. The Potential Impact of Vaccination on the Dynamics of Dengue Infections.

    PubMed

    Knipl, Diána; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2015-12-01

    Dengue, classified as a 'neglected topical disease', is currently regarded globally as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease, which inflicts substantial socioeconomic and health burden in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world. While efforts continue towards developing and improving the efficacy of a tetravalent vaccine to protect individuals against all dengue virus serotypes, the long-term epidemiological impact of vaccination remains elusive. We develop a serotype-specific, vector-host compartmental model to evaluate the effect of vaccination in the presence of antibody-dependent enhancement and cross-protection following recovery from primary infection. Reproducing the reported multi-annual patterns of dengue infection, our model projects that vaccination can dramatically reduce the overall incidence of the disease. However, if the duration of vaccine-induced protection is shorter than the average lifetime of the human population, vaccination can potentially increase the incidence of severe infection of dengue haemorrhagic fever due to the effects of antibody-dependent enhancement. The magnitude and timelines for this increase depend strongly on the efficacy and duration of the vaccine-induced protection. Corresponding to the current estimates of vaccine efficacy, we show that dengue eradication is infeasible using an imperfect vaccine. Furthermore, for a vaccine that induces lifetime protection, a nearly full coverage of infant vaccination is required for dengue elimination. Our findings suggest that other vector control measures may still play a significant role in dengue prevention even when a vaccine with high protection efficacy becomes available. PMID:26585748

  20. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention. PMID:26818736

  1. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention. PMID:26818736

  2. Development of the Sanofi Pasteur tetravalent dengue vaccine: One more step forward.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Briand, Olivier; Lang, Jean; Saville, Melanie; Jackson, Nicholas

    2015-12-10

    Sanofi Pasteur has developed a recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) that is in late-stage development. The present review summarizes the different steps in the development of this dengue vaccine, with a particular focus on the clinical data from three efficacy trials, which includes one proof-of-concept phase IIb (NCT00842530) and two pivotal phase III efficacy trials (NCT01373281 and NCT01374516). Earlier studies showed that the CYD-TDV candidate had a satisfactory safety profile and was immunogenic across the four vaccine serotypes in both in vitro and in vivo preclinical tests, as well as in initial phase I to phase II clinical trials in both flavivirus-naïve and seropositive individuals. Data from the 25 months (after the first injection) active phase of the two pivotal phase III efficacy studies shows that CYD-TDV (administered at 0, 6, and 12 months) is efficacious against virologically-confirmed disease (primary endpoint) and has a good safety profile. Secondary analyses also showed efficacy against all four dengue serotypes and protection against severe disease and hospitalization. The end of the active phases in these studies completes more than a decade of development of CYD-TDV, but considerable activities and efforts remain to address outstanding scientific, clinical, and immunological questions, while preparing for the introduction and use of CYD-TDV. Additional safety observations were recently reported from the first complete year of hospital phase longer term surveillance for two phase 3 studies and the first and second completed years for one phase 2b study, demonstrating the optimal age for intervention from 9 years. Dengue is a complex disease, and both short-term and long-term safety and efficacy will continue to be addressed by ongoing long-term follow-up and future post-licensure studies.

  3. Development of DENVax: A chimeric dengue-2 PDK-53-based tetravalent vaccine for protection against dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Kinney, Richard M.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue. virus infection is the leading arboviral cause of disease worldwide. A vaccine is being developed based on the attenuated DEN-2 virus, DEN-2 PDK-53. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the parent DEN-2 PDK-53 strain as well as the chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DEN-1, DEN-3 or DEN-4 virus in the genetic backbone of the DEN-2 PDK-53 virus (termed DENVax). Tetravalent DENVax formulations containing cloned, fully sequenced isolates of the DEN-2 PDK-53 virus and the three chimeras have been evaluated for safety and efficacy in preclinical animal models. Based on the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in preclinical studies, Phase 1 clinical testing of DENVax has been initiated. PMID:21777638

  4. Invited commentary: Dengue lessons from Cuba.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, D W

    2000-11-01

    An 18-year interval between a dengue virus type 1 outbreak in 1977-1979 and a dengue virus type 2 outbreak in 1997 in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, provided a unique opportunity to evaluate risk factors for dengue disease. All patients with symptomatic dengue, including 205 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 12 deaths, were adults born before the dengue virus type 1 epidemic, and nearly all (98%) experienced secondary dengue virus infections. In contrast, almost all of those who seroconverted without illness (97%) experienced primary dengue virus infection. This provides epidemiologic support for the immune enhancement theory of dengue pathogenesis. The Cuban experience suggests that immune enhancement can be seen even 20 years after the primary dengue virus infection. It also supports the contention that primary infections with dengue virus type 2 (and dengue virus type 4) are largely subclinical. These observations have implications for dengue vaccine development based on live-attenuated viruses.

  5. Valuing the broader benefits of dengue vaccination, with a preliminary application to Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E; Cafiero, Elizabeth T; O'Brien, Jennifer C

    2013-04-01

    The incidence of dengue has been on the rise since at least the 1960s, bringing greater urgency to the need for a vaccine to prevent the disease. Recent advances suggest that the scientific world is moving closer to an effective dengue vaccine. However, there are concerns that the price of a future vaccine could limit its uptake. High prices, in addition to other challenges, have already weighed negatively in government decisions to include other new vaccines in national immunization programs, e.g., the pneumococcal, rotavirus, and human papillomavirus vaccines. Recent research on the value of vaccination, however, suggests that vaccination confers benefits that are often neglected by traditional economic evaluations. In the case of dengue, commonly overlooked benefits are likely to include reduced spending on outbreak control, averted losses in tourism flows, and avoided productivity losses due to long-term dengue sequelae. Accounting for these and other broader benefits of dengue vaccination could reveal significantly greater economic value and strengthen the case for inclusion of dengue vaccination in national immunization programs. In this article we discuss a framework for the broader value of vaccination and review its application in the context of dengue vaccination for Brazil. PMID:23886895

  6. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed. PMID:26458801

  7. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  8. Guiding dengue vaccine development using knowledge gained from the success of the yellow fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huabin; Lee, Min; Jin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise approximately 70 closely related RNA viruses. These include several mosquito-borne pathogens, such as yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which can cause significant human diseases and thus are of great medical importance. Vaccines against both YFV and JEV have been used successfully in humans for decades; however, the development of a DENV vaccine has encountered considerable obstacles. Here, we review the protective immune responses elicited by the vaccine against YFV to provide some insights into the development of a protective DENV vaccine.

  9. Mouse models of dengue virus infection for vaccine testing.

    PubMed

    Sarathy, Vanessa V; Milligan, Gregg N; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. With an annual global burden of approximately 390 million infections occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide, an effective vaccine to combat dengue is urgently needed. Historically, a major impediment to dengue research has been development of a suitable small animal infection model that mimics the features of human illness in the absence of neurologic disease that was the hallmark of earlier mouse models. Recent advances in immunocompromised murine infection models have resulted in development of lethal DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 models in AG129 mice that are deficient in both the interferon-α/β receptor (IFN-α/β R) and the interferon-γ receptor (IFN-γR). These models mimic many hallmark features of dengue disease in humans, such as viremia, thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and cytokine storm. Importantly AG129 mice develop lethal, acute, disseminated infection with systemic viral loads, which is characteristic of typical dengue illness. Infected AG129 mice generate an antibody response to DENV, and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) models have been established by both passive and maternal transfer of DENV-immune sera. Several steps have been taken to refine DENV mouse models. Viruses generated by peripheral in vivo passages incur substitutions that provide a virulent phenotype using smaller inocula. Because IFN signaling has a major role in immunity to DENV, mice that generate a cellular immune response are desired, but striking the balance between susceptibility to DENV and intact immunity is complicated. Great strides have been made using single-deficient IFN-α/βR mice for DENV-2 infection, and conditional knockdowns may offer additional approaches to provide a panoramic view that includes viral virulence and host immunity. Ultimately, the DENV AG129 mouse models result in reproducible lethality and offer multiple

  10. Mouse models of dengue virus infection for vaccine testing.

    PubMed

    Sarathy, Vanessa V; Milligan, Gregg N; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. With an annual global burden of approximately 390 million infections occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide, an effective vaccine to combat dengue is urgently needed. Historically, a major impediment to dengue research has been development of a suitable small animal infection model that mimics the features of human illness in the absence of neurologic disease that was the hallmark of earlier mouse models. Recent advances in immunocompromised murine infection models have resulted in development of lethal DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 models in AG129 mice that are deficient in both the interferon-α/β receptor (IFN-α/β R) and the interferon-γ receptor (IFN-γR). These models mimic many hallmark features of dengue disease in humans, such as viremia, thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and cytokine storm. Importantly AG129 mice develop lethal, acute, disseminated infection with systemic viral loads, which is characteristic of typical dengue illness. Infected AG129 mice generate an antibody response to DENV, and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) models have been established by both passive and maternal transfer of DENV-immune sera. Several steps have been taken to refine DENV mouse models. Viruses generated by peripheral in vivo passages incur substitutions that provide a virulent phenotype using smaller inocula. Because IFN signaling has a major role in immunity to DENV, mice that generate a cellular immune response are desired, but striking the balance between susceptibility to DENV and intact immunity is complicated. Great strides have been made using single-deficient IFN-α/βR mice for DENV-2 infection, and conditional knockdowns may offer additional approaches to provide a panoramic view that includes viral virulence and host immunity. Ultimately, the DENV AG129 mouse models result in reproducible lethality and offer multiple

  11. Immunologic interference from sequential administration of live attenuated alphavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    McClain, D J; Pittman, P R; Ramsburg, H H; Nelson, G O; Rossi, C A; Mangiafico, J A; Schmaljohn, A L; Malinoski, F J

    1998-03-01

    Two different human vaccine trials examined interference arising from sequential administration of vaccines against heterologous alphaviruses. The first trial indicated that persons previously vaccinated against Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) exhibited poor neutralizing antibody responses to a live attenuated chikungunya virus (CHIKV) vaccine (46% response rate). The second trial prospectively examined neutralizing antibody responses to live attenuated VEEV vaccine in persons previously inoculated with either CHIKV vaccine or placebo. Following seroconversion to CHIKV, CHIKV vaccine recipients' geometric mean titers (GMTs) to VEEV by 80% plaque-reduction neutralization titration never exceeded 10, compared with a peak GMT of 95 after VEEV vaccination for alphavirus-naive volunteers who initially received placebo (P < .003). ELISA antibody responses demonstrated cross-reactive IgG to VEEV after primary CHIKV immunization and then an anamnestic response upon subsequent VEEV vaccination. These data indicate that preexisting alphavirus immunity in humans interferes with subsequent neutralizing antibody response to a live attenuated, heterologous vaccine.

  12. Update on dengue: epidemiology, virus evolution, antiviral drugs, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Gubler, Duane J

    2010-05-01

    Dengue virus is the most widespread geographically of the arboviruses and a major public health threat in the tropics and subtropics. Scientific advances in recent years have provided new insights about the pathogenesis of more severe disease and novel approaches into the development of antiviral compounds and dengue vaccines. Phylogenetic studies show an association between specific subtypes (within serotypes) and severity of dengue. The lack of association between maternal antibodies and development of severe dengue in infants in a recent study has called for the rethinking or refinement of the current antibody-dependent enhancement theory of dengue hemorrhagic syndrome in infancy. Such studies should stimulate new directions of research into mechanisms responsible for the development of severe dengue. The life cycle of dengue virus readily shows that virus entry and replication can be targeted by small molecules. Advances in a mouse model (AG 129 mice) have made it easier to test such antiviral compounds. The efforts to find specific dengue inhibitors are intensifying and the tools to evaluate the efficacy of new drugs are now in place for rapid translation into trials in humans. Furthermore, several dengue vaccine candidates are in development, of which the chimeric dengue/yellow fever vaccine has now entered phase 3 trials. Until the availability of a licensed vaccine, disease surveillance and vector population control remain the mainstay of dengue prevention. PMID:21308524

  13. Update on dengue: epidemiology, virus evolution, antiviral drugs, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Gubler, Duane J

    2010-05-01

    Dengue virus is the most widespread geographically of the arboviruses and a major public health threat in the tropics and subtropics. Scientific advances in recent years have provided new insights about the pathogenesis of more severe disease and novel approaches into the development of antiviral compounds and dengue vaccines. Phylogenetic studies show an association between specific subtypes (within serotypes) and severity of dengue. The lack of association between maternal antibodies and development of severe dengue in infants in a recent study has called for the rethinking or refinement of the current antibody-dependent enhancement theory of dengue hemorrhagic syndrome in infancy. Such studies should stimulate new directions of research into mechanisms responsible for the development of severe dengue. The life cycle of dengue virus readily shows that virus entry and replication can be targeted by small molecules. Advances in a mouse model (AG 129 mice) have made it easier to test such antiviral compounds. The efforts to find specific dengue inhibitors are intensifying and the tools to evaluate the efficacy of new drugs are now in place for rapid translation into trials in humans. Furthermore, several dengue vaccine candidates are in development, of which the chimeric dengue/yellow fever vaccine has now entered phase 3 trials. Until the availability of a licensed vaccine, disease surveillance and vector population control remain the mainstay of dengue prevention.

  14. Preparing for dengue vaccine introduction in ASEAN countries: recommendations from the first ADVA regional workshop.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Capeding, Maria R; Goh, Daniel Yam Thiam; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Ismail, Zulkifli; Tantawichien, Terapong; Yoksan, Sutee; Pang, Tikki

    2014-05-01

    The independent, scientific and educational The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) Member States Dengue Vaccination Advocacy Steering Committee (ADVASC) was established in 2011 to address the practical challenges faced by ASEAN countries as they prepare for the eventual introduction of a dengue vaccine. ADVASC convened a workshop in September 2012 that drew together public health representatives and dengue experts from seven ASEAN countries in order to make practical recommendations to improve current surveillance and diagnostics for dengue to enable countries to assess consistently, and accurately communicate, the impact of a dengue vaccine. The workshop compared surveillance and diagnostic capacity in these ASEAN countries and made recommendations to streamline and harmonize key elements of these systems. In particular, attendees recommended the need for reconciliation and harmonization of the different World Health Organization guidelines, in use in ASEAN countries for case definition and surveillance of dengue.

  15. Models of the impact of dengue vaccines: a review of current research and potential approaches.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Michael A; Hombach, Joachim; Cummings, Derek A T

    2011-08-11

    Vaccination reduces transmission of pathogens directly, by preventing individual infections, and indirectly, by reducing the probability of contact between infected individuals and susceptible ones. The potential combined impact of future dengue vaccines can be estimated using mathematical models of transmission. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the structure of models that accurately represent dengue transmission dynamics. Here, we review models that could be used to assess the impact of future dengue immunization programmes. We also review approaches that have been used to validate and parameterize models. A key parameter of all approaches is the basic reproduction number, R(0), which can be used to determine the critical vaccination fraction to eliminate transmission. We review several methods that have been used to estimate this quantity. Finally, we discuss the characteristics of dengue vaccines that must be estimated to accurately assess their potential impact on dengue virus transmission. PMID:21699949

  16. New vaccines for neglected parasitic diseases and dengue.

    PubMed

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-09-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a significant source of morbidity and socioeconomic burden among the world's poor. Virtually all of the 2.4 billion people who live on less than $2 per d, more than a third of the world's population, are at risk for these debilitating NTDs. Although chemotherapeutic measures exist for many of these pathogens, they are not sustainable countermeasures on their own because of rates of reinfection, risk of drug resistance, and inconsistent maintenance of drug treatment programs. Preventative and therapeutic NTD vaccines are needed as long-term solutions. Because there is no market in the for-profit sector of vaccine development for these pathogens, much of the effort to develop vaccines is driven by nonprofit entities, mostly through product development partnerships. This review describes the progress of vaccines under development for many of the NTDs, with a specific focus on those about to enter or that are currently in human clinical trials. Specifically, we report on the progress on dengue, hookworm, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease, and onchocerciasis vaccines. These products will be some of the first with specific objectives to aid the world's poorest populations. PMID:23578479

  17. Efficacy of a Tetravalent Chimeric Dengue Vaccine (DENVax) in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Brewoo, Joseph N.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Arguello, John; Moldovan, Ioana R.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Powell, Tim D.; Livengood, Jill A.; Kinney, Richard M.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2011-01-01

    Three tetravalent formulations of chimeric dengue (DENVax) viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of serotypes 1–4 expressed by the attenuated DENV-2 PDK-53 genome were tested for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Subcutaneous injection of the DENVax formulations was well-tolerated. Low levels of viremia of only one of the four vaccine viruses were detected yet virus neutralizing antibody titers were induced against all four dengue virus serotypes after one or two administrations of vaccine. All animals immunized with the high-dose formulation were protected from viremia, and all immunized animals were completely protected from DENV-3 and DENV-4 challenge. A lower dose of DENVax formulation partially protected animals from DENV-1 or DENV-2 challenge. In contrast, all control animals developed high levels of viremia for multiple days after challenge with DENV 1–4. This study highlights the immunogenicity and efficacy of the tetravalent DENVax formulations in nonhuman primates. PMID:21633037

  18. The relevance of dengue virus genotypes surveillance at country level before vaccine approval

    PubMed Central

    Usme-Ciro, José A; Méndez, Jairo A; Laiton, Katherine D; Páez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major threat for public health in tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In the absence of a licensed vaccine and effective antiviral therapies, control measures have been based on education activities and vector elimination. Current efforts for developing a vaccine are both promising and troubling. At the advent of the introduction of a tetravalent dengue vaccine, molecular surveillance of the circulating genotypes in different geographical regions has gained considerable importance. A growing body of in vitro, preclinical, and clinical phase studies suggest that vaccine conferred protection in a geographical area could depends on the coincidence of the dengue virus genotypes included in the vaccine and those circulating. In this review we present the state-of-the-art in this field, highlighting the need of deeper knowledge on neutralizing immune response for making decisions about future vaccine approval and the potential need for different vaccine composition for regional administration. PMID:25483495

  19. The relevance of dengue virus genotypes surveillance at country level before vaccine approval.

    PubMed

    Usme-Ciro, José A; Méndez, Jairo A; Laiton, Katherine D; Páez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major threat for public health in tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In the absence of a licensed vaccine and effective antiviral therapies, control measures have been based on education activities and vector elimination. Current efforts for developing a vaccine are both promising and troubling. At the advent of the introduction of a tetravalent dengue vaccine, molecular surveillance of the circulating genotypes in different geographical regions has gained considerable importance. A growing body of in vitro, preclinical, and clinical phase studies suggest that vaccine conferred protection in a geographical area could depends on the coincidence of the dengue virus genotypes included in the vaccine and those circulating. In this review we present the state-of-the-art in this field, highlighting the need of deeper knowledge on neutralizing immune response for making decisions about future vaccine approval and the potential need for different vaccine composition for regional administration.

  20. The relevance of dengue virus genotypes surveillance at country level before vaccine approval.

    PubMed

    Usme-Ciro, José A; Méndez, Jairo A; Laiton, Katherine D; Páez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a major threat for public health in tropical and subtropical countries around the world. In the absence of a licensed vaccine and effective antiviral therapies, control measures have been based on education activities and vector elimination. Current efforts for developing a vaccine are both promising and troubling. At the advent of the introduction of a tetravalent dengue vaccine, molecular surveillance of the circulating genotypes in different geographical regions has gained considerable importance. A growing body of in vitro, preclinical, and clinical phase studies suggest that vaccine conferred protection in a geographical area could depends on the coincidence of the dengue virus genotypes included in the vaccine and those circulating. In this review we present the state-of-the-art in this field, highlighting the need of deeper knowledge on neutralizing immune response for making decisions about future vaccine approval and the potential need for different vaccine composition for regional administration. PMID:25483495

  1. Economic Impact of Dengue Illness and the Cost-Effectiveness of Future Vaccination Programs in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Luis R.; Lee, Linda K.; Lee, Vernon J.; Ooi, Eng Eong; Shepard, Donald S.; Thein, Tun L.; Gan, Victor; Cook, Alex R.; Lye, David; Ng, Lee Ching; Leo, Yee Sin

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue illness causes 50–100 million infections worldwide and threatens 2.5 billion people in the tropical and subtropical regions. Little is known about the disease burden and economic impact of dengue in higher resourced countries or the cost-effectiveness of potential dengue vaccines in such settings. Methods and Findings We estimate the direct and indirect costs of dengue from hospitalized and ambulatory cases in Singapore. We consider inter alia the impacts of dengue on the economy using the human-capital and the friction cost methods. Disease burden was estimated using disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and the cost-effectiveness of a potential vaccine program was evaluated. The average economic impact of dengue illness in Singapore from 2000 to 2009 in constant 2010 US$ ranged between $0.85 billion and $1.15 billion, of which control costs constitute 42%–59%. Using empirically derived disability weights, we estimated an annual average disease burden of 9–14 DALYs per 100 000 habitants, making it comparable to diseases such as hepatitis B or syphilis. The proportion of symptomatic dengue cases detected by the national surveillance system was estimated to be low, and to decrease with age. Under population projections by the United Nations, the price per dose threshold for which vaccines stop being more cost-effective than the current vector control program ranged from $50 for mass vaccination requiring 3 doses and only conferring 10 years of immunity to $300 for vaccination requiring 2 doses and conferring lifetime immunity. The thresholds for these vaccine programs to not be cost-effective for Singapore were $100 and $500 per dose respectively. Conclusions Dengue illness presents a serious economic and disease burden in Singapore. Dengue vaccines are expected to be cost-effective if reasonably low prices are adopted and will help to reduce the economic and disease burden of dengue in Singapore substantially. PMID:22206028

  2. Cytokine Profile of Children Hospitalized with Virologically-Confirmed Dengue during Two Phase III Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Harenberg, Anke; de Montfort, Aymeric; Jantet-Blaudez, Frédérique; Bonaparte, Matthew; Boudet, Florence; Saville, Melanie; Jackson, Nicholas; Guy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Two large-scale efficacy studies with the recombinant yellow fever-17D–dengue virus, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) candidate undertaken in Asia (NCT01373281) and Latin America (NCT01374516) demonstrated significant protection against dengue disease during two years’ active surveillance (active phase). Long-term follow up of participants for breakthrough disease leading to hospitalization is currently ongoing (hospital phase). Methodology/Principal findings We assessed the cytokine profile in acute sera from selected participants hospitalized (including during the active phase) up to the beginning of the second year of long-term follow up for both studies. The serum concentrations of 38 cytokines were measured in duplicate using the Milliplex Human Cytokine MAGNETIC BEAD Premixed 38 Plex commercial kit (Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA). Partial least squares discriminant analyses did not reveal any difference in the overall cytokine profile of CYD-TDV and placebo recipients hospitalized for breakthrough dengue regardless of stratification used. In addition, there was no difference in the cytokine profile for breakthrough dengue among those aged <9 years versus those aged ≥ 9 years. Conclusions/Significance These exploratory findings show that CYD-TDV does not induce a particular immune profile versus placebo, corroborating the clinical profile observed. PMID:27459266

  3. Chemical Mutagenesis of Dengue Virus Type 4 Yields Mutant Viruses Which Are Temperature Sensitive in Vero Cells or Human Liver Cells and Attenuated in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, Joseph E.; Johnson, Daniel H.; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T.; Murphy, Brian R.; Whitehead, Stephen S.

    2001-01-01

    A recombinant live attenuated dengue virus type 4 (DEN4) vaccine candidate, 2AΔ30, was found previously to be generally well tolerated in humans, but a rash and an elevation of liver enzymes in the serum occurred in some vaccinees. 2AΔ30, a non-temperature-sensitive (non-ts) virus, contains a 30-nucleotide deletion (Δ30) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the viral genome. In the present study, chemical mutagenesis of DEN4 was utilized to generate attenuating mutations which may be useful in further attenuation of the 2AΔ30 candidate vaccine. Wild-type DEN4 2A virus was grown in Vero cells in the presence of 5-fluorouracil, and a panel of 1,248 clones were isolated. Twenty ts mutant viruses were identified that were ts in both simian Vero and human liver HuH-7 cells (n = 13) or only in HuH-7 cells (n = 7). Each of the 20 ts mutant viruses possessed an attenuation phenotype, as indicated by restricted replication in the brains of 7-day-old mice. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 20 ts mutant viruses identified nucleotide substitutions in structural and nonstructural genes as well as in the 5′ and 3′ UTRs, with more than one change occurring, in general, per mutant virus. A ts mutation in the NS3 protein (nucleotide position 4995) was introduced into a recombinant DEN4 virus possessing the Δ30 deletion, thereby creating rDEN4Δ30-4995, a recombinant virus which is ts and more attenuated than rDEN4Δ30 virus in the brains of mice. We are assembling a menu of attenuating mutations that should be useful in generating satisfactorily attenuated recombinant dengue vaccine viruses and in increasing our understanding of the pathogenesis of dengue virus. PMID:11559806

  4. Attenuated Vesicular Stomatitis Viruses as Vaccine Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Anjeanette; Buonocore, Linda; Price, Ryan; Forman, John; Rose, John K.

    1999-01-01

    We showed previously that a single intranasal vaccination of mice with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing an influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein provided complete protection from lethal challenge with influenza virus (A. Roberts, E. Kretzschmar, A. S. Perkins, J. Forman, R. Price, L. Buonocore, Y. Kawaoka, and J. K. Rose, J. Virol. 72:4704–4711, 1998). Because some pathogenesis was associated with the vector itself, in the present study we generated new VSV vectors expressing HA which are completely attenuated for pathogenesis in the mouse model. The first vector has a truncation of the cytoplasmic domain of the VSV G protein and expresses influenza virus HA (CT1-HA). This nonpathogenic vector provides complete protection from lethal influenza virus challenge after intranasal administration. A second vector with VSV G deleted and expressing HA (ΔG-HA) is also protective and nonpathogenic and has the advantage of not inducing neutralizing antibodies to the vector itself. PMID:10196265

  5. Attenuated Measles Virus as a Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Armando; Wang, ZiLi; Liniger, Matthias; Hangartner, Lars; Caballero, Michael; Pavlovic, Jovan; Wild, Peter; Viret, Jean Francois; Glueck, Reinhard; Billeter, Martin A.; Naim, Hussein Y.

    2013-01-01

    Live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have an impressive record of safety, efficacy and ability to induce life-long immunity against measles infection. Using reverse genetics technology, such negative-strand RNA viruses can now be rescued from cloned DNA. This technology allows the insertion of exogenous genes encoding foreign antigens into the MV genome in such a way that they can be expressed by the MV vaccine strain, without affecting virus structure, propagation and cell targeting. Recombinant viruses rescued from cloned cDNA induce immune responses against both measles virus and the cloned antigens. The tolerability of MV to gene(s) insertion makes it an attractive flexible vector system, especially if broad immune responses are required. The fact that measles replication strictly occurs in the cytoplasm of infected cells without DNA intermediate has important biosafety implications and adds to the attractiveness of MV as a vector. In this article we report the characteristics of reporter gene expression (GFP, LacZ and CAT) and the biochemical, biophysical and immunological properties of recombinant MV expressing heterologous antigens of simian immunogeficiency virus (SIV). PMID:17303293

  6. Dengue vaccines: what we know, what has been done, but what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Abrão, Emiliana Pereira; Espósito, Danillo Lucas Alves; Lauretti, Flávio; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Dengue, a disease caused by any of the four serotypes of dengue viruses, is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease in the world in terms of both morbidity and mortality. The infection by these viruses induces a plethora of clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic infections to severe diseases with involvement of several organs. Severe forms of the disease are more frequent in secondary infections by distinct serotypes and, consequently, a dengue vaccine must be tetravalent. Although several approaches have been used on the vaccine development, no vaccine is available against these viruses, especially because of problems on the development of a tetravalent vaccine. Here, we describe briefly the vaccine candidates available and their ability to elicit a protective immune response. We also discuss the problems and possibilities of any of the vaccines in final development stage reaching the market for human use.

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of recombinant tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in individuals aged 2-45 y: Phase II randomized controlled trial in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Leo, Yee Sin; Wilder-Smith, Anneliese; Archuleta, Sophia; Shek, Lynette P; Chong, Chia-Yin; Leong, Hoe Nam; Low, Chian Yong; Oh, May-Lin Helen; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Wartel, T Anh; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-01

    This was a multicenter, blinded, Phase II study (NCT00880893) conducted in Singapore. The primary objectives were to evaluate the safety of a tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) comprising four recombinant, live, attenuated viruses (CYD-TDV) and the dengue virus serotype-specific antibody responses before and 28 d after each vaccination. Participants were randomized 3:1 to receive three doses of CYD-TDV or a control vaccine at 0, 6 and 12 mo. Control vaccine was placebo for the first dose (all ages) and for subsequent doses, licensed hepatitis-A for children (aged 2-11 y) or influenza vaccine for adolescents (12-17 y) and adults (18-45 y). Between April and October 2009, 317 children, 187 adolescents and 696 adults were enrolled. In all age groups, reactogenicity was higher after the first injection of CYD-TDV than after placebo control. Reactogenicity after subsequent CYD-TDV doses was no higher than after the first dose, and tended to be lower or similar to that seen after active control vaccination. Seropositivity rates and geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers (GMTs; 1/dil) against all four dengue virus serotypes increased in all age groups after each of the three CYD-TDV doses. Post-dose 3, 66.5% of all participants were seropositive to all four serotypes, and 87.2% were seropositive to ≥ 3 serotypes; GMTs for all participants ranged from 43.0 against dengue virus serotype 1 to 100 against dengue virus serotype 4. GMTs were higher in children than in adolescents. These results support the continued development of CYD-TDV for the prevention of dengue disease.

  8. Utility, Limitations, and Future of Non-Human Primates for Dengue Research and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Sariol, Carlos A.; White, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is considered the most important emerging, human arboviruses, with worldwide distribution in the tropics. Unfortunately, there are no licensed dengue vaccines available or specific anti-viral drugs. The development of a dengue vaccine faces unique challenges. The four serotypes co-circulate in endemic areas, and pre-existing immunity to one serotype does not protect against infection with other serotypes, and actually may enhance severity of disease. One foremost constraint to test the efficacy of a dengue vaccine is the lack of an animal model that adequately recapitulates the clinical manifestations of a dengue infection in humans. In spite of this limitation, non-human primates (NHP) are considered the best available animal model to evaluate dengue vaccine candidates due to their genetic relatedness to humans and their ability to develop a viremia upon infection and a robust immune response similar to that in humans. Therefore, most dengue vaccines candidates are tested in primates before going into clinical trials. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of published studies on dengue vaccine evaluations using the NHP model, and discuss critical parameters affecting the usefulness of the model. In the light of recent clinical data, we assess the ability of the NHP model to predict immunological parameters of vaccine performances in humans and discuss parameters that should be further examined as potential correlates of protection. Finally, we propose some guidelines toward a more standardized use of the model to maximize its usefulness and to better compare the performance of vaccine candidates from different research groups. PMID:25309540

  9. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  10. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  11. Nucleic acid (DNA) immunization as a platform for dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kevin R; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2015-12-10

    Since the early 1990s, DNA immunization has been used as a platform for developing a tetravalent dengue vaccine in response to the high priority need for protecting military personnel deployed to dengue endemic regions of the world. Several approaches have been explored ranging from naked DNA immunization to the use of live virus vectors to deliver the targeted genes for expression. Pre-clinical animal studies were largely successful in generating anti-dengue cellular and humoral immune responses that were protective either completely or partially against challenge with live dengue virus. However, Phase 1 clinical evaluation of a prototype monovalent dengue 1 DNA vaccine expressing prM and E genes revealed anti-dengue T cell IFNγ responses, but poor neutralizing antibody responses. These less than optimal results are thought to be due to poor uptake and expression of the DNA vaccine plasmids. Because DNA immunization as a vaccine platform has the advantages of ease of manufacture, flexible genetic manipulation and enhanced stability, efforts continue to improve the immunogenicity of these vaccines using a variety of methods. PMID:26458805

  12. Nucleic acid (DNA) immunization as a platform for dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kevin R; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2015-12-10

    Since the early 1990s, DNA immunization has been used as a platform for developing a tetravalent dengue vaccine in response to the high priority need for protecting military personnel deployed to dengue endemic regions of the world. Several approaches have been explored ranging from naked DNA immunization to the use of live virus vectors to deliver the targeted genes for expression. Pre-clinical animal studies were largely successful in generating anti-dengue cellular and humoral immune responses that were protective either completely or partially against challenge with live dengue virus. However, Phase 1 clinical evaluation of a prototype monovalent dengue 1 DNA vaccine expressing prM and E genes revealed anti-dengue T cell IFNγ responses, but poor neutralizing antibody responses. These less than optimal results are thought to be due to poor uptake and expression of the DNA vaccine plasmids. Because DNA immunization as a vaccine platform has the advantages of ease of manufacture, flexible genetic manipulation and enhanced stability, efforts continue to improve the immunogenicity of these vaccines using a variety of methods.

  13. Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Reduces Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Dengue Virus Infections in Healthy Children and Adolescents Aged 2–16 Years in Asia and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Botello, Gustavo; Coudeville, Laurent; Fanouillere, Karen; Guy, Bruno; Chambonneau, Laurent; Noriega, Fernando; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Asymptomatic dengue virus–infected individuals are thought to play a major role in dengue virus transmission. The efficacy of the recently approved quadrivalent CYD-TDV dengue vaccine against asymptomatic dengue virus infection has not been previously assessed. Methods. We pooled data for 3 736 individuals who received either CYD-TDV or placebo at 0, 6, and 12 months in the immunogenicity subsets of 2 phase 3 trials (clinical trials registration NCT01373281 and NCT01374516). We defined a seroconversion algorithm (ie, a ≥4-fold increase in the neutralizing antibody titer and a titer of ≥40 from month 13 to month 25) as a surrogate marker of asymptomatic infection in the vaccine and placebo groups. Results. The algorithm detected seroconversion in 94% of individuals with a diagnosis of virologically confirmed dengue between months 13 and 25, validating its discriminatory power. Among those without virologically confirmed dengue (n = 3 669), 219 of 2 485 in the vaccine group and 157 of 1 184 in the placebo group seroconverted between months 13 and 25, giving a vaccine efficacy of 33.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.9%–46.1%) against asymptomatic infection. Vaccine efficacy was marginally higher in subjects aged 9–16 years (38.6%; 95% CI, 22.1%–51.5%). The annual incidence of asymptomatic dengue virus infection in this age group was 14.8%, which was 4.4 times higher than the incidence for symptomatic dengue (3.4%). Conclusions. The observed vaccine efficacy against asymptomatic dengue virus infections is expected to translate into reduced dengue virus transmission if sufficient individuals are vaccinated in dengue-endemic areas. PMID:27418050

  14. Forecasting dengue vaccine demand in disease endemic and non-endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Ole; Margolis, Harold S; Mahoney, Richard T

    2010-01-01

    Background A dengue vaccine in large-scale clinical trials could be licensed in several years. We estimated the potential vaccine demand for different introduction strategies in 54 dengue-endemic countries and for travelers from non-endemic countries to enable vaccine producers and public health agencies to better prepare for timely utilization of the vaccine. Results Under our assumptions, 2.4–3.5 billion dengue vaccine doses would be needed in the first five years after introduction with >75% delivered in the public sector. Among 20 potential ‘early-adopter’ countries, an estimated 0.9–1.4 billion doses would be needed for the same introduction approach. For the private sector, covering 10% of children and 30% of adults an estimated 443–664 million doses would be required. In non-endemic countries, travelers could use an estimated 59–89 million vaccine doses, although the present product profile would make it unlikely to be able to administer vaccine in a timely manner. Methods Calculations were based on 2015–2020 population projections for endemic countries in Asia and the Americas with populations >100,000. For dengue-endemic countries we assumed country-wide routine 12–23 month-old vaccination and catch-up vaccination among 2–14 year-old children employing a 2 or 3-dose schedule. Assumptions on expected vaccination coverage were based on country-specific public, private and travelers' sectors immunization performance. Conclusions Our results project an upper-limit estimate of vaccine demand, with actual demand depending on country priorities, cost and product profile. Given the potential for a dengue vaccine, policymakers in endemic and non-endemic countries should consider appropriate implementation strategies in advance of licensure. PMID:20930501

  15. Dengue serotype immune-interactions and their consequences for vaccine impact predictions.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, José; Recker, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Dengue is one of the most important and wide-spread viral infections affecting human populations. The last few decades have seen a dramatic increase in the global burden of dengue, with the virus now being endemic or near-endemic in over 100 countries world-wide. A recombinant tetravalent vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) has recently completed Phase III clinical efficacy trials in South East Asia and Latin America and has been licensed for use in several countries. The trial results showed moderate-to-high efficacies in protection against clinical symptoms and hospitalisation but with so far unknown effects on transmission and infections per se. Model-based predictions about the vaccine's short- or long-term impact on the burden of dengue are therefore subject to a considerable degree of uncertainty. Furthermore, different immune interactions between dengue's serotypes have frequently been evoked by modelling studies to underlie dengue's oscillatory dynamics in disease incidence and serotype prevalence. Here we show how model assumptions regarding immune interactions in the form of antibody-dependent enhancement, temporary cross-immunity and the number of infections required to develop full immunity can significantly affect the predicted outcome of a dengue vaccination campaign. Our results thus re-emphasise the important gap in our current knowledge concerning the effects of previous exposure on subsequent dengue infections and further suggest that intervention impact studies should be critically evaluated by their underlying assumptions about serotype immune-interactions. PMID:27663790

  16. Preclinical and clinical development of a dengue recombinant subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Manoff, Susan B; George, Sarah L; Bett, Andrew J; Yelmene, Michele L; Dhanasekaran, Govindarajan; Eggemeyer, Linda; Sausser, Michele L; Dubey, Sheri A; Casimiro, Danilo R; Clements, David E; Martyak, Timothy; Pai, Vidya; Parks, D Elliot; Coller, Beth-Ann G

    2015-12-10

    This review focuses on a dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidate based on a recombinant subunit approach which targets the DENV envelope glycoprotein (E). Truncated versions of E consisting of the N-terminal portion of E (DEN-80E) have been expressed recombinantly in the Drosophila S2 expression system and shown to have native-like conformation. Preclinical studies demonstrate that formulations containing tetravalent DEN-80E adjuvanted with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant induce high titer virus neutralizing antibodies and IFN-γ producing T cells in flavivirus-naïve non-human primates. The preclinical data further suggest that administration of such formulations on a 0, 1, 6 month schedule may result in higher maximum virus neutralizing antibody titers and better durability of those titers compared to administration on a 0, 1, 2 month schedule. In addition, the virus neutralizing antibody titers induced by adjuvanted tetravalent DEN-80E compare favorably to the titers induced by a tetravalent live virus comparator. Furthermore, DEN-80E was demonstrated to be able to boost virus neutralizing antibody titers in macaques that have had a prior DENV exposure. A monovalent version of the vaccine candidate, DEN1-80E, was formulated with Alhydrogel™ and studied in a proof-of-principle Phase I clinical trial by Hawaii Biotech, Inc. (NCT00936429). The clinical trial results demonstrate that both the 10 μg and 50 μg formulations of DEN1-80E with 1.25 mg of elemental aluminum were immunogenic when administered in a 3-injection series (0, 1, 2 months) to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. The vaccine formulations induced DENV-1 neutralizing antibodies in the majority of subjects, although the titers in most subjects were modest and waned over time. Both the 10 μg DEN1-80E and the 50 μg DEN1-80E formulations with Alhydrogel™ were generally well tolerated.

  17. [Analysis of the evidence on the efficacy and safety of CYD-TDV dengue vaccine and its potential licensing and implementation through Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Rodríguez-López, Mario Henry; García-García, Lourdes; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; López Gatell-Ramírez, Hugo; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Díaz-Ortega, José Luis; Ángeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Tonatiuh; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major global public health problem affecting Latin America and Mexico Prevention and control measures, focusing on epidemiological surveillance and vector control, have been partially effective and costly, thus, the development of a vaccine against dengue has created great expectations among health authorities and scientific communities worldwide. The CYD-TDV dengue vaccine produced by Sanofi-Pasteur is the only dengue vaccine evaluated in phase 3 controlled clinical trials. Notwithstanding the significant contribution to the development of a vaccine against dengue, the three phase 3 clinical studies of CYD-TDV and the meta-analysis of the long-term follow up of those studies, have provided evidence that this vaccine exhibited partial vaccine efficacy to protect against virologically confirmed dengue and lead to four considerations: a) adequate vaccine efficacy against dengue virus (DENV) infections 3 and 4, less vaccine efficacy against DENV 1 and no protection against infection by DENV 2; b) decreased vaccine efficacy in dengue seronegative individuals at the beginning of the vaccination; c) 83% and 90% protection against hospitalizations and severe forms of dengue, respectively, at 25 months follow-up; and d) increased hospitalization for dengue in the vaccinated group, in children under nine years of age at the time of vaccination, detected since the third year of follow-up. The benefit of the CYD-TDV vaccine can be summarized in the protection against infection by DENV 3 and 4, as well as protection for hospitalizations and severe cases in people over nine years, who have had previous dengue infection, working mainly as a booster. In this review we identified elements on efficacy and safety of this vaccine that must be taken into account in the licensing process and potential inclusion in the national vaccination program of Mexico. The available scientific evidence on the CYD-TDV vaccine shows merits, but also leads to relevant questions that

  18. [Analysis of the evidence on the efficacy and safety of CYD-TDV dengue vaccine and its potential licensing and implementation through Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Rodríguez-López, Mario Henry; García-García, Lourdes; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; López Gatell-Ramírez, Hugo; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Díaz-Ortega, José Luis; Ángeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Tonatiuh; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major global public health problem affecting Latin America and Mexico Prevention and control measures, focusing on epidemiological surveillance and vector control, have been partially effective and costly, thus, the development of a vaccine against dengue has created great expectations among health authorities and scientific communities worldwide. The CYD-TDV dengue vaccine produced by Sanofi-Pasteur is the only dengue vaccine evaluated in phase 3 controlled clinical trials. Notwithstanding the significant contribution to the development of a vaccine against dengue, the three phase 3 clinical studies of CYD-TDV and the meta-analysis of the long-term follow up of those studies, have provided evidence that this vaccine exhibited partial vaccine efficacy to protect against virologically confirmed dengue and lead to four considerations: a) adequate vaccine efficacy against dengue virus (DENV) infections 3 and 4, less vaccine efficacy against DENV 1 and no protection against infection by DENV 2; b) decreased vaccine efficacy in dengue seronegative individuals at the beginning of the vaccination; c) 83% and 90% protection against hospitalizations and severe forms of dengue, respectively, at 25 months follow-up; and d) increased hospitalization for dengue in the vaccinated group, in children under nine years of age at the time of vaccination, detected since the third year of follow-up. The benefit of the CYD-TDV vaccine can be summarized in the protection against infection by DENV 3 and 4, as well as protection for hospitalizations and severe cases in people over nine years, who have had previous dengue infection, working mainly as a booster. In this review we identified elements on efficacy and safety of this vaccine that must be taken into account in the licensing process and potential inclusion in the national vaccination program of Mexico. The available scientific evidence on the CYD-TDV vaccine shows merits, but also leads to relevant questions that

  19. Vaccine Development as a Means to Control Dengue Virus Pathogenesis: Do We Know Enough?

    PubMed

    Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted RNA virus responsible for 390 million infections each year and significant morbidity and mortality throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Efforts to develop a DENV vaccine span 70 years and include the work of luminaries of the virus vaccine field. Although vaccines have been used to reduce the global health burden of other flaviviruses, the unique requirement for a single vaccine to protect against four different groups of dengue viruses, and the link between secondary infections and DENV disease pathogenesis, has limited success to date. In this review, we discuss several promising DENV vaccine candidates in clinical trials and assess how recent advances in understanding of DENV biology and immunity may expedite efforts toward the development of safe and effective vaccines. PMID:26958727

  20. Projected Impact of Dengue Vaccination in Yucatán, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Chao, Dennis L.; Rojas, Diana Patricia; Recchia, Gabriel L.; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.; Longini, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccines will soon provide a new tool for reducing dengue disease, but the effectiveness of widespread vaccination campaigns has not yet been determined. We developed an agent-based dengue model representing movement of and transmission dynamics among people and mosquitoes in Yucatán, Mexico, and simulated various vaccine scenarios to evaluate effectiveness under those conditions. This model includes detailed spatial representation of the Yucatán population, including the location and movement of 1.8 million people between 375,000 households and 100,000 workplaces and schools. Where possible, we designed the model to use data sources with international coverage, to simplify re-parameterization for other regions. The simulation and analysis integrate 35 years of mild and severe case data (including dengue serotype when available), results of a seroprevalence survey, satellite imagery, and climatological, census, and economic data. To fit model parameters that are not directly informed by available data, such as disease reporting rates and dengue transmission parameters, we developed a parameter estimation toolkit called AbcSmc, which we have made publicly available. After fitting the simulation model to dengue case data, we forecasted transmission and assessed the relative effectiveness of several vaccination strategies over a 20 year period. Vaccine efficacy is based on phase III trial results for the Sanofi-Pasteur vaccine, Dengvaxia. We consider routine vaccination of 2, 9, or 16 year-olds, with and without a one-time catch-up campaign to age 30. Because the durability of Dengvaxia is not yet established, we consider hypothetical vaccines that confer either durable or waning immunity, and we evaluate the use of booster doses to counter waning. We find that plausible vaccination scenarios with a durable vaccine reduce annual dengue incidence by as much as 80% within five years. However, if vaccine efficacy wanes after administration, we find that there

  1. Projected Impact of Dengue Vaccination in Yucatán, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hladish, Thomas J; Pearson, Carl A B; Chao, Dennis L; Rojas, Diana Patricia; Recchia, Gabriel L; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Longini, Ira M

    2016-05-01

    Dengue vaccines will soon provide a new tool for reducing dengue disease, but the effectiveness of widespread vaccination campaigns has not yet been determined. We developed an agent-based dengue model representing movement of and transmission dynamics among people and mosquitoes in Yucatán, Mexico, and simulated various vaccine scenarios to evaluate effectiveness under those conditions. This model includes detailed spatial representation of the Yucatán population, including the location and movement of 1.8 million people between 375,000 households and 100,000 workplaces and schools. Where possible, we designed the model to use data sources with international coverage, to simplify re-parameterization for other regions. The simulation and analysis integrate 35 years of mild and severe case data (including dengue serotype when available), results of a seroprevalence survey, satellite imagery, and climatological, census, and economic data. To fit model parameters that are not directly informed by available data, such as disease reporting rates and dengue transmission parameters, we developed a parameter estimation toolkit called AbcSmc, which we have made publicly available. After fitting the simulation model to dengue case data, we forecasted transmission and assessed the relative effectiveness of several vaccination strategies over a 20 year period. Vaccine efficacy is based on phase III trial results for the Sanofi-Pasteur vaccine, Dengvaxia. We consider routine vaccination of 2, 9, or 16 year-olds, with and without a one-time catch-up campaign to age 30. Because the durability of Dengvaxia is not yet established, we consider hypothetical vaccines that confer either durable or waning immunity, and we evaluate the use of booster doses to counter waning. We find that plausible vaccination scenarios with a durable vaccine reduce annual dengue incidence by as much as 80% within five years. However, if vaccine efficacy wanes after administration, we find that there

  2. Internal ribosome entry site-based attenuation of a flavivirus candidate vaccine and evaluation of the effect of beta interferon coexpression on vaccine properties.

    PubMed

    Frese, Michael; Lee, Eva; Larena, Maximilian; Lim, Pek Siew; Rao, Sudha; Matthaei, Klaus I; Khromykh, Alexander; Ramshaw, Ian; Lobigs, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Infectious clone technologies allow the rational design of live attenuated viral vaccines with the possibility of vaccine-driven coexpression of immunomodulatory molecules for additional vaccine safety and efficacy. The latter could lead to novel strategies for vaccine protection against infectious diseases where traditional approaches have failed. Here we show for the flavivirus Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) that incorporation of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of Encephalomyocarditis virus between the capsid and prM genes strongly attenuated virulence and that the resulting bicistronic virus was both genetically stable and potently immunogenic. Furthermore, the novel bicistronic genome organization facilitated the generation of a recombinant virus carrying an beta interferon (IFN-β) gene. Given the importance of IFNs in limiting virus dissemination and in efficient induction of memory B and T cell antiviral immunity, we hypothesized that coexpression of the cytokine with the live vaccine might further increase virulence attenuation without loss of immunogenicity. We found that bicistronic mouse IFN-β coexpressing MVEV yielded high virus and IFN titers in cultured cells that do not respond to the coexpressed IFN. However, in IFN response-sufficient cell cultures and mice, the virus produced a self-limiting infection. Nevertheless, the attenuated virus triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses evidenced by the induced expression of Mx proteins (used as a sensitive biomarker for measuring the type I IFN response) and the generation of neutralizing antibodies, respectively. IMPORTANCE The family Flaviviridae includes a number of important human pathogens, such as Dengue virus, Yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and Hepatitis C virus. Flaviviruses infect large numbers of individuals on all continents. For example, as many as 100 million people are infected annually with Dengue virus, and 150 million people

  3. Acceptability of live attenuated influenza vaccine by vaccine providers in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Kiely, Marilou; Boulianne, Nicole; Landry, Monique

    2015-01-01

    A live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was offered during the 2012-13 influenza season in Quebec, Canada, to children aged between 2 and 17 years with chronic medical conditions. Despite the offer, uptake of the vaccine was low. We assessed the perceptions and opinions about seasonal influenza vaccination and LAIV use among vaccine providers who participated in the 2012-13 campaign. More than 70% of them thought that LAIV was safe and effective and more than 90% considered that the vaccine was well-received by parents and healthcare professionals. According to respondents, the most frequent concerns of parents about LAIV were linked to vaccine efficacy. LAIV is well-accepted by vaccine providers involved in influenza vaccination clinics, but more information about the vaccine and the recommendations for its use are needed to increase vaccine uptake.

  4. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  5. Will people change their vector-control practices in the presence of an imperfect dengue vaccine?

    PubMed

    Boccia, T M Q R; Burattini, M N; Coutinho, F A B; Massad, E

    2014-03-01

    Human behaviours, which are influenced by social, cultural, economic and political factors, can increase or decrease the risk of dengue infection, depending on the relationship with the insect vector. Because no vaccine is currently available, the spread of dengue can only be curtailed by controlling vector populations (Aedes aegypti and others) and by protecting individuals. This study tested the hypothesis that dengue-affected populations are likely to relax their vector-control habits if a potentially protective vaccine becomes available. The hypothesis was tested using two approaches: a mathematical model designed to describe dengue transmission and an empirical field test in which the local population of an endemic area was interviewed about their vector-control habits given the presence of a theoretical vaccine. The model demonstrated that depending on the level of vector-control reduction, there is a threshold in vaccine efficacy below which it is better not to introduce the vaccine. The interview showed that people who were informed that a very effective vaccine is available would reduce their vector-control habits significantly compared to a group that was informed that the vaccine is not very effective.

  6. Live attenuated varicella vaccine in children with leukemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; Larussa, P; Ferrara, A; Gelb, L

    1984-09-01

    One-hundred-ninety-one children with acute leukemia in remission for at least one year were immunized with 1 or more doses of live attenuated varicella vaccine. All were susceptible to varicella prior to vaccination. The only significant side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen especially in children with maintenance chemotherapy temporarily suspended for one week before and one week after vaccination. Children with rash were at some risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to varicella susceptibles with whom they had close contact.

  7. Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Based Attenuation of a Flavivirus Candidate Vaccine and Evaluation of the Effect of Beta Interferon Coexpression on Vaccine Properties

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Michael; Lee, Eva; Larena, Maximilian; Lim, Pek Siew; Rao, Sudha; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Khromykh, Alexander; Ramshaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infectious clone technologies allow the rational design of live attenuated viral vaccines with the possibility of vaccine-driven coexpression of immunomodulatory molecules for additional vaccine safety and efficacy. The latter could lead to novel strategies for vaccine protection against infectious diseases where traditional approaches have failed. Here we show for the flavivirus Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) that incorporation of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of Encephalomyocarditis virus between the capsid and prM genes strongly attenuated virulence and that the resulting bicistronic virus was both genetically stable and potently immunogenic. Furthermore, the novel bicistronic genome organization facilitated the generation of a recombinant virus carrying an beta interferon (IFN-β) gene. Given the importance of IFNs in limiting virus dissemination and in efficient induction of memory B and T cell antiviral immunity, we hypothesized that coexpression of the cytokine with the live vaccine might further increase virulence attenuation without loss of immunogenicity. We found that bicistronic mouse IFN-β coexpressing MVEV yielded high virus and IFN titers in cultured cells that do not respond to the coexpressed IFN. However, in IFN response-sufficient cell cultures and mice, the virus produced a self-limiting infection. Nevertheless, the attenuated virus triggered robust innate and adaptive immune responses evidenced by the induced expression of Mx proteins (used as a sensitive biomarker for measuring the type I IFN response) and the generation of neutralizing antibodies, respectively. IMPORTANCE Flaviviridae Dengue virus Yellow fever virus Japanese encephalitis virus West Nile virus Hepatitis C virus Dengue virus Hepatitis C virus PMID:24307589

  8. Principles underlying rational design of live attenuated influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yo Han

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent innovative advances in molecular virology and the developments of vaccines, influenza virus remains a serious burden for human health. Vaccination has been considered a primary countermeasure for prevention of influenza infection. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) are particularly attracting attention as an effective strategy due to several advantages over inactivated vaccines. Cold-adaptation, as a classical means for attenuating viral virulence, has been successfully used for generating safe and effective donor strains of LAIVs against seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Recently, the advent of reverse genetics technique expedited a variety of rational strategies to broaden the pool of LAIVs. Considering the breadth of antigenic diversity of influenza virus, the pool of LAIVs is likely to equip us with better options for controlling influenza pandemics. With a brief reflection on classical attenuating strategies used at the initial stage of development of LAIVs, especially on the principles underlying the development of cold-adapted LAIVs, we further discuss and outline other attenuation strategies especially with respect to the rationales for attenuation, and their practicality for mass production. Finally, we propose important considerations for a rational vaccine design, which will provide us with practical guidelines for improving the safety and effectiveness of LAIVs. PMID:23596576

  9. DENGUE PATIENTS AT PHOTHARAM HOSPITAL: A CLINICAL TRIAL SITE OF DENGUE VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Nunthanid, Somboon; Tiawilai, Anongrat

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2013, 1,868 dengue patients, 916 male and 952 female, were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Among these patients, there were 1,209 with dengue fever (DF), 598 with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 61 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with 1 death. The disease was seen all year round with a higher incidence in the rainy season. A trend of shift in age group towards older children and adults was seen during the study period. These data show that dengue patient admissions to Photharam Hospital are common, causing a heavy burden on the health system. Only one death was seen during the period of study, indicating that early recognition and effective management of dengue patients occurred. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients during the study period is a problem of concern and needs further clarification. PMID:26506727

  10. DENGUE PATIENTS AT PHOTHARAM HOSPITAL: A CLINICAL TRIAL SITE OF DENGUE VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Nunthanid, Somboon; Tiawilai, Anongrat

    2015-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2013, 1,868 dengue patients, 916 male and 952 female, were admitted to Photharam Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand. Among these patients, there were 1,209 with dengue fever (DF), 598 with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 61 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) with 1 death. The disease was seen all year round with a higher incidence in the rainy season. A trend of shift in age group towards older children and adults was seen during the study period. These data show that dengue patient admissions to Photharam Hospital are common, causing a heavy burden on the health system. Only one death was seen during the period of study, indicating that early recognition and effective management of dengue patients occurred. The trend towards higher age in dengue patients during the study period is a problem of concern and needs further clarification.

  11. Live attenuated varicella vaccine use in immunocompromised children and adults.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S P; Gelb, L

    1986-10-01

    Live attenuated varicella vaccine has been administered to 307 children with leukemia in remission and to 86 healthy adults. The vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic. The major side effect in leukemic children receiving maintenance chemotherapy was development of a vaccine-associated rash. Vaccinees in whom a rash developed were potentially somewhat infectious to others about 1 month after immunization. Vaccination was not associated with an increase in the incidence of herpes zoster or in relapse of leukemia. Vaccination provided excellent protection against severe varicella. It was associated with a significant decrease in the attack rate of chickenpox following an intimate exposure to varicella-zoster virus, conferring about 80% protection in leukemic children. The cases of breakthrough varicella that occurred were mild. Thus, the vaccine may either prevent or modify varicella in high-risk individuals. It may also have use for prevention of nosocomial varicella.

  12. Immunity to avian pneumovirus infection in turkeys following in ovo vaccination with an attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Karen J; Sargent, Barbara A; Davelaar, F G; Jones, R C

    2003-03-28

    Fertile turkey eggs after 24 days of incubation were vaccinated in ovo with a commercial live attenuated subtype A avian pneumovirus (APV) vaccine. Hatchability was not adversely affected. When a high dose (10 times maximum commercial dose) of vaccine was tested in maternal antibody negative (MA-) eggs, mild clinical signs developed in a small proportion of the poults for 1-4 days only. Post-vaccination antibody titres at 3 weeks of age were significantly higher than those seen when the same dose was administered by eyedrop or spray at day-old. A low dose (end of shelf-life titre) of vaccine given to MA- eggs did not cause disease and vaccinated poults were 100% protected against virulent APV challenge at 3 or 5 weeks of age. Post-vaccination antibody titres reached significant levels at 3 weeks of age, whereas those from MA- poults vaccinated by spray at day-old with a similar low dose did not. In a 'worst-case' scenario, maternal antibody positive (MA+) poults vaccinated in ovo with the low dose were still 77% protected against clinical disease, despite lack of seroconversion. The recommended commercial dose of vaccine given to MA- eggs in ovo induced 100% protection against virulent APV challenge for up to 14 weeks of age, even though post-vaccination antibody titres had dropped to insignificant levels at this age. In ovo vaccination with a mixture of the recommended commercial doses of live APV and Newcastle disease (ND) vaccines had no detrimental affect on the efficacy of the APV vaccine. This is the first report of the successful use of an APV vaccine being given in ovo. The results indicate that for turkeys, in ovo vaccination with a live attenuated APV vaccine is safe and effective against virulent challenge and comparable with vaccination by conventional methods.

  13. Transmission Dynamics of the Four Dengue Serotypes in Southern Vietnam and the Potential Impact of Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Coudeville, Laurent; Garnett, Geoff P.

    2012-01-01

    Background With approximately 2.5 billion people at risk, dengue is a major international public health concern. Dengue vaccines currently in development should help reduce the burden associated with this disease but the most efficient way of using future dengue vaccines remains to be defined. Mathematical models of transmission can provide insight into the expected impact of different vaccination strategies at a population level and contribute to this definition. Methods and Findings We developed and analyzed an age-structured, host-vector and serotype-specific compartmental model, including seasonality. We first used this transmission model to identify the immunological interactions between serotypes that affect the risks and consequences of secondary infections (cross-protection, increased susceptibility, increased severity, and increased infectiousness) and reproduce the observed epidemiology of dengue. For populating this model, we used routine surveillance data from Southern Vietnam and the results of a prospective cohort study conducted in the same area. The model provided a good fit to the observed data for age, severity of cases, serotype distribution, and dynamics over time, using two scenarios of immunological interaction : short term cross-protection alone (6–17 months) or a combination of short term cross-protection with cross-enhancement (increased susceptibility, severity and infectiousness in the case of secondary infections). Finally, we explored the potential impact of vaccination for these two scenarios. Both highlighted that vaccination can substantially decrease dengue burden by reducing the magnitude and frequency of outbreaks. Conclusion Our model suggests that seasonality and short term cross-protection are key factors for explaining dengue dynamics in Southern Vietnam. Vaccination was predicted to significantly reduce the disease burden, even in the situation where immunological cross-enhancement affects the risks and consequences of

  14. Immunogenicity of a novel tetravalent vaccine formulation with four recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Mei-Yu; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel platform to express high levels of recombinant lipoproteins with intrinsic adjuvant properties. Based on this technology, our group developed recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs as vaccine candidates against dengue virus. This work aims to evaluate the immune responses in mice to the tetravalent formulation. We demonstrate that 4 serotypes of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III induced both humoral and cellular immunity against all 4 serotypes of dengue virus on the mixture that formed the tetravalent formulation. Importantly, the immune responses induced by the tetravalent formulation in the absence of the exogenous adjuvant were functional in clearing the 4 serotypes of dengue virus in vivo. We affirm that the tetravalent formulation of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III is a potential vaccine candidate against dengue virus and suggest further detailed studies of this formulation in nonhuman primates. PMID:27470096

  15. Immunogenicity of a novel tetravalent vaccine formulation with four recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Mei-Yu; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel platform to express high levels of recombinant lipoproteins with intrinsic adjuvant properties. Based on this technology, our group developed recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs as vaccine candidates against dengue virus. This work aims to evaluate the immune responses in mice to the tetravalent formulation. We demonstrate that 4 serotypes of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III induced both humoral and cellular immunity against all 4 serotypes of dengue virus on the mixture that formed the tetravalent formulation. Importantly, the immune responses induced by the tetravalent formulation in the absence of the exogenous adjuvant were functional in clearing the 4 serotypes of dengue virus in vivo. We affirm that the tetravalent formulation of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III is a potential vaccine candidate against dengue virus and suggest further detailed studies of this formulation in nonhuman primates. PMID:27470096

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent dengue vaccine in healthy adults in India: A randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Anand Prakash; Agarkhedkar, Sharad; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Narayan, Arun; Ganguly, Satyabrata; Wartel, T Anh; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Menezes, Josemund

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that is endemic in India. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Indian adults. In this observer-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase II study, adults aged 18-45 years were randomized 2:1 to receive CYD-TDV or placebo at 0, 6 and 12 months in sub-cutaneous administration. Immunogenicity was assessed using a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) at baseline and 28 days after each study injection. 189 participants were enrolled (CYD-TDV [n = 128]; placebo, [n = 61]). At baseline, seropositivity rates for dengue serotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 ranged from 77.0% to 86.9%. Seropositivity rates for each serotype increased after each CYD-TDV injection with a more pronounced increase after the first injection. In the CYD-TDV group, geometric mean titres (GMTs) were 2.38 to 6.11-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline but remained similar to baseline in the placebo group. In the CYD-TDV group, the GMTs were 1.66 to 4.95-fold higher and 9.23 to 24.6-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline in those who were dengue seropositive and dengue seronegative, respectively. Pain was the most commonly reported solicited injection site reaction after the first injection in both the CYD-TDV (6.3%) and placebo groups (4.9%), but occurred less frequently after subsequent injections. No serious adverse events were vaccine-related, no immediate unsolicited adverse events, and no virologically-confirmed cases of dengue, were reported during the study. The immunogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV was satisfactory in both dengue seropositive and seronegative Indian adults. PMID:26291554

  17. Immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent dengue vaccine in healthy adults in India: A randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Anand Prakash; Agarkhedkar, Sharad; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Narayan, Arun; Ganguly, Satyabrata; Wartel, T Anh; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Menezes, Josemund

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that is endemic in India. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Indian adults. In this observer-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase II study, adults aged 18-45 years were randomized 2:1 to receive CYD-TDV or placebo at 0, 6 and 12 months in sub-cutaneous administration. Immunogenicity was assessed using a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) at baseline and 28 days after each study injection. 189 participants were enrolled (CYD-TDV [n = 128]; placebo, [n = 61]). At baseline, seropositivity rates for dengue serotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 ranged from 77.0% to 86.9%. Seropositivity rates for each serotype increased after each CYD-TDV injection with a more pronounced increase after the first injection. In the CYD-TDV group, geometric mean titres (GMTs) were 2.38 to 6.11-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline but remained similar to baseline in the placebo group. In the CYD-TDV group, the GMTs were 1.66 to 4.95-fold higher and 9.23 to 24.6-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline in those who were dengue seropositive and dengue seronegative, respectively. Pain was the most commonly reported solicited injection site reaction after the first injection in both the CYD-TDV (6.3%) and placebo groups (4.9%), but occurred less frequently after subsequent injections. No serious adverse events were vaccine-related, no immediate unsolicited adverse events, and no virologically-confirmed cases of dengue, were reported during the study. The immunogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV was satisfactory in both dengue seropositive and seronegative Indian adults.

  18. Immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent dengue vaccine in healthy adults in India: A randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Anand Prakash; Agarkhedkar, Sharad; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Narayan, Arun; Ganguly, Satyabrata; Wartel, T Anh; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Menezes, Josemund

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that is endemic in India. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Indian adults. In this observer-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase II study, adults aged 18–45 years were randomized 2:1 to receive CYD-TDV or placebo at 0, 6 and 12 months in sub-cutaneous administration. Immunogenicity was assessed using a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) at baseline and 28 days after each study injection. 189 participants were enrolled (CYD-TDV [n = 128]; placebo, [n = 61]). At baseline, seropositivity rates for dengue serotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 ranged from 77.0% to 86.9%. Seropositivity rates for each serotype increased after each CYD-TDV injection with a more pronounced increase after the first injection. In the CYD-TDV group, geometric mean titres (GMTs) were 2.38 to 6.11-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline but remained similar to baseline in the placebo group. In the CYD-TDV group, the GMTs were 1.66 to 4.95-fold higher and 9.23 to 24.6-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline in those who were dengue seropositive and dengue seronegative, respectively. Pain was the most commonly reported solicited injection site reaction after the first injection in both the CYD-TDV (6.3%) and placebo groups (4.9%), but occurred less frequently after subsequent injections. No serious adverse events were vaccine-related, no immediate unsolicited adverse events, and no virologically-confirmed cases of dengue, were reported during the study. The immunogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV was satisfactory in both dengue seropositive and seronegative Indian adults. PMID:26291554

  19. Novel vaccination approach for dengue infection based on recombinant immune complex universal platform.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Young; Reljic, Rajko; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Ceballos-Olvera, Ivonne; Yang, Moon-Sik; Reyes-del Valle, Jorge; Mason, Hugh S

    2015-04-01

    Dengue infection is on the rise in many endemic areas of the tropics. Vaccination remains the most realistic strategy for prevention of this potentially fatal viral disease but there is currently no effective vaccine that could protect against all four known serotypes of the dengue virus. This study describes the generation and testing of a novel vaccination approach against dengue based on recombinant immune complexes (RIC). We modelled the dengue RIC on the existing Ebola RIC (Phoolcharoen, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011;108(Dec (51)):20695) but with a key modification that allowed formation of a universal RIC platform that can be easily adapted for use for other pathogens. This was achieved by retaining only the binding epitope of the 6D8 ant-Ebola mAb, which was then fused to the consensus dengue E3 domain (cEDIII), resulting in a hybrid dengue-Ebola RIC (DERIC). We expressed human and mouse versions of these molecules in tobacco plants using a geminivirus-based expression system. Following purification from the plant extracts by protein G affinity chromatography, DERIC bound to C1q component of complement, thus confirming functionality. Importantly, following immunization of mice, DERIC induced a potent, virus-neutralizing anti-cEDIII humoral immune response without exogenous adjuvants. We conclude that these self-adjuvanting immunogens have the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for dengue infection, and provide the basis for a universal RIC platform for use with other antigens. PMID:25728317

  20. Investigations towards an efficacious and safe strangles vaccine: submucosal vaccination with a live attenuated Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, A A; Goovaerts, D; Nuijten, P J; Theelen, R P; Hartford, O M; Foster, T J

    2000-11-11

    As part of a search for a safe and efficacious strangles vaccine, several different vaccines and different vaccination routes were tested in foals. The degree of protection was evaluated after an intranasal challenge with virulent Streptococcus equi by clinical, postmortem and bacteriological examinations. Inactivated vaccines containing either native purified M-protein (500 microg per dose) or whole S equi cells (10(10) cells per dose) administered at least twice intramuscularly at intervals of four weeks, did not protect against challenge. Different live attenuated S equi mutants administered at least twice at intervals of four weeks by the intranasal route were either safe but not protective or caused strangles. In contrast, a live attenuated deletion mutant administered intramuscularly, induced complete protection but also induced unacceptable local reactions at the site of vaccination. Submucosal vaccination in the inner side of the upper lip with the live attenuated mutant at > or =10(8) colony-forming units per dose, appeared to be safe and efficacious in foals as young as four months of age. The submucosal vaccinations caused small transient swellings that resolved completely within two weeks, and postmortem no vaccine remnants or other abnormalities were found at the site of vaccination.

  1. Live attenuated hepatitis A vaccines developed in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Two live, attenuated hepatitis A vaccines, H 2 and LA-1 virus strains, were developed through serial passages of the viruses in cell cultures at 32 °C and 35 °C respectively. Both vaccines were safe and immunogenic, providing protection against clinical hepatitis A in 95% of the vaccinees, with a single dose by subcutaneous injection. The vaccine recipients were not protected from asymptomatic, subclinical hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, which induced a similar antibody response as for unvaccinated subjects. A second dose caused anamnestic response and can be used for boosting. Oral immunization of human with H 2 vaccine or of marmoset with LA-1 vaccine failed, and no evidence was found for person-to-person transmission of the H 2 strain or for marmoset-to-marmoset transmission of LA-1 strain, by close contact. H 2 strain was genetically stable when passaged in marmosets, humans or cell cultures at 37 °C; 3 consecutive passages of the virus in marmosets did not cause virulence mutation. The live vaccines offer the benefits of low cost, single dose injection, long- term protection, and increased duration of immunity through subclinical infection. Improved sanitation and administration of 150 million doses of the live vaccines to children had led to a 90% reduction in the annual national incidence rate of hepatitis A in China during the 16-year period, from 1991 to 2006. Hepatitis A immunization with both live and inactivated HA vaccines was implemented in the national routine childhood immunization program in 2008 and around 92% of the 16 million annual births received the affordable live, attenuated vaccines at 18 months of age. Near elimination of the disease was achieved in China for 14 years following introduction of the H 2 live vaccine into the Expanded Immunization Program (EPI) in 1992.

  2. An Adjuvanted, Tetravalent Dengue Virus Purified Inactivated Vaccine Candidate Induces Long-Lasting and Protective Antibody Responses Against Dengue Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G.; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L.; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  3. An adjuvanted, tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine candidate induces long-lasting and protective antibody responses against dengue challenge in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  4. Live Cell Analysis and Mathematical Modeling Identify Determinants of Attenuation of Dengue Virus 2'-O-Methylation Mutant.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Bianca; Rinas, Melanie; Ruggieri, Alessia; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Bartenschlager, Marie; Reuter, Antje; Fischl, Wolfgang; Harder, Nathalie; Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Flossdorf, Michael; Rohr, Karl; Höfer, Thomas; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-transmitted virus infecting ~390 million people worldwide. In spite of this high medical relevance, neither a vaccine nor antiviral therapy is currently available. DENV elicits a strong interferon (IFN) response in infected cells, but at the same time actively counteracts IFN production and signaling. Although the kinetics of activation of this innate antiviral defense and the timing of viral counteraction critically determine the magnitude of infection and thus disease, quantitative and kinetic analyses are lacking and it remains poorly understood how DENV spreads in IFN-competent cell systems. To dissect the dynamics of replication versus antiviral defense at the single cell level, we generated a fully viable reporter DENV and host cells with authentic reporters for IFN-stimulated antiviral genes. We find that IFN controls DENV infection in a kinetically determined manner that at the single cell level is highly heterogeneous and stochastic. Even at high-dose, IFN does not fully protect all cells in the culture and, therefore, viral spread occurs even in the face of antiviral protection of naïve cells by IFN. By contrast, a vaccine candidate DENV mutant, which lacks 2'-O-methylation of viral RNA is profoundly attenuated in IFN-competent cells. Through mathematical modeling of time-resolved data and validation experiments we show that the primary determinant for attenuation is the accelerated kinetics of IFN production. This rapid induction triggered by mutant DENV precedes establishment of IFN-resistance in infected cells, thus causing a massive reduction of virus production rate. In contrast, accelerated protection of naïve cells by paracrine IFN action has negligible impact. In conclusion, these results show that attenuation of the 2'-O-methylation DENV mutant is primarily determined by kinetics of autocrine IFN action on infected cells. PMID:26720415

  5. Live Cell Analysis and Mathematical Modeling Identify Determinants of Attenuation of Dengue Virus 2’-O-Methylation Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Alessia; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Bartenschlager, Marie; Reuter, Antje; Fischl, Wolfgang; Harder, Nathalie; Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Flossdorf, Michael; Rohr, Karl; Höfer, Thomas; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-transmitted virus infecting ~390 million people worldwide. In spite of this high medical relevance, neither a vaccine nor antiviral therapy is currently available. DENV elicits a strong interferon (IFN) response in infected cells, but at the same time actively counteracts IFN production and signaling. Although the kinetics of activation of this innate antiviral defense and the timing of viral counteraction critically determine the magnitude of infection and thus disease, quantitative and kinetic analyses are lacking and it remains poorly understood how DENV spreads in IFN-competent cell systems. To dissect the dynamics of replication versus antiviral defense at the single cell level, we generated a fully viable reporter DENV and host cells with authentic reporters for IFN-stimulated antiviral genes. We find that IFN controls DENV infection in a kinetically determined manner that at the single cell level is highly heterogeneous and stochastic. Even at high-dose, IFN does not fully protect all cells in the culture and, therefore, viral spread occurs even in the face of antiviral protection of naïve cells by IFN. By contrast, a vaccine candidate DENV mutant, which lacks 2’-O-methylation of viral RNA is profoundly attenuated in IFN-competent cells. Through mathematical modeling of time-resolved data and validation experiments we show that the primary determinant for attenuation is the accelerated kinetics of IFN production. This rapid induction triggered by mutant DENV precedes establishment of IFN-resistance in infected cells, thus causing a massive reduction of virus production rate. In contrast, accelerated protection of naïve cells by paracrine IFN action has negligible impact. In conclusion, these results show that attenuation of the 2’-O-methylation DENV mutant is primarily determined by kinetics of autocrine IFN action on infected cells. PMID:26720415

  6. Safety of a live attenuated Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine for swine.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eric J; Grinberg, Alex; Bonistalli, Kathryn N; Mack, Hamish J; Lehrbach, Philip R; Gibson, Nicole

    2009-03-30

    Infection with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae has a significant economic impact on pig production systems worldwide. Both inactivated and attenuated vaccines are available to prevent development of clinical signs of swine erysipelas. The ability of a live attenuated E. rhusiopathiae strain to become persistently established in pigs after intranasal exposure and its potential to cause clinical signs consistent with swine erysipelas after being administered directly into the nasopharynx of healthy pigs was evaluated. Five, E. rhusiopathiae-negative pigs were vaccinated by deep intranasal inoculation then followed for 14 days. Nasal swabs were collected daily for 5 days and clinical observations were made daily for 14 days post-vaccination. Nasal swabs were cultured for E. rhusiopathiae with the intent of back-passaging any recovered organisms into subsequent replicates. No organism was recovered from nasal swabs in the first vaccination replicate. A second replicate including 10 pigs was initiated and followed in an identical manner to that described above. Again, no E. rhusiopathiae was recovered from any pigs. No pigs in either replicate showed any signs of clinical swine erysipelas. The live attenuated E. rhusiopathiae strain evaluated in this study did not appear to become persistently established in pigs post-vaccination, did not cause any local or systemic signs consistent with swine erysipelas, and was therefore unlikely to revert to a virulent state when used in a field setting.

  7. Stability of further-attenuated measles vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mann, G F; Allison, L M; Lloyd, J S; Tam, P; Zuckerman, A J; Perkins, F T

    1983-01-01

    Accelerated stability tests on lyophilized measles vaccines show two distinct mechanisms of virus inactivation. A rapid initial loss of infectivity occurs only on exposure to temperatures above the ambient temperature. This loss is temperature related and may be attributable to the movement of residual moisture from the virus pellet into the void space of the vial. Subsequent inactivation of virus occurs at all temperatures as a first-order reaction that follows Arrhenius kinetics. Integration of values for these two components allows precise prediction of vaccine stability at any temperature. Analysis of the results obtained for greater than 30 vaccines shows that those which are stable for one week at 37 C have a predicted life of more than one year at 8 C. This simple test is now being applied to the identification of unstable products. The rate of this reaction is closely, if conservatively, matched by a time-temperature color indicator, which may be useful for monitoring vaccine quality. PMID:6879003

  8. Factors influencing the stability of live oral attenuated bacterial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cryz, S J; Pasteris, O; Varallyay, S J; Fürer, E

    1996-01-01

    Live oral attenuated vaccines against typhoid fever (Salmonella typhi Ty21a) and cholera (Vibrio cholerae CVD 103-HgR) have been licensed for human use. Vaccine potency is dependent upon each dose containing a minimum number of viable organisms and galenic parameters. To ensure long-term stability, such vaccines must be stored at 5 degrees C +/- 3 degrees C. However, exposure to ambient temperatures (25 degrees C) for short periods of time (< 7 days) does not compromise vaccine potency. Brief exposures (< or = 24 hours) to temperatures as high as 37 degrees C will also not render the vaccine unsuitable for use. The Ty21a vaccine is available either as enteric-coated capsules or as a "liquid formulation", while CVD 103-HgR is presented only in the latter form. Each galenic formulation presents unique challenges with regard to the production of stable vaccines. Residual moisture, excipients, and processing temperatures during manufacturing were all found to markedly affect vaccine stability.

  9. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections

    PubMed Central

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections. PMID:27114893

  10. Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue is an infection caused by a virus. You can get it if an infected mosquito bites you. Dengue does not spread from person to person. It ... the world. Outbreaks occur in the rainy season. Dengue is rare in the United States. Symptoms include ...

  11. Quadrivalent Ann Arbor strain live-attenuated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Toback, Seth L; Levin, Myron J; Block, Stan L; Belshe, Robert B; Ambrose, Christopher S; Falloon, Judith

    2012-11-01

    Influenza B is responsible for significant morbidity in children and adults worldwide. For more than 25 years, two antigenically distinct lineages of influenza B viruses, B/Yamagata and B/Victoria, have cocirculated globally. Current influenza vaccine formulations are trivalent and contain two influenza subtype A strains (A/H1N1 and A/H3N2) but only one B strain. In a half of recent influenza seasons, the predominant circulating influenza B lineage was different from that contained in trivalent influenza vaccines. A quadrivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine (Q/LAIV) that contains two B strains, one from each lineage, has been developed to help provide broad protection against influenza B. Q/LAIV was recently approved for use in the USA in eligible individuals 2-49 years of age. This review summarizes clinical trial data in support of Q/LAIV.

  12. Dengue Vaccines: A Perspective from the Point of View of Intellectual Property.

    PubMed

    da Veiga, Claudimar Pereira; da Veiga, Cássia Rita Pereira; Del Corso, Jansen Maia; da Silva, Wesley Vieira

    2015-08-12

    Dengue is a serious infectious disease and a growing public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. To control this neglected tropical disease (NTD), vaccines are likely to be the most cost-effective solution. This study analyzed dengue vaccines from both a historical and longitudinal perspective by using patent data, evaluating the geographic and time coverage of innovations, the primary patent holders, the network of cooperation and partnership for vaccine research and development (R & D), the flow of knowledge and the technological domain involved. This study can be seen as an example of the use of patent information to inform policy discussions, strategic research planning, and technology transfer. The results show that 93% of patents were granted since 2000, the majority belonging to the United States and Europe, although the share of patents from developing countries has increased. Unlike another NTDs, there is great participation of private companies in R & D of dengue vaccines and partnerships and collaboration between public and private companies. Finally, in this study, the main holders showed high knowledge absorption and generated capabilities. Therefore, this issue suggests that to overcome the difficulty of translational R & D it is necessary to stimulate the generation of knowledge and relevant scientific research, to enable the productive sector to have the capacity to absorb knowledge, to turn it into innovation, and to articulate partnerships and collaboration.

  13. Dengue Vaccines: A Perspective from the Point of View of Intellectual Property.

    PubMed

    da Veiga, Claudimar Pereira; da Veiga, Cássia Rita Pereira; Del Corso, Jansen Maia; da Silva, Wesley Vieira

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a serious infectious disease and a growing public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. To control this neglected tropical disease (NTD), vaccines are likely to be the most cost-effective solution. This study analyzed dengue vaccines from both a historical and longitudinal perspective by using patent data, evaluating the geographic and time coverage of innovations, the primary patent holders, the network of cooperation and partnership for vaccine research and development (R & D), the flow of knowledge and the technological domain involved. This study can be seen as an example of the use of patent information to inform policy discussions, strategic research planning, and technology transfer. The results show that 93% of patents were granted since 2000, the majority belonging to the United States and Europe, although the share of patents from developing countries has increased. Unlike another NTDs, there is great participation of private companies in R & D of dengue vaccines and partnerships and collaboration between public and private companies. Finally, in this study, the main holders showed high knowledge absorption and generated capabilities. Therefore, this issue suggests that to overcome the difficulty of translational R & D it is necessary to stimulate the generation of knowledge and relevant scientific research, to enable the productive sector to have the capacity to absorb knowledge, to turn it into innovation, and to articulate partnerships and collaboration. PMID:26274968

  14. Dengue Vaccines: A Perspective from the Point of View of Intellectual Property

    PubMed Central

    Pereira da Veiga, Claudimar; Pereira da Veiga, Cássia Rita; Del Corso, Jansen Maia; Vieira da Silva, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a serious infectious disease and a growing public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. To control this neglected tropical disease (NTD), vaccines are likely to be the most cost-effective solution. This study analyzed dengue vaccines from both a historical and longitudinal perspective by using patent data, evaluating the geographic and time coverage of innovations, the primary patent holders, the network of cooperation and partnership for vaccine research and development (R & D), the flow of knowledge and the technological domain involved. This study can be seen as an example of the use of patent information to inform policy discussions, strategic research planning, and technology transfer. The results show that 93% of patents were granted since 2000, the majority belonging to the United States and Europe, although the share of patents from developing countries has increased. Unlike another NTDs, there is great participation of private companies in R & D of dengue vaccines and partnerships and collaboration between public and private companies. Finally, in this study, the main holders showed high knowledge absorption and generated capabilities. Therefore, this issue suggests that to overcome the difficulty of translational R & D it is necessary to stimulate the generation of knowledge and relevant scientific research, to enable the productive sector to have the capacity to absorb knowledge, to turn it into innovation, and to articulate partnerships and collaboration. PMID:26274968

  15. The interplay of vaccination and vector control on small dengue networks.

    PubMed

    Hendron, Ross-William S; Bonsall, Michael B

    2016-10-21

    Dengue fever is a major public health issue affecting billions of people in over 100 countries across the globe. This challenge is growing as the invasive mosquito vectors, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, expand their distributions and increase their population sizes. Hence there is an increasing need to devise effective control methods that can contain dengue outbreaks. Here we construct an epidemiological model for virus transmission between vectors and hosts on a network of host populations distributed among city and town patches, and investigate disease control through vaccination and vector control using variants of the sterile insect technique (SIT). Analysis of the basic reproductive number and simulations indicate that host movement across this small network influences the severity of epidemics. Both vaccination and vector control strategies are investigated as methods of disease containment and our results indicate that these controls can be made more effective with mixed strategy solutions. We predict that reduced lethality through poor SIT methods or imperfectly efficacious vaccines will impact efforts to control disease spread. In particular, weakly efficacious vaccination strategies against multiple virus serotype diversity may be counter productive to disease control efforts. Even so, failings of one method may be mitigated by supplementing it with an alternative control strategy. Generally, our network approach encourages decision making to consider connected populations, to emphasise that successful control methods must effectively suppress dengue epidemics at this landscape scale. PMID:27457093

  16. A VACCINE AGAINST METHAMPHETAMINE ATTENUATES ITS BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun Y.; Kosten, Therese A.; Lopez, Angel Y.; Kinsey, Berma M.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vaccines have treatment potential for methamphetamine (MA) addiction. We tested whether a conjugate vaccine against MA (succinyl-methamphetamine–keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein; SMA-KLH) would generate MA antibodies and alter MA-induced behaviors. METHODS Mice were injected with SMA-KLH and received booster administrations 3-and 20-weeks later. Serum antibody titers reached peak levels by 4–6 weeks, remained at a modest level through 18-weeks, peaked again at 22-wks after the second boost, and were still elevated at 35-weeks. At 7 weeks, groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were administered one of three MA doses (1, 2, or 3 mg/kg) to assess locomotor activity. RESULTS Non-vaccinated mice showed dose-dependent effects of MA with hypolocomotion at the lowest dose and elevated activity levels at the highest dose. Both dose effects were reduced in SMA-KLH groups, particularly low dose-induced hypolocomotion at later times post MA administration. Separate groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were trained in MA place conditioning at 30-weeks with either 0 (vehicle) or 0.5 mg/kg MA. Although times spent in the MA-paired side did not differ between groups on Test vs. Baseline sessions, SMA-KLH mice conditioned with MA showed reduced conditioned approach behaviors and decreased conditioned activity levels compared to control groups. CONCLUSION These data suggest SMA-KLH attenuates the ability of MA to support place conditioning and reduces or delays its locomotor effects. Overall, results support SMA-KLH as a candidate MA vaccine. PMID:23022610

  17. Development of Global Consensus of Dengue Virus Envelope Glycoprotein for Epitopes Based Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mazhar; Idrees, Muhammad; Afzal, Samia

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the member of Flaviviridae and causative agent of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome. Every year, around 70% of the world population is at risk, due to epidemic episodes orchestrated by one or more of its serotypes. So, a tetravalent DENV vaccine is needed which may induce the immune response against all four DENV serotypes. In this study, B-cell and T-cell epitopes have been predicted from the DENV envelope glycoprotein (Eg) using a consensus based approach in complement with the physico-chemical property (PCP) conservancy analysis. Through DENV-Eg analysis, a total of 7 PCP conserved, water soluble, in vitro and in vivo stable epitopes were predicted which may induce the B-cell and T-cell mediated anti-viral immune response.

  18. Will Dengue Vaccines Be Used in the Public Sector and if so, How? Findings from an 8-country Survey of Policymakers and Opinion Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Don L.; DeRoeck, Denise A.; Mahoney, Richard T.; Wichmann, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Background A face-to-face survey of 158 policymakers and other influential professionals was conducted in eight dengue-endemic countries in Asia (India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam) and Latin America (Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Nicaragua) to provide an indication of the potential demand for dengue vaccination in endemic countries, and to anticipate their research and other requirements in order to make decisions about the introduction of dengue vaccines. The study took place in anticipation of the licensure of the first dengue vaccine in the next several years. Methods/Principal Findings Semi-structured interviews were conducted on an individual or small group basis with government health officials, research scientists, medical association officers, vaccine producers, local-level health authorities, and others considered to have a role in influencing decisions about dengue control and vaccines. Most informants across countries considered dengue a priority disease and expressed interest in the public sector use of dengue vaccines, with a major driver being the political pressure from the public and the medical community to control the disease. There was interest in a vaccine that protects children as young as possible and that can fit into existing childhood immunization schedules. Dengue vaccination in most countries surveyed will likely be targeted to high-risk areas and begin with routine immunization of infants and young children, followed by catch-up campaigns for older age groups, as funding permits. Key data requirements for decision-making were additional local dengue surveillance data, vaccine cost-effectiveness estimates, post-marketing safety surveillance data and, in some countries vaccine safety and immunogenicity data in the local population. Conclusions/Significance The lookout for the public sector use of dengue vaccines in the eight countries appears quite favorable. Major determinants of whether and when countries will introduce dengue vaccines

  19. Dengue virus RNA polymerase NS5: a potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Rawlinson, Stephen M; Pryor, Melinda J; Wright, Peter J; Jans, David A

    2006-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF)/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is the most common arthropod-borne viral infection, where it is now estimated that 2.5-3 billion people world-wide are at risk of infection. Currently there is no available treatment, in the form of vaccine or drug, making eradication of the mosquito vector the only viable control measure, which has proved costly and of limited success. There are a number of different vaccines undergoing testing, but whilst a dengue vaccine is clearly desirable, there are several issues which make live-attenuated vaccines problematic. These include the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) and the possibility of recombination of attenuated vaccine strains with wild-type flavivirus members reverting vaccines to a virulent form. Until we gain a better understanding of these issues and their associated risks, the safety of any live dengue vaccine cannot be assured. It therefore may be safer and more feasible for therapeutic-based approaches to be developed as an alternative to live vaccines. As our understanding of dengue molecular biology expands, new potential targets for drugs are emerging. One of the most promising is the dengue non-structural protein 5 (NS5), the largest and most highly conserved of the dengue proteins. This review examines the unique properties of NS5, including its functions, interactions, subcellular localisation and regulation, and looks at ways in which some of these may be exploited in our quest for effective drugs.

  20. Accuracy of Clinical Diagnosis of Dengue Episodes in the RV144 HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trial in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Stablein, Donald; Dawson, Peter; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Robb, Merlin L; O'Connell, Robert J; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan; Excler, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    RV144 was a community-based HIV vaccine efficacy trial conducted in HIV-uninfected adults in Thailand, where dengue virus continues to cause a large number of infections every year. We attempted to document the accuracy of clinically diagnosed dengue episodes reported as serious adverse events (SAEs) and adverse events (AEs) and examine whether dengue serology would support the clinical diagnosis. Subjects without a clinical dengue diagnosis but with an infection or idiopathic fever were selected as a control population. Dengue serology was performed by hemagglutination inhibition on plasma samples. A total of 124 clinical dengue episodes were reported (103 SAEs and 21 AEs). Overall 82.6% of the clinically diagnosed dengue episodes were supported by a positive dengue serology: 71.4% of the AEs and 85.0% of the SAEs. Of the 100 subjects with both clinical dengue and positive serology, all presented with fever, 83% with leucopenia, 54% with thrombocytopenia, and 27% with hemorrhagic symptoms. All episodes resolved spontaneously without sequellae. Only two of 15 subjects with a negative serology presented with fever. The sensitivity and specificity of clinical dengue diagnosis were 90.9% and 74.4%, respectively, when compared to the control population, and with a positive predictive value of 82.6% and negative predictive value of 84.7% when compared to dengue serology. Clinical diagnosis of dengue is an accurate method of dengue diagnosis in adults in Thailand. Large-scale clinical trials offer the opportunity to systematically study infectious diseases such as dengue and other infections that may occur during the trial.

  1. Neurovirulence of varicella and the live attenuated varicella vaccine virus.

    PubMed

    Horien, Corey; Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic herpesvirus, which can cause a variety of complications during varicella infections. These range from meningoencephalitis to polyneuritis to retinitis. After primary VZV infection, VZV enters the dorsal root ganglia in a latent state. Reactivation from latency leads to zoster. The velocity of VZV is 13 cm per day, as the virus travels from ganglion to skin. The live attenuated varicella vaccine virus is markedly less neurovirulent than the wild-type virus. Nevertheless, a few cases of herpes zoster due to the vaccine virus have been documented. Usually, herpes zoster occurs in the same arm as the vaccination, often 3 or more years after vaccination. Thus, herpes zoster in a vaccinee often represents a reactivation of vaccine virus that was carried to the cervical dorsal root ganglia from a site of local replication in the arm. Finally, the role of autophagy during VZV infection is discussed. Autophagosome formation is a prominent feature in the skin vesicles during both varicella and herpes zoster. Therefore, autophagy is one of the innate immune mechanisms associated with VZV infection in humans.

  2. Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology Transmission, information on epidemics and stats... Entomology & Ecology Mosquito that spreads dengue and its ecology... Clinical & Laboratory Guidance Tools for clinicians and laboratorians... ...

  3. Dengue.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2007-11-10

    The four dengue viruses are transmitted in tropical countries that circle the globe. All can cause syndromes that are self-limited or severe. The common severe syndrome--dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS)--is characterised by sudden vascular permeability generated by cytokines released when T cells attack dengue-infected cells. Dengue 1 virus became prevalent in Hawaii where it was transmitted by Aedes albopictus, producing a classic virgin soil epidemic, with clinical disease seen largely in adults. In Cuba and Singapore, sequential dengue infections at long intervals produced unusually severe disease in adults. Evidence suggests that enhancing and cross-reactive neutralising antibodies regulate dengue epidemics and disease severity. Classic DHF/DSS arises during initial dengue infections in infants with low circulating amounts of maternal dengue antibodies, an observation that precludes an exclusive causal role for secondary T-cell responses. Here, I review and discuss data on clinical diagnosis and pathophysiology of vascular permeability and coagulopathy, parenteral treatment of DHF/DSS, and new laboratory tests.

  4. Mosquitocidal vaccines: a neglected addition to malaria and dengue control strategies.

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Peter F; Foy, Brian; Rasgon, Jason L

    2008-09-01

    The transmission of vector-borne diseases is dependent upon the ability of the vector to survive for longer than the period of development of the pathogen within the vector. One means of reducing mosquito lifespan, and thereby reducing their capacity to transmit diseases, is to target mosquitoes with vaccines. Here, the principle behind mosquitocidal vaccines is described, their potential impact in malaria and dengue control is modeled and the current research that could make these vaccines a reality is reviewed. Mosquito genome data, combined with modern molecular techniques, can be exploited to overcome the limited advances in this field. Given the large potential benefit to vector-borne disease control, research into the development of mosquitocidal vaccines deserves a high profile. PMID:18678529

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Capripoxvirus Strain KSGP 0240 from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Capripoxviruses cause economically important diseases in domestic ruminants in regions endemic for these viruses. We report here the complete genome sequence of the KSGP 0240 vaccine strain from the live attenuated vaccine Kenyavac (JOVAC). PMID:27795268

  6. Optimization and Validation of a Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test for the Detection of Neutralizing Antibodies to Four Serotypes of Dengue Virus Used in Support of Dengue Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Timiryasova, Tatyana M.; Bonaparte, Matthew I.; Luo, Ping; Zedar, Rebecca; Hu, Branda T.; Hildreth, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    A dengue plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to measure dengue serotype–specific neutralizing antibodies for all four virus serotypes was developed, optimized, and validated in accordance with guidelines for validation of bioanalytical test methods using human serum samples from dengue-infected persons and persons receiving a dengue vaccine candidate. Production and characterization of dengue challenge viruses used in the assay was standardized. Once virus stocks were characterized, the dengue PRNT50 for each of the four serotypes was optimized according to a factorial design of experiments approach for critical test parameters, including days of cell seeding before testing, percentage of overlay carboxymethylcellulose medium, and days of incubation post-infection to generate a robust assay. The PRNT50 was then validated and demonstrated to be suitable to detect and measure dengue serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies in human serum samples with acceptable intra-assay and inter-assay precision, accuracy/dilutability, specificity, and with a lower limit of quantitation of 10. PMID:23458954

  7. Live attenuated vaccines: Historical successes and current challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Philip D.

    2015-05-15

    Live attenuated vaccines against human viral diseases have been amongst the most successful cost effective interventions in medical history. Smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980; poliomyelitis is nearing global eradication and measles has been controlled in most parts of the world. Vaccines function well for acute diseases such as these but chronic infections such as HIV are more challenging for reasons of both likely safety and probable efficacy. The derivation of the vaccines used has in general not been purely rational except in the sense that it has involved careful clinical trials of candidates and subsequent careful follow up in clinical use; the identification of the candidates is reviewed. - Highlights: • Live vaccines against human diseases caused by viruses have been very successful. • They have been developed by empirical clinical studies and problems identified in later use. • It can be difficult to balance ability to cause disease and ability to immunise for a strain. • There is currently no reliable basis for predicting success from pure virological studies. • Vaccinia, which eradicated smallpox, is the paradigm for all successes and issues.

  8. [Development of immunizing agents against dengue].

    PubMed

    López Antuñano, F J; Mota, J

    2000-05-01

    The four serotypes of dengue flaviviruses are transmitted mainly by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, and some epidemics have been attributed to Ae. albopictus, Ae. polynesiensis, and various species of the Ae. scutellaris complex. The risk factors involved in dengue mortality and morbidity are related to the human host (genetic characteristics of infected persons; lifestyles, immune status, and health conditions of people; basic sanitation of dwellings; and water supply) and to the virus (genetic variability between and among serotypes, different pathogenicities, and geographic distribution). Notwithstanding the lack of knowledge of the immunopathobiology of dengue fever, important advances have been made in terms of a protective immune response, using attenuated dengue viruses or antigens produced by means of recombinant technologies. Efforts have been made since the 1940s to develop dengue vaccines. Immunity acquired from natural infection is specific for each serotype, and as many as three different serotype infections have been reported in one individual. For this reason, a tetravalent vaccine may likely be needed. Candidate vaccines against the four serotypes have been tested in volunteers and have proven to be immunogenic and safe. Although attenuated live virus vaccines are promising, more study is needed regarding their effectiveness and safety. Currently, several studies are ongoing to develop dengue vaccines using antigens from structural proteins (particularly E glycoprotein) and nonstructural proteins, with recombinant DNA technology and other biomolecular technologies. With the same goal, various expression vectors are being used, including Escherichia coli, baculovirus, vaccinia virus, and yellow fever virus. Unfortunately, no satisfactory results have been obtained in humans. The need for effective dengue vaccines is great, given the serious worldwide problem of the transmission of the four serotypes. Effective immunization against dengue would contribute

  9. Dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine induces protective immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, K; Porter, K R; Kochel, T J; Ewing, D; Simmons, M; Phillips, I; Murphy, G S; Weiss, W R; Hayes, C G

    2000-07-01

    A candidate DNA vaccine expressing dengue virus type 1 pre-membrane and envelope proteins was used to immunize rhesus macaques. Monkeys were immunized intramuscularly (i.m.) or intradermally (i.d.) by three or four 1 mg doses of vaccine, respectively. Monkeys that were inoculated i.m. seroconverted more quickly and had higher antibody levels than those that were inoculated i.d. The sera exhibited virus-neutralizing activity, which declined over time. Four of the eight i.m.-inoculated monkeys were protected completely from developing viraemia when challenged 4 months after the last dose with homologous dengue virus. The other four monkeys had reduced viraemia compared with the control immunized monkeys. The i.d. -inoculated monkeys showed no reduction in viraemia when challenged with the virus. All vaccinated monkeys showed an anamnestic antibody response, indicating that they had established immunological memory. Vaccine-induced antibody had an avidity index similar to that of antibody induced by virus infection; however, no clear correlation was apparent between antibody avidity and virus neutralization titres.

  10. Type I Interferon Signals in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells Control Dengue Virus Infection: Implications for a New Mouse Model To Test Dengue Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Ying-Xiu; Valdés, Iris; Cerny, Daniela; Heinrich, Julia; Hermida, Lisset; Marcos, Ernesto; Guillén, Gerardo; Kalinke, Ulrich; Shi, Pei-Yong; Fink, Katja

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) infects an estimated 400 million people every year, causing prolonged morbidity and sometimes mortality. Development of an effective vaccine has been hampered by the lack of appropriate small animal models; mice are naturally not susceptible to DENV and only become infected if highly immunocompromised. Mouse models lacking both type I and type II interferon (IFN) receptors (AG129 mice) or the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR−/− mice) are susceptible to infection with mouse-adapted DENV strains but are severely impaired in mounting functional immune responses to the virus and thus are of limited use for study. Here we used conditional deletion of the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) on individual immune cell subtypes to generate a minimally manipulated mouse model that is susceptible to DENV while retaining global immune competence. Mice lacking IFNAR expression on CD11c+ dendritic cells and LysM+ macrophages succumbed completely to DENV infection, while mice deficient in the receptor on either CD11c+ or LysM+ cells were susceptible to infection but often resolved viremia and recovered fully from infection. Conditional IFNAR mice responded with a swift and strong CD8+ T-cell response to viral infection, compared to a weak response in IFNAR−/− mice. Furthermore, mice lacking IFNAR on either CD11c+ or LysM+ cells were also sufficiently immunocompetent to raise a protective immune response to a candidate subunit vaccine against DENV-2. These data demonstrate that mice with conditional deficiencies in expression of the IFNAR represent improved models for the study of DENV immunology and screening of vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus infects 400 million people every year worldwide, causing 100 million clinically apparent infections, which can be fatal if untreated. Despite many years of research, there are no effective vaccine and no antiviral treatment available for dengue. Development of vaccines has been hampered in particular by

  11. Chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus as a candidate dengue vaccine: quantitation of the dengue virus-specific CD8 T-cell response.

    PubMed

    van Der Most, R G; Murali-Krishna, K; Ahmed, R; Strauss, J H

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against DEN-2 virus challenge, indicating that protection was mediated by the DEN-2 virus prM- and E-specific immune responses. YF/DEN vaccine-primed CD8 T cells expanded and were efficiently recruited into the central nervous systems of DEN-2 virus challenged mice. At 5 days after challenge, 3 to 4% of CD8 T cells in the spleen were specific for the prM and E proteins, and 34% of CD8 T cells in the central nervous system recognized these proteins. Depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells, or both, strongly reduced the protective efficacy of the YF/DEN virus, stressing the key role of the antiviral T-cell response.

  12. Paradoxical role of antibodies in dengue virus infections: considerations for prophylactic vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Eliana G; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Highly effective prophylactic vaccines for flaviviruses including yellow fever virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus and Japanese encephalitis virus are currently in use. However, the development of a dengue virus (DENV) vaccine has been hampered by the requirement of simultaneous protection against four distinct serotypes and the threat that DENV-specific antibodies might either mediate neutralization or, on the contrary, exacerbate disease through the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. Therefore, understanding the cellular, biochemical and molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and ADE are fundamental for the development of a safe DENV vaccine. Here we summarize current structural and mechanistic knowledge underlying these phenomena. We also review recent results demonstrating that the humoral immune response triggered during natural DENV infection is able to generate neutralizing antibodies binding complex quaternary epitopes only present on the surface of intact virions. PMID:26577689

  13. Impact of combined vector-control and vaccination strategies on transmission dynamics of dengue fever: a model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Knerer, Gerhart; Currie, Christine S M; Brailsford, Sally C

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever is a vector-borne disease prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions. It is an important public health problem with a considerable and often under-valued disease burden in terms of frequency, cost and quality-of-life. Recent literature reviews have documented the development of mathematical models of dengue fever both to identify important characteristics for future model development as well as to assess the impact of dengue control interventions. Such reviews highlight the importance of short-term cross-protection; antibody-dependent enhancement; and seasonality (in terms of both favourable and unfavourable conditions for mosquitoes). The compartmental model extends work by Bartley (2002) and combines the following factors: seasonality, age-structure, consecutive infection by all four serotypes, cross-protection and immune enhancement, as well as combined vector-host transmission. The model is used to represent dengue transmission dynamics using parameters appropriate for Thailand and to assess the potential impact of combined vector-control and vaccination strategies including routine and catch-up vaccination strategies on disease dynamics. When seasonality and temporary cross-protection between serotypes are included, the model is able to approximate the observed incidence of dengue fever in Thailand. We find vaccination to be the most effective single intervention, albeit with imperfect efficacy (30.2 %) and limited duration of protection. However, in combination, control interventions and vaccination exhibit a marked impact on dengue fever transmission. This study shows that an imperfect vaccine can be a useful weapon in reducing disease spread within the community, although it will be most effective when promoted as one of several strategies for combating dengue fever transmission.

  14. Impact of combined vector-control and vaccination strategies on transmission dynamics of dengue fever: a model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Knerer, Gerhart; Currie, Christine S M; Brailsford, Sally C

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever is a vector-borne disease prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions. It is an important public health problem with a considerable and often under-valued disease burden in terms of frequency, cost and quality-of-life. Recent literature reviews have documented the development of mathematical models of dengue fever both to identify important characteristics for future model development as well as to assess the impact of dengue control interventions. Such reviews highlight the importance of short-term cross-protection; antibody-dependent enhancement; and seasonality (in terms of both favourable and unfavourable conditions for mosquitoes). The compartmental model extends work by Bartley (2002) and combines the following factors: seasonality, age-structure, consecutive infection by all four serotypes, cross-protection and immune enhancement, as well as combined vector-host transmission. The model is used to represent dengue transmission dynamics using parameters appropriate for Thailand and to assess the potential impact of combined vector-control and vaccination strategies including routine and catch-up vaccination strategies on disease dynamics. When seasonality and temporary cross-protection between serotypes are included, the model is able to approximate the observed incidence of dengue fever in Thailand. We find vaccination to be the most effective single intervention, albeit with imperfect efficacy (30.2 %) and limited duration of protection. However, in combination, control interventions and vaccination exhibit a marked impact on dengue fever transmission. This study shows that an imperfect vaccine can be a useful weapon in reducing disease spread within the community, although it will be most effective when promoted as one of several strategies for combating dengue fever transmission. PMID:24370922

  15. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Intranasal live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine: does not challenge current practice.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    Influenza vaccination of children is only justified when there is a risk of serious influenza complications. In 2012, a live attenuated vaccine for intranasal administration was authorised in the European Union for influenza prevention in individuals aged from 2 to less than 18 years. This type of vaccine has been available in the United States since 2003. Clinical evaluation of this live vaccine is based on three non-inferiority trials versus an injected inactivated vaccine. There are no specific trials in children at risk of serious influenza complications. Only one of these trials was double-blinded. Two trials involved children with a history of respiratory problems. Symptomatic influenza confirmed by viral culture was less frequent in these three trials after intranasal vaccination than after injection of the conventional vaccine (about 3 to 5% and 6 to 10%, respectively). There was no difference between the vaccines in terms of clinical complications of influenza, especially asthma exacerbations. Adverse effects attributed to the intranasal vaccine mainly consisted of local reactions such as rhinorrhoea and nasal congestion, as well as flu-like syndromes. Wheezing, respiratory tract infections and hospitalisation were more frequent with the intranasal vaccine than with the injected vaccine in children aged less than 1 year and in children with a history of severe respiratory illness. The intranasal vaccine is contraindicated in these children. The intranasal vaccine contains live attenuated virus strains and is therefore contraindicated in immunocompromised patients. US pharmacovigilance data suggest that severe allergic reactions to the intranasal vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and transmission of vaccine viruses to contacts are very rare. Intranasal administration seems to be more practical, especially for children. In practice, there is no firm evidence that this live attenuated influenza vaccine has any clinical advantages over injected vaccines

  17. Improving live attenuated bacterial carriers for vaccination and therapy.

    PubMed

    Loessner, Holger; Endmann, Anne; Leschner, Sara; Bauer, Heike; Zelmer, Andrea; zur Lage, Susanne; Westphal, Kathrin; Weiss, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria are well established as vaccines. Thus, their use as carriers for prophylactic and therapeutic macromolecules is a logical consequence. Here we describe several experimental applications of bacteria to carry heterologous macromolecules into the murine host. First, Listeria monocytogenes are described that are able to transfer eukaryotic expression plasmids into host cells for gene therapy. High multiplicities of infection are still required for efficient gene transfer and we point out some of the bottlenecks that counteract a more efficient transfer and application in vivo. Then, we describe Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) as an expression plasmid transfer vehicle for oral DNA vaccination of mice. We demonstrate that the stabilization of the plasmid transformants results in an improved immune response. Stabilization was achieved by replacing the origin of replication of the original high-copy-number plasmid by a low-copy-number origin. Finally, we describe Salmonella carriers for the improved expression of heterologous proteins. We introduce a system in which the plasmid is carried as a single copy during cultivation but is amplified several fold upon infection of the host. Using the same in vivo inducible promoter for both protein expression and plasmid amplification, a substantial increase in antigen expression in vivo can be achieved. A modification of this approach is the introduction of inducible gene expression in vivo with a low-molecular-weight compound. Using P(BAD) promoter and L-arabinose as inducer we were able to deliberately activate genes in the bacterial carrier. No background activity could be observed with P(BAD) such that an inducible suicide gene could be introduced. This is adding an important safety feature to such live attenuated carrier bacteria.

  18. Preclinical development of a dengue tetravalent recombinant subunit vaccine: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Meschino, Steven; Guan, Liming; Clements, David E; ter Meulen, Jan H; Casimiro, Danilo R; Coller, Beth-Ann G; Bett, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    We describe here the preclinical development of a dengue vaccine composed of recombinant subunit carboxy-truncated envelope (E) proteins (DEN-80E) for each of the four dengue serotypes. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy studies in Rhesus monkeys were conducted to evaluate monovalent and tetravalent DEN-80E vaccines formulated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant. Three different doses and two dosing regimens (0, 1, 2 months and 0, 1, 2, and 6 months) were evaluated in these studies. We first evaluated monomeric (DEN4-80E) and dimeric (DEN4-80EZip) versions of DEN4-80E, the latter generated in an attempt to improve immunogenicity. The two antigens, evaluated at 6, 20 and 100 μg/dose formulated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were equally immunogenic. A group immunized with 20 μg DEN4-80E and Alhydrogel™ induced much weaker responses. When challenged with wild-type dengue type 4 virus, all animals in the 6 and 20 μg groups and all but one in the DEN4-80EZip 100 μg group were protected from viremia. Two out of three monkeys in the Alhydrogel™ group had breakthrough viremia. A similar study was conducted to evaluate tetravalent formulations at low (3, 3, 3, 6 μg of DEN1-80E, DEN2-80E, DEN3-80E and DEN4-80E respectively), medium (10, 10, 10, 20 μg) and high (50, 50, 50, 100 μg) doses. All doses were comparably immunogenic and induced high titer, balanced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV. Upon challenge with the four wild-type DENV, all animals in the low and medium dose groups were protected against viremia while two animals in the high-dose group exhibited breakthrough viremia. Our studies also indicated that a 0, 1, 2 and 6 month vaccination schedule is superior to the 0, 1, and 2 month schedule in terms of durability. Overall, the subunit vaccine was demonstrated to induce strong neutralization titers resulting in protection against viremia following challenge even 8-12 months after the last vaccine dose. PMID:26144900

  19. Effect of attenuated viral vaccines on suckling mice infected with LCMV.

    PubMed

    Csatáry, L K; Szeri, I; Bános, Z; Anderlik, P; Nász, I

    1986-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal treatment with live Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) containing attenuated NDV vaccine, and with live infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) containing attenuated IBDV vaccine, one day before intracerebral infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) increased, whereas a similar treatment with inactivated NDV or IBDV vaccine did not influence the death rate of suckling mice from experimental lymphocytic choriomeningitis. Thus the attenuated live vaccine stimulated, whereas the inactivated ones failed to affect the cell-mediated immune response to LCMV. Control studies set up with the supernatant of plain tissue culture routinely used for the propagation of IBDV have shown that unlike the attenuated NDV vaccine, the immunostimulatory action is associated not so much with the virus itself, as with an as yet unidentified component of the tissue culture supernatant.

  20. The neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness of chimeric tick-borne encephalitis/dengue virus can be attenuated by introducing defined mutations into the envelope and NS5 protein genes and the 3' non-coding region of the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Amber R.; Rumyantsev, Alexander A.; Maximova, Olga A.; Speicher, James M.; Heiss, Brian; Murphy, Brian R.; Pletnev, Alexander G.

    2010-09-15

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a severe disease affecting thousands of people throughout Eurasia. Despite the use of formalin-inactivated vaccines in endemic areas, an increasing incidence of TBE emphasizes the need for an alternative vaccine that will induce a more durable immunity against TBE virus (TBEV). The chimeric attenuated virus vaccine candidate containing the structural protein genes of TBEV on a dengue virus genetic background (TBEV/DEN4) retains a high level of neurovirulence in both mice and monkeys. Therefore, attenuating mutations were introduced into the envelope (E{sub 315}) and NS5 (NS5{sub 654,655}) proteins, and into the 3' non-coding region ({Delta}30) of TBEV/DEN4. The variant that contained all three mutations (v{Delta}30/E{sub 315}/NS5{sub 654,655}) was significantly attenuated for neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence and displayed a reduced level of replication and virus-induced histopathology in the brains of mice. The high level of safety in the central nervous system indicates that v{Delta}30/E{sub 315}/NS5{sub 654,655} should be further evaluated as a TBEV vaccine.

  1. An Epitope-Substituted DNA Vaccine Improves Safety and Immunogenicity against Dengue Virus Type 2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chung-Tao; Li, Pi-Chun; Liu, I-Ju; Liao, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chiung-Yi; Chao, Day-Yu; Wu, Han-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a global disease, is divided into four serotypes (DENV1-4). Cross-reactive and non-neutralizing antibodies against envelope (E) protein of DENV bind to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) of cells, and thereby exacerbate viral infection by heterologous serotypes via antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Identification and modification of enhancing epitopes may mitigate enhancement of DENV infection. In this study, we characterized the cross-reactive DB21-6 and DB39-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against domain I-II of DENV; these antibodies poorly neutralized and potently enhanced DENV infection both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, two enhancing mAbs, DB21-6 and DB39-2, were observed to compete with sera antibodies from patients infected with dengue. The epitopes of these enhancing mAbs were identified using phage display, structural prediction, and mapping of virus-like particle (VLP) mutants. N8, R9, V12, and E13 are the reactive residues of DB21-6, while N8, R9, and E13 are the reactive residues of DB39-2. N8 substitution tends to maintain VLP secretion, and decreases the binding activity of DB21-6 and DB39-2. The immunized sera from N8 substitution (N8R) DNA vaccine exerted greater neutralizing and protective activity than wild-type (WT)-immunized sera, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with N8R-immunized sera reduced the enhancement of mortality in AG129 mice. These results support identification and substitution of enhancing epitope as a novel strategy for developing safe dengue vaccines. PMID:26135599

  2. Efficacy and effectiveness of live attenuated influenza vaccine in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Coelingh, Kathleen; Olajide, Ifedapo Rosemary; MacDonald, Peter; Yogev, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of high efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from randomized controlled trials is strong for children 2-6 years of age, but fewer data exist for older school-age children. We reviewed the published data on efficacy and effectiveness of LAIV in children ≥5 years. QUOSA (Elsevier database) was searched for articles published from January 1990 to June 2014 that included 'FluMist', 'LAIV', 'CAIV', 'cold adapted influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated cold adapted' or 'flu mist'. Studies evaluated included randomized controlled trials, effectiveness and indirect protection studies. This review demonstrates that LAIV has considerable efficacy and effectiveness in school-age children.

  3. 75 FR 6211 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses''-- European Patent Application Number 02739358.6, filed May 22, 2002... Deletion in the 3'-UTR of Dengue Types 1,2,3, and 4, or Antigenic Chimeric Dengue Viruses 1,2,3, and 4... which enhance the replication of dengue virus type 4 and an antigenic chimeric dengue virus type...

  4. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors.

  5. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  6. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: Suitability of attenuating mutations found in SA14-14-2 for WN vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir; Manuvakhova, Marina; Rodriguez, Efrain

    2016-01-01

    Direct attenuation of West Nile (WN) virus strain NY99 for the purpose of vaccine development is not feasible due to its high virulence and pathogenicity. Instead, we created highly attenuated chimeric virus W1806 with the serological identity of NY99. To further attenuate W1806, we investigated effects of mutations found in Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine SA14-14-2. WN viruses carrying all attenuating mutations lost infectivity in mammalian, but not in mosquito cells. No single reversion restored infectivity in mammalian cells, although increased infectivity in mosquito cells was observed. To identify a subset of mutations suitable for further attenuation of W1806, we analyzed effects of E138K and K279M changes on virulence, growth properties, and immunogenicity of derivatized W956, from which chimeric W1806 inherited its biological properties and attenuation profile. Despite strong dominant attenuating effect, introduction of only two mutations was not sufficient for attenuating W1806 to the safety level acceptable for human use.

  7. Comparative genomics of the Mycobacterium signaling architecture and implications for a novel live attenuated Tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peifu; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains a major threat to global public health. A new TB vaccine affording superior immune protection to M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is imperative. The advantage of a live attenuated vaccine is that it can mimic the bona fide pathogen, elicit immune responses similar to natural infection, and potentially provide more protection than other vaccines. BCG, the only vaccine and a live attenuated vaccine that is the result of cumulative mutations by serial passage of M. bovis, has provided clues for the construction of novel improved vaccines. A strategy is put forward for identifying a new live attenuated TB vaccine generated by cumulative mutation based on M.tb. Given the important role of the M.tb signaling network consisting of a two-component system, eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinase system and sigma factor system based on comparisons among M.tb H37Rv, M. bovis, and BCG, we have put a premium on this signaling circuit as the starting point for the generation of an attenuated TB vaccine.

  8. Methods to Evaluate the Preclinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Live-Attenuated Leishmania Parasite Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Ismail, Nevien; Avishek, Kumar; Salotra, Poonam; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Satoskar, Abhay; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated parasite vaccines are being explored as potential vaccine candidates since other approaches of vaccination have not produced an effective vaccine so far. In order for live-attenuated parasite vaccines to be tested in preclinical studies and possibly in clinical studies, the safety and immunogenicity of these organisms must be rigorously evaluated. Here we describe methods to test persistence in the immunized host and immunogenicity, and to identify biomarkers of vaccine safety and efficacy with particular reference to genetically attenuated Leishmania parasites.

  9. Methods to Evaluate the Preclinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Live-Attenuated Leishmania Parasite Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Ismail, Nevien; Avishek, Kumar; Salotra, Poonam; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Satoskar, Abhay; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated parasite vaccines are being explored as potential vaccine candidates since other approaches of vaccination have not produced an effective vaccine so far. In order for live-attenuated parasite vaccines to be tested in preclinical studies and possibly in clinical studies, the safety and immunogenicity of these organisms must be rigorously evaluated. Here we describe methods to test persistence in the immunized host and immunogenicity, and to identify biomarkers of vaccine safety and efficacy with particular reference to genetically attenuated Leishmania parasites. PMID:27076157

  10. Current status of live attenuated influenza virus vaccine in the US.

    PubMed

    Belshe, Robert B

    2004-07-01

    The efficacy and effectiveness of cold adapted live attenuated (CAIV-T, FluMist intranasal influenza vaccine is reviewed. CAIV-T consists of approximately 10(7) TCID50 per dose of each influenza A/H1N1, influenza A/H3N2, and influenza B vaccine strain. The exact strains are updated each year to antigenically match the antigens recommended by national health authorities for inclusion in the vaccine. In one year in which the vaccine strain did not well match the epidemic strain, the live attenuated vaccine induced a broad immune response that cross-reacted significantly with the drifted strain. The efficacy of CAIV-T in adults was demonstrated with challenge studies and the effectiveness of the vaccine for reducing febrile upper respiratory illness, days of missed work, and days of antibiotic use was demonstrated in a large field trial. In young children, protective efficacy against culture confirmed influenza was demonstrated in a field trial with overall protective efficacy of 92% during a two year study. Vaccine was also highly protective against a strain not contained in the vaccine, with 86% protective efficacy demonstrated against this significantly drifted virus. Effectiveness measures, including protection against febrile otitis media and visits to the doctor were demonstrated. Live attenuated vaccine provides a significant new tool to help prevent influenza.

  11. A Tetravalent Sub-unit Dengue Vaccine Formulated with Ionizable Cationic Lipid Nanoparticle induces Significant Immune Responses in Rodents and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Gokul; Thoryk, Elizabeth A.; Cox, Kara S.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Jayanthi J.; Gindy, Marian E.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bett, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus has emerged as an important arboviral infection worldwide. As a complex pathogen, with four distinct serotypes, the development of a successful Dengue virus vaccine has proven to be challenging. Here, we describe a novel Dengue vaccine candidate that contains truncated, recombinant, Dengue virus envelope protein from all four Dengue virus serotypes (DEN-80E) formulated with ionizable cationic lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Immunization studies in mice, Guinea pigs, and in Rhesus macaques, revealed that LNPs induced high titers of Dengue virus neutralizing antibodies, with or without co-administration or encapsulation of a Toll-Like Receptor 9 agonist. Importantly, LNPs were also able to boost DEN-80E specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Cytokine and chemokine profiling revealed that LNPs induced strong chemokine responses without significant induction of inflammatory cytokines. In addition to being highly efficacious, the vaccine formulation proved to be well-tolerated, demonstrating no elevation in any of the safety parameters evaluated. Notably, reduction in cationic lipid content of the nanoparticle dramatically reduced the LNP’s ability to boost DEN-80E specific immune responses, highlighting the crucial role for the charge of the LNP. Overall, our novel studies, across multiple species, reveal a promising tetravalent Dengue virus sub-unit vaccine candidate. PMID:27703172

  12. Evaluation of an attenuated, cold-recombinant influenza B virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monto, A S; Miller, F D; Maassab, H F

    1982-01-01

    A live, attenuated influenza B virus vaccine was evaluated in a group of students. The virus, cold-recombinant (CR) 7, was produced by recombining the attenuated cold-adapted parent, B/Ann Arbor/1/66, with a wild strain, B/Hong Kong/8/73. In ferrets, the wild strain produced histopathologic lesions in the lungs, whereas the CR strain and the attenuated parent did not. A total of 306 individuals was inoculated intranasally with either the CR virus or a placebo. After inoculation, only one symptom was significantly more common in the vaccinees than in the control subjects. That symptom, sore throat, occurred briefly in 26% of the vaccine recipients and in 10.5% of the placebo recipients. An outbreak of influenza B occurred three months after vaccination. When serologic infection rates in the two groups were compared, it was found that the vaccine had been significantly effective (P less than 0.01) in preventing infection.

  13. Genomic variations associated with attenuation in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) whole cell vaccines have been widely used tools in the control of Johne’s disease in animals despite being unable to provide complete protection. Current vaccine strains derive from stocks created many decades ago; however their genotypes, underlying mechanisms and relative degree of their attenuation are largely unknown. Results Using mouse virulence studies we confirm that MAP vaccine strains 316 F, II and 2e have diverse but clearly attenuated survival and persistence characteristics compared with wild type strains. Using a pan genomic microarray we characterise the genomic variations in a panel of vaccine strains sourced from stocks spanning over 40 years of maintenance. We describe multiple genomic variations specific for individual vaccine stocks in both deletion (26–32 Kbp) and tandem duplicated (11–40 Kbp) large variable genomic islands and insertion sequence copy numbers. We show individual differences suitable for diagnostic differentiation between vaccine and wild type genotypes and provide evidence for functionality of some of the deleted MAP-specific genes and their possible relation to attenuation. Conclusions This study shows how culture environments have influenced MAP genome diversity resulting in large tandem genomic duplications, deletions and transposable element activity. In combination with classical selective systematic subculture this has led to fixation of specific MAP genomic alterations in some vaccine strain lineages which link the resulting attenuated phenotypes with deficiencies in high reactive oxygen species handling. PMID:23339684

  14. Efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine in classical swine fever virus postnatally persistently infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Muñoz, Marta; Bohorquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Summerfield, Artur; Domingo, Mariano; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ganges, Llilianne

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) causes major losses in pig farming, with various degrees of disease severity. Efficient live attenuated vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are used routinely in endemic countries. However, despite intensive vaccination programs in these areas for more than 20 years, CSF has not been eradicated. Molecular epidemiology studies in these regions suggests that the virus circulating in the field has evolved under the positive selection pressure exerted by the immune response to the vaccine, leading to new attenuated viral variants. Recent work by our group demonstrated that a high proportion of persistently infected piglets can be generated by early postnatal infection with low and moderately virulent CSFV strains. Here, we studied the immune response to a hog cholera lapinised virus vaccine (HCLV), C-strain, in six-week-old persistently infected pigs following post-natal infection. CSFV-negative pigs were vaccinated as controls. The humoral and interferon gamma responses as well as the CSFV RNA loads were monitored for 21 days post-vaccination. No vaccine viral RNA was detected in the serum samples and tonsils from CSFV postnatally persistently infected pigs for 21 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, no E2-specific antibody response or neutralising antibody titres were shown in CSFV persistently infected vaccinated animals. Likewise, no of IFN-gamma producing cell response against CSFV or PHA was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the absence of a response to vaccination in CSFV persistently infected pigs.

  15. Ineffectiveness and comparative pathogenicity of attenuated rabies virus vaccines for the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, C E; Charlton, K M; Artois, M; Casey, G A; Webster, W A; Campbell, J B; Lawson, K F; Schneider, L G

    1990-01-01

    Three attenuated rabies virus vaccines (SAD-B19, ERA/BHK-21, AZA 2) were compared for efficacy and safety in the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) by the oral and intranasal routes. The SAD-B19 and ERA/BHK-21 vaccines were given orally; all three vaccines were given intranasally. Oral administration of SAD-B19 and ERA/BHK-21 vaccines induced neither seroconversion nor significant protection against rabies challenge. One skunk which consumed a SAD-B19 vaccine-laden bait succumbed to vaccine-induced rabies. Intranasal instillation of the three vaccines resulted in the deaths of two of six (AZA 2), three of six (ERA/BHK-21) and six of six (SAD-B19) skunks.

  16. Protective immune response of live attenuated thermo-adapted peste des petits ruminants vaccine in goats.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, V; Sen, A; Venkatesan, G; Bhanuprakash, V; Singh, R K

    2014-01-01

    Virulent isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) of Indian origin (PPRV Jhansi 2003) initially adapted in Vero cells was further propagated in thermo-adapted (Ta) Vero cells grown at 40 °C for attaining thermo-adaption and attenuation of virus for development of Ta vaccine against PPR in goats and sheep. The virus was attenuated up to 50 passages in Ta Vero cells, at which, the virus was found sterile, innocuous in mice and guinea pigs and safe in seronegative goats and sheep. The developed vaccine was tested for its immunogenicity in goats and sheep by subcutaneous inoculation of 100 TCID50 (0.1 field dose), 10(3) TCID50 (one field dose) and 10(5) TCID50 (100 field doses) of the attenuated virus along with controls as per OIE described protocols for PPR vaccine testing and were assessed for PPRV-specific antibodies 7-28 days post vaccination (dpv) by PPR competitive ELISA and serum neutralization tests. The PPRV antibodies were detected in all immunized goats and sheep and goats were protective when challenged with virulent PPRV at 28th dpv along with controls for potency testing of the vaccine. The attenuated vaccine did not induce any adverse reaction at high dose (10(5) TCID50) in goats and sheep and provided complete protection even at low dose (10(2) TCID50) in goats when challenged with virulent virus. There was no shedding and horizontal transmission of the attenuated virus to in-contact controls. The results indicate that the developed PPR Ta attenuated virus is innocuous, safe, immunogenic and potent or efficacious vaccine candidate alternative to the existing vaccines for the protection of goats and sheep against PPR in the tropical countries like India. PMID:25674603

  17. Live attenuated HIV vaccines: predicting the tradeoff between efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Blower, S M; Koelle, K; Kirschner, D E; Mills, J

    2001-03-13

    The utility of live attenuated vaccines for controlling HIV epidemics is being debated. Live attenuated HIV vaccines (LAHVs) could be extremely effective in protecting against infection with wild-type strains, but may not be completely safe as the attenuated strain could cause AIDS in some vaccinated individuals. We present a theoretical framework for evaluating the consequences of the tradeoff between vaccine efficacy (in terms of preventing new infections with wild-type strains) and safety (in terms of vaccine-induced AIDS deaths). We use our framework to predict, for Zimbabwe and Thailand, the epidemiological impact of 1,000 different (specified by efficacy and safety characteristics) LAHVs. We predict that paradoxically: (i) in Zimbabwe (where transmission is high) LAHVs would significantly decrease the AIDS death rate, but (ii) in Thailand (where transmission is low) exactly the same vaccines (in terms of efficacy and safety characteristics) would increase the AIDS death rate. Our results imply that a threshold transmission rate exists that determines whether any given LAHV has a beneficial or a detrimental impact. We also determine the vaccine perversity point, which is defined in terms of the fraction of vaccinated individuals who progress to AIDS as a result of the vaccine strain. Vaccination with any LAHV that causes more than 5% of vaccinated individuals to progress to AIDS in 25 years would, even 50 years later, lead to perversity (i.e., increase the annual AIDS death rate) in Thailand; these same vaccines would lead to decreases in the annual AIDS death rate in Zimbabwe.

  18. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A.; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  19. The Case for Live Attenuated Vaccines against the Neglected Zoonotic Diseases Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Cabello, Ana; Akoolo, Lavoisier; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Arenas-Gamboa, Angela; McMurray, David; Ficht, Thomas A; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Vaccination of humans and animals with live attenuated organisms has proven to be an effective means of combatting some important infectious diseases. In fact, the 20th century witnessed tremendous improvements in human and animal health worldwide as a consequence of large-scale vaccination programs with live attenuated vaccines (LAVs). Here, we use the neglected zoonotic diseases brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis (BTb) caused by Brucella spp. and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), respectively, as comparative models to outline the merits of LAV platforms with emphasis on molecular strategies that have been pursued to generate LAVs with enhanced vaccine safety and efficacy profiles. Finally, we discuss the prospects of LAV platforms in the fight against brucellosis and BTb and outline new avenues for future research towards developing effective vaccines using LAV platforms. PMID:27537413

  20. Evaluation of protective efficacy using a nonstructural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine-loaded microspheres against dengue 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-shiung; Li, I-Hsun; Hong, Po-da; Yeh, Ming-kung

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus results in dengue fever or severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop an effective antidengue virus delivery system, by designing poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid/polyethylene glycol (PLGA/PEG) microspheres using a double-emulsion solvent extraction method, for vaccination therapy based on locally and continuously sustained biological activity. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w), yield (85.2%), and entrapment efficiency (39%), the mean particle size 4.8 μm, and a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%), lag time (4 days), and continued released protein over 70 days. The distribution of protein on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core were 3.0%, 28.5%, and 60.7%, respectively. A release rate was noticed to be 1.07 μg protein/mg microspheres/day of protein release, maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at Days 1, 28, and 42 was 18.5, 53.7, and 62.66 μg protein/mg microspheres, respectively. The dengue virus challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 20 μg NS1 protein content of microspheres, in comparison with NS1 protein in Al(OH)3 or PBS solution, was evaluated after intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres (100%). In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state immune protection in rat plasma changed from 4,443 ± 1,384 pg/mL to 10,697 ± 3,197 pg/mL, which was 2.5-fold higher than that observed for dengue virus in Al(OH)3 at 21 days. These findings strongly suggest that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres offer a new therapeutic strategy in optimizing the vaccine incorporation

  1. Dengue virus NS1 triggers endothelial permeability and vascular leak that is prevented by NS1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beatty, P Robert; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Glasner, Dustin R; Hopkins, Kaycie; Harris, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to DENV4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause up to ~100 million cases of dengue annually worldwide. Severe disease is thought to result from immunopathogenic processes involving serotype cross-reactive antibodies and T cells that together induce vasoactive cytokines, causing vascular leakage that leads to shock. However, no viral proteins have been directly implicated in triggering endothelial permeability, which results in vascular leakage. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is secreted and circulates in patients' blood during acute infection; high levels of NS1 are associated with severe disease. We show that inoculation of mice with DENV NS1 alone induces both vascular leakage and production of key inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, simultaneous administration of NS1 with a sublethal dose of DENV2 results in a lethal vascular leak syndrome. We also demonstrate that NS1 from DENV1, DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4 triggers endothelial barrier dysfunction, causing increased permeability of human endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. These pathogenic effects of physiologically relevant amounts of NS1 in vivo and in vitro were blocked by NS1-immune polyclonal mouse serum or monoclonal antibodies to NS1, and immunization of mice with NS1 from DENV1 to DENV4 protected against lethal DENV2 challenge. These findings add an important and previously overlooked component to the causes of dengue vascular leak, identify a new potential target for dengue therapeutics, and support inclusion of NS1 in dengue vaccines. PMID:26355030

  2. Influence of maternally-derived antibodies on live attenuated influenza vaccine efficacy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Hyun Mi; Hlasny, Magda; Zhou, Yan

    2015-07-17

    Vaccination during pregnancy is practiced in swine farms as one measure to control swine influenza virus (SIV) infection in piglets at an early age. Vaccine-induced maternal antibodies transfer to piglets through colostrum and stabilize the herd: however, maternally derived antibodies (MDA) interfere with immune response following influenza vaccination in piglets at the later stage of life. In addition, MDA is related to enhanced respiratory disease in SIV infection. Previously, we have developed a bivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) which harbors both H1 and H3 HAs. We demonstrated vaccination of this LAIV provided protection to homologous and heterologous SIV infection in pigs. In this study we aimed to investigate the influence of MDA on LAIV efficacy. To this end, SIV sero-negative sows were vaccinated with a commercial vaccine. After parturition, nursery piglets were vaccinated with LAIV intranasally or intramuscularly, and were then challenged with SIV. We report that MDA hampered serum antibody response induced by intramuscular vaccination but not by intranasal vaccination of the LAIV. Viral challenge in the presence of MDA caused exacerbated respiratory disease in unvaccinated piglets. In contrast, all LAIV vaccinated piglets were protected from homologous viral infection regardless of the route of vaccination and the presence of MDA. Our results demonstrated that LAIV conferred protection in the presence of MDA without inciting exacerbated respiratory disease.

  3. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based dengue-2 vaccine candidate induces humoral response and protects mice against lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Flavio; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; de Oliveira França, Rafael Freitas; Castro-Jorge, Luiza; Rose, John; Fonseca, Benedito A L da

    2016-09-01

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus disease throughout the world and it is responsible for more than 500,000 dengue hemorrhagic cases and 22,000 deaths every year. One vaccine was recently licensed for human use in Brazil, Mexico and Philippines and although at least seven candidates have been in clinical trials the results of the most developed CYD vaccine have demonstrated immunization problems, such as uneven protection and interference between serotypes. We constructed a vaccine candidate based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expression of pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) and tested it in mice to evaluate immunogenicity and protection against DENV-2 infection. VSV has been successfully used as vaccine vectors for several viruses to induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses. The VSV-DENV-2 recombinant was constructed by inserting the DENV-2 structural proteins into a VSV plasmid DNA for recombinant VSV-DENV-2 recovery. Infectious recombinant VSV viruses were plaque purified and prM and E expression were confirmed by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of proteins of infected cells. Forty Balb/C mice were inoculated through subcutaneous (s.c.) route with VSV-DENV-2 vaccine in a two doses schedule 15 d apart and 29 d after first inoculation, sera were collected and the mice were challenged with 50 lethal doses (LD50) of a neurovirulent DENV-2. The VSV-DENV-2 induced anti-DENV-2 antibodies and protected animals in the challenge experiment comparable to DENV-2 immunization control group. We conclude that VSV is a promising platform to test as a DENV vaccine and perhaps against others Flaviviridae.

  4. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based dengue-2 vaccine candidate induces humoral response and protects mice against lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Flavio; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; de Oliveira França, Rafael Freitas; Castro-Jorge, Luiza; Rose, John; Fonseca, Benedito A L da

    2016-09-01

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus disease throughout the world and it is responsible for more than 500,000 dengue hemorrhagic cases and 22,000 deaths every year. One vaccine was recently licensed for human use in Brazil, Mexico and Philippines and although at least seven candidates have been in clinical trials the results of the most developed CYD vaccine have demonstrated immunization problems, such as uneven protection and interference between serotypes. We constructed a vaccine candidate based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expression of pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) and tested it in mice to evaluate immunogenicity and protection against DENV-2 infection. VSV has been successfully used as vaccine vectors for several viruses to induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses. The VSV-DENV-2 recombinant was constructed by inserting the DENV-2 structural proteins into a VSV plasmid DNA for recombinant VSV-DENV-2 recovery. Infectious recombinant VSV viruses were plaque purified and prM and E expression were confirmed by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of proteins of infected cells. Forty Balb/C mice were inoculated through subcutaneous (s.c.) route with VSV-DENV-2 vaccine in a two doses schedule 15 d apart and 29 d after first inoculation, sera were collected and the mice were challenged with 50 lethal doses (LD50) of a neurovirulent DENV-2. The VSV-DENV-2 induced anti-DENV-2 antibodies and protected animals in the challenge experiment comparable to DENV-2 immunization control group. We conclude that VSV is a promising platform to test as a DENV vaccine and perhaps against others Flaviviridae. PMID:27185081

  5. Dengue conundrums.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Robert V

    2010-11-01

    Dengue virus is the most common arboviral infection of humans in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This review briefly describes some of the challenges it presents. Dengue is an emerging disease; it is increasing in geographical distribution and severity, despite being significantly underreported. The World Health Organization case definition for the generally more severe manifestation of infection, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), is controversial. The name DHF is something of a misnomer as the disease infrequently results in frank haemorrhage; the hallmark of DHF is actually plasma leakage. The existence of four closely related dengue virus serotypes contributes to difficulties in diagnosis and to original antigenic sin in the serological response to infection. The existence of multiple serotypes can result in more severe disease upon a second infection and complicates vaccine development. Nevertheless, a safe and effective vaccine is the greatest prospect for stemming the tide of dengue.

  6. Single-dose attenuated Vesiculovax vaccines protect primates against Ebola Makona virus.

    PubMed

    Mire, Chad E; Matassov, Demetrius; Geisbert, Joan B; Latham, Theresa E; Agans, Krystle N; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael A; Fenton, Karla A; Clarke, David K; Eldridge, John H; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2015-04-30

    The family Filoviridae contains three genera, Ebolavirus (EBOV), Marburg virus, and Cuevavirus. Some members of the EBOV genus, including Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), can cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans. During 2014 an unprecedented ZEBOV outbreak occurred in West Africa and is still ongoing, resulting in over 10,000 deaths, and causing global concern of uncontrolled disease. To meet this challenge a rapid-acting vaccine is needed. Many vaccine approaches have shown promise in being able to protect nonhuman primates against ZEBOV. In response to the current ZEBOV outbreak several of these vaccines have been fast tracked for human use. However, it is not known whether any of these vaccines can provide protection against the new outbreak Makona strain of ZEBOV. One of these approaches is a first-generation recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine expressing the ZEBOV glycoprotein (GP) (rVSV/ZEBOV). To address safety concerns associated with this vector, we developed two candidate, further-attenuated rVSV/ZEBOV vaccines. Both attenuated vaccines produced an approximately tenfold lower vaccine-associated viraemia compared to the first-generation vaccine and both provided complete, single-dose protection of macaques from lethal challenge with the Makona outbreak strain of ZEBOV.

  7. Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ted M

    2010-03-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus affecting humans today. The virus group consists of 4 serotypes that manifest with similar symptoms. Dengue causes a spectrum of disease, ranging from a mild febrile illness to a life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. Breeding sites for the mosquitoes that transmit dengue virus have proliferated, partly because of population growth and uncontrolled urbanization in tropical and subtropical countries. Successful vector control programs have also been eliminated, often because of lack of governmental funding. Dengue viruses have evolved rapidly as they have spread worldwide, and genotypes associated with increased virulence have spread across Asia and the Americas. This article describes the virology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations and outcomes, and treatments/vaccines associated with dengue infection.

  8. Efficacy of a new attenuated duck parvovirosis vaccine in Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Maurin-Bernaud, L; Goutebroze, S; Merdy, O; Chanay, A; Cozette, V; Le Gros, F-X

    2014-09-20

    The efficacy of a new live attenuated parvovirosis vaccine was tested in conventional ducklings against Derzsy's disease by comparing two vaccination regimens. Ducklings were vaccinated with either one injection at 17 days of age or two injections at 1 and 17 days of age. Controls and vaccinated ducklings were challenged with a virulent Derzsy strain at 21 days of age (day 20). Weight was measured on days 20, 34 and 42/43. Surviving birds were necropsied on day 42/43. Protection rates were significantly higher in the groups vaccinated once (90 per cent, P=0.003) and twice (95 per cent, P<0.001) than in the control group (59 per cent). The bodyweight was significantly higher in both vaccinated groups than in the control group on day 34 (P=0.008 and P<0.001, respectively) and day 42/43 (P<0.001 for both groups). The growth was significantly higher in the group vaccinated twice than the group vaccinated once on day 34 (P=0.047) and day 42/43 (P=0.017). Both vaccination regimens provided a quick onset of immunity. The higher weight gain in the group vaccinated twice suggests that an early vaccination at hatchery followed by a second injection at 17 days of age is an optimal and practical schedule to prevent parvovirosis.

  9. Standardization of large scale production of homologous live attenuated PPR vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Raveendra; Gomes, Amitha R; Byregowda, S M; Hugar, Paramananda; Giridhar, P; Renukaprasad, C

    2008-01-01

    Live attenuated homologous vaccine against peste des petits ruminants of sheep and goats was produced on a large scale basis in roller culture bottles using seed virus developed at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Muktheswar, India. Vero cells between 130-150 passages with six percent foetal calf serum were used for the production of vaccine. The cells were infected with 0.01 multiplicity of infection and harvested when the cytopathic effect was 80%. The vaccine was freezedried in order to maintain the stability of the vaccine. Identity test and titration was performed and the vaccine titre was monitored to be minimum of 10(5)/100 doses. In-house sterility tests and quality control tests using experimental animals and small ruminants were performed. The vacuum and moisture content of the vaccine were also regulated to be within the normal limits.

  10. Increasing uptake of live attenuated influenza vaccine among children in the United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Loren; Pabst, Laura J; Chaves, Sandra S

    2015-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends annual influenza vaccination for all persons in the United States aged ≥6 months. On June 25, 2014, ACIP preferentially recommended live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) for healthy children aged 2-8 years. Little is known about national LAIV uptake. To determine uptake of LAIV relative to inactivated influenza vaccine, we analyzed vaccination records from six immunization information system sentinel sites (approximately 10% of US population). LAIV usage increased over time in all sites. Among children 2-8 years of age vaccinated for influenza, exclusive LAIV usage in the collective sentinel site area increased from 20.1% (2008-09 season) to 38.0% (2013-14). During 2013-14, at least half of vaccinated children received LAIV in Minnesota (50.0%) and North Dakota (55.5%). Increasing LAIV usage suggests formulation acceptability, and this preexisting trend offers a favorable context for implementation of ACIP's preferential recommendation.

  11. Experimental evaluation of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Aye, Racheal; Soi, Reuben; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Naessens, Jan; Wesonga, Hezron

    2016-01-01

    The current control method for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Africa is vaccination with a live, attenuated strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). However, this method is not very efficient and often causes serious adverse reactions. Several studies have attempted to induce protection using inactivated mycoplasma, but with widely contradictory results. Therefore, we compared the protective capacity of the live T1/44 vaccine with two inactivated preparations of Mmm strain Afadé, inoculated with an adjuvant. Protection was measured after a challenge with Afadé. The protection levels were 31%, 80.8% and 74.1% for the formalin-inactivated, heat-inactivated and live attenuated preparations, respectively. These findings indicate that low doses of heat-inactivated Mmm can offer protection to a level similar to the current live attenuated (T1/44) vaccine formulation.

  12. Experimental evaluation of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Aye, Racheal; Soi, Reuben; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Naessens, Jan; Wesonga, Hezron

    2016-01-01

    The current control method for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Africa is vaccination with a live, attenuated strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). However, this method is not very efficient and often causes serious adverse reactions. Several studies have attempted to induce protection using inactivated mycoplasma, but with widely contradictory results. Therefore, we compared the protective capacity of the live T1/44 vaccine with two inactivated preparations of Mmm strain Afadé, inoculated with an adjuvant. Protection was measured after a challenge with Afadé. The protection levels were 31%, 80.8% and 74.1% for the formalin-inactivated, heat-inactivated and live attenuated preparations, respectively. These findings indicate that low doses of heat-inactivated Mmm can offer protection to a level similar to the current live attenuated (T1/44) vaccine formulation. PMID:26827840

  13. Dose titration study of live attenuated varicella vaccine in healthy children. Pennridge Pediatric Associates.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, E P; Bernstein, H H; Ngai, A L; Cho, I; White, C J

    1997-02-01

    To approximate the effect of prolonged storage on safety and immunogenicity, healthy children were given a single dose of the currently marketed live attenuated varicella vaccine (3625 pfu) or of a partially heat-inactivated vaccine (1125 or 439 pfu). The 3 doses had similar antigen content (attenuated plus inactive virus particles). The vaccine was well tolerated. No significant differences in adverse reactions were observed. Although the seroconversion rates were excellent at each dose (> or = 98%), the higher doses resulted in significantly greater geometric mean antibody titers at 6 weeks (10.5 and 10.6 ELISA U/mL) compared with the 439 pfu dose (5.7 ELISA U/mL), P < or = .01. One year after immunization, differences in antibodies were similar to the 6-week postimmunization results. Results indicate that until the date of expiry, the vaccine's immunogenicity will be preserved and there will be no clinically important changes in type or frequency of adverse events.

  14. Clinical efficacy of the RIT 4237 live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine in infants vaccinated before a rotavirus epidemic.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T; Isolauri, E; Delem, A; d'Hondt, E; André, F E; Beards, G M; Flewett, T H

    1985-08-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 331 infants aged 6 to 12 months received orally, at an interval of 1 month, either two doses of live attenuated bovine rotavirus vaccine strain RIT 4237 or equivalent placebo. The vaccinations were carried out during September to November, a non-rotavirus season; only three cases of rotavirus diarrhea occurred in the study group before the vaccinations were completed. During the epidemic season from December to May, 31 patients with clinically significant rotavirus diarrhea required therapy. Five of these were among the 168 vaccine recipients, and 26 among the 160 placebo recipients (P less than 0.001), giving a vaccine protection rate of 82%. The incidence of clinically significant diarrhea from all causes was reduced by 76% in the vaccinees. As determined by an enzyme immunoassay antibody test with homologous virus antigen, seroconversion after vaccination was obtained in 53% of the initially seronegative infants. Clinical protection correlated well with seroconversion, but the vaccinees who failed to seroconvert also had less rotavirus diarrhea than the placebo recipients, suggesting that immunity may be mediated by factors other than serum EIA antibody. Seventeen of the 23 rotavirus isolates in the epidemic season that were typed were of serotype 1, two were of serotype 2, and four were of serotype 3. The protection rates against clinically significant diarrhea were 72%, 100%, and 100% for serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. We conclude that epidemic infantile winter diarrhea associated with human rotaviruses can be significantly reduced by vaccination with the live attenuated RIT 4237 bovine rotavirus vaccine before the epidemic season.

  15. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    SciTech Connect

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  16. Persistence of Th1/Tc1 responses one year after tetravalent dengue vaccination in adults and adolescents in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Anke; Begue, Sarah; Mamessier, Audrey; Gimenez-Fourage, Sophie; Ching Seah, Ching; Wei Liang, Ai; Li Ng, Jun; Yun Toh, Xue; Archuleta, Sophia; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Shek, Lynette P; Wartel-Tram, Anh; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Lang, Jean; Crevat, Denis; Caillet, Catherine; Guy, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the cell mediated immunity (CMI) induced by the investigational CYD tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV), we developed a whole-blood, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay and a multiplex assay, each requiring 3 mL of blood. We assessed CMI before and 28 d after a first and third injection of CYD-TDV and one year after the third injection in a subset of 80 adolescents and adults enrolled in a phase II trial in Singapore (ClinicalTrial.gov NCT NCT00880893). CD4/IFNγ/TNFα responses specific to dengue NS3 were detected before vaccination. Vaccination induced YF-17D-NS3-specific CD8/IFNγ responses, without significant TNFα, and a CYD-specific Th1/Tc1 cellular response in all participants, which was characterized by predominant IFNγ secretion compared with TNFα, associated with low level IL-13 secretion in multiplex analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) supernatants after restimulation with each the CYD vaccine viruses. Responses were directed mainly against CYD-4 after the first vaccination, and were more balanced against all four serotypes after the third vaccination. The same qualitative profile was observed one year after the third vaccination, with approximately 2-fold lower NS3-specific responses, and 3-fold lower serotype-specific cellular responses. These findings confirm previous observations regarding both the nature and specificity of cellular responses induced by CYD-TDV, and for the first time demonstrate the persistence of cellular responses after one year. We also established the feasibility of analyzing CMI with small blood samples, allowing such analysis to be considered for pediatric trials.

  17. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a recombinant, genetically engineered, live-attenuated vaccine against canine blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Bass, Chris; Filutowicz, Hanna I; Legendre, Alfred M; Klein, Bruce S

    2011-05-01

    Blastomycosis is a severe, commonly fatal infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis in dogs that live in the United States, Canada, and parts of Africa. The cost of treating an infection can be expensive, and no vaccine against this infection is commercially available. A genetically engineered live-attenuated strain of B. dermatitidis lacking the major virulence factor BAD-1 successfully vaccinates against lethal experimental infection in mice. Here we studied the safety, toxicity, and immunogenicity of this strain as a vaccine in dogs, using 25 beagles at a teaching laboratory and 78 foxhounds in a field trial. In the beagles, escalating doses of live vaccine ranging from 2 × 10⁴ to 2 × 10⁷ yeast cells given subcutaneously were safe and did not disseminate to the lung or induce systemic illness, but a dose of < 2 × 10⁶ yeast cells induced less fever and local inflammation. A vaccine dose of 10⁵ yeast cells was also well tolerated in vaccinated foxhounds who had never had blastomycosis; however, vaccinated dogs with prior infection had more local reactions at the vaccine site. The draining lymph node cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated dogs demonstrated gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) specifically in response to stimulation with Blastomyces antigens. Thus, the live-attenuated vaccine against blastomycosis studied here proved safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic in dogs and merits further studies of vaccine efficacy.

  18. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Dengue Virus Serotype-1 Purified-Inactivated Vaccine: Results of a Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Luis Javier; Lin, Leyi; Blaylock, Jason M.; Lyons, Arthur G.; Bauer, Kristen M.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Simmons, Monika; Jarman, Richard G.; Currier, Jeffrey R.; Friberg, Heather; Danko, Janine R.; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C.; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Thomas, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the results from a human clinical trial of a dengue virus serotype-1, purified-inactivated vaccine (DENV-1 PIV) adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide. This first-in-man, Phase 1, open-label clinical trial consisted of two groups of flavivirus-naïve healthy adult volunteers that received two intramuscular vaccine doses of either 2.5 μg or 5 μg of DENV-1 PIV administered on days 0 and 28. Following vaccination, both vaccine doses exhibited an acceptable safety profile with minimal injection site and systemic reactions. By study day 42, 2 weeks following the second vaccine dose, all volunteers in both vaccine groups developed serum-neutralizing antibodies against DENV-1. Additional testing using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated induction of a humoral immune response following both vaccine doses. The DENV-1 PIV was safe and immunogenic in a small number of volunteers supporting development and further testing of a tetravalent DENV PIV formulation. PMID:26149862

  19. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Dengue Virus Serotype-1 Purified-Inactivated Vaccine: Results of a Phase 1 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis Javier; Lin, Leyi; Blaylock, Jason M; Lyons, Arthur G; Bauer, Kristen M; De La Barrera, Rafael; Simmons, Monika; Jarman, Richard G; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather; Danko, Janine R; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    We describe the results from a human clinical trial of a dengue virus serotype-1, purified-inactivated vaccine (DENV-1 PIV) adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide. This first-in-man, Phase 1, open-label clinical trial consisted of two groups of flavivirus-naïve healthy adult volunteers that received two intramuscular vaccine doses of either 2.5 μg or 5 μg of DENV-1 PIV administered on days 0 and 28. Following vaccination, both vaccine doses exhibited an acceptable safety profile with minimal injection site and systemic reactions. By study day 42, 2 weeks following the second vaccine dose, all volunteers in both vaccine groups developed serum-neutralizing antibodies against DENV-1. Additional testing using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated induction of a humoral immune response following both vaccine doses. The DENV-1 PIV was safe and immunogenic in a small number of volunteers supporting development and further testing of a tetravalent DENV PIV formulation. PMID:26149862

  20. Recombinant Dengue 2 Virus NS3 Helicase Protein Enhances Antibody and T-Cell Response of Purified Inactivated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Monika; Sun, Peifang; Putnak, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus purified inactivated vaccines (PIV) are highly immunogenic and protective over the short term, but may be poor at inducing cell-mediated immune responses and long-term protection. The dengue nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is considered the main target for T-cell responses during viral infection. The amino (N)-terminal protease and the carboxy (C)-terminal helicase domains of DENV-2 NS3 were expressed in E. coli and analyzed for their immune-potentiating capacity. Mice were immunized with DENV-2 PIV with and without recombinant NS3 protease or NS3 helicase proteins, and NS3 proteins alone on days 0, 14 and 28. The NS3 helicase but not the NS3 protease was effective in inducing T-cell responses quantified by IFN-γ ELISPOT. In addition, markedly increased total IgG antibody titer against virus antigen was seen in mice immunized with the PIV/NS3 helicase combination in the ELISA, as well as increased neutralizing antibody titer measured by the plaque reduction neutralization test. These results indicate the potential immunogenic properties of the NS3 helicase protein and its use in a dengue vaccine formulation. PMID:27035715

  1. Influenza vaccination for the pediatric patient: a focus on the new intranasal, cold-adapted, live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jennifer M; Reilly, Joan C; Salazar, Juan C

    2004-04-01

    FluMist is the first live attenuated, cold-adapted intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV) approved for the prevention of influenza A and B. Clinical trials have shown that annual vaccination with LAIV is effective for the prevention of influenza. LAIV appears well tolerated in healthy patients 5-49 years of age. The most common adverse events are abdominal pain, chills, cough, diarrhea, headache, irritability, lethargy, muscle aches, otitis media, rhinitis, sinusitis, sore throat, and vomiting. FluMist has a novel intranasal route of administration that allows for influenza prevention without a painful intramuscular injection. Barriers preventing acceptance of LAIV include defining the appropriate patient population, cost, and insurance coverage.

  2. Induction of a Protective Response in Mice by the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein Using DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Vidale, Mariana M.; Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A.; Freire, Marcos S.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection. PMID:22031819

  3. Induction of a protective response in mice by the dengue virus NS3 protein using DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Costa, Simone M; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Vidale, Mariana M; Costa, Emmerson C B; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A; Freire, Marcos S; Alves, Ada M B

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection.

  4. Multicenter Safety and Immunogenicity Trial of an Attenuated Measles Vaccine for NHP

    PubMed Central

    Yee, JoAnn L; McChesney, Michael B; Christe, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Measles is a highly contagious viral disease in NHP. The infection can range from asymptomatic to rapidly fatal, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in captive populations. In addition to appropriate quarantine practices, restricted access, the immunization of all personnel in contact with NHP, and the wearing of protective clothing including face masks, measles immunization further reduces the infection risk. Commercially available measles vaccines are effective for use in NHP, but interruptions in their availability have prevented the implementation of ongoing, consistent vaccination programs. This need for a readily available vaccine led us to perform a broad, multicenter safety and immunogenicity study of another candidate vaccine, MVac (Serum Institute of India), a monovalent measles vaccine derived from live Edmonston–Zagreb strain virus that had been attenuated after 22 passages on human diploid cells. PMID:26473350

  5. Schistosoma japonicum: an ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y E; Jiang, C F; Han, J J; Li, Y L; Ruppel, A

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease. PMID:2113005

  6. Schistosoma japonicum: An ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Y.E.; Jiang, C.F.; Han, J.J.; Li, Y.L.; Ruppel, A. )

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease.

  7. Schistosoma japonicum: an ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y E; Jiang, C F; Han, J J; Li, Y L; Ruppel, A

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinated animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease.

  8. CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS ANTIBODY TITERS IN DOMESTIC CATS AFTER DELIVERY OF A LIVE ATTENUATED VIRUS VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Edward; Sadler, Ryan; Rush, Robert; Seimon, Tracie; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Fleetwood, Ellen A; McAloose, Denise; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Three methods for delivering a live attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to domestic cats ( Felis catus ) were investigated, as models for developing vaccination protocols for tigers (Panthera tigris). Twenty domestic cats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls); and oral, intranasal, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Cats were injected with saline or a CDV vaccine (Nobivac DP, Merck) at wk 0 and 4. Blood and nasal swabs were collected at wk 0 (prior to the initial vaccination) and weekly thereafter for 9 wk. Urine samples were collected on wk 1 to 9 after initial vaccination. Forty-nine weeks following the initial vaccination series, three cats from the subcutaneous group and three cats from the intranasal group were revaccinated. Blood was collected immediately prior, and 7 and 21 days subsequent to revaccination. Nasal swabs and urine samples were collected from each cat prior to wk 49 revaccination and daily for 7 days thereafter. Nasal swabs and urine were analyzed by quantitative PCR for vaccine virus presence. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All cats were sero-negative for CDV antibodies at the beginning of the study, and saline-injected cats remained sero-negative throughout the study. A dramatic anamnestic response was seen following wk 4 subcutaneous vaccinations, with titers peaking at wk 6 (geometric mean = 2,435.5). Following wk 49 revaccination, subcutaneous vaccinates again mounted impressive titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 2,048). Revaccination of the intranasal group cats at wk 49 produced a small increase in titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 203). CDV viral RNA was detected in six nasal swabs but no urine samples, demonstrating low viral shedding postvaccination. The strong antibody response to subcutaneous vaccination and the lack of adverse effects suggest this vaccine is safe and potentially protective against CDV infection in domestic cats.

  9. Unique immunogenicity of hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine presented by live-attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C; Wong, L P; Zheng, B J; Yuen, K Y

    2001-04-01

    A novel vaccine for hepatitis B virus (HBV) was designed by putting a naked DNA vaccine carrying hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) into live-attenuated Salmonella typhimurium. Mucosal immunization by the oral route in mice showed significantly stronger cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response than recombinant HBsAg vaccination (P < 0.01 at an effector:target ratio of 100:1), while comparable to intramuscular naked DNA immunization at all effector:target ratios. Contrary to previous reports on naked DNA vaccines given intramuscularly, the IgG antibody response induced by the mucosal DNA vaccine is relatively weak when compared to recombinant HBsAg vaccine (P < 0.001 at day 21). These findings are supported by a high interferon-gamma but a low interleukin-4 level detected in the supernatant of splenic cell cultures obtained from mucosally immunized mice. As distinct to recombinant HBsAg vaccine which is effective for protection, oral mucosal DNA vaccine should be considered as a candidate for therapeutic immunization in chronic HBV infection, donor immunization before adoptive transfer of HBV-specific CTL to HBsAg positive bone marrow transplant recipients, and immunization of non-responders to recombinant HBsAg vaccine. This strongly cellular and relatively absent humoral response may make this vaccine a better candidate as a therapeutic vaccine for chronic HBV carriers than naked DNA vaccines, as the humoral response is relatively less important for the clearance of HBV from hepatocytes, but its presence may lead to side effects such as serum sickness and immune complex deposition in chronic HBV carriers.

  10. CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS ANTIBODY TITERS IN DOMESTIC CATS AFTER DELIVERY OF A LIVE ATTENUATED VIRUS VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Edward; Sadler, Ryan; Rush, Robert; Seimon, Tracie; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Fleetwood, Ellen A; McAloose, Denise; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Three methods for delivering a live attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to domestic cats ( Felis catus ) were investigated, as models for developing vaccination protocols for tigers (Panthera tigris). Twenty domestic cats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls); and oral, intranasal, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Cats were injected with saline or a CDV vaccine (Nobivac DP, Merck) at wk 0 and 4. Blood and nasal swabs were collected at wk 0 (prior to the initial vaccination) and weekly thereafter for 9 wk. Urine samples were collected on wk 1 to 9 after initial vaccination. Forty-nine weeks following the initial vaccination series, three cats from the subcutaneous group and three cats from the intranasal group were revaccinated. Blood was collected immediately prior, and 7 and 21 days subsequent to revaccination. Nasal swabs and urine samples were collected from each cat prior to wk 49 revaccination and daily for 7 days thereafter. Nasal swabs and urine were analyzed by quantitative PCR for vaccine virus presence. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All cats were sero-negative for CDV antibodies at the beginning of the study, and saline-injected cats remained sero-negative throughout the study. A dramatic anamnestic response was seen following wk 4 subcutaneous vaccinations, with titers peaking at wk 6 (geometric mean = 2,435.5). Following wk 49 revaccination, subcutaneous vaccinates again mounted impressive titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 2,048). Revaccination of the intranasal group cats at wk 49 produced a small increase in titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 203). CDV viral RNA was detected in six nasal swabs but no urine samples, demonstrating low viral shedding postvaccination. The strong antibody response to subcutaneous vaccination and the lack of adverse effects suggest this vaccine is safe and potentially protective against CDV infection in domestic cats. PMID:27468028

  11. Novel Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate with an IRES-Based Attenuation and Host Range Alteration Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Kenneth; Wang, Eryu; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Weger, James; Gorchakov, Rodion; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Seymour, Robert; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that has recently caused devastating urban epidemics of severe and sometimes chronic arthralgia. As with most other mosquito-borne viral diseases, control relies on reducing mosquito populations and their contact with people, which has been ineffective in most locations. Therefore, vaccines remain the best strategy to prevent most vector-borne diseases. Ideally, vaccines for diseases of resource-limited countries should combine low cost and single dose efficacy, yet induce rapid and long-lived immunity with negligible risk of serious adverse reactions. To develop such a vaccine to protect against chikungunya fever, we employed a rational attenuation mechanism that also prevents the infection of mosquito vectors. The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus replaced the subgenomic promoter in a cDNA CHIKV clone, thus altering the levels and host-specific mechanism of structural protein gene expression. Testing in both normal outbred and interferon response-defective mice indicated that the new vaccine candidate is highly attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious after a single dose. Furthermore, it is incapable of replicating in mosquito cells or infecting mosquitoes in vivo. This IRES-based attenuation platform technology may be useful for the predictable attenuation of any alphavirus. PMID:21829348

  12. Response of pheasants to live attenuated turkey rhinotracheitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dalton, J R F; Niblett, J; Thrusfield, M V

    2002-09-21

    The entire crop of 18,120 pheasants for the 2000 rearing season (May 8 to August 7) of one estate in the south of England was vaccinated at one day and five weeks of age with a turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) vaccine. Blood samples and oropharyngeal swabs were taken from the second week's hatching every three weeks throughout the growing season to assess the response of the birds. There was evidence of seroconversion in samples collected three weeks after vaccination, with positive titres being maintained in 33 per cent or more of the population up to at least 22 weeks of age. Positive titres were also recorded in samples taken on December 6 from shot birds between 22 and 30 weeks of age. Positive titres to infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) were identified in a high proportion of the poults as early as one day of age. Reverse-transcriptase PCR detected IBV-like virus and TRT of the same subtype as the TRT vaccine administered three weeks previously.

  13. Deep Sequencing of Distinct Preparations of the Live Attenuated Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccine Reveals a Conserved Core of Attenuating Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Yamanishi, Koichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Gershon, Anne A.; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The continued success of the live attenuated varicella-zoster virus vaccine in preventing varicella-zoster and herpes zoster is well documented, as are many of the mutations that contribute to the attenuation of the vOka virus for replication in skin. At least three different preparations of vOka are marketed. Here, we show using deep sequencing of seven batches of vOka vaccine (including ZostaVax, VariVax, VarilRix, and the Oka/Biken working seed) from three different manufacturers (VariVax, GSK, and Biken) that 137 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations are present in all vaccine batches. This includes six sites at which the vaccine allele is fixed or near fixation, which we speculate are likely to be important for attenuation. We also show that despite differences in the vaccine populations between preparations, batch-to-batch variation is minimal, as is the number and frequency of mutations unique to individual batches. This suggests that the vaccine manufacturing processes are not introducing new mutations and that, notwithstanding the mixture of variants present, VZV live vaccines are extremely stable. IMPORTANCE The continued success of vaccinations to prevent chickenpox and shingles, combined with the extremely low incidence of adverse reactions, indicates the quality of these vaccines. The vaccine itself is comprised of a heterogeneous live attenuated virus population and thus requires deep-sequencing technologies to explore the differences and similarities in the virus populations between different preparations and batches of the vaccines. Our data demonstrate minimal variation between batches, an important safety feature, and provide new insights into the extent of the mutations present in this attenuated virus. PMID:27440875

  14. Production of a Recombinant Dengue Virus 2 NS5 Protein and Potential Use as a Vaccine Antigen.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rúbens Prince Dos Santos; Pereira, Lennon Ramos; Fabris, Denicar Lina Nascimento; Salvador, Felipe Scassi; Santos, Robert Andreata; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade; Romano, Camila Malta; Amorim, Jaime Henrique; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza

    2016-06-01

    Dengue fever is caused by any of the four known dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to DENV4) that affect millions of people worldwide, causing a significant number of deaths. There are vaccines based on chimeric viruses, but they still are not in clinical use. Anti-DENV vaccine strategies based on nonstructural proteins are promising alternatives to those based on whole virus or structural proteins. The DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is the main target of anti-DENV T cell-based immune responses in humans. In this study, we purified a soluble recombinant form of DENV2 NS5 expressed in Escherichia coli at large amounts and high purity after optimization of expression conditions and purification steps. The purified DENV2 NS5 was recognized by serum from DENV1-, DENV2-, DENV3-, or DENV4-infected patients in an epitope-conformation-dependent manner. In addition, immunization of BALB/c mice with NS5 induced high levels of NS5-specific antibodies and expansion of gamma interferon- and tumor necrosis factor alpha-producing T cells. Moreover, mice immunized with purified NS5 were partially protected from lethal challenges with the DENV2 NGC strain and with a clinical isolate (JHA1). These results indicate that the recombinant NS5 protein preserves immunological determinants of the native protein and is a promising vaccine antigen capable of inducing protective immune responses. PMID:27030586

  15. Room Temperature Stabilization of Oral, Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi-Vectored Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Satoshi; Martin, Russell; Saxena, Atul; Pham, Binh; Chiueh, Gary; Osorio, Manuel; Kopecko, Dennis; Xu, DeQi; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong-Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    Foam drying, a modified freeze drying process, was utilized to produce a heat-stable, live attenuated Salmonella Typhi ‘Ty21a’ bacterial vaccine. Ty21a vaccine was formulated with pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, including sugars, plasticizers, amino acids, and proteins. Growth media and harvesting conditions of the bacteria were also studied to enhance resistance to desiccation stress encountered during processing as well as subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. The optimized Ty21a vaccine, formulated with trehalose, methionine, and gelatin, demonstrated stability for approximately 12 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1log10 CFU) and no loss in titer at 4 and 25°C following storage for the same duration. Furthermore, the foam dried Ty21a elicited a similar immunogenic response in mice as well as protection in challenge studies compared to Vivotif™, the commercial Ty21a vaccine. The enhanced heat stability of the Ty21a oral vaccine, or Ty21a derivatives expressing foreign antigens (e.g. anthrax), could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long term storage, shipping, delivery to geographical areas with warmer climates or during emergency distribution following a bioterrorist attack. Because the foam drying process is conducted using conventional freeze dryers and can be readily implemented at any freeze drying manufacturing facility, this technology appears ready and appropriate for large scale processing of foam dried vaccines. PMID:21300096

  16. Biosafety considerations for attenuated measles virus vectors used in virotherapy and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Aline; Galanis, Evanthia; Tangy, Frédéric; Herman, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Attenuated measles virus (MV) is one of the most effective and safe vaccines available, making it attractive candidate vector to prevent infectious diseases. Attenuated MV have acquired the ability to use the complement regulator CD46 as a major receptor to mediate virus entry and intercellular fusion. Therefore, attenuated MV strains preferentially infect and destroy a wide variety of cancer cells making them also attractive oncolytic vectors. The use of recombinant MV vector has to comply with various regulatory requirements, particularly relating to the assessment of potential risks for human health and the environment. The present article highlights the main characteristics of MV and recombinant MV vectors used for vaccination and virotherapy and discusses these features from a biosafety point of view. PMID:26631840

  17. Live-Attenuated Measles Virus Vaccine Targets Dendritic Cells and Macrophages in Muscle of Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Rennick, Linda J.; de Vries, Rory D.; Carsillo, Thomas J.; Lemon, Ken; van Amerongen, Geert; Ludlow, Martin; Nguyen, D. Tien; Yüksel, Selma; Verburgh, R. Joyce; Haddock, Paula; McQuaid, Stephen; de Swart, Rik L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although live-attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have been used successfully for over 50 years, the target cells that sustain virus replication in vivo are still unknown. We generated a reverse genetics system for the live-attenuated MV vaccine strain Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ), allowing recovery of recombinant (r)MVEZ. Three recombinant viruses were generated that contained the open reading frame encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) within an additional transcriptional unit (ATU) at various positions within the genome. rMVEZEGFP(1), rMVEZEGFP(3), and rMVEZEGFP(6) contained the ATU upstream of the N gene, following the P gene, and following the H gene, respectively. The viruses were compared in vitro by growth curves, which indicated that rMVEZEGFP(1) was overattenuated. Intratracheal infection of cynomolgus macaques with these recombinant viruses revealed differences in immunogenicity. rMVEZEGFP(1) and rMVEZEGFP(6) did not induce satisfactory serum antibody responses, whereas both in vitro and in vivo rMVEZEGFP(3) was functionally equivalent to the commercial MVEZ-containing vaccine. Intramuscular vaccination of macaques with rMVEZEGFP(3) resulted in the identification of EGFP+ cells in the muscle at days 3, 5, and 7 postvaccination. Phenotypic characterization of these cells demonstrated that muscle cells were not infected and that dendritic cells and macrophages were the predominant target cells of live-attenuated MV. IMPORTANCE Even though MV strain Edmonston-Zagreb has long been used as a live-attenuated vaccine (LAV) to protect against measles, nothing is known about the primary cells in which the virus replicates in vivo. This is vital information given the push to move toward needle-free routes of vaccination, since vaccine virus replication is essential for vaccination efficacy. We have generated a number of recombinant MV strains expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein. The virus that best mimicked the nonrecombinant vaccine

  18. An avian live attenuated master backbone for potential use in epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Danielle; Hossain, Md Jaber; Song, Haichen; Araya, Yonas; Solórzano, Alicia; Perez, Daniel R

    2008-11-01

    The unprecedented emergence in Asia of multiple avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes with a broad host range poses a major challenge in the design of vaccination strategies that are both effective and available in a timely manner. The present study focused on the protective effects of a genetically modified AIV as a source for the preparation of vaccines for epidemic and pandemic influenza. It has previously been demonstrated that a live attenuated AIV based on the internal backbone of influenza A/Guinea fowl/Hong Kong/WF10/99 (H9N2), called WF10att, is effective at protecting poultry species against low- and high-pathogenicity influenza strains. More importantly, this live attenuated virus provided effective protection when administered in ovo. In order to characterize the WF10att backbone further for use in epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccines, this study evaluated its protective effects in mice. Intranasal inoculation of modified attenuated viruses in mice provided adequate protective immunity against homologous lethal challenges with both the wild-type influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) and A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) viruses. Adequate heterotypic immunity was also observed in mice vaccinated with modified attenuated viruses carrying H7N2 surface proteins. The results presented in this report suggest that the internal genes of a genetically modified AIV confer similar protection in a mouse model and thus could be used as a master donor strain for the generation of live attenuated vaccines for epidemic and pandemic influenza.

  19. Development of a stable liquid formulation of live attenuated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    White, Jessica A; Estrada, Marcus; Flood, E Alexander; Mahmood, Kutub; Dhere, Rajeev; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-07-12

    Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing influenza. However, the cost of producing annual seasonal influenza vaccines puts them out of reach for most developing countries. While live attenuated influenza vaccines are among the most efficacious and can be manufactured at low cost, they may require lyophilization to be stable enough for developing-country use, which adds a significant cost burden. The development of a liquid live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine that is stable for around a year-the duration of an annual influenza season-would significantly improve not only the production output but also the use and accessibility of influenza vaccines in low-resource settings. In this study, potential stabilizing excipients were screened and optimized using the least stable influenza vaccine strain presently known, H1N1 (A/California/07/2009), as a model. The stability-conferring properties of the lead formulations were also tested with a Type B strain of influenza virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008). Stability was also evaluated with higher titers of influenza virus and exposure to agitation and freeze-thaw stresses to further confirm the stability of the lead formulations. Through this process, we identified a liquid formulation consisting of sucrose phosphate glutamate buffer with 1% arginine and 0.5% recombinant human serum albumin that provided storage stability of one year at 2-8°C for the influenza A and B strains tested. PMID:27155495

  20. Reverse genetics of rabies virus: new strategies to attenuate virus virulence for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shimao; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunhua; Luo, Farui; Guo, Caiping

    2015-08-01

    Rabies is an ancient neurological disease that is almost invariably fatal once the clinical symptoms develop. Currently, prompt wound cleansing after exposing to a potentially rabid animal and vaccination using rabies vaccine combined with administration of rabies immune globulin are the only effective methods for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies. Reverse genetic technique is a novel approach to investigate the function of a specific gene by analyzing the phenotypic effects through directly manipulating the gene sequences. It has revolutionized and provided a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of RNA viruses and has been widely used in rabies virus research. The attenuation of rabies virus virulence is the prerequisite for rabies vaccine development. Given the current challenge that sufficient and affordable high-quality vaccines are limited and lacking for global rabies prevention and control, highly cell-adapted, stable, and attenuated rabies viruses with broad cross-reactivity against different viral variants are ideal candidates for consideration to meet the need for human rabies control in the future. A number of approaches have been pursued to reduce the virulence of the virus and improve the safety of rabies vaccines. The application of reverse genetic technique has greatly advanced the engineering of rabies virus and paves the avenue for utilizing rabies virus for vaccine against rabies, viral vectors for exogenous antigen expression, and gene therapy in the future.

  1. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate.

    PubMed

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L; Bergren, Nicholas A; Seymour, Robert L; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-α/β receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing.

  2. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate.

    PubMed

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L; Bergren, Nicholas A; Seymour, Robert L; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-α/β receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing. PMID:26340754

  3. Extended Preclinical Safety, Efficacy and Stability Testing of a Live-attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Kenneth S; Rossi, Shannan L.; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Seymour, Robert L.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently described a new, live-attenuated vaccine candidate for chikungunya (CHIK) fever, CHIKV/IRES. This vaccine was shown to be well attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious in protecting against CHIK virus (CHIKV) challenge of mice and nonhuman primates. To further evaluate its preclinical safety, we compared CHIKV/IRES distribution and viral loads in interferon-α/β receptor-incompetent A129 mice to another CHIK vaccine candidate, 181/clone25, which proved highly immunogenic but mildly reactive in human Phase I/II clinical trials. Compared to wild-type CHIK virus, (wt-CHIKV), both vaccines generated lower viral loads in a wide variety of tissues and organs, including the brain and leg muscle, but CHIKV/IRES exhibited marked restrictions in dissemination and viral loads compared to 181/clone25, and was never found outside the blood, spleen and muscle. Unlike wt-CHIKV, which caused disrupted splenic architecture and hepatic lesions, histopathological lesions were not observed in animals infected with either vaccine strain. To examine the stability of attenuation, both vaccines were passaged 5 times intracranially in infant A129 mice, then assessed for changes in virulence by comparing parental and passaged viruses for footpad swelling, weight stability and survival after subcutaneous infection. Whereas strain 181/clone25 p5 underwent a significant increase in virulence as measured by weight loss (from <10% to >30%) and mortality (from 0 to 100%), CHIKV/IRES underwent no detectible change in any measure of virulence (no significant weight loss and no mortality). These data indicate greater nonclinical safety of the CHIKV/IRES vaccine candidate compared to 181/clone25, further supporting its eligibility for human testing. PMID:26340754

  4. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Costa, Simone M.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  5. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson R A; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Costa, Simone M; Azevedo, Adriana S; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M A; Alves, Ada M B

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  6. Vaccine-induced inflammation attenuates the vascular responses to mental stress.

    PubMed

    Paine, Nicola J; Ring, Christopher; Bosch, Jos A; Drayson, Mark T; Aldred, Sarah; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J C S

    2014-09-01

    Inflammation is associated with poorer vascular function, with evidence to suggest that inflammation can also impair the vascular responses to mental stress. This study examined the effects of vaccine-induced inflammation on vascular responses to mental stress in healthy participants. Eighteen male participants completed two stress sessions: an inflammation condition having received a typhoid vaccination and a control (non-inflamed) condition. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 (p's<.001) increased following vaccination, confirming modest increases in inflammation. Mental stress increased blood flow, blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output in both conditions (all p's<.001), but the blood flow response to stress was attenuated having received the vaccination compared to the control condition (p's<.05). These results further implicate the interaction between inflammation and the vasculature as a mechanism through which stress may trigger myocardial infarction.

  7. The course of LCMV infection in gnotobiotic and conventional adult mice pretreated with attenuated NDV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Szeri, I; Csatáry, L K; Anderlik, P; Bános, Z; Nász, I; Barna, Z

    1990-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal treatment with two different doses of live Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) containing attenuated NDV vaccine one day before intracerebral inoculation with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) had no influence on the ratio and time of deaths after infection with a 100 LD50 dose of LCMV either in gnotobiotic or in conventional mice. There was no difference either in the LD50 values determined on the basis of three parallel LCMV titration performed on mice pretreated with two different doses of vaccine or untreated. NDV vaccine pretreatment thus did not influence the cellular immune response to LCMV infection either in gnotobiotic or in conventional adult mice. As the NDV vaccine increased the cellular immune response to LCMV infection in suckling mice according to earlier results, the present results reinforce our earlier statement that the direction of immunomodulatory effects can be influenced by age.

  8. Safety of attenuated smallpox vaccine LC16m8 in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Hiroyuki; Shinmura, Yasuhiko; Kanehara, Tomomi; Maruno, Shinichi; Kuranaga, Masahiko; Matsui, Hajime; Hashizume, So

    2014-09-01

    Freeze-dried live attenuated smallpox vaccine LC16m8 prepared in cell culture has been the sole smallpox vaccine licensed in Japan since 1975 and was recently recommended as a WHO stockpile vaccine. We evaluated the safety of recently remanufactured lots of LC16m8 using a series of immunodeficient mouse models. These models included suckling mice, severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, and wild-type mice treated with cyclosporine. LC16m8 showed extremely low virulence in each of the three mouse models compared with that of its parental strains, Lister and LC16mO. These results provide further evidence that LC16m8 is one of the safest replication-competent smallpox vaccines in the world and may be considered for use in immunodeficient patients.

  9. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection.

  10. Effects of vaccination against bluetongue on milk production and quality in cattle vaccinated with live-attenuated monovalent type 2 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, A; Conte, A; Panichi, G; Calistri, P; Dessì, M; Foddis, F; Schintu, A; Caporale, V

    2004-01-01

    The first epidemic of bluetongue (BT) to affect the three regions of Sardinia, Sicily and Calabria (Italy) in 2000 induced high economic losses caused by the disease itself and by the cessation of ruminant movements both within, and out of, the infected areas. In order to reduce virus circulation, and to create a resistant livestock population, the Italian Ministry of Health ruled, in May 2001, that all sheep, cattle, goats and water buffalo, in infected and in neighbouring regions, be vaccinated. The live-attenuated BTV-2 monovalent vaccine produced by Onderstepoort Biological Products in South Africa was to be used. Accordingly, in 2002, 98.6% of the sheep and goats, and 88.1% of the cattle, on Sardinia were vaccinated. Included was the vaccination of >70% of the cattle in the province of Oristano where >18,000 dairy cows in >220 herds are concentrated in the municipality of Arborea (Oristano) and which account for 65-70% of the milk produced in Sardinia. Using data collected at the centralised dairy co-operative since 1999 the quantity and quality of milk produced before vaccination against bluetongue was compared to that produced after vaccination. The following variables were analysed: average milk production/cow/month, monthly average fat content (%), monthly average protein content (%), average monthly somatic cell count and average monthly platelet count. The findings indicate that vaccination against BTV-2 in Sardinian dairy cattle did not impact negatively upon milk quantity nor milk quality.

  11. Wild dengue virus types 1, 2 and 3 viremia in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Freire, M S; Marchevsky, R S; Almeida, L F C; Yamamura, A M Y; Caride, E C; Brindeiro, P A; Motta, M C A; Nogueira, R M R; Kubelka, C F; Bonaldo, M C; Galler, R

    2007-05-01

    Among the flaviviruses, dengue, with its four serotypes, has spread throughout the tropics. The most advanced vaccines developed so far include live attenuated viruses, which have been tested in humans but none has been licensed. Preclinical testing of dengue vaccine candidates is performed initially in mice and in nonhuman primates. In the latter the main criteria used to assay protection are neutralizing antibodies elicited by the vaccine candidate and the magnitude and duration of peripheral viremia upon challenge of previously immunized animals. Towards the identification of wild-type viruses that could be used in challenge experiments a total of 31 rhesus monkeys were inoculated subcutaneously of wild dengue types 1, 2, and 3 viruses. The viremia caused by the different viruses was variable but it was possible to identify dengue viruses useful as challenge strains.

  12. Schistosoma mansoni polypeptides immunogenic in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, J.P.; Strand, M.

    1987-10-01

    We compared the humoral immune response of mice protected against Schistosoma mansoni by vaccination with radiation-attenuated cercariae to that of patently infected mice, and we identified antigens that elicit a greater, or unique, immune response in the vaccinated mice. These comparisons were based upon radioimmunoprecipitations and immunodepletion of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled schistosomular and adult worm polypeptides, followed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analyses. The humoral responses of patently infected mice and of mice vaccinated once were remarkably similar and were directed against schistosome glycoproteins ranging in molecular size from greater than 300 to less than 10 kDa. Exposing mice to a second vaccination resulted in a marked change in the immune response, to one predominantly directed toward high molecular size glycoproteins. Sequential immunodepletion techniques identified five schistosomular and seven adult worm antigens that showed a greater or unique immunogenicity in vaccinated mice as compared with patently infected mice. These adult worm antigens were purified by preparative sequential immunoaffinity chromatography and used to prepare a polyclonal antiserum, anti-irradiated vaccine. This antiserum bound to the surface of live newly transformed and lung-stage schistosomula, as assessed by immunofluorescence assays, and was reactive with a number of /sup 125/I-labeled schistosomular surface polypeptides, including a doublet of 150 kDa that was also recognized by sera of vaccinated mice but not by sera of patently infected mice.

  13. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  14. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Fernando, S; Fernando, D J; Seneviratne, S L

    2004-10-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

  15. Vaccination against canine distemper virus infection in infant ferrets with and without maternal antibody protection, using recombinant attenuated poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Welter, J; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E; Stephensen, C B

    2000-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log(10) inverse mean titer +/- standard deviation of 2.30 +/- 0.12 and 2.20 +/- 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 +/- 0.57 versus 0.40 +/- 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 +/- 0. 54 and 1.28 +/- 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 +/- 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 +/- 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 x 10(-6)). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1

  16. Vaccination against Canine Distemper Virus Infection in Infant Ferrets with and without Maternal Antibody Protection, Using Recombinant Attenuated Poxvirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Janet; Taylor, Jill; Tartaglia, James; Paoletti, Enzo; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log10 inverse mean titer ± standard deviation of 2.30 ± 0.12 and 2.20 ± 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 ± 0.57 versus 0.40 ± 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 ± 0.54 and 1.28 ± 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 ± 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 ± 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 × 10−6). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1.63 ± 0

  17. Stability of live attenuated rotavirus vaccine with selected preservatives and primary containers.

    PubMed

    Lal, Manjari; Jarrahian, Courtney; Zhu, Changcheng; Hosken, Nancy A; McClurkan, Chris L; Koelle, David M; Saxon, Eugene; Roehrig, Andrew; Zehrung, Darin; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-05-11

    Rotavirus infection, which can be prevented by vaccination, is responsible for a high burden of acute gastroenteritis disease in children, especially in low-income countries. An appropriate formulation, packaging, and delivery device for oral rotavirus vaccine has the potential to reduce the manufacturing cost of the vaccine and the logistical impact associated with introduction of a new vaccine, simplify the vaccination procedure, and ensure that the vaccine is safely and accurately delivered to children. Single-dose prefilled presentations can be easy to use; however, they are typically more expensive, can be a bottleneck during production, and occupy a greater volume per dose vis-à-vis supply chain storage and medical waste disposal, which is a challenge in low-resource settings. Multi-dose presentations used thus far have other issues, including increased wastage of vaccine and the need for separate delivery devices. In this study, the goals were to evaluate both the technical feasibility of using preservatives to develop a liquid multi-dose formulation and the primary packaging alternatives for orally delivered, liquid rotavirus vaccines. The feasibility evaluation included evaluation of commonly used preservatives for compatibility with rotavirus vaccines and stability testing of rotavirus vaccine in various primary containers, including Lameplast's plastic tubes, BD's oral dispenser version of Uniject™ (Uniject DP), rommelag's blow-fill-seal containers, and MEDInstill's multi-dose vial and pouch. These presentations were compared to a standard glass vial. The results showed that none of the preservatives tested were compatible with a live attenuated rotavirus vaccine because they had a detrimental effect on the viability of the virus. In the presence of preservatives, vaccine virus titers declined to undetectable levels within 1 month. The vaccine formulation without preservatives maintained a stability profile over 12 months in all primary containers

  18. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SV4089 as a potential carrier of oral DNA vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Ideris, Aini; Zakaria, Zunita; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella has been used as a carrier for DNA vaccine. However, in vitro and in vivo studies on the bacteria following transfection of plasmid DNA were poorly studied. In this paper, eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H5N1 genes, pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP, were transfected into an attenuated Salmonella enteric typhimurium SV4089. In vitro stability of the transfected plasmids into Salmonella were over 90% after 100 generations. The attenuated Salmonella were able to invade MCF-7 (1.2%) and MCF-10A (0.5%) human breast cancer cells. Newly hatched specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicks were inoculated once by oral gavage with 10(9) colony-forming unit (CFU) of the attenuated Salmonella. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths were recorded after inoculation. Viable bacteria were detected 3 days after inoculation by plating from spleen, liver, and cecum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out for confirmation. Salmonella was not detected in blood cultures although serum antibody immune responses to Salmonella O antiserum group D1 factor 1, 9, and 12 antigens were observed in all the inoculated chickens after 7 days up to 35 days. Our results showed that live attenuated S. typhimurium SV4089 harboring pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP may provide a unique alternative as a carrier for DNA oral vaccine in chickens.

  19. Protection by attenuated and polyvalent vaccines against highly virulent strains of Marek's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Witter, R L

    1982-01-01

    Tests confirmed that turkey herpesvirus (HVT) vaccine protected chickens poorly against challenge with the highly virulent Md5 strain of Marek's disease (MD) virus, especially in chickens with homologous HVT antibodies. The naturally avirulent SB-1 vaccine virus was likewise poorly protective against challenge with the Md5 strain. Homologous antibodies reduced the protective efficacy of both vaccines, but SB-1 was not affected by HVT antibodies. In order to provide better protection against strains of MD virus poorly protected against by HVT, such as Md5, the Md11 strain of MD virus was attenuated by 75 cell culture passages and evaluated for protective efficacy. This vaccine virus, designated Mdl 1/75C, provided good protection against challenge with Md5 and most other highly virulent MD viruses tested, but was less efficacious against challenge with the JM/102W strain, a prototype MD virus protected against well by HVT and SB-1 vaccines. Furthermore, its efficacy was consistently lower in chicks with HVT antibody. Thus, although HVT, SB-1, and Md11/75C were all efficacious against certain MD viruses, none of these vaccines protected optimally against all MD challenge viruses in all chickens. A polyvalent vaccine composed of Md11/75C, HVT and SB-1 viruses protected chickens better against a battery of five highly virulent MD challenge viruses, including three strains poorly protected against by HVT, than any single vaccine and was not influenced by HVT antibody. These data suggest that vaccinal immunity may be partially viral strain specific.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Goatpox Virus Strain Gorgan Obtained Directly from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mathijs, Elisabeth; Vandenbussche, Frank; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequence of the goatpox virus strain Gorgan, which was obtained directly from a commercial live attenuated vaccine (Caprivac, Jordan Bio-Industries Centre). PMID:27738031

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of the Three African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Trivalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the three virus strains included in a South African commercial trivalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26294618

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Four African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Tetravalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the four virus strains included in a South African commercial tetravalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26607890

  3. Live Attenuated Shigella dysenteriae Type 1 Vaccine Strains Overexpressing Shiga Toxin B Subunit ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Grassel, Christen; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae 1) is unique among the Shigella species and serotypes in the expression of Shiga toxin which contributes to more severe disease sequelae and the ability to cause explosive outbreaks and pandemics. S. dysenteriae 1 shares characteristics with other Shigella species, including the capability of causing clinical illness with a very low inoculum (10 to 100 CFU) and resistance to multiple antibiotics, underscoring the need for efficacious vaccines and therapeutics. Following the demonstration of the successful attenuating capacity of deletion mutations in the guaBA operon in S. flexneri 2a vaccine strains in clinical studies, we developed a series of S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine candidates containing the fundamental attenuating mutation in guaBA. All strains are devoid of Shiga toxin activity by specific deletion of the gene encoding the StxA subunit, which encodes enzymatic activity. The StxB subunit was overexpressed in several derivatives by either plasmid-based constructs or chromosomal manipulation to include a strong promoter. All strains are attenuated for growth in vitro in the HeLa cell assay and for plaque formation and were safe in the Serény test and immunogenic in the guinea pigs. Each strain induced robust serum and mucosal anti-S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses and protected against wild-type challenge. Two strains engineered to overexpress StxB induced high titers of Shiga toxin neutralizing antibodies. These candidates demonstrate the potential for a live attenuated vaccine to protect against disease caused by S. dysenteriae 1 and potentially to protect against the toxic effects of other Shiga toxin 1-expressing pathogens. PMID:21969003

  4. Evaluation of Streptococcus iniae killed bacterin and live attenuated vaccines in hybrid striped bass through injection and bath immersion.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Vicknair, Mike R; Ostland, Vaughn E; Nizet, Victor; Buchanan, John T

    2010-03-01

    Streptococcus iniae poses a serious threat to finfish aquaculture operations worldwide. Stringent regulatory standards limit the use of antibiotics to treat S. iniae infections; improved vaccination strategies are thus of great interest. We investigated the potential for efficient, non-injectable batch vaccination via the use of live attenuated vaccines. Three attenuated S. iniae strains with genetic mutations eliminating the production of virulence factors--capsular polysaccharide (delta cpsD), M-like protein (delta simA), and phosphoglucomutase (delta pgmA)--were evaluated in parallel with an adjuvanted, formalin-killed, whole-cell S. iniae bacterin. Juvenile hybrid striped bass (HSB; Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) were vaccinated through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection or bath immersion and held for 800 degree-days prior to challenge with a lethal dose of the virulent wild-type (WT) S. iniae parent strain. The delta cpsD, delta pgmA, and bacterin vaccines provided the highest level of vaccination safety (0% mortality), whereas the delta simA mutant, although it caused 12 to 16% vaccination-related mortality, was the only vaccine candidate to provide 100% protection in both i.p. and immersion delivery models. Our studies demonstrate the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines for prevention of S. iniae infection, and identify immersion delivery of live vaccines as an attractive option for use in commercial aquaculture settings.

  5. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L; Cole, Leah E; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 10(5) CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development.

  6. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain.

  7. Immune responses of infants to infection with respiratory viruses and live attenuated respiratory virus candidate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Crowe, J E

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the parainfluenza viruses (PIV), and the influenza viruses cause severe lower respiratory tract diseases in infants and children throughout the world. Experimental live attenuated vaccines for each of these viruses are being developed for intranasal administration in the first weeks or months of life. A variety of promising RSV, PIV-3, and influenza virus vaccine strains have been developed by classical biological methods, evaluated extensively in preclinical and clinical studies, and shown to be attenuated and genetically stable. The ongoing clinical evaluation of these vaccine candidates, coupled with recent major advances in the ability to develop genetically engineered viruses with specified mutations, may allow the rapid development of respiratory virus strains that possess ideal levels of replicative capacity and genetic stability in vivo. A major remaining obstacle to successful immunization of infants against respiratory virus associated disease may be the relatively poor immune response of very young infants to primary virus infection. This paper reviews the immune correlates of protection against disease caused by these viruses, immune responses of infants to naturally-acquired infection, and immune responses of infants to experimental infection with candidate vaccine viruses. PMID:9711783

  8. Correlates of Immunity to Influenza as Determined by Challenge of Children with Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter F; Hoen, Anne G; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Brown, Eric P; Ackerman, Margaret E; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Connor, Ruth I; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Haynes, Brenda C; Luke, Catherine J; Subbarao, Kanta; Treanor, John J

    2016-04-01

    Background.  The efficacy of live, attenuated live attenuated influenza vaccine(LAIV) and inactivated influenza vaccine(IIV) is poorly explained by either single or composite immune responses to vaccination. Protective biomarkers were therefore studied in response to LAIV or IIV followed by LAIV challenge in children. Methods.  Serum and mucosal responses to LAIV or IIV were analyzed using immunologic assays to assess both quantitative and functional responses. Cytokines and chemokines were measured in nasal washes collected before vaccination, on days 2, 4, and 7 after initial LAIV, and again after LAIV challenge using a 63-multiplex Luminex panel. Results.  Patterns of immunity induced by LAIV and IIV were significantly different. Serum responses induced by IIV, including hemagglutination inhibition, did not correlate with detection or quantitation of LAIV on subsequent challenge. Modalities that induced sterilizing immunity seen after LAIV challenge could not be defined by any measurements of mucosal or serum antibodies induced by the initial LAIV immunization. No single cytokine or chemokine was predictive of protection. Conclusions.  The mechanism of protective immunity observed after LAIV could not be defined, and traditional measurements of immunity to IIV did not correlate with protection against an LAIV challenge. PMID:27419180

  9. Construction, Safety, and Immunogenicity in Nonhuman Primates of a Chimeric Yellow Fever-Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Guirakhoo, F.; Arroyo, J.; Pugachev, K. V.; Miller, C.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Weltzin, R.; Georgakopoulos, K.; Catalan, J.; Ocran, S.; Soike, K.; Ratterree, M.; Monath, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported construction of a chimeric yellow fever-dengue type 2 virus (YF/DEN2) and determined its safety and protective efficacy in rhesus monkeys (F. Guirakhoo et al., J. Virol. 74:5477–5485, 2000). In this paper, we describe construction of three additional YF/DEN chimeras using premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of wild-type (WT) clinical isolates: DEN1 (strain PUO359, isolated in 1980 in Thailand), DEN3 (strain PaH881/88, isolated in 1988 in Thailand), and DEN4 (strain 1228, isolated in 1978 in Indonesia). These chimeric viruses (YF/DEN1, YF/DEN3, and YF/DEN4) replicated to ∼7.5 log10 PFU/ml in Vero cells, were not neurovirulent in 3- to 4-week-old ICR mice inoculated by the intracerebral route, and were immunogenic in monkeys. All rhesus monkeys inoculated subcutaneously with one dose of these chimeric viruses (as monovalent or tetravalent formulation) developed viremia with magnitudes similar to that of the YF 17D vaccine strain (YF-VAX) but significantly lower than those of their parent WT viruses. Eight of nine monkeys inoculated with monovalent YF/DEN1 -3, or -4 vaccine and six of six monkeys inoculated with tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 vaccine seroconverted after a single dose. When monkeys were boosted with a tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 dose 6 months later, four of nine monkeys in the monovalent YF/DEN groups developed low levels of viremia, whereas no viremia was detected in any animals previously inoculated with either YF/DEN1-4 vaccine or WT DEN virus. An anamnestic response was observed in all monkeys after the second dose. No statistically significant difference in levels of neutralizing antibodies was observed between YF virus-immune and nonimmune monkeys which received the tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 vaccine or between tetravalent YF/DEN1-4-immune and nonimmune monkeys which received the YF-VAX. However, preimmune monkeys developed either no detectable viremia or a level of viremia lower than that in nonimmune controls. This is the first

  10. Evaluation of protection induced by a dengue virus serotype 2 envelope domain III protein scaffold/DNA vaccine in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    McBurney, Sean P; Sunshine, Justine E; Gabriel, Sarah; Huynh, Jeremy P; Sutton, William F; Fuller, Deborah H; Haigwood, Nancy L; Messer, William B

    2016-06-24

    We describe the preclinical development of a dengue virus vaccine targeting the dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) envelope domain III (EDIII). This study provides proof-of-principle that a dengue EDIII protein scaffold/DNA vaccine can protect against dengue challenge. The dengue vaccine (EDIII-E2) is composed of both a protein particle and a DNA expression plasmid delivered simultaneously via intramuscular injection (protein) and gene gun (DNA) into rhesus macaques. The protein component can contain a maximum of 60 copies of EDIII presented on a multimeric scaffold of Geobacillus stearothermophilus E2 proteins. The DNA component is composed of the EDIII portion of the envelope gene cloned into an expression plasmid. The EDIII-E2 vaccine elicited robust antibody responses to DENV2, with neutralizing antibody responses detectable following the first boost and reaching titers of greater than 1:100,000 following the second and final boost. Vaccinated and naïve groups of macaques were challenged with DENV2. All vaccinated macaques were protected from detectable viremia by infectious assay, while naïve animals had detectable viremia for 2-7 days post-challenge. All naïve macaques had detectable viral RNA from day 2-10 post-challenge. In the EDIII-E2 group, three macaques were negative for viral RNA and three were found to have detectable viral RNA post challenge. Viremia onset was delayed and the duration was shortened relative to naïve controls. The presence of viral RNA post-challenge corresponded to a 10-30-fold boost in neutralization titers 28 days post challenge, whereas no boost was observed in the fully protected animals. Based on these results, we determine that pre-challenge 50% neutralization titers of >1:6000 correlated with sterilizing protection against DENV2 challenge in EDIII-E2 vaccinated macaques. Identification of the critical correlate of protection for the EDIII-E2 platform in the robust non-human primate model lays the groundwork for further

  11. Cross-Protection against Marburg Virus Strains by Using a Live, Attenuated Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Ströher, Ute; Hensley, Lisa E.; Grolla, Allen; Fritz, Elizabeth A.; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) has been associated with sporadic episodes of hemorrhagic fever, including a recent highly publicized outbreak in Angola that produced severe disease and significant mortality in infected patients. MARV is also considered to have potential as a biological weapon. Recently, we reported the development of a promising attenuated, replication-competent vaccine against MARV based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the glycoprotein of the Musoke strain of MARV (VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke). We used this vaccine to demonstrate complete protection of cynomolgus monkeys against a homologous MARV challenge. While these results are highly encouraging, an effective vaccine would need to confer protection against all relevant strains of MARV. Here, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke vaccine against two heterologous MARV strains, the seemingly more pathogenic Angola strain and the more distantly related Ravn strain. In this study, seven cynomolgus monkeys were vaccinated with the VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke vector. Three of these animals were challenged with the Angola strain, three with the Ravn strain, and a single animal with the Musoke strain of MARV. Two animals served as controls and were each injected with a nonspecific VSV vector; these controls were challenged with the Angola and Ravn strains, respectively. Both controls succumbed to challenge by day 8. However, none of the specifically vaccinated animals showed any evidence of illness either from the vaccination or from the MARV challenges and all of these animals survived. These data suggest that the VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke vaccine should be sufficient to protect against all known MARV strains. PMID:16973570

  12. Identification of the pXO1 plasmid in attenuated Bacillus anthracis vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhang, Enmin; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin; Zhu, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Anthrax toxins and capsule are the major virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis. They are encoded by genes located on the plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, respectively. The vaccine strain Pasteur II was produced from high temperature subcultures of B. anthracis, which resulted in virulence attenuation through the loss of the plasmid pXO1. However, it is unclear whether the high temperature culture completely abolishes the plasmid DNA or affects the replication of the plasmid pXO1. In this study, we tested 3 B. anthracis vaccine strains, including Pasteur II from France, Qiankefusiji II from Russia, and Rentian II from Japan, which were all generated from subcultures at high temperatures. Surprisingly, we detected the presence of pXO1 plasmid DNA using overlap PCR in all these vaccine strains. DNA sequencing analysis of overlap PCR products further confirmed the presence of pXO1. Moreover, the expression of the protective antigen (PA) encoded on pXO1 was determined by using SDS-PAGE and western blotting. In addition, we mimicked Pasteur's method and exposed the A16R vaccine strain, which lacks the pXO2 plasmid, to high temperature, and identified the pXO1 plasmid in the subcultures at high temperatures. This indicated that the high temperature treatment at 42.5°C was unable to eliminate pXO1 plasmid DNA from B. anthracis. Our results suggest that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is likely due to the impact of high temperature stress on plasmid replication, which in turn limits the copy number of pXO1. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of the remaining immunogenicity and toxicity of the vaccine strains. PMID:27029580

  13. Rational development of an attenuated recombinant cyprinid herpesvirus 3 vaccine using prokaryotic mutagenesis and in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is causing severe economic losses worldwide in the carp industry, and a safe and efficacious attenuated vaccine compatible with mass vaccination is needed. We produced single deleted recombinants using prokaryotic mutagenesis. When producing a recombinant lacking open...

  14. Development of an acid-resistant Salmonella Typhi Ty21a attenuated vector for improved oral vaccine delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The licensed oral, live-attenuated bacterial vaccine for typhoid fever, Salmonella Typhi strain Ty21a, has also been utilized as a vaccine delivery platform for expression of diverse foreign antigens that stimulate protection against shigellosis, anthrax, plague, or human papilloma virus. However, T...

  15. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rigau-Pérez, J G; Clark, G G; Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Sanders, E J; Vorndam, A V

    1998-09-19

    The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue have greatly increased in recent years. Dengue is an acute mosquito-transmitted viral disease characterised by fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, rash, nausea, and vomiting. Some infections result in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), a syndrome that in its most severe form can threaten the patient's life, primarily through increased vascular permeability and shock. The case fatality rate in patients with dengue shock syndrome can be as high as 44%. For decades, two distinct hypotheses to explain the mechanism of DHF have been debated-secondary infection or viral virulence. However, a combination of both now seems to be the plausible explanation. The geographical expansion of DHF presents the need for well-documented clinical, epidemiological, and virological descriptions of the syndrome in the Americas. Biological and social research are essential to develop effective mosquito control, medications to reduce capillary leakage, and a safe tetravalent vaccine.

  16. Influenza A Virus Attenuation by Codon Deoptimization of the NS Gene for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F.; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Dewhurst, Stephen; Topham, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viral infection represents a serious public health problem that causes contagious respiratory disease, which is most effectively prevented through vaccination to reduce transmission and future infection. The nonstructural (NS) gene of influenza A virus encodes an mRNA transcript that is alternatively spliced to express two viral proteins, the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) and the nuclear export protein (NEP). The importance of the NS gene of influenza A virus for viral replication and virulence has been well described and represents an attractive target to generate live attenuated influenza viruses with vaccine potential. Considering that most amino acids can be synthesized from several synonymous codons, this study employed the use of misrepresented mammalian codons (codon deoptimization) for the de novo synthesis of a viral NS RNA segment based on influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) (PR8) virus. We generated three different recombinant influenza PR8 viruses containing codon-deoptimized synonymous mutations in coding regions comprising the entire NS gene or the mRNA corresponding to the individual viral protein NS1 or NEP, without modifying the respective splicing and packaging signals of the viral segment. The fitness of these synthetic viruses was attenuated in vivo, while they retained immunogenicity, conferring both homologous and heterologous protection against influenza A virus challenges. These results indicate that influenza viruses can be effectively attenuated by synonymous codon deoptimization of the NS gene and open the possibility of their use as a safe vaccine to prevent infections with these important human pathogens. IMPORTANCE Vaccination serves as the best therapeutic option to protect humans against influenza viral infections. However, the efficacy of current influenza vaccines is suboptimal, and novel approaches are necessary for the prevention of disease cause by this important human respiratory pathogen. The nonstructural

  17. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D; Child, Robert; Crane, Deborah D; Celli, Jean; Bosio, Catharine M

    2012-01-01

    Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. <100 organisms, may address this concern. Herein we describe the ability of three defined, attenuated mutants of F. tularensis SchuS4, deleted for FTT0369c, FTT1676, or FTT0369c and FTT1676, respectively, to engender protective immunity against tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  18. The dengue viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Henchal, E A; Putnak, J R

    1990-01-01

    Dengue, a major public health problem throughout subtropical and tropical regions, is an acute infectious disease characterized by biphasic fever, headache, pain in various parts of the body, prostration, rash, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia. In more severe or complicated dengue, patients present with a severe febrile illness characterized by abnormalities of hemostasis and increased vascular permeability, which in some instances results in a hypovolemic shock. Four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (dengue-1, dengue-2, dengue-3, and dengue-4) exist, with numerous virus strains found worldwide. Molecular cloning methods have led to a greater understanding of the structure of the RNA genome and definition of virus-specific structural and nonstructural proteins. Progress towards producing safe, effective dengue virus vaccines, a goal for over 45 years, has been made. Images PMID:2224837

  19. The dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Henchal, E A; Putnak, J R

    1990-10-01

    Dengue, a major public health problem throughout subtropical and tropical regions, is an acute infectious disease characterized by biphasic fever, headache, pain in various parts of the body, prostration, rash, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia. In more severe or complicated dengue, patients present with a severe febrile illness characterized by abnormalities of hemostasis and increased vascular permeability, which in some instances results in a hypovolemic shock. Four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (dengue-1, dengue-2, dengue-3, and dengue-4) exist, with numerous virus strains found worldwide. Molecular cloning methods have led to a greater understanding of the structure of the RNA genome and definition of virus-specific structural and nonstructural proteins. Progress towards producing safe, effective dengue virus vaccines, a goal for over 45 years, has been made. PMID:2224837

  20. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure. PMID:23171359

  1. Successful respiratory immunization with dry powder live-attenuated measles virus vaccine in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Hsuan; Griffin, Diane E; Rota, Paul A; Papania, Mark; Cape, Stephen P; Bennett, David; Quinn, Brian; Sievers, Robert E; Shermer, Charles; Powell, Kenneth; Adams, Robert J; Godin, Steven; Winston, Scott

    2011-02-15

    Measles remains an important cause of childhood mortality worldwide. Sustained high vaccination coverage is the key to preventing measles deaths. Because measles vaccine is delivered by injection, hurdles to high coverage include the need for trained medical personnel and a cold chain, waste of vaccine in multidose vials and risks associated with needle use and disposal. Respiratory vaccine delivery could lower these barriers and facilitate sustained high coverage. We developed a novel single unit dose, dry powder live-attenuated measles vaccine (MVDP) for respiratory delivery without reconstitution. We tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy in rhesus macaques of one dose of MVDP delivered either with a mask or directly intranasal with two dry powder inhalers, PuffHaler and BD Solovent. MVDP induced robust measles virus (MeV)-specific humoral and T-cell responses, without adverse effects, which completely protected the macaques from infection with wild-type MeV more than one year later. Respiratory delivery of MVDP was safe and effective and could aid in measles control.

  2. Clinical and molecular aspects of the live attenuated Oka varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Mark; Breuer, Judy

    2014-07-01

    VZV is a ubiquitous member of the Herpesviridae family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Both manifestations can cause great morbidity and mortality and are therefore of significant economic burden. The introduction of varicella vaccination as part of childhood immunization programs has resulted in a remarkable decline in varicella incidence, and associated hospitalizations and deaths, particularly in the USA. The vaccine preparation, vOka, is a live attenuated virus produced by serial passage of a wild-type clinical isolate termed pOka in human and guinea pig cell lines. Although vOka is clinically attenuated, it can cause mild varicella, establish latency, and reactivate to cause herpes zoster. Sequence analysis has shown that vOka differs from pOka by at least 42 loci; however, not all genomes possess the novel vOka change at all positions, creating a heterogeneous population of genetically distinct haplotypes. This, together with the extreme cell-associated nature of VZV replication in cell culture and the lack of an animal model, in which the complete VZV life cycle can be replicated, has limited studies into the molecular basis for vOka attenuation. Comparative studies of vOka with pOka replication in T cells, dorsal root ganglia, and skin indicate that attenuation likely involves multiple mutations within ORF 62 and several other genes. This article presents an overview of the clinical aspects of the vaccine and current progress on understanding the molecular mechanisms that account for the clinical phenotype of reduced virulence.

  3. Tests in mice of a dengue vaccine candidate made of chimeric Junin virus-like particles and conserved dengue virus envelope sequences.

    PubMed

    Mareze, Vania Aparecida; Borio, Cristina Silvia; Bilen, Marcos F; Fleith, Renata; Mirazo, Santiago; Mansur, Daniel Santos; Arbiza, Juan; Lozano, Mario Enrique; Bruña-Romero, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Two new vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV) infection were generated by fusing the coding sequences of the self-budding Z protein from Junin virus (Z-JUNV) to those of two cryptic peptides (Z/DENV-P1 and Z/DENV-P2) conserved on the envelope protein of all serotypes of DENV. The capacity of these chimeras to generate virus-like particles (VLPs) and to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies in mice was determined. First, recombinant proteins that displayed reactivity with a Z-JUNV-specific serum by immunofluorescence were detected in HEK-293 cells transfected with each of the two plasmids and VLP formation was also observed by transmission electron microscopy. Next, we determined the presence of antibodies against the envelope peptides of DENV in the sera of immunized C57BL/6 mice. Results showed that those animals that received Z/DENV-P2 DNA coding sequences followed by a boost with DENV-P2 synthetic peptides elicited significant specific antibody titers (≥6.400). Finally, DENV plaque-reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) were performed. Although no significant protective effect was observed when using sera of Z/DENV-P1-immunized animals, antibodies raised against vaccine candidate Z/DENV-P2 (diluted 1:320) were able to reduce in over 50 % the number of viral plaques generated by infectious DENV particles. This reduction was comparable to that of the 4G2 DENV-specific monoclonal cross-reactive (all serotypes) neutralizing antibody. We conclude that Z-JUNV-VLP is a valid carrier to induce antibody-mediated immune responses in mice and that Z/DENV-P2 is not only immunogenic but also protective in vitro against infection of cells with DENV, deserving further studies. On the other side, DENV's fusion peptide-derived chimera Z/DENV-P1 did not display similar protective properties.

  4. Vaccination of children with a live-attenuated, intranasal influenza vaccine – analysis and evaluation through a Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Andersohn, Frank; Bornemann, Reinhard; Damm, Oliver; Frank, Martin; Mittendorf, Thomas; Theidel, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a worldwide prevalent infectious disease of the respiratory tract annually causing high morbidity and mortality in Germany. Influenza is preventable by vaccination and this vaccination is so far recommended by the The German Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) as a standard vaccination for people from the age of 60 onwards. Up to date a parenterally administered trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) has been in use almost exclusively. Since 2011 however a live-attenuated vaccine (LAIV) has been approved additionally. Consecutively, since 2013 the STIKO recommends LAIV (besides TIV) for children from 2 to 17 years of age, within the scope of vaccination by specified indications. LAIV should be preferred administered in children from 2 to 6 of age. The objective of this Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to address various research issues regarding the vaccination of children with LAIV. The analysis was performed from a medical, epidemiological and health economic perspective, as well as from an ethical, social and legal point of view. Method: An extensive systematic database research was performed to obtain relevant information. In addition a supplementary research by hand was done. Identified literature was screened in two passes by two independent reviewers using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Included literature was evaluated in full-text using acknowledged standards. Studies were graded with the highest level of evidence (1++), if they met the criteria of European Medicines Agency (EMA)-Guidance: Points to consider on applications with 1. meta-analyses; 2. one pivotal study. Results: For the medical section, the age of the study participants ranges from 6 months to 17 years. Regarding study efficacy, in children aged 6 months to ≤7 years, LAIV is superior to placebo as well as to a vac-cination with TIV (Relative Risk Reduction – RRR – of laboratory confirmed influenza infection approx. 80% and 50

  5. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis - discovery and implications.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen(-/-) in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  6. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-01

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response.

  7. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines.

  8. Dengue in children.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Lilly M; de Groot, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and increasing incidence. The vast majority of dengue cases are children less than 15 years of age. Dengue causes a spectrum of illness from mild fever to severe disease with plasma leakage and shock. Infants and children with secondary heterologous dengue infections are most at risk for severe dengue disease. Laboratory diagnosis of dengue can be established within five days of disease onset by direct detection of viral components in serum. After day five, serologic diagnosis provides indirect evidence of dengue. Currently, no effective antiviral agents are available to treat dengue infection. Therefore, treatment remains supportive, with emphasis on close hematological monitoring, recognition of warning signs of severe disease and fluid-replacement therapy and/or blood transfusions when required. Development of a dengue vaccine is considered a high public health priority. A safe and efficacious dengue vaccine would also be important for travelers. This review highlights the current understanding of dengue in children, including its clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnostic tests, management and prevention.

  9. Global gene expression in channel catfish after vaccination with an attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Shoemaker, Craig A; Mu, Xingjiang; Klesius, Phillip H

    2012-04-01

    To understand the global gene expression in channel catfish after immersion vaccination with an attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri (AquaVac-ESC™), microarray analysis of 65,182 UniGene transcripts was performed. With a filter of false-discovery rate less than 0.05 and fold change greater than 2, a total of 52 unique transcripts were found to be upregulated in vaccinated fish at 48 h post vaccination, whereas a total of 129 were downregulated. The 52 upregulated transcripts represent genes with putative functions in the following seven major categories: (1) hypothetical (25%); (2) novel (23%); (3) immune response (17%); (4) signal transduction (15%); (5) cell structure (8%); (6) metabolism (4%); and (7) others (8%). The 129 downregulated transcripts represent genes with putative functions in the following ten major categories: (1) novel (25%); (2) immune response (23%); (3) hypothetical (12%); (4) metabolism (10%); (5) signal transduction (7%); (6) protein synthesis (6.2%); (7) cell structure (5%); (8) apoptosis (3%); (9) transcription/translation (2%); and (10) others (6%). Microarray analysis revealed that apolipoprotein A-I was upregulated the most (8.5 fold, P = 0.011) at 48 h post vaccination whereas a novel protein (accession no. CV995854) was downregulated the most (342 fold, P = 0.001). Differential regulation of several randomly selected transcripts in vaccinated fish was also validated by quantitative PCR. Our results suggest that these differentially regulated genes elicited by the vaccination might play important roles in the protection of channel catfish against E. ictaluri.

  10. Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine Is Fully Attenuated by a Combination of Partial Attenuations in the S, M, and L Segments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Terence E.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L.; Gong, Bin; Slack, Olga A. L.; Ly, Hoai J.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to Africa and characterized by a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus), which has a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome (consisting of the S, M, and L segments). Further spread of RVF into countries where the disease is not endemic may affect the economy and public health, and vaccination is an effective approach to prevent the spread of RVFV. A live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is one of the best-characterized RVF vaccines for safety and efficacy and is currently conditionally licensed for use for veterinary purposes in the United States. Meanwhile, as of 2015, no other RVF vaccine has been conditionally or fully licensed for use in the United States. The MP-12 strain is derived from wild-type pathogenic strain ZH548, and its genome encodes 23 mutations in the three genome segments. However, the mechanism of MP-12 attenuation remains unknown. We characterized the attenuation of wild-type pathogenic strain ZH501 carrying a mutation(s) of the MP-12 S, M, or L segment in a mouse model. Our results indicated that MP-12 is attenuated by the mutations in the S, M, and L segments, while the mutations in the M and L segments confer stronger attenuation than those in the S segment. We identified a combination of 3 amino acid changes, Y259H (Gn), R1182G (Gc), and R1029K (L), that was sufficient to attenuate ZH501. However, strain MP-12 with reversion mutations at those 3 sites was still highly attenuated. Our results indicate that MP-12 attenuation is supported by a combination of multiple partial attenuation mutations and a single reversion mutation is less likely to cause a reversion to virulence of the MP-12 vaccine. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that is endemic to Africa and that has the potential to

  11. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, U C; Nagar, Rachna

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of this country with dengue has been long and intense. The ?rst recorded epidemic of clinically dengue-like illness occurred at Madras in 1780 and the dengue virus was isolated for the ?rst time almost simultaneously in Japan and Calcutta in 1943-1944. After the ?rst virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever along the East Coast of India in 1963-1964, it spread to allover the country.The ?rst full-blown epidemic of the severe form of the illness,the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in North India in 1996. Aedes aegypti is the vector for transmission of the disease. Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti and prevent its bite. This country has few virus laboratories and some of them have done excellent work in the area of molecular epidemiology,immunopathology and vaccine development. Selected work done in this country on the problems of dengue is presented here.

  12. A Low Gastric pH Mouse Model to Evaluate Live Attenuated Bacterial Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, Karen E.; Willingham, Crystal; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn A.; 3rd, Roy Curtiss; Roland, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    The low pH of the stomach serves as a barrier to ingested microbes and must be overcome or bypassed when delivering live bacteria for vaccine or probiotic applications. Typically, the impact of stomach acidity on bacterial survival is evaluated in vitro, as there are no small animal models to evaluate these effects in vivo. To better understand the effect of this low pH barrier to live attenuated Salmonella vaccines, which are often very sensitive to low pH, we investigated the value of the histamine mouse model for this application. A low pH gastric compartment was transiently induced in mice by the injection of histamine. This resulted in a gastric compartment of approximately pH 1.5 that was capable of distinguishing between acid-sensitive and acid-resistant microbes. Survival of enteric microbes during gastric transit in this model directly correlated with their in vitro acid resistance. Because many Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi vaccine strains are sensitive to acid, we have been investigating systems to enhance the acid resistance of these bacteria. Using the histamine mouse model, we demonstrate that the in vivo survival of S. Typhi vaccine strains increased approximately 10-fold when they carried a sugar-inducible arginine decarboxylase system. We conclude that this model will be a useful for evaluating live bacterial preparations prior to clinical trials. PMID:24489912

  13. A multicentre trial of live attenuated varicella vaccine in children with leukaemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S; Gelb, L; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; LaRussa, P; Ferrara, A

    1985-01-01

    Two hundred forty children with acute leukaemia in remission for at least 1 year were immunized with live attenuated varicella vaccine. All were susceptible to varicella before immunization. There was a seroconversion to varicella-zoster virus in approximately 85% after 1 dose, and in 97% after 2 doses. The major side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen mainly in children with maintenance chemotherapy suspended for 1 week before and 1 week after vaccination. Vaccinees with rash were at some risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to varicella susceptibles with whom they had close contact. Twenty-nine vaccinees were subsequently exposed to varicella in their households. The attack rate of clinical varicella in these vaccinees was 21%, which is significantly lower than the 80%-90% attack rate occurring in varicella susceptibles after household exposure. All these breakthrough cases of varicella were mild, even in leukaemics receiving chemotherapy. Varicella vaccine was approximately 80% effective in preventing clinical varicella in children with leukaemia and completely effective in preventing severe varicella in this high-risk group.

  14. Live attenuated varicella vaccine. Efficacy for children with leukemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S P; Gelb, L; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; LaRussa, P; Farrara, A

    1984-07-20

    One hundred ninety-one varicella-susceptible children with leukemia in remission were immunized with live attenuated varicella vaccine. There was serological evidence of an immune response in approximately 80% after one dose and in more than 90% after two doses. The major side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen especially in children with maintenance chemotherapy suspended for one week before and one week after vaccination. Children with rash had higher antibody titers than those without rash, but those with rash were also at risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to others. Twenty-two vaccinees subsequently had household exposures to varicella or zoster. The attack rate of clinical varicella in these vaccinees was 18%, significantly lower than the attack rate of approximately 90% in varicella-susceptible persons with household exposures. All cases of clinical illness were extremely mild, with an average of about 50 vesicles. The mild character of the illness was clearly different than varicella in unimmunized children receiving chemotherapy for leukemia. Varicella vaccine was approximately 80% effective in preventing clinical varicella in children with leukemia and completely effective in preventing severe varicella in this high-risk group.

  15. The yellow fever 17D virus as a platform for new live attenuated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Sequeira, Patrícia C; Galler, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The live-attenuated yellow fever 17D virus is one of the most outstanding human vaccines ever developed. It induces efficacious immune responses at a low production cost with a well-established manufacture process. These advantages make the YF17D virus attractive as a vector for the development of new vaccines. At the beginning of vector development studies, YF17D was genetically manipulated to express other flavivirus prM and E proteins, components of the viral envelope. While these 17D recombinants are based on the substitution of equivalent YF17D genes, other antigens from unrelated pathogens have also been successfully expressed and delivered by recombinant YF17D viruses employing alternative strategies for genetic manipulation of the YF17D genome. Herein, we discuss these strategies in terms of possibilities of single epitope or larger sequence expression and the main properties of these replication-competent viral platforms.

  16. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hayes, E B; Gubler, D J

    1992-04-01

    Hundreds of thousands of dengue cases are reported worldwide each year. Given the difficulty in obtaining full reporting, the actual number of human infections is probably much higher than the number reported. Dengue is usually a nonspecific febrile illness that resolves with supportive therapy but the clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe hemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. The pathophysiology of the severe forms of dengue may be related to sequential infection with different serotypes, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental and host factors or a combination of these factors. Control of dengue at the present time is dependent on control of the principal vector mosquito, A. aegypti. Efforts to achieve such control are now focusing on community education and action towards eliminating this mosquito's breeding sites near human dwellings. Vaccine development continues, but at present the only way to avoid dengue in an area where it is endemic or epidemic is to use repellents and mosquito barriers. The movement of people to and from tropical areas makes dengue an important differential diagnosis in any patient with an acute illness and history of recent travel to tropical areas. Because of continued infestation of the southeastern United States with A. aegypti, indigenous transmission in the continental United States remains a public health concern.

  17. Rational development of an attenuated recombinant cyprinid herpesvirus 3 vaccine using prokaryotic mutagenesis and in vivo bioluminescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Ouyang, Ping; Fournier, Guillaume; Reschner, Anca; Rakus, Krzysztof; Wilkie, Gavin S; Farnir, Frédéric; Bayrou, Calixte; Lieffrig, François; Li, Hong; Desmecht, Daniel; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-02-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV 3) is causing severe economic losses worldwide in common and koi carp industries, and a safe and efficacious attenuated vaccine compatible with mass vaccination is needed. We produced single deleted recombinants using prokaryotic mutagenesis. When producing a recombinant lacking open reading frame 134 (ORF134), we unexpectedly obtained a clone with additional deletion of ORF56 and ORF57. This triple deleted recombinant replicated efficiently in vitro and expressed an in vivo safety/efficacy profile compatible with use as an attenuated vaccine. To determine the role of the double ORF56-57 deletion in the phenotype and to improve further the quality of the vaccine candidate, a series of deleted recombinants was produced and tested in vivo. These experiments led to the selection of a double deleted recombinant lacking ORF56 and ORF57 as a vaccine candidate. The safety and efficacy of this strain were studied using an in vivo bioluminescent imaging system (IVIS), qPCR, and histopathological examination, which demonstrated that it enters fish via skin infection similar to the wild type strain. However, compared to the parental wild type strain, the vaccine candidate replicated at lower levels and spread less efficiently to secondary sites of infection. Transmission experiments allowing water contamination with or without additional physical contact between fish demonstrated that the vaccine candidate has a reduced ability to spread from vaccinated fish to naïve sentinel cohabitants. Finally, IVIS analyses demonstrated that the vaccine candidate induces a protective mucosal immune response at the portal of entry. Thus, the present study is the first to report the rational development of a recombinant attenuated vaccine against CyHV 3 for mass vaccination of carp. We also demonstrated the relevance of the CyHV 3 carp model for studying alloherpesvirus transmission and mucosal immunity in teleost skin.

  18. Growth restriction of an experimental live attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine in human ciliated airway epithelium in vitro parallels attenuation in African green monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Scull, Margaret A.; Schmidt, Alexander C.; Murphy, Brian R.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are common causes of severe pediatric respiratory viral disease. We characterized wild-type HPIV2 infection in an in vitro model of human airway epithelium (HAE) and found that the virus replicates to high titer, sheds apically, targets ciliated cells, and induces minimal cytopathology. Replication of an experimental, live attenuated HPIV2 vaccine strain, containing both temperature sensitive (ts) and non-ts attenuating mutations, was restricted >30-fold compared to rHPIV2-WT in HAE at 32°C and exhibited little productive replication at 37°C. This restriction paralleled attenuation in the upper and lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, supporting the HAE model as an appropriate and convenient system for characterizing HPIV2 vaccine candidates. PMID:20139039

  19. Dengue fever: natural management.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Abbas, Khizar; Tahir, Madeha; Irfan, Muhammad; Raza Bukhari, Syeda Fiza; Ahmed, Bilal; Hanif, Muhammad; Rasul, Akhtar; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Dengue fever is caused by the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4, and is the most common arboviral infection of humans in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Dengue virus infections can present with a spacious range of clinical signs, from a mild feverish illness to a life-threatening shock syndrome. Till now, there is no approved vaccine or drug against this virus. Therefore, there is an urgent need of development of alternative solutions for dengue. Several plant species have been reported with anti-dengue activity. Many herbal/natural drugs, most of which are commonly used as nutritional components, have been used as antiviral, larvicidal, mosquitocidal and mosquito repellents that may be used against dengue. The objective of this review article was to provide current approaches for the treatment and management/prevention of dengue fever by targeting viral proteins involved in replication cycle of the virus and different developmental stages of mosquito.

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kun; Chen, Zhijin; Zhu, Chunyue; Li, Jianhua; Hu, Xiaomei; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2015-09-01

    Enteric fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A has progressively increased in recent years and became a global health issue. Currently licensed typhoid vaccines do not confer adequate cross-immunoprotection against S. Paratyphi A infection. Therefore, vaccines specifically against enteric fever caused by S. Paratyphi A are urgently needed. In the present study, an attenuated vaccine strain was constructed from S. Paratyphi A CMCC50093 by the deletions of aroC and yncD. The obtained strain SPADD01 showed reduced survival within THP-1 cells and less bacterial burden in spleens and livers of infected mice compared with the wild-type strain. The 50% lethal doses of SPADD01 and the wild-type strain were assessed using a murine infection model. The virulence of SPADD01 is approximately 40,000-fold less than that of the wild-type strain. In addition, SPADD01 showed an excellent immunogenicity in mouse model. Single intranasal inoculation elicited striking humoral and mucosal immune responses in mice and yielded effective protection against lethal challenge of the wild-type strain. A high level of cross-reactive humoral immune response against LPS of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was also detected in immunized mice. However, SPADD01 vaccination only conferred a low level of cross-protection against S. Typhi. Our data suggest that SPADD01 is a promising vaccine candidate against S. Paratyphi A infection and deserves further evaluation in clinical trial. To date, no study has demonstrated a good cross-protection between serovars of S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A, suggesting that the dominant protective antigens of both serovars are likely different and need to be defined in future study.

  1. Dengue: a continuing global threat

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Maria G.; Halstead, Scott B.; Artsob, Harvey; Buchy, Philippe; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane J.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Kroeger, Axel; Margolis, Harold S.; Martínez, Eric; Nathan, Michael B.; Pelegrino, Jose Luis; Simmons, Cameron; Yoksan, Sutee; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ~50 million dengue infections and ~500,000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. Illness is produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes. A global strategy aimed at increasing the capacity for surveillance and outbreak response, changing behaviours and reducing the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently under development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future. PMID:21079655

  2. Dengue: a continuing global threat.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria G; Halstead, Scott B; Artsob, Harvey; Buchy, Philippe; Farrar, Jeremy; Gubler, Duane J; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Kroeger, Axel; Margolis, Harold S; Martínez, Eric; Nathan, Michael B; Pelegrino, Jose Luis; Simmons, Cameron; Yoksan, Sutee; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arthropod-borne viral diseases. Each year, there are ∼50 million dengue infections and ∼500,000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. Illness is produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes. A global strategy aimed at increasing the capacity for surveillance and outbreak response, changing behaviours and reducing the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently under development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future.

  3. Effect of size and temperature at vaccination on immunization and protection conferred by a live attenuated Francisella noatunensis immersion vaccine in red hybrid tilapia.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Brown, Nicholas; Gardenfors, Zackarias O; Yount, Shaun; Revan, Floyd; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Camus, Alvin

    2014-12-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is a pleomorphic, facultative intracellular, Gram-negative, emerging bacterial pathogen of marine and fresh water fish with worldwide distribution. In this study, the efficacy of an attenuated Fno intracellular growth locus C (iglC) mutant was evaluated for use as a live immersion vaccine, when administered to hybrid tilapia at two different stages of growth (5 g fry and 10 g fingerlings) and at two temperatures (25 °C and 30 °C). To determine vaccine efficacy, mortality, days to first death, and Fno genome equivalents (GE) in the spleens of survivors, as well as serum and mucus antibody levels, were evaluated after 30 d in fish challenged with a wild type virulent strain. Both size and temperature at vaccination played an important role in immunization and protection. Fry vaccinated at 25 °C were not protected when compared to non-vaccinated fry at 25 °C (p = 0.870). In contrast, 5 g fry vaccinated at 30 °C were significantly protected compared to non-vaccinated fry at 30 °C (p = 0.038). Although lower mortalities occurred, 10 g fingerlings vaccinated at 25 °C were not protected, compared to non-vaccinated fingerlings at 25 °C (p = 0.328), while, 10 g fingerlings vaccinated at 30 °C were significantly protected, compared to non-vaccinated fingerlings at 30 °C (p = 0.038). Additionally, overall mortality of 5 g fish was significantly higher than in 10 g fish. Mortality was also significantly higher in fish subjected to a 30 to 25 °C temperature change one week prior to challenge, than in fish maintained at the same temperature during vaccination and challenge. This information demonstrates that both temperature and size at vaccination are important factors when implementing immunization prophylaxis in cultured tilapia.

  4. Computational prediction and analysis of envelop glycoprotein epitopes of DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates: a first step towards Dengue vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Amat-ur-Rasool, Hafsa; Saghir, Anam; Idrees, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever of tropics is a mosquito transmitted devastating disease caused by dengue virus (DENV). There is no effective vaccine available, so far, against any of its four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4). There is a need for the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines against DENV to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, especially in Pakistan. In this research, linear and conformational B-cell epitopes of envelope glycoprotein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 (the most prevalent serotypes in Pakistan) were predicted. We used Kolaskar and Tongaonkar method for linear epitope prediction, Emini's method for surface accessibility prediction and Karplus and Schulz's algorithm for flexibility determination. To propose three dimensional epitopes, the E proteins for both serotypes were homology modeled by using Phyre2 V 2.0 server, and ElliPro was used for the prediction of surface epitopes on their globular structure. Total 21 and 19 linear epitopes were predicted for DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates respectively. Whereas, 5 and 4 discontinuous epitopes were proposed for DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates respectively. Moreover, the values of surface accessibility, flexibility and solvent-accessibility can be helpful in analyzing vaccines against DENV-2 and DENV-3. In conclusion, the proposed continuous and discontinuous antigenic peptides can be valuable candidates for diagnostic and therapeutics of DENV.

  5. Rational design of genetically stable, live-attenuated poliovirus vaccines of all three serotypes: relevance to poliomyelitis eradication.

    PubMed

    Macadam, Andrew J; Ferguson, Geraldine; Stone, David M; Meredith, Janet; Knowlson, Sarah; Auda, Ghazi; Almond, Jeffrey W; Minor, Philip D

    2006-09-01

    The global eradication of poliomyelitis caused by wild-type virus is likely to be completed within the next few years, despite immense logistic and political difficulties, and may ultimately be followed by the cessation of vaccination. However, the existing live-attenuated vaccines have the potential to revert to virulence, causing occasional disease, and viruses can be shed by immunocompromised individuals for prolonged periods of time. Moreover, several outbreaks of poliomyelitis have been shown to be caused by viruses derived from the Sabin vaccine strains. The appearance of such strains depends on the prevailing circumstances but poses a severe obstacle to strategies for stopping vaccination. Vaccine strains that are incapable of reversion at a measurable rate would provide a possible solution. Here, we describe the constructions of strains of type 3 poliovirus that are stabilized by the introduction of four mutations in the 5' noncoding region compared to the present vaccine. The strains are genetically and phenotypically stable under conditions where the present vaccine loses the attenuating mutation in the 5' noncoding region completely. Type 1 and type 2 strains in which the entire 5' noncoding regions of Sabin 1 and Sabin 2 were replaced exactly with that of one of the type 3 strains were also constructed. The genetic stability of 5' noncoding regions of these viruses matched that of the type 3 strains, but significant phenotypic reversion occurred, illustrating the potential limitations of a rational approach to the genetic stabilization of live RNA virus vaccines.

  6. Gentamicin-Attenuated Leishmania infantum Vaccine: Protection of Dogs against Canine Visceral Leishmaniosis in Endemic Area of Southeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Hamid; Namazi, Mohammad Javad; Kamiabi, Hossein; Burchmore, Richard; Cleaveland, Sarah; Phillips, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An attenuated line of Leishmania infantum (L. infantum H-line) has been established by culturing promastigotes in vitro under gentamicin pressure. A vaccine trial was conducted using 103 naive dogs from a leishmaniosis non-endemic area (55 vaccinated and 48 unvaccinated) brought into an endemic area of southeast Iran. No local and/or general indications of disease were observed in the vaccinated dogs immediately after vaccination. The efficacy of the vaccine was evaluated after 24 months (4 sandfly transmission seasons) by serological, parasitological analyses and clinical examination. In western blot analysis of antibodies to L. infantum antigens, sera from 10 out of 31 (32.2%) unvaccinated dogs, but none of the sera from vaccinated dogs which were seropositive at >100, recognized the 21 kDa antigen of L. infantum wild-type (WT). Nine out of 31 (29%) unvaccinated dogs, but none of vaccinated dogs, were positive for the presence of Leishmania DNA. One out of 46 (2.2%) vaccinated dogs and 9 out of 31 (29%) unvaccinated dogs developed clinical signs of disease. These results suggest that gentamicin-attenuated L. infantum induced a significant and strong protective effect against canine visceral leishmaniosis in the endemic area. PMID:24743691

  7. Live Attenuated Francisella novicida Vaccine Protects against Francisella tularensis Pulmonary Challenge in Rats and Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ping; Cunningham, Aimee L.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Nguyen, Jesse Q.; Barker, Jeffrey R.; Lyons, C. Rick; Wilder, Julie; Valderas, Michelle; Sherwood, Robert L.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Klose, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia. Human pulmonary exposure to the most virulent form, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (Ftt), leads to high morbidity and mortality, resulting in this bacterium being classified as a potential biothreat agent. However, a closely-related species, F. novicida, is avirulent in healthy humans. No tularemia vaccine is currently approved for human use. We demonstrate that a single dose vaccine of a live attenuated F. novicida strain (Fn iglD) protects against subsequent pulmonary challenge with Ftt using two different animal models, Fischer 344 rats and cynomolgus macaques (NHP). The Fn iglD vaccine showed protective efficacy in rats, as did a Ftt iglD vaccine, suggesting no disadvantage to utilizing the low human virulent Francisella species to induce protective immunity. Comparison of specific antibody profiles in vaccinated rat and NHP sera by proteome array identified a core set of immunodominant antigens in vaccinated animals. This is the first report of a defined live attenuated vaccine that demonstrates efficacy against pulmonary tularemia in a NHP, and indicates that the low human virulence F. novicida functions as an effective tularemia vaccine platform. PMID:25340543

  8. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies.

  9. Stabilizing formulations for inhalable powders of live-attenuated measles virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jessica L; Cape, Stephen P; Braun, Chad S; McAdams, David H; Best, Jessica A; Bhagwat, Pradnya; Pathak, Pankaj; Rebits, Lia G; Sievers, Robert E

    2008-03-01

    Carbon dioxide Assisted Nebulization with a Bubble Dryer((R)) (CAN-BD) processing allows particles to be made in the 3-5 mum size range, which is desirable for lung delivery, without destroying biological activity. In response to the Grand Challenge in Global Health Initiative #3, we have been developing an inhalable needle-free live-attenuated measles virus vaccine for use in developing countries. Measles was chosen because it is the number one vaccine preventable killer of children worldwide. Powders were processed by CAN-BD, where a solution containing excipients and live-attenuated measles virus in water was mixed intimately with supercritical or near superctitical carbon dioxide to form an emulsion. The emulsion was expanded to atmospheric pressure through a flow restrictor. The resulting plume was dried by heated nitrogen and the powders collected on a filter at the bottom of the drying chamber. Powders were analyzed using varying techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Andersen cascade impaction, differential scanning calorimetery, Karl Fischer titration, and viral plaque assay. CAN-BD has been used to produce powders of live-attenuated measles virus vaccine with characteristics desirable for lung delivery. The powders retain viral activity through forming and drying the microparticles by CAN-BD, and have passed the WHO stability test for 1 week at 37 degrees C. The powders have an amorphous character and a glass transition temperature of around 60 degrees C. Lyophilization, the present standard commercial method of processing measles vaccine makes solids with a water content of less than 1%. By substituting myo-inositol for sorbitol and using the CAN-BD drying technique the water content can be lowered to 0.5%. The most successful formulations to date have been based conceptually on the current lyophilized formulation, but with modifications to the type and amounts of sugar. Of current interest are formulations containing myo

  10. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Provides Superior Protection from Heterologous Infection in Pigs with Maternal Antibodies without Inducing Vaccine-Associated Enhanced Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Richt, Jürgen A.; Janke, Bruce H.; Sandbulte, Matthew R.; Gauger, Philip C.; Loving, Crystal L.; Webby, Richard J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the United States is hindered because inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants cocirculating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be limited further for vaccines administered to young pigs that possess maternally derived immunity. We previously demonstrated that a recombinant A/sw/Texas/4199-2/1998 (TX98) (H3N2) virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein is attenuated in swine and has potential for use as an intranasal live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccine. In the present study, we compared 1 dose of intranasal LAIV with 2 intramuscular doses of TX98 whole inactivated virus (WIV) with adjuvant in weanling pigs with and without TX98-specific maternally derived antibodies (MDA). Pigs were subsequently challenged with wild-type homologous TX98 H3N2 virus or with an antigenic variant, A/sw/Colorado/23619/1999 (CO99) (H3N2). In the absence of MDA, both vaccines protected against homologous TX98 and heterologous CO99 shedding, although the LAIV elicited lower hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers in serum. The efficacy of both vaccines was reduced by the presence of MDA; however, WIV vaccination of MDA-positive pigs led to dramatically enhanced pneumonia following heterologous challenge, a phenomenon known as vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). A single dose of LAIV administered to MDA-positive pigs still provided partial protection from CO99 and may be a safer vaccine for young pigs under field conditions, where dams are routinely vaccinated and diverse IAV strains are in circulation. These results have implications not only for pigs but also for other influenza virus host species. PMID:22811541

  11. Live attenuated influenza vaccine provides superior protection from heterologous infection in pigs with maternal antibodies without inducing vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy L; Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M; Richt, Jürgen A; Janke, Bruce H; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Philip C; Loving, Crystal L; Webby, Richard J; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2012-10-01

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the United States is hindered because inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants cocirculating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be limited further for vaccines administered to young pigs that possess maternally derived immunity. We previously demonstrated that a recombinant A/sw/Texas/4199-2/1998 (TX98) (H3N2) virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein is attenuated in swine and has potential for use as an intranasal live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccine. In the present study, we compared 1 dose of intranasal LAIV with 2 intramuscular doses of TX98 whole inactivated virus (WIV) with adjuvant in weanling pigs with and without TX98-specific maternally derived antibodies (MDA). Pigs were subsequently challenged with wild-type homologous TX98 H3N2 virus or with an antigenic variant, A/sw/Colorado/23619/1999 (CO99) (H3N2). In the absence of MDA, both vaccines protected against homologous TX98 and heterologous CO99 shedding, although the LAIV elicited lower hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers in serum. The efficacy of both vaccines was reduced by the presence of MDA; however, WIV vaccination of MDA-positive pigs led to dramatically enhanced pneumonia following heterologous challenge, a phenomenon known as vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). A single dose of LAIV administered to MDA-positive pigs still provided partial protection from CO99 and may be a safer vaccine for young pigs under field conditions, where dams are routinely vaccinated and diverse IAV strains are in circulation. These results have implications not only for pigs but also for other influenza virus host species. PMID:22811541

  12. Live attenuated influenza vaccine provides superior protection from heterologous infection in pigs with maternal antibodies without inducing vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy L; Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M; Richt, Jürgen A; Janke, Bruce H; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Philip C; Loving, Crystal L; Webby, Richard J; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2012-10-01

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the United States is hindered because inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants cocirculating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be limited further for vaccines administered to young pigs that possess maternally derived immunity. We previously demonstrated that a recombinant A/sw/Texas/4199-2/1998 (TX98) (H3N2) virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein is attenuated in swine and has potential for use as an intranasal live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccine. In the present study, we compared 1 dose of intranasal LAIV with 2 intramuscular doses of TX98 whole inactivated virus (WIV) with adjuvant in weanling pigs with and without TX98-specific maternally derived antibodies (MDA). Pigs were subsequently challenged with wild-type homologous TX98 H3N2 virus or with an antigenic variant, A/sw/Colorado/23619/1999 (CO99) (H3N2). In the absence of MDA, both vaccines protected against homologous TX98 and heterologous CO99 shedding, although the LAIV elicited lower hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers in serum. The efficacy of both vaccines was reduced by the presence of MDA; however, WIV vaccination of MDA-positive pigs led to dramatically enhanced pneumonia following heterologous challenge, a phenomenon known as vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). A single dose of LAIV administered to MDA-positive pigs still provided partial protection from CO99 and may be a safer vaccine for young pigs under field conditions, where dams are routinely vaccinated and diverse IAV strains are in circulation. These results have implications not only for pigs but also for other influenza virus host species.

  13. Safety of live attenuated influenza vaccine in young people with egg allergy: multicentre prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Jo; Andrews, Nick J; Miller, Elizabeth; Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Study question How safe is live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), which contains egg protein, in young people with egg allergy? Methods In this open label, phase IV intervention study, 779 young people (2-18 years) with egg allergy were recruited from 30 UK allergy centres and immunised with LAIV. The cohort included 270 (34.7%) young people with previous anaphylaxis to egg, of whom 157 (20.1%) had experienced respiratory and/or cardiovascular symptoms. 445 (57.1%) had doctor diagnosed asthma or recurrent wheeze. Participants were observed for at least 30 minutes after vaccination and followed-up by telephone 72 hours later. Participants with a history of recurrent wheeze or asthma underwent further follow-up four weeks later. The main outcome measure was incidence of an adverse event within two hours of vaccination in young people with egg allergy. Study answer and limitations No systemic allergic reactions occurred (upper 95% confidence interval for population 0.47% and in participants with anaphylaxis to egg 1.36%). Nine participants (1.2%, 95% CI 0.5% to 2.2%) experienced mild symptoms, potentially consistent with a local, IgE mediated allergic reaction. Delayed events potentially related to the vaccine were reported in 221 participants. 62 participants (8.1%, 95% CI for population 6.3% to 10.3%) experienced lower respiratory tract symptoms within 72 hours, including 29 with parent reported wheeze. No participants were admitted to hospital. No increase in lower respiratory tract symptoms occurred in the four weeks after vaccination (assessed with asthma control test). The study cohort may represent young people with more severe allergy requiring specialist input, since they were recruited from secondary and tertiary allergy centres. What this study adds LAIV is associated with a low risk of systemic allergic reactions in young people with egg allergy. The vaccine seems to be well tolerated in those with well controlled asthma or recurrent wheeze. Funding

  14. Attempt to develop live attenuated bacterial vaccines by selecting resistance to gossypol, proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, or ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H; Yildirim-Aksoy, Mediha

    2013-04-26

    In an attempt to develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, four chemicals (gossypol, proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, and ciprofloxacin) were used to modify the following four genera of bacteria through chemical-resistance strategy: (1) Aeromonas hydrophila (9 isolates); (2) Edwardsiella tarda (9 isolates); (3) Streptococcus iniae (9 isolates); and (4) S. agalactiae (11 isolates). All bacteria used in this study were able to develop high resistance to gossypol. However, only some bacteria were able to develop resistance to proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, or ciprofloxacin. When the virulence of resistant bacteria was tested in tilapia or catfish, none of the gossypol-resistant isolate was attenuated, whereas majority of the proflavine hemisulfate-resistant isolates were attenuated. However, all proflavine hemisulfate-attenuated bacteria failed to provide significant protection to fish. Eight novobiocin- or ciprofloxacin-resistant Gram-positive bacteria (S. agalactiae and S. inaie) were found to be attenuated. However, none of them offered protection higher than 70%. Of seven attenuated novobiocin- or ciprofloxacin-resistant Gram-negative isolates (A. hydrophila and E. tarda), only one (novobiocin-resistant E. tarda 30305) was found to safe and highly efficacious. When E. tarda 30305-novo vaccinated Nile tilapia were challenged by its virulent E. tarda 30305, relative percent of survival of vaccinated fish at 14- and 28-days post vaccination (dpv) was 100% and 92%, respectively. Similarly, E. tarda 30305-novo offered 100% protection to channel catfish against challenges with virulent parent isolate E. tarda 30305 at both 14- and 28-dpv. Our results suggest that the development of live attenuated bacterial vaccines that are safe and efficacious is challenging, although it is feasible.

  15. Attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis SO2 vaccine candidate is unable to induce cell death.

    PubMed

    Aporta, Adriana; Arbues, Ainhoa; Aguilo, Juan I; Monzon, Marta; Badiola, Juan J; de Martino, Alba; Ferrer, Nadia; Marinova, Dessislava; Anel, Alberto; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julian

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulent strains inhibit apoptosis and trigger cell death by necrosis of host macrophages to evade innate immunity, while non-virulent strains induce typical apoptosis activating a protective host response. As part of the characterization of a novel tuberculosis vaccine candidate, the M. tuberculosis phoP mutant SO2, we sought to evaluate its potential to induce host cell death. The parental M. tuberculosis MT103 strain and the current vaccine against tuberculosis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) were used as comparators in mouse models in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that attenuated SO2 was unable to induce apoptotic events neither in mouse macrophages in vitro nor during lung infection in vivo. In contrast, virulent MT103 triggers typical apoptotic events with phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation and nuclear condensation and fragmentation. BCG strain behaved like SO2 and did not induce apoptosis. A clonogenic survival assay confirmed that viability of BCG- or SO2-infected macrophages was unaffected. Our results discard apoptosis as the protective mechanism induced by SO2 vaccine and provide evidence for positive correlation between classical apoptosis induction and virulent strains, suggesting apoptosis as a possible virulence determinant during M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:23028853

  16. Attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis SO2 Vaccine Candidate Is Unable to Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Marta; Badiola, Juan J.; de Martino, Alba; Ferrer, Nadia; Marinova, Dessislava; Anel, Alberto; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julian

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulent strains inhibit apoptosis and trigger cell death by necrosis of host macrophages to evade innate immunity, while non-virulent strains induce typical apoptosis activating a protective host response. As part of the characterization of a novel tuberculosis vaccine candidate, the M. tuberculosis phoP mutant SO2, we sought to evaluate its potential to induce host cell death. The parental M. tuberculosis MT103 strain and the current vaccine against tuberculosis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) were used as comparators in mouse models in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that attenuated SO2 was unable to induce apoptotic events neither in mouse macrophages in vitro nor during lung infection in vivo. In contrast, virulent MT103 triggers typical apoptotic events with phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation and nuclear condensation and fragmentation. BCG strain behaved like SO2 and did not induce apoptosis. A clonogenic survival assay confirmed that viability of BCG- or SO2-infected macrophages was unaffected. Our results discard apoptosis as the protective mechanism induced by SO2 vaccine and provide evidence for positive correlation between classical apoptosis induction and virulent strains, suggesting apoptosis as a possible virulence determinant during M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:23028853

  17. Vaccination with an Attenuated Ferritin Mutant Protects Mice against Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Pandey, Ruchi; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rodriguez, G. Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis the causative agent of tuberculosis affects millions of people worldwide. New tools for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis are urgently needed. We previously showed that a ferritin (bfrB) mutant of M. tuberculosis has altered iron homeostasis and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and to microbicidal effectors produced by activated macrophages. Most importantly, M. tuberculosis lacking BfrB is strongly attenuated in mice, especially, during the chronic phase of infection. In this study, we examined whether immunization with a bfrB mutant could confer protection against subsequent infection with virulent M. tuberculosis in a mouse model. The results show that the protection elicited by immunization with the bfrB mutant is comparable to BCG vaccination with respect to reduction of bacterial burden. However, significant distinctions in the disease pathology and host genome-wide lung transcriptome suggest improved containment of Mtb infection in animals vaccinated with the bfrB mutant, compared to BCG. We found that downmodulation of inflammatory response and enhanced fibrosis, compared to BCG vaccination, is associated with the protective response elicited by the bfrB mutant. PMID:26339659

  18. Comparative Safety and Immunogenicity of Two Attenuated Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Strains in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Robin; Bourgeois, A. Louis; Engstrom, Fayette; Hall, Eric; Chang, H. Sunny; Gomes, Joseph G.; Kyle, Jennifer L.; Cassels, Fred; Turner, Arthur K.; Randall, Roger; Darsley, Michael; Lee, Cynthia; Bedford, Philip; Shimko, Janet; Sack, David A.

    2006-01-01

    A vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is needed to prevent diarrheal illness among children in developing countries and at-risk travelers. Two live attenuated ETEC strains, PTL002 and PTL003, which express the ETEC colonization factor CFA/II, were evaluated for safety and immunogenicity. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 19 subjects ingested one dose, and 21 subjects ingested two doses (days 0 and 10) of PTL-002 or PTL-003 at 2 × 109 CFU/dose. Anti-CFA/II mucosal immune responses were determined from the number of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in blood measured by enzyme-linked immunospot assay, the antibody in lymphocyte supernatants (ALS) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels determined by ELISA. Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) ELISA was more sensitive than standard colorimetric ELISA for measuring serum antibody responses to CFA/II and its components, CS1 and CS3. Both constructs were well tolerated. Mild diarrhea occurred after 2 of 31 doses (6%) of PTL-003. PTL-003 produced more sustained intestinal colonization than PTL-002 and better IgA response rates: 90% versus 55% (P = 0.01) for anti-CFA/II IgA-ASCs, 55% versus 30% (P = 0.11) for serum anti-CS1 IgA by TRF, and 65% versus 25% (P = 0.03) for serum anti-CS3 IgA by TRF. Serum IgG response rates to CS1 or CS3 were 55% in PTL-003 recipients and 15% in PTL-002 recipients (P = 0.02). Two doses of either strain were not significantly more immunogenic than one. Based on its superior immunogenicity, which was comparable to that of a virulent ETEC strain and other ETEC vaccine candidates, PTL-003 will be developed further as a component of a live, oral attenuated ETEC vaccine. PMID:16428745

  19. Evaluation in mice of Brucella ovis attenuated mutants for use as live vaccines against B. ovis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brucella ovis causes ram contagious epididymitis, a disease for which a specific vaccine is lacking. Attenuated Brucella melitensis Rev 1, used as vaccine against ovine and caprine brucellosis caused by B. melitensis, is also considered the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of B. ovis infection, but its use for this purpose has serious drawbacks. In this work, two previously characterized B. ovis attenuated mutants (Δomp25d and Δomp22) were evaluated in mice, in comparison with B. melitensis Rev 1, as vaccines against B. ovis. Similarities, but also significant differences, were found regarding the immune response induced by the three vaccines. Mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants developed anti-B. ovis antibodies in serum of the IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses and their levels were higher than those observed in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. After an antigen stimulus with B. ovis cells, splenocytes obtained from all vaccinated mice secreted similar levels of TNF-α and IL12(p40) and remarkably high amounts of IFN-γ, a crucial cytokine in protective immunity against other Brucella species. By contrast, IL-1α -an enhancer of T cell responses to antigen- was present at higher levels in mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants, while IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was significantly more abundant in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. Additionally, the B. ovis mutants showed appropriate persistence, limited splenomegaly and protective efficacy against B. ovis similar to that observed with B. melitensis Rev 1. These characteristics encourage their evaluation in the natural host as homologous vaccines for the specific prophylaxis of B. ovis infection. PMID:24898325

  20. Yersinia pestis with regulated delayed attenuation as a vaccine candidate to induce protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Roland, Kenneth L; Kuang, Xiaoying; Branger, Christine G; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Two mutant strains of Yersinia pestis KIM5+, a Deltacrp mutant and a mutant with arabinose-dependent regulated delayed-shutoff crp expression (araC P(BAD) crp), were constructed, characterized in vitro, and evaluated for virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice. Both strains were highly attenuated by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. The 50% lethal doses (LD(50)s) of the Deltacrp and araC P(BAD) crp mutants were approximately 1,000,000-fold and 10,000-fold higher than those of Y. pestis KIM5+, respectively, indicating that both strains were highly attenuated. Mice vaccinated s.c. with 3.8 x 10(7) CFU of the Deltacrp mutant developed high anti-Y. pestis and anti-LcrV serum IgG titers, both with a strong Th2 bias, and induced protective immunity against subcutaneous challenge with virulent Y. pestis (80% survival) but no protection against pulmonary challenge. Mice vaccinated with 3.0 x 10(4) CFU of the araC P(BAD) crp mutant also developed high anti-Y. pestis and anti-LcrV serum IgG titers but with a more balanced Th1/Th2 response. This strain induced complete protection against s.c. challenge and partial protection (70% survival) against pulmonary challenge. Our results demonstrate that arabinose-dependent regulated crp expression is an effective strategy to attenuate Y. pestis while retaining strong immunogenicity, leading to protection against the pneumonic and bubonic forms of plague.

  1. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis KIM as a vaccine against plague.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Six, David; Kuang, Xiaoying; Roland, Kenneth L; Raetz, Christian R H; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-04-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a potential weapon of bioterrorism. Y. pestis evades the innate immune system by synthesizing tetra-acylated lipid A with poor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-stimulating activity at 37°C, whereas hexa-acylated lipid A, a potent TLR4 agonist, is made at lower temperatures. Synthesis of Escherichia coli LpxL, which transfers the secondary laurate chain to the 2'-position of lipid A, in Y. pestis results in production of hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C, leading to significant attenuation of virulence. Previously, we described a Y. pestis vaccine strain in which crp expression is under the control of the arabinose-regulated araC P(BAD) promoter, resulting in a 4-5 log reduction in virulence. To reduce the virulence of the crp promoter mutant further, we introduced E. coli lpxL into the Y. pestis chromosome. The χ10030(pCD1Ap) (ΔlpxP32::P(lpxL)lpxL ΔP(crp21)::TT araC P(BAD)crp) construct likewise produced hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C and was significantly more attenuated than strains harboring each individual mutation. The LD(50) of the mutant in mice, when administered subcutaneously or intranasally was >10(7)-times and >10(4)-times greater than wild type, respectively. Mice immunized subcutaneously with a single dose of the mutant were completely protected against a subcutaneous challenge of 3.6×10(7) wild-type Y. pestis and significantly protected (80% survival) against a pulmonary challenge of 1.2×10(4) live cells. Intranasal immunization also provided significant protection against challenges by both routes. This mutant is an immunogenic, highly attenuated live Y. pestis construct that merits further development as a vaccine candidate.

  2. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis KIM as a vaccine against plague

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Six, David; Kuang, Xiaoying; Roland, Kenneth L; Raetz, Christian R.H.; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a potential weapon of bioterrorism. Y. pestis evades the innate immune system by synthesizing tetra-acylated lipid A with poor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-stimulating activity at 37°C, whereas hexa-acylated lipid A, a potent TLR4 agonist, is made at lower temperatures. Synthesis of Escherichia coli LpxL, which transfers the secondary laurate chain to the 2′-position of lipid A, in Y. pestis results in production of hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C, leading to significant attenuation of virulence. Previously, we described a Y. pestis vaccine strain in which crp expression is under the control of the arabinose-regulated araC PBAD promoter, resulting in a 4-5 log reduction in virulence. To reduce the virulence of the crp promoter mutant further, we introduced E. coli lpxL into the Y. pestis chromosome. The χ10030(pCD1Ap) (ΔlpxP32::PlpxL lpxL ΔPcrp21::TT araC PBAD crp) construct likewise produced hexa-acylated lipid A at 37°C and was significantly more attenuated than strains harboring each individual mutation. The LD50 of the mutant in mice, when administered subcutaneously or intranasally was >107-times and >104-times greater than wild type, respectively. Mice immunized subcutaneously with a single dose of the mutant were completely protected against a subcutaneous challenge of 3.6 × 107 wild-type Y. pestis and significantly protected (80% survival) against a pulmonary challenge of 1.2 × 104 live cells. Intranasal immunization also provided significant protection against challenges by both routes. This mutant is an immunogenic, highly attenuated live Y. pestis construct that merits further development as a vaccine candidate. PMID:21320544

  3. Variability in Dengue Titer Estimates from Plaque Reduction Neutralization Tests Poses a Challenge to Epidemiological Studies and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Salje, Henrik; Rodríguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Nisalak, Ananda; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Thomas, Stephen J.; Fernandez, Stefan; Jarman, Richard G.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate determination of neutralization antibody titers supports epidemiological studies of dengue virus transmission and vaccine trials. Neutralization titers measured using the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) are believed to provide a key measure of immunity to dengue viruses, however, the assay's variability is poorly understood, making it difficult to interpret the significance of any assay reading. In addition there is limited standardization of the neutralization evaluation point or statistical model used to estimate titers across laboratories, with little understanding of the optimum approach. Methodology/Principal Findings We used repeated assays on the same two pools of serum using five different viruses (2,319 assays) to characterize the variability in the technique under identical experimental conditions. We also assessed the performance of multiple statistical models to interpolate continuous values of neutralization titer from discrete measurements from serial dilutions. We found that the variance in plaque reductions for individual dilutions was 0.016, equivalent to a 95% confidence interval of 0.45–0.95 for an observed plaque reduction of 0.7. We identified PRNT75 as the optimum evaluation point with a variance of 0.025 (log10 scale), indicating a titer reading of 1∶500 had 95% confidence intervals of 1∶240–1∶1000 (2.70±0.31 on a log10 scale). The choice of statistical model was not important for the calculation of relative titers, however, cloglog regression out-performed alternatives where absolute titers are of interest. Finally, we estimated that only 0.7% of assays would falsely detect a four-fold difference in titers between acute and convalescent sera where no true difference exists. Conclusions Estimating and reporting assay uncertainty will aid the interpretation of individual titers. Laboratories should perform a small number of repeat assays to generate their own variability estimates. These could be used

  4. Bioinformatics of varicella-zoster virus: Single nucleotide polymorphisms define clades and attenuated vaccine genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vincent T.; Tipples, Graham A.; Grose, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is one of the human herpesviruses. To date, over 40 complete VZV genomes have been sequenced and analyzed. The VZV genome contains around 125,000 base pairs including 70 open reading frames (ORFs). Enumeration of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has determined that the following ORFs are the most variable (in descending order): 62, 22, 29, 28, 37, 21, 54, 31, 1 and 55. ORF 62 is the major immediate early regulatory VZV gene. Further SNP analysis across the entire genome has led to the observation that VZV strains can be broadly grouped into clades within a phylogenetic tree. VZV strains collected in Singapore provided important sequence data for construction of the phylogenetic tree. Currently 5 VZV clades are recognized; they have been designated clades 1 through 5. Clades 1 and 3 include European/North American strains; clade 2 includes Asian strains, especially from Japan; and clade 5 includes strains from India. Clade 4 includes some strains from Europe, but its geographic origins need further documentation.. Within clade 1, five variant viruses have been isolated with a missense mutation in the gE (ORF 68) glycoprotein; these strains have an altered increased cell spread phenotype. Bioinformatics analyses of the attenuated vaccine strains have also been performed, with a subsequent discovery of a stop-codon SNP in ORFO as a likely attenuation determinant. Taken together, these VZV bioinformatics analyses have provided enormous insights into VZV phylogenetics as well as VZV SNPs associated with attenuation. PMID:23183312

  5. Live-Attenuated Bacterial Vectors: Tools for Vaccine and Therapeutic Agent Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ivan Y. C.; Van, Thi Thu Hao; Smooker, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically attenuated microorganisms, including pathogenic and commensal bacteria, can be engineered to carry and deliver heterologous antigens to elicit host immunity against both the vector as well as the pathogen from which the donor gene is derived. These live attenuated bacterial vectors have been given much attention due to their capacity to induce a broad range of immune responses including localized mucosal, as well as systemic humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity. In addition, the unique tumor-homing characteristics of these bacterial vectors has also been exploited for alternative anti-tumor vaccines and therapies. In such approach, tumor-associated antigen, immunostimulatory molecules, anti-tumor drugs, or nucleotides (DNA or RNA) are delivered. Different potential vectors are appropriate for specific applications, depending on their pathogenic routes. In this review, we survey and summarize the main features of the different types of live bacterial vectors and discussed the clinical applications in the field of vaccinology. In addition, different approaches for using live attenuated bacterial vectors for anti-cancer therapy is discussed, and some promising pre-clinical and clinical studies in this field are outlined. PMID:26569321

  6. Rapid quality control of a live attenuated Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) vaccine by monoclonal antibody based sandwich ELISA.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, P; Sen, A; Balamurugan, V; Bandyopadhyay, S K; Singh, R K

    2008-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease of goats and sheep. A homologous Vero cell-based attenuated PPR vaccine developed in our laboratory and used extensively throughout the country, is available for control of PPR. The presently used quality control test, titration in Vero cells for PPR virus titre in vaccine batches, takes at least 6-8days to determine the quality and dose of vaccine. In this study, 74 freeze-dried PPR vaccine batches were tested simultaneously by both virus titration and PPR sandwich ELISA (S-ELISA) to correlate the titre of the vaccine virus with reactivity in S-ELISA. It was found that the vaccine batches with titre more than 10(3)TCID(50)/ml gave positive results in S-ELISA and correlated well with the virus titre of the freeze-dried vaccines. The correlation coefficient between the virus titration and S-ELISA reactivity was estimated as 0.96, indicating a high correlation between the two parameters based on 74 batches of freeze-dried PPR vaccine. The vaccine batches with titres of 3.0, 4.3, 4.5, 5.0, 6.5 and 7.0 had shown a positive reaction when tested in two-fold dilutions in S-ELISA at 1, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9log2 titres, respectively. The test vaccine batches were found to be negative in S-ELISA when the titre of the vaccine was less than 10(3)TCID50/ml, suggesting that the vaccine could not be passed for field use. It is concluded that S-ELISA could be a preliminary tool useful for the quality control of PPR vaccine as it is rapid and easy to perform when compared to virus titration.

  7. [Effect of Low Dose of Chicken Infectious Anemia Virus in Attenuated Vaccine on SPF Chicken Body Weight and Vaccine Immune Antibody].

    PubMed

    Fang, Lichun; Li, Xiaohan; Ren, Zhihao; Li, Yang; Wang, Yixin; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In order to observe the effect of the immune and weight of chickens after use the attenuated vaccine with low dose of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV). In this study, the effects of low dose of CIAV on the weight of SPF chickens and NDV antibody production were observed by simulated experiments. The results showed that 10 EID50 and 5 EID50 CIAV per plume attenuated NDV vaccines were used to cause the weight loss of SPF chickens. Compared with the use of the non contaminated vaccine group, it has significant difference. And NDV antibody levels compared with the use of the non contaminated groups also decreased after use the vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. It has significant difference. A certain proportion of CIAV antibody positive was detected at the beginning of the second week after use the NDV vaccine with two doses of CIAV contaminated. The detection of a high proportion of CIAV nucleic acid was detected in the first week after the use of a contaminated vaccine. The results of the study demonstrate the effects of CIAV pollution on the production and immune function of SPF chickens, and it is suggested that increasing the detection of viral nucleic acid can help save time and improve the detection rate in the detection of exogenous virus contamination by SPF chicken test method.

  8. An attenuated virus vaccine appears safe to the central nervous system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after intranasal delivery.

    PubMed

    Larragoite, Erin T; Tacchi, Luca; LaPatra, Scott E; Salinas, Irene

    2016-02-01

    Nasal vaccines are very effective but the olfactory organ provides direct access of antigens to the brain. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is known to cause high mortalities in salmonids. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of a live attenuated IHNV nasal (I.N) vaccine in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the olfactory organ, the vaccine was detected 1 and 4 days after primary I.N vaccination but not in the intramuscular (i.m) or control groups. In the brain, IHNV was detected by RT-qPCR 4 and 21 days after i.m primary vaccination. One i.m and one I.N vaccinated trout were positive at days 4 and 28 days post-boost, respectively. Presence of IHNV in the brain of i.m vaccinated fish correlated with moderate increases in IL-1β and TNF-α expression in this tissue. These results demonstrate that IHNV vaccine lasts for 4 days in the local nasal environment and that nasal vaccination appears to be safe to the CNS of rainbow trout.

  9. An attenuated virus vaccine appears safe to the central nervous system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after intranasal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larragoite, Erin T.; Tacchi, Luca; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Nasal vaccines are very effective but the olfactory organ provides direct access of antigens to the brain. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is known to cause high mortalities in salmonids. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of a live attenuated IHNV nasal (I.N) vaccine in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the olfactory organ, the vaccine was detected 1 and 4 days after primary I.N vaccination but not in the intramuscular (i.m) or control groups. In the brain, IHNV was detected by RT-qPCR 4 and 21 days after i.m primary vaccination. One i.m and one I.N vaccinated trout were positive at days 4 and 28 days post-boost, respectively. Presence of IHNV in the brain of i.m vaccinated fish correlated with moderate increases in IL-1β and TNF-α expression in this tissue. These results demonstrate that IHNV vaccine lasts for 4 days in the local nasal environment and that nasal vaccination appears to be safe to the CNS of rainbow trout. PMID:26772477

  10. Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine for tilapia via continuous passage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, L P; Wang, R; Liang, W W; Huang, T; Huang, Y; Luo, F G; Lei, A Y; Chen, M; Gan, X

    2015-08-01

    Fish Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) seriously harms the world's aquaculture industry and causes huge economic losses. This study aimed to develop a potential live attenuated vaccine of S. agalactiae. Pre-screened vaccine candidate strain S. agalactiae HN016 was used as starting material to generate an attenuated strain S. agalactiae YM001 by continuous passage in vitro. The biological characteristics, virulence, and stability of YM001 were detected, and the protective efficacy of YM001 immunization in tilapia was also determined. Our results indicated that the growth, staining, characteristics of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotype, and virulence of YM001 were changed significantly as compared to the parental strain HN016. High doses of YM001 by intraperitoneal (IP) injection (1.0 × 10(9) CFU/fish) and oral gavage (1.0 × 10(10) CFU/fish) respectively did not cause any mortality and morbidity in tilapia. The relative percent survivals (RPSs) of fishes immunized with YM001 (1.0 × 10(8) CFU/fish, one time) via injection, immersion, and oral administration were 96.88, 67.22, and 71.81%, respectively, at 15 days, and 93.61, 60.56, and 53.16%, respectively, at 30 days. In all tests with 1-3 times of immunization in tilapia, the dosages at 1 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(9) CFU/fish displayed the similar best results, whereas the immunoprotection of the dosages at 1 × 10(6) and 1 × 10(7) CFU/fish declined significantly (P < 0.01), and 1 × 10(5) CFU/fish hardly displayed any protective effect. In addition, the efficacy of 2-3 times of immunization was significantly higher than that of single immunization (P < 0.01) while no significant difference in the efficacy between twice and thrice of immunization was seen (P > 0.05). The level of protective antibody elicited by oral immunization was significantly higher compared to that of the control group (P < 0.01), and the antibody reached their maximum levels 14-21 days after the immunization but decreased

  11. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs immunized with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine and subsequently infected with an antigenically divergent virus of the same HA subtype. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines administered intranasally h...

  12. Live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccination confers superinfection resistance against macrophage-tropic and neurovirulent wild-type SIV challenge.

    PubMed

    Berry, Neil; Ham, Claire; Alden, Jack; Clarke, Sean; Stebbings, Richard; Stott, Jim; Ferguson, Deborah; Almond, Neil

    2015-07-01

    Vaccination with live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in non-human primate species provides a means of characterizing the protective processes of retroviral superinfection and may lead to novel advances of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS vaccine design. The minimally attenuated SIVmacC8 vaccine has been demonstrated to elicit early potent protection against pathogenic rechallenge with genetically diverse viral isolates in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). In this study, we have characterized further the biological breadth of this vaccine protection by assessing the ability of both the nef-disrupted SIVmacC8 and its nef-intact counterpart SIVmacJ5 viruses to prevent superinfection with the macrophage/neurotropic SIVmac239/17E-Fr (SIVmac17E-Fr) isolate. Inoculation with either SIVmacC8 or SIVmacJ5 and subsequent detailed characterization of the viral replication kinetics revealed a wide range of virus-host outcomes. Both nef-disrupted and nef-intact immunizing viruses were able to prevent establishment of SIVmac17E-Fr in peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues. Differences in virus kinetics, indicative of an active process, identified uncontrolled replication in one macaque which although able to prevent SIVmac17E-Fr superinfection led to extensive neuropathological complications. The ability to prevent a biologically heterologous, CD4-independent/CCR5+ viral isolate and the macrophage-tropic SIVmac316 strain from establishing infection supports the hypothesis that direct target cell blocking is unlikely to be a central feature of live lentivirus vaccination. These data provide further evidence to demonstrate that inoculation of a live retroviral vaccine can deliver broad spectrum protection against both macrophage-tropic as well as lymphocytotropic viruses. These data add to our knowledge of live attenuated SIV vaccines but further highlight potential safety concerns of vaccinating with a live retrovirus.

  13. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Costa, Simone M.; Paes, Marciano V.; Silva, Juliana F. A.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.; Almeida, Cecília J.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1) induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50), which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50). The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity. PMID:26650916

  14. Reversion to virulence and efficacy of an attenuated Canarypox vaccine in Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Carter T; Wiegand, Kimberly C; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I

    2012-12-01

    Vaccines may be effective tools for protecting small populations of highly susceptible endangered, captive-reared, or translocated Hawaiian honeycreepers from introduced Avipoxvirus, but their efficacy has not been evaluated. An attenuated Canarypox vaccine that is genetically similar to one of two passerine Avipoxvirus isolates from Hawai'i and distinct from Fowlpox was tested to evaluate whether Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) can be protected from wild isolates of Avipoxvirus from the Hawaiian Islands. Thirty-one (31) Hawai'i 'Amakihi were collected from high-elevation habitats on Mauna Kea Volcano, where pox transmission is rare, and randomly divided into two groups. One group was vaccinated with Poximune C, whereas the other group received a sham vaccination with sterile water. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, whereas one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or "take." After vaccine lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox (FP) from Hawai'i, a Hawai'i 'Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus (PV1), or a Hawai'i 'Amakihi isolate of a related, but distinct, passerine Avipoxvirus (PV2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated 'Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated 'Amakihi challenged with FP had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated 'Amakihi challenged with PV1 and PV2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for PV1 to 60% (3/5) for PV2. Mortality in unvaccinated 'Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for PV1 to 100% (5/5) for PV2. Although the vaccine provided some protection against PV1, both potential for vaccine reversion and low efficacy against PV2 preclude its use in captive or wild honeycreepers.

  15. Reversion to virulence and efficacy of an attenuated Canarypox vaccine in Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Carter T; Wiegand, Kimberly C; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I

    2012-12-01

    Vaccines may be effective tools for protecting small populations of highly susceptible endangered, captive-reared, or translocated Hawaiian honeycreepers from introduced Avipoxvirus, but their efficacy has not been evaluated. An attenuated Canarypox vaccine that is genetically similar to one of two passerine Avipoxvirus isolates from Hawai'i and distinct from Fowlpox was tested to evaluate whether Hawai'i 'Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) can be protected from wild isolates of Avipoxvirus from the Hawaiian Islands. Thirty-one (31) Hawai'i 'Amakihi were collected from high-elevation habitats on Mauna Kea Volcano, where pox transmission is rare, and randomly divided into two groups. One group was vaccinated with Poximune C, whereas the other group received a sham vaccination with sterile water. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, whereas one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or "take." After vaccine lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox (FP) from Hawai'i, a Hawai'i 'Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus (PV1), or a Hawai'i 'Amakihi isolate of a related, but distinct, passerine Avipoxvirus (PV2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated 'Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated 'Amakihi challenged with FP had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated 'Amakihi challenged with PV1 and PV2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for PV1 to 60% (3/5) for PV2. Mortality in unvaccinated 'Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for PV1 to 100% (5/5) for PV2. Although the vaccine provided some protection against PV1, both potential for vaccine reversion and low efficacy against PV2 preclude its use in captive or wild honeycreepers. PMID:23272348

  16. A reassortment-incompetent live attenuated influenza virus vaccine for use in protection against pandemic virus strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) are safe for use in protection against seasonal influenza strains, concerns over their potential to reassort with wild-type virus strains have been voiced. LAIVs have been demonstrated to induce enhanced mucosal and cell-mediated immunity over inac...

  17. Attempt to develop live attenuated bacterial vaccines by selecting resistance to gossypol, proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, or ciprofloxacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, four chemicals (gossypol, proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, and ciprofloxacin) were used to modify the following four genera of bacteria through chemical-resistance strategy: 1) Aeromonas hydrophila (9 isolates); 2) Edwardsie...

  18. Attempt to develop live attenuated bacterial vaccines by selecting resistance to gossypol, proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, or ciprofloxacin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, four chemicals (gossypol, proflavine hemisulfate, novobiocin, and ciprofloxacin) were used to modify the following four genera of bacteria through chemical-resistance strategy: (1) Aeromonas hydrophila (9 isolates); (2) Edwards...

  19. Generation of growth arrested Leishmania amastigotes: a tool to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Solanki, Sumit; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-06-30

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal if not treated and is prevalent widely in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of world. VL is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani or Leishmania infantum. Although several second generation vaccines have been licensed to protect dogs against VL, there are no effective vaccines against human VL [1]. Since people cured of leishmaniasis develop lifelong protection, development of live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccines, which can have controlled infection, may be a close surrogate to leishmanization. This can be achieved by deletion of genes involved in the regulation of growth and/or virulence of the parasite. Such mutant parasites generally do not revert to virulence in animal models even under conditions of induced immune suppression due to complete deletion of the essential gene(s). In the Leishmania life cycle, the intracellular amastigote form is the virulent form and causes disease in the mammalian hosts. We developed centrin gene deleted L. donovani parasites that displayed attenuated growth only in the amastigote stage and were found safe and efficacious against virulent challenge in the experimental animal models. Thus, targeting genes differentially expressed in the amastigote stage would potentially attenuate only the amastigote stage and hence controlled infectivity may be effective in developing immunity. This review lays out the strategies for attenuation of the growth of the amastigote form of Leishmania for use as live vaccine against leishmaniasis, with a focus on visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:24837513

  20. Development and efficacy of a novel live-attenuated QX-like nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus vaccine in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Keyu; Xue, Yu; Wang, Jinglan; Chen, Weiguo; Chen, Feng; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2015-02-25

    In this study, we attenuated a Chinese QX-like nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain, YX10, by passaging through fertilized chicken eggs. The 90th passage strain (YX10p90) was selected as the live-attenuated vaccine candidate strain. YX10p90 was found to be safe in 7-day-old specific pathogen free chickens without induction of morbidity or mortality. YX10p90 provided nearly complete protection against QX-like (CH I genotype) strains and partial protection against other two major Chinese genotype strains. YX10p90 also showed no reversion to virulence after five back passages in chickens. An IBV polyvalent vaccine containing YX10p90 was developed and showed that it could provide better protection against major Chinese IBV virulent strains than commercial polyvalent vaccines. In addition, the complete genome sequence of YX10p90 was sequenced. Multiple-sequence alignments identified 38 nucleotide substitutions in the whole genome which resulted in 26 amino acid substitutions and a 110-bp deletion in the 3' untranslated region. In conclusion, the attenuated YX10p90 strain exhibited a fine balance between attenuation and immunogenicity, and should be considered as a candidate vaccine to prevent infection of Chinese QX-like nephropathogenic IBV.

  1. Generation of growth arrested Leishmania amastigotes: a tool to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Solanki, Sumit; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-06-30

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal if not treated and is prevalent widely in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of world. VL is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani or Leishmania infantum. Although several second generation vaccines have been licensed to protect dogs against VL, there are no effective vaccines against human VL [1]. Since people cured of leishmaniasis develop lifelong protection, development of live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccines, which can have controlled infection, may be a close surrogate to leishmanization. This can be achieved by deletion of genes involved in the regulation of growth and/or virulence of the parasite. Such mutant parasites generally do not revert to virulence in animal models even under conditions of induced immune suppression due to complete deletion of the essential gene(s). In the Leishmania life cycle, the intracellular amastigote form is the virulent form and causes disease in the mammalian hosts. We developed centrin gene deleted L. donovani parasites that displayed attenuated growth only in the amastigote stage and were found safe and efficacious against virulent challenge in the experimental animal models. Thus, targeting genes differentially expressed in the amastigote stage would potentially attenuate only the amastigote stage and hence controlled infectivity may be effective in developing immunity. This review lays out the strategies for attenuation of the growth of the amastigote form of Leishmania for use as live vaccine against leishmaniasis, with a focus on visceral leishmaniasis.

  2. Pre- and post-exposure safety and efficacy of attenuated rabies virus vaccines are enhanced by their expression of IFNγ

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhouse, Darryll A.; Faber, Milosz; Hooper, D. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with evidence of a strong correlation between interferon gamma (IFNγ) production and rabies virus (RABV) clearance from the CNS, we recently demonstrated that engineering a pathogenic RABV to express IFNγ highly attenuates the virus. Reasoning that IFNγ expression by RABV vaccines would enhance their safety and efficacy, we reverse-engineered two proven vaccine vectors, GAS and GASGAS, to express murine IFNγ. Mortality and morbidity were monitored during suckling mice infection, immunize/challenge experiments and mixed intracranial infections. We demonstrate that GASγ and GASγGAS are significantly attenuated in suckling mice compared to the GASGAS vaccine. GASγ better protects mice from lethal DRV4 RABV infection in both pre- and post-exposure experiments compared to GASGAS. Finally, GASγGAS reduces post-infection neurological sequelae, compared to control, during mixed intracranial infection with DRV4. These data show IFNγ expression by a vaccine vector can enhance its safety while increasing its efficacy as pre- and post-exposure treatment. - Highlights: • IFNγ expression improves attenuated rabies virus safety and immunogenicity. • IFNγ expression is safer and more immunogenic than doubling glycoprotein expression. • Co-infection with IFNγ-expressing RABV prevents wild-type rabies virus lethality. • Vaccine safety and efficacy is additive for IFNγ and double glycoprotein expression.

  3. Generation and Characterization of Live Attenuated Influenza A(H7N9) Candidate Vaccine Virus Based on Russian Donor of Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbik, Svetlana; Pearce, Nicholas; Balish, Amanda; Jones, Joyce; Thor, Sharmi; Davis, Charles Todd; Pearce, Melissa; Tumpey, Terrence; Cureton, David; Chen, Li-Mei; Villanueva, Julie; Bousse, Tatiana L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus has emerged recently and continues to cause severe disease with a high mortality rate in humans prompting the development of candidate vaccine viruses. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) are 6:2 reassortant viruses containing the HA and NA gene segments from wild type influenza viruses to induce protective immune responses and the six internal genes from Master Donor Viruses (MDV) to provide temperature sensitive, cold-adapted and attenuated phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings LAIV candidate A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9)-CDC-LV7A (abbreviated as CDC-LV7A), based on the Russian MDV, A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2), was generated by classical reassortment in eggs and retained MDV temperature-sensitive and cold-adapted phenotypes. CDC-LV7A had two amino acid substitutions N123D and N149D (H7 numbering) in HA and one substitution T10I in NA. To evaluate the role of these mutations on the replication capacity of the reassortants in eggs, the recombinant viruses A(H7N9)RG-LV1 and A(H7N9)RG-LV2 were generated by reverse genetics. These changes did not alter virus antigenicity as ferret antiserum to CDC-LV7A vaccine candidate inhibited hemagglutination by homologous A(H7N9) virus efficiently. Safety studies in ferrets confirmed that CDC-LV7A was attenuated compared to wild-type A/Anhui/1/2013. In addition, the genetic stability of this vaccine candidate was examined in eggs and ferrets by monitoring sequence changes acquired during virus replication in the two host models. No changes in the viral genome were detected after five passages in eggs. However, after ten passages additional mutations were detected in the HA gene. The vaccine candidate was shown to be stable in the ferret model; post-vaccination sequence data analysis showed no changes in viruses collected in nasal washes present at day 5 or day 7. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that the A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9)-CDC-LV7A reassortant virus is a safe and

  4. Vaccination with Tat toxoid attenuates disease in simian/HIV-challenged macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pauza, C. David; Trivedi, Parul; Wallace, Marianne; Ruckwardt, Tracy J.; Le Buanec, Hélene; Lu, Wei; Bizzini, Bernard; Burny, Arséne; Zagury, Daniel; Gallo, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    The Tat protein is essential for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication and may be an important virulence factor in vivo. We studied the role of Tat in viral pathogenesis by immunizing rhesus macaques with chemically inactivated Tat toxoid and challenging these animals by intrarectal inoculation with the simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6PD. Immune animals had significantly attenuated disease with lowered viral RNA, interferon-α, and chemokine receptor expression (CXCR4 and CCR5) on CD4+ T cells; these features of infection have been linked to in vitro effects of Tat and respond similarly to extracellular Tat protein produced during infection. Immunization with Tat toxoid inhibits key steps in viral pathogenesis and should be included in therapeutic or preventive HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:10725402

  5. FTIR spectroscopy for the detection and evaluation of live attenuated viruses in freeze dried vaccine formulations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Laurent; De Beer, Thomas; Pierre, Karin; Pastoret, Soumya; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Daoussi, Rim; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the applicability of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect the applied virus medium volume (i.e., during sample filling), to evaluate the virus state and to distinguish between different vaccine doses in a freeze dried live, attenuated vaccine formulation. Therefore, different formulations were freeze dried after preparing them with different virus medium volumes (i.e., 30, 100, and 400 µl) or after applying different pre-freeze-drying sample treatments (resulting in different virus states); i.e., (i) as done for the commercial formulation; (ii) samples without virus medium (placebo); (iii) samples with virus medium but free from antigen; (iv) concentrated samples obtained via a centrifugal filter device; and (v) samples stressed by 96h exposure to room temperature; or by using different doses (placebo, 25-dose vials, 50-dose-vials and 125-dose vials). Each freeze-dried product was measured directly after freeze-drying with FTIR spectroscopy. The collected spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and evaluated at three spectral regions, which might provide information on the coated proteins of freeze dried live, attenuated viruses: (i) 1700-1600 cm(-1) (amide I band), 1600-1500 cm(-1) (amide II band) and 1200-1350 cm(-1) (amide III band). The latter spectral band does not overlap with water signals and is hence not influenced by residual moisture in the samples. It was proven that FTIR could distinguish between the freeze-dried samples prepared using different virus medium volumes, containing different doses and using different pre-freeze-drying sample treatments in the amide III region. PMID:25960257

  6. Dengue research opportunities in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Catherine A; Morens, David M; Cassetti, M Cristina; Costero-Saint Denis, Adriana; San Martin, Jose-Luis; Whitehead, Stephen S; Fauci, Anthony S

    2012-10-01

    Dengue is a systemic arthropod-borne viral disease of major global public health importance. At least 2.5 billion people who live in areas of the world where dengue occurs are at risk of developing dengue fever (DF) and its severe complications, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Repeated reemergences of dengue in sudden explosive epidemics often cause public alarm and seriously stress healthcare systems. The control of dengue is further challenged by the lack of effective therapies, vaccines, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite years of study, even its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. This article discusses recent advances in dengue research and identifies challenging gaps in research on dengue clinical evaluation, diagnostics, epidemiology, immunology, therapeutics, vaccinology/clinical trials research, vector biology, and vector ecology. Although dengue is a major global tropical pathogen, epidemiologic and disease control considerations in this article emphasize dengue in the Americas. PMID:22782946

  7. Dengue Research Opportunities in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine A.; Morens, David M.; Cassetti, M. Cristina; Costero-Saint Denis, Adriana; San Martin, Jose-Luis; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a systemic arthropod-borne viral disease of major global public health importance. At least 2.5 billion people who live in areas of the world where dengue occurs are at risk of developing dengue fever (DF) and its severe complications, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Repeated reemergences of dengue in sudden explosive epidemics often cause public alarm and seriously stress healthcare systems. The control of dengue is further challenged by the lack of effective therapies, vaccines, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite years of study, even its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. This article discusses recent advances in dengue research and identifies challenging gaps in research on dengue clinical evaluation, diagnostics, epidemiology, immunology, therapeutics, vaccinology/clinical trials research, vector biology, and vector ecology. Although dengue is a major global tropical pathogen, epidemiologic and disease control considerations in this article emphasize dengue in the Americas. PMID:22782946

  8. Dengue research opportunities in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Catherine A; Morens, David M; Cassetti, M Cristina; Costero-Saint Denis, Adriana; San Martin, Jose-Luis; Whitehead, Stephen S; Fauci, Anthony S

    2012-10-01

    Dengue is a systemic arthropod-borne viral disease of major global public health importance. At least 2.5 billion people who live in areas of the world where dengue occurs are at risk of developing dengue fever (DF) and its severe complications, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Repeated reemergences of dengue in sudden explosive epidemics often cause public alarm and seriously stress healthcare systems. The control of dengue is further challenged by the lack of effective therapies, vaccines, and point-of-care diagnostics. Despite years of study, even its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. This article discusses recent advances in dengue research and identifies challenging gaps in research on dengue clinical evaluation, diagnostics, epidemiology, immunology, therapeutics, vaccinology/clinical trials research, vector biology, and vector ecology. Although dengue is a major global tropical pathogen, epidemiologic and disease control considerations in this article emphasize dengue in the Americas.

  9. Conservation Analysis of Dengue Virus T-cell Epitope-Based Vaccine Candidates Using Peptide Block Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches are based on combinations of highly conserved T-cell epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach for assembling sets of broadly covering antigens. Since T-cell epitopes are recognized as peptides rather than individual residues, this method is based on calculating the information content of blocks of peptides from a multiple sequence alignment of homologous proteins rather than using the information content of individual residues. The block entropy analysis provides broad coverage of variant antigens. We applied the block entropy analysis method to the proteomes of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) and found 1,551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, which cover 99% of available sequences with five or fewer unique peptides. In contrast, the benchmark study by Khan et al. (2008) resulted in 165 conserved 9-mer peptides. Many of the conserved blocks are located consecutively in the proteins. Connecting these blocks resulted in 78 conserved regions. Of the 1551 blocks of 9-mer peptides 110 comprised predicted HLA binder sets. In total, 457 subunit peptides that encompass the diversity of all sequenced DENV strains of which 333 are T-cell epitope candidates. PMID:22566858

  10. Macrophages as effector cells of protective immunity in murine schistosomiasis: macrophage activation in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Natovitz, P C; Farrar, W L; Leonard, E J

    1984-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses contributing to macrophage activation were compared in mice that demonstrated partial resistance to challenge Schistosoma mansoni infection as a result of vaccination with radiation-attenuated cercariae or of ongoing low-grade primary infection. Vaccinated mice developed significant delayed hypersensitivity reactions to soluble schistosome antigens in vivo. Splenocytes from vaccinated animals responded to in vitro culture with various specific antigens (soluble adult worm extract, living or disrupted schistosomula) by proliferation and production of macrophage-activating lymphokines as did lymphocytes from S. mansoni-infected animals. Macrophage-activating factors produced by spleen cells from vaccinated mice upon specific antigen stimulation eluted as a single peak on Sephadex G-100 with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000 and contained gamma interferon activity. Moreover, peritoneal macrophages with larvicidal and tumoricidal activity were recovered from vaccinated mice after intraperitoneal challenge with soluble schistosome antigens, a procedure also observed to elicit activated macrophages in S. mansoni-infected animals. These observations demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated cercariae stimulates many of the same cellular responses observed after primary S. mansoni infection, and suggest that lymphokine-activated macrophages may participate in the effector mechanism of vaccine-induced and concomitant immunity to challenge schistosome infection. This is the first demonstration of a potential immune effector mechanism in the irradiated vaccine model. PMID:6609885

  11. Limited potential for mosquito transmission of genetically engineered, live-attenuated western equine encephalitis virus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Turell, Michael J; O'Guinn, Monica L; Parker, Michael D

    2003-02-01

    Specific mutations associated with attenuation of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus in rodent models were identified during efforts to develop an improved VEE vaccine. Analogous mutations were produced in full-length cDNA clones of the Cba 87 strain of western equine encephalitis (WEE) virus by site-directed mutagenesis in an attempt to develop an improved WEE vaccine. Isogenic viral strains with these mutations were recovered after transfection of baby hamster kidney cells with infectious RNA. We evaluated two of these strains (WE2102 and WE2130) for their ability to replicate in and be transmitted by Culex tarsalis, the principal natural vector of WEE virus in the United States. Each of the vaccine candidates contained a deletion of the PE2 furin cleavage site and a secondary mutation in the E1 or E2 glycoprotein. Both of these potential candidates replicated in mosquitoes significantly less efficiently than did either wild-type WEE (Cba 87) virus or the parental clone (WE2000). Likewise, after intrathoracic inoculation, mosquitoes transmitted the vaccine candidate strains significantly less efficiently than they transmitted either the wild-type or the parental clone. One-day-old chickens vaccinated with either of the two vaccine candidates did not become viremic when challenged with virulent WEE virus two weeks later. Mutations that result in less efficient replication in or transmission by mosquitoes should enhance vaccine safety and reduce the possibility of accidental introduction of the vaccine strain to unintentional hosts.

  12. DENGUE: GLOBAL THREAT.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease, which is currently an expanding global problem. Four closely related dengue serotypes cause the disease, which ranges from asymptomatic infection to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever (DF), and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF is characterized by fever, bleeding diathesis, and a tendency to develop a potentially fatal shock syndrome. Dengue infection with organ impairment mainly involves the central nervous system and the liver. Consistent hematological findings include vasculopathy, coagulopathy, and thrombocytopenia. Laboratory diagnosis includes virus isolation, serology, and detection of dengue ribonucleic acid. Successful treatment, which is mainly supportive, depends on early recognition of the disease and careful monitoring for shock. A severity-based revised dengue classification for medical interventions has been developed and validated in many countries. There is no specific dengue treatment, and prevention is currently limited to vector control measures. The world's first, large-scale dengue vaccine efficacy study demonstrated its efficacy and a reduction of dengue disease severity with a good safety profile in a study of more than 30,000 volunteers from Asia and Latin America.

  13. Stability of attenuated live virus rabies vaccine in baits targeted to wild foxes under operational conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, K F; Bachmann, P

    2001-01-01

    The viability of an attenuated live virus rabies vaccine in a bait targeted to red foxes was examined under various operational conditions in a series of experiments in Ontario. The virus was relatively stable over a 28-day period in the field, losing a mean 0.5, s = 0.2 log10 of virus titer. The micro-environment into which the bait was placed (open cultivated field, grassy meadow, wooded grove, sun or shade) did not make an appreciable difference in the viability of the virus. There was no significant difference (P < or = 0.05) between mean ambient temperatures and the temperature of fluids in blister packs of baits placed in sun or shade. Sixty-three percent of foxes fed baits exposed to sun and shade conditions for 21 days (titer 10(6.2) tissue culture infective doses per 1 mL) developed rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies. Storage of vaccine baits at -30 degrees C prior to bait distribution was important in maintaining virus viability. PMID:11360859

  14. Development of a live, oral, attenuated vaccine against El Tor cholera.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D N; Killeen, K P; Hack, D C; Kenner, J R; Coster, T S; Beattie, D T; Ezzell, J; Hyman, T; Trofa, A; Sjogren, M H

    1994-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae El Tor strains from Peru, Bangladesh, and Bahrain were attenuated by deletion of a genetic element that encodes virulence factors and RS1. The B subunit of ctx (ctxB) was reintroduced into the recA gene of the deletion mutants, rendering them unable to recombine with exogenous genetic elements and generating Peru-3, Bang-3, and Bah-3. Fifteen volunteers received one dose of various vaccine strains at 4 x 10(6) to 1 x 10(8) cfu. All strains colonized the gut. A > or = 4-fold rise in vibriocidal titer was observed in 14 volunteers, with titers of > or = 1600 in 13. Peru-3 was the least reactogenic, but 2 of 6 volunteers had loose stools. Peru-14, a filamentous motility-deficient mutant of Peru-3, was well tolerated and colonized 18 of 21 volunteers at doses of 2 x 10(6) to 1 x 10(9) cfu. Also, when 8 Peru-3 or Peru-5 vaccinees, 5 Peru-14 vaccinees, and 8 controls were challenged with 2 x 10(6) cfu V. cholerae El Tor Inaba (N16961), 11 vaccinees were protected compared with no controls. Peru-14 shows promise as a safe, effective, single-dose oral vaccine against El Tor cholera.

  15. Development of a live attenuated vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoxin; Gao, Xuyuan; Xiao, Yali; Liu, Shaoqiong; Peng, Shan; Li, Xuesong; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Wu, Xiaogang; Yan, Pixi; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Tong, Guangzhi; Li, Zejun

    2014-02-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) is a newly emerging pathogenic flavivirus that is causing massive economic loss in the Chinese duck industry. To obtain a live vaccine candidate against the disease, the DTMUV isolate FX2010 was passaged serially in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Characterization of FX2010-180P revealed that it was unable to replicate efficiently in chicken embryonated eggs, nor intranasally infect mice or shelducks at high doses of 5.5log10 tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50). FX2010-180P did not induce clinical symptoms, or pathological lesions in ducks at a dose of 5.5log10TCID50. The attenuation of FX2010-180P was due to 19 amino acid changes and 15 synonymous mutations. Importantly, FX2010-180P elicited good immune responses in ducks inoculated at low doses (3.5log10TCID50) and provided complete protection against challenge with a virulent strain. These results indicate that FX2010-180P is a promising candidate live vaccine for prevention of duck Tembusu viral disease.

  16. Live attenuated Salmonella vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with antigen delivery via the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Arteaga-Cortés, Lourdes T; Kader, Rebin; Curtiss, Roy; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health threat, and there is dire need to develop a vaccine that is safe and efficacious and confers long-lasting protection. In this study, we constructed recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with plasmids expressing fusion proteins consisting of the 80 amino-terminal amino acids of the type 3 secretion system effector SopE of Salmonella and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa (ESAT-6) protein and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10). We demonstrated that the SopE-mycobacterial antigen fusion proteins were translocated into the cytoplasm of INT-407 cells in cell culture assays. Oral immunization of mice with RASV strains synthesizing SopE-ESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion proteins resulted in significant protection of the mice against aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv that was similar to the protection afforded by immunization with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) administered subcutaneously. In addition, oral immunization with the RASV strains specifying these mycobacterial antigens elicited production of significant antibody titers to ESAT-6 and production of ESAT-6- or CFP-10-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-secreting splenocytes. PMID:22144486

  17. Conserved MHC class I-presented dengue virus epitopes identified by immunoproteomics analysis are targets for cross-serotype reactive T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Testa, James S; Shetty, Vivekananda; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Nickens, Zacharie; Hafner, Julie; Kamal, Shivali; Zhang, Xianchao; Jett, Marti; Philip, Ramila

    2012-02-15

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are significant global public health problems, and understanding the overall immune response to infection will contribute to appropriate management of the disease and its potentially severe complications. Live attenuated and subunit vaccine candidates, which are under clinical evaluation, induce primarily an antibody response to the virus and minimal cross-reactive T-cell responses. Currently, there are no available tools to assess protective T-cell responses during infection or after vaccination. In this study, we utilize an immunoproteomics process to uncover novel HLA-A2-specific epitopes derived from dengue virus (DV)-infected cells. These epitopes are conserved, and we report that epitope-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) are cross-reactive against all 4 DV serotypes. These epitopes have potential as new informational and diagnostic tools to characterize T-cell immunity in DV infection and may serve as part of a universal vaccine candidate complementary to current vaccines in trial.

  18. Synergistic neutralizing antibody response to a dengue virus type 2 DNA vaccine by incorporation of lysosome-associated membrane protein sequences and use of plasmid expressing GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, K; Marques, E; Ewing, D; Lu, Y; Phillips, I; Porter, K R; Kochel, T J; August, T J; Hayes, C G; Murphy, G S

    2001-11-10

    We have previously shown that a dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine expressing premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes was immunogenic in mice and monkeys and that rhesus monkeys vaccinated with this construct were completely to partially protected from virus challenge. In order to improve the immunogenicity of dengue DNA vaccines, we have evaluated the effect of lysosome targeting of antigens and coimmunization with a plasmid expressing GM-CSF on antibody responses. A dengue virus type 2 candidate vaccine containing prM and E genes was constructed in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of E were replaced by those of the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP). The modified vaccine construct expressed antigen that was colocalized with endogenous LAMP in lysosomal vesicles of transfected cells, whereas the antigen expressed from the unmodified construct was not. It was hypothesized that targeting of antigen to the lysosomal compartment will increase antigen presentation by MHC class II, leading to stronger CD4-mediated immune responses. Mice immunized with the modified construct responded with significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies compared to those immunized with the unmodified construct. Coimmunization of mice with a plasmid expressing murine GM-CSF enhanced the antibody response obtained with either the unmodified or the modified construct alone. The highest antibody responses were noted when the modified construct was coinjected with plasmid expressing the GM-CSF gene. These results could form the basis for an effective tetravalent dengue virus DNA vaccine. PMID:11883007

  19. Efficacy for a new live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine candidate to reduce internal egg contamination.

    PubMed

    Nandre, R; Matsuda, K; Lee, J H

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a novel attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (△lon△cpxR) vaccine candidate (JOL919), chickens were immunized through oral and intramuscular routes to reduce egg contamination against S. Enteritidis challenge. Birds were orally immunized with JOL919 on the first day of life and were subsequently boosted in the 6th and 16th weeks through oral (group B) or intramuscular (group C) route, while control birds were unimmunized (group A). The chickens of all groups were challenged intravenously with the virulent S. Enteritidis strain in the 24th week. The immunized groups B and C showed significantly higher plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA levels as compared to those of the control group. The lymphocyte proliferation response and CD45(+) CD3(+) T-cell number in the peripheral blood of the groups B and C were significantly increased. In addition, the egg contamination rates were significantly lower in the group B (0%, 10.7% and 0%) and the group C (3.6%, 14.3% and 3.6%) as compared to the group A (28.6%, 42.8% and 28.6%) in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd weeks post-challenge. All animals in the groups B and C showed lower organ lesion scores in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the liver, spleen and ovary at the 3rd week post-challenge. These results indicate that this vaccine candidate can be an efficient tool for prevention of Salmonella infections by inducing protective humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, this vaccine did not prevent egg contamination, but did appear to reduce incidence. Booster immunizations, especially via oral administration route, showed an efficient protection against internal egg contamination with S. Enteritidis.

  20. Oral Vaccination with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium-Delivered TsPmy DNA Vaccine Elicits Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Bi, Kuo; Sun, Ximeng; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (TsPmy) is an immunomodulatory protein that inhibits complement C1q and C8/C9 to evade host complement attack. Vaccination with recombinant TsPmy protein induced protective immunity against T. spiralis larval challenge. Due to the difficulty in producing TsPmy as a soluble recombinant protein, we prepared a DNA vaccine as an alternative approach in order to elicit a robust immunity against Trichinella infection. Methods and Findings The full-length TsPmy coding DNA was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1, and the recombinant pVAX1/TsPmy was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207. Oral vaccination of mice with this attenuated Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine elicited a significant mucosal sIgA response in the intestine and a systemic IgG antibody response with IgG2a as the predominant subclass. Cytokine analysis also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 5, 6, 10) responses in lymphocytes from the spleen and MLNs of immunized mice upon stimulation with TsPmy protein. The expression of the homing receptors CCR9/CCR10 on antibody secreting B cells may be related to the translocation of IgA-secreted B cells to local intestinal mucosa. The mice immunized with Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine produced a significant 44.8% reduction in adult worm and a 46.6% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis larvae. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that oral vaccination with TsPmy DNA delivered by live attenuated S. typhimurium elicited a significant local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that elicited a significant protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:27589591

  1. [History of development of the live poliomyelitis vaccine from Sabin attenuated strains in 1959 and idea of poliomyelitis eradication].

    PubMed

    Lashkevich, V A

    2013-01-01

    In 1958 Poliomyelitis Institute in Moscow and Institute of Experimental Medicine in St. Petersburg received from A. Sabin the attenuated strains of poliomyelitis virus. The characteristics of the strains were thoroughly studied by A. A. Smorodintsev and coworkers. They found that the virulence of the strains fluctuated slightly in 10 consecutive passages through the intestine of the non-immune children. A part of the Sabin material was used by A. A. Smorodintsev and M. P. Chumakov in the beginning of 1959 for immunizing approximately 40000 children in Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia. Epidemic poliomyelitis rate in these republics decreased from approximately 1000 cases yearly before vaccination to less than 20 in the third quarter of 1959. This was a convincing proof of the efficacy and safety of the vaccine from the attenuated Sabin strains. In 1959, according to A. Sabin's recommendation, a technology of live vaccine production was developed at the Poliomyelitis Institute, and several experimental lots of vaccine were prepared. In the second part of 1959, 13.5 million children in USSR were immunized. The epidemic poliomyelitis rate decreased 3-5 times in different regions without paralytic cases, which could be attributed to the vaccination. These results were the final proof of high efficiency and safety of live poliomyelitis vaccine from the attenuated Sabin strains. Based on these results, A. Sabin and M. P. Chumakov suggested in 1960 the idea of poliomyelitis eradication using mass immunization of children with live vaccine. 72 million persons up to 20 years old were vaccinated in USSR in 1960 with a 5 times drop in the paralytic rate. 50-year-long use of live vaccine results in poliomyelitis eradication in almost all countries worldwide. More than 10 million children were rescued from the death and palsy. Poliomyelitis eradication in a few countries where it still exists depends not on medical services but is defined by the attitude of their leaders to fight

  2. The attenuated hepatocellular carcinoma-specific Listeria vaccine Lmdd-MPFG prevents tumor occurrence through immune regulation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xin; Cheng, Ci; Lin, Zhe; Jiang, Runqiu; Zhao, Wei; Yan, Xin; Tang, Junwei; Yao, Kun; Sun, Beicheng; Chen, Yun

    2015-04-20

    Immunotherapy is a promising treatment for liver cancer. Here, we tested the ability of the attenuated hepatocellular carcinoma-specific Listeria vaccine (Lmdd-MPFG) to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a mouse model. Immunization with the vaccine caused a strong anti-tumor response, especially in mice reinfused with dendritic cells (DCs). In mice that were also administered DCs, tumor suppression was accompanied by the strongest cytotoxic T lymphocyte response of all treatment groups and by induced differentiation of CD4+ T cells, especially Th17 cells. Additionally, the Lmdd-MPFG vaccine caused maturation of DCs in vitro. We demonstrated the synergistic effect of TLR4 and NLRP3 or NOD1 signaling pathways in LM-induced DC activation. These results suggest that the Lmdd-MPFG vaccine is a feasible strategy for preventing HCC. PMID:25826093

  3. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-01

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27060051

  4. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: implications from other RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the U.S. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype and does not replicate at 41°C. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF. PMID:26322023

  5. Progress for dengue virus diseases. Towards the NS2B-NS3pro inhibition for a therapeutic-based approach.

    PubMed

    Melino, Sonia; Paci, Maurizio

    2007-06-01

    Transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, the dengue virus is the etiological agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, and, as such, is a significant factor in the high death rate found in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue diseases are not only a health burden to developing countries, but pose an emerging problem worldwide. The immunopathological mechanisms appear to include a complex series of immune responses. A rapid increase in the levels of cytokines and chemical mediators during dengue disease plays a key role in inducing plasma leakage, shock and hemorrhagic manifestations. Currently, there are no vaccines available against dengue virus, although several tetravalent live-attenuated dengue vaccines are in clinical phases I or II, and prevention through vaccination has become a major priority on the agendas of the World Health Organization and of national ministries of health and military organizations. An alternative to vaccines is found in therapeutic-based approaches. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of viral replication has led to the development of potential drugs, and new molecular viral targets for therapy are emerging. The NS3 protease domain of the NS3 protein is responsible for processing the viral polyprotein and its inhibition is one of the principal aims of pharmacological therapy. This review is an overview of the progress made against dengue virus; in particular, it examines the unique properties--structural and functional--of the NS3 protease for the treatment of dengue virus infections by the inhibition of viral polyprotein processing.

  6. Brugia malayi: vaccination of jirds with /sup 60/cobalt-attenuated infective stage larvae protects against homologous challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, J.A.; Higashi, G.I.

    1985-11-01

    Vaccination of inbred jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) with /sup 60/cobalt radiation-attenuated Brugia malayi infective stage larvae (L3) protected against homologous challenge given either subcutaneously (sc) or by the intraperitoneal (ip) route. Groups of jirds vaccinated once sc with 75, 15 Krad L3 showed from 69% to 91% reduction in recovered worms after ip challenge infection compared to infection in non-vaccinated control jirds, while 75% reduction in mean worm burden was seen in jirds receiving sc challenge infection. A single sc vaccination with 75, 10 or 20 Krad L3 produced no protection (10 Krad) and 64% reduction in recovered worms (20 Krad). Therefore the 15 Krad dose appeared to be best. A marked increase in anti-B. malayi antibody in vaccinated jirds was seen (by ELISA) immediately after challenge infection and an immunofluorescence assay showed that L3 incubated in serum from vaccinated jirds were completely and uniformly covered with specific antibody. Eosinophil-rich granulomas containing dead and moribund L3 were recovered from vaccinated jirds. This model of protective immunity in a Brugia-susceptible small rodent may provide a useful system for identification of molecularly defined filarial-protective immunogens.

  7. Generation and protective efficacy of a cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yandi; Qi, Lu; Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    To prevent H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in chickens, a long-term vaccination program using inactivated vaccines has been implemented in China. However, the protective efficacy of inactivated vaccines against antigenic drift variants is limited, and H9N2 influenza virus continues to circulate in vaccinated chicken flocks in China. Therefore, developing a cross-reactive vaccine to control the impact of H9N2 influenza in the poultry industry remains a high priority. In the present study, we developed a live cold-adapted H9N2 influenza vaccine candidate (SD/01/10-ca) by serial passages in embryonated eggs at successively lower temperatures. A total of 13 amino acid mutations occurred during the cold-adaptation of this H9N2 virus. The candidate was safe in chickens and induced robust hemagglutination-inhibition antibody responses and influenza virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell immune responses in chickens immunized intranasally. Importantly, the candidate could confer protection of chickens from homologous and heterogenous H9N2 viruses. These results demonstrated that the cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 virus would be selected as a vaccine to control the infection of prevalent H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens. PMID:27457755

  8. Generation and protective efficacy of a cold-adapted attenuated avian H9N2 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yandi; Qi, Lu; Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Pu, Juan; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    To prevent H9N2 avian influenza virus infection in chickens, a long-term vaccination program using inactivated vaccines has been implemented in China. However, the protective efficacy of inactivated vaccines against antigenic drift variants is limited, and H9N2 influenza virus continues to circulate in vaccinated chicken flocks in China. Therefore, developing a cross-reactive vaccine to control the impact of H9N2 influenza in the poultry industry remains a high priority. In the present study, we developed a live cold-adapted H9N2 influenza vaccine candidate (SD/01/10-ca) by serial passages in embryonated eggs at successively lower temperatures. A total of 13 amino acid mutations occurred during the cold-adaptation of this H9N2 virus. The candidate was safe in chickens and induced robust hemagglutination-inhibition antibody responses and influenza virus–specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses in chickens immunized intranasally. Importantly, the candidate could confer protection of chickens from homologous and heterogenous H9N2 viruses. These results demonstrated that the cold-adapted attenuated H9N2 virus would be selected as a vaccine to control the infection of prevalent H9N2 influenza viruses in chickens. PMID:27457755

  9. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Envelope Protein of Chimeric Yellow Fever-Dengue 1 Vaccine Virus Reduces Neurovirulence for Suckling Mice and Viremia/Viscerotropism for Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Guirakhoo, F.; Zhang, Z.; Myers, G.; Johnson, B. W.; Pugachev, K.; Nichols, R.; Brown, N.; Levenbook, I.; Draper, K.; Cyrek, S.; Lang, J.; Fournier, C.; Barrere, B.; Delagrave, S.; Monath, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    A chimeric yellow fever-dengue 1 (ChimeriVax-DEN1) virus was produced by the transfection of Vero cells with chimeric in vitro RNA transcripts. The cell culture supernatant was subjected to plaque purification for the identification of a vaccine candidate without mutations. Of 10 plaque-purified clones, 1 containing no mutation (clone J) was selected for production of the vaccine virus. During subsequent cell culture passaging of this clone for vaccine production, a single amino acid substitution (K to R) occurred in the envelope (E) protein at residue 204 (E204) (F. Guirakhoo, K. Pugachev, Z. Zhang, G. Myers, I. Levenbook, K. Draper, J. Lang, S. Ocran, F. Mitchell, M. Parsons, N. Brown, S. Brandler, C. Fournier, B. Barrere, F. Rizvi, A. Travassos, R. Nichols, D. Trent, and T. Monath, J. Virol. 78:4761-4775, 2004). The same mutation was observed in another clone (clone E). This mutation attenuated the virus in 4-day-old suckling mice inoculated by the intracerebral (i.c.) route and led to reduced viremia in monkeys inoculated by the subcutaneous or i.c. route. The histopathology scores of lesions in the brain tissue of monkeys inoculated with either the E204K or E204R virus were reduced compared to those for monkeys inoculated with the reference virus, a commercial yellow fever 17D vaccine (YF-VAX). Both viruses grew to significantly lower titers than YF-VAX in HepG2, a human hepatoma cell line. After intrathoracic inoculation into mosquitoes, both viruses grew to a similar level as YF-VAX, which was significantly lower than that of their wild-type DEN1 parent virus. A comparison of the E-protein structures of nonmutant and mutant viruses suggested the appearance of new intramolecular bonds between residues 204R, 261H, and 257E in the mutant virus. These changes may be responsible for virus attenuation through a change in the pH threshold for virus envelope fusion with the host cell membrane. PMID:15331733

  10. Dengue haemorrhagic fever — a public health problem and a field for research*

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is an enigmatic and growing public health problem which is confined at present to countries of South-East Asia. Since 1956, over 350 000 patients have been hospitalized and nearly 12 000 deaths have been reported. Dengue viruses, a group of four flaviviruses, are transmitted to man by Aedes aegypti. Currently, dengue viruses are actively transmitted in 61 countries which circle the globe in the tropical zone and have a combined population of 1500 million. Because the precise antecedents to DHF/DSS are unknown, the public health hazard posed by this syndrome is potentially worldwide. Epidemiological studies in South-East Asia clearly link DHF/DSS to individuals who have had a previous dengue infection or who have acquired maternal dengue antibody. Such antibody may serve as an opsonin, enhancing dengue virus infection of mononuclear phagocytes—the type of cell in man to which dengue infection may be confined. Antibody-mediated infection of these cells is the central concept in the hypothesis of immune infection enhancement. This hypothesis provides a conceptual framework for design of future research. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive identification of ”risk factors” in DHF/DSS. This research could be approached by undertaking comparative prospective epidemiological studies in dengue-endemic areas with and without DHF/DSS. Although important progress is being made in the development of attenuated dengue vaccines for each dengue type, a clearer understanding of the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS may be required to provide guidelines for safe and lasting immunoprophylaxis in man. PMID:6966540

  11. Dengue haemorrhagic fever--a public health problem and a field for research.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1980-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is an enigmatic and growing public health problem which is confined at present to countries of South-East Asia. Since 1956, over 350 000 patients have been hospitalized and nearly 12 000 deaths have been reported. Dengue viruses, a group of four flaviviruses, are transmitted to man by Aedes aegypti. Currently, dengue viruses are actively transmitted in 61 countries which circle the globe in the tropical zone and have a combined population of 1500 million. Because the precise antecedents to DHF/DSS are unknown, the public health hazard posed by this syndrome is potentially worldwide. Epidemiological studies in South-East Asia clearly link DHF/DSS to individuals who have had a previous dengue infection or who have acquired maternal dengue antibody. Such antibody may serve as an opsonin, enhancing dengue virus infection of mononuclear phagocytes-the type of cell in man to which dengue infection may be confined. Antibody-mediated infection of these cells is the central concept in the hypothesis of immune infection enhancement. This hypothesis provides a conceptual framework for design of future research. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive identification of "risk factors" in DHF/DSS. This research could be approached by undertaking comparative prospective epidemiological studies in dengue-endemic areas with and without DHF/DSS. Although important progress is being made in the development of attenuated dengue vaccines for each dengue type, a clearer understanding of the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS may be required to provide guidelines for safe and lasting immunoprophylaxis in man.

  12. Immune effects of the vaccine of live attenuated Aeromonas hydrophila screened by rifampicin on common carp (Cyprinus carpio L).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Yanjing; Kong, Xianghui; Pei, Chao; Li, Li; Nie, Guoxing; Li, Xuejun

    2016-06-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila, as a strong Gram-negative bacterium, can infect a wide range of freshwater fish, including common carp Cyprinus carpio, and cause the huge economic loss. To create the effective vaccine is the best way to control the outbreak of the disease caused by A. hydrophila. In this study, a live attenuated A. hydrophila strain, XX1LA, was screened from the pathogenic A. hydrophila strain XX1 cultured on medium containing the antibiotic rifampicin, which was used as a live attenuated vaccine candidate. The immune protection of XX1LA against the pathogen A. hydrophila in common carp was evaluated by the relative percent survival (RPS), the specific IgM antibody titers, serum lysozyme activity and the expression profiles of multiple immune-related genes at the different time points following immunization. The results showed that the variable up-regulations of the immune-related genes, such as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, the chemokine IL-10 and IgM, were observed in spleen and liver of common carp injected in the vaccines with the formalin-killed A. hydrophila (FKA) and the live attenuated XX1LA. Specific antibody to A. hydrophila was found to gradually increase during 28 days post-vaccination (dpv), and the RPS (83.7%) in fish vaccinated with XX1LA, was significant higher than that (37.2%) in fish vaccinated with FKA (P<0.05) on Day 28 after challenged by pathogen. It was demonstrated that the remarkable immune protection presented in the group vaccinated with XX1LA. During the late stage of 4-week immunization phase, compared with FKA and the control, specific IgM antibody titers significantly increased (P<0.05) in the XX1LA group. The activity of the lysozyme in serum indicated no significant change among three groups. In summary, the live attenuated bacterial vaccine XX1LA, screened in this study, indicates the better protect effect on common carp against A. hydrophila, which can be applied in aquaculture of common carp to prevent from the

  13. [DEVELOPMENT OF THE QUADRIVALENT LIVE ATTENUATED INFLUENZA VACCINE INCLUDING TWO INFLUENZA B LINEAGES--VICTORIA AND YAMAGATA].

    PubMed

    Desheva, Yu A; Smolonogina, T A; Doroshenko, E M; Rudenko, L G

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the research of the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) comprising two reassortant B/USSR/60/69-based vaccine influenza viruses Victoria and Yamagata. The intranasal immunization of the CBA mice with both Victoria and Yamagata strains induced 100% lung protection against the subsequent infection with the wild-type influenza B viruses of any antigen lineage. The quadrivalent LAIV (qLAIV) comprising both reassortant influenza B viruses Victoria and Yamagata were safe and areactogenic in adult volunteers. Following qLAIV administration the immune response was achieved to both Victoria and Yamagata lineages. PMID:27145595

  14. [DEVELOPMENT OF THE QUADRIVALENT LIVE ATTENUATED INFLUENZA VACCINE INCLUDING TWO INFLUENZA B LINEAGES--VICTORIA AND YAMAGATA].

    PubMed

    Desheva, Yu A; Smolonogina, T A; Doroshenko, E M; Rudenko, L G

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the research of the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) comprising two reassortant B/USSR/60/69-based vaccine influenza viruses Victoria and Yamagata. The intranasal immunization of the CBA mice with both Victoria and Yamagata strains induced 100% lung protection against the subsequent infection with the wild-type influenza B viruses of any antigen lineage. The quadrivalent LAIV (qLAIV) comprising both reassortant influenza B viruses Victoria and Yamagata were safe and areactogenic in adult volunteers. Following qLAIV administration the immune response was achieved to both Victoria and Yamagata lineages.

  15. Deliberate attenuation of chikungunya virus by adaptation to heparan sulfate-dependent infectivity: a model for rational arboviral vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Christina L; Hritz, Jozef; Sun, Chengqun; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Song, Timothy Y; Ghedin, Elodie; Higgs, Stephen; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2014-02-01

    Mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus from the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, which causes fever, rash and severe persistent polyarthralgia in humans. Since there are currently no FDA licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies for CHIKV, the development of vaccine candidates is of critical importance. Historically, live-attenuated vaccines (LAVs) for protection against arthropod-borne viruses have been created by blind cell culture passage leading to attenuation of disease, while maintaining immunogenicity. Attenuation may occur via multiple mechanisms. However, all examined arbovirus LAVs have in common the acquisition of positively charged amino acid substitutions in cell-surface attachment proteins that render virus infection partially dependent upon heparan sulfate (HS), a ubiquitously expressed sulfated polysaccharide, and appear to attenuate by retarding dissemination of virus particles in vivo. We previously reported that, like other wild-type Old World alphaviruses, CHIKV strain, La Réunion, (CHIKV-LR), does not depend upon HS for infectivity. To deliberately identify CHIKV attachment protein mutations that could be combined with other attenuating processes in a LAV candidate, we passaged CHIKV-LR on evolutionarily divergent cell-types. A panel of single amino acid substitutions was identified in the E2 glycoprotein of passaged virus populations that were predicted to increase electrostatic potential. Each of these substitutions was made in the CHIKV-LR cDNA clone and comparisons of the mutant viruses revealed surface exposure of the mutated residue on the spike and sensitivity to competition with the HS analog, heparin, to be primary correlates of attenuation in vivo. Furthermore, we have identified a mutation at E2 position 79 as a promising candidate for inclusion in a CHIKV LAV.

  16. Watching Every Step of the Way: Junín Virus Attenuation Markers in the Vaccine Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Betina Inés; Lozano, Mario Enrique; Goñi, Sandra Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The Arenaviridae family includes several hemorrhagic fever viruses which are important emerging pathogens. Junín virus, a member of this family, is the etiological agent of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (AHF). A collaboration between the Governments of Argentina and the USA rendered the attenuated Junín virus vaccine strain Candid#1. Arenaviruses are enveloped viruses with genomes consisting of two single-stranded RNA species (L and S), each carrying two coding regions separated by a stably structured, non-coding intergenic region. Molecular characterization of the vaccine strain and of its more virulent ancestors, XJ13 (prototype) and XJ#44, allows a systematic approach for the discovery of key elements in virulence attenuation. We show comparisons of sequence information for the S RNA of the strains XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1 of Junín virus, along with other strains from the vaccine lineage and a set of Junín virus field strains collected at the AHF endemic area. Comparisons of nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed different point mutations which might be linked to the attenuated phenotype. The majority of changes are consistent with a progressive attenuation of virulence between XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1. We propose that changes found in genomic regions with low natural variation frequencies are more likely to be associated with the virulence attenuation process. We partially sequenced field strains to analyze the genomic variability naturally occurring for Junín virus. This information, together with the sequence analysis of strains with intermediate virulence, will serve as a starting point to study the molecular bases for viral attenuation. PMID:24396274

  17. Dengue: a global threat.

    PubMed

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is currently an expanding global problem. The disease is caused by four closely related dengue serotypes; it ranges from asymptomatic infection to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). DHF is characterized by fever, bleeding diathesis and a tendency to develop apotentially fatal shock syndrome. Dengue infection with organ impairment mainly involves the central nervous system and liver. Consistent hematological findings include vasculopathy, coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia. Laboratory diagnoses include virus isolation, serology, and detection ofdengue ribonucleic acid. Successful treatment, which is mainly supportive, depends on early recognition of the disease and careful monitoring for shock. A severity-based revised dengue classification for medical interventions has been developed and validated in many countries. So far however, there has not been any specific dengue treatment; prevention is currently limited to vector control measures. The world's first, large-scale dengue vaccine, efficacy study demonstrated its efficacy and a reduction of dengue's severity in a study of more than 10,000 volunteers in Asia. Initial safety data are consistent with a good safety profile.

  18. The epidemiological impact of childhood influenza vaccination using live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany: predictions of a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine annual influenza vaccination is primarily recommended for all persons aged 60 and above and for people with underlying chronic conditions in Germany. Other countries have already adopted additional childhood influenza immunisation programmes. The objective of this study is to determine the potential epidemiological impact of implementing paediatric influenza vaccination using intranasally administered live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Germany. Methods A deterministic age-structured model is used to simulate the population-level impact of different vaccination strategies on the transmission dynamics of seasonal influenza in Germany. In our base-case analysis, we estimate the effects of adding a LAIV-based immunisation programme targeting children 2 to 17 years of age to the existing influenza vaccination policy. The data used in the model is based on published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Results In our model, additional vaccination of children 2 to 17 years of age with LAIV leads to the prevention of 23.9 million influenza infections and nearly 16 million symptomatic influenza cases within 10 years. This reduction in burden of disease is not restricted to children. About one third of all adult cases can indirectly be prevented by LAIV immunisation of children. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that vaccinating children 2–17 years of age is likely associated with a significant reduction in the burden of paediatric influenza. Furthermore, annual routine childhood vaccination against seasonal influenza is expected to decrease the incidence of influenza among adults and older people due to indirect effects of herd protection. In summary, our model provides data supporting the introduction of a paediatric influenza immunisation programme in Germany. PMID:24450996

  19. Live attenuated measles and mumps viral strain-containing vaccines and hearing loss: Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), United States, 1990--2003.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Armenak; Pool, Vitali; Chen, Robert T; Kohl, Katrin S; Davis, Robert L; Iskander, John K

    2008-02-26

    Hearing loss (HL) is a known complication of wild measles and mumps viral infections. As vaccines against measles and mumps contain live attenuated viral strains, it is biologically plausible that in some individuals HL could develop as a complication of vaccination against measles and/or mumps. Our objectives for this study were: to find and describe all cases of HL reported in the scientific literature and to the US Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) for the period 1990--2003; and to determine reporting rate of HL after live attenuated measles and/or mumps viral strain-containing vaccines (MMCV) administration. We searched published reports for cases of HL identified after vaccination with MMCV. We also searched for reports of HL after MMCV administration submitted to VAERS from 1990 through 2003 and determined the dose-adjusted reporting rate of HL. Our main outcome measure was reported cases of HL after immunization with MMCV which were classified as idiopathic. We found 11 published case reports of HL following MMCV. The review of the VAERS reports identified 44 cases of likely idiopathic sensorineural HL after MMCV administration. The onset of HL in the majority of VAERS and published cases was consistent with the incubation periods of wild measles and mumps viruses. Based on the annual usage of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, we estimated the reporting rate of HL to be 1 case per 6-8 million doses. Thus, HL following MMCV has been reported in the literature and to the VAERS. Further studies are needed to better understand if there is a causal relationship between MMCV and HL.

  20. Mucosal immunization with an attenuated Salmonella vaccine partially protects white-tailed deer from chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Fernando; Mathiason, Candace K; Yim, Lucia; Wong, Kinlung; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Nalls, Amy; Peyser, Daniel; Estevez, Veronica; Denkers, Nathaniel; Xu, Jinfeng; Osborn, David A; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Brown, David R; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Hoover, Edward A; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-01-29

    Prion disease is a unique category of illness, affecting both animals and humans, in which the underlying pathogenesis is related to a conformational change of a normal, self-protein called PrP(C) (C for cellular) to a pathological and infectious conformer known as PrP(Sc) (Sc for scrapie). Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a prion disease believed to have arisen from feeding cattle with prion contaminated meat and bone meal products, crossed the species barrier to infect humans. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) infects large numbers of deer and elk, with the potential to infect humans. Currently no prionosis has an effective treatment. Previously, we have demonstrated we could prevent transmission of prions in a proportion of susceptible mice with a mucosal vaccine. In the current study, white-tailed deer were orally inoculated with attenuated Salmonella expressing PrP, while control deer were orally inoculated with vehicle attenuated Salmonella. Once a mucosal response was established, the vaccinated animals were boosted orally and locally by application of polymerized recombinant PrP onto the tonsils and rectal mucosa. The vaccinated and control animals were then challenged orally with CWD-infected brain homogenate. Three years post CWD oral challenge all control deer developed clinical CWD (median survival 602 days), while among the vaccinated there was a significant prolongation of the incubation period (median survival 909 days; p=0.012 by Weibull regression analysis) and one deer has remained CWD free both clinically and by RAMALT and tonsil biopsies. This negative vaccinate has the highest titers of IgA in saliva and systemic IgG against PrP. Western blots showed that immunoglobulins from this vaccinate react to PrP(CWD). We document the first partially successful vaccination for a prion disease in a species naturally at risk. PMID:25539804

  1. Mucosal immunization with an attenuated Salmonella vaccine partially protects white-tailed deer from chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Fernando; Mathiason, Candace K; Yim, Lucia; Wong, Kinlung; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Nalls, Amy; Peyser, Daniel; Estevez, Veronica; Denkers, Nathaniel; Xu, Jinfeng; Osborn, David A; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Brown, David R; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Hoover, Edward A; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-01-29

    Prion disease is a unique category of illness, affecting both animals and humans, in which the underlying pathogenesis is related to a conformational change of a normal, self-protein called PrP(C) (C for cellular) to a pathological and infectious conformer known as PrP(Sc) (Sc for scrapie). Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a prion disease believed to have arisen from feeding cattle with prion contaminated meat and bone meal products, crossed the species barrier to infect humans. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) infects large numbers of deer and elk, with the potential to infect humans. Currently no prionosis has an effective treatment. Previously, we have demonstrated we could prevent transmission of prions in a proportion of susceptible mice with a mucosal vaccine. In the current study, white-tailed deer were orally inoculated with attenuated Salmonella expressing PrP, while control deer were orally inoculated with vehicle attenuated Salmonella. Once a mucosal response was established, the vaccinated animals were boosted orally and locally by application of polymerized recombinant PrP onto the tonsils and rectal mucosa. The vaccinated and control animals were then challenged orally with CWD-infected brain homogenate. Three years post CWD oral challenge all control deer developed clinical CWD (median survival 602 days), while among the vaccinated there was a significant prolongation of the incubation period (median survival 909 days; p=0.012 by Weibull regression analysis) and one deer has remained CWD free both clinically and by RAMALT and tonsil biopsies. This negative vaccinate has the highest titers of IgA in saliva and systemic IgG against PrP. Western blots showed that immunoglobulins from this vaccinate react to PrP(CWD). We document the first partially successful vaccination for a prion disease in a species naturally at risk.

  2. Development of live attenuated Bordetella pertussis strains expressing the universal influenza vaccine candidate M2e.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Lim, Annabelle; Ow, Stephanie T L; Phoon, Meng Chee; Locht, Camille; Chow, Vincent T; Alonso, Sylvie

    2011-07-26

    The attenuated Bordetella pertussis BPZE1 vaccine strain represents an attractive platform for the delivery of heterologous vaccine candidates via the nasal route. The filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) has been used to secrete or expose the foreign antigens at the bacterial surface. In this study, one, two and three copies of the Cys-containing ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) from influenza A virus were genetically fused to full length FHA and expressed in BPZE1. The secretion efficacy of the FHA-(M2e)(1,2,3) chimera in the extracellular milieu and the ability of the recombinant bacteria to colonize the mouse lungs inversely correlated with the number of M2e copies fused to FHA. Nevertheless FHA-(M2e)(3)-producing bacteria (BPLR3) triggered the highest systemic anti-M2e antibody response upon nasal administration to BALB/c mice. Nasal immunization with BPLR3 bacteria resulted in a significant reduction in the viral loads upon challenge with H1N1/PR8 influenza A virus, but did not improve the survival rate compared to BPZE1-immunized mice. Furthermore, since previous work reported that disulfide bond formation in Cys-containing passenger antigens affects the secretion efficacy of the FHA chimera, the dsbA gene encoding a periplasmic disulfide isomerase was deleted in the FHA-(M2e)(3)-producing strain. Despite improving significantly the secretion efficacy of the FHA-(M2e)(3) chimera, the dsbA deletion did not result in higher anti-M2e antibody titers in mice, due to impaired bacterial fitness and colonization ability.

  3. A Live Attenuated Equine H3N8 Influenza Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Efficacious in Mice and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Baz, Mariana; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Zengel, James; Cheng, Xing; Treanor, John J.; Jin, Hong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine influenza viruses (EIV) are responsible for rapidly spreading outbreaks of respiratory disease in horses. Although natural infections of humans with EIV have not been reported, experimental inoculation of humans with these viruses can lead to a productive infection and elicit a neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, EIV have crossed the species barrier to infect dogs, pigs, and camels and therefore may also pose a threat to humans. Based on serologic cross-reactivity of H3N8 EIV from different lineages and sublineages, A/equine/Georgia/1/1981 (eq/GA/81) was selected to produce a live attenuated candidate vaccine by reverse genetics with the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of the eq/GA/81 wild-type (wt) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted (ca) A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) vaccine donor virus, which is the backbone of the licensed seasonal live attenuated influenza vaccine. In both mice and ferrets, intranasal administration of a single dose of the eq/GA/81 ca vaccine virus induced neutralizing antibodies and conferred complete protection from homologous wt virus challenge in the upper respiratory tract. One dose of the eq/GA/81 ca vaccine also induced neutralizing antibodies and conferred complete protection in mice and nearly complete protection in ferrets upon heterologous challenge with the H3N8 (eq/Newmarket/03) wt virus. These data support further evaluation of the eq/GA/81 ca vaccine in humans for use in the event of transmission of an equine H3N8 influenza virus to humans. IMPORTANCE Equine influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect other mammals such as dogs, pigs, and camels and therefore may also pose a threat to humans. We believe that it is important to develop vaccines against equine influenza viruses in the event that an EIV evolves, adapts, and spreads in humans, causing disease. We generated a live attenuated H3N8 vaccine candidate and demonstrated that the vaccine was immunogenic and

  4. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-γ ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease. PMID:26381401

  5. Efficiency of live attenuated and inactivated rabies viruses in prophylactic and post exposure vaccination against the street virus strain.

    PubMed

    Huang, F; Ahmad, W; Duan, M; Liu, Z; Guan, Z; Zhang, M; Qiao, B; Li, Y; Song, Y; Song, Y; Chen, Y; Amjad Ali, M

    2015-06-01

    Rabies remains an enigmatic and widely discussed global infectious disease and causes an increasing number of deaths. The currently used highly effective prophylactic and post exposure (p.e.) vaccination depends solely upon inexpensive, effective and safe vaccines to counteract the spread of the disease. In this study, the potential of an attenuated Chinese rabies vaccine (SRV9) strain in prophylactic and p.e. vaccination against the street strain of rabies virus (RV) was evaluated in mice. Prophylactic vaccination consisting of one intramuscular (i.m.) dose of SRV9 protected 100% of mice from intracerebral (i.c.) challenge with a lethal dose of the street virus. The latter was detected in the brain of mice at day 6 post challenge by RT-PCR. Post exposure vaccination was performed at days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 post infection (p.i.) with either SRV9 or inactivated rabies vaccine. The survival rates after i.m. inoculation of SRV9 at the indicated days were 70%, 50%, 30%, 20%, 10%, and 0%, respectively; the corresponding survival rates for the inactivated rabies vaccine were 30%, 20%, 10%, 0%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. However, 100%, 90%, 70%, 50%, 20%, 10%, and 10% of mice survived after i.c. inoculation of SRV9 at the indicated days. The increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier and the infiltration of CD19+ B cells into the central nervous system after i.c. inoculation of SRV9 are regarded as prerequisites for the clearance of the street virus. The obtained data suggest that SRV9 is a promising candidate for prophylactic and p.e. vaccination against rabies infection and that it exhibits a potential for the control of rabies in China.

  6. Secretion of dengue virus envelope protein ectodomain from mammalian cells is dependent on domain II serotype and affects the immune response upon DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Slon Campos, J L; Poggianella, M; Marchese, S; Bestagno, M; Burrone, O R

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is currently among the most important human pathogens and affects millions of people throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although it has been a World Health Organization priority for several years, there is still no efficient vaccine available to prevent infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E), exposed on the surface on infective viral particles, is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. For this reason it has been used as the antigen of choice for vaccine development efforts. Here we show a detailed analysis of factors involved in the expression, secretion and folding of E ectodomain from all four DENV serotypes in mammalian cells, and how this affects their ability to induce neutralizing antibody responses in DNA-vaccinated mice. Proper folding of E domain II (DII) is essential for efficient E ectodomain secretion, with DIII playing a significant role in stabilizing soluble dimers. We also show that the level of protein secreted from transfected cells determines the strength and efficiency of antibody responses in the context of DNA vaccination and should be considered a pivotal feature for the development of E-based DNA vaccines against DENV. PMID:26358704

  7. Clustering, climate and dengue transmission.

    PubMed

    Junxiong, Pang; Yee-Sin, Leo

    2015-06-01

    Dengue is currently the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease, with an increasing burden over recent decades. Currently, neither a licensed vaccine nor an effective anti-viral therapy is available, and treatment largely remains supportive. Current vector control strategies to prevent and reduce dengue transmission are neither efficient nor sustainable as long-term interventions. Increased globalization and climate change have been reported to influence dengue transmission. In this article, we reviewed the non-climatic and climatic risk factors which facilitate dengue transmission. Sustainable and effective interventions to reduce the increasing threat from dengue would require the integration of these risk factors into current and future prevention strategies, including dengue vaccination, as well as the continuous support and commitment from the political and environmental stakeholders.

  8. Clustering, climate and dengue transmission.

    PubMed

    Junxiong, Pang; Yee-Sin, Leo

    2015-06-01

    Dengue is currently the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease, with an increasing burden over recent decades. Currently, neither a licensed vaccine nor an effective anti-viral therapy is available, and treatment largely remains supportive. Current vector control strategies to prevent and reduce dengue transmission are neither efficient nor sustainable as long-term interventions. Increased globalization and climate change have been reported to influence dengue transmission. In this article, we reviewed the non-climatic and climatic risk factors which facilitate dengue transmission. Sustainable and effective interventions to reduce the increasing threat from dengue would require the integration of these risk factors into current and future prevention strategies, including dengue vaccination, as well as the continuous support and commitment from the political and environmental stakeholders. PMID:25872683

  9. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  10. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  11. Vaccination of pigs against Aujeszky's disease by the intradermal route using live attenuated and inactivated virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vannier, P; Cariolet, R

    1989-09-01

    A study was undertaken of the protection induced by inactivated and live Aujeszky's disease virus vaccines. The vaccines were administered using a special device which, without the use of a needle, delivered the preparation intradermally. The trials were performed on 88 pigs which were vaccinated at the beginning of the fattening period both in experimental conditions and in pig herds. All the pigs were challenged at the end of the fattening period in isolation units. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the same vaccines injected intramuscularly. It was shown that vaccination via the intradermal route induced good protection in the vaccinated animals and was similar to that conferred by live virus vaccine injected intramuscularly. The results, with the inactivated virus vaccine, were not so good when it was injected via the intradermal route. Studies with intradermal vaccination showed no local lesion or very small nodules strictly localized to the dermis. The results also confirmed that the effects of challenge exposure depended on the health status of animals prior to infection and show the necessity to use a synthetic value (delta G) to interpret the data and mainly to compare the results objectively. In fattening pigs this vaccination procedure is attractive because (i) less animal constraint is needed than would be for intramuscular injections, (ii) injection can be checked by the presence of a visible papula at the site of inoculation and, (iii) pigs can be vaccinated in the ham while they are feeding. Injection without a needle also contributes to avoiding bacterial contamination under practical farm conditions of vaccination.

  12. Selective primary health care: strategies for control of disease in the developing world. XI. Dengue.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1984-01-01

    Since World War II, dengue viruses have progressively extended their geographic domain and have increased as causes of human morbidity and mortality. This complex of four flaviviruses is principally transmitted to humans by the bite of Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever vector. Factors that promote the indoor storage of water are congenial to the breeding of A. aegypti. These include the dislocations of wars, overpopulation , and urbanization. By the mid-20th century, A. aegypti eradication campaigns had nearly succeeded in much of the Western Hemisphere. Since then, there has been a steady degradation in ability to cope with this species despite the fact that a newly emerged, severe immunopathologic disorder, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, endows dengue epidemics with grave consequences. Development of a vaccine against dengue is complicated by the need to develop four different live attenuated vaccines and by a justifiable caution imposed by dengue immunopathology. A wide range of proven methods have been and are available to reduce populations of A. aegypti. This paper argues that the eradication strategy adopted earlier in this century is still viable and cost effective. Critical to a successful control program is a prioritied approach, a thorough, disciplined planning effort, a commitment to assessment, adequate compensation of staff, and, above all, the will to succeed.

  13. Safety of Japanese encephalitis live attenuated vaccination in post-marketing surveillance in Guangdong, China, 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Lin, Hualiang; Zhu, Qi; Wu, Chenggang; Zhao, Zhanjie; Zheng, Huizhen

    2014-03-26

    We reviewed the adverse events following immunization of live attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Guangdong Province, China. During the period of 2005-2012, 23 million doses of live attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine were used and 1426 adverse events were reported (61.24 per million doses); of which, 570 (40%) were classified as allergic reactions (24.48 per million doses), 31 (2%) were neurologic events (1.33 per million doses), and 36 (2.5%) were diagnosed as serious adverse events (1.55 per million doses). This study suggests that the JEV-L has a reasonable safety profile, most adverse events are relatively mild, with relatively rare neurologic events being observed. PMID:24503272

  14. Evaluation of stability of live attenuated camelpox vaccine stabilized with different stabilizers and reconstituted with various diluents.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M; Bhanuprakash, V; Venkatesan, G; Yogisharadhya, R; Bora, D P; Balamurugan, V

    2014-05-01

    In this study, thermostability of a Vero cell attenuated live camelpox vaccine under conventional lyophilization conditions has been evaluated. Three stabilizers were used separately for freeze-drying the vaccine and the stability of the vaccine, both in freeze-dried and reconstituted forms at different temperatures was assessed. The study revealed that the camelpox vaccine lyophilized with TAA stabilizer found superior with a shelf life of 44 months, 227 days, 22 days and 20 days at 4, 25, 37 and 45 °C, respectively followed by LS stabilizer. In terms of half-life, TAA stabilizer proved better followed by LS and BUGS stabilizers at all temperatures except at 25 °C in which LS found relatively superior. Among the four diluents viz. 1x PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.4), 0.85% NaCl, distilled water and 1 M MgSO4, PBS was a better diluent followed by 0.85% NaCl. Both the diluents maintained the infectivity titer more than the minimum effective dose (3 log10TCID50 with a maximum titre of 6.53 log10TCID50 in both the diluents) for 60 h at 37 and 45 °C. However, 1 M MgSO4 found less suitable for camelpox vaccine dilution. The study indicates that the TAA and 1× PBS are the choice of stabilizer and diluent, respectively for camelpox vaccine.

  15. Recent advances in the study of live attenuated cell-cultured smallpox vaccine LC16m8.

    PubMed

    Eto, Akiko; Saito, Tomoya; Yokote, Hiroyuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    LC16m8 is a live, attenuated, cell-cultured smallpox vaccine that was developed and licensed in Japan in the 1970s, but was not used in the campaign to eradicate smallpox. In the early 2000s, the potential threat of bioterrorism led to reconsideration of the need for a smallpox vaccine. Subsequently, LC16m8 production was restarted in Japan in 2002, requiring re-evaluation of its safety and efficacy. Approximately 50,000 children in the 1970s and about 3500 healthy adults in the 2000s were vaccinated with LC16m8 in Japan, and 153 adults have been vaccinated with LC16m8 or Dryvax in phase I/II clinical trials in the USA. These studies confirmed the safety and efficacy of LC16m8, while several studies in animal models have shown that LC16m8 protects the host against viral challenge. The World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization recommended LC16m8, together with ACAM2000, as a stockpile vaccine in 2013. In addition, LC16m8 is expected to be a viable alternative to first-generation smallpox vaccines to prevent human monkeypox. PMID:26319072

  16. Recent advances in the study of live attenuated cell-cultured smallpox vaccine LC16m8.

    PubMed

    Eto, Akiko; Saito, Tomoya; Yokote, Hiroyuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    LC16m8 is a live, attenuated, cell-cultured smallpox vaccine that was developed and licensed in Japan in the 1970s, but was not used in the campaign to eradicate smallpox. In the early 2000s, the potential threat of bioterrorism led to reconsideration of the need for a smallpox vaccine. Subsequently, LC16m8 production was restarted in Japan in 2002, requiring re-evaluation of its safety and efficacy. Approximately 50,000 children in the 1970s and about 3500 healthy adults in the 2000s were vaccinated with LC16m8 in Japan, and 153 adults have been vaccinated with LC16m8 or Dryvax in phase I/II clinical trials in the USA. These studies confirmed the safety and efficacy of LC16m8, while several studies in animal models have shown that LC16m8 protects the host against viral challenge. The World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization recommended LC16m8, together with ACAM2000, as a stockpile vaccine in 2013. In addition, LC16m8 is expected to be a viable alternative to first-generation smallpox vaccines to prevent human monkeypox.

  17. Evaluation of stability of live attenuated camelpox vaccine stabilized with different stabilizers and reconstituted with various diluents.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, M; Bhanuprakash, V; Venkatesan, G; Yogisharadhya, R; Bora, D P; Balamurugan, V

    2014-05-01

    In this study, thermostability of a Vero cell attenuated live camelpox vaccine under conventional lyophilization conditions has been evaluated. Three stabilizers were used separately for freeze-drying the vaccine and the stability of the vaccine, both in freeze-dried and reconstituted forms at different temperatures was assessed. The study revealed that the camelpox vaccine lyophilized with TAA stabilizer found superior with a shelf life of 44 months, 227 days, 22 days and 20 days at 4, 25, 37 and 45 °C, respectively followed by LS stabilizer. In terms of half-life, TAA stabilizer proved better followed by LS and BUGS stabilizers at all temperatures except at 25 °C in which LS found relatively superior. Among the four diluents viz. 1x PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.4), 0.85% NaCl, distilled water and 1 M MgSO4, PBS was a better diluent followed by 0.85% NaCl. Both the diluents maintained the infectivity titer more than the minimum effective dose (3 log10TCID50 with a maximum titre of 6.53 log10TCID50 in both the diluents) for 60 h at 37 and 45 °C. However, 1 M MgSO4 found less suitable for camelpox vaccine dilution. The study indicates that the TAA and 1× PBS are the choice of stabilizer and diluent, respectively for camelpox vaccine. PMID:24657207

  18. Persistence of poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies 2-16 years after immunization with live attenuated vaccine. A seroepidemiologic survey in the mainland of Venice.

    PubMed Central

    Trivello, R.; Renzulli, G.; Farisano, G.; Bonello, C.; Moschen, M.; Gasparini, V.; Benussi, G.

    1988-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey was conducted on subjects who had received a full vaccination course with live attenuated poliovirus 2-16 years before. For strains 1 and 2 prevalence of seropositives and median values dropped gradually during the first 10 years; strain 3 showed a much earlier decline. Environmental displacement of wild poliovirus by the attenuated, less immunogenic strain might eventually induce a 'gap', should complacency hamper needed vaccination efforts. PMID:2850939

  19. Oral multicomponent DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella elicited immunoprotection against American trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Silvia I; Matos, Marina N; Cerny, Natacha; Ramirez, Carolina; Alberti, Andrés Sanchez; Bivona, Augusto E; Morales, Celina; Guzmán, Carlos A; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-03-01

    We have reported that attenuated Salmonella (S) carrying plasmids encoding the cysteine protease cruzipain (Cz) protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Here, we determined whether immunoprotection could be improved by the oral coadministration of 3 Salmonella carrying the plasmids that encode the antigens Cz, Tc52, and Tc24. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized mice presented an increased antibody response against each antigen compared with those in the single antigen-immunized groups, as well as higher trypomastigotes antibody-mediated lyses and cell invasion inhibition compared with controls. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized and -challenged mice rendered lower parasitemia. Weight loss after infection was detected in all mice except those in the SCz+STc52+STc24 group. Moreover, cardiomyopathy-associated enzyme activity was significantly lower in SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice compared with controls. Few or no abnormalities were found in muscle tissues of SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice, whereas controls presented with inflammatory foci, necrosis, and amastigote nests. We conclude that a multicomponent approach that targets several invasion and metabolic mechanisms improves protection compared with single-component vaccines.

  20. Oral multicomponent DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella elicited immunoprotection against American trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Silvia I; Matos, Marina N; Cerny, Natacha; Ramirez, Carolina; Alberti, Andrés Sanchez; Bivona, Augusto E; Morales, Celina; Guzmán, Carlos A; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-03-01

    We have reported that attenuated Salmonella (S) carrying plasmids encoding the cysteine protease cruzipain (Cz) protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Here, we determined whether immunoprotection could be improved by the oral coadministration of 3 Salmonella carrying the plasmids that encode the antigens Cz, Tc52, and Tc24. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized mice presented an increased antibody response against each antigen compared with those in the single antigen-immunized groups, as well as higher trypomastigotes antibody-mediated lyses and cell invasion inhibition compared with controls. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized and -challenged mice rendered lower parasitemia. Weight loss after infection was detected in all mice except those in the SCz+STc52+STc24 group. Moreover, cardiomyopathy-associated enzyme activity was significantly lower in SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice compared with controls. Few or no abnormalities were found in muscle tissues of SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice, whereas controls presented with inflammatory foci, necrosis, and amastigote nests. We conclude that a multicomponent approach that targets several invasion and metabolic mechanisms improves protection compared with single-component vaccines. PMID:25160983

  1. African horse sickness in The Gambia: circulation of a live-attenuated vaccine-derived strain.

    PubMed

    Oura, C A L; Ivens, P A S; Bachanek-Bankowska, K; Bin-Tarif, A; Jallow, D B; Sailleau, C; Maan, S; Mertens, P C; Batten, C A

    2012-03-01

    African horse sickness virus serotype 9 (AHSV-9) has been known for some time to be circulating amongst equids in West Africa without causing any clinical disease in indigenous horse populations. Whether this is due to local breeds of horses being resistant to disease or whether the AHSV-9 strains circulating are avirulent is currently unknown. This study shows that the majority (96%) of horses and donkeys sampled across The Gambia were seropositive for AHS, despite most being unvaccinated and having no previous history of showing clinical signs of AHS. Most young horses (<3 years) were seropositive with neutralizing antibodies specific to AHSV-9. Eight young equids (<3 years) were positive for AHSV-9 by serotype-specific RT-PCR and live AHSV-9 was isolated from two of these horses. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an AHSV-9 strain showing 100% identity to Seg-2 of the AHSV-9 reference strain, indicating that the virus circulating in The Gambia was highly likely to have been derived from a live-attenuated AHSV-9 vaccine strain.

  2. Generation of an attenuated strain oral vaccine candidate using a novel double selection platform in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Yuan, Chaowen; Bao, Jun; Guan, Weikun; Zhao, Zhiteng; Li, Xingyue; Tang, Jie; Li, Dandan; Shi, Dongfang

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria delivered orally are interesting tools for mucosal immunization. The objective of this study was to construct a novel counter-selection platform based on an attenuated wild-type Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain and to utilize it for the delivery of LTR192G-STaA13Q fusion protein as an oral vaccine. First, a counter-selectable marker, namely, PRPL-Kil, was inserted into an attenuated wild-type E. coli strain through the use of the red and G-DOC homologous recombination systems to construct the counter-selection platform, and PRPL-Kil was subsequently replaced by the LT192-STa13 fusion gene to construct the oral vaccine O142 (yaiT::LT192-STa13) (ER-A). Subsequently, BALB/c mice were orogastrically inoculated with ER-A. Our results showed that ER-A could induce the production of specific IgA and IgG against fimbriae (F41) and enterotoxins (LT and STa), with neutralizing activity in BALB/c mice. In addition, assays of cellular immune responses showed that the stimulation index (SI) values of immunized mice were significantly higher than those of control mice (P<0.05), and revealed a marked shift toward Th2-mediated immunity. These findings suggest that ER-A is a suitable candidate for an oral vaccine strain to protect animals from enter toxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. PMID:25301580

  3. Pandemic preparedness with live attenuated influenza vaccines based on A/Leningrad/134/17/57 master donor virus.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Larisa; Isakova-Sivak, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Continuously evolving avian influenza viruses pose a constant threat to the human public health. In response to this threat, a number of pandemic vaccine candidates have been prepared and evaluated in animal models and clinical trials. This review summarizes the data from the development and preclinical and clinical evaluation of pandemic live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) based on Russian master donor virus A/Leningrad/134/17/57. LAIV candidates of H5N1, H5N2, H7N3, H1N1 and H2N2 subtypes were safe, immunogenic and protected animals from challenge with homologous and heterologous viruses. Clinical trials of the pandemic LAIVs demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity for healthy adult volunteers. The vaccine viruses were infectious, genetically stable and did not transmit to unvaccinated contacts. In addition, here we discuss criteria for the assessment of pandemic LAIV immunogenicity and efficacy necessary for their licensure.

  4. Oral immunization of broiler chickens against necrotic enteritis with an attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector expressing Clostridium perfringens antigens.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R R; Parreira, V R; Sharif, S; Prescott, J F

    2008-08-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens but currently no effective vaccine is available. Our previous study showed that certain C. perfringens secreted proteins when administered intramuscularly protected chickens against experimental infection. In the current study, genes encoding three C. perfringens proteins: fructose-biphosphate-aldolase (FBA), pyruvate:fer