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Sample records for attenuated human rotavirus

  1. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Adaptive B and T Cell Responses to a Prototype Monovalent Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Challenge in a Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD) gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS) sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα) cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12) and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented) pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2) and IFNγ (PID6) compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more severe

  2. Divergent Immunomodulating Effects of Probiotics on T Cell Responses to Oral Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Infection in a Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ−producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV. PMID:23918983

  3. Divergent immunomodulating effects of probiotics on T cell responses to oral attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus infection in a neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-09-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ-producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV.

  4. Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; Gautam, Rashi

    2015-06-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, has dramatically reduced RVA-associated AGE and mortality. High-throughput, sensitive and specific techniques are required to rapidly diagnose and characterize rotavirus strains in stool samples for proper patient treatment and to monitor circulating vaccine and wild-type rotavirus strains. New molecular assays are rapidly developed that are more sensitive and specific than the conventional assays for detection, genotyping and full genome characterization of circulating rotavirus wild-type and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) strains causing AGE.

  5. Rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, U. D.; Bresee, J. S.; Gentsch, J. R.; Glass, R. I.

    1998-01-01

    Rotavirus, the most common diarrheal pathogen in children worldwide, causes approximately one third of diarrhea-associated hospitalizations and 800,000 deaths per year. Because natural infection reduces the incidence and severity of subsequent episodes, rotavirus diarrhea might be controlled through vaccination. Serotypespecific immunity may play a role in protection from disease. Tetravalent rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV) (which contains a rhesus rotavirus with serotype G3 specificity and reassortant rhesus-human rotaviruses with G1, G2, and G4 specificity) provides coverage against the four common serotypes of human rotavirus. In clinical trials in industrialized countries, RRV-TV conferred 49% to 68% protection against any rotavirus diarrhea and 61% to 100% protection against severe disease. This vaccine was licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on August 31, 1998, and should be cost-effective in reducing diarrheal diseases in industrialized countries. The vaccine's efficacy and cost-effectiveness in developing countries should be evaluated. PMID:9866732

  6. Public health impact and cost effectiveness of mass vaccination with live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) in India: model based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorn, Rachael L; Watts, Brook; Singer, Mendel E

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the public health impact of mass vaccination with live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) in a birth cohort in India, and to estimate the cost effectiveness and affordability of such a programme. Design Decision analytical Markov model encompassing all direct medical costs. Infection risk and severity depended on age, number of previous infections, and vaccination history; probabilities of use of inpatient and outpatient health services depended on symptom severity. Data sources Published clinical, epidemiological, and economic data. When possible, parameter estimates were based on data specific for India. Population Simulated Indian birth cohort followed for five years. Main outcome measures Decrease in rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes (non-severe and severe), deaths, outpatient visits, and admission to hospital; incremental cost effectiveness ratio of vaccination expressed as net cost in 2007 rupees per life year saved. Results In the base case, vaccination prevented 28 943 (29.7%) symptomatic episodes, 6981 (38.2%) severe episodes, 164 deaths (41.0%), 7178 (33.3%) outpatient visits, and 812 (34.3%) admissions to hospital per 100 000 children. Vaccination cost 8023 rupees (about £100, €113, $165) per life year saved, less than India’s per capita gross domestic product, a common criterion for cost effectiveness. The net programme cost would be equivalent to 11.6% of the 2006-7 budget of the Indian Department of Health and Family Welfare. Model results were most sensitive to variations in access to outpatient care for those with severe symptoms. If this parameter was increased to its upper limit, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio for vaccination still fell between one and three times the per capita gross domestic product, meeting the World Health Organization’s criterion for “cost effective” interventions. Uncertainty analysis indicated a 94.7% probability that vaccination would be cost effective according to

  7. Evaluation of a human group a rotavirus assay for on-site detection of bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Maes, Roger K; Grooms, Daniel L; Wise, Annabel G; Han, Cunqin; Ciesicki, Valerie; Hanson, Lora; Vickers, Mary Lynne; Kanitz, Charles; Holland, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal diarrhea induced by bovine group A rotavirus causes significant economic loss in the dairy and beef industry due to increased morbidity and mortality, treatment costs, and reduced growth rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate a human group A rotavirus assay (ImmunoCardSTAT Rotavirus [ICS-RV]) as an on-site diagnostic test for bovine rotavirus. When used with a collection of bovine diarrhea samples submitted to the Virology Section of the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health at Michigan State University and compared to a bovine group A rotavirus-specific reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), the ICS-RV assay had a sensitivity and specificity of 87.0 and 93.6%, respectively. A commercially available group A rotavirus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Pathfinder; Sanofi Diagnostics, Redmond, Wash.), when used with the same fecal sample collection and compared to the same RT-PCR, had a sensitivity and specificity of 78.3 and 67.7%, respectively. Subsequently, the ICS-RV assay, RT-PCR, and a different commercially available group A rotavirus ELISA (Rotaclone; Meridian Diagnostics, Cincinnati, Ohio) were used to evaluate fecal samples collected from neonatal calves experimentally infected with bovine rotavirus. When diarrheic fecal samples that were positive for bovine rotavirus by RT-PCR were evaluated, the ICS-RV assay and the Rotaclone assay detected bovine rotavirus 85 and 95% of the time, respectively. Based on these studies, the ICS-RV assay appears to be an excellent test for detecting group A bovine rotaviruses. This assay may be useful as an on-site diagnostic test for veterinarians as an aid in the management of bovine neonatal diarrhea.

  8. Dual functions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ at the intermediate dose in protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with a human rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangning; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Jones, Dorothy; Pelzer, Kevin; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (LA) ™ strain on rotavirus-specific antibody and B cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with an oral attenuated human rotavirus (AttHRV). Methods Pigs were inoculated with AttHRV vaccine in conjunction with high dose LA (14 doses, total 2.2×109 colony forming units [CFU]), intermediate dose LA (9 doses, total 3.2×106 CFU), low dose LA (5 doses, total 2.1×106 CFU) or without LA feeding. Protection against rotavirus shedding and diarrhea was assessed upon challenge with a virulent HRV. Rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells in ileum, spleen and blood of the pigs were measured and compared among treatment groups. Results The intermediate dose LA (MidLA), but not high or low dose LA, significantly reduced rotavirus diarrhea (MidLA only group) and significantly improved the protection conferred by AttHRV vaccine (MidLA+AttHRV group). Associated with the increased protection, MidLA significantly enhanced rotavirus-specific antibody, ASC and memory B cell responses to AttHRV vaccine. High or low dose LA did not enhance virus-specific antibody and ASC responses, hence did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of dose selection and indicate that certain specific lactobacilli strains at the appropriate dose have the dual function of reducing rotavirus diarrhea and enhancing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. PMID:24126832

  9. Rescue of noncultivatable human rotavirus by gene reassortment during mixed infection with ts mutants of a cultivatable bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H B; Kalica, A R; Wyatt, R G; Jones, R W; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1981-01-01

    Fastidious human rotaviruses that did not undergo productive infection in tissue culture were rescued by genetic reassortment during mixed infection with a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of a cultivatable bovine rotavirus. In this manner, the genes of the fastidious rotavirus that restricted growth in vitro were replaced by the corresponding genes from a tissue culture-adapted rotavirus. We recovered genetically reassorted viruses that grew to high titer and were neutralized specifically by hyperimmune guinea pig type 1 or type 2 human rotavirus antiserum. Preliminary RNA analysis of these clones disclosed that they were indeed viruses with reassorted genes. Images PMID:6264442

  10. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  11. Porcine rotaviruses antigenically related to human rotavirus serotypes 1 and 2.

    PubMed Central

    Bellinzoni, R B; Mattion, N M; Matson, D O; Blackhall, J; La Torre, J L; Scodeller, E A; Urasawa, S; Taniguchi, K; Estes, M K

    1990-01-01

    Fecal samples from rotavirus-infected piglets were characterized by a serotyping enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 (D. O. Matson, M. K. Estes, J. W. Burns, H. B. Greenberg, K. Taniguchi, and S. Urasawa, submitted for publication). Rotavirus in 19 of 25 specimens tested from two herds of pigs from Buenos Aires province, Argentina, were classified antigenically as follows: one serotype 1, four serotype 2, two serotype 3, and no serotype 4. Six specimens reacted with both serotype 1 and 2 MAbs, and viruses in six specimens probably belonged to other serotypes because they reacted only with a VP7 common epitope MAb. Two porcine rotavirus fecal samples found to contain both serotype 1 and 2 viruses by the MAb-based test and one found to contain a serotype 2 virus were grown in tissue culture. When plaque-purified preparations of these tissue culture-adapted viruses were analyzed in the serotyping ELISA, the C60 and C86 preparations reacted only as serotype 1 viruses, indicating that the original fecal samples, which showed multiple VP7 reactivities, were heterogeneous and apparently contained two types of viruses. Testing of plaque-purified C134 virus confirmed its serotype 2 reactivity. The MAb-based serotype designations of these viruses also were confirmed by using a neutralization immunoperoxidase focus reduction assay. This is the first report of the occurrence of serotype 1 and 2 rotaviruses in animals. The MAbs originally developed to serotype human rotaviruses can be utilized to type animal rotaviruses. PMID:2157739

  12. Direct isolation in cell culture of human rotaviruses and their characterization into four serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R G; James, H D; Pittman, A L; Hoshino, Y; Greenberg, H B; Kalica, A R; Flores, J; Kapikian, A Z

    1983-01-01

    Of 73 rotavirus-positive fecal specimens tested, 39 yielded a human rotavirus that could be cultivated serially in MA104 or primary African green monkey kidney cells or both; 18 were serotyped. Four distinct serotypes were identified by plaque reduction or tube neutralization assay or both, and three of these serotypes were the same as those established previously by plaque reduction, using human rotaviruses cultivated by genetic reassortment with a cultivable bovine rotavirus. Ten human rotavirus strains received from Japan were found to be similar, if not identical, to our candidate prototype strains representing these four human rotavirus serotypes. Images PMID:6311872

  13. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    gastrointestinal infections such as HRV infection. HRVs remain a major worldwide cause of diarrhea-associated morbidity and mortality in children ≤5 years of age. Current in vitro models of rotavirus infection rely primarily on the use of animal rotaviruses because HRV growth is limited in most transformed cell lines and animal models. We demonstrate that HIEs are novel, cellularly diverse, and physiologically relevant epithelial cell cultures that recapitulate in vivo properties of HRV infection. HIEs will allow the study of HRV biology, including human host-pathogen and live, attenuated vaccine interactions; host and cell type restriction; virus-induced fluid secretion; cell-cell communication within the epithelium; and the epithelial response to infection in cultures from genetically diverse individuals. Finally, drug therapies to prevent/treat diarrheal disease can be tested in these physiologically active cultures. PMID:26446608

  14. Selection of cold-adapted mutants of human rotaviruses that exhibit various degrees of growth restriction in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1994-01-01

    Group A human rotavirus strains D, Wa, DS-1, and P were originally recovered from children with diarrhea. In an attempt to attenuate virulent, wild-type human rotaviruses of major epidemiological importance for use in a live oral vaccine, two reference rotavirus strains, D and DS-1, and two laboratory-generated reassortants, Wa x DS-1 and Wa x P, were subjected to cold adaptation. Collectively, these viruses provide antigenic coverage for both of the clinically important rotavirus VP4 antigens and three of the four important rotavirus VP7 antigens. Mutants of each of these rotaviruses were selected during successive serial passage in primary African green monkey kidney cells at progressively lower suboptimal temperatures (30, 28, and 26 degrees C). The genotype of each mutant appeared to be indistinguishable from that of its wild-type, parental virus. The mutants recovered after 10 serial passages at 30 degrees C exhibited both temperature sensitivity of plaque formation (i.e., a ts phenotype) and the ability to form plaques efficiently at suboptimal temperature (i.e., a cold adaptation [ca] phenotype), in contrast to parental wild-type rotavirus. The succeeding set of 10 serial passages at 28 degrees C selected mutants that exhibited an increased degree of cold adaptation, and three of the mutants exhibited an associated increase in temperature sensitivity. Finally, in the case of three of the strains, the third successive serial passage series, which was performed at 26 degrees C, selected for mutants with an even greater degree of cold adaptation than the previous series and was associated with greater temperature sensitivity in one instance. It appeared that each of the viruses sustained a minimum of four to five mutations during the total selection procedure. The ultimate identification of candidate vaccine viruses that exhibit the desired level of attenuation, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy needed for immunoprophylaxis will require evaluation of

  15. Efficiency of human rotavirus propagation in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R L; Knowlton, D R; Pierce, M J

    1984-01-01

    This study was designed to find methods to reproducibly propagate human rotaviruses from fecal specimens and to determine the relationship between particle numbers and infectivity. Growth of virus was initially compared in primary and continuous lines of monkey kidney cells. Primary cells (African green and cynomolgus monkey kidney) supported virus growth directly from fecal specimens much more efficiently than did continuous lines of African green (CV-1) or rhesus (MA104) monkey kidney cells. Rotaviruses were grown in primary cells from 14 of 14 fecal specimens of different individuals collected over a 3-year period. Although rotaviruses in fecal samples could not always be grown in the continuous cell lines, two passages in primary cells appeared to fully adapt the viruses for propagation in the continuous cell line tested (MA104). The efficiency of rotavirus growth was quantified with five of the fecal isolates. It was calculated that, on the average, 1 out of every 46,000 particles in fecal specimens infected monkey kidney cells. After three passages in primary cells, an average of 1 out of every 6,600 progeny virus particles appeared to be infectious. Thus, rotaviruses in fecal specimens were consistently grown in primary cells, and passage in these cells both increased virus infectivity and adapted the viruses for growth in continuous cell lines. PMID:6088569

  16. Nomenclature of human rotaviruses: designation of subgroups and serotypes*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Based on the specificity of subgroup antigens and serotype antigens which are situated, respectively, in the major inner and outer capsid polypeptides, a new nomenclature for human rotaviruses is proposed. The subgroups are designated as I and II, and the serotypes as 1, 2, 3, 4. PMID:6088101

  17. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected against challenge (33% protection rate). Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC were enumerated at selected PID in intestinal (duodenal and ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node [MLN]) and systemic (spleen and blood) lymphoid tissues by using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. At challenge (PID 21), the numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) ASC, but not IgG ASC, in intestines and blood were significantly greater in virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs than in attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs and were correlated (correlation coefficients: for duodenum and ileum, 0.9; for MLN, 0.8; for blood, 0.6) with the degree of protection induced. After challenge, the numbers of IgA and IgG virus-specific ASC and serum-neutralizing antibodies increased significantly in the attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs but not in the virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs (except in the spleen and except for IgA ASC in the duodenum). The transient appearance of IgA ASC in the blood mirrored the IgA ASC responses in the gut, albeit at a lower level, suggesting that IgA ASC in the blood of humans could serve as an indicator for IgA ASC responses in the intestine after rotavirus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study and identify intestinal IgA ASC as a correlate of protective active immunity in an animal model of human-rotavirus-induced disease. PMID:8627786

  18. Dietary rice bran protects against rotavirus diarrhea and promotes Th1-type immune responses to human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Li, Guohua; Wang, Haifeng; Kocher, Jacob; Pelzer, Kevin; Ryan, Elizabeth; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-10-01

    Rice bran (RB) contains a distinct stoichiometry of phytochemicals that can promote gut mucosal immune responses against enteric pathogens. The effects of RB on rotavirus diarrhea and immunogenicity of an attenuated human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine were evaluated in gnotobiotic pigs. The four treatment groups studied were RB plus vaccine, vaccine only, RB only, and mock control. Pigs in the RB groups were fed the amount of RB that replaced 10% of the pigs' total daily calorie intake from milk starting from 5 days of age until they were euthanized. Pigs in the vaccine groups were orally inoculated with two doses of the attenuated HRV vaccine. A subset of pigs from each group was orally challenged with the homologous virulent HRV on postinoculation day 28. Diarrhea and virus shedding were monitored daily from postchallenge day 0 to day 7. RB feeding significantly protected against diarrhea upon virulent HRV challenge and enhanced the protective rate of the vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea. Consistent with protection, RB significantly increased gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, RB also increased the number of total IgM- and IgA-secreting cells, total serum IgM, IgG, and IgA titers, and HRV-specific IgA titers in intestinal contents. RB reduced the numbers of intestinal and systemic HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells and reduced serum HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers before the challenge. These results demonstrate clear beneficial effects of RB in protection against rotavirus diarrhea and stimulation of nonspecific and HRV-specific immune responses, as well as its biased Th1-type adjuvant effect for the vaccine.

  19. Virus-specific intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cell responses induced by human rotavirus infection and vaccines are correlated with protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Wen, Ke; Azevedo, Marli S P; Gonzalez, Ana M; Zhang, Wei; Saif, Linda J

    2008-06-19

    We examined rotavirus-specific IFN-gamma producing CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with a virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) or vaccinated with an attenuated (Att) HRV vaccine (AttHRV3x or AttHRV2x) or an AttHRV oral priming and 2/6-virus-like particle (VLP) intranasal boosting (AttHRV-2/6VLP) regimen. In VirHRV infected pigs, HRV-specific IFN-gamma producing T cells reside primarily in ileum. AttHRV-2/6VLP induced similar frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells as the VirHRV, whereas AttHRV3x or 2x vaccines were less effective. Protection rates against rotavirus diarrhea upon VirHRV challenge significantly correlated (r=0.97-1.0, p<0.005) with frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells, suggesting their role in protective immunity.

  20. Reassortant rotaviruses as potential live rotavirus vaccine candidates.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Greenberg, H B; Hoshino, Y; Kapikian, A Z; Wyatt, R G; Chanock, R M

    1985-01-01

    A series of reassortants was isolated from coinfection of cell cultures with a wild-type animal rotavirus and a "noncultivatable" human rotavirus. Wild-type bovine rotavirus (UK strain) was reassorted with human rotavirus strains D, DS-1, and P; wild-type rhesus rotavirus was reassorted with human rotavirus strains D and DS-1. The D, DS-1, and P strains represent human rotavirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Monospecific antiserum (to bovine rotavirus, NCDV strain) or a set of monoclonal antibodies to the major outer capsid neutralization glycoprotein, VP7 (of the rhesus rotavirus), was used to select for reassortants with human rotavirus neutralization specificity. This selection technique yielded many reassortants which received only the gene segment coding for the major neutralization protein from the human rotavirus parent, whereas the remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent. Single human rotavirus gene substitution reassortants of this sort represent potential live vaccine strains. Images PMID:2983101

  1. Sequence Diversity of VP4 and VP7 Genes of Human Rotavirus Strains in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S; Al-Malky, Mater I R; Alsulaimani, Adnan A A; Abuelsaad, Abdelaziz S A; Mohamed, Imad; Ismail, Ayman K

    2015-12-01

    Group A rotavirus is responsible for inducing severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are used to control the disease in many countries. In the current study, the sequences of human rotavirus G and P types in Saudi Arabia are reported and compared to different relevant published sequences. In addition, the VP4 and VP7 genes of the G1P[8] strains are compared to different antigenic epitopes of the rotavirus vaccines. Stool samples were collected from children under 2 years suffering from severe diarrhea. Screening of the rotavirus-positive samples was performed with rapid antigen detection kit. RNA was amplified from rotavirus-positive samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay for both VP4 and VP7 genes. Direct sequencing of the VP4 and VP7 genes was conducted and the obtained sequences were compared to each other and to the rotavirus vaccines. Both G1P[8] G1P[4] genotypes were detected. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the detected strains belong to G1 lineage 1 and 2, P[8] lineage 3, and to P[4] lineage 5. Multiple amino acid substitutions were detected between the Saudi RVA strains and the commonly used vaccines. The current findings emphasize the importance of the continuous surveillance of the circulating rotavirus strains, which is crucial for monitoring virus evolution and helping in predicting the protection level afforded by rotavirus vaccines.

  2. Human rotavirus strain Wa downregulates NHE1 and NHE6 expressions in rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honglang; Song, Lijun; Li, Guixian; Chen, Wenfeng; Zhao, Shumin; Zhou, Ruoxia; Shi, Xiaoying; Peng, Zhenying; Zhao, Wenchang

    2017-03-13

    Rotavirus (RV) is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis and fatal dehydration in human infants and neonates of different species. However, the pathogenesis of rotavirus-induced diarrhea is poorly understood. Secretory diarrhea caused by rotavirus may lead to a combination of excessive secretion of fluid and electrolytes into the intestinal lumen. Fluid absorption in the small intestine is driven by Na(+)-coupled transport mechanisms at the luminal membrane, including Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE). Here, we performed qRT-PCR to detect the transcription of NHEs. Western blotting was employed for protein detection. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry was used to validate the NHE's protein expression. Finally, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results demonstrated that the NHE6 mRNA and protein expressed in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2). Furthermore, RV-Wa induced decreased expression of the NHE1 and NHE6 in Caco-2 cell in a time-dependent manner. In addition, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in RV-Wa-infected Caco-2 cells was higher than that in the mock-infected cells. Furthermore, RV-Wa also can downregulate the expression of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) in Caco-2 cells. These findings provides important insights into the mechanisms of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Further studies on the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that downregulate NHEs in RV-induced diarrhea are required.

  3. WHO informal consultation on quality, safety and efficacy specifications for live attenuated rotavirus vaccines Mexico City, Mexico, 8-9 February 2005.

    PubMed

    Wood, David

    2005-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are at an advanced stage of development but there are as yet no WHO recommendations on production and quality control to provide regulatory guidance. A meeting of experts was convened by WHO and PAHO/AMRO to review the scientific basis for production and quality control of rotavirus vaccines, and to discuss specific measures to assure the safety and efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. The meeting was attended by 25 experts from 14 countries, drawn from academia, public health, national regulatory authorities and vaccine producers. It was agreed that existing guidance for other live virus vaccines provides a very good basis for product characterization, especially for source materials and control of production. The basis for attenuation of current vaccines or vaccine candidates is not known but, at least for the vaccines based on the Jennerian approach of using animal (bovine) rotaviruses, is likely to be multigenic. The risk of intussusception in humans is influenced by genetic background and age. Recent analyzes of large vaccine safety trials found that certain strains of vaccine virus were not associated with intussusception, although in these trials the first dose of vaccine was not administered to children over 3 months of age. Since age is a risk factor for intussusception, this may suggest that early delivery of the first dose of vaccine is desirable. However, maternal antibodies may mitigate against early delivery of the first vaccine dose. Factors which could affect vaccine efficacy or safety include strain diversity, malnutrition, other enteric infections, parasitic infection or immune suppression. It was concluded that data from clinical trials conducted in one part of the world would not necessarily be predictive of vaccine efficacy in other places. It was agreed that in nonclinical evaluations there was a need to use oral dosing for toxicity studies and, because rotavirus is non-neurovirulent, that there was no need for an animal

  4. [Impact of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Delacour, H

    2009-08-01

    Rotaviruses discovered in 1973 are the most common cause of severe diarrheal disease in infants and young children world-wide. Annually rotavirus infections are estimated to cause the deaths of more than 600,000 children under the age of 5 years with more than 90% of fatalities occurring in developing countries. In 2006 two live oral attenuated rotavirus vaccines were licensed: the monovalent human rotavirus vaccine (RotarixT) and the pentavalent bovine-human, reassortant vaccine (RotaTeqT). Both vaccines demonstrated excellent safety and protective effectiveness in large pre-licensing trials conducted in Europe, the United States and Latin America. Several countries in Latin and Central America have already decided to include rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization program. African and Asiatic countries have postponed their decisions pending the results of further studies.

  5. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw ); Vaughn, J.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  6. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  7. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  8. [Seroepidemiology of human rotaviruses in a community of the Avellaneda district, Province of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Bercovich, A; Alvarez, A; Garrido, D; Grinstein, S

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained during a prospective study performed in 49 families of the Avellaneda District, Buenos Aires Province, in order to known the seroepidemiology of human rotaviruses under natural conditions were described. Families which included a pregnant woman, were voluntarily recruited. The newborn was studied together with its family until two years of age, in order to assess the moment of the primary rotavirus infection. Feces from every person with gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained for rotavirus diagnosis. Blood samples from every member of the family were obtained since their recruitment and each 6 months until the newborn reached two years of age. Rotavirus infections were established by determining the amount of circulating rotavirus IgG antibodies in paired serum samples using ELISA. In all, 502.2 six-month periods with paired serum samples were studied. Most of the infections detected during the first year of life were primary infections (0.64 cases per child-year; 91.3% in seronegative children; p less than 0.005). The peaks of rotavirus diarrhea incidence were observed at the same age (0.25 cases per child-year; p less than 0.01). It must be stated that 51.9% of the newborns presented circulating anti-rotavirus IgG antibodies transmitted by the mother; 72% were breastfed for a mean period of 9.7 months. The total incidence of rotavirus infections was 0.63 cases per person-year, without significant variations for each age group. Most of them were asymptomatic cases and 61.6% were reinfections. These results show the high endemicity of human rotavirus in our population where siblings and adults act as reservoirs of the infection. Finally we found a significant relation between the level of circulating anti-rotavirus antibodies and the resistance to infection and illness caused by rotavirus during the six-month periods studied with paired serum samples (p less than 0.005 for infection; p less than 0.03 for diarrhea). The incidence of rotavirus

  9. Whole genotype constellation of prototype feline rotavirus strains FRV-1 and FRV64 and their phylogenetic relationships with feline-like human rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Gauchan, Punita; Sasaki, Eriko; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    Feline rotaviruses, members of the species Rotavirus A, are an infrequent source of zoonotic infections, and were previously shown by RNA-RNA hybridization assays to possess two distinct genomic RNA constellations, represented by strains FRV-1 and FRV64. Due to the lack of whole genome sequence information for FRV-1, human rotavirus strain AU-1 has been used as a surrogate for the genotype constellation of feline rotaviruses. The aim of this study was to determine the whole genome sequence of FRV-1 and FRV64 to help understand the genetic relationships among existing feline rotaviruses from the evolutionary perspective. The genotype constellations of FRV-1 and FRV64 were G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H3 and G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E3-H6, respectively. FRV-1 has a genotype constellation identical to that of the AU-1 strain. Although for individual genes they shared lineages, with the exception of genes encoding VP2, VP6 and VP7, the sequence identity between FRV-1 and AU-1 was considered to be sufficiently high for the AU-1 to be regarded as an example of the direct transmission of a feline rotavirus to a child. On the other hand, the FRV64 strain was not only similar in all the 11 genome segments to another feline rotavirus strain, Cat97, but also to canine rotavirus strains (K9 and CU-1) and feline/canine-like human rotavirus strains (Ro1845 and HCR3A). In conclusion, this study revealed intermingled sharing of genotypes and lineages among feline rotaviruses, suggesting the occurrence of frequent reassortment events over the course of evolution to emerge in four genotype constellations represented by FRV-1, FRV64/Cat97, Cat2 and BA222 strains.

  10. Molecular characterization of a human group C rotavirus detected first in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Dalgic, Buket; Bostanci, Ilknur; Nishizono, Akira; Ahmed, Kamruddin

    2009-10-01

    The present study was done to find out the prevalence of group B and C rotavirus infections in children with diarrhea presented at two major hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Group B rotavirus was not found in any samples. One of 122 samples was positive for group C rotavirus. Phylogenetic analysis of genes for nonstructural protein NSP4, and structural proteins VP4, VP6, and VP7 confirmed the human origin of this strain. Similar to other human group C rotaviruses, one N-glycosylation site was predicted at amino acid residue 67 on the VP7 of strain GUP188. The genes of strain GUP188 were closely related to those of human group C rotavirus strain from the UK (Bristol) for NSP4, China (208 and Wu82) for VP4 and VP6, and from Colombia (Javeriana) for VP7, indicating that the Turkish group C rotavirus was unique and can serve as an additional reference strain for the molecular epidemiology of group C rotaviruses.

  11. RNA electropherotypes of human rotaviruses from North and South America*

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D. H.; Graham, D. Y.; Lopez, J.; Muchinik, G.; Velasco, G.; Stenback, W. A.; Estes, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    Between April 1979 and December 1982, viral agents were found in 231 of 695 children admitted to the Texas Children's Hospital with gastroenteritis. Electron microscopic analysis showed that rotaviruses were the most common viral agents, and a seasonal pattern of rotavirus disease was observed. The migration patterns of the RNA segments of these rotaviruses on electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels were compared with those of rotaviruses collected from other areas of the United States of America and from Argentina, Colombia and Mexico. A number of different RNA electropherotypes were found, including some patterns not previously reported. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:6329538

  12. Distinguishing the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like rotaviruses vs. porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda D F; Gregori, F; McDonald, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many animal species. Previous studies have suggested that human Wa-like RVAs share a close evolutionary relationship with porcine RVAs. Specifically, the VP1-VP3 and NSP2-5/6 genes of these viruses are usually classified as genotype 1 with >81% nucleotide sequence identity. Yet, it remains unknown whether the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like strains are distinguishable from those of porcine strains. To investigate this, we performed comprehensive bioinformatic analyses using all known genotype 1 gene sequences. The RVAs analyzed represent wildtype strains isolated from humans or pigs at various geographical locations during the years of 2004-2013, including 11 newly-sequenced porcine RVAs from Brazil. We also analyzed archival strains that were isolated during the years of 1977-1992 as well as atypical strains involved in inter-species transmission between humans and pigs. We found that, in general, the genotype 1 genes of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs clustered together in phylogenetic trees and were separate from those of typical modern porcine RVAs. The only exception was for the NSP5/6 gene, which showed no host-specific phylogenetic clustering. Using amino acid sequence alignments, we identified 34 positions that differentiated the VP1-VP3, NSP2, and NSP3 genotype 1 proteins of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs versus typical modern porcine RVAs and documented how these positions vary in the archival/unusual isolates. No host-specific amino acid positions were identified for NSP4, NSP5, or NSP6. Altogether, the results of this study support the notion that human Wa-like RVAs and porcine RVAs are evolutionarily related, but indicate that some of their genotype 1 genes and proteins have diverged over time possibly as a reflection of sequestered replication and protein co-adaptation in their respective hosts.

  13. Distinguishing the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like rotaviruses vs. porcine rotaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda D.F.; Gregori, F.; McDonald, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many animal species. Previous studies have suggested that human Wa-like RVAs share a close evolutionary relationship with porcine RVAs. Specifically, the VP1-VP3 and NSP2-5/6 genes of these viruses are usually classified as genotype 1 with >81% nucleotide sequence identity. Yet, it remains unknown whether the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like strains are distinguishable from those of porcine strains. To investigate this, we performed comprehensive bioinformatic analyses using all known genotype 1 gene sequences. The RVAs analyzed represent wildtype strains isolated from humans or pigs at various geographical locations during the years of 2004–2013, including 11 newly-sequenced porcine RVAs from Brazil. We also analyzed archival strains that were isolated during the years of 1977–1992 as well as atypical strains involved in inter-species transmission between humans and pigs. We found that, in general, the genotype 1 genes of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs clustered together in phylogenetic trees and were separate from those of typical modern porcine RVAs. The only exception was for the NSP5/6 gene, which showed no host-specific phylogenetic clustering. Using amino acid sequence alignments, we identified 34 positions that differentiated the VP1-VP3, NSP2, and NSP3 genotype 1 proteins of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs versus typical modern porcine RVAs and documented how these positions vary in the archival/unusual isolates. No host-specific amino acid positions were identified for NSP4, NSP5, or NSP6. Altogether, the results of this study support the notion that human Wa-like RVAs and porcine RVAs are evolutionarily related, but indicate that some of their genotype 1 genes and proteins have diverged over time possibly as a reflection of sequestered replication and protein co-adaptation in their respective hosts. PMID

  14. Molecular characterization of a rare, human-porcine reassortant rotavirus strain, G11P[6], from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bányai, Krisztián; Esona, Mathew D; Kerin, Tara K; Hull, Jennifer J; Mijatovic, Slavica; Vásconez, Nancy; Torres, Carlos; de Filippis, Ana M B; Foytich, Kimberly R; Gentsch, Jon R

    2009-01-01

    The Pan-American Health Organization established a rotavirus pre-vaccination disease burden and strain surveillance network in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2004. During strain surveillance in Ecuador in 2005-2006, a rare rotavirus genotype, G11P[6], was detected among common strains. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of this strain identified a novel lineage of the G11 VP7 gene, most closely related to A253 (91.8% nt identity), a porcine rotavirus strain identified in Venezuela. Most genes of this strain clustered with porcine, human-porcine or bovine-porcine reassortant strains; only VP6 and perhaps NSP2 genes were more closely related to cognate genes of human rotaviruses. Thus, this strain was likely generated by gene reassortment between porcine and human parental strains. Our study provides further evidence that animal rotaviruses play an important role in genetic and antigenic diversity of rotaviruses pathogenic for humans.

  15. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  16. Evidence of multiple reassortment events of feline-to-human rotaviruses based on a rare human G3P[9] rotavirus isolated from a patient with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-06-01

    A rare human/feline-like rotavirus G3P[9] strain, CAU14-1-262, from a 2-year-old girl with severe gastroenteritis was isolated and sequenced. The 11 gene segments of the CAU14-1-262 strain possessed a novel genotype constellation, G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T1-E3-H6, which was identified for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain identified the following genome origins: VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1-VP3, NSP1, NSP2, and NSP4 genes possessed an AU-1-like genotype 3 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the feline and human/feline-like rotaviruses; NSP5 possessed a H6 lineage, with highest sequence identity to the human/feline-like E2541 strain; and the NSP3 gene possessed a Wa-like genotype 1 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the of human rotaviruses. These results provided evidence of multiple reassortment events in G3P[9] rotavirus CAU14-1-262 and possibility of feline-to-human interspecies transmission.

  17. Recombinant Monovalent Llama-Derived Antibody Fragments (VHH) to Rotavirus VP6 Protect Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglets against Human Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Nuñez, Carmen; Alvarado, Carmen; Lasa, Rodrigo; Escribano, José M.; Garaicoechea, Lorena L.; Fernandez, Fernando; Bok, Karin; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Saif, Linda J.; Parreño, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs) against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH) to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea. PMID:23658521

  18. Recombinant monovalent llama-derived antibody fragments (VHH) to rotavirus VP6 protect neonatal gnotobiotic piglets against human rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vega, Celina G; Bok, Marina; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Nuñez, Carmen; Alvarado, Carmen; Lasa, Rodrigo; Escribano, José M; Garaicoechea, Lorena L; Fernandez, Fernando; Bok, Karin; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Saif, Linda J; Parreño, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs) against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH) to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea.

  19. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Z.D.; Birch, C.; Heath, R.; Gust, I.

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for 1 h each.

  20. Prediction of human rotavirus serotype by nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP7 protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Green, K Y; Sears, J F; Taniguchi, K; Midthun, K; Hoshino, Y; Gorziglia, M; Nishikawa, K; Urasawa, S; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M

    1988-01-01

    Human rotavirus field isolates were characterized by direct sequence analysis of the gene encoding the serotype-specific major neutralization protein (VP7). Single-stranded RNA transcripts were prepared from virus particles obtained directly from stool specimens or after two or three passages in MA-104 cells. Two regions of the gene (nucleotides 307 through 351 and 670 through 711) which had previously been shown to contain regions of sequence divergence among rotavirus serotypes were sequenced by the dideoxynucleotide method with two different synthetic oligonucleotide primers. The resulting nucleotide sequences were compared with the corresponding sequences from rotaviruses of known serotype (serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4). A total of 25 field isolates and 10 laboratory strains examined by this method exhibited marked sequence identity in both areas of the gene with the corresponding regions of 1 of the 4 reference strains. In addition, the predicted serotype from the sequence analysis correlated in each case with the serotype determined when the rotaviruses were examined by plaque reduction neutralization or reactivity with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies. These data suggest that as a result of the high degree of sequence conservation observed among rotaviruses of the same serotype, it is possible to predict the serotype of a rotavirus isolate by direct sequence analysis of its VP7 gene. PMID:2833626

  1. The origin of two rare human P[10] rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Urushibara, Noriko; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Shintani, Tsuzumi; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-01-01

    The Group A rotavirus (RVA) P[10] is a rare genotype of the RVA VP4 gene. To date, the whole genome sequence of only a single P[10] RVA strain, RVA/Human-tc/IDN/69M/1980/G8P4[10], has been determined, revealing a DS-1-like genotype constellation. Whole genomic analyses of P[10] RVA strains with other VP7 genotypes are essential to obtain conclusive data on the origin and genetic diversity of the P10] RVAs. In the present study, the whole genome of a human G4P[10] RVA strain, RVA/Human-tc/IDN/57M/1980/G4P[10], was analyzed. Strain 57M exhibited an unusual G4-P[10]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T2-E1-H2 genotype constellation, and was found to originate from intergenogroup reassortment events involving acquisition of RVA strain 69M-like VP4, NSP3 and NSP5 genes by a co-circulating Wa-like human G4 RVA strain. Although the reference P[10] strain, 69M, exhibits a DS-1-like genotype constellation, the exact origin of this RVA remains to be elucidated. By detailed phylogenetic analyses, we found that the VP1-VP3, VP6, NSP2 and NSP4 genes of 69M originated from artiodactyl and/or artiodactyl-like human P[14] strains, whilst its NSP1, NSP3 and NSP5 genes were more related to those of typical human DS-1-like strains than those of other RVAs. On the other hand, the origin of the VP4 gene of 69M could not be established. Nevertheless, these observations clearly indicated that strain 69M might have originated from reassortment events involving at least the artiodactyl or artiodactyl-like human RVAs and the typical human DS-1-like strains. The present study provided rare evidence for intergenogroup reassortment events involving co-circulating typical human Wa-like RVAs and unusual RVAs of the DS-1-like genogroup, and revealed the presence of artiodactyl-like genes in a human P[10] strain, highlighting the complex evolutionary patterns of the P[10] RVAs.

  2. Discovery of rotavirus: Implications for child health.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Ruth

    2009-10-01

    For centuries, acute diarrhea has been a major worldwide cause of death in young children, and until 1973, no infectious agents could be identified in about 80% of patients admitted to hospital with severe dehydrating diarrhea. In 1973 Ruth Bishop, Geoffrey Davidson, Ian Holmes, and Brian Ruck identified abundant particles of a 'new' virus (rotavirus) in the cytoplasm of mature epithelial cells lining duodenal villi and in feces, from such children admitted to the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. Rotaviruses have now been shown to cause 40-50% of severe acute diarrhea in young children worldwide in both developing and developed countries, and > 600 000 young children die annually from rotavirus disease, predominantly in South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Longitudinal surveillance studies following primary infection in young children have shown that rotavirus reinfections are common. However the immune response that develops after primary infection is protective against severe symptoms on reinfection. This observation became the basis for development of live oral rotavirus vaccines. Two safe and effective vaccines are now licensed in 100 countries and in use in 17 countries (including Australia). Rotarix (GSK) is a single attenuated human rotavirus, representative of the most common serotype identified worldwide (G1P[8]). RotaTeq (Merck) is a pentavalent mixture of naturally attenuated bovine/human rotavirus reassortants representing G1, G2, G3, G4, and P(8) serotypes. Preliminary surveillance of the numbers of children requiring hospitalization for severe diarrhea, in USA, Brazil, and Australia, after introduction of these vaccines, encourages the hope that rotavirus infection need no longer be a threat to young children worldwide.

  3. Distribution of serotypes of human rotavirus in different populations.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, P A; Gentsch, J; Gouvea, V; Mata, L; Santosham, M; Bai, Z S; Urasawa, S; Glass, R I

    1992-01-01

    Serotyping is a useful tool to study the epidemiologic characteristics of rotaviruses in large populations and to assess the need for a vaccine to protect against all strains. By using an enzyme immunoassay with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies to the four most common rotavirus serotypes, we analyzed 1,183 rotavirus-positive specimens from 16 stool collections in eight countries on four continents that were obtained from 1978 to 1989. Of the 926 strains (78%) that could be serotyped, 48% were serotype 1, 8% were serotype 2, 15% were serotype 3, and 7% were serotype 4. Twenty-two percent had insufficient numbers of double-shelled virus particles to react with the monoclonal antibody of the VP4 rotavirus protein and therefore could not be serotyped. Our results indicate that vaccines being developed must provide the greatest coverage against serotype 1 and that the serotype distribution cannot be predicted currently by the geographic area or prevalence in the preceding year. PMID:1315333

  4. Construction and Characterization of Human Rotavirus Recombinant VP8* Subunit Parenteral Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W.; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-01-01

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in E. coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., (P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. PMID:22885016

  5. Construction and characterization of human rotavirus recombinant VP8* subunit parenteral vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-09-21

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in Escherichia coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines.

  6. A comparison of the VP7 gene sequences of human and bovine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Steele, A D; Hoshino, Y; Sereno, M; Garcia, D; Sarasini, A; Flores, J

    1994-07-01

    The sequences of the gene encoding VP7 (the major outer capsid protein) from one bovine and three human rotavirus strains were determined because of their unusual VP7 specificities. Two of the human strains (PA 169 and PA 151) had VP7 serotype 6 specificity whereas the two other strains, recovered from a child (HAL 1166) and a calf (678) belonged to VP7 serotype 8. The serotype 8 strains exhibited a high degree of sequence conservation when compared with each other and with other serotype 8 strains previously sequenced. The serotype 6 human strains shared a greater degree of sequence similarity with previously reported serotype 6 bovine strains than with other rotavirus serotypes; however the degree of sequence similarity among PA 169, PA 151 and the bovine strains was lower than had been previously reported for strains belonging to the same serotype. The demonstration of rotavirus serotypes that are shared between human and animal species supports the concept that interspecies transmission occurs and may play a role in rotavirus evolution.

  7. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nyaga, Martin M.; Jere, Khuzwayo C.; Esona, Mathew D.; Seheri, Mapaseka L.; Stucker, Karla M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M.; Steele, A. Duncan; Wentworth, David E.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5 years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G- (VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  8. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Nyaga, Martin M; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Esona, Mathew D; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G-(VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  9. Identification of novel and diverse rotaviruses in rodents and insectivores, and evidence of cross-species transmission into humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Lin, Xian-Dan; Huang, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Bing; Shi, Mang; Guo, Wen-Ping; Wang, Miao-Ruo; Wang, Wen; Xing, Jian-Guang; Li, Ming-Hui; Hong, Wang-Sheng; Holmes, Edward C; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Rotaviruses are an important cause of severe diarrheal illness in children globally. We characterized rotaviruses sampled in humans, insectivores (shrews) and rodents from urban and rural regions of Zhejiang province, China. Phylogenetic analyses revealed seven genotypic constellations of human rotaviruses with six different combinations of G and P genotypes - G3P[8] (50.06%), G9P[8] (36.16%), G1P[8] (8.92%), G2P[4] (4.63%), G3P[3] (0.12%), and G3P[9] (0.12%). In rodents and shrews sampled from the same locality we identified a novel genotype constellation (G32-P[46]-I24-R18-C17-M17-A28-N17-T19-E24-H19), a novel P genotype (P[45]), and two different AU-1-like rotaviruses associated with a G3P[3] genotype combination. Of particular note was a novel rotavirus from a human patient that was closely related to viruses sampled from rodents in the same region, indicative of a local species jump. In sum, these data are suggestive of the cross-species transmission of rodent rotaviruses into humans and for reassortment among human and animal rotaviruses.

  10. Analysis of gene selection in reassortant formation between canine rotavirus K9 and human rotaviruses with different antigenic specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Taniguchi, K; Urasawa, T; Urasawa, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of antigenic mosaic reassortants which have neutralization proteins VP4 and VP7 derived from different parental strains were analysed in order to study gene selection in reassortant formation between animal and human rotaviruses (HRV). These reassortants were isolated from mixed infection of MA-104 cells with canine rotavirus strain K9 (subgroup I and G serotype 3) and HRV strains (with subgroup I or II antigen and G serotype 1-4, 9 or 12 antigen), through repeated selections with anti-VP4 and anti-VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed specifically at HRV and K9, respectively. By serological and genomic analyses, all the isolated clones were found to be antigenic mosaic reassortants possessing VP4 of K9 and VP7 of HRV. In the reassortants between strain K9 and one of the six strains of subgroup II HRV, a single or a few genotypes with particular constellations of RNA segments were predominant, with only a few RNA segments including gene 4 (encoding VP4) being derived from K9. In contrast, in the reassortants between strain K9 and any one of the subgroup I HRV, more than nine different genotypes were identified and various RNA segments, except for segments 8 and 10, were derived from K9. These findings indicated that the RNA segments of K9 might be reassorted more readily with those of subgroup I HRV than with those of subgroup II HRV, suggesting the possible existence of functional mechanisms which determine the extent of diversity of genome selection depending on the pairs of parent strains in the reassortant formation.

  11. Structural characterization by multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) of human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ashline, David J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Prasad, Venkataram; Estes, Mary K; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F; Reinhold, Vernon N

    2014-11-01

    We have shown that recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the human rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains (N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain (B223) recognize unique glycans within the repertoire of human milk glycans. The accompanying study by Yu et al.(2), describes a human milk glycan shotgun glycan microarray that led to the identification of 32 specific glycans in the human milk tagged glycan library that were recognized by these human rotaviruses. These microarray analyses also provided a variety of metadata about the recognized glycan structures compiled from anti-glycan antibody and lectin binding before and after specific glycosidase digestions, along with compositional information from mass analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry. To deduce glycan sequence and utilize information predicted by analyses of metadata from each glycan, 28 of the glycan targets were retrieved from the tagged glycan library for detailed sequencing using sequential disassembly of glycans by ion-trap mass spectrometry. Our aim is to obtain a deeper structural understanding of these key glycans using an orthogonal approach for structural confirmation in a single ion trap mass spectrometer. This sequential ion disassembly strategy details the complexities of linkage and branching in multiple compositions, several of which contained isomeric mixtures including several novel structures. The application of this approach exploits both library matching with standard materials and de novo approaches. This combination together with the metadata generated from lectin and antibody-binding data before and after glycosidase digestions provide a heretofore-unavailable level of analytical detail to glycan structure analysis. The results of these studies showed that, among the 28 glycan targets analyzed, 27 unique structures were identified, and 23 of the human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses represent

  12. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment Photos ...

  13. Rotavirus Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment Photos ...

  14. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection. PMID:27610023

  15. Extraction of rotavirus from human feces by treatment with lithium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Croxson, M C; Bellamy, A R

    1981-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for the isolation of rotavirus from human fecal specimens based on the resistance of the virus to treatment with cold 1% lithium dodecyl sulfate at neutral pH. A single detergent treatment of fecal material followed by low- and high-speed centrifugations yielded a virus suspension of sufficient purity for viral ribonucleic acid to be analyzed directly by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels.

  16. Genetic analyses reveal differences in the VP7 and VP4 antigenic epitopes between human rotaviruses circulating in Belgium and rotaviruses in Rotarix and RotaTeq.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Patton, John T; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Coster, Sarah; Ciarlet, Max; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2012-03-01

    Two live-attenuated rotavirus group A (RVA) vaccines, Rotarix (G1P[8]) and RotaTeq (G1-G4, P[8]), have been successfully introduced in many countries worldwide, including Belgium. The parental RVA strains used to generate the vaccines were isolated more than 20 years ago in France (G4 parental strain in RotaTeq) and the United States (all other parental strains). At present, little is known about the relationship between currently circulating human RVAs and the vaccine strains. In this study, we determined sequences for the VP7 and VP4 outer capsid proteins of representative G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], G9P[8], and G12P[8] RVAs circulating in Belgium during 2007 to 2009. The analyses showed that multiple amino acid differences existed between the VP7 and VP4 antigenic epitopes of the vaccine viruses and the Belgian isolates, regardless of their G and P genotypes. However, the highest variability was observed among the circulating G1P[8] RVA strains and the G1 and P[8] components of both RVA vaccines. In particular, RVA strains of the P[8] lineage 4 (OP354-like) showed a significant number of amino acid differences with the P[8] VP4 of both vaccines. In addition, the circulating Belgian G3 RVA strains were found to possibly possess an extra N-linked glycosylation site compared to the G3 RVA vaccine strain of RotaTeq. These results indicate that the antigenic epitopes of RVA strains contained in the vaccines differ substantially from those of the currently circulating RVA strains in Belgium. Over time, these differences might result in selection for strains that escape the RVA neutralizing-antibody pressure induced by vaccines.

  17. Serotype determination of human rotavirus isolates and antibody prevalence in pediatric population in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Urasawa, S; Urasawa, T; Taniguchi, K; Chiba, S

    1984-01-01

    Three different serotypes of human rotavirus isolates defined in our laboratory were compared by cross neutralization tests with human rotavirus serotypes established in the NIH, U.S.A. The results clearly demonstrated that our three serotypes correspond well to their serotypes Wa, DS-1 and M (or P). Using the three serotype-specific rabbit antisera, all of the 16 strains isolated to date could be assigned to one of those three serotypes. The prevalence of human rotavirus serotypes 1, 2 and 3 among inhabitants of Sapporo and its outskirts was investigated based on the results of neutralizing antibody distribution patterns by age using sera of non-infectious disease patients examined at the Sapporo Medical College Hospital. Neutralizing antibody titers were measured against four strains, KU and K8 (serotype 1), S2 (serotype 2) and YO (serotype 3). The results revealed that serum antibody titers against KU, K8 and YO strains rose with time after birth, reaching the highest antibody distribution levels in either the 3-5-year-old or 6-9-year-old age group, while antibody against S2 strain tended to be lower than that against the other three strains throughout all age ranges examined, with the highest level being shown in the adult group.

  18. Evidence of VP7 and VP4 intra-lineage diversification in G4P[8] Italian human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Guerra, Paola; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora; Calderaro, Adriana

    2014-04-01

    Intragenotypic heterogeneity of co-circulating rotaviruses is remarkable. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the rotavirus VP7 and VP4 genes were performed on selected human G4P[8] strains identified in Parma, Northern Italy, during 2004-2005 and 2008-2012. All the strains clustered into lineages Ic (VP7) and P[8]-III (VP4) in different subclusters with a nucleotide sequence variation up to 4 %. VP7 and VP4 amino acid sequences of the Italian rotaviruses showed multiple changes with the corresponding reference strains as well as with vaccine viruses in the neutralizing epitopes. There is concern that the progressive intra-lineage diversification in the VP7 and VP4 through the accumulation of point mutations and amino acid differences between vaccine strains and currently circulating rotaviruses could generate, over the years, vaccine-resistant variants.

  19. Investigation of a regulatory agency enquiry into potential porcine circovirus type 1 contamination of the human rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix™

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Gary; Toussaint, Jean-François; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Howe, Barbara; Boyce, Donna; Friedland, Leonard; Abu-Elyazeed, Remon; Poncelet, Sylviane; Han, Htay Htay; Debrus, Serge

    2013-01-01

    In January 2010, porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV1) DNA was unexpectedly detected in the oral live-attenuated human rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix™ (GlaxoSmithKline [GSK] Vaccines) by an academic research team investigating a novel, highly sensitive analysis not routinely used for adventitious agent screening. GSK rapidly initiated an investigation to confirm the source, nature and amount of PCV1 in the vaccine manufacturing process and to assess potential clinical implications of this finding. The investigation also considered the manufacturer’s inactivated poliovirus (IPV)-containing vaccines, since poliovirus vaccine strains are propagated using the same cell line as the rotavirus vaccine strain. Results confirmed the presence of PCV1 DNA and low levels of PCV1 viral particles at all stages of the Rotarix™ manufacturing process. PCV type 2 DNA was not detected at any stage. When tested in human cell lines, productive PCV1 infection was not observed. There was no immunological or clinical evidence of PCV1 infection in infants who had received Rotarix™ in clinical trials. PCV1 DNA was not detected in the IPV-containing vaccine manufacturing process beyond the purification stage. Retrospective testing confirmed the presence of PCV1 DNA in Rotarix™ since the initial stages of its development and in vaccine lots used in clinical studies conducted pre- and post-licensure. The acceptable safety profile observed in clinical trials of Rotarix™ therefore reflects exposure to PCV1 DNA. The investigation into the presence of PCV1 in Rotarix™ could serve as a model for risk assessment in the event of new technologies identifying adventitious agents in the manufacturing of other vaccines and biological products. PMID:24056737

  20. Human rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix): focus on effectiveness and impact 6 years after first introduction in Africa.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Giaquinto, Carlo; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    A decade after licensure of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV), a wealth of evidence supports a reduction of rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis-associated mortality and hospitalizations following HRV inclusion in national immunization programs. Nevertheless, the majority of real-world data has been generated in high- or middle-income settings. Clinical efficacy trials previously indicated RV vaccine performance may be lower in less-developed countries compared with wealthier counterparts. Using recently published data from Africa, we examine the effectiveness and impact of HRV in resource-deprived areas, exploring whether vaccine performance differs by socioeconomic setting and the potential underlying factors. HRV vaccine effectiveness in early adopting African countries has proven to be similar or even superior to the efficacy results observed in pre-licensure studies.

  1. Full genomic analyses of human rotavirus strains possessing the rare P[8]b VP4 subtype.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Yamamoto, Dai; Nagashima, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2011-08-01

    Rotaviruses with the P[8] VP4 genotype are a major cause of acute infantile diarrhea. The P[8] genotype is classified into two genetically distinct subtypes, P[8]a and P[8]b. Most of the P[8] strains belong to subtype P[8]a, whilst P[8]b strains are rare. To date, the whole genomes of a few P[8]a strains have been analyzed, whilst there are no reports on full genomic analysis of the P[8]b strains. To determine the genetic makeup of the rare P[8]b strains and their overall genetic relatedness to the P[8]a strains, the present study analyzed the full genomes of a human G9P[8]b strain, MMC38, and a G1P[8]b strain, MMC71, detected in Bangladesh in 2005. By nucleotide sequence identities and phylogenetic analyses, strains MMC38 and MMC71 exhibited a human rotavirus Wa-like genotype constellation. Except for the VP4 gene, all the genes of strains MMC38 and MMC71 were closely related to cognate genes of the contemporary and more recent human Wa-like G1P[8]a, G9P[8]a, G11P[8]a, G11P[25], G12P[6] and G12P[8]a strains, including those from Bangladesh. Therefore, strains MMC38 and MMC71 possessed the genetically distinct P[8]b VP4 gene on a common human Wa-like genetic backbone, pointing towards their possible origin from reassortment events between common human Wa-like strains and unidentified rotavirus strains possessing the rare P[8]b-like VP4 gene. Since strains with this stable Wa-like genetic backbone can spread rapidly, and it is not certain as to whether the current rotavirus vaccines will be equally efficacious against the P[8]b strains as the P[8]a strains, proper detection of P[8]b strains and their whole genomic analyses might be of public health significance. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report on full genomic analysis of the rare P[8]b rotavirus strains.

  2. Hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and infectious virus in gut-associated lymphoid tissue of mice after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Moser, C A; Dolfi, D V; Di Vietro, M L; Heaton, P A; Offit, P A; Clark, H F

    2001-04-01

    Oral inoculation of infants with a vaccine that contains simian-human reassortant rotaviruses has been found to be a rare cause of intussusception. Because intussusception can be associated with enlargement of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, we studied the capacity of simian-human and bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses to cause lymphoid hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Peyer's patches (PP) of adult BALB/c mice. Neither hypertrophy nor hyperplasia was detected in PP after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses. However, infectious virus was detected in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes after oral inoculation with simian, but not bovine, reassortant rotaviruses. Implications of these findings on the pathogenesis of intussusception are discussed.

  3. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. )

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  4. Serotypic differentiation of rotaviruses in field samples from diarrheic pigs by using nucleic acid probes specific for porcine VP4 and human and porcine VP7 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Lopez, S; Flores, J; Saif, L J

    1994-01-01

    Of 216 fecal and intestinal samples collected from nursing or weaned diarrheic pigs in the United States and Canada, 57 were identified as group A rotavirus positive by RNA electrophoresis and silver staining. Fifty-seven and 52 rotavirus-positive samples were analyzed by hybridization with Gottfried and OSU PCR-derived gene 9 and 4 probes, respectively. Only 17 samples were identified with either homologous VP4 (P)- or VP7 (G)-coding genes or both. One rotavirus identified as G4 and P7 was similar to the previously characterized interserotype rotavirus, SB-1A. Additional hybridization analyses were performed with PCR-derived probes prepared from gene 9 cDNA of the human rotaviruses Wa (G1), DS-1 (G2), and P (G3) and of the porcine rotavirus YM (G11). Eleven of 52 samples collected and analyzed from swine in Ohio, California, and Nebraska were identified as G11. No samples with G1-, G2-, or G3-type specificities were detected among the 25 of 57 rotavirus-positive samples analyzed with human rotavirus-derived probes. Further investigations with a PCR-derived gene 4 probe prepared from porcine rotavirus YM revealed hybridization specificities similar to those of the OSU gene 4 probe. Images PMID:8150940

  5. Analysis of complete genome sequences of G9P[19] rotavirus strains from human and piglet with diarrhea provides evidence for whole-genome interspecies transmission of nonreassorted porcine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Chuchaona, Watchaporn; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Kongkaew, Aphisek; Vachirachewin, Ratchaya; Okitsu, Shoko; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-01-01

    Whole genomes of G9P[19] human (RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19]) and porcine (RVA/Pig-wt/THA/CMP-015-12/2012/G9P[19]) rotaviruses concurrently detected in the same geographical area in northern Thailand were sequenced and analyzed for their genetic relationships using bioinformatic tools. The complete genome sequence of human rotavirus RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19] was most closely related to those of porcine rotavirus RVA/Pig-wt/THA/CMP-015-12/2012/G9P[19] and to those of porcine-like human and porcine rotaviruses reference strains than to those of human rotavirus reference strains. The genotype constellation of G9P[19] detected in human and piglet were identical and displayed as the G9-P[19]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1 genotypes with the nucleotide sequence identities of VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, NSP4, and NSP5 at 99.0%, 99.5%, 93.2%, 97.7%, 97.7%, 85.6%, 89.5%, 93.2%, 92.9%, 94.0%, and 98.1%, respectively. The findings indicate that human rotavirus strain RVA/Human-wt/THA/CMH-S070-13/2013/G9P[19] containing the genome segments of porcine genetic backbone is most likely a human rotavirus of porcine origin. Our data provide an evidence of interspecies transmission and whole-genome transmission of nonreassorted G9P[19] porcine RVA to human occurring in nature in northern Thailand.

  6. Conservation of the fourth gene among rotaviruses recovered from asymptomatic newborn infants and its possible role in attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Midthun, K.; Hoshino, Y.; Green, K.; Gorziglia, M.; Kapikian, A.Z.; Chanock, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    RNA-RNA hybridization was performed to assess the extent of genetic relatedness among human rotaviruses isolated from children with gastroenteritis and from asymptomatic newborn infants. /sup 32/P-labeled single-stranded RNAs produced by in vitro transcription from viral cores of the different strains tested were used as probes in two different hybridization assays: (1) undenatured genomic RNAs were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, denatured in situ, electrophoretically transferred to diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper (Northern blots), and then hybridized to the probes under two different conditions of stringency; and (ii) denatured genomic double-stranded RNAs were hybridized to the probes in solution and the hybrids which formed were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When analyzed by Northern blot hybridization at a low level of stringency, all genes from the strains tested cross-hybridized, providing evidence for some sequence homology in each of the corresponding genes. However, when hybridization stringency was increased, a difference in gene 4 sequence was detected between strains recovered from asymptomatic newborn infants (nursery strains) and strains recovered from infants and young children with diarrhea. Although the nursery strains exhibited serotypic diversity, the fourth gene appeared to be highly conversed. These results were confirmed and extended during experiments in which the RNA-RNA hybridization was carried out in solution and the resulting hybrids were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Full-length hybrids did not form between the fourth genes from the nursery strains and the corresponding genes from the strains recovered from symptomatic infants and young children.

  7. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  8. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; ...

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type IImore » precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.« less

  9. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type II precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.

  10. Analysis of human rotavirus strains prevailing in Bangladesh in relation to nationwide floods brought by the 1988 monsoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M U; Urasawa, S; Taniguchi, K; Urasawa, T; Kobayashi, N; Wakasugi, F; Islam, A I; Sahikh, H A

    1991-10-01

    The virologic character of human rotavirus strains prevailing in Bangladesh was investigated in relation to the devastating nationwide floods brought by the 1988 monsoon. Human rotaviruses contained in stool specimens that were collected from inpatients with infantile and adult diarrhea in two hospitals in Mymensingh over a 13-month period (January 1988 to January 1989) and in one hospital in Dhaka over a 3-month period (February to April 1988) were examined for their subgroup, VP7 serotype, and RNA electropherotype. In concurrence with the spread of the flood (from the middle of August 1988), the number of infantile and adult diarrhea patients increased greatly. At the same time, the proportion of rotavirus-positive specimens in all diarrhea cases also increased remarkably, reaching 54 and 45% in September and October, respectively. An electrophoretic analysis of viral RNA revealed 17 distinct patterns of viral RNA (14 long and 3 short electropherotypes) and a considerable number of mixed electropherotypes, suggesting the simultaneous infection of some patients with more than two rotavirus strains. It was noteworthy that electropherotypes of rotavirus strains prevailing in the community changed considerably after the spreading of the flood and that the frequency of virus specimens showing mixed electropherotypes increased significantly during the flood period. These results suggest that sudden environmental change caused by the devastating floods seriously affected the epidemiology of rotavirus infections by increasing the opportunity of transmission of the virus and by reducing the resistance of the host to infection. In both pediatric and adult patient groups, serotypes 1 and 2 were the most frequent ones detected, followed by serotype 4.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Rotavirus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Rotavirus KidsHealth > For Parents > Rotavirus Print A A A ... Call the Doctor en español El rotavirus About Rotavirus Almost all kids have had a rotavirus infection ...

  12. Detection and genotyping of human rotavirus VP4 and VP7 genes by reverse transcriptase PCR and reverse hybridization.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Kleter, Bernhard; Hoefnagel, Evert; Stainier, Isabelle; Poliszczak, Annick; Colau, Brigitte; Quint, Wim

    2009-09-01

    Rotavirus infections can be diagnosed in stool samples by serological and molecular methods. We developed a novel reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) method for the amplification of rotavirus RNA and a reverse hybridization assay on a strip to detect amplimers and identify the specific G and P genotypes present in human stool specimens. An additional aim was to permit specific identification of the rotavirus G1P[8] strain, used in the Rotarix vaccine. Novel broad-spectrum PCR primers were developed for both VP4 and VP7, permitting the amplification of a wide range of rotavirus genotypes. Primer sets comprise mixtures of defined primer sequences. For the identification of G and P genotypes, two reverse hybridization strip assays were developed. Both the VP4 and the VP7 strip contain universal probes for the detection of VP4 and VP7 sequences, irrespective of the G or P genotype. The VP4 strip contains type-specific probes for P[4], P[6], P[8], P[9], and P[10]. The VP7 strip contains type-specific probes for G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6, G8, and G9. In addition, probes to distinguish between wild-type G1 and G1 vaccine strain sequences were present. Testing by analysis of multiple reference strains confirmed that both RT-PCR methods allowed the detection of a broad spectrum of genotypes. RT-PCR for VP7 was more sensitive than RT-PCR for VP4, but all samples identified as positive for rotavirus antigen by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were also positive for both VP4 and VP7. The high specificity of the reverse hybridization method was confirmed by sequence analysis as well as by type-specific PCR, and the vaccine strain could also be specifically identified. The reverse hybridization method permits accurate identification of mixed infections with different genotypes. Rotavirus genotypes for which no type-specific probes were present on the strip were adequately identified by the universal detection probes. The assay was formally validated by analyses of

  13. Rotavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E; Hyde, Terri B; Cortese, Margaret M; Lopman, Benjamin A; Jiang, Baoming; Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh D

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among children <5 years worldwide. Currently licensed rotavirus vaccines have been efficacious and effective, with many countries reporting substantial declines in diarrheal and rotavirus-specific morbidity and mortality. However, the full public health impact of these vaccines has not been realized. Most countries, including those with the highest disease burden, have not yet introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. Research activities that may help inform vaccine introduction decisions include (1) establishing effectiveness, impact, and safety for rotavirus vaccines in low-income settings; (2) identifying potential strategies to improve performance of oral rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, such as zinc supplementation; and (3) pursuing alternate approaches to oral vaccines, such as parenteral immunization. Policy- and program-level barriers, such as financial implications of new vaccine introductions, should be addressed to ensure that countries are able to make informed decisions regarding rotavirus vaccine introduction. PMID:24755452

  14. Immunogenicity, safety and efficacy of tetravalent rhesus-human, reassortant rotavirus vaccine in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, A. C.; Gabbay, Y. B.; Mascarenhas, J. D.; de Freitas, R. B.; Oliveira, C. S.; Bellesi, N.; Monteiro, T. A.; Lins-Lainson, Z.; Ramos, F. L.; Valente, S. A.

    1996-01-01

    A tetravalent rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus (RRV-TV) vaccine (4 x 10(4) plaque-forming units/dose) was evaluated for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 540 Brazilian infants. Doses of vaccine or placebo were given at ages 1, 3 and 5 months. No significant differences were noted in the occurrence of diarrhoea or vomiting in vaccine and placebo recipients following each dose. Low-grade fever occurred on days 3-5 in 2-3% of vaccinees after the first dose, but not after the second or third doses of vaccine. An IgA antibody response to rhesus rotavirus (RRV) occurred in 58% of vaccinees and 33% of placebo recipients. Neutralizing antibody responses to individual serotypes did not exceed 20% when measured by fluorescent focus reduction, but exceeded 40% when assayed by plaque reduction neutralization. There were 91 cases of rotavirus diarrhoea among the 3-dose (vaccine or placebo) recipients during two years of follow-up, 36 of them among children given the vaccine. Overall vaccine efficacy was 8% (P = 0.005) against any diarrhoea and 35% (P = 0.03) against any rotavirus diarrhoea. Protection during the first year of follow-up, when G serotype 1 rotavirus predominated, was 57% (P = 0.008), but fell to 12% in the second year. Similar results were obtained when analysis was restricted to episodes in which rotavirus was the only identified pathogen. There was a tendency for enhanced protection by vaccine against illness associated with an average of 6 or more stools per day. These results are sufficiently encouraging to warrant further studies of this vaccine in developing countries using a higher dosage in an attempt to improve its immunogenicity and efficacy. PMID:9002329

  15. Complete genome analysis of a rabbit rotavirus causing gastroenteritis in a human infant.

    PubMed

    Bonica, Melisa Berenice; Zeller, Mark; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Heylen, Elisabeth

    2015-02-17

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are responsible for causing infantile diarrhea both in humans and animals. The molecular characteristics of lapine RVA strains are only studied to a limited extent and so far G3P[14] and G3P[22] were found to be the most common G/P-genotypes. During the 2012-2013 rotavirus season in Belgium, a G3P[14] RVA strain was isolated from stool collected from a two-year-old boy. We investigated whether RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE5028/2012/G3P[14] is completely of lapine origin or the result of reassortment event(s). Phylogenetic analyses of all gene segments revealed the following genotype constellation: G3-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M3-A9-N2-T6-E5-H3 and indicated that BE5028 probably represents a rabbit to human interspecies transmission able to cause disease in a human child. Interestingly, BE5028 showed a close evolutionary relationship to RVA/Human-wt/BEL/B4106/2000/G3P[14], another lapine-like strain isolated in a Belgian child in 2000. The phylogenetic analysis of the NSP3 segment suggests the introduction of a bovine(-like) NSP3 into the lapine RVA population in the past 12 years. Sequence analysis of NSP5 revealed a head-to-tail partial duplication, combined with two short insertions and a deletion, indicative of the continuous circulation of this RVA lineage within the rabbit population.

  16. Chicken Egg Yolk Antibodies (IgY) for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Rotavirus Diarrhea in Human and Animal Neonates: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Hlaing Myat; Myat, Theingi Win; Win, Mo Mo; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Rahman, Shofiqur; Umeda, Kouji; Nguyen, Sa Van; Icatlo, Faustino C.; Higo-Moriguchi, Kyoko; Taniguchi, Koki; Tsuji, Takao; Oguma, Keiji; Kim, Sang Jong; Bae, Hyun Suk

    2017-01-01

    The rotavirus-induced diarrhea of human and animal neonates is a major public health concern worldwide. Until recently, no effective therapy is available to specifically inactivate the rotavirion particles within the gut. Passive immunotherapy by oral administration of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) has emerged of late as a fresh alternative strategy to control infectious diseases of the alimentary tract and has been applied in the treatment of diarrhea due to rotavirus infection. The purpose of this concise review is to evaluate evidence on the properties and performance of anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin Y (IgY) for prevention and treatment of rotavirus diarrhea in human and animal neonates. A survey of relevant anti-rotavirus IgY basic studies and clinical trials among neonatal animals (since 1994-2015) and humans (since 1982-2015) have been reviewed and briefly summarized. Our analysis of a number of rotavirus investigations involving animal and human clinical trials revealed that anti-rotavirus IgY significantly reduced the severity of clinical manifestation of diarrhea among IgY-treated subjects relative to a corresponding control or placebo group. The accumulated information as a whole depicts oral IgY to be a safe and efficacious option for treatment of rotavirus diarrhea in neonates. There is however a clear need for more randomized, placebo controlled and double-blind trials with bigger sample size to further solidify and confirm claims of efficacy and safety in controlling diarrhea caused by rotavirus infection especially among human infants with health issues such as low birth weights or compromised immunity in whom it is most needed. PMID:28316465

  17. A systematic review of genetic diversity of human rotavirus circulating in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Than, Van Thai; Jeong, Sunyoung; Kim, Wonyong

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus infections continue to be the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young Korean children. Rotavirus data acquired from uninterrupted surveillance studies between 1989 and 2009 in South Korea were analyzed to better understand the genetic diversity and evolution. The relationship between rotaviruses and the currently licensed rotavirus vaccine viruses was also examined. The most prevalent rotavirus strains, with genotype G1P[8], followed by G3P[8], G4P[6], and G2P[4], accounted for approximately 76.7% of the total identified strains, and more recently, rotavirus G9P[8] has significance increased to be the fifth most common genotype. Phylogenetic analyses underscored the heterogeneity between viral populations within each genotype, with different lineages and sub-lineages. Although the currently licensed rotavirus vaccines are effective, safe, and economical, additional data from rotavirus monitoring is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of these vaccines for their sustained use in South Korea. The present study provides comprehensive and up-to-date information regarding the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of the circulating rotaviruses in South Korea.

  18. Evolution of human G4P[8] group A rotavirus strains circulating in Italy in 2013.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2015-06-02

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in young (<5 years of age) children, causing up to 450.000 deaths worldwide, mostly in developing countries. VP7 (G-type) and VP4 (P-type) genotypes are the basis for the binary RVA classification. Although at least 27 G-types and 37 P-types of rotavirus are presently known, most RVA infections in humans worldwide are associated with the five major G/P combinations G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8]. During RVA gastroenteritis surveillance in Italy, a total of 1112 samples collected from children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in 2013 were RVA positive and were genotyped following standardized protocols from the EuroRotaNet. Most strains analyzed belonged to the five major human genotypes. Among these common strains, 22 G4P[8] RVA strains from different Italian regions were subjected to nucleotide sequencing of their VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP4 genes to investigate their evolution. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian strains belonged to lineage G4-I for VP7 and to lineage P[8]-III for VP4, in line with the modern G4P[8] RVA strains detected in children worldwide. The phylogenetic trees revealed high degrees of nucleotide identity between the RVA strains involved in this study and G4P[8] strains detected previously in Europe, Asia and Africa, but also demonstrated at least three separate evolution clusters within the same lineage. Based on the amino acid sequences deduced for their hypervariable regions, both the VP7 and VP8* proteins of the Italian G4P[8] RVA strains presented amino acid substitutions near known neutralizing epitopes.

  19. Genomic characterization of a rotavirus G8P[1] detected in a child with diarrhea reveal direct animal-to-human transmission.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Magaly; Phan, Tung Gia; Galeano, Maria Eugenia; Russomando, Graciela; Parreno, Viviana; Delwart, Eric; Parra, Gabriel I

    2014-10-01

    Group A rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children and young animals. During a retrospective analysis of samples collected from Paraguayan children under 5 years old with diarrhea, and previously negative for rotavirus and norovirus, we detected the presence of bovine rotavirus sequences by viral metagenomics. Nucleic acid was extracted direct from stool sample and determined to be G8P[1]. The genomic analyzes revealed that the strain presents an Artiodactyl-like genome (G8-P[1]-I2-R2-C2-M1-Ax-N2-T6-E12-H3) suggesting a direct animal-to-human transmission.

  20. Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri modulate cytokine responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M. S. P.; Zhang, W.; Wen, K.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Saif, L. J.; Yousef, A. E.; Yuan, L.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains L. acidophilus and L. reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV). We demonstrated that HRV alone, or HRV plus LAB, but not LAB alone, initiated serum cytokine responses, as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10 at post-inoculation day (PID) 2 in the HRV only and LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs. Peak cytokine responses coincided with the peak of HRV replication. LAB further enhanced the Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to HRV infection as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in the LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to the LAB-HRV+ pigs. The LAB+HRV+ pigs maintained relatively constant concentrations of TGF-β compared to the HRV only group which had a significant increase at PID 2 and decrease at PID 7, suggesting a regulatory role of LAB in maintaining gut homeostasis. At PID 28, cytokine secreting cell (CSC) responses, measured by ELISpot, showed increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) CSC numbers in the LAB+HRV+ and LAB-HRV+ groups compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs, with significantly increased IL-12 CSCs in spleen and PBMCs and IFN-γ CSCs in spleen of the LAB+HRV+ group. Thus, HRV infection alone, but not LAB alone was effective in inducing cytokine responses but LAB significantly enhanced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in HRV-infected pigs. LAB may also help to maintain immunological homeostasis during HRV infection by regulating TGF-β production. PMID:22348907

  1. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  2. Human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) efficacy in the first two years of life

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yan-Ping; Luo, Dong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhao-Jun; Liao, Xue-Yan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are a major cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children aged <5 y. For the first time in China, we assessed the efficacy of two oral doses of the human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) in infants during the first two years of life (113808/NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks were randomized (1:1) to receive two oral doses of either the RIX4414 vaccine/placebo according to a 0, 1 month schedule. Vaccine efficacy (VE) against severe RVGE was assessed from two weeks post-Dose 2 up until the end of the second RV season and calculated with its 95% confidence intervals (CI). The primary efficacy objective was met if the lower limit of the 95% CI on VE was ≥10%. Unsolicited symptoms reported during the 31-d post-vaccination follow-up period and serious adverse events (SAEs) reported throughout the study were assessed. Of 3333 enrolled infants, 3148 were included in the according-to-protocol efficacy cohort. Over two consecutive RV seasons, fewer severe RVGE episodes were reported in the RIX4414 group (n = 21) vs. the placebo group (n = 75). VE against severe RVGE was 72% (95% CI: 54.1–83.6); the lower limit of the 95% CI on VE was >10%. The number of unsolicited symptoms and SAEs reported was similar between both groups. Thirteen deaths (RIX4414 = 6; placebo = 7) occurred during the study. All SAEs and deaths in the RIX4414 group were considered unrelated to vaccination. Two oral doses of RIX4414 vaccine provided a substantial level of protection against severe RVGE in Chinese children during the first two years of life. PMID:24013441

  3. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey Jr, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l−1 HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l−1) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l−1) (PRE) (n=19–21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7–8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection. PMID:24522264

  4. Prenatally acquired vitamin A deficiency alters innate immune responses to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model§

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Siegismund, Christine S.; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined how prenatally acquired vitamin A deficiency (VAD) modulates innate immune responses and human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine efficacy in a gnotobiotic (Gn) piglet model of HRV diarrhea. The VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS) Gn pigs were vaccinated with attenuated HRV (AttHRV) with or without concurrent oral vitamin A supplementation (100,000IU) and challenged with virulent HRV (VirHRV). Regardless of vaccination status, the numbers of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (cDCs and pDCs) were higher in VAD piglets pre-challenge, but decreased substantially post-challenge as compared to VAS pigs. We observed significantly higher frequency of CD103 (integrin αEβ7) expressing DCs in VAS vs. VAD piglets post-challenge, indicating that VAD may interfere with homing (including intestinal) phenotype acquisition. Post VirHRV challenge, we observed longer and more pronounced diarrhea and higher VirHRV fecal titers in non-vaccinated VAD piglets. Consistent with higher VirHRV shedding titers, higher IFNα levels were induced in control VAD vs. VAS piglet sera at post-challenge day (PCD)2. Ex vivo HRV-stimulated mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from spleen and blood of VAD pigs pre-challenge also produced more IFNα. In contrast at PCD10, we observed reduced IFNα levels in VAD pigs that coincided with decreased TLR3+ MNC frequencies. Numbers of necrotic MNCs were higher in VAD pigs in spleen (coincident with splenomegaly in other VAD animals) pre-challenge and intestinal tissues (coincident with higher VirHRV induced intestinal damage) post-challenge. Thus, prenatal VAD caused an imbalance in innate immune responses and exacerbated VirHRV infection, whereas vitamin A supplementation failed to compensate for these VAD effects. PMID:23536630

  5. Comparative In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Porcine Rotavirus G9P[13] and Human Rotavirus Wa G1P[8

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lulu; Fischer, David D.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rauf, Abdul; Langel, Stephanie N.; Wentworth, David E.; Stucker, Karla M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Lam, Ham Ching; Marthaler, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The changing epidemiology of group A rotavirus (RV) strains in humans and swine, including emerging G9 strains, poses new challenges to current vaccines. In this study, we comparatively assessed the pathogenesis of porcine RV (PRV) G9P[13] and evaluated the short-term cross-protection between this strain and human RV (HRV) Wa G1P[8] in gnotobiotic pigs. Complete genome sequencing demonstrated that PRV G9P[13] possessed a human-like G9 VP7 genotype but shared higher overall nucleotide identity with historic PRV strains. PRV G9P[13] induced longer rectal virus shedding and RV RNAemia in pigs than HRV Wa G1P[8] and generated complete short-term cross-protection in pigs challenged with HRV or PRV, whereas HRV Wa G1P[8] induced only partial protection against PRV challenge. Moreover, PRV G9P[13] replicated more extensively in porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) than did HRV Wa G1P[8]. Cross-protection was likely not dependent on serum virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies, as the heterologous VN antibody titers in the sera of G9P[13]-inoculated pigs were low. Thus, our results suggest that heterologous protection by the current monovalent G1P[8] HRV vaccine against emerging G9 strains should be evaluated in clinical and experimental studies to prevent further dissemination of G9 strains. Differences in the pathogenesis of these two strains may be partially attributable to their variable abilities to replicate and persist in porcine immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). Additional studies are needed to evaluate the emerging G9 strains as potential vaccine candidates and to test the susceptibility of various immune cells to infection by G9 and other common HRV/PRV genotypes. IMPORTANCE The changing epidemiology of porcine and human group A rotaviruses (RVs), including emerging G9 strains, may compromise the efficacy of current vaccines. An understanding of the pathogenesis and genetic, immunological, and biological features of the new emerging

  6. Quantification of human infection risk caused by rotavirus in surface waters from Córdoba, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Prez, V E; Gil, P I; Temprana, C F; Cuadrado, P R; Martínez, L C; Giordano, M O; Masachessi, G; Isa, M B; Ré, V E; Paván, J V; Nates, S V; Barril, P A

    2015-12-15

    Fecal contamination of water is a worrying problem because it is associated with the transmission of enteric pathogenic microorganisms that can cause many infectious diseases. In this study, an environmental survey was conducted to assess the level of viral contamination by viable enterovirus and rotavirus genome in two recreational rivers (Suquía and Xanaes) of Córdoba, Argentina. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was calculated to estimate the risk of rotavirus infection. Water sampling was carried out during a one-year period, the presence of total and fecal coliforms was determined and water samples were then concentrated for viral determination. Cell culture and indirect immunofluorescence were applied for enterovirus detection and RT-qPCR for rotavirus quantification. Coliform bacteria levels found in Suquía River often far exceeded the guideline limits for recreational waters. The Xanaes exhibited a lower level of bacterial contamination, frequently within the guideline limits. Enterovirus and rotavirus were frequently detected in the monitoring rivers (percentage of positive samples in Suquía: 78.6% enterovirus, 100% rotavirus; in Xanaes: 87.5% enterovirus, 18.7% rotavirus). Rotavirus was detected at a media concentration of 5.7×10(5) genome copies/L (gc/L) in the Suquía and 8.5×10(0)gc/L in the Xanaes. QMRA revealed high risk of rotavirus infection in the Suquía, at sampling points with acceptable and non-acceptable bacteria numbers. The Xanaes showed significantly lower health risk of rotavirus infection but it proved to be a public health hazard. The viral occurrence was not readily explained by the levels of bacteria indicators, thus viral monitoring should be included to determine microbiological water quality. These findings provide the first data of QMRA for recreational waters in Argentina and reveal the need for public awareness of the health implications of the use of the river waters.

  7. Expression and characterization of human group C rotavirus virus-like particles in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kristina B.; Lin, S.-C.; Humphrey, Charles; Foytich, Kimberly; Esona, Mathew; Wang Yuhuan; Liu, Merry; Jiang Baoming

    2009-05-10

    Group C rotavirus (GpC RV) is a causative agent of acute gastroenteritis in children and adults. We expressed the three major capsid proteins VP2, VP6 and VP7 of human GpC RV in baculovirus and demonstrated the self-assembly of VP2/6/7 or VP6/7 virus-like particles (VLPs) in insect cells. We examined a number of parameters, including the kinetics of protein synthesis in different cell lines and media, to optimize the most favorable conditions for the synthesis of recombinant viral proteins and the production of VLPs in Sf9 cells. Hyperimmune serum to VP2/6/7 and VP6/7 VLPs recognized individual recombinant proteins of human GpC RV by Western blot analysis. This serum also showed specific reactivities with the corresponding GpC VLPs but not GpA RV by using immune electron microscopy (IEM) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The ability to produce an unlimited amount of GpC RV antigen and the availability of high quality antibody will allow us to develop sensitive and specific diagnostic assays to better determine the epidemiology and disease burden of GpC RV in humans.

  8. Titration of human-bovine rotavirus reassortants using a tetrazolium-based colorimetric end-point dilution assay.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, D J; Gould, S L; Munshi, S; Robinson, D K

    1995-10-01

    A colorimetric end-point dilution assay was developed for the titration of rotavirus-containing samples that uses commercially available tetrazolium dyes as an indicator of virus infection. This assay offers several advantages over both plaque assays and traditional end-point dilution methods. The latter assays require manual counting of plaques or the scoring of wells for the presence of virus based on observed cytopathic effects. The colorimetric end-point dilution assay enables the scoring of wells based upon absorbance readings alone, thereby eliminating time-consuming and subjective manual screenings. This method also has the potential for automating the analysis of large numbers of samples. Virus titers of human-bovine rotavirus reassortants obtained using this method are comparable to those determined by plaque assay. The scoring of wells based on absorbance readings was also found to agree with manual scoring of cytopathic effects and with the production of viral antigen.

  9. Complete genotype constellation of human rotavirus group A circulating in Thailand, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Theamboonlers, A; Maiklang, O; Thongmee, T; Chieochansin, T; Vuthitanachot, V; Poovorawan, Y

    2014-01-01

    This study has identified diverse and re-assorted group A rotavirus (RVA) strains by sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the 11 genomic segments. The 22 cases investigated in this study were collected from children with diarrhea between 2008 and 2011. The RVA genomic constellations identified in this study were identified as G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 22.7% (5/22); G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 27.3% (6/22); G3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 18.2% (4/22); G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H6 4.6% (1/22); G9-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 9.1% (2/22); G12-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 4.6% (1/22) and G12-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 13.6% (3/22). Two RVA strains, possessing a complete AU-1-like genomic backbone, showed re-assortment for genes 3 and 11, revealing possible zoonotic re-assortment events between human and canine strains. In addition, one of the analyzed strains revealed a G12 specificity for VP7 in combination with a porcine-like P[6] VP4 and a complete Wa-like constellation. Continuous surveillance of rotavirus strains and their evolution may be useful for understanding the emergence of novel strains through interspecies genome re-assortment between human and animal viruses.

  10. Temporal and geographical distributions of human rotavirus serotypes, 1983 to 1988.

    PubMed Central

    Beards, G M; Desselberger, U; Flewett, T H

    1989-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1988, subgroups and serotypes were determined for 907 of 1,084 clinical specimens of rotaviruses collected in various countries of Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Enhanced enzyme immunoassays based on monoclonal antibodies specific for rotavirus proteins VP6 and VP7 were used. Significant differences in the prevalent serotypes were detected from year to year in the United Kingdom and Brazil and also in different countries during the same year. Throughout the study, rotavirus serotype 1 was detected most often (53.8%), followed in frequency by serotype 2 (17.8%), serotype 3 (12.1%), serotype 4 (11.1%), and serotypes other than 1 to 4 (5.1%). No individual serotype was found to predominate consistently in any one location. In the United Kingdom, rotavirus serotypes varied in prevalence in a regular but not predictable way. We suggest that a similar epidemiology might be found in other settings. Seventeen unusual strains were detected. Of these, five strains did not react with reference monoclonal antibodies specific for subgroup I and subgroup II, but they reacted with rotavirus group A-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies; four strains were of subgroup II, serotype 2, and at least one had a "long" electropherotype; two strains were of subgroup I, serotype 2 with a long electropherotype; and one strain was of subgroup I, serotype 3. Five group C rotaviruses were detected. Images PMID:2556435

  11. The prevalence and genotype diversity of Human Rotavirus A circulating in Thailand, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Vutithanachot, Viboonsak; Phumpholsup, Tikumporn; Posuwan, Nawarat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Human rotavirus A (RVA) is the major infectious virus causing acute watery diarrhea in children, especially those younger than 5 years of age, and is a major public health problem in Thailand. Outbreaks of this virus have been reported worldwide. Besides the common genotypes, unusual genotypes providing evidence of inter-species transmission have also been described. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genotypes of RVA in Thailand. A total of 688 samples were collected from children who were hospitalized with acute diarrhea in Chumphae Hospital in Khon Kaen and Chulalongkorn Hospital in Bangkok. RVA was detected using one-step RT-PCR and the genotypes were evaluated by sequencing. Overall, 204 of the 688 samples (30%) were positive for RVA. Nine genotypes were identified: three common in humans (G1P[8] [53%], G2P[4] [18%], G3P[8] [12%]), one feline-like (G3P[9] [1%]), four porcine-like (G4P[6] [0.5%], G5P[6] [0.5%], G9P[8] [0.5%], G12P[6] [1.5%]), and one bovine-like (G8P[8] [13%]). The variation in virus genotypes and the animal-like genotypes detected in this study suggested that a high diversity of RVA types is circulating in the Thai population. Therefore, continuous molecular epidemiological monitoring of RVA is essential and has implications for the national vaccination program.

  12. Efficiency of isolation of human rotavirus in primary African green monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Aboudy, Y; Shif, I; Silberstein, I; Gotlieb-Stematsky, T

    1989-09-01

    Out of 212 human rotavirus (HRV) containing fecal specimens, 173 (81.6%) yielded virus on first passage in primary African Green monkey kidney cells (AGMK), while additional 34 specimens, did not yield virus on first passage. However, following blind passages, 18 of the 34 yielded virus in passage levels 2-8, thus raising the overall isolation rate to 90.1%. The isolation rate of HRV strains obtained in embryonic Rhesus monkey kidney cell line (MA-104), was only 41.4%. ELISA tests performed on fluids from infected cell cultures proved to be an efficient tool to measure virus replication. No differences were encountered in the isolation rates between subgroup I and II strains, while viruses lacking the antigenic determinants of both subgroups did not grow at all. However, one of those unusual group A strains was isolated and grew well in AGMK cells. Primary AGMK and MA-104 cells supported the growth of tissue culture adapted virus most efficiently when compared with six human and primate cell types.

  13. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine.

  14. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  15. Fine mapping of sequential neutralization epitopes on the subunit protein VP8 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Yoo, Dongwan; Mine, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The epitopes of the HRV (human rotavirus), especially those involved in virus neutralization, have not been determined in their entirety, and would have significant implications for HRV vaccine development. In the present study, we report on the epitope mapping and identification of sequential neutralization epitopes, on the Wa strain HRV subunit protein VP8, using synthetic overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Wa VP8 were produced previously in chicken, and purified from egg yolk, which showed neutralizing activity against HRV in vitro. Overlapping VP8 peptide fragments were synthesized and probed with the anti-VP8 antibodies, revealing five sequential epitopes on VP8. Further analysis suggested that three of the five epitopes detected, M1-L10, I55-D66 and L223-P234, were involved in virus neutralization, indicating that sequential epitopes may also be important for the HRV neutralization. The interactions of the antibodies with the five epitopes were characterized by an examination of the critical amino acids involved in antibody binding. Epitopes comprised primarily of hydrophobic amino acid residues, followed by polar and charged residues. The more critical amino acids appeared to be located near the centre of the epitopes, with proline, isoleucine, serine, glutamine and arginine playing an important role in the binding of antibody to the VP8 epitopes. PMID:12901721

  16. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection.

  17. Evaluation of unintended effects in the composition of tomatoes expressing a human immunoglobulin A against rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paloma; Fernandez-del-Carmen, Asun; Rambla, Jose L; Presa, Silvia; Mico, Amparo; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2014-08-13

    The production of neutralizing immunoglobulin A (IgA) in edible fruits as a means of oral passive immunization is a promising strategy for the inexpensive treatment of mucosal diseases. This approach is based on the assumption that the edible status remains unaltered in the immunoglobulin-expressing fruit, and therefore extensive purification is not required for mucosal delivery. However, unintended effects associated with IgA expression such as toxic secondary metabolites and protein allergens cannot be dismissed a priori and need to be investigated. This paper describes a collection of independent transgenic tomato lines expressing a neutralizing human IgA against rotavirus, a mucosal pathogen producing severe diarrhea episodes. This collection was used to evaluate possible unintended effects associated with recombinant IgA expression. A comparative analysis of protein and secondary metabolite profiles using wild type lines and other commercial varieties failed to find unsafe features significantly associated with IgA expression. Preliminary, the data indicate that formulations derived from IgA tomatoes are as safe for consumption as equivalent formulations derived from wild type tomatoes.

  18. Genotyping of human rotaviruses circulating among children with diarrhea in Valencia, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Vizzi, Esmeralda; Piñeros, Oscar; González, Germán Gabriel; Zambrano, José L; Ludert, Juan E; Liprandi, Ferdinando

    2011-12-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis during childhood worldwide, especially in developing countries. Two rotavirus vaccines are available for childhood immunization programs. Evaluation of the vaccine performance will benefit from knowledge of the epidemiological features of rotavirus infection in regional settings. Limited information on the molecular characteristics of the rotavirus types circulating in Venezuela is available. Eighty seven (89.7%) of the 97 ELISA rotavirus positive stool samples collected from children with diarrhea aged <5 years during 2003 in Valencia (Carabobo State), were G-, P- and NSP4-genotyped by RT-PCR and/or automated sequencing. Four common combinations, G3P[8]/NSP4-E1, G2P[4]/NSP4-E2, G9P[8]/NSP4-E1, and G1P[8]/NSP4-E1 were responsible for 50.6%, 35.6%, 5.7%, and 1.1%, respectively of cases of rotavirus diarrhea, most of them (66%) in children ≤12 months. One uncommon G8P[14]/NSP4-E2 strain was also detected. Temporal fluctuation of genotype distribution occurred, but no differences by age, diarrhea severity score, sex, treatment type or patient medical attention were observed, except for the G3P[8]/NSP4-E1, associated with a more severe dehydration than any other type (P < 0.01). The results confirm the broad diversity among rotavirus strains circulating in Venezuela prior to vaccine implementation, showing the predominance of G3, significant proportion of G2 and moderate circulation of G9 strains. Epidemiological surveillance is needed to detect the emergence of new genotypes that could escape protection induced by vaccination.

  19. Whole genomic constellation of the first human G8 rotavirus strain detected in Japan.

    PubMed

    Agbemabiese, Chantal Ama; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Doan, Yen Hai; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Human G8 Rotavirus A (RVA) strains are commonly detected in Africa but are rarely detected in Japan and elsewhere in the world. In this study, the whole genome sequence of the first human G8 RVA strain designated AU109 isolated in a child with acute gastroenteritis in 1994 was determined in order to understand how the strain was generated including the host species origin of its genes. The genotype constellation of AU109 was G8-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. Phylogenetic analyses of the 11 genome segments revealed that its VP7 and VP1 genes were closely related to those of a Hungarian human G8P[14] RVA strain and these genes shared the most recent common ancestors in 1988 and 1982, respectively. AU109 possessed an NSP2 gene closely related to those of Chinese sheep and goat RVA strains. The remaining eight genome segments were closely related to Japanese human G2P[4] strains which circulated around 1985-1990. Bayesian evolutionary analyses revealed that the NSP2 gene of AU109 and those of the Chinese sheep and goat RVA strains diverged from a common ancestor around 1937. In conclusion, AU109 was generated through genetic reassortment event where Japanese DS-1-like G2P[4] strains circulating around 1985-1990 obtained the VP7, VP1 and NSP2 genes from unknown ruminant G8 RVA strains. These observations highlight the need for comprehensive examination of the whole genomes of RVA strains of less explored host species.

  20. Human milk contains novel glycans that are potential decoy receptors for neonatal rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L; Ashline, David J; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Estes, Mary K; Reinhold, Vernon N; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F

    2014-11-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MS(n) analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MS(n) are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures.

  1. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  2. Full genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a zoonotic human G8P[14] rotavirus strain detected in a sample from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Esona, Mathew D; Lopez, Beatriz; Mencos, Yolanda; Rey-Benito, Gloria; Bowen, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    We report the genomic characterization of a rare human G8P[14] rotavirus strain, identified in a stool sample from Guatemala (GTM) during routine rotavirus surveillance. This strain was designated as RVA/Human-wt/GTM/2009726790/2009/G8P[14], with a genomic constellation of G8-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A13-N2-T6-E2-H3. The VP4 gene occupied lineage VII within the P[14] genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of each genome segment revealed close relatedness to several zoonotic simian, guanaco and bovine strains. Our findings suggest that strain RVA/Human-wt/GTM/2009726790/2009/G8P[14] is an example of a direct zoonotic transmission event. The results of this study reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission and reassortment in generating novel and rare rotavirus strains which infect humans.

  3. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design. PMID:27445802

  4. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design.

  5. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    SciTech Connect

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  6. Efficacy of human rotavirus vaccine against severe gastroenteritis in Malawian children in the first two years of life: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, Nigel A; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey M; Todd, Stacy; Bostock, Nancy J; Turner, Ann M; Chimpeni, Philips; Victor, John C; Steele, A Duncan; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2012-04-27

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among African infants and young children. A phase III, placebo-controlled, multi-centre clinical trial of a live, oral G1P[8] human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) undertaken in Malawi and South Africa significantly reduced the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the first year of life. We now report on vaccine efficacy in the Malawi cohort of children who were followed into the second year of life. A total of 1773 healthy infants were enrolled in Blantyre, Malawi into three groups. Two groups received three doses of RIX4414 or placebo at age 6, 10, and 14 weeks and the third group received placebo at 6 weeks and RIX4414 at age 10 and 14 weeks. Subjects were followed by weekly home visits for episodes of gastroenteritis until 1 year of age, and were then re-consented for further follow-up to 18-24 months of age. Severity of gastroenteritis episodes was graded according to the Vesikari scoring system. Seroconversion for anti-rotavirus IgA was determined on a subset of children by using ELISA on pre- and post-vaccine blood samples. Rotavirus VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotypes were determined by RT-PCR. A total of 70/1030 (6.8%, 95% CI 5.3-8.5) subjects in the pooled (2 dose plus 3 dose) RIX4414 group compared with 53/483 (11.0%, 8.3-14.1) subjects in the placebo group developed severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the entire follow-up period (vaccine efficacy 38.1% (9.8-57.3)). The point estimate of efficacy in the second year of life (17.6%; -59.2 to 56.0) was lower than in the first year of life (49.4%; 19.2-68.3). There were non-significant trends towards a higher efficacy in the second year of life among children who received the three-dose schedule compared with the two-dose schedule, and a higher anti-rotavirus IgA seroresponse rate in the three-dose RIX4414 group. Rotavirus strains detected included genotype G12 (31%); G9 (23%); and G8 (18%); only 18% of strains belonged to the G1P[8

  7. Isolation and characterization of two distinct human rotavirus strains with G6 specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Gerna, G; Sarasini, A; Parea, M; Arista, S; Miranda, P; Brüssow, H; Hoshino, Y; Flores, J

    1992-01-01

    Two new human rotavirus (HRV) strains, PA151 and PA169, with subgroup I specificity and a long RNA pattern, yet with a serotype G (VP7) specificity different from those of any of the six well-established HRV serotypes (G1 to G4, G8, and G9), were isolated 3 months apart from two children with acute gastroenteritis in Sicily, southern Italy, in the winter season of 1987 and 1988. The HRV isolates were adapted to growth in cell cultures and were then characterized by neutralization and RNA-RNA (Northern blot) hybridization. Cross-neutralization studies with type-specific immune sera to RV serotypes 1 to 10 showed the antigenic relatedness of the two strains with serotype 6 bovine strains UK and NCDV. Monoclonal antibodies to VP7 of UK were able to recognize UK and NCDV strains as well as both HRV isolates. Cross-hybridization studies showed a genetic relatedness of PA151 and PA169 to bovine strains for all genes except gene 4. Gene 4 of PA151 appeared to be genetically related to that of AU228 (a human strain of subgroup I and with serotype G3 specificity that belongs to a feline genogroup), whereas gene 4 of PA169 appeared to be unique, yet it was related to gene 4 of two recently reported subgroup I HRV strains, one (PA710) with serotype G3 specificity and the other (HAL1271) with serotype G8 specificity. The new HRV strains must be taken into consideration when deciding strategies for the development of an effective RV vaccine. Images PMID:1370851

  8. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria promote immune homeostasis by modulating innate immune responses to human rotavirus in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Liu, Zhe; Esseili, Malak; Shao, Lulu; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    The effects of co-colonization with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) on 3-dose vaccination with attenuated HRV and challenge with virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) were assessed in 4 groups of gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs: Pro+Vac (probiotic-colonized/vaccinated), Vac (vaccinated), Pro (probiotic-colonized, non-vaccinated) and Control (non-colonized, non-vaccinated). Subsets of pigs were euthanized pre- [post-challenge day (PCD) 0] and post (PCD7)-VirHRV challenge to assess diarrhea, fecal HRV shedding and dendritic cell/innate immune responses. Post-challenge, Pro+Vac and Vac groups were completely protected from diarrhea; protection rates against HRV shedding were 100% and 83%, respectively. Diarrhea and HRV shedding were reduced in Pro compared to Control pigs following VirHRV challenge. Diarrhea scores and virus shedding were significantly higher in Controls, compared to all other groups, coincident with significantly higher serum interferon-alpha levels post-challenge. LGG+Bb12 colonization ±vaccine promoted immunomaturation as reflected by increased frequencies of CD4, SWC3a, CD11R1, MHCII expressing mononuclear cells (MNCs) and conventional dendritic cells in intestinal tissues and blood post-challenge. Colonization decreased frequencies of toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR4 expressing MNCs from vaccinated pigs (Pro+Vac) pre-challenge and increased frequencies of TLR3 expressing MNCs from Pro pigs post-challenge, suggesting that probiotics likely exert anti-inflammatory (TLR2 and 4 down-regulation) and antiviral (TLR3 up-regulation by HRV dsRNA) actions via TLR signaling. Probiotic colonization alone (Pro) increased frequencies of intestinal and systemic apoptotic MNCs pre-challenge, thereby regulating immune hyperreactivity and tolerance. However, these frequencies were decreased in intestinal and systemic tissues post-challenge, moderating HRV-induced apoptosis. Additionally, post-challenge, Pro+Vac and Pro groups had

  9. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria Promote Immune Homeostasis by Modulating Innate Immune Responses to Human Rotavirus in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Liu, Zhe; Esseili, Malak; Shao, Lulu; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of co-colonization with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) on 3-dose vaccination with attenuated HRV and challenge with virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) were assessed in 4 groups of gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs: Pro+Vac (probiotic-colonized/vaccinated), Vac (vaccinated), Pro (probiotic-colonized, non-vaccinated) and Control (non-colonized, non-vaccinated). Subsets of pigs were euthanized pre- [post-challenge day (PCD) 0] and post (PCD7)-VirHRV challenge to assess diarrhea, fecal HRV shedding and dendritic cell/innate immune responses. Post-challenge, Pro+Vac and Vac groups were completely protected from diarrhea; protection rates against HRV shedding were 100% and 83%, respectively. Diarrhea and HRV shedding were reduced in Pro compared to Control pigs following VirHRV challenge. Diarrhea scores and virus shedding were significantly higher in Controls, compared to all other groups, coincident with significantly higher serum interferon-alpha levels post-challenge. LGG+Bb12 colonization ±vaccine promoted immunomaturation as reflected by increased frequencies of CD4, SWC3a, CD11R1, MHCII expressing mononuclear cells (MNCs) and conventional dendritic cells in intestinal tissues and blood post-challenge. Colonization decreased frequencies of toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR4 expressing MNCs from vaccinated pigs (Pro+Vac) pre-challenge and increased frequencies of TLR3 expressing MNCs from Pro pigs post-challenge, suggesting that probiotics likely exert anti-inflammatory (TLR2 and 4 down-regulation) and antiviral (TLR3 up-regulation by HRV dsRNA) actions via TLR signaling. Probiotic colonization alone (Pro) increased frequencies of intestinal and systemic apoptotic MNCs pre-challenge, thereby regulating immune hyperreactivity and tolerance. However, these frequencies were decreased in intestinal and systemic tissues post-challenge, moderating HRV-induced apoptosis. Additionally, post-challenge, Pro+Vac and Pro groups had

  10. IgY antibodies protect against human Rotavirus induced diarrhea in the neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Vega, Celina G; Bok, Marina; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Fernández, Fernando M; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Parreño, Viviana G; Saif, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Group A Rotaviruses are the most common cause of severe, dehydrating diarrhea in children worldwide. The aim of the present work was to evaluate protection against rotavirus (RV) diarrhea conferred by the prophylactic administration of specific IgY antibodies (Ab) to gnotobiotic piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] human rotavirus (HRV). Chicken egg yolk IgY Ab generated from Wa HRV hyperimmunized hens specifically recognized (ELISA) and neutralized Wa HRV in vitro. Supplementation of the RV Ab free cow milk diet with Wa HRV-specific egg yolk IgY Ab at a final ELISA Ab titer of 4096 (virus neutralization -VN- titer = 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against Wa HRV associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. This protection was dose-dependent. The oral administration of semi-purified passive IgY Abs from chickens did not affect the isotype profile of the pig Ab secreting cell (ASC) responses to Wa HRV infection, but it was associated with significantly fewer numbers of HRV-specific IgA ASC in the duodenum. We further analyzed the pigś immune responses to the passive IgY treatment. The oral administration of IgY Abs induced IgG Ab responses to chicken IgY in serum and local IgA and IgG Ab responses to IgY in the intestinal contents of neonatal piglets in a dose dependent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that IgY Abs administered orally as a milk supplement passively protect neonatal pigs against an enteric viral pathogen (HRV). Piglets are an animal model with a gastrointestinal physiology and an immune system that closely mimic human infants. This strategy can be scaled-up to inexpensively produce large amounts of polyclonal IgY Abs from egg yolks to be applied as a preventive and therapeutic passive Ab treatment to control RV diarrhea.

  11. Identification of cross-reactive and serotype 2-specific neutralization epitopes on VP3 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, K; Maloy, W L; Nishikawa, K; Green, K Y; Hoshino, Y; Urasawa, S; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M; Gorziglia, M

    1988-01-01

    The group A rotaviruses are composed of at least seven serotypes. Serotype specificity is defined mainly by an outer capsid protein, VP7. In contrast, the other surface protein, VP3 (775 amino acids), appears to be associated with both serotype-specific and heterotypic immunity. To identify the cross-reactive and serotype-specific neutralization epitopes on VP3 of human rotavirus, we sequenced the VP3 gene of antigenic mutants resistant to each of seven anti-VP3 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs) which exhibited heterotypic or serotype 2-specific reactivity, and we defined three distinct neutralization epitopes on VP3. The mutants sustained single amino acid substitutions at position 305, 392, 433, or 439. Amino acid position 305 was critical to epitope I, whereas amino acid position 433 was critical to epitope III. In contrast, epitope II appeared to be more dependent upon conformation and protein folding because both amino acid positions 392 and 439 appeared to be critical. These four positions clustered in a relatively limited area of VP5, the larger of the two cleavage products of VP3. At the positions where amino acid substitutions occurred, there was a correlation between amino acid sequence homology among different serotypes and the reactivity patterns of various viruses with the N-MAbs used for selection of mutants. A synthetic peptide (amino acids 296 to 313) which included the sequence of epitope I reacted with its corresponding N-MAb, suggesting that the region contains a sequential antigenic determinant. These data may prove useful in current efforts to develop vaccines against human rotavirus infection. PMID:2453680

  12. Whole genomic analysis of bovine group A rotavirus strains A5-10 and A5-13 provides evidence for close evolutionary relationship with human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Pongsuwanna, Yaowapa; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Higo-Moriguchi, Kyoko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-11-15

    Bovine group A rotavirus (RVA) is an important cause of acute diarrhea in calves worldwide. In order to obtain precise information on the origin and evolutionary dynamics of bovine RVA strains, we determined and analyzed the complete nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of six archival bovine RVA strains; four Thai strains (RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A5-10/1988/G8P[1], RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A5-13/1988/G8P[1], RVA/Cow-tc/THA/61A/1989/G10P[5], and RVA/Cow-tc/THA/A44/1989/G10P[11]), one American strain (RVA/Cow-tc/USA/B223/1983/G10P[11]), and one Japanese strain (RVA/Cow-tc/JPN/KK3/1983/G10P[11]). On whole genomic analysis, the 11 gene segments of strains A5-10, A5-13, 61A, A44, B223, and KK3 were found to be considerably genetically diverse, but to share a conserved non-G/P genotype constellation except for the NSP1 gene (I2-R2-C2-M2-(A3/11/13/14)-N2-T6-E2-H3), which is commonly found in RVA strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis revealed that most genes of the six strains were genetically related to bovine and bovine-like strains. Of note is that the VP1, VP3, and NSP2 genes of strains A5-10 and A5-13 exhibited a closer relationship with the cognate genes of human DS-1-like strains than those of other RVA strains. Furthermore, the VP6 genes of strains A5-10 and A5-13 appeared to be equally related to both human DS-1-like and bovine strains. Thus, strains A5-10 and A5-13 were suggested to be derived from the same evolutionary origin as human DS-1-like strains, and were assumed to be examples of bovine RVA strains that provide direct evidence for a close evolutionary relationship between bovine and human DS-1-like strains. Our findings will provide important insights into the origin of bovine RVA strains, and into evolutionary links between bovine and human RVA strains.

  13. Solar and temperature treatments affect the ability of human rotavirus wa to bind to host cells and synthesize viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Romero-Maraccini, Ofelia C; Shisler, Joanna L; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-06-15

    Rotavirus, the leading cause of diarrheal diseases in children under the age of five, is often resistant to conventional wastewater treatment and thus can remain infectious once released into the aquatic environment. Solar and heat treatments can inactivate rotavirus, but it is unknown how these treatments inactivate the virus on a molecular level. To answer this question, our approach was to correlate rotavirus inactivation with the inhibition of portions of the virus life cycle as a means to identify the mechanisms of solar or heat inactivation. Specifically, the integrity of the rotavirus NSP3 gene, virus-host cell interaction, and viral RNA synthesis were examined after heat (57°C) or solar treatment of rotavirus. Only the inhibition of viral RNA synthesis positively correlated with a loss of rotavirus infectivity; 57°C treatment of rotavirus resulted in a decrease of rotavirus RNA synthesis at the same rate as rotavirus infectivity. These data suggest that heat treatment neutralized rotaviruses primarily by targeting viral transcription functions. In contrast, when using solar disinfection, the decrease in RNA synthesis was responsible for approximately one-half of the decrease in infectivity, suggesting that other mechanisms, including posttranslational, contribute to inactivation. Nevertheless, both solar and heat inactivation of rotaviruses disrupted viral RNA synthesis as a mechanism for inactivation.

  14. Solar and Temperature Treatments Affect the Ability of Human Rotavirus Wa To Bind to Host Cells and Synthesize Viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Shisler, Joanna L.

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus, the leading cause of diarrheal diseases in children under the age of five, is often resistant to conventional wastewater treatment and thus can remain infectious once released into the aquatic environment. Solar and heat treatments can inactivate rotavirus, but it is unknown how these treatments inactivate the virus on a molecular level. To answer this question, our approach was to correlate rotavirus inactivation with the inhibition of portions of the virus life cycle as a means to identify the mechanisms of solar or heat inactivation. Specifically, the integrity of the rotavirus NSP3 gene, virus-host cell interaction, and viral RNA synthesis were examined after heat (57°C) or solar treatment of rotavirus. Only the inhibition of viral RNA synthesis positively correlated with a loss of rotavirus infectivity; 57°C treatment of rotavirus resulted in a decrease of rotavirus RNA synthesis at the same rate as rotavirus infectivity. These data suggest that heat treatment neutralized rotaviruses primarily by targeting viral transcription functions. In contrast, when using solar disinfection, the decrease in RNA synthesis was responsible for approximately one-half of the decrease in infectivity, suggesting that other mechanisms, including posttranslational, contribute to inactivation. Nevertheless, both solar and heat inactivation of rotaviruses disrupted viral RNA synthesis as a mechanism for inactivation. PMID:25862222

  15. Rapid detection of human group C rotaviruses by reverse passive hemagglutination and latex agglutination tests using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuya, M; Fujii, R; Hamano, M; Nagabayashi, T; Tsunemitsu, H; Yamada, M; Nii, S; Mori, T

    1993-01-01

    Reverse passive hemagglutination (RPHA) tests and a latex agglutination test with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed for the rapid detection of noncultivatable human group C rotaviruses. For RPHA tests, two MAbs, MAb 5A12 recognizing the outer capsid and MAb 13A3 recognizing the inner capsid, were separately used for the coating of sheep erythrocytes (SRBCs). Forty-six fecal samples were examined to confirm the practicality of the tests. As a result, there was concordance between the RPHA test with SRBCs coated with MAb 5A12 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of viral RNA (RNA-PAGE) in 44 (95.6%) of 46 samples, while the diagnoses by the RPHA test with SRBCs coated with MAb 13A3 were in complete agreement with those by RNA-PAGE. Furthermore, a latex agglutination test with MAb 13A3 was also developed, and this test was fast enough and sensitive enough to successfully detect the viruses from most fecal samples within 2 min. The present procedures would be useful for the diagnosis of human group C rotavirus infections in clinical laboratories which are not well equipped. Images PMID:8388891

  16. Rotavirus Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian rotaviruses are members of the Reoviridae family, which is characterized by virions that contain 10-12 linear double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments. The Reoviridae consists of 15 genera which can be placed into two recognized subfamilies based upon the presence or absence of structural “tur...

  17. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... including a severe allergy to latex. Babies with "severe combined immunodeficiency" (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ... with moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor if ...

  18. Rotavirus P[8] Infections in Persons with Secretor and Nonsecretor Phenotypes, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ayouni, Siwar; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; de Rougemont, Alexis; Estienney, Marie; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge; Hamami, Sabeur; Aouni, Mahjoub; Neji-Guediche, Mohamed; Pothier, Pierre; Belliot, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether rotavirus infections are linked to secretor status, we studied samples from children in Tunisia with gastroenteritis. We phenotyped saliva for human blood group antigens and tested feces for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 32/114 patients. Secretor genotyping showed that P[8] rotavirus infected secretors and nonsecretors, and infection correlated with presence of Lewis antigen.

  19. Aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vestibular system contributes to sympathetic activation by engagement of the otolith organs. However, there is a significant loss of vestibular function with aging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if young and older individuals differ in their cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to otolithic stimulation (ie, head-down rotation, HDR). We hypothesized that responses to otolithic stimulation would be attenuated in older adults because of morphological and physiological alterations that occur in the vestibular system with aging. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and head rotation were measured during HDR in 11 young (26 +/- 1 years) and 11 older (64 +/- 1 years) subjects in the prone posture. Five older subjects performed head rotation (chin to chest) in the lateral decubitus position, which simulates HDR but does not alter afferent inputs from the vestibular system. MSNA responses to HDR were significantly attenuated in older as compared with young subjects (P<0.01). MSNA increased in the older subjects by only 12 +/- 5% as compared with 85 +/- 16% in the young. Furthermore, HDR elicited significant reductions in mean arterial blood pressure in older (Delta-6 +/- 1 mm Hg; P<0.01) but not young subjects (Delta1 +/- 1 mm Hg). In contrast to HDR, head rotation performed in the lateral decubitus position did not elicit hypotension. MSNA responses to baroreceptor unloading and the cold pressor test were not different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans and may contribute to the increased prevalence of orthostatic hypotension with age.

  20. Innate immune responses to human rotavirus in the neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    González, Ana M; Azevedo, Marli S P; Jung, Kwonil; Vlasova, Anastasia; Zhang, Wei; Saif, Linda J

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal and systemic dendritic cell (DC) frequencies, serum and small intestinal content cytokines and uptake/binding of human rotavirus (HRV) virus-like particles (VLP) were studied in HRV acutely infected or mock-inoculated neonatal gnotobiotic piglets. Intestinal, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and splenic plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), conventional DCs (cDCs) and macrophages/monocytes were assessed by flow cytometry. In infected pigs, serum and small intestinal content interferon-α (IFN-α) were highest, interleukin-12 (IL-12) was lower and IL-10, tumour necrosis factor-α and IL-6 were minimal. Compared with mock-inoculated piglets, frequencies of total intestinal DCs were higher; splenic and MLN DC frequencies were lower. Most intestinal pDCs, but few cDCs, were IFN-α(+) and intestinal macrophages/monocytes were negative for IFN-α. Serum IFN-α levels and IFN-α(+) intestinal pDCs were highly correlated, suggesting IFN-α production in vivo by intestinal pDCs (r=0·8; P<0·01). The intestinal pDCs and cDCs, but not intestinal macrophages/monocytes, of HRV-infected piglets showed significantly lower VLP uptake/binding compared with mock-inoculated piglets, suggesting higher activation of pDCs and cDCs in infected piglets. Both intestinal pDCs and cDCs were activated (IFN-α(+) and lower VLP binding) after HRV infection, suggesting their role in induction of HRV-specific immunity. Dose-effects of HRV on serum IFN-α and IFN-α(+) DCs were studied by infecting piglets with 100-fold higher HRV dose. A high dose increased parameters associated with inflammation (diarrhoea, intestinal pathology) but serum IFN-α and IFN-α(+) DCs were similar between both groups. The pDCs have both anti- and pro-inflammatory functions. Stimulation of the anti-inflammatory effects of pDCs after the high dose, without increasing their pro-inflammatory impacts, may be critical to reduce further immunopathology during HRV infection.

  1. The Impact of Socio-Economic Determinants on the Vaccination Rates with Rotavirus and Human Papiloma Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    GRDADOLNIK, Urška; SOČAN, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-economic inequalities may have an impact on the uptake of selfpaid vaccines. The aim of the study was to identify the effect of some socio economic determinants on vaccination rates with self-paid human papilloma virus (HPV) and rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Methods Vaccination coverage data, available in electronic database cepljenje.net (administered by the National Institute of Public Health), were collected at administrative unit level. The socio-economic determinants (the average gross pay in euros, the unemployment rate, the educational and households structure, the population density, the number of inhabitants, the number of children aged from 0 to 4, the number of women aged from 15 to 30) were extracted from Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia web page. The strength of the correlation between socioeconomic variables and self-paid HPV and RV vaccination rates was determined. Results Rotavirus vaccination rates show a slight negative correlation with the number of residents per administrative unit (ρ=−0.29, p=0.04), and no correlation with other socio-economic variables. Likewise, no correlation has been found between HPV vaccination rates and the selected socio-economic variables. Conclusion Ecological study did not reveal any correlations between socio economic variables and vaccination rates with RV and HPV self-paid vaccines on administrative unit level. PMID:27647088

  2. Serologic response to porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV1) in infants vaccinated with the human rotavirus vaccine, Rotarix™: A retrospective laboratory analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Htay Htay; Karkada, Naveen; Jayadeva, Girish; Dubin, Gary

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2010, porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV1) material was unexpectedly detected in the oral live-attenuated human rotavirus (RV) vaccine, Rotarix™ (GSK Vaccines, Belgium). An initial study (NCT01511133) found no immunologic response against PCV1 in 40 vaccinated infants. As a follow-up, the current study (NCT02153333), searched for evidence of post-vaccination serologic response to PCV1 in a larger number of archived serum samples. Unlike the previous study, serum anti-PCV1 antibodies were assessed with an adapted Immuno Peroxidase Monolayer Assay (IPMA) using a Vero-adapted PCV1 strain. Samples from 596 infants who participated in clinical trials of the human RV vaccine were randomly selected and analyzed. The observed anti-PCV1 antibody seropositivity rate 1–2 months post-dose 2 was approximately 1% [90% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.3–2.6] (3/299 samples) in infants who received the human RV vaccine and 0.3% [90% CI: 0.0–1.6] (1/297 samples) in those who received placebo; the difference between the groups was −0.66 [90% CI: −2.16–0.60]. One subject in the vaccinated group was also seropositive before vaccination. Notably, the seropositivity rate observed in vaccinated subjects was below that observed during assay qualification in samples from unvaccinated subjects outside of this study (2.5%; 5/200 samples). No serious adverse events had been reported in any of the 4 subjects providing anti-PCV1 positive samples during the 31-day post-vaccination follow-up period in the original studies. In conclusion, the presence of PCV1 in the human RV vaccine is considered to be a manufacturing quality issue and does not appear to pose a safety risk to vaccinated infants. PMID:27657348

  3. Detection of Porcine Rotavirus Type G9 and of a Mixture of Types G1 and G5 Associated with Wa-Like VP4 Specificity: Evidence for Natural Human-Porcine Genetic Reassortment

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Norma; Lima, Rita C. C.; Nozawa, Carlos M.; Linhares, Rosa E.; Gouvea, Vera

    1999-01-01

    Rotavirus type G5 is a primarily porcine pathogen that has caused frequent and widespread diarrhea in children in Brazil and in piglets elsewhere. Initial results on the rotavirus types circulating in diarrheic piglets in Brazil disclosed a high diversity of strains with distinct G types including G1, G4, G5, and G9 and the novelty of P[8], the predominant human P specificity type. Those results add strong evidence for the emergence of new strains through natural reassortment between rotaviruses of human and porcine origins. PMID:10405435

  4. Isolation, propagation, and characterization of a second equine rotavirus serotype.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Y; Wyatt, R G; Greenberg, H B; Kalica, A R; Flores, J; Kapikian, A Z

    1983-01-01

    A rotavirus designated strain H-2 was isolated in primary African green monkey kidney cells from a foal with diarrhea. This cell culture-adapted strain was found to be similar, if not identical, to simian rotavirus (strains MMU18006 and SA-11) and canine rotavirus (strain CU-1) and, in addition, demonstrated a one-way antigenic relationship with five human rotavirus strains (P, B, no. 14, no. 15, and YO) of the third human rotavirus serotype by the plaque reduction neutralization test. This is the fifth example of an animal rotavirus which shares serotypic specificity with a human rotavirus. The H-2 strain is distinct from the H-1 strain (Y. Hoshino et al., J. Clin. Microbiol., in press) of equine rotavirus not only in serotypic specificity by neutralization but also in subgroup specificity, hemagglutinating activity, and RNA electrophoretic migration pattern, thus establishing the existence of a second equine rotavirus serotype. This H-2 isolate is also distinct by neutralization from three other human rotavirus serotypes, 1 (Wa), 2 (DS-1), and 4 (St. Thomas no. 4), as well as bovine (NCDV), and porcine (OSU) rotaviruses. Images PMID:6309657

  5. Rotavirus genotype distribution during the pre-vaccine period in Bolivia: 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Rosario; Forney, Kristen; Castro, Maria René; Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Mamani, Nataniel; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.; Iñiguez, Volga

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives Rotavirus is the most important etiology of severe diarrhea in Bolivia. The monovalent attenuated human oral rotavirus vaccine Rotarix® was introduced in Bolivia in 2008. We describe the molecular epidemiology of circulating rotavirus strains before vaccine introduction. Methods Two thousand one hundred thirty-five diarrheal samples were collected from hospitals in four Bolivian cities during 2007–2008. Forty-three percent (445 of 1030 rotavirus-positive samples) were analyzed for G and P genotypes. Among those, 331 were electropherotyped by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disease severity was quantified using a modified Vesikari scale. Results Among the 445 samples, five genotypes were found to be prevalent: G9P[8] (33%), G1P[6] (17%), G2P[4] (13%), G9P[6] (12%), and G1P[8] (4%). Co-infections with two or more strains accounted for 14% of samples. The most prevalent strain, G9, showed greater electropherotype diversity compared to other serogroups. Strain G1P[6] generally infected younger children and peaked later in the year than other strains. No particular genotype was associated with a higher severity score, though there was a significant difference in the duration of diarrhea between genotypes. Conclusions During the 2-year pre-vaccine period, substantial diversity of rotavirus co-circulating strains was observed. These data constitute a baseline against which changes in circulating strains post-vaccine introduction can be monitored. PMID:23688547

  6. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  7. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Paim, Francine C; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Fischer, David D; Langel, Stephanie N; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103(+) and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing the rates

  8. Comparison of human rotaviruses isolated in Mexico City and in Santiago, Chile, by electrophoretic migration of their double-stranded ribonucleic acid genome segments.

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, R T; Avendaño, L F; Muñoz, O; Romero, P; Eternod, J G; Lopez, S; Moncaya, J

    1980-01-01

    During the period October to December 1979, rotaviruses were obtained from infants and young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Mexico City and were compared by analysis of the migration of their double-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome segments in gel electrophoresis. Comparison of the results of this analysis and of those of similar studies carried out in 1977 and 1978 showed that the two rotavirus electropherotypes designated 2s and 21 have been continuously present and that the proportion in which these two types have been found in hospitalized patients has varied greatly year to year. The RNAs from rotaviruses 2s and 21 differed in the electrophoretic migraton of at least eight genome segments. However, RNAs from virus assigned to the same electrophoreotypes were not necessarily identical: on the basis of small but significant differences in the migration of segment 7, 8, or 9, isolates of types 2s and 21 could be assigned to two and three different subtypes, respectively. Human rotaviruses obtained in a distant geographical region, Santiago, Chile, in July 1979 had RNA electrophoretic patterns similar to that of electropherotype 21 but different from it in the migration of one or two of the larger RNA segments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6254887

  9. Full Genome Characterization of Novel DS-1-Like G8P[8] Rotavirus Strains that Have Emerged in Thailand: Reassortment of Bovine and Human Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like Intergenogroup Reassortant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Komoto, Satoshi; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Sinchai, Phakapun; Upachai, Sompong; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of unusual DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant rotavirus strains have been recently reported in Asia, Australia, and Europe. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand in 2013–2014, novel DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G8P[8] genotypes (i.e., strains KKL-17, PCB-79, PCB-84, PCB-85, PCB-103, SKT-107, SWL-12, NP-130, PCB-656, SKT-457, SSKT-269, and SSL-55) were identified in stool samples from hospitalized children with severe diarrhea. In this study, we determined and characterized the complete genomes of these 12 strains (seven strains, KKL-17, PCB-79, PCB-84, PCB-85, PCB-103, SKT-107, and SWL-12, found in 2013 (2013 strains), and five, NP-130, PCB-656, SKT-457, SSKT-269, and SSL-55, in 2014 (2014 strains)). On full genomic analysis, all 12 strains showed a unique genotype constellation comprising a mixture of genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G8-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. With the exception of the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the 12 strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) was found to be shared with DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains. On phylogenetic analysis, six of the 11 genes of the 2013 strains (VP4, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains, while the remaining four (VP7, VP6, VP1, and NSP2) and one (NSP4) gene appeared to be of bovine and human origin, respectively. Thus, the 2013 strains appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant, bovine, bovine-like human, and/or human rotaviruses. On the other hand, five of the 11 genes of the 2014 strains (VP4, VP2, VP3, NSP1, and NSP3) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains, while three (VP7, VP1, and NSP2) and one (NSP4) were assumed to be of bovine and human origin, respectively. Notably, the remaining two genes, VP6 and NSP5, of the 2014 strains appeared to have originated from locally

  10. Differential effects of Escherichia coli Nissle and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG on human rotavirus binding, infection, and B cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Fischer, David; Kumar, Anand; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Rauf, Abdul; Shao, Lulu; Langel, Stephanie N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in modulating host-pathogen interactions, but little is known about the impact of commonly used probiotics on human RV (HRV) infection. In this study, we compared the immunomodulatory effects of Gram-positive [Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG)] and Gram-negative [Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN)] probiotic bacteria on virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) infection and immunity using neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets. Gn piglets were colonized with EcN, LGG, EcN+LGG or uncolonized and challenged with VirHRV. Mean peak virus shedding titers and mean cumulative fecal scores were significantly lower in EcN-colonized compared to LGG-colonized or uncolonized piglets. Reduced viral shedding titers were correlated with significantly reduced small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses in EcN-colonized compared to uncolonized piglets post-VirHRV challenge. However the total IgA levels post-VirHRV challenge in the intestine and pre-VirHRV challenge in serum were significantly higher in EcN-colonized than in LGG-colonized piglets. In vitro treatment of mononuclear cells (MNCs) with these probiotics demonstrated that EcN, but not LGG, induced IL-6, IL-10, and IgA, with the latter partially dependent on IL-10. However, addition of exogenous recombinant porcine IL-10 + IL-6 to MNCs co-cultured with LGG significantly enhanced IgA responses. The greater effectiveness of EcN in moderating HRV infection, may also be explained by the binding of EcN, but not LGG to Wa HRV particles or HRV 2/4/6 virus-like particles (VLP) but not 2/6 VLP. Results suggest that EcN and LGG differentially modulate RV infection and B cell responses. PMID:26800875

  11. Study of the Ability of Bifidobacteria of Human Origin to Prevent and Treat Rotavirus Infection Using Colonic Cell and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Darveau, André; Fliss, Ismaïl

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Despite effective vaccines, inexpensive alternatives such as probiotics are needed. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of probiotic candidate Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 to inhibit rotavirus infection. Bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells and interference with viral attachment were evaluated in vitro. B. thermophilum RBL67 displayed adhesion indexes of 625 ± 84 and 1958 ± 318 on Caco-2 and HT-29 cells respectively and was comparable or superior to four other bifidobacteria, including B. longum ATCC 15707 and B. pseudolongum ATCC 25526 strains. Incubation of B. thermophilum RBL67 for 30 min before (exclusion) and simultaneously (competition) with human rotavirus strain Wa decreased virus attachment by 2.0 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0.1 log10 (by 99.0% and 96.8% respectively). Displacement of virus already present was negligible. In CD-1 suckling mice fed B. thermophilum RBL67 challenged with simian rotavirus SA-11, pre-infection feeding with RBL 67 was more effective than post-infection feeding, reducing the duration of diarrhea, limiting epithelial lesions, reducing viral replication in the intestine, accelerating recovery, and stimulating the humoral specific IgG and IgM response, without inducing any adverse effect. B. thermophilum RBL67 had little effect on intestinal IgA titer. These results suggest that humoral immunoglobulin might provide protection against the virus and that B. thermophilum RBL67 has potential as a probiotic able to inhibit rotavirus infection and ultimately reduce its spread. PMID:27727323

  12. Study of the Ability of Bifidobacteria of Human Origin to Prevent and Treat Rotavirus Infection Using Colonic Cell and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Mélanie; Vimont, Allison; Darveau, André; Fliss, Ismaïl; Jean, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Despite effective vaccines, inexpensive alternatives such as probiotics are needed. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of probiotic candidate Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 to inhibit rotavirus infection. Bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells and interference with viral attachment were evaluated in vitro. B. thermophilum RBL67 displayed adhesion indexes of 625 ± 84 and 1958 ± 318 on Caco-2 and HT-29 cells respectively and was comparable or superior to four other bifidobacteria, including B. longum ATCC 15707 and B. pseudolongum ATCC 25526 strains. Incubation of B. thermophilum RBL67 for 30 min before (exclusion) and simultaneously (competition) with human rotavirus strain Wa decreased virus attachment by 2.0 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0.1 log10 (by 99.0% and 96.8% respectively). Displacement of virus already present was negligible. In CD-1 suckling mice fed B. thermophilum RBL67 challenged with simian rotavirus SA-11, pre-infection feeding with RBL 67 was more effective than post-infection feeding, reducing the duration of diarrhea, limiting epithelial lesions, reducing viral replication in the intestine, accelerating recovery, and stimulating the humoral specific IgG and IgM response, without inducing any adverse effect. B. thermophilum RBL67 had little effect on intestinal IgA titer. These results suggest that humoral immunoglobulin might provide protection against the virus and that B. thermophilum RBL67 has potential as a probiotic able to inhibit rotavirus infection and ultimately reduce its spread.

  13. Feline Origin of Rotavirus Strain, Tunisia, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Fredj, Mouna Ben Hadj; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Fodha, Imene; Benhamida-Rebai, Meriam; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    In Tunisia in 2008, an unusual G6P[9] rotavirus, RVA/human-wt/TUN/17237/2008/G6P[9], rarely found in humans, was detected in a child. To determine the origin of this strain, we conducted phylogenetic analyses and found a unique genotype constellation resembling rotaviruses belonging to the feline BA222-like genotype constellation. The strain probably resulted from direct cat-to-human transmission. PMID:23631866

  14. Survey of rotavirus G and P types associated with human gastroenteritis in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1986 to 1992.

    PubMed Central

    Timenetsky, M do C; Santos, N; Gouvea, V

    1994-01-01

    Rotavirus strains causing gastroenteritis in Brazilian children were characterized by PCR-based typing assays. In addition to strains bearing the major human G and P types, large numbers of strains bearing P3 (M37-like), P6 (HCR3-like), untypeable P and G types, and complex mixtures of P and G types not previously recognized were present in the community. PMID:7814514

  15. Spike Protein VP8* of Human Rotavirus Recognizes Histo-Blood Group Antigens in a Type-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pengwei; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Wei, Chao; Wang, Leyi; Morrow, Ardythe

    2012-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs), an important cause of severe diarrhea in children, have been found to recognize sialic acid as receptors for host cell attachment. While a few animal RVs (of P[1], P[2], P[3], and P[7]) are sialidase sensitive, human RVs and the majority of animal RVs are sialidase insensitive. In this study, we demonstrated that the surface spike protein VP8* of the major P genotypes of human RVs interacts with the secretor histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Strains of the P[4] and P[8] genotypes shared reactivity with the common antigens of Lewis b (Leb) and H type 1, while strains of the P[6] genotype bound the H type 1 antigen only. The bindings between recombinant VP8* and human saliva, milk, or synthetic HBGA oligosaccharides were demonstrated, which was confirmed by blockade of the bindings by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to Leb and/or H type 1. In addition, specific binding activities were observed when triple-layered particles of a P[8] (Wa) RV were tested. Our results suggest that the spike protein VP8* of RVs is involved in the recognition of human HBGAs that may function as ligands or receptors for RV attachment to host cells. PMID:22345472

  16. Effectiveness of Monovalent and Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Immergluck, Lilly Cheng; Held, Melissa; Jain, Shabnam; Chan, Trisha; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Khizer, Saadia; Barrett, Carol; Quaye, Osbourne; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Gautam, Rashi; Bowen, Michael D.; Moore, Jessica; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Vázquez, Marietta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous US evaluations have not assessed monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1, a G1P[8] human rotavirus strain) effectiveness, because of its later introduction (2008). Using case-control methodology, we measured the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the 2-dose RV1 and 3-dose pentavalent vaccine (RV5) series against rotavirus disease resulting in hospital emergency department or inpatient care. METHODS: Children were eligible for enrollment if they presented to 1 of 5 hospitals (3 in Georgia, 2 in Connecticut) with diarrhea of ≤10 days’ duration during January through June 2010 or 2011, and were born after RV1 introduction. Stools were collected; immunization records were obtained from providers and state electronic immunization information system (IIS). Case-subjects (children testing rotavirus antigen-positive) were compared with 2 control groups: children testing rotavirus negative and children selected from IIS. RESULTS: Overall, 165 rotavirus-case subjects and 428 rotavirus-negative controls were enrolled. Using the rotavirus-negative controls, RV1 VE was 91% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80 to 95) and RV5 VE was 92% (CI 75 to 97) among children aged ≥8 months. The RV1 VE against G2P[4] disease was high (94%, CI 78 to 98), as was that against G1P[8] disease (89%, CI 70 to 96). RV1 effectiveness was sustained among children aged 12 through 23 months (VE 91%; CI 75 to 96). VE point estimates using IIS controls were similar to those using rotavirus-negative controls. CONCLUSIONS: RV1 and RV5 were both highly effective against severe rotavirus disease. RV1 conferred sustained protection during the first 2 years of life and demonstrated high effectiveness against G2P[4] (heterotypic) disease. PMID:23776114

  17. Substantial Receptor-induced Structural Rearrangement of Rotavirus VP8*: Potential Implications for Cross-Species Infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Mishra, Rahul; Holloway, Gavan; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Rotavirus-cell binding is the essential first step in rotavirus infection. This binding is a major determinant of rotavirus tropism, as host cell invasion is necessary to initiate infection. Initial rotavirus-cell interactions are mediated by carbohydrate-recognizing domain VP8* of the rotavirus capsid spike protein VP4. Here, we report the first observation of significant structural rearrangement of VP8* from human and animal rotavirus strains upon glycan receptor binding. The structural adaptability of rotavirus VP8* delivers important insights into how human and animal rotaviruses utilize the wider range of cellular glycans identified as VP8* binding partners. Furthermore, our studies on rotaviruses with atypical genetic makeup provide information expected to be critical for understanding the mechanisms of animal rotavirus gene emergence in humans and support implementation of epidemiologic surveillance of animal reservoirs as well as future vaccination schemes.

  18. Molecular Characterization of G11P[25] and G3P[3] Human Rotavirus Strains Associated With Asymptomatic Infection in South India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indrani; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Rajendran, Priya; Primrose, Beryl; Ramani, Sasirekha; Gray, James J.; Brown, David W.; Kang, Gagandeep

    2008-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the major etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Two unusual rotavirus strains not previously reported in India, G11P[25] (CRI 10795) and G3P[3] (CRI 33594) were isolated from faecal samples of asymptomatic children in India. The strains were characterized by sequence analysis of the genes encoding the VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4. The G11P[25] strain was closely related to the human G11P[25] strains from Bangladesh (with 98% identity at the nucleotide [nt] level and the amino acid [aa] level for the VP7 gene and 96% identity at the nt and 98% at the aa level for the VP4 gene). The G3P[3] strain was found to be related to a G3P[3] strain isolated in Thailand (CMH222; 88% identity at the nt level and 97% at aa level for the VP7 gene and 84% identity at the nt level and 90% at the aa level for the VP4 gene). Phylogenetic analysis of the VP6 and the NSP4 genes revealed that the Vellore G11P[25] strain was of VP6 subgroup II and NSP4 genotype B. The G3P[3] strain was identified as NSP4 genotype C and the VP6 gene showed 97% identity at the deduced amino acid level with strain CMH222 (Thailand) strain but did not cluster with sequences of SGI, SGII, SGI+II or SG-nonI/nonII. Both strains had gene segments of animal rotavirus origin suggesting inter-species transmission of rotavirus, and in the case of G11P[25] possibly underwent reassortment subsequently with human strains resulting in an animal-human hybrid strain. PMID:17854037

  19. Cultivation and characterization of novel human group A rotaviruses with long RNA electropherotypes, subgroup II specificities, and serotype 2 VP7 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bingnan, F; Unicomb, L E; Tu, G L; Ali, A; Malek, A; Rahim, Z; Tzipori, S

    1991-01-01

    During an epidemiological study of human rotavirus infections in Bangladesh, three group A strains hybridized with a serotype 2 oligonucleotide probe, but they had long RNA electropherotypes. The three strains were collected from 8- to 20-month-old infants with acute diarrhea and moderate malnutrition. By a modified isolation procedure, two strains (T-B and T-C) were adapted in MA104 cell cultures. They were identified to be subgroup II specific by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with subgroup I- and II-specific monoclonal antibodies and were identified by a fluorescent focus reduction neutralization assay with hyperimmune antisera to be serotype 2 specific. Further characterization of these unusual rotavirus strains needs to be carried out. Images PMID:1658036

  20. Seasonal shifts of group A rotavirus strains as a possible mechanism of persistence in the human population.

    PubMed

    Parra, Gabriel I

    2009-03-01

    This article demonstrates how the seasonal predominance of a new rotavirus strain in Asuncion, Paraguay is correlated with a wide spectrum of age groups of children infected in that given season. Therefore, this study provides new evidence to support the idea that seasonal shift of rotavirus strains is a possible mechanism used by the virus to evade herd immunity (acquired by the population due to previous infections) and, thus, ultimately persist in that population.

  1. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Thaís Aparecida Vieira; Assis, Andrêssa Silvino Ferreira; do Valle, Daniel Almeida; Barletta, Vívian Honorato; de Carvalho, Iná Pires; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; da Rosa e Silva, Maria Luzia

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus species F (HAdV-F) type 40 and 41 are commonly associated with acute diarrheal disease (ADD) across the world. Despite being the largest state in southeastern Brazil and having the second largest number of inhabitants, there is no information in the State of Minas Gerais regarding the role of HAdV-F in the etiology of ADD. This study was performed to determine the prevalence, to verify the epidemiological aspects of infection, and to characterize the strains of human adenoviruses (HAdV) detected. A total of 377 diarrheal fecal samples were obtained between January 2007 and August 2011 from inpatient and outpatient children of age ranging from 0 to 12 years. All samples were previously tested for rotavirus, norovirus, and astrovirus, and 314 of 377 were negative. The viral DNA was extracted, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the HAdV-positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Chi-square test (p < 0.05), considering two conditions: the total of samples tested (377) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (314). The overall prevalence of HAdV was 12.47% (47/377); and in 76.60% (36/47) of the positive samples, this virus was the only infectious agent detected. The phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of 32 positive samples revealed that they all clustered with the HAdV-F type 41. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the onset of the HAdV infection and the origin of the samples (inpatients or outpatients) in the two conditions tested: the total of samples tested (p = 0.598) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (p = 0.614). There was a significant association in the occurrence of infection in children aged 0–12 months for the condition 1 (p = 0.030) as well as condition 2 (p = 0.019). The occurrence of infections due to HAdV did not coincide with a pattern of seasonal

  2. Emergence of human G2P[4] rotaviruses containing animal derived gene segments in the post-vaccine era

    PubMed Central

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nuyts, Valerie; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Coster, Sarah; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Rotarix into the Belgian immunization program in June 2006 coincided with an increase of the relative prevalence of G2P[4] strains. However, the genetic composition of these persistent G2P[4] strains has not been investigated. Therefore, we have investigated the NSP4 gene of 89 Belgian G2P[4] strains detected between 1999 and 2013, covering both pre- and post-vaccination periods. The NSP4 genes were divided over seven separate clusters of which six were more closely related to animal than to human strains. The NSP4 genes that clustered more closely to animal DS-1-like strains were isolated after 2004–2005 and were found throughout multiple seasons. Complete genome sequencing of 28 strains identified several other gene segments that clustered more closely to animal than to human DS-1-like strains. These findings suggest that frequent interspecies reassortments may have played a role in the spread of G2P[4] rotaviruses in the post-vaccination period in Belgium. PMID:27841357

  3. Molecular characterization of OP354-like P[8] (P[8]b subtype) human rotaviruses A species isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, Mitsutaka; Fujii, Ritsushi; Hamano, Masako; Kida, Kouji; Kanadani, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Keiko; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    OP354-like P[8] (P[8]b subtype) species A rotaviruses (RVAs) were isolated first time in Japan during a RVA survey in Okayama Prefecture between 2006 and 2009. Two of 236 RVA-positive samples were identified as G1P[8]b by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. P[8]b strains (RVA/human-wt/JPN/OH1998/2008/G1P[8]b and RVA/human-wt/JPN/OH2024/2008/G1P[8]b) were isolated only in May, 2008 and both patients infected with P[8]b viruses lived in the same city, suggesting that the prevalence of P[8]b RVAs is limited considerably in Okayama Prefecture. Molecular analysis of four genes (VP4, VP6, VP7, and NSP4 genes) of Japanese P[8]b strains revealed that the VP4 genes of these strains were related closely to those of Southeast Asian and Indian P[8]b strains. In contrast, the VP6, VP7, and NSP4 genes of Japanese P[8]b strains were highly homologous to G1P[8]a strains prevalent in the same area. These results suggest that the Japanese P[8]b strain may be a result of reassortment events between Japanese G1P[8]a viruses and unidentified Asian viruses possessing the P[8]b VP4 gene.

  4. Skin Vaccination against Rotavirus Using Microneedles: Proof of Concept in Gnotobiotic Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhuan; Vlasova, Anastasia; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Saif, Linda J.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have lower efficacy in low income countries, and additionally are associated with a rare but severe adverse event, intussusception. We have been pursuing the development of an inactivated rotavirus vaccine (IRV) using the human rotavirus strain CDC-9 (G1P[8]) through parenteral immunization and previously demonstrated dose sparing and enhanced immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) unadjuvanted IRV using a coated microneedle patch in comparison with intramuscular (IM) administration in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response and protection against RV infection and diarrhea conferred by the administration of the ID unadjuvanted IRV using the microneedle device MicronJet600® in neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets challenged with virulent Wa G1P[8] human RV. Three doses of 5 μg IRV when administered intradermally and 5 μg IRV formulated with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3] when administered intramuscularly induced comparable rotavirus-specific antibody titers of IgA, IgG, IgG avidity index and neutralizing activity in sera of neonatal piglets. Both IRV vaccination regimens protected against RV antigen shedding in stools, and reduced the cumulative diarrhea scores in the piglets. This study demonstrated that the ID and IM administrations of IRV are immunogenic and protective against RV-induced diarrhea in neonatal piglets. Our findings highlight the potential value of an adjuvant sparing effect of the IRV ID delivery route. PMID:27824918

  5. Skin Vaccination against Rotavirus Using Microneedles: Proof of Concept in Gnotobiotic Piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhuan; Vlasova, Anastasia; Velasquez, Daniel E; Saif, Linda J; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have lower efficacy in low income countries, and additionally are associated with a rare but severe adverse event, intussusception. We have been pursuing the development of an inactivated rotavirus vaccine (IRV) using the human rotavirus strain CDC-9 (G1P[8]) through parenteral immunization and previously demonstrated dose sparing and enhanced immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) unadjuvanted IRV using a coated microneedle patch in comparison with intramuscular (IM) administration in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response and protection against RV infection and diarrhea conferred by the administration of the ID unadjuvanted IRV using the microneedle device MicronJet600® in neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets challenged with virulent Wa G1P[8] human RV. Three doses of 5 μg IRV when administered intradermally and 5 μg IRV formulated with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3] when administered intramuscularly induced comparable rotavirus-specific antibody titers of IgA, IgG, IgG avidity index and neutralizing activity in sera of neonatal piglets. Both IRV vaccination regimens protected against RV antigen shedding in stools, and reduced the cumulative diarrhea scores in the piglets. This study demonstrated that the ID and IM administrations of IRV are immunogenic and protective against RV-induced diarrhea in neonatal piglets. Our findings highlight the potential value of an adjuvant sparing effect of the IRV ID delivery route.

  6. Genomic characterization of uncommon human G3P[6] rotavirus strains causing diarrhea in children in Italy in 2009.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2015-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in young children, causing up to 450,000 deaths worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Most of RVA human infections in developed countries are related to five major G/P combinations: G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8]. During the surveillance activity of RotaNet-Italy, three uncommon G3P[6] RVA strains, designated as RVA/Human-wt/ITA/NA01/2009/G3P[6], RVA/Human-wt/ITA/NA06/2009/G3P[6], and RVA/Human-wt/ITA/NA19/2009/G3P[6], were identified in the stools of children with diarrhea hospitalized in Southern Italy in 2009. Samples NA01, NA06 and NA19 were characterized as genotype G3P[6]. To investigate the three strains further, partial sequencing of the eleven genomic segments was performed. RVA strains NA01, NA06 and NA19 were found to share the rare genotype constellation: G3-P[6]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, which had not been reported previously in continental Italy. The phylogenetic analysis of the eleven genomic segments showed no evidence of zoonosis or inter-species reassortment at the origin of the Italian G3P[6] strains, indicating that they possessed DS-1-like genomic constellations similar to those detected previously in human cases in Africa and Europe. The analysis of the hypervariable regions of VP7 and VP4 (VP8*) revealed high amino acid identity between the Italian G3P[6] RVA strains involved in this study.

  7. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  8. Relevance of secretor status genotype and microbiota composition in susceptibility to rotavirus and norovirus infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; García-Mantrana, Izaskun; Vila-Vicent, Susana; Gozalbo-Rovira, Roberto; Buesa, Javier; Monedero, Vicente; Collado, Maria Carmen

    2017-03-30

    Host genetic factors, such as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), are associated with susceptibility to norovirus (NoV) and rotavirus (RV) infections. Recent advances point to the gut microbiome as a key player necessary for a viral pathogen to cause infection. In vitro NoV attachment to host cells and resulting infections have been linked to interactions with certain bacterial types in the gut microbiota. We investigated the relationship between host genotype, gut microbiota, and viral infections. Saliva and fecal samples from 35 adult volunteers were analysed for secretor status genotype, the gut microbiota composition by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and salivary IgA titers to NoV and RV. Higher levels of IgA against NoV and RV were related to secretor-positive status. No significant differences were found between the FUT2 genotype groups, although the multivariate analysis showed a significant impact of host genotype on specific viral susceptibilities in the microbiome composition. A specific link was found between the abundance of certain bacterial groups, such as Faecalibacterium and Ruminococcus spp., and lower IgA titers against NoV and RV. As a conclusion, we can state that there is a link between host genetics, gut microbiota, and susceptibility to viral infections in humans.

  9. High protective efficacy of rice bran against human rotavirus diarrhea via enhancing probiotic growth, gut barrier function, and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Twitchell, Erica; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Kocher, Jacob; Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Yuan, Lijuan

    2015-10-13

    Previously, we showed that rice bran (RB) was able to reduce human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Here, we investigated its effect on the growth of diarrhea-reducing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN), and the resulting effects on HRV diarrhea, gut epithelial health, permeability and innate immune responses during virulent HRV challenge. On 3, 5, and 7 days of age pigs were inoculated with 2 × 10(4) colony-forming-units LGG+EcN to initiate colonization. Daily RB supplementation (replacing 10% calorie intake) was started at 5 days of age and continued until euthanasia. A subset of pigs in each group was challenged orally with 10(5) focus-forming-units of virulent HRV at 33 days of age. RB completely prevented HRV diarrhea in LGG+EcN colonized pigs. RB significantly promoted the growth of both probiotic strains in the gut (~5 logs) and increased the body-weight-gain at 4-5 weeks of age compared to non-RB group. After HRV challenge, RB-fed pigs had significantly lower ileal mitotic index and villus width, and significantly increased intestinal IFN-γ and total IgA levels compared to non-RB group. Therefore, RB plus LGG+EcN colonization may represent a highly effective therapeutic approach against HRV and potentially a variety of other diarrhea-inducing enteric pathogens.

  10. Relevance of secretor status genotype and microbiota composition in susceptibility to rotavirus and norovirus infections in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; García-Mantrana, Izaskun; Vila-Vicent, Susana; Gozalbo-Rovira, Roberto; Buesa, Javier; Monedero, Vicente; Collado, Maria Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Host genetic factors, such as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), are associated with susceptibility to norovirus (NoV) and rotavirus (RV) infections. Recent advances point to the gut microbiome as a key player necessary for a viral pathogen to cause infection. In vitro NoV attachment to host cells and resulting infections have been linked to interactions with certain bacterial types in the gut microbiota. We investigated the relationship between host genotype, gut microbiota, and viral infections. Saliva and fecal samples from 35 adult volunteers were analysed for secretor status genotype, the gut microbiota composition by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and salivary IgA titers to NoV and RV. Higher levels of IgA against NoV and RV were related to secretor-positive status. No significant differences were found between the FUT2 genotype groups, although the multivariate analysis showed a significant impact of host genotype on specific viral susceptibilities in the microbiome composition. A specific link was found between the abundance of certain bacterial groups, such as Faecalibacterium and Ruminococcus spp., and lower IgA titers against NoV and RV. As a conclusion, we can state that there is a link between host genetics, gut microbiota, and susceptibility to viral infections in humans. PMID:28358023

  11. High protective efficacy of rice bran against human rotavirus diarrhea via enhancing probiotic growth, gut barrier function, and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingdong; Twitchell, Erica; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Kocher, Jacob; Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Yuan, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that rice bran (RB) was able to reduce human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Here, we investigated its effect on the growth of diarrhea-reducing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN), and the resulting effects on HRV diarrhea, gut epithelial health, permeability and innate immune responses during virulent HRV challenge. On 3, 5, and 7 days of age pigs were inoculated with 2 × 104 colony-forming-units LGG+EcN to initiate colonization. Daily RB supplementation (replacing 10% calorie intake) was started at 5 days of age and continued until euthanasia. A subset of pigs in each group was challenged orally with 105 focus-forming-units of virulent HRV at 33 days of age. RB completely prevented HRV diarrhea in LGG+EcN colonized pigs. RB significantly promoted the growth of both probiotic strains in the gut (~5 logs) and increased the body-weight-gain at 4–5 weeks of age compared to non-RB group. After HRV challenge, RB-fed pigs had significantly lower ileal mitotic index and villus width, and significantly increased intestinal IFN-γ and total IgA levels compared to non-RB group. Therefore, RB plus LGG+EcN colonization may represent a highly effective therapeutic approach against HRV and potentially a variety of other diarrhea-inducing enteric pathogens. PMID:26459937

  12. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 protects gnotobiotic pigs against human rotavirus by modulating pDC and NK-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Shao, Lulu; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Fischer, David D; Rauf, Abdul; Langel, Stephanie N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Kumar, Anand; Huang, Huang-Chi; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2016-10-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a gram-positive lactic acid bacterium, is one of the most widely used probiotics; while fewer gram-negative probiotics including Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) are characterized. A mechanistic understanding of their individual and interactive effects on human rotavirus (HRV) and immunity is lacking. In this study, noncolonized, EcN-, LGG-, and EcN + LGG-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs were challenged with HRV. EcN colonization is associated with a greater protection against HRV, and induces the highest frequencies of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), significantly increased NK-cell function and decreased frequencies of apoptotic and TLR4(+) mononuclear cells (MNCs). Consistent with the highest NK-cell activity, splenic CD172(+) MNCs (DC enriched fraction) of EcN-colonized pigs produced the highest levels of IL-12 in vitro. LGG colonization has little effect on the above parameters, which are intermediate in EcN + LGG-colonized pigs, suggesting that probiotics modulate each other's effects. Additionally, in vitro EcN-treated splenic or intestinal MNCs produce higher levels of innate, immunoregulatory and immunostimulatory cytokines, IFN-α, IL-12, and IL-10, compared to MNCs of pigs treated with LGG. These results indicate that the EcN-mediated greater protection against HRV is associated with potent stimulation of the innate immune system and activation of the DC-IL-12-NK immune axis.

  13. Detection and characterization of a human G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiji P; Kaida, Atsushi; Ono, Atsushi; Kubo, Hideyuki; Iritani, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    In a surveillance system in Osaka City, Japan, 48 sporadic rotavirus A (RVA) infections were detected during 2008/2009-2011/2012 seasons. The G/P-genotypes of detected RVAs were G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G9P[4], and G9P[8]. Although G9P[4] is a rare genotype that had not been reported in Japan, it was the second most prevalent genotype, following G1P[8], and accounted for 35.3% of RVA cases in the 2011/2012 season. Further genotyping revealed that the G9P[4] strain had genotype 2 internal protein genes except for NSP3: G9-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T1-E2-H2. Among detected RVA strains, G9P[4] and some G9P[8] strains shared high nucleotide identity in VP7 and NSP3 genes. Phylogenetic and BLAST search analyses showed that the G9P[4] strain in Japan shared high nucleotide identity in genotype 2 genes with common G2P[4] strains circulating globally, but was distinct from other G9P[4] strains circulating worldwide. These results suggest that the G9P[4] strain in Japan may have emerged through an independent reassortment between G9P[8] and G2P[4]. Finally, the role of NSP3 protein in the circulating RVA from an amino acid comparison between T1- and T2-type NSP3 is discussed. These findings provide an important insight into less problematic combinations of circulating RVA genes derived from different genotypes.

  14. Rotavirus Stimulates Release of Serotonin (5-HT) from Human Enterochromaffin Cells and Activates Brain Structures Involved in Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Engblom, David; Karlsson, Thommie; Rodriguez-Diaz, Jesus; Buesa, Javier; Taylor, John A.; Loitto, Vesa-Matti; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Ahlman, Håkan; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children. A virus-encoded enterotoxin, NSP4 is proposed to play a major role in causing RV diarrhoea but how RV can induce emesis, a hallmark of the illness, remains unresolved. In this study we have addressed the hypothesis that RV-induced secretion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) by enterochromaffin (EC) cells plays a key role in the emetic reflex during RV infection resulting in activation of vagal afferent nerves connected to nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and area postrema in the brain stem, structures associated with nausea and vomiting. Our experiments revealed that RV can infect and replicate in human EC tumor cells ex vivo and in vitro and are localized to both EC cells and infected enterocytes in the close vicinity of EC cells in the jejunum of infected mice. Purified NSP4, but not purified virus particles, evoked release of 5-HT within 60 minutes and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a human midgut carcinoid EC cell line (GOT1) and ex vivo in human primary carcinoid EC cells concomitant with the release of 5-HT. Furthermore, NSP4 stimulated a modest production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), but not of cAMP. RV infection in mice induced Fos expression in the NTS, as seen in animals which vomit after administration of chemotherapeutic drugs. The demonstration that RV can stimulate EC cells leads us to propose that RV disease includes participation of 5-HT, EC cells, the enteric nervous system and activation of vagal afferent nerves to brain structures associated with nausea and vomiting. This hypothesis is supported by treating vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. PMID:21779163

  15. Molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses in India.

    PubMed

    Broor, Shobha; Ghosh, Dhrubaa; Mathur, Purva

    2003-08-01

    Rotaviruses cause an estimated 140 million cases of gastroenteritis and 800,000 deaths in children between the ages of 6 months to 2 yr in developing countries. In India, one of every 250 children or about 100-150,000 children die of rotavirus diarrhoea each year. The prevalence of rotavirus diarrhoea in India has been found to vary from 5-71 per cent in hospitalized children <5 yr of age with acute gastroenteritis. The seasonal variation of rotavirus diarrhoea in India varies in different geographical regions with high incidence in winter months at low relative humidity in north India. The distinctive features of rotavirus infection in India include the occurrence of severe disease at an early age and common neonatal rotavirus infections which are often asymptomatic. Rotavirus shows genetic and antigenic diversity in terms of subgroup, electropherotypes and G and P serotypes/genotypes. There are a few studies in terms of prevalence of different antigenic and genetic variants from various regions of India. In most studies on subgroup distribution from India a higher prevalence of subgroup II was reported compared to subgroup I. Electropherotyping has also demonstrated that a number of multiple electropherotypes co-circulate at one time in a particular community leading to extensive genomic variation and the appearance of new strains which may become the predominant electropherotype during the peak season. The most common G types reported from India are G1 and G2 and P types are P[4] and P[8]. A significant number of children also have mixed rotavirus infections. G9 strains are also quite commonly seen in Indian children. In addition P6 strains of probable bovine origin have been reported from India. A novel neonatal strain P type 11 human rotavirus (116 E) was isolated from neonates in Delhi, the VP4 of which was closely related to the bovine serotype G10P[11] strain B223 and VP7 was closely related to the human serotype G9 strain. Another neonatal strain G10P[11

  16. Attenuation Coefficient Estimation of the Healthy Human Thyroid In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, J.; Cueva, T.; Portal, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Lavarello, R.

    Previous studies have demonstrated that attenuation coefficients can be useful towards characterizing thyroid tissues. In this work, ultrasonic attenuation coefficients were estimated from healthy human thyroids in vivo using a clinical scanner. The selected subjects were five young, healthy volunteers (age: 26 ± 6 years old, gender: three females, two males) with no reported history of thyroid diseases, no palpable thyroid nodules, no smoking habits, and body mass index less than 30 kg/m2. Echographic examinations were conducted by a trained sonographer using a SonixTouch system (Ultrasonix Medical Corporation, Richmond, BC) equipped with an L14-5 linear transducer array (nominal center frequency of 10 MHz, transducer footprint of 3.8 cm). Radiofrequency data corresponding to the collected echographic images in both transverse and longitudinal views were digitized at a sampling rate of 40 MHz and processed with Matlab codes (MathWorks, Natick, MA) to estimate attenuation coefficients using the spectral log difference method. The estimation was performed using an analysis bandwidth spanning from 4.0 to 9.0 MHz. The average value of the estimated ultrasonic attenuation coefficients was equal to 1.34 ± 0.15 dB/(cm.MHz). The standard deviation of the estimated average attenuation coefficient across different volunteers suggests a non-negligible inter-subject variability in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of the human thyroid.

  17. Molecular characterization of the NSP4 gene of human group A rotavirus strains circulating in Tunisia from 2006 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Ben Hadj Fredj, Mouna; Zeller, Mark; Fodha, Imene; Heylen, Elisabeth; Chouikha, Anissa; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Trabelsi, Abdelhalim

    2012-07-01

    Non-structural protein 4 (NSP4), encoded by group A rotavirus (RVA) genome segment 10, is a multifunctional protein and the first recognized virus-encoded enterotoxin. Recently, a new classification system for RVAs was proposed and a total of 14 NSP4 genotypes (E1-E14) are currently described. The most common NSP4 genotypes in humans are Wa-like E1 and DS-1-like E2. This report represents the first investigation on the genetic diversity of RVA NSP4 genes in Tunisia from 2006 to 2008. In the present study, the NSP4-encoding genes of human RVA strains with different G/P-genotype combinations were analyzed. NSP4 genes of 261 RVA-positive fecal samples were analyzed using a semi-nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in addition the NSP4 gene of 46 representative RVA strains were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the Tunisian NSP4 nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of two NSP4 genotypes. Genotype E1 was found to be associated with G1P[8], G3P[6], G3P[8], G4P[6] and G4P[8], whereas genotype E2 was associated with G2P[4], G2P[6] and G6P[9] samples. These results support the hypothesis that P[8] carrying RVA strains usually possess the E1 genotype, whereas P[4] carrying RVA strains usually possess the E2 genotype. P[6] carrying strains were found with both E1 and E2. The unusual G6P[9] strains possessed a E2 genotype with a possible animal origin. These results underline the need for further investigations to assess the validity of NSP4 as a suitable target for epidemiologic surveillance of RVA infections and vaccine development.

  18. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  19. Effectiveness of the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine produced by a domestic manufacturer in China studied using a population-based case-control design.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shan-Shan; Li, Yue; Wang, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-10-01

    A universal rotavirus (RV) immunization program is a potentially cost-effective measure for preventing RV infection in China. However, the efficacy of the only licensed RV vaccine (Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine, LLR), which is made by a domestic manufacturer, has not been proven by a properly designed clinical trial. In October 2011 to March 2012, to measure the potential protection provided by LLR, a case-control study nested in a population-based active diarrhea surveillance study of children <5 years of age was conducted in rural Zhengding county. During the study period, 308 episodes of diarrhea were identified as being caused by RV infection, resulting in an incidence rate of 48.0/1000 people/year. The predominant RV serotype was G3 (61.5%), followed by G1 (15.2%), and G9 (6.5%). Overall, a protection of 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0%-52.0%) was identified, and higher protection was found among moderate RV gastroenteritis cases caused by the serotype G3 (52.0% 95% CI: 2.0%-76.1%). A concurrently conducted case-control study comparing non-RV viral diarrheal cases with non-diarrheal controls in the same population found that the RV vaccine offered no protection against non-RV diarrhea. Even under a less ideal immunization schedule, the oral LLR conferred a certain level of protection against RV gastroenteritis. However, further studies are needed to understand the full characteristics of the LLR, including its efficacy when administered following the optimal regimen, the potential risk of inducing intussusception, and the direct and indirect protective effects of LLR.

  20. Rotavirus epidemiology: the Asian Rotavirus Surveillance Network.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E A S; Bresee, J S; Parashar, U D; Widdowson, M-A; Glass, R I

    2008-06-19

    Availability of new rotavirus vaccines has highlighted the need to collect local disease and economic burden data to aid decision makers at global, regional and country level. The World Health Organization and the GAVI Alliance recommended that generic protocols be used and that regional surveillance networks be established to collect these data, thereby helping to fast-track the introduction of these new vaccines into developing countries. Nine countries and regions participated in the first phase of the Asian Rotavirus Surveillance Network (ARSN), which collected data over a 2-year period during 2001-2003. Overall 45% of diarrhoea admissions in the region were positive for rotavirus, which was higher than had been anticipated. Significant rotavirus strain diversity was noted during the surveillance period. Data collection for a second phase of the ARSN commenced in 2004 and included a greater proportion of poorer countries that would in future be eligible for funding support for rotavirus immunization from GAVI. Limited economic evaluations in Asia have demonstrated the potential for new rotavirus vaccines to be cost-effective but more local analyses are required. Despite the ARSN's comprehensive data from a mix of developed and developing countries, Asia has lagged the Americas in terms of the introduction of rotavirus vaccines into National Immunization Programmes (NIPs). Lack on rotavirus vaccine efficacy data in Asia, particularly in poorer populations, will have contributed to this delay. Thus ensuring that all global regions are simultaneously involved in the evaluation of new vaccines from the beginning and also encouraging more regional collaborations of Ministry of Health representatives could help to accelerate the introduction of new vaccines into NIPs.

  1. Clinical trials of live oral rotavirus vaccines: the Finnish experience.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, T

    1993-01-01

    Live oral candidate rotavirus vaccines of bovine (RIT 4237) or rhesus (RRV-1) origin and reassortants of RRV-1 expressing human serotype 1 (DxRRV) or serotype 2 (DS1xRRV) VP7 protein were evaluated for clinical efficacy in young children in successive trials from 1983 to 1989. In each study, the vaccinations were given before a rotavirus epidemic season and the follow-up of vaccinees covered two rotavirus epidemic seasons lasting up to 2-3 years of age. Serotype 1 rotavirus was predominant in each season. Protection rates against all rotavirus-associated diarrhoea ranged from 0 to 67% but were higher, up to 100%, against more severe rotavirus disease. All tested vaccines also showed efficacy for diarrhoea not apparently associated with rotavirus; therefore the clinical benefit of the vaccinations was greater than could be deduced from efficacy rates for rotavirus-associated diarrhoea alone. Each of the candidate vaccines could significantly reduce severe diarrhoea in Finnish children in the first 2 to 3 years of life. For optimal efficacy, the vaccines should be administered in the autumn before the regular epidemic season of rotavirus.

  2. Diversity of the G3 genes of human rotaviruses in isolates from Spain from 2004 to 2006: cross-species transmission and inter-genotype recombination generates alleles.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Román, Angela; Rodriguez, Miriam; Cervera, Isabel; Head, Jacqueline; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Picazo, Juan J

    2009-04-01

    Rotavirus evolves by using multiple genetic mechanisms which are an accumulation of spontaneous point mutations and reassortment events. Other mechanisms, such as cross-species transmission and inter-genotype recombination, may be also involved. One of the most interesting genotypes in the accumulation of these events is the G3 genotype. In this work, six new Spanish G3 sequences belonging to 0-2-year-old patients from Madrid were analysed and compared with 160 others of the same genotype obtained from humans and other host species to establish the evolutionary pathways of the G3 genotype. The following results were obtained: (i) there are four different lineages of the G3 genotype which have evolved in different species; (ii) Spanish G3 rotavirus sequences are most similar to the described sequences that belong to lineage I; (iii) several G3 genotype alleles were reassigned as other G genotypes; and (iv) inter-genotype recombination events in G3 viruses involving G1 and G2 were described. These findings strongly suggest multiple inter-species transmission events between different non-human mammalian species and humans.

  3. Modeling rotavirus infection and antiviral therapy using primary intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuebang; Bijvelds, Marcel; Dang, Wen; Xu, Lei; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Knipping, Karen; Tuysuz, Nesrin; Dekkers, Johanna F; Wang, Yijin; de Jonge, Jeroen; Sprengers, Dave; van der Laan, Luc J W; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Ten Berge, Derk; Metselaar, Herold J; de Jonge, Hugo; Koopmans, Marion P G; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-11-01

    Despite the introduction of oral vaccines, rotavirus still kills over 450,000 children under five years of age annually. The absence of specific treatment prompts research aiming at further understanding of pathogenesis and the development of effective antiviral therapy, which in turn requires advanced experimental models. Given the intrinsic limitations of the classical rotavirus models using immortalized cell lines infected with laboratory-adapted strains in two dimensional cultures, our study aimed to model infection and antiviral therapy of both experimental and patient-derived rotavirus strains using three dimensional cultures of primary intestinal organoids. Intestinal epithelial organoids were successfully cultured from mouse or human gut tissues. These organoids recapitulate essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture, and are susceptible to rotavirus. Human organoids are more permissive to rotavirus infection, displaying an over 10,000-fold increase in genomic RNA following 24h of viral replication. Furthermore, infected organoids are capable of producing infectious rotavirus particles. Treatment of interferon-alpha or ribavirin inhibited viral replication in organoids of both species. Importantly, human organoids efficiently support the infection of patient-derived rotavirus strains and can be potentially harnessed for personalized evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral medications. Therefore, organoids provide a robust model system for studying rotavirus-host interactions and assessing antiviral medications.

  4. Multi-reassortant G3P[3] group A rotavirus in a horseshoe bat in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michihito; Orba, Yasuko; Sasaki, Satoko; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Ishii, Akihiro; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Ito, Kimihito; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2016-10-01

    Group A rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhoea in humans, especially in young children. Bats also harbour group A rotaviruses, but the genetic backgrounds of bat rotavirus strains are usually distinct from those of human rotavirus strains. We identified a new strain of group A rotavirus in the intestinal contents of a horseshoe bat in Zambia. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the identified virus, named RVA/Bat-wt/ZMB/LUS12-14/2012/G3P[3], possessed the genotype constellation G3-P[3]-I3-R2-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E2-H3. Several genome segments of LUS12-14 were highly similar to those of group A rotaviruses identified from humans, cows and antelopes, indicating interspecies transmission of rotaviruses between bats and other mammals with possible multiple genomic reassortment events.

  5. VP4 and VP7 Genotyping by Reverse Transcription-PCR of Human Rotavirus in Mexican Children with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Castillo, Araceli; Villa, Andrés Velasco; Ramírez González, José Ernesto; Mayén Pimentel, Elvira; Melo Munguía, Martín; Díaz de Jesús, Benita; Olivera Díaz, Hiram; García Lozano, Herlinda

    2000-01-01

    Dual typing (VP4 and VP7) of rotavirus obtained from 257 Mexican children during three epidemiological seasons was performed by reverse transcription-PCR. The P1G1 genotype was the most prevalent (40%), followed by P1G3 (19%) and P2G2 (16%). Thirty-one specimens (12%) presented mixed infections, while some genotypes were not found. This is the first dual typing of isolates from diarrhea cases in Mexico. PMID:11015426

  6. Detection of two atypical rotaviruses in the province of Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Basnec, S N; Giordano, M O; Bennun, F R; Nates, S V; Vergara, M; Depetris, A R

    1991-09-01

    Out of 317 human gastroenteritis cases studied between August 1988-August 1989, two atypical antigenically distinct rotaviruses (pararotaviruses) were detected in faecal samples among 19 rotaviruses shedding children from Misiones province, North-Eastern Argentina. A 1 3/4 year old girl a 3 years old boy, both with vomiting and normal temperature, shed these atypical rotaviruses. Their morphology by electron microscopy was identical to other rotaviruses; they contained 11 double-stranded RNA segments detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and failed to react with the antibody directed against the rotavirus group specific antigen (Rotazyme II ELISA). The electrophoretic migration of these RNAs (electropherotype) in polyacrylamide gels did not coincide with the typical pattern of distinct size classes observed in most human rotaviruses reported, instead, they appeared to be related to patterns of rotaviruses group C.

  7. Characterization of human rotaviruses circulating in Iraq in 2008: atypical G8 and high prevalence of P[6] strains.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salwa; Klena, John; Albana, Antun; Alhamdani, Faisal; Oskoff, John; Soliman, Mireille; Heylen, Elisabeth; Teleb, Nadia; Husain, Tupur; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2013-06-01

    Fecal samples from 976 children with gastroenteritis were collected and analyzed for group A rotavirus (RVA), in three different cities in Iraq between January 2008 and December 2008. RVA antigen was detected in 394 (40%) of the samples, and 98 samples were available for further genotype analyses using multiplex RT-PCR and sequence analyses for untypeable strains. The G/P-genotype combination was determined for 69 samples, and 19, 2 and 8 samples remained P-untypeable, G-untypeable and G/P-untypeable (UT), respectively. The most prevalent genotype was G2 (40%, 39/98) most often associated with P[6]. G1 was the second most common genotype (16%, 16/98) mainly associated with P[8] and P[UT]. G3, G4 and G9 were detected at a lower prevalence (3%, 11%, 3%, respectively), mainly associated with P[6]. Surprisingly, five G8P[6], and seven G12 RVA strains in combination with P[6] and P[8] were also detected for the first time in Iraq. Overall, a striking high prevalence of 47% of the analyzed samples possessed the P[6] genotype (65% of the P-typed RVA strains). Atypical genotype combinations such as G1P[4], G1P[6], G2P[8] or strains with mixed G-types were detected sporadically. The detection of unusual G8P[6] RVA strains prompted us to further analyze the NSP2, NSP3, NSP4 and NSP5 gene segments of three selected G8P[6] strains, resulting in their designation to the N2, T2, E2 and H2 genotypes, respectively. The VP7, VP4, NSP2, NSP3 and NSP5 gene segments clustered closely with common human RVA strains, whereas the NSP4 gene sequences were found to cluster with animal derived RVA strains, suggesting a potential reassortment event. The high prevalence of RVA strains with the G8, G12 and P[6] genotypes in combination with a DS-1-like genotype constellation in Iraq, needs to be monitored closely as these RVA strains might challenge the effectiveness of current RVA vaccines.

  8. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of rotavirus VP7-encoding gene from humans and animals of Northeast India: a relative study of Indian and global isolates.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, P; Barman, N N; Sharma, I

    2015-09-01

    A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay was developed to examine the genetic relationship between 67 (29 Indian, 38 global) rotavirus isolates of human, bovine and porcine neonates. The assay involved direct digestion of RT-PCR amplified VP7 cDNAs with three restriction enzymes (VspI, HaeIII, NlaIV) independently. Forty-eight RFLP patterns were identified for all 67 strains, and of these 20 patterns were associated with Indian isolates. A correlation between the restriction patterns and G type was apparent through deduction of enzyme restriction sites from known sequences. Major G serotypes (G1, G2, G6, G8) with a few mixed types could be differentiated where there was a positive assortment of intrinsic serotypes from multiple host origin, and certain single or combined enzyme profiles were highly dominant in the population. Significant genetic variations were established between global and Indian isolates and none of the RFLP patterns were shared between them. These data suggest that the Indian wild-type rotavirus population is distinguishable based on the VP7 gene, and co-circulation of distinct strains in different hosts is foremost, indicating the possible likelihood of inter-species transmission.

  9. P[8] and P[4] Rotavirus Infection Associated with Secretor Phenotypes Among Children in South China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Long, Yan; Tan, Ming; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Qiong; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Wen-Fang; Li, Jian-Dong; Hu, Gui-Fang; Tang, Shixing; Dai, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are known to recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as a host ligand that is believed to play an important role in rotavirus host susceptibility and host range. In this study, paired fecal and saliva samples collected from children with viral gastroenteritis, as well as paired serum and saliva samples collected from the general population in south China were studied to evaluate potential association between rotavirus infections and human HBGA phenotypes. Rotavirus was detected in 75 (28%) of 266 fecal samples and P[8] rotaviruses were found to be the predominant genotype. The HBGA phenotypes of the rotavirus-infected children were determined through their saliva samples. Secretor statuses were found to correlate with the risk of rotavirus infection and all P[8]/P[4] rotavirus infected children were secretors. Accordingly, recombinant VP8* proteins of the P[8]/P[4] rotaviruses bound saliva samples from secretor individuals. Furthermore, correlation between serum P[8]/P[4]-specific IgG and host Lewis and secretor phenotypes has been found among 206 studied serum samples. Our study supported the association between rotavirus infection and the host HBGA phenotypes, which would help further understanding of rotavirus host range and epidemiology. PMID:27708367

  10. [Rotavirus and other viruses of diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bajolet, O; Chippaux-Hyppolite, C

    1998-01-01

    Rotaviruses represent 80% of recognized viral etiologies and 140 million cases of diarrhea per year. They strike young children with similar frequency throughout the world, but the mortality rate is high in developing countries only, with some 870,000 deaths per year (WHO, 1997). Rotaviruses belong to the family of Reoviridae; they are segmented bicatenary RNA viruses, which explains their genetic variability, the presence of mixed infections, the establishment for some time already of a molecular epidemiology by electrophore types. The viruses are "naked" and thus resistant to the outside environment; their massive elimination, 10(8) to 10(10)viral particles per gram of faeces, begins with the first day of diarrhea. They are found in used water and can also be concentrated by shellfish; the environment thus constitutes a notable reservoir for the virus. Oral-faecal transmission is facilitated by deficient sanitary conditions. The 11 fragments of the genome each codify for 1 viral protein; 2 surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, bring about the formation of neutralizing antibodies, which are important for the protection and determination of different serotypes. A non structural protein--NSP4--would seem to intervene in the cytopathogenic effect and may act as a veritable viral enterotoxine. Numerous animal species are infected by rotaviruses which are district from the human ones. The pathology as it affects animals is of economic importance and of interest as an experimental and vaccinal model. Between human and animal rotaviruses there can be genetic rematchings and the VP6 protein is an antigen common to the group. The description of the other viruses responsible for diarrhea has benefited from widespread use of electronic microscopes from the very first years of study of rotaviruses. These other viruses belong to 6 different types: adenovirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, Norwalk agent and related viruses, coronavirus, enterovirus. They therefore have a structural and

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about Rotavirus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Mumps Norovirus Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Polio Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Rotavirus Rubella (German Measles) ... Disease Mumps Norovirus Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Polio Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Rotavirus Rubella (German Measles) ...

  12. Whole genomic analyses of asymptomatic human G1P[6], G2P[6] and G3P[6] rotavirus strains reveal intergenogroup reassortment events and genome segments of artiodactyl origin.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Souvik; Urushibara, Noriko; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Krishnan, Triveni; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-06-01

    Although P[6] group A rotaviruses (RVA) cause diarrhoea in humans, they have been also associated with endemics of predominantly asymptomatic neonatal infections. Interestingly, strains representing the endemic and asymptomatic P[6] RVAs were found to possess one of the four common human VP7 serotypes (G1-G4), and exhibited little antigenic/genetic differences with the VP4 proteins/VP4 encoding genome segments of P[6] RVAs recovered from diarrhoeic children, raising interest on their complete genetic constellations. In the present study, we report the overall genetic makeup and possible origin of three such asymptomatic human P[6] RVA strains, RVA/Human-tc/VEN/M37/1982/G1P2A[6], RVA/Human-tc/SWE/1076/1983/G2P2A[6] and RVA/Human-tc/AUS/McN13/1980/G3P2A[6]. G1P[6] strain M37 exhibited an unusual genotype constellation (G1-P[6]-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T2-E1-H1), not reported previously, and was found to originate from possible intergenogroup reassortment events involving acquisition of a DS-1-like NSP3 encoding genome segment by a human Wa-like RVA strain. On the other hand, G2P[6] strain 1076 exhibited a DS-1-like genotype constellation, and was found to possess several genome segments (those encoding VP1, VP3, VP6 and NSP4) of possible artiodactyl (ruminants) origin on a human RVA genetic backbone. The whole genome of G3P[6] strain McN13 was closely related to that of asymptomatic human Wa-like G3P[6] strain RV3, and both strains shared unique amino acid changes, which might have contributed to their attenuation. Taken together, the present study provided insights into the origin and complex genetic diversity of P[6] RVAs possessing the common human VP7 genotypes. This is the first report on the whole genomic analysis of a G1P[6] RVA strain.

  13. High dose and low dose Lactobacilli acidophilus exerted differential immune modulating effects on T cell immune responses induced by an oral human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Li, Yanru; Kocher, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Yang, Xingdong; Yuan, Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Background Strain-specific effects of probiotics in pro- or anti-inflammatory immune responses have been well recognized. Several proinflammatory Lactobacillus strains have been shown to act as adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines. However, dose effects of probiotics in modulating immune responses are not clearly understood. This study examined the dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) NCFM strain on T cell immune responses to rotavirus vaccination in a gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model. Methods Frequencies of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and IL-10 and TGF-β producing CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25- regulatory T (Treg) cell responses were determined in the intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of Gn pigs vaccinated with an oral human rotavirus vaccine in conjunction with low dose (5 feedings; up to 106 colony forming units [CFU]/dose) or high dose (14 feedings; up to 109 CFU/dose) or without LA feeding. Results Low dose LA significantly promoted IFN-γ producing T cell responses and down-regulated Treg cell responses and their TGF-β and IL-10 productions in all the tissues compared to the high dose LA and control groups. To the contrary, high dose LA increased the frequencies of Treg cells in most of the tissues compared to the control groups. The dose effects of LA on IFN-γ producing T cell and CD4+CD25- Treg cell immune responses were similar in the intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues and were independent from the vaccination. Conclusion Thus the same probiotic strain in different doses can either promote or suppress IFN-γ producing T cell or Treg cell immune responses. These findings have significant implications in the use of probiotic lactobacilli as immunostimulatory versus immunoregulatory agents. Probiotics can be ineffective or even detrimental if not used at the optimal dosage for the appropriate purposes. PMID:22178726

  14. New approaches in oral rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kuate Defo, Zenas; Lee, Byong

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea worldwide, and affects primarily developing nations, in large part because of the inaccessibility of vaccines and high rates of mortality present therein. At present, there exist two oral rotaviral vaccines, Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™. These vaccines are generally effective in their actions: however, associated costs often stymie their effectiveness, and they continue to be associated with a slight risk of intussusception. While different programs are being implemented worldwide to enhance vaccine distribution and monitor vaccine administration for possible intussusception in light of recent WHO recommendation, another major problem persists: that of the reduced efficacy of the existing rotaviral vaccines in developing countries over time. The development of new oral rotavirus vaccine classes - live-attenuated vaccines, virus-like particles, lactic acid bacteria-containing vaccines, combination therapy with immunoglobulins, and biodegradable polymer-encapsulated vaccines - could potentially circumvent these problems.

  15. Rotavirus infections and vaccines: burden of illness and potential impact of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Lambert, Stephen B; Milne, Richard J

    2010-08-01

    Rotaviruses are the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. By 5 years of age virtually every child worldwide will have experienced at least one rotavirus infection. This leads to an enormous disease burden, where every minute a child dies because of rotavirus infection and another four are hospitalized, at an annual societal cost in 2007 of $US2 billion. Most of the annual 527 000 deaths are in malnourished infants living in rural regions of low and middle income countries. In contrast, most measurable costs arise from medical expenses and lost parental wages in high income countries. Vaccines are the only public health prevention strategy likely to control rotavirus disease. They were developed to mimic the immunity following natural rotavirus infection that confers protection against severe gastroenteritis and consequently reduces the risk of primary healthcare utilization, hospitalization and death. The two currently licensed vaccines--one a single human strain rotavirus vaccine, the other a multiple strain human-bovine pentavalent reassortant rotavirus vaccine--are administered to infants in a two- or three-dose course, respectively, with the first dose given at 6-14 weeks of age. In various settings they are safe, immunogenic and efficacious against many different rotavirus genotypes. In high and middle income countries, rotavirus vaccines confer 85-100% protection against severe disease, while in low income regions of Africa and Asia, protection is less, at 46-77%. Despite this reduced efficacy in low income countries, the high burden of diarrheal disease in these regions means that proportionately more severe cases are prevented by vaccination than elsewhere. Post-licensure effectiveness studies show that rotavirus vaccines not only reduce rotavirus activity in infancy but they also decrease rates of rotavirus diarrhea in older and unimmunized children. A successful rotavirus vaccination program will rely upon sustained vaccine efficacy

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of human group C rotavirus in hospitalized children with gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Patrícia dos Santos; Guerra, Sylvia de Fátima dos Santos; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Soares, Luana da Silva; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Linhares, Alexandre C; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Group C rotavirus (RVC) is potentially an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritis (AG), especially in outbreaks. This study aims to detect and molecularly characterize RVC in hospitalized children with AG in Belém, Brazil. From May 2008 to April 2011, 279 stools were subjected to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction targeting VP7, VP6, VP4, and NSP4 genes. RVC positivity rate was 2.1% (6/279) and phylogenetic analysis of positive samples yields genotype G4-P[2]-I2-E2. No evidence of zoonotic transmission and VP7 gene demonstrated close relationship with Asian strains. RVC surveillance is worth to expand information on evolutionary and epidemiological features of this virus.

  17. Lack of cosegregation of the subgroup II antigens on genes 2 and 6 in porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, L; Padilla-Noriega, L; Taniguchi, K; Greenberg, H B

    1990-01-01

    The rotavirus subgroup I and II specificities associated with gene 2 and 6 products (vp2 and vp6, respectively) were shown not to cosegregate in a number of porcine rotavirus strains. The porcine OSU rotavirus strain and OSU-vp7-like strains were all found to possess a subgroup II-specific region on vp2 and a subgroup I-specific region on vp6. Of interest is the observation that the subgroup II-specific epitope on vp2 appears to be present only in human and porcine rotavirus strains, suggesting a possible human-pig ancestral lineage for gene 2. Images PMID:1688386

  18. Novel G10P[14] Rotavirus Strain, Northern Territory, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Celeste M.; Roczo-Farkas, Susie; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2013-01-01

    We identified a genotype G10P[14] rotavirus strain in 5 children and 1 adult with acute gastroenteritis from the Northern Territory, Australia. Full genome sequence analysis identified an artiodactyl-like (bovine, ovine, and camelid) G10-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A11-N2-T6-E2-H3 genome constellation. This finding suggests artiodactyl-to-human transmission and strengthens the need to continue rotavirus strain surveillance. PMID:23876354

  19. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  20. Complete genome analysis of contemporary G12P[8] rotaviruses reveals heterogeneity within Wa-like genomic constellation.

    PubMed

    De Grazia, Simona; Dóró, Renáta; Bonura, Floriana; Marton, Szilvia; Cascio, Antonio; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián; M Giammanco, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    G12 rotaviruses are globally emergent rotaviruses causing severe childhood gastroenteritis. Little is known about the evolution and diversity of G12P[8] rotaviruses and the possible role that widespread vaccine use, globally, has had on their emergence. In Sicily, Italy, surveillance activity for rotaviruses has been conducted uninterruptedly since 1985, thus representing a unique observatory for the study of human rotaviruses in the pre- and post-vaccine era. G12 rotaviruses were first detected only in 2012 and between 2012 and 2014 they accounted for 8.7% of all rotavirus-associated infections among children, with peaks of 27.8% in 2012/2013 and 21% in 2014. We determined and analyzed the full-genome of 22 G12P[8] rotaviruses collected during the 2012-2014. Although all G12P[8] rotaviruses exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation (G12P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1), phylogenetic analysis allowed distinguishing either two or three (sub)lineages in each genome segment. On the basis of the segregation patterns into lineages/sublineages, 20 G12P[8] rotaviruses could be grouped into three stable major genomic sub-constellations, whilst two strains displayed unique genome architectures, likely due to ressortment with co-circulating strains. Altogether, these findings indicate that the onset and prolonged circulation of G12 rotaviruses was due to repeated introductions of different G12 rotaviruses circulating globally. Importantly, as regional rotavirus vaccination was initiated in 2012 reaching a 45% coverage in newborns in 2014, a correlation between the appearance and spread of G12 rotaviruses and the enacted vaccination program could not be drawn. Constant epidemiologic surveillance remains important to monitor the epidemiological dynamics of human rotaviruses.

  1. Higher proportion of G2P[4] rotaviruses in vaccinated hospitalized cases compared with unvaccinated hospitalized cases, despite high vaccine effectiveness against heterotypic G2P[4] rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Matthijnssens, J; Zeller, M; Heylen, E; De Coster, S; Vercauteren, J; Braeckman, T; Van Herck, K; Meyer, N; Pirçon, J-Y; Soriano-Gabarro, M; Azou, M; Capiau, H; De Koster, J; Maernoudt, A-S; Raes, M; Verdonck, L; Verghote, M; Vergison, A; Van Damme, P; Van Ranst, M

    2014-10-01

    The overall vaccine effectiveness of the monovalent rotavirus vaccine in an observational, prospective, multicentre, hospital-based case-control study in Belgium (RotaBel) was 90%. However, rotavirus genotype and co-infecting pathogens are important parameters to take into account when assessing vaccine effectiveness. In this study we specifically investigated the effect of rotavirus genotypes and co-infecting pathogens on vaccine effectiveness of the monovalent vaccine. In addition, we also investigated the effect of co-infecting pathogens on disease severity. From February 2008 to June 2010 stool samples of rotavirus gastroenteritis cases of a random sample of 39 Belgian hospitals were collected and subsequently genotyped. Fisher's exact tests were performed to investigate the relationships between rotavirus genotype, co-infecting pathogens and disease severity. The vaccine effectiveness of a full series of the monovalent rotavirus vaccine against hospitalized rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by G1P[8] rotavirus strains was 95% (95% CI 77.5-98.7). Against G2P[4], the vaccine effectiveness was 85% (95% CI: 63.7-93.8). G4P[8]- and G3P[8]-specific vaccine effectiveness was 90% (95% CI 19.2-98.7) and 87% (95% CI -5.2 to 98.4), respectively. A post-hoc analysis showed that the genotype distribution was significantly related to the vaccination status (p <0.001), whereby G2P[4] strains were proportionally more prevalent in vaccinated cases than in unvaccinated cases. No statistical associations were found between co-infection status and vaccination status, Vesikari severity score or rotavirus genotype. The high vaccine effectiveness against the individual genotypes implies robust protection of the monovalent rotavirus vaccine against hospitalized rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by the major human rotavirus genotypes. The prevalence of G2P[4] requires continued monitoring.

  2. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Spilki, Fernando Rosado; da Luz, Roger Bordin; Fabres, Rafael Bandeira; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Kluge, Mariana; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Comerlato, Juliana; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Dasso, Maurício Gautério; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV), as well as human enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV). HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions. PMID:24516464

  3. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Spilki, Fernando Rosado; da Luz, Roger Bordin; Fabres, Rafael Bandeira; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Kluge, Mariana; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Comerlato, Juliana; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Dasso, Maurício Gautério; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV), as well as human enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV). HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions.

  4. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  5. Isolation and characterization of rotavirus from feral pigeon in mammalian cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Minamoto, N.; Oki, K.; Tomita, M.; Kinjo, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Avian rotaviruses were isolated from feral pigeon faeces treated with trypsin using roller tube cultures of mammalian cells. Two pigeon strains, designated as strains PO-8 and PO-13, produced a marked cytopathic effect (CPE), small intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and high titres of infectious particles in infected MA-104 and MDBK cell lines without cell adaptation and roller drum apparatus. The pigeon rotaviruses shared a common group specific antigen with the Lincoln strain of bovine rotavirus by indirect immunofluorescence, but differed from both the Lincoln strain and the Wa strain of human rotavirus in neutralization tests. The RNA segment profile of this virus on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis differed from that of group A mammalian rotaviruses. The results of a serological survey suggested that antibody to pigeon rotaviruses was widespread in avian species in Japan. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:2837407

  6. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step.

    PubMed

    Rossen, John W A; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H C; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C

    2004-09-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiviral therapy. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells were infected with human rotavirus Wa or simian rotavirus SA-11. COX-2 mRNA expression and secreted PGE2 levels were determined at different time points postinfection, and the effect of COX inhibitors on rotavirus infection was studied by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). To reveal the signal transduction pathways involved, the effect of MEK, protein kinase A (PKA), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and NF-kappaB inhibitors on rotavirus infection was analyzed. In infected Caco-2 cells, increased COX-2 mRNA expression and secreted PGE2 levels were detected. Indomethacin (inhibiting both COX-1 and COX-2) and specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors reduced rotavirus infection by 85 and 50%, respectively, as measured by an IFA. Indomethacin reduced virus infection at a postbinding step early in the infection cycle, inhibiting virus protein synthesis. Indomethacin did not seem to affect viral RNA synthesis. Inhibitors of MEK, PKA, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB decreased rotavirus infection by at least 40%. PGE2 counteracted the effect of the COX and PKA inhibitors but not of the MEK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB inhibitors. Conclusively, COXs and PGE2 are important mediators of rotavirus infection at a postbinding step. The ERK1/2 pathway mediated by PKA is involved in COX induction by rotavirus infection. MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways are involved in rotavirus infection but in a PGE2-independent manner. This report offers new perspectives in the search for therapeutic agents in treatment of severe rotavirus-mediated diarrhea in children.

  7. Prevalence of human rotavirus genotypes in Wuhan, China, during 2008-2011: changing trend of predominant genotypes and emergence of strains with the P[8]b subtype of the VP4 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Hong; Zhou, Xuan; Ghosh, Souvik; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Pang, Bei-Bei; Peng, Jin-Song; Hu, Quan; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2011-12-01

    Hospital-based surveillance of rotavirus genotypes was conducted in Wuhan, China, between March 2008 and May 2011. The detection rates of group A rotavirus were 24.6% (458/1859) and 12.1% (96/795) in children and adults, respectively, with diarrhea. Among the 554 positive specimens, the most frequent genotype was G3P[8] (57.9%), followed by G1P[8] (29.4%). Compared with previous studies in Wuhan (2000-2008), the relative frequency of G3P[8] has been decreasing year by year, while the predominant genotype G3 shifted to G1 in 2011. In the present study, a rare P[8]b subtype of the VP4 gene (OP354-like P[8]) was identified in nine strains. Full-length sequences of VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes of two G9P[8]b strains (RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E1545/2009/G9P[8]b and RVA/Human-wt/CHN/Z1108/2008/G9P[8]b) were determined for phylogenetic analysis. The four genes of these strains were closely related to one another, and the G9-VP7 genes of these strains belonged to lineage III, which contains globally spreading G9 rotaviruses. The full-length sequence of VP4 gene segments of the P[8]b strains in Wuhan clustered with those of P[8]b strains in Vietnam, Russia and Belgium, while they were distinct from those of the OP354 strain from Malawi and Bangladeshi strains. The VP6 and NSP4 genes of two P[8]b strains belonged to the I1 and E1 genotype, respectively, and clustered with those of strains belonging to Wa-like human rotaviruses from various Asian countries. These findings indicate the changing epidemiologic trend of rotavirus genotypes in Wuhan, i.e., the shift of the predominant type from G3 to G1 and the emergence of P[8]b strains genetically related to those distributed in other Asian countries.

  8. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices.

  9. Effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Ciprofloxacin on small intestinal epithelial cell mRNA expression in the neonatal piglet model of human rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Paim, Francine C; Langel, Stephanie N; Fischer, David D; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Shao, Lulu; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Huang, Huang-Chi; Kumar, Anand; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J; Vlasova, Anastasia N

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and the antibiotic Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) on mRNA expression of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets colonized with a defined commensal microflora (DMF) and inoculated with human rotavirus (HRV) that infects IECs. We analyzed mRNA levels of IEC genes for enteroendocrine cells [chromogranin A (CgA)], goblet cells [mucin 2 (MUC2)], transient amplifying progenitor cell [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)], intestinal epithelial stem cell (SOX9) and enterocytes (villin). Cipro treatment enhanced HRV diarrhea and decreased the mRNA levels of MUC2 and villin but increased PCNA. These results suggest that Cipro alters the epithelial barrier, potentially decreasing the numbers of mature enterocytes (villin) and goblet cells secreting protective mucin (MUC2). These alterations may induce increased IEC proliferation (PCNA expression) to restore the integrity of the epithelial layer. Coincidental with decreased diarrhea severity in EcN treated groups, the expression of CgA and villin was increased, while SOX9 expression was decreased representing higher epithelial integrity indicative of inhibition of cellular proliferation. Thus, EcN protects the intestinal epithelium from damage by increasing the gene expression of enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, maintaining the absorptive function and, consequently, decreasing the severity of diarrhea in HRV infection.

  10. Prevalence of VP7 and VP4 genotypes of human group A rotavirus in infants and children with acute diarrhea in a northern city of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, S K; Hossain, M A; Ahmed, M U; Alam, M M; Musa, A K; Shamsuzzaman, A K; Islam, M N; Saha, S K

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this cross sectional prospective study was to determine rotavirus etiology and prevalence of the different rotavirus genotypes causing acute gastroenteritis in infants and children (Rotavirus detection rate was 31.3% (301/962). Among the 71 representative rotavirus specimens examined genetically by RT-PCR, the most frequent G genotypes were G2 (57.7%), followed by G1 (21.1%), and G9 (15.5%). The G12 was detected from two specimens (2.8%) and was the first report in the study area. The predominant P genotypes were P[4] (54.9%), followed by P[6] (19.7%), and P[8] (15.5%). Among the single infection, the predominant G/P combinations were G2P[4] (52.1%), followed by G1P[8] (10%), and G1P[6] (8.5%). Nucleotide Sequence identity of VP7 gene of G2 rotaviruses were higher than 99.0% with each other and these G2 viruses showed genetically lower identity to G2 rotaviruses reported elsewhere in the world, except for some strains reported in African countries. All the G2 strains sequenced in this study were grouped into single cluster in phylogenetic tree for G2 strains. As rotavirus vaccine is implemented in immunization program worldwide, the hospital based surveillance study will provide valuable information to assess the future impact of vaccination.

  11. Rotavirus vaccine: a cost effective control measure for India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Goel, Manish K; Jain, Ram Bilas; Khanna, Pardeep; Vibha, Vibha

    2012-04-01

    Globally, rotavirus diarrhea results in 453,000 deaths in children younger than 5 y—37% of deaths attributable to diarrhea and 5% of all deaths in children younger than 5 y. India alone accounts for 22% (~100,000 deaths) of all deaths attributable to rotavirus infection. Two oral rotavirus vaccines are available: Rotarix, a monovalent P1A[8] G1 vaccine (GlaxoSmithKline), and RotaTeq, a pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine (Merck). Rotarix is administered in a 2-dose schedule with the first and second doses of DTP (DTP1, DTP2). RotaTeq requires a 3-dose schedule with DTP1, DTP2 and DTP3 with an interval of 4–10 weeks between doses. The first dose of either vaccine should be administered to infants aged 6–15 weeks irrespective of the history of previous rotavirus infection, and the maximum age for administering the last dose of either vaccine should be 32 weeks. Although India would require funding from international health organizations/GAVI until new indigenous rotavirus vaccine candidates are developed at a cheaper price, introduction of vaccination into the national immunization program would be a cost-effective step toward control of the rotavirus diarrhea-related morbidity and mortality in India.

  12. Genomic characterization of G3P[6], G4P[6] and G4P[8] human rotaviruses from Wuhan, China: Evidence for interspecies transmission and reassortment events.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Ghosh, Souvik; Tang, Wei-Feng; Pang, Bei-Bei; Liu, Man-Qing; Peng, Jin-Song; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2015-07-01

    We report here the whole genomic analyses of two G4P[6] (RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E931/2008/G4P[6], RVA/Human-wt/CHN/R1954/2013/G4P[6]), one G3P[6] (RVA/Human-wt/CHN/R946/2006/G3P[6]) and one G4P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E2484/2011/G4P[8]) group A rotavirus (RVA) strains detected in sporadic cases of diarrhea in humans in the city of Wuhan, China. All the four strains displayed a Wa-like genotype constellation. Strains E931 and R1954 shared a G4-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1 constellation, whilst the 11 gene segments of strains R946 and E2484 were assigned to G3-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 and G4-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 genotypes, respectively. Phylogenetically, the VP7 gene of R946, NSP3 gene of E931, and 10 of 11 gene segments of E2484 (except for VP7 gene) belonged to lineages of human RVAs. On the other hand, based on available data, it was difficult to ascertain porcine or human origin of VP3 genes of strains E931 and R946, and NSP2 genes of strains R946 and R1954. The remaining genes of E2484, E931, R946 and R1954 were close to those of porcine RVAs from China, and/or porcine-like human RVAs. Taken together, our observations suggested that strain R1954 might have been derived from porcine RVAs, whilst strains R946 and E931 might be reassortants possessing human RVA-like gene segments on a porcine RVA genetic backbone. Strain E2484 might be derived from reassortment events involving acquisition of a porcine-like VP7 gene by a Wa-like human RVA strain. The present study provided important insights into zoonotic transmission and complex reassortment events involving human and porcine RVAs, reiterating the significance of whole-genomic analysis of RVA strains.

  13. Human G3P[9] rotavirus strains possessing an identical genotype constellation to AU-1 isolated at high prevalence in Brazil, 1997-1999.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Takeshi; Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus (RV) A is a very common cause of acute diarrhoea in infants and young children worldwide. Most human strains are classified into two major Wa-like and DS-1-like genotype constellations, whilst a minor third strain, AU-1, was described in 1989 among human RV isolates from Japan. AU-1 demonstrates a high degree of homology to a feline RV, FRV-1, which suggests interspecies transmission of feline RV. However, there has been no subsequent report of RVs possessing the AU-1 genotype throughout all 11 genes of the genome. Between March 1997 and December 1999, 157 RV-positive stool samples were collected from Brazilian children, and 16 of the RVs (10.2 %) were P[9] genotype. We analysed eight strains by almost full-genome sequencing. These eight strains were divided into two groups: five AU-1-like and three Wa-like strains. Four of the five AU-1-like strains had the AU-1-like genotype constellation throughout the 11 genes. The remaining AU-1-like strain was considered to be a reassortant strain comprosed of nine, two and one genes from the AU-1-like, Wa-like and G9 strains, respectively. The three Wa-like strains were considered to be reassortants comprising seven to eight genes and three to four genes from Wa-like and non-Wa-like strains, respectively. This report of human G3P[9] RV strains possessing the AU-1 genotype constellation throughout all genes demonstrates the stability and infectivity of the AU-1-like strain with its original genotype over distance and time.

  14. Full genome characterization of a porcine-like human G9P[6] rotavirus strain isolated from an infant in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2012-10-01

    Interspecies transmissions of group A rotavirus (RVA) strains among animals and humans are thought to take place frequently. During a RVA surveillance study in Belgium we isolated an unusual G9P[6] RVA strain, RVA/human-wt/BEL/BE2001/2009/G9P[6], from a 1month old boy, which did not cluster with other G9 or P[6] strains isolated in Belgium. In this study we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of this unusual G9P[6] strain BE2001. Phylogenetic analyses of all 11 genes revealed a unique genotype constellation: G9-P[6]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1. The VP6 and NSP1 genotypes I5 and A8 are genotypes commonly found in porcine RVA strains, while the VP7 and VP4 genes clustered only distantly to human lineages of G9 and P[6], respectively. The VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP2, NSP4 and NSP5 genes all belonged to Wa-like genotypes, but clustered more closely to porcine strains than to human strains. NSP3 belonged to the rare T7 genotype. Thus far, T7 genotypes have only been detected in one porcine-like human strain (RVA/human-tc/CHN/R479/2004/G4P[6]), one bovine-like human strain (RVA/human-xx/IND/mani-265/2007/G10P[6]) and one bovine RVA strain (RVA/cow-tc/GBR/UK/1973/G6P7[5]). Sequence analysis of the BE2001 NSP5 gene segment revealed a 300 nucleotide duplication in the 3' end non-coding region. BE2001 is most likely a direct interspecies transmission between a pig and a human. Inquiry with the patient's physician revealed that the father of the patient had been working on a pig farm in the week the patient became ill, providing a plausible route of transmission.

  15. Detection and genetic characterization of porcine group A rotaviruses in asymptomatic pigs in smallholder farms in East Africa: predominance of P[8] genotype resembling human strains.

    PubMed

    Amimo, J O; Junga, J O; Ogara, W O; Vlasova, A N; Njahira, M N; Maina, S; Okoth, E A; Bishop, R P; Saif, L J; Djikeng, A

    2015-02-25

    Viral enteritis is a serious problem accounting for deaths in neonatal animals and humans worldwide. The absence of surveillance programs and diagnostic laboratory facilities have resulted in a lack of data on rotavirus associated diarrheas in pigs in East Africa. Here we describe the incidence of group A rotavirus (RVA) infections in asymptomatic young pigs in East Africa. Of the 446 samples examined, 26.2% (117/446) were positive for RVA. More nursing piglets (78.7%) shed RVA than weaned (32.9%) and grower (5.8%) pigs. RVA incidence was higher in pigs that were either housed_free-range (77.8%) or tethered_free-range (29.0%) than those that were free-range or housed or housed-tethered pigs. The farms with larger herd size (>10 pigs) had higher RVA prevalence (56.5%) than farms with smaller herd size (24.1-29.7%). This study revealed that age, management system and pig density significantly (p<0.01) influenced the incidence of RVA infections, with housed_free-range management system and larger herd size showing higher risks for RVA infection. Partial (811-1604nt region) sequence of the VP4 gene of selected positive samples revealed that different genotypes (P[6], P[8] and P[13]) are circulating in the study area with P[8] being predominant. The P[6] strain shared nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequence identity of 84.4-91.3% and 95.1-96.9%, respectively, with known porcine and human P[6] strains. The P[8] strains shared high nt and aa sequence identity with known human P[8] strains ranging from 95.6-100% to 92-100%, respectively. The P[13] strains shared nt and aa sequence identity of 83.6-91.7% and 89.3-96.4%, respectively, only with known porcine P[13] strains. No P[8] strains yielded RNA of sufficient quality/quantity for full genome sequencing. However analysis of the full genome constellation of the P[6], two P[13] and one untypeable strains revealed that the P[6] strain (Ke-003-5) genome constellation was G26-P[6]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1, P[13

  16. Detection of Common, Emerging and Uncommon VP4, and VP7 Human Group A Rotavirus Genotypes from Urban Sewage Samples in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Tort, Luis Fernando Lopez; Victoria, Matías; Lizasoain, Andrés; García, Mariana; Berois, Mabel; Cristina, Juan; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Colina, Rodney

    2015-12-01

    Environmental approach has proven to be a useful tool for epidemiological studies demonstrating through environmental studies the diversity of viruses circulating in a given population. The aim of this study was to perform a phylogenetic characterization of the group A rotavirus (RVA) glycoprotein (G)- and protease-sensitive (P)-genotypes obtained from sewage samples (n = 116) collected in six cities of Uruguay during March 2011 to April 2013. A worldwide standardized semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR (SNM RT-PCR) protocol directed against VP4 and VP7 genes were conducted for RVA detection and consensual DNA fragments were submitted to nucleotide sequencing. P and/or G genotype was successfully determined by phylogenetic analysis in 61% (n = 37) of the positive samples obtained by SNM RT-PCR (n = 61). The RVA genotypes were as follow: G1 (n = 2), G2 (n = 14), G3 (n = 5), G12 (n = 2), P[4] (n = 4), P[8] (n = 16), and P[3] (n = 2). Interestingly, through phylogenetic analysis, emerging, and uncommon human genotypes could be detected. Results obtained from the comparison of RVA genotypes detected in the current study and Uruguayan RVA strains previously described for contemporary clinical pediatric cases showed that monitoring sewage may be a good screening option for a rapid and economical overview of the circulating genotypes in the surrounding human population and a useful approximation to study RVA epidemiology in a future vaccine monitoring program. The present study represents the first report in Uruguay that describes the phylogenetic diversity of RVA from urban sewage samples.

  17. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Related Links Vaccines & Immunizations Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It Language: English Español (Spanish) ... vaccine. Why should my child get the rotavirus vaccine? The rotavirus vaccine: Protects your child from rotavirus, ...

  18. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: Suitability of attenuating mutations found in SA14-14-2 for WN vaccine design

    SciTech Connect

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir Manuvakhova, Marina; Rodriguez, Efrain

    2016-01-15

    Direct attenuation of West Nile (WN) virus strain NY99 for the purpose of vaccine development is not feasible due to its high virulence and pathogenicity. Instead, we created highly attenuated chimeric virus W1806 with the serological identity of NY99. To further attenuate W1806, we investigated effects of mutations found in Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine SA14-14-2. WN viruses carrying all attenuating mutations lost infectivity in mammalian, but not in mosquito cells. No single reversion restored infectivity in mammalian cells, although increased infectivity in mosquito cells was observed. To identify a subset of mutations suitable for further attenuation of W1806, we analyzed effects of E{sub 138}K and K{sub 279}M changes on virulence, growth properties, and immunogenicity of derivatized W956, from which chimeric W1806 inherited its biological properties and attenuation profile. Despite strong dominant attenuating effect, introduction of only two mutations was not sufficient for attenuating W1806 to the safety level acceptable for human use. - Highlights: • Further attenuation of a WN vaccine precursor is outlined. • Effect of SA14-14-2 attenuating mutations is tested. • Mechanism of attenuation is proposed and illustrated. • The need for additional attenuating mutations is justified.

  19. Growth restriction of an experimental live attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine in human ciliated airway epithelium in vitro parallels attenuation in African green monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Scull, Margaret A.; Schmidt, Alexander C.; Murphy, Brian R.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are common causes of severe pediatric respiratory viral disease. We characterized wild-type HPIV2 infection in an in vitro model of human airway epithelium (HAE) and found that the virus replicates to high titer, sheds apically, targets ciliated cells, and induces minimal cytopathology. Replication of an experimental, live attenuated HPIV2 vaccine strain, containing both temperature sensitive (ts) and non-ts attenuating mutations, was restricted >30-fold compared to rHPIV2-WT in HAE at 32°C and exhibited little productive replication at 37°C. This restriction paralleled attenuation in the upper and lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, supporting the HAE model as an appropriate and convenient system for characterizing HPIV2 vaccine candidates. PMID:20139039

  20. Rotavirus activates dendritic cells derived from umbilical cord blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Martinez, D; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, L; Badillo-Godinez, O; Lopez-Guerrero, D; Santana-Calderon, A; Cortez-Gomez, R; Ramirez-Pliego, O; Esquivel-Guadarrama, F

    2016-10-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of acute infectious diarrhea in human neonates and infants. However, the studies aimed at dissecting the anti-virus immune response have been mainly performed in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in innate and acquired immune responses. Therefore, it is very important to determine the response of neonatal and infant DCs to rotavirus and to compare it to the response of adult DCs. Thus, we determined the response of monocyte-derived DCs from umbilical cord blood (UCB) and adult peripheral blood (PB) to rotavirus in vitro. It was found that the rotavirus and its genome, composed of segmented doubled stranded RNA (dsRNA), induced the activation of neonatal DCs, as these cells up-regulated the levels of CD40, CD86, MHC II, TLR-3 and TLR-4, the production of cytokines IL-6, IL-12/23p40, IL-10, TGF-β (but not of IL-12p70), and the message for TNF-α and IFN-β. This activation enabled the neonatal DCs to induce a strong proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells and the production of IFN-γ. Moreover, neonatal DCs could be infected by rotavirus and sustain its replication. Neonatal DCs had a similar response as adult DCs towards rotavirus and its genome. However, adult DCs had a biased pro-inflammatory response compared to neonatal DCs, which showed a biased regulatory profile, as they produced higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-β, and were less efficient in inducing a Th1 type response. So it can be concluded that rotavirus and its genome can induce the activation of neonatal DCs in spite of their tolerogenic bias.

  1. 75 FR 48706 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice with comment period. SUMMARY: Under the National Childhood Vaccine...

  2. Comparison between adsorption of poliovirus and rotavirus by aluminum hydroxide and activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Goyal, S M; Gerba, C P; Conklin, R H; Smith, E M

    1978-01-01

    Adsorption of poliovirus and rotavirus by aluminum hydroxide and activated sludge flocs was studied. Both aluminum hydroxide and activated sludge flocs adsorbed greater amounts of poliovirus than rotavirus. Aluminum hydroxide flocs reduced the titer of poliovirus in tap water by 3 log10, but they only reduced the titer of a simian rotovirus (SA-11) in tap water by 1 log10 or less and did not noticeably reduce the number of human rotavirus particles present in a dilute stool suspension. Activated sludge flocs reduced the titer of added poliovirus by 0.7 to 1.8 log10 and reduced the titer of SA-11 by 0.5 log10 or less. These studies indicate that a basic difference in the adsorptive behavior of enteroviruses and rotaviruses exists and that water and wastewater treatment processes that are highly effective in removal of enteroviruses may not be as effective in removing other viral groups such as rotaviruses. PMID:205173

  3. Genetic Diversity of Rotavirus Strains Circulating in Environmental Water and Bivalve Shellfish in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kittigul, Leera; Panjangampatthana, Apinya; Rupprom, Kitwadee; Pombubpa, Kannika

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus is a common cause of acute diarrhea in young children worldwide. This study investigated the prevalence and molecular characterization of rotavirus in environmental water and oyster samples in Thailand. A total of 114 water samples and 110 oyster samples were collected and tested for group A rotavirus using RT-nested PCR. Rotavirus genotype was identified by phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genetic sequences. Group A rotavirus was detected in 21 water samples (18.4%) and six oyster samples (5.4%). Twenty five rotavirus strains were successfully sequenced and classified into four genotypes; G1, G2, G3, and G9. Rotavirus G1 (three strains), G2 (three strains), and G9 (two strains) demonstrated the genetic sequences similar to human strains (90%–99% nucleotide identity), whereas G3 (17 strains) was closely related to animal strains (84%–98% nucleotide identity). G1 strains belonged to lineages I (sub-lineage c) and II. G2 strains belonged to lineage II. G9 strains belonged to lineages III (sub-lineage b) and IV. G3 strains belonged to lineages I, III (sub-lineage c), and IV with a predominance of lineage I. The present study provides important information on the rotavirus strains circulating in the environment. PMID:24469269

  4. Genetic diversity of rotavirus strains circulating in environmental water and bivalve shellfish in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Panjangampatthana, Apinya; Rupprom, Kitwadee; Pombubpa, Kannika

    2014-01-24

    Rotavirus is a common cause of acute diarrhea in young children worldwide. This study investigated the prevalence and molecular characterization of rotavirus in environmental water and oyster samples in Thailand. A total of 114 water samples and 110 oyster samples were collected and tested for group A rotavirus using RT-nested PCR. Rotavirus genotype was identified by phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genetic sequences. Group A rotavirus was detected in 21 water samples (18.4%) and six oyster samples (5.4%). Twenty five rotavirus strains were successfully sequenced and classified into four genotypes; G1, G2, G3, and G9. Rotavirus G1 (three strains), G2 (three strains), and G9 (two strains) demonstrated the genetic sequences similar to human strains (90%-99% nucleotide identity), whereas G3 (17 strains) was closely related to animal strains (84%-98% nucleotide identity). G1 strains belonged to lineages I (sub-lineage c) and II. G2 strains belonged to lineage II. G9 strains belonged to lineages III (sub-lineage b) and IV. G3 strains belonged to lineages I, III (sub-lineage c), and IV with a predominance of lineage I. The present study provides important information on the rotavirus strains circulating in the environment.

  5. In vitro anti-rotavirus activity of some medicinal plants used in Brazil against diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J L S; Lopes, R C; Oliveira, D B; Costa, S S; Miranda, M M F S; Romanos, M T V; Santos, N S O; Wigg, M D

    2005-07-14

    Acute diarrhea, especially in children, is a very common disease with worldwide distribution and with a significant public health impact. Rotaviruses have been recognized as the major agents of diarrhea in infants and young children in developed as well as developing countries. In Brazil, diarrhea is one of the principal causes of death, mainly in the infant population. To fight diarrhea, traditional Brazilian medicine uses a great variety of plants. In this work, 12 medicinal plant species were screened for simian (SA-11) and human (HCR3) rotaviruses inhibition in vitro. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, the extracts from Artocarpus integrifolia L. (Moraceae) bark (480 microg/ml) and Spondias lutea L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (160 microg/ml) had antiviral activity against both viruses. They showed inhibition of 99.2% and 97%, respectively, for human rotavirus, and 96.4% and 96.2% for simian rotavirus. The extracts from Myristica fragrans Houtt (Myristicaceae) seeds (160 microg/ml) and Spongias lutea bark (40 microg/ml) inhibited human rotavirus (90% and 82.2% inhibition, respectively), whereas the extracts from Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (4 microg/ml) and Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) leaves (8 microg/ml) showed activity only against simian rotavirus (82.2% and 93.8% inhibition, respectively). Our results indicate that the extracts of Artocarpus integrifolia, Myristica fragrans and Spongias lutea can be useful in the treatment of human diarrhea if the etiologic agent is a rotavirus.

  6. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity and safety of the human rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) oral suspension (liquid formulation) when co-administered with expanded program on immunization (EPI) vaccines in Vietnam and the Philippines in 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Anh, D D; Carlos, C C; Thiem, D V; Hutagalung, Y; Gatchalian, S; Bock, H L; Smolenov, I; Suryakiran, P V; Han, H H

    2011-03-03

    Evaluation of immunogenicity and safety of a 2-dose liquid formulation of human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 following WHO's Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) schedule (0, 1, and 2 months; Month 0 indicates day of enrollment) in Vietnam and the Philippines. Infants aged 6-10 (mean=8.7 ± 1.07 weeks Vietnam) and 5-10 weeks (mean=6.6 ± 1.03 weeks Philippines) received two doses of RIX4414 vaccine (V) and one dose of placebo (PL) or three placebo doses concomitantly with commercially available diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis, hepatitis B and oral poliovirus vaccines. The vaccination schedules were: V-V-PL, V-PL-V and PL-PL-PL (Vietnam); PL-V-V, V-PL-V and PL-PL-PL (Philippines). Anti-rotavirus seroconversion rate was assessed pre-vaccination and post-vaccination (ELISA cut-off=20 U/ml). 375 infants were enrolled in each country. Seroconversion rates at one month post-Dose 2 of RIX4414 were Vietnam 63.3% (95% CI: 54.3-71.6) in V-V-PL group and 81.5% (95% CI: 73.4-88) in V-PL-V group; Philippines 70% (95% CI: 61-78) in PL-V-V group and 59.2% (95% CI: 49.8-68) in V-PL-V group. Frequencies of solicited (8-day post-each dose) and unsolicited symptoms (31-day post-each dose) were similar. Two-doses of rotavirus vaccine administered within the WHO EPI offer flexibility in existing schedule, though both schedules provides good immune responses.

  7. Caffeine attenuates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in humans.

    PubMed

    Riedel, W; Hogervorst, E; Leboux, R; Verhey, F; van Praag, H; Jolles, J

    1995-11-01

    Caffeine consumption can be beneficial for cognitive functioning. Although caffeine is widely recognized as a mild CNS stimulant drug, the most important consequence of its adenosine antagonism is cholinergic stimulation, which might lead to improvement of higher cognitive functions, particularly memory. In this study, the scopolamine model of amnesia was used to test the cholinergic effects of caffeine, administered as three cups of coffee. Subjects were 16 healthy volunteers who received 250 mg caffeine and 2 mg nicotine separately, in a placebo-controlled double-blind cross-over design. Compared to placebo, nicotine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of storage in short-term memory and attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of speed of short-term memory scanning. Nicotine also attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of reaction time in a response competition task. Caffeine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of free recall from short- and long-term memory, quality and speed of retrieval from long-term memory in a word learning task, and other cognitive and non-cognitive measures, such as perceptual sensitivity in visual search, reading speed, and rate of finger-tapping. On the basis of these results it was concluded that caffeine possesses cholinergic cognition enhancing properties. Caffeine could be used as a control drug in studies using the scopolamine paradigm and possibly also in other experimental studies of cognitive enhancers, as the effects of a newly developed cognition enhancing drug should at least be superior to the effects of three cups of coffee.

  8. Introduction and prolonged circulation of G12 rotaviruses in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, G M; Bonura, F; DI Bernardo, F; Cascio, A; Ferrera, G; Dones, P; Saporito, L; Collura, A; Terranova, D M; Valenzise, M; Allù, M T; Casuccio, N; Palermo, M; Bányai, K; Martella, V; DE Grazia, S

    2016-07-01

    Genotype G12 strains are now considered to be the sixth most prevalent human rotaviruses worldwide. In two Sicilian cities, Palermo and Messina, surveillance of rotavirus circulation performed since 1985 and 2009, respectively, did not detect G12 strains until 2012. From 2012 to 2014 rotavirus infection was detected in 29·7% of 1647 stool samples collected from children admitted for acute gastroenteritis to three Sicilian hospitals in Palermo, Messina and Ragusa. In 2012, G12P[8] was first detected in Palermo and then in Messina where it represented the second most frequent genotype (20% prevalence) after G1P[8]. Thereafter, G12 strains continued to circulate in Sicily, showing a marked prevalence in Ragusa (27·8%) in 2013 and in Palermo (21%) and Messina (16·6%) in 2014. All but one of the Sicilian G12 strains carried a P[8] VP4 genotype, whereas the single non-P[8] rotavirus strain was genotyped as G12P[9]. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 and VP4 sequences allowed distinction of several genetic lineages and separation of the G12P[8] strains into three cluster combinations. These findings indicate independent introductions of G12 rotavirus strains in Sicily in recent years.

  9. Extinction treatment in multiple contexts attenuates ABC renewal in humans.

    PubMed

    Balooch, Siavash Bandarian; Neumann, David L; Boschen, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Renewal has been implicated as one of the underlying mechanisms in return of fear following exposure therapy. ABC renewal is clinically more relevant than ABA renewal and yet it is a weaker form of renewal, suggesting that conducting extinction treatment in multiple contexts may be sufficient to attenuate ABC renewal. Using self-reported expectancy of shock and startle blink responses the current study examined the effects of conducting extinction treatment in multiple contexts on ABC fear renewal. Participants (N = 68) received conditional stimulus (CS) and unconditional stimulus (US) pairings in one context (A) followed by extinction treatment (CS presentations alone) in either one other context (B) or three other contexts (BCD). Non-reinforced test trials in a novel context (E) resulted in renewal of extinguished conditioned behaviour for those who received extinction in only one context. However, renewal was attenuated for those who received extinction treatment in three contexts. No renewal was found for the control group that received the test trial in the same context as during extinction. Suggestions are provided for clinicians seeking to prevent or attenuate return of fear following exposure therapy.

  10. Assessment of the risks for human health of adenoviruses, hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses and enteroviruses in the Buffalo River and three source water dams in the Eastern Cape.

    PubMed

    Chigor, Vincent N; Sibanda, Timothy; Okoh, Anthony I

    2014-06-01

    Buffalo River is an important water resource in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. The potential risks of infection constituted by exposure to human enteric viruses in the Buffalo River and three source water dams along its course were assessed using mean values and static quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The daily risks of infection determined by the exponential model [for human adenovirus (HAdV) and enterovirus (EnV)] and the beta-Poisson model (for hepatitis A virus (HAV) and rotavirus (RoV)) varied with sites and exposure scenario. The estimated daily risks of infection values at the sites where the respective viruses were detected, ranged from 7.31 × 10(-3) to 1 (for HAdV), 4.23 × 10(-2) to 6.54 × 10(-1) (RoV), 2.32 × 10(-4) to 1.73 × 10(-1) (HAV) and 1.32 × 10(-4) to 5.70 × 10(-2) (EnV). The yearly risks of infection in individuals exposed to the river/dam water via drinking, recreational, domestic or irrigational activities were unacceptably high, exceeding the acceptable risk of 0.01% (10(-4) infection/person/year), and the guideline value used as by several nations for drinking water. The risks of illness and death from infection ranged from 6.58 × 10(-5) to 5.0 × 10(-1) and 6.58 × 10(-9) to 5.0 × 10(-5), respectively. The threats here are heightened by the high mortality rates for HAV, and its endemicity in South Africa. Therefore, we conclude that the Buffalo River and its source water dams are a public health hazard. The QMRA presented here is the first of its kinds in the Eastern Cape Province and provides the building block for a quantitatively oriented local guideline for water quality management in the Province.

  11. Vaccines: the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine: discovery to licensure and beyond.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Penny M; Ciarlet, Max

    2007-12-15

    Twenty-five years passed between the discovery of the parent strain (WC3) of the pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (PRV) in 1981 and the licensure of PRV in 2006. This orally administered liquid vaccine, which is given as a 3-dose series, is indicated for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis, caused by the G serotypes contained in the vaccine, in infants and children. PRV is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American Academy of Pediatrics for administration to all infants in the United States. These recommendations are supported by the results of the phase III studies, which demonstrated that PRV is well tolerated and efficacious. PRV reduced rotavirus-related hospitalizations by 96% and was not associated with an increased incidence of serious adverse events, including intussusception. This report focuses on the safety and efficacy data from the late-phase studies of PRV and discusses plans for providing this vaccine to the developing world.

  12. Rotavirus Prevalence in the Primary Care Setting in Nicaragua after Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G.; Weber, David J.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1–3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9–5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program. PMID:22049057

  13. Rotavirus seasonality in urban sewage from Argentina: effect of meteorological variables on the viral load and the genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Barril, P A; Fumian, T M; Prez, V E; Gil, P I; Martínez, L C; Giordano, M O; Masachessi, G; Isa, M B; Ferreyra, L J; Ré, V E; Miagostovich, M; Pavan, J V; Nates, S V

    2015-04-01

    In Argentina, the rotavirus disease exhibits seasonal variations, being most prevalent in the fall and winter months. To deepen the understanding of rotavirus seasonality in our community, the influence of meteorological factors on the rotavirus load and the genetic diversity in urban raw sewage from Córdoba city, Argentina were evaluated. Wastewater samples were collected monthly during a three-year study period and viral particles were concentrated by polyethylene glycol precipitation. RT-nested PCR was applied for rotavirus detection, and VP7/VP4 characterization and real-time PCR for rotavirus quantification. Both molecular techniques showed relatively similar sensitivity rates and revealed rotavirus presence in urban wastewater in cold and warm seasons, indicating its circulation in the local community all year round. However, a slight trend for rotavirus circulation was noted by real-time PCR in the fall and winter seasons, showing a significantly higher peak of rotavirus concentration at mean temperatures lower than 18°C and also higher, although not statistically different during drier weather. VP7 and VP4 gene characterization showed that G1 and P[8] genotypes were dominant, and temporal variations in genotype distribution were not observed. Rotavirus spread is complex and our results point out that weather factors alone cannot explain the seasonal quantitative pattern of the rotavirus disease. Therefore, alternative transmission routes, changes in human behavior and susceptibility, and the stability and survivability of the virus might all together contribute to the seasonality of rotavirus. The results obtained here provide evidence regarding the dynamics of rotavirus circulation and maintenance in Argentina.

  14. Modeling of the rotavirus group C capsid predicts a surface topology distinct from other rotavirus species.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Zamuda, Kimberly; Patton, John T

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus C (RVC) causes sporadic gastroenteritis in adults and is an established enteric pathogen of swine. Because RVC strains grow poorly in cell culture, which hinders generation of virion-derived RVC triple-layered-particle (TLP) structures, we used the known Rotavirus A (RVA) capsid structure to model the human RVC (Bristol) capsid. Comparative analysis of RVA and RVC capsid proteins showed major differences at the VP7 layer, an important target region for vaccine development due to its antigenic properties. Our model predicted the presence of a surface extended loop in RVC, which could form a major antigenic site on the capsid. We analyzed variations in the glycosylation patterns among RV capsids and identified group specific conserved sites. In addition, our results showed a smaller RVC VP4 foot, which protrudes toward the intermediate VP6 layer, in comparison to that of RVA. Finally, our results showed major structural differences at the VP8* glycan recognition sites.

  15. Minocycline attenuates subjective-rewarding effects of dextroamphetamine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Mooney, Marc; Kosten, Thomas; Waters, Andrew; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, interacts with brain glutamate and dopamine neurotransmission. In preclinical studies, minocycline attenuated amphetamine-induced acute dopamine release and subsequent behavioral sensitization. The goal of this study was to determine minocycline’s effects on the acute physiological, behavioral, and subjective responses to dextroamphetamine (DAMP) in healthy volunteers. Methods Ten healthy volunteers participated in an outpatient double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Subjects had a 5-day treatment period with either minocycline (200 mg/day) or placebo and then were crossed over for 5-days of the other treatment. After two days of taking the study medication, on days 3 and 4, subjects were randomly assigned to double-blind acute challenge with either 20 mg/70 kg DAMP or placebo DAMP (randomly labeled as drug A or B) and then crossed-over to the other challenge. On Day 5 (Experimental Session 3), subjects had the opportunity to self-administer either placebo or DAMP capsules by working on a progressive ratio computer task. Results Minocycline attenuated DAMP-induced subjective-rewarding effects but did not change DAMP choice behavior. Minocycline treatment speeded reaction times on a Go No-Go task and reduced plasma cortisol levels. Conclusions These findings warrant further studies examining the potential use of minocycline for stimulant addiction. PMID:20838775

  16. Protect Your Child from Rotavirus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... will be protected from severe rotavirus disease. Most vaccinated children will not get sick from rotavirus at all. ... does not cover vaccines for your child, the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program may be able to help. This ...

  17. Rotavirus vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/rotavirus.pdf . CDC review information ... known reason for it. www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/rotavirus.pdf Problems that could ...

  18. Innate cellular responses to rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S

    2013-06-01

    Rotavirus is a leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhoea in infants and young children. Following rotavirus infection in the intestine an innate immune response is rapidly triggered. This response leads to the induction of type I and type III interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines, resulting in a reduction in viral replication. Here we review the current literature describing the detection of rotavirus infection by pattern recognition receptors within host cells, the subsequent molecular mechanisms leading to IFN and cytokine production, and the processes leading to reduced rotavirus replication and the development of protective immunity. Rotavirus countermeasures against innate responses, and their roles in modulating rotavirus replication in mice, also are discussed. By linking these different aspects of innate immunity, we provide a comprehensive overview of the host's first line of defence against rotavirus infection. Understanding these processes is expected to be of benefit in improving strategies to combat rotavirus disease.

  19. The first detection and whole genome characterization of the G6P[15] group A rotavirus strain from roe deer.

    PubMed

    Jamnikar-Ciglenecki, Urska; Kuhar, Urska; Sturm, Sabina; Kirbis, Andrej; Racki, Nejc; Steyer, Andrej

    2016-08-15

    Although rotaviruses have been detected in a variety of host species, there are only limited records of their occurrence in deer, where their role is unknown. In this study, group A rotavirus was identified in roe deer during a study of enteric viruses in game animals. 102 samples of intestinal content were collected from roe deer (56), wild boars (29), chamois (10), red deer (6) and mouflon (1), but only one sample from roe deer was positive. Following whole genome sequence analysis, the rotavirus strain D38/14 was characterized by next generation sequencing. The genotype constellation, comprising 11 genome segments, was G6-P[15]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genome segment showed that the D38/14 rotavirus strain is closely related to the various G6 zoonotic rotavirus strains of bovine-like origin frequently detected in humans. In the VP4 segment, this strain showed high variation compared to that in the P[15] strain found in sheep and in a goat. This finding suggests that rotaviruses from deer are similar to those in other DS-1 rotavirus groups and could constitute a source of zoonotically transmitted rotaviruses. The epidemiological status of group A rotaviruses in deer should be further investigated.

  20. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  1. Attenuation correction for the large non-human primate brain imaging using microPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo-Variawa, S.; Lehnert, W.; Kassiou, M.; Banati, R.; Meikle, S. R.

    2010-04-01

    Assessment of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in vivo is often performed on animal models of human disease prior to their use in humans. The baboon brain is physiologically and neuro-anatomically similar to the human brain and is therefore a suitable model for evaluating novel CNS radioligands. We previously demonstrated the feasibility of performing baboon brain imaging on a dedicated small animal PET scanner provided that the data are accurately corrected for degrading physical effects such as photon attenuation in the body. In this study, we investigated factors affecting the accuracy and reliability of alternative attenuation correction strategies when imaging the brain of a large non-human primate (papio hamadryas) using the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner. For measured attenuation correction, the best bias versus noise performance was achieved using a 57Co transmission point source with a 4% energy window. The optimal energy window for a 68Ge transmission source operating in singles acquisition mode was 20%, independent of the source strength, providing bias-noise performance almost as good as for 57Co. For both transmission sources, doubling the acquisition time had minimal impact on the bias-noise trade-off for corrected emission images, despite observable improvements in reconstructed attenuation values. In a [18F]FDG brain scan of a female baboon, both measured attenuation correction strategies achieved good results and similar SNR, while segmented attenuation correction (based on uncorrected emission images) resulted in appreciable regional bias in deep grey matter structures and the skull. We conclude that measured attenuation correction using a single pass 57Co (4% energy window) or 68Ge (20% window) transmission scan achieves an excellent trade-off between bias and propagation of noise when imaging the large non-human primate brain with a microPET scanner.

  2. Inspiratory muscle training attenuates the human respiratory muscle metaboreflex

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Jonathan D; Guenette, Jordan A; Rupert, Jim L; McKenzie, Donald C; Sheel, A William

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) would attenuate the sympathetically mediated heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increases normally observed during fatiguing inspiratory muscle work. An experimental group (Exp, n = 8) performed IMT 6 days per week for 5 weeks at 50% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), while a control group (Sham, n = 8) performed IMT at 10% MIP. Pre- and post-training, subjects underwent a eucapnic resistive breathing task (RBT) (breathing frequency = 15 breaths min−1, duty cycle = 0.70) while HR and MAP were continuously monitored. Following IMT, MIP increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the Exp group (−125 ± 10 to −146 ± 12 cmH2O; mean ±s.e.m.) but not in the Sham group (−141 ± 11 to −148 ± 11 cmH2O). Prior to IMT, the RBT resulted in significant increases in HR (Sham: 59 ± 2 to 83 ± 4 beats min−1; Exp: 62 ± 3 to 83 ± 4 beats min−1) and MAP (Sham: 88 ± 2 to 106 ± 3 mmHg; Exp: 84 ± 1 to 99 ± 3 mmHg) in both groups relative to rest. Following IMT, the Sham group observed similar HR and MAP responses to the RBT while the Exp group failed to increase HR and MAP to the same extent as before (HR: 59 ± 3 to 74 ± 2 beats min−1; MAP: 84 ± 1 to 89 ± 2 mmHg). This attenuated cardiovascular response suggests a blunted sympatho-excitation to resistive inspiratory work. We attribute our findings to a reduced activity of chemosensitive afferents within the inspiratory muscles and may provide a mechanism for some of the whole-body exercise endurance improvements associated with IMT. PMID:17855758

  3. Homotypic immune response to primary infection with rotavirus serotype G1.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A M; Boher, Y; Guntiñas, M J; Pérez-Schael, I

    1995-12-01

    Some aspects of rotavirus humoral immunity were assessed on the basis of distinguishing serotype-specific specificities (VP4/VP7) by using rotavirus reassortants, human and animal strains in neutralization assays in serum samples obtained during the acute phase, and 1, 6 and 12 months after primary natural infection. In this study, all the infecting virus strains were characterized as G type and some also as P type. Primary natural infection induces a significantly greater homotypic neutralization response than heterotypic response. In addition, there was no significant difference in the number of homotypic or heterotypic responses following reinfection. Transplacentally acquired homotypic antibodies were associated with protection against dehydration during rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  4. Rotavirus Infection in Children with Diarrhea at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Damanka, Susan; Adiku, Theophilus K; Armah, George E; Rodrigues, Onike; Donkor, Eric S; Nortey, David; Asmah, Richard

    2016-07-22

    Human rotavirus infection was studied over a 13-month period (January 2004 to January 2005) in children <5 years of age admitted with severe diarrhea at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana. During this period, 206 hospitalizations for diarrhea were recorded, with 34.0% (70/206) being positive for rotavirus infection. Infection occurred throughout the year, with peak rotavirus infection occurring during the month of March. Hospitalization associated with rotaviruses was most common in the 6-8 month age group. The case fatality rate of rotavirus infection was 2.9% (2/70) and occurred in children <12 months of age. Four rotavirus VP7 genotypes (G1, G2, G3, and G9) were detected. The predominant genotypes were G2 (22.9%), G1 (17.1%), G9 (17.1%) and G3 (12.9%). Mixed G types were also detected. The predominant VP4 genotypes (P types) were P[6] (38.6%), P[8] (21.4%), P[4] (4.3%) and P[9] (1.4%). The predominant rotavirus strains infecting children in Accra were G9P[6] (10.0%) and G1P[8] (8.6%). Strains with unusual genotypes such as G2P[8] and G(2/3)P[6] were also detected.

  5. Prevention of rotavirus infections in vitro with aqueous extracts of Quillaja Saponaria Molina

    PubMed Central

    Roner, Michael R; Tam, Ka Ian; Kiesling-Barrager, Melody

    2010-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide, estimated to be responsible for over 300,000 childhood deaths every year, mostly in developing countries. Rotavirus-related deaths represent approximately 5% of all deaths in children younger than 5 years of age worldwide. Saponins are readily soluble in water and are approved by the US FDA for inclusion in beverages intended for human consumption. The addition of saponins to existing water supplies offers a new form of intervention into the cycle of rotavirus infection. We believe that saponins will ‘coat’ the epithelium of the host's small intestine and prevent attachment of rotavirus. Discussion This experiment provides in vitro data for the possibility of including saponin in drinking water to prevent infections of rotavirus. We demonstrate that microgram amounts of extract, while exhibiting no cell cytotoxicity or direct virucidal activity, prevent rotavirus from infecting its host cells. In addition, the presence of residual amounts of extract continue to block viral infection and render cells resistant to infection for at least 16 h after the removal of the extract from the cell culture media. Conclusion We demonstrate that two Quillaja extracts possess strong antiviral activity at concentrations more than 1000-fold lower than concentrations exhibiting cell cytotoxicity. Extract concentrations as high as 1000 μg/ml are not cytotoxic, but concentrations as low as 1.0 μg/ml are able to block rotavirus and reovirus attachment and infection. PMID:20725585

  6. Candidate new rotavirus species in sheltered dogs, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A-H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I.

  7. Monitoring impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2011-08-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age globally. Since 2009, the WHO has recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization programs of all countries. Data regarding rotavirus vaccine impact and effectiveness under conditions of routine use are important for encouraging countries to implement vaccination programs. In the absence of a national rotavirus vaccination program in France, the IVANHOE study was initiated to determine the real-world impact and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine following introduction in a limited geographic area. This study found a twofold reduction in rotavirus hospitalizations among children <2 years of age who were age-eligible to receive rotavirus vaccine and a 98% vaccine effectiveness, highlighting the health benefits of a vaccination program.

  8. New insights into rotavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mameli, Chiara; Fabiano, Valentina; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have shown to be effective and well tolerated in clinical trials. However it’s crucial to point out that immunization occurs in “real-word” conditions different from ideal clinical trial settings. Thus, the impact of rotavirus vaccines in terms of effectiveness and safety needs to be evaluated in real-world conditions. Post-licensure data regarding vaccine impact, effectiveness and safety under routine use are now available and provide a “real-world view.” PMID:22699445

  9. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    MedlinePlus

    ... PARENT S | DISEASES and the VACCINES THAT PREVENT THEM | Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It Last ... February 2014 The best way to protect against rotavirus is by getting the rotavirus vaccine. Doctors recommend ...

  10. Genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis attenuated vaccine strain A16R used for human in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiankai; Qi, Xinpeng; Zhu, Li; Wang, Dongshu; Gao, Zhiqi; Deng, Haijun; Wu, Weili; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chen; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Hengliang

    2015-09-20

    An attenuated Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain for human use, A16R, was obtained in China after ultraviolet radiation treatment and continuous subculture of the wild-type strain A16. A16R can synthesize the exotoxin, but without a capsule. We sequenced and annotated the A16R genome to encourage the use of this strain. The genome sequencing of the wild-type strain A16 is underway and the genomic comparison between the two strains will help to illustrate the attenuating mechanism of the A16R vaccine strain.

  11. Diversity of rotavirus serotypes in Mexican infants with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Noriega, L; Arias, C F; López, S; Puerto, F; Snodgrass, D R; Taniguchi, K; Greenberg, H B

    1990-01-01

    One hundred thirty-two stool specimens from infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalized in two Mexican cities (Mexico City and Mérida) were examined by serotype- and subgroup-specific enzyme immunoassays. Among them, 38 (29%) were serotype 1, 15 (11%) were serotype 2, 13 (10%) were serotype 3, 22 (17%) were serotype 4, none was serotype 5 or 6, and 44 (33%) could not be serotyped. By subgrouping, 121 specimens were characterized as follows: 24 (18%) were subgroup 1, 97 (74%) were subgroup 2, and none had both subgroup specificities. While serotype 1 rotavirus predominated in the Mexico City area for 4 consecutive years (1984 to 1987), serotype 4 predominated in Mérida during the single epidemic season studied (1985). These data demonstrate that all four primary human rotavirus serotypes circulated in Mexico, with serotype 1 being the most prevalent. The seroneutralization responses of 14 of the 22 patients infected with serotype 4 strains had been previously studied. Of these 14 infants, 11 appeared to have primary infections, as indicated by absence of neutralizing antibodies in the acute-phase sera and their young age (8 months on average) at the time of illness. Seven patients seroresponded to serotypes 1 and 4; two seroresponded to serotypes 1, 3, and 4; three seroresponded to serotype 1; and two had low-level seroresponses to serotype 3 or 4. These data indicate that heterotypic neutralizing antibody responses occur frequently following infection with serotype 4 rotaviruses. PMID:2166073

  12. Serial observations of chronic rotavirus infection in an immunodeficient child.

    PubMed

    Oishi, I; Kimura, T; Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Yamazaki, K; Seto, Y; Minekawa, Y; Funamoto, H

    1991-01-01

    Chronic rotavirus infection of an infant with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was studied by virological examinations in association with long-term observation of his symptoms and immune status. During eleven months of hospitalization, the patient was suffering from incurable severe diarrhea with persisting excretion of rotaviruses detected by electron microscopy and the reversed-passive hemagglutination (R-PHA) test and had transient hepatitis symptom despite multiple administrations of human gammaglobulin and high calorie fluids. The detected viruses were morphologically recognized as rotavirus with double capsid structure. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (PAGE) analysis of their genomic RNAs showed the long electropherotype of group A virus with abnormal migration profiles changing considerably from the early to the late phase of illness: (1) The 11th segment became undetectable; (2) the molecular weight of the 6th segment slightly increased; (3) seven to fourteen extra segments appeared; and (4) PAGE patterns of viral genomic RNAs changed every three or four months. These findings suggest that chronic infection with rotavirus accompanied the generation of extra viral genomic segments and their unusual assortments in an immunodeficient host.

  13. Attenuated noradrenergic sensitivity during local cooling in aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Caitlin S; Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W. Larry

    2005-01-01

    Reflex-mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction (VC) is impaired in older humans; however, it is unclear whether this blunted VC also occurs during local cooling, which mediates VC through different mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that the sensitization of cutaneous vessels to noradrenaline (NA) during direct skin cooling seen in young skin is blunted in aged skin. In 11 young (18–30 years) and 11 older (62–76 years) men and women, skin blood flow was monitored at two forearm sites with laser Doppler (LD) flowmetry while local skin temperature was cooled and clamped at 24°C. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; LD flux/mean arterial pressure) was expressed as percentage change from baseline (%ΔCVCbase). At one site, five doses of NA (10−10–10−2m) were sequentially infused via intradermal microdialysis during cooling while the other 24°C site served as control (Ringer solution + cooling). At control sites, VC due to cooling alone was similar in young versus older (−54 ± 5 versus −56 ± 3%ΔCVCbase, P= 0.46). In young, NA infusions induced additional dose-dependent VC (10−8, 10−6, 10−4 and 10−2m: −70 ± 2, −72 ± 3, −78 ± 3 and −79 ± 4%ΔCVCbase; P < 0.05 versus control). In older subjects, further VC did not occur until the highest infused dose of NA (10−2m: −70 ± 5%ΔCVCbase; P < 0.05 versus control). When cutaneous arterioles are sensitized to NA by direct cooling, young skin exhibits the capacity to further constrict to NA in a dose-dependent manner. However, older skin does not display enhanced VC capacity until treated with saturating doses of NA, possibly due to age-associated decrements in Ca2+ availability or α2C-adrenoceptor function. PMID:15705648

  14. Molecular analysis of the VP7, VP4, VP6, NSP4, and NSP5/6 genes of a buffalo rotavirus strain: identification of the rare P[3] rhesus rotavirus-like VP4 gene allele.

    PubMed

    Martella, V; Ciarlet, M; Pratelli, A; Arista, S; Terio, V; Elia, G; Cavalli, A; Gentile, M; Decaro, N; Greco, G; Cafiero, M A; Tempesta, M; Buonavoglia, C

    2003-12-01

    We report the detection and molecular characterization of a rotavirus strain, 10733, isolated from the feces of a buffalo calf affected with diarrhea in Italy. Strain 10733 was classified as a P[3] rotavirus, as the VP8* trypsin cleavage product of the VP4 protein revealed a high amino acid identity (96.2%) with that of rhesus rotavirus strain RRV (P5B[3]), used as the recipient virus in the human-simian reassortant vaccine. Analysis of the VP7 gene product revealed that strain 10733 possessed G6 serotype specificity, a type common in ruminants, with an amino acid identity to G6 rotavirus strains ranging from 88 to 98%, to Venezuelan bovine strain BRV033, and Hungarian human strain Hun4. Phylogenetic analysis based on the VP7 gene of G6 rotaviruses identified at least four lineages and an apparent linkage between each lineage and the VP4 specificity, suggesting the occurrence of repeated interspecies transmissions and genetic reassortment events between ruminant and human rotaviruses. Moreover, strain 10733 displayed a bovine-like NSP4 and NSP5/6 and a subgroup I VP6 specificity, as well as a long electropherotype pattern. The detection of the rare P[3] genotype in ruminants provides additional evidence for the wide genetic and antigenic diversity of group A rotaviruses.

  15. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly by mediating fusion with the cell membrane) and VP7 (a glycoprotein), show more similarities with those of other viruses such as the orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and alphaviruses. Rotavirus morphogenesis is a unique process, during which immature subviral particles bud through the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During this process, transiently enveloped particles form, the outer capsid proteins are assembled onto particles, and mature particles accumulate in the lumen of the ER. Two ER-specific viral glycoproteins are involved in virus maturation, and these glycoproteins have been shown to be useful models for studying protein targeting and retention in the ER and for studying mechanisms of virus budding. New ideas and approaches to understanding how each gene functions to replicate and assemble the segmented viral genome have emerged from knowledge of the primary structure of rotavirus genes and their proteins and from knowledge of the properties of domains on individual proteins. Localization of type-specific and cross-reactive neutralizing epitopes on the outer capsid proteins is becoming increasingly useful in dissecting the protective immune response, including evaluation of vaccine trials, with the practical possibility of enhancing the production of new, more effective vaccines. Finally, future analyses with recently characterized immunologic and gene probes and new animal models can be expected to provide a basic understanding of what regulates the

  16. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact

    PubMed Central

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact. PMID:23836258

  17. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact.

    PubMed

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-06-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact.

  18. Novel G9 rotavirus strains co-circulate in children and pigs, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang-Tzy; Bányai, Krisztián; Jiang, Baoming; Liu, Luke Tzu-Chi; Marton, Szilvia; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Huang, Li-Min; Liao, Ming-Hui; Hsiung, Chao A.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies collecting information of the spatiotemporal distribution of rotavirus VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotypes have shown evidence for the increasing global importance of genotype G9 rotaviruses in humans and pigs. Sequence comparison of the VP7 gene of G9 strains identified different lineages to prevail in the respective host species although some of these lineages appear to be shared among heterologous hosts providing evidence of interspecies transmission events. The majority of these events indicates the pig-to-human spillover, although a reverse route of transmission cannot be excluded either. In this study, new variants of G9 rotaviruses were identified in two children with diarrhea and numerous pigs in Taiwan. Whole genome sequence and phylogenetic analyses of selected strains showed close genetic relationship among porcine and human strains suggesting zoonotic origin of Taiwanese human G9 strains detected in 2014–2015. Although the identified human G9P[19] and G9P[13] rotaviruses represented minority strains, the repeated detection of porcine-like rotavirus strains in Taiwanese children over time justifies the continuation of synchronized strain surveillance in humans and domestic animals. PMID:28098174

  19. The impact of rotavirus disease in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Schael, I

    1996-09-01

    Information concerning the disease burden of rotavirus, particularly in developing countries, has important implications for the use and for monitoring the impact of rotavirus vaccines. Although rotavirus has been recognized as the most frequent cause of hospitalization in the world, national estimates and specific information about the incidence of hospitalization for rotavirus gastroenteritis are very limited. Consequently, estimates of the incidence of hospitalization among children during the first 2 years of life in Venezuela were determined by extrapolation of data from a community-based study carried out in Caracas.

  20. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  1. Rotavirus Infection: A Disease of the Past?

    PubMed

    Dennehy, Penelope H

    2015-12-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe diarrhea disease in infants and young children worldwide. Vaccination is the only control measure likely to have a significant impact on the incidence of severe disease. Rotavirus vaccines have reduced the burden of disease in the United States and Europe and vaccine programs are being introduced in Asia and Africa where it is hoped that vaccine will have significant impact on severe infection. Long-term monitoring and strain surveillance are needed to assess the effects of rotavirus immunization programs and to determine whether changes in strain ecology will affect rotavirus vaccine effectiveness.

  2. Protection of Humans against Malaria by Immunization with Radiation-Attenuated Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-15

    departments of the Navy or Army. a Present affiliations: Celera Genomics , Rockville, Maryland (S.L.H.); Pe- diatric Specialty Center, Monroe, Louisiana...Stephen L. Hoffman, Biologics, Celera Genomics , 45 W. Gude Dr., Rockville, MD 20850 (stephen.hoffman@celera.com). Received 1 August 2001; revised 19...Protection of Humans against Malaria by Immunization with Radiation-Attenuated Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites Stephen L. Hoffman,1,a Lucy M. L

  3. Measurement and analysis of channel attenuation characteristics for an implantable galvanic coupling human-body communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Qin, Yu-Ping; Liu, Yi-He; Vai, Mang I

    2016-11-14

    In this study, an experiment was designed to verify the low power consumption of galvanic coupling human-body communication. A silver electrode (silver content: 99%) is placed in a pig leg and a sine wave signal with the power of 0 dBm is input. Compared with radio frequency communication and antenna transmission communication, attenuation is reduced by approximately 10 to 15 dB, so channel characteristics are highly improved.

  4. Neutralizing antibody immune response in children with primary and secondary rotavirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C F; López, S; Mascarenhas, J D; Romero, P; Cano, P; Gabbay, Y B; de Freitas, R B; Linhares, A C

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized the neutralizing antibody immune response to six human rotavirus serotypes (G1 to G4, G8, and G9) in Brazilian children with primary and secondary rotavirus infections and correlated the response with the G serotype of the infecting rotavirus strain. Twenty-five children were studied: 17 had a single rotavirus infection, 4 were reinfected once, and 4 experienced three infections. Two of the reinfections were by non-group A rotaviruses. Among the 25 primary infections, we observed homotypic as well as heterotypic responses; the serotype G1 viruses, which accounted for 13 of these infections, induced mostly a homotypic response, while infections by serotype G2 and G4 viruses induced, in addition to the homotypic, a heterotypic response directed primarily to serotype G1. Two of the primary infections induced heterotypic antibodies to 69M, a serotype G8 virus that by RNA electrophoresis analysis was found not to circulate in the population during the time of the study. The specificity of the neutralizing antibody immune response induced by a virus of a given serotype was the same in primary as well as secondary infections. These results indicate that the heterotypic immune response induced in a primary rotavirus infection is an intrinsic property of the virus strain, and although there seem to be general patterns of serotype-specific seroconversion, these may vary from serotype to serotype and from strain to strain within a serotype. PMID:7496929

  5. Neutralizing antibodies against rotavirus produced in transgenically labelled purple tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Paloma; Presa, Silvia; Espí, Joaquín; Pineda, Benito; Antón, María T; Moreno, Vicente; Buesa, Javier; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2012-04-01

    Edible fruits are inexpensive biofactories for human health-promoting molecules that can be ingested as crude extracts or partially purified formulations. We show here the production of a model human antibody for passive protection against the enteric pathogen rotavirus in transgenically labelled tomato fruits. Transgenic tomato plants expressing a recombinant human immunoglobulin A (hIgA_2A1) selected against the VP8* peptide of rotavirus SA11 strain were obtained. The amount of hIgA_2A1 protein reached 3.6 ± 0.8% of the total soluble protein in the fruit of the transformed plants. Minimally processed fruit-derived products suitable for oral intake showed anti-VP8* binding activity and strongly inhibited virus infection in an in vitro virus neutralization assay. In order to make tomatoes expressing hIgA_2A1 easily distinguishable from wild-type tomatoes, lines expressing hIgA_2A1 transgenes were sexually crossed with a transgenic tomato line expressing the genes encoding Antirrhinum majus Rosea1 and Delila transcription factors, which confer purple colour to the fruit. Consequently, transgenically labelled purple tomato fruits expressing hIgA_2A1 have been developed. The resulting purple-coloured extracts from these fruits contain high levels of recombinant anti-rotavirus neutralizing human IgA in combination with increased amounts of health-promoting anthocyanins.

  6. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S.; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity. PMID:26384561

  7. Molecular characterization of rotavirus isolated from alpaca (Vicugna pacos) crias with diarrhea in the Andean Region of Cusco, Peru.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, Antonio E; Lopez, Wellington; Ortega, Nastassja; Chamorro, Marycris J

    2015-10-22

    Alpacas (Vicugna pacos), a species of South American camelids (SAC), suffer high morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of alpaca cria mortality in Peru and elsewhere. In order to develop appropriate control and/or treatment, it is necessary to identify infectious pathogens that cause diarrhea in crias. Rotavirus was isolated in cell culture from feces collected from crias with acute diarrhea that tested positive to rotaviral antigen by rapid immunochromatographic methods in an earlier study. The isolates were identified as rotaviruses by RT-PCR run with specific primers for human rotavirus VP7 coding sequences using total RNA extracted from cells displaying cytopathic effects as template. These alpaca isolates were further identified as group A rotaviruses by means of a VP6-specific PCR and were designated as ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3368-10 and ALRVA-K'ayra/Perú/3386-10. Molecular G and P typing, placed the former as G3/P11 and the latter as G3/P?. Sequence analysis of two genome segments (coding for VP4 and VP7) from the alpaca isolates revealed partial homologies to swine and human rotaviruses, respectively. These results demonstrate that rotaviruses are associated with a proportion of cases of diarrhea in crias, although prevalence and impact remain to be determined. The isolation of rotaviruses from alpaca crias with diarrhea will contribute positively to further understand the pathogen and its role in the diarrhea complex.

  8. Lack of impact of rapid identification of rotavirus-infected patients on nosocomial rotavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, P H; Tente, W E; Fisher, D J; Veloudis, B A; Peter, G

    1989-05-01

    The efficacy of rapid identification of rotavirus-infected patients in the control of nosocomial rotavirus infections on an infant and young toddler ward by use of a rotavirus antigen detection test on stool from patients with diarrhea was evaluated by comparing the rate of nosocomial rotavirus infection in children during two separate 5-week periods in the winters of 1984 and 1986. In contrast to 1984 rapid rotavirus antigen testing by latex agglutination of stool from patients with diarrhea was instituted in 1986, in addition to testing for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay, to determine whether use of rapid antigen testing resulted in an increased incidence of appropriate isolation and a decrease in nosocomial infections. In 1986 rapid identification of rotavirus resulted in an increase in hospitalization of rotavirus-infected patients in single bed rooms from 68% to 100% (P = 0.02, chi square test) but no significant increase in the use of enteric precautions for these patients. The total number of cases of nosocomial rotavirus infection in the two periods did not differ. In both periods 11 cases occurred; the nosocomial infection rate in 1984 was 18.9 cases/1000 days of exposure whereas in 1986 it was 20.2 cases/1000 days. These findings indicate that the use of rapid rotavirus antigen testing of patients with diarrhea is not of appreciable benefit in preventing the nosocomial spread of rotavirus to infants on the ward.

  9. Phenylephrine-induced elevations in arterial blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure are attenuated in heat-stressed humans, blood pressure was elevated via steady-state infusion of three doses of phenylephrine HCl in 10 healthy subjects in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature by 0.5 degrees C, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), heart rate, and cardiac output and decreased total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR; all P < 0.005) but did not change mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; P > 0.05). At the highest dose of phenylephrine, the increase in MAP and TPR from predrug baselines was significantly attenuated during the heat stress [DeltaMAP 8.4 +/- 1.2 mmHg; DeltaTPR 0.96 +/- 0.85 peripheral resistance units (PRU)] compared with normothermia (DeltaMAP 15.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg, DeltaTPR 7.13 +/- 1.18 PRU; all P < 0.001). The sensitivity of baroreflex control of MSNA and heart rate, expressed as the slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure, as well as the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure, respectively, was similar between thermal conditions (each P > 0.05). These data suggest that phenylephrine-induced elevations in MAP are attenuated in heat-stressed humans without affecting baroreflex control of MSNA or heart rate.

  10. Curcumin attenuates quinocetone-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Li, Daowen; Zhao, Kena; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-01-01

    Quinocetone (QCT), a new quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides, has been used as antimicrobial feed additive in China. Potential genotoxicity of QCT was concerned as a public health problem. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on QCT-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte L02 cells. Cell viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), biomarkers of oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) level were measured. Meanwhile, comet assay and micronucleus assay were carried out to evaluate genotoxicity. The results showed that, compared to the control group, QCT at the concentration ranges of 2-16 μg/mL significantly decreased L02 cell viability, which was significantly attenuated with curcumin pretreatment (2.5 and 5 μM). In addition, QCT significantly increased cell oxidative stress, characterized by increases of intracellular ROS level, while decreased endogenous antioxidant biomarkers GSH level and SOD activity (all p < 0.05 or 0.01). Curcumin pretreatment significantly attenuated ROS formation, inhibited the decreases of SOD activity and GSH level. Furthermore, curcumin significantly reduced QCT-induced DNA fragments and micronuclei formation. These data suggest that curcumin could attenuate QCT-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in L02 cells, which may be attributed to ROS scavenging and anti-oxidative ability of curcumin. Importantly, consumption of curcumin may be a plausible way to prevent quinoxaline 1,4-dioxides-mediated oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human or animals.

  11. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  12. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome following rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Gurkas, Esra; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Yılmaz, Unsal; Havalı, Cengiz; Demir, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurologic disorder characterized by opsoclonus, myoclonus, ataxia and behavioral disturbance. In the pathogenesis, an autoimmune process with infectious or paraneoplastic trigger has been suggested. We describe the case of a 22-month-old girl with OMS following rotavirus gastroenteritis. Rotavirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of OMS in children.

  13. Innate immunity in pluripotent human cells: attenuated response to interferon-β.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-Xiao; Carmichael, Gordon G

    2013-05-31

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) binds to cell surface receptors IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 and triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes. This response is a crucial component in innate immunity in that it establishes an "antiviral state" in cells and protects them against further damage. Previous work demonstrated that, compared with their differentiated counterparts, pluripotent human cells have a much weaker response to cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and are only able to produce a minimal amount of IFN-β. We show here that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) also exhibit an attenuated response to IFN-β. Even though all known type I IFN signaling components are expressed in these cells, STAT1 phosphorylation is greatly diminished upon IFN-β treatment. This attenuated response correlates with a high expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1). Upon differentiation of hESCs into trophoblasts, cells acquire the ability to respond to IFN-β, and this is accompanied by a significant induction of STAT1 phosphorylation as well as a decrease in SOCS1 expression. Furthermore, SOCS1 knockdown in hiPSCs enhances their ability to respond to IFN-β. Taken together, our results suggest that an attenuated cellular response to type I IFNs may be a general feature of pluripotent human cells and that this is associated with high expression of SOCS1.

  14. Reactogenicity and safety of a liquid human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) in healthy adults, children and infants in China: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase I studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Cheng; Li, Yan-Ping; Mo, Zhao-Jun; Luo, Dong; Huang, Teng; Kong, Ji-Lian; Wang, Lao-Hong; Song, Ning-Sheng; Liu, Aixue; Zhang, Helen; Liao, Xueyan; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2013-08-01

    We report the findings of three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase I studies undertaken to support licensure of the liquid formulation of the human G1P[8] rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414; GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA) in China. Healthy adults aged 18-45 y (n=48) and children aged 2-6 y (n=50) received a single dose of the human RV vaccine or placebo. Healthy infants (n=50) aged 6-16 weeks at the time of first vaccination received two oral doses of the human RV vaccine or placebo according to a 0, 1 mo schedule. In infants, blood samples were collected prior to vaccination and one month post-dose 2 to assess anti-RV IgA antibody concentrations using ELISA. Stool samples were collected from all infants on the day of each vaccination, at 7 and 15 d after each vaccination and one month post-dose 2. Stool samples were analyzed by ELISA for detection of RV antigen to assess RV antigen excretion. The reactogenicity profile of the human RV vaccine was found to be comparable to that of placebo in all age groups studied. The anti-RV IgA antibody seroconversion rate in infants after two vaccine doses was 86.7% (95% CI: 59.5-98.3). Vaccine take in infants who received the liquid human RV vaccine was 86.7% (95% CI: 59.5-98.3). A Phase III efficacy study of the human RV vaccine in the infant population in China has now been completed (ROTA-075/NCT01171963).

  15. Genetic engineering of rotaviruses by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2013-07-01

    The rotavirus genome is composed of 11 gene segments of dsRNA. A recent breakthrough in the field of rotaviruses is the development of a reverse genetics system for generating recombinant rotaviruses possessing a gene segment derived from cloned cDNA. Although this approach is a helper virus-driven system that is technically limited and gives low levels of recombinant viruses, it allows alteration of the rotavirus genome, thus contributing to our understanding of these medically important viruses. So far, this approach has successfully been applied to three of the 11 viral segments in our laboratory and others, and the efficiency of recovery of recombinant viruses has been improved. However, we are still waiting for the development of a helper virus-free reverse genetics system for generating an infectious rotavirus entirely from cDNAs, as has been achieved for other members of the Reoviridae family.

  16. Asymptomatic rotavirus infections in day care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Barrón-Romero, B L; Barreda-González, J; Doval-Ugalde, R; Zermeño-Eguia Liz, J; Huerta-Peña, M

    1985-01-01

    Rotaviruses and other enteropathogenic agents were detected in 288 (42.1%) of 684 children in day care centers of Instituto Politecnico Nacional in Mexico City. The same agents were also found in 114 (37.7%) of 302 adults directly involved in the care of the children. The study was carried out from July to December 1982 and from July 1983 to February 1984. Rotaviruses were the main enteropathogenic agents found and were detected in 169 (29.9%) of 564 children without diarrhea and in 34 (28.3%) of 120 children with diarrhea. These viruses were present in 62 (20.5%) of 302 adults without diarrhea. Of all rotavirus-positive individuals, 20% were also positive for other enteropathogens. All these observations indicate that asymptomatic rotavirus infections are not a rare event in children and that diarrhea caused by rotavirus infections is only one of the expressions of their presence. PMID:2991328

  17. Molecular characterization of human G8P[4] rotavirus strains in Italy: proposal of a more complete subclassification of the G8 genotype in three major lineages.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, G; Delogu, R; Bonomo, P; Castiglia, P; Ruggeri, F M; Fiore, L

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, two children with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis were hospitalized in Sardinia, Italy. Two RVA strains with G8P[4] genotype were detected in their stools, and were named SS56/2011 and SS65/2011. The aim of the study was to characterize these two rare strains, collected within a national RVA gastroenteritis surveillance program. Eight of the 11 RVA genes were sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed. VP7 amino acid sequence was also analyzed. Sequencing of genes encoding the VP4, VP6, VP7, and NSP1-5 proteins classified both strains as G8-P[4]-I2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, not detected previously in Italy. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most genes of Italian RVA strains were closely similar to typical DS-1 like strains circulating worldwide, whereas the VP7 gene was strictly related to G8 strains firstly reported in Africa. This finding of G8P[4] RVA strains with a DS-1 like genomic constellation also in a southern European country further confirms the wide circulation of this uncommon genotype in the world. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the VP7 capsid protein of the Italian G8P[4] RVA strains with sequences reported previously suggests that the G8 genotype should be divided into three major lineages.

  18. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus.

  19. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children after Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    McAtee, Casey L.; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P.; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5–24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus. PMID:26598569

  20. FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation in human granulosa cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiu, Xin; Fang, Lanlan; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Activin A stimulates cell proliferation in KGN human granulosa cell tumor-derived cell line. •Cyclin D2 mediates activin A-induced KGN cell proliferation. •FOXL2 induces follistatin expression in KGN cells. •FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated KGN cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Human granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare, and their etiology remains largely unknown. Recently, the FOXL2 402C > G (C134W) mutation was found to be specifically expressed in human adult-type GCTs; however, its function in the development of human GCTs is not fully understood. Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, which has been shown to stimulate normal granulosa cell proliferation; however, little is known regarding the function of activins in human GCTs. In this study, we examined the effect of activin A on cell proliferation in the human GCT-derived cell line KGN. We show that activin A treatment stimulates KGN cell proliferation. Treatment with the activin type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. In addition, our results show that cyclin D2 is induced by treatment with activin A and is involved in activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. Moreover, the activation of Smad signaling is required for activin A-induced cyclin D2 expression. Finally, we show that the overexpression of the wild-type FOXL2 but not the C134W mutant FOXL2 induced follistatin production. Treatment with exogenous follistatin blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation, and the overexpression of wild-type FOXL2 attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. These results suggest that FOXL2 may act as a tumor suppressor in human adult-type GCTs by inducing follistatin expression, which subsequently inhibits activin-stimulated cell proliferation.

  1. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-08-08

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide.

  2. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults.

  3. Genetic variability of VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes of common human G1P[8] rotavirus strains circulating in Italy between 2010 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2016-07-15

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. The RVA outer capsid layer is composed of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. The VP7 (G-type) and VP4 (P-type) genotypes are the basis for the binary RVA nomenclature. At least 27 G-types and 37 P-types of RVA are currently known, but most of human infections are related to the five major genotypes G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]. Every year G1P[8] strains cause approximately 50% of all symptomatic RVA infections reported in children in Italy. Fifteen G1P[8] RVA strains identified in different areas of Italy between 2010 and 2014 were selected. Strains were subjected to nucleotide sequencing of the VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes to investigate their genetic variability with respect to geographic area and date of detection. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the 15 G1P[8] RVA strains belonged to two different lineages for both the VP7 and NSP4 genes, and showed some intra-lineage diversity in VP4 and VP6 genes. Similarities between strains correlated by either area or date of detection were also evaluated. The results obtained by phylogenetic analyses were confirmed analyzing the deduced amino acid sequences of the VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 proteins of the G1P[8] RVA strains, detecting several substitutions in all proteins. The genetic variability observed between common G1P[8] RVAs highlights the constant evolution of the RVA genome through random point mutations (genetic drift) and intra-genotype reassortment (genetic shift). The evolution and diversity of the G1 RVA strains observed in this study can be related to the naturally acquired herd immunity, which represents the main mechanism of selective pressure in Italy, where mass anti-rotavirus vaccination was missing during the years of the study.

  4. RBFOX3 regulates Claudin-1 expression in human lung tissue via attenuation of proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Eun; Choi, Sunkyung

    2017-01-01

    RBFOX3, a nuclear RNA-binding protein, is well known as a regulator of alternative pre-mRNA splicing during neuronal development. However, other functions of RBFOX3 are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the function of RBFOX3 in the cytoplasm with respect to regulation of Claudin-1 expression. In human lung tissue, Claudin-1 is higher in RBFOX3-positive cells than in RBFOX3-negative cells. Immunostaining and mRNA quantification revealed that protein levels, but not mRNA levels, of Claudin-1 are increased by RBFOX3. In addition, cycloheximide treatment of human lung cancer cells revealed that RBFOX3 increases the stability of Claudin-1 through attenuation of its ubiquitination. Our study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms by which RBFOX3 regulates Claudin-1 expression in human lung tissue. PMID:28126724

  5. Age-Dependent TLR3 Expression of the Intestinal Epithelium Contributes to Rotavirus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Stockinger, Silvia; Torow, Natalia; Smoczek, Anna; Lindner, Cornelia; McInerney, Gerald; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Baumann, Ulrich; Pabst, Oliver; Bleich, André; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea worldwide and exhibits a pronounced small intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) tropism. Both human infants and neonatal mice are highly susceptible, whereas adult individuals remain asymptomatic and shed only low numbers of viral particles. Here we investigated age-dependent mechanisms of the intestinal epithelial innate immune response to rotavirus infection in an oral mouse infection model. Expression of the innate immune receptor for viral dsRNA, Toll-like receptor (Tlr) 3 was low in the epithelium of suckling mice but strongly increased during the postnatal period inversely correlating with rotavirus susceptibility, viral shedding and histological damage. Adult mice deficient in Tlr3 (Tlr3−/−) or the adaptor molecule Trif (TrifLps2/Lps2) exerted significantly higher viral shedding and decreased epithelial expression of proinflammatory and antiviral genes as compared to wild-type animals. In contrast, neonatal mice deficient in Tlr3 or Trif did not display impaired cell stimulation or enhanced rotavirus susceptibility. Using chimeric mice, a major contribution of the non-hematopoietic cell compartment in the Trif-mediated antiviral host response was detected in adult animals. Finally, a significant age-dependent increase of TLR3 expression was also detected in human small intestinal biopsies. Thus, upregulation of epithelial TLR3 expression during infancy might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to rotavirus infection. PMID:22570612

  6. Rotavirus infections in Galapagos sea lions.

    PubMed

    Coria-Galindo, Elsa; Rangel-Huerta, Emma; Verdugo-Rodríguez, Antonio; Brousset, Dulce; Salazar, Sandie; Padilla-Noriega, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses infect and cause diarrhea in the young of a broad range of terrestrial mammals, but it is unknown, to our knowledge, whether they infect marine mammals. During February and March of 2002 and 2003, we collected 125 serum samples and 18 rectal swab samples from Galapagos sea lion pups (GSL, Zalophus wollebaeki), and 22 serum samples from Galapagos fur seal pups (GFS, Arctocephalus galapagoensis) from nine islands of the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. Sera were tested for antibodies (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to rotavirus by an enzyme immunoassay using rhesus rotavirus as the capture antigen. In addition, rectal swabs were analyzed for the presence of rotavirus genomic double-stranded RNA by silver-stained polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antibodies to rotavirus were detected in 27 GSL pups (22%) and five GFS pups (23%), and rotavirus RNA was detected in the fecal sample from one GSL pup (6%). These results provide the first evidence that rotavirus infections are prevalent at an early age in Galapagos sea lions and Galapagos fur seals.

  7. Live Attenuated Human Salmonella Vaccine Candidates: tracking the pathogen in natural infection and stimulation of host immunity

    PubMed Central

    Galen, James E.; Buskirk, Amanda D.; Tennant, Sharon M.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by members of the genus Salmonella, is responsible for considerable global morbidity and mortality, in both animals and humans. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenesis of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, focusing on human Salmonella infections. We will trace the path of Salmonella through the body, including host entry sites, tissues and organs affected, and mechanisms involved in both pathogenesis and stimulation of host immunity. Careful consideration of the natural progression of disease provides an important context in which attenuated live oral vaccines can be rationally designed and developed. With this in mind, we will describe a series of attenuated live oral vaccines that have been successfully tested in clinical trials and demonstrated to be both safe and highly immunogenic. The attenuation strategies summarized in this review offer important insights into further development of attenuated vaccines against other Salmonella for which live oral candidates are currently unavailable. PMID:27809955

  8. Live Attenuated Human Salmonella Vaccine Candidates: Tracking the Pathogen in Natural Infection and Stimulation of Host Immunity.

    PubMed

    Galen, James E; Buskirk, Amanda D; Tennant, Sharon M; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2016-11-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by members of the genus Salmonella, is responsible for considerable global morbidity and mortality in both animals and humans. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, focusing on human Salmonella infections. We will trace the path of Salmonella through the body, including host entry sites, tissues and organs affected, and mechanisms involved in both pathogenesis and stimulation of host immunity. Careful consideration of the natural progression of disease provides an important context in which attenuated live oral vaccines can be rationally designed and developed. With this in mind, we will describe a series of attenuated live oral vaccines that have been successfully tested in clinical trials and demonstrated to be both safe and highly immunogenic. The attenuation strategies summarized in this review offer important insights into further development of attenuated vaccines against other Salmonella for which live oral candidates are currently unavailable.

  9. Podocyte-specific overexpression of human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Renisha; Milagres, Rosangela; Dilauro, Marc; Gutsol, Alex; Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Kennedy, Chris; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel; Burns, Kevin D

    2012-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin II to angiotensin-(1-7) and is expressed in podocytes. Here we overexpressed ACE2 in podocytes in experimental diabetic nephropathy using transgenic methods where a nephrin promoter drove the expression of human ACE2. Glomeruli from these mice had significantly increased mRNA, protein, and activity of ACE2 compared to wild-type mice. Male mice were treated with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. After 16 weeks, there was no significant difference in plasma glucose levels between wild-type and transgenic diabetic mice. Urinary albumin was significantly increased in wild-type diabetic mice at 4 weeks, whereas albuminuria in transgenic diabetic mice did not differ from wild-type nondiabetic mice. However, this effect was transient and by 16 weeks both transgenic and nontransgenic diabetic mice had similar rates of proteinuria. Compared to wild-type diabetic mice, transgenic diabetic mice had an attenuated increase in mesangial area, decreased glomerular area, and a blunted decrease in nephrin expression. Podocyte numbers decreased in wild-type diabetic mice at 16 weeks, but were unaffected in transgenic diabetic mice. At 8 weeks, kidney cortical expression of transforming growth factor-β1 was significantly inhibited in transgenic diabetic mice as compared to wild-type diabetic mice. Thus, the podocyte-specific overexpression of human ACE2 transiently attenuates the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Characterization of the neutralizing epitopes of VP7 of the Gottfried strain of porcine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Kang, S Y; Benfield, D A; Gorziglia, M; Saif, L J

    1993-09-01

    The neutralization epitopes of the outer capsid protein VP7 of a porcine group A rotavirus were studied by using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs). Six N-MAbs which were specific for the VP7 protein of the Gottfried strain of porcine rotavirus (serotype G4) were used for analyzing the antigenic sites of VP7. Three different approaches were used for this analysis: testing the serological reactivity of each N-MAb against different G serotypes of human and animal rotaviruses, analyzing N-MAb-resistant viral antigenic variants, and performing a nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP7 gene of each of the viral antigenic variants generated. From the serological analyses, three different reactivity patterns were recognized by plaque reduction virus neutralization and cell culture immunofluorescence tests. A single MAb (RG36H9) reacted with animal rotavirus serotypes G3 and G4 but not with human serotypes G3 and G4. The MAb 57/8 (D. A. Benfield, E. A. Nelson, and Y. Hoshino, p. 111, in Abstr. VIIth Internat. Congr. Virol., 1987, and E. R. Mackow, R. D. Shaw, S. M. Matsui, P. T. Vo, D. A. Benfield, and H. B. Greenberg, Virology 165:511-517, 1988) reacted with animal and human rotavirus serotypes G3 and G4 and also with human serotype G9 and bovine serotype G6. The other four MAbs reacted only with the porcine rotavirus serotype G4. The epitope defined by MAb 57/8 and the epitope defined by the other five MAbs appeared to be partially overlapping or close to each other, as identified by viral antigenic variant analysis. However, data from nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence analyses of the VP7 of each of the viral antigenic variants showed that these two epitopes constituted a large, single neutralization domain.

  11. Hesperidin Attenuates Ultraviolet B-Induced Apoptosis by Mitigating Oxidative Stress in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Han, Xia; Oh, Min Chang; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Human skin cells undergo pathophysiological processes via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon excessive exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. This study investigated the ability of hesperidin (C28H34O15) to prevent apoptosis due to oxidative stress generated through UVB-induced ROS. Hesperidin significantly scavenged ROS generated by UVB radiation, attenuated the oxidation of cellular macromolecules, established mitochondrial membrane polarization, and prevented the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Hesperidin downregulated expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bcl-2-associated X protein, and upregulated expression of B-cell lymphoma 2. Hesperidin absorbed wavelengths of light within the UVB range. In summary, hesperidin shielded human keratinocytes from UVB radiation-induced damage and apoptosis via its antioxidant and UVB absorption properties. PMID:26797112

  12. Complete attenuation of genetically engineered Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kublin, James G; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Sack, Brandon K; Fishbaugher, Matt E; Seilie, Annette; Shelton, Lisa; VonGoedert, Tracie; Firat, Melike; Magee, Sara; Fritzen, Emma; Betz, Will; Kain, Heather S; Dankwa, Dorender A; Steel, Ryan W J; Vaughan, Ashley M; Noah Sather, D; Murphy, Sean C; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2017-01-04

    Immunization of humans with whole sporozoites confers complete, sterilizing immunity against malaria infection. However, achieving consistent safety while maintaining immunogenicity of whole parasite vaccines remains a formidable challenge. We generated a genetically attenuated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria parasite by deleting three genes expressed in the pre-erythrocytic stage (Pf p52(-)/p36(-)/sap1(-)). We then tested the safety and immunogenicity of the genetically engineered (Pf GAP3KO) sporozoites in human volunteers. Pf GAP3KO sporozoites were delivered to 10 volunteers using infected mosquito bites with a single exposure consisting of 150 to 200 bites per subject. All subjects remained blood stage-negative and developed inhibitory antibodies to sporozoites. GAP3KO rodent malaria parasites engendered complete, protracted immunity against infectious sporozoite challenge in mice. The results warrant further clinical testing of Pf GAP3KO and its potential development into a vaccine strain.

  13. Genomic characterization of porcine rotaviruses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Martella, V; Pratelli, A; Greco, G; Tempesta, M; Ferrari, M; Losio, M N; Buonavoglia, C

    2001-01-01

    A total of 23 rotavirus strains isolated from pigs were analyzed. Twenty strains had been isolated from diarrheic piglets from an outbreak that occurred in northern Italy in 1983. Three strains had been isolated in 1984 from swine herds located in distinct areas of northern Italy. All 23 strains were characterized as type G6P[5] by PCR. The isolation from piglets of rotaviruses displaying typical bovine G- and P-type specificities points out the high frequency of rotavirus transmission between cattle and pigs.

  14. First molecular detection of group A rotaviruses in drinking water sources in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    He, X Q; Cheng, L; Zhang, D Y; Li, W; Xie, X M; Ma, M; Wang, Z J

    2009-07-01

    The most prevalent group A rotavirus found in the diarrheic children was also determined in drinking water sources including raw water, treated water and tap water in Beijing, and then the possible contamination contributions to tap water for human consumption were discussed in this study. A total of 26 raw water samples, 77 treated water samples and 143 tap water samples in Beijing were collected for analysis of group A rotavirus from April 2006 to August 2007. According to the results, it was shown that group A rotaviruses occurred in 9 raw water samples (34.6%), 9 treated water samples (11.7%) and 32 tap water samples (22.4%) during the sampling period, and low disinfectant residuals or a vulnerability of the distribution system to pressure transients, in addition to raw water, may account for the group A rotaviruses contamination to tap water. The rotavirus contamination observed in this study may highlight a potential public health risk and illustrate the importance of including routine virological analysis of drinking water supplies during winter time in Beijing.

  15. The VP8* Domain of Neonatal Rotavirus Strain G10P[11] Binds to Type II Precursor Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Sasirekha; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Smith, David F.; Kang, Gagandeep; Ramig, Robert F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses with a P[11] VP4 genotype exhibit a tropism for neonates. Interaction of the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4 with sialic acid was thought to be the key mediator for rotavirus infectivity. However, recent studies have indicated a role for nonsialylated glycoconjugates, including histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), in the infectivity of human rotaviruses. We sought to determine if the bovine rotavirus-derived VP8* of a reassortant neonatal G10P[11] virus interacts with hitherto uncharacterized glycans. In an array screen of >600 glycans, VP8* P[11] showed specific binding to glycans with the Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif, which forms the core structure of type II glycans and is the precursor of H type II HBGA. The specificity of glycan binding was confirmed through hemagglutination assays; GST-VP8* P[11] hemagglutinates type O, A, and B red blood cells as well as pooled umbilical cord blood erythrocytes. Further, G10P[11] infectivity was significantly enhanced by the expression of H type II HBGA in CHO cells. The bovine-origin VP4 was confirmed to be essential for this increased infectivity, using laboratory-derived reassortant viruses generated from sialic acid binding rotavirus SA11-4F and a bovine G10P[11] rotavirus, B223. The binding to a core glycan unit has not been reported for any rotavirus VP4. Core glycan synthesis is constitutive in most cell types, and modification of these glycans is thought to be developmentally regulated. These studies provide the first molecular basis for understanding neonatal rotavirus infections, indicating that glycan modification during neonatal development may mediate the age-restricted infectivity of neonatal viruses. PMID:23616650

  16. Spread and predominance in Japan of novel G1P[8] double-reassortant rotavirus strains possessing a DS-1-like genotype constellation typical of G2P[4] strains.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshiki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nishimura, Naoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Miura, Sinobu; Ito, Hisato; Doan, Yen Hai; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ozaki, Takao; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children <5 years of age worldwide, and two, live attenuated rotavirus vaccines are globally available. As rotavirus vaccines are introduced into national immunization programs, there is an increasing need to monitor circulating wild-type strains. However, few studies have systematically examined their full genotype constellation. This study was therefore undertaken to characterize the whole genotype constellation of circulating rotavirus strains in three widely-separated locations in Japan during the 2012 rotavirus season when rotavirus vaccines became available in the country for the first time. Of 107 rotavirus-positive specimens, 50 (46.7%) strains collected from all three locations possessed an unusual G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 constellation in which a typical G2P[4] strain appeared to have acquired its two surface protein genes from the most common G1P[8] strain. These G1P[8] double-reassortant strains were shown to possess the 11 genome segments virtually indistinguishable from each other in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages except for two strains that underwent further intra-genotype reassortment. Successful spread to and predominance in broad locations across Japan of novel rotavirus strains possessing a genotype constellation that was previously thought not to be preferred suggests unexpected genomic flexibility of the genotype constellation.

  17. Complex evolutionary patterns of two rare human G3P[9] rotavirus strains possessing a feline/canine-like H6 genotype on an AU-1-like genotype constellation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Hong; Pang, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Xuan; Ghosh, Souvik; Tang, Wei-Feng; Peng, Jin-Song; Hu, Quan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-06-01

    The group A rotavirus (RVA) G3P[9] is a rare VP7-VP4 genotype combination, detected occasionally in humans and cats. Other than the prototype G3P[9] strain, RVA/Human- tc/JPN/AU-l/1982/G3P3[9], the whole genomes of only two human G3P[9] RVA strains and two feline G3P[9] RVA strains have been analyzed so far, revealing complex evolutionary patterns, distinct from that of AU-1. We report here the whole genomic analyses of two human G3P[9] RVA strains, RVA/Human-tc/CHN/L621/2006/G3P[9] and RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E2451/2011/G3P[9], detected in patients with diarrhea in China. Strains L621 and E2451 possessed a H6 NSP5 genotype on an AU-1-like genotype constellation, not reported previously. However, not all the genes of L621 and E2451 were closely related to those of AU-1, or to each other, revealing different evolutionary patterns among the AU-1-like RVAs. The VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes of E2451 and L621 were found to cluster together with human G3P[9] RVA strains believed to be of possible feline/canine origin, and feline or raccoon dog RVA strains. The VP1, VP3, NSP2 and NSP5 genes of E2451 and L621 formed distinct clusters in genotypes typically found in feline/canine RVA strains or RVA strains from other host species which are believed to be of feline/canine RVA origin. The VP2 genes of E2451 and L621, and NSP3 gene of L621 clustered among RVA strains from different host species which are believed to have a complete or partial feline/canine RVA origin. The NSP1 genes of E2451 and L621, and NSP3 gene of E2451 clustered with AU-1 and several other strains possessing a complete or partial feline RVA strain BA222-05-like genotype constellation. Taken together, these observations suggest that nearly all the eleven gene segments of G3P[9] RVA strains L621 and E2451 might have originated from feline/canine RVAs, and that reassortments may have occurred among these feline/canine RVA strains, before being transmitted to humans.

  18. Hyperosmolarity attenuates TNFα–mediated pro-inflammatory activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anirban; Moore, Ernest E.; McLaughlin, Nathan J.; Lee, Luis; Jones, Wilbert L.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Nydam, Trevor L.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Firm neutrophil (PMN)-endothelial (EC) adhesion is crucial to the PMN-mediated hyperinflammation observed in acute lung injury. Hypertonic saline (HTS) used for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock has been associated with a decreased incidence of PMN-mediated lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesize that physiologically accessible hypertonic incubation (170mM vs. 140mM, osmolarity ranging from 360-300 mOsm/L) inhibits pro-inflammatory activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Pro-inflammatory activation of HMVECs was investigated in response to TNFα including IL-8 release, ICAM-1 surface expression, PMN adhesion, and signaling mechanisms under both isotonic (control) and hypertonic conditions. Hyperosmolarity alone had no effect on either basal IL-8 release or ICAM-1 surface expression, but did lead to concentration-dependent decreases in TNFα–induced IL-8 release, ICAM-1 surface expression, and PMN:HMVEC adhesion. Conversely, HTS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and enhanced TNFα activation of p38 MAPK. Despite this basal activation, hyperosmolar incubation attenuated TNFα stimulated IL-8 release and ICAM-1 surface expression and subsequent PMN adherence, while p38 MAPK inhibition did not further influence the effects of hyperosmolar conditions on ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, TNFα induced NF-kB DNA binding, but HTS conditions attenuated this by 31% (p<0.01). In conclusion, HTS reduces PMN:HMVEC adhesion as well as TNFα-induced pro-inflammatory activation of primary HMVECs via attenuation of NF-kB signaling. PMID:23364439

  19. Rotavirus vaccine and health-care utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis in Tsu City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Hajime; Suga, Shigeru; Nagao, Mizuho; Ichimi, Ryoji; Fujisawa, Takao; Umemoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Ito, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shigeki; Ido, Masaru; Taniguchi, Koki; Ihara, Toshiaki; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotavirus vaccines were introduced in Japan in November 2011. We evaluated the subsequent reduction of the health-care burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods We conducted active surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among children under 5 years old before and after the vaccine introduction. We surveyed hospitalization rates for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in Tsu City, Mie Prefecture, Japan, from 2007 to 2015 and surveyed the number of outpatient visits at a Tsu City clinic from 2010 to 2015. Stool samples were obtained for rotavirus testing and genotype investigation. We assessed rotavirus vaccine coverage for infants living in Tsu City. Results In the pre-vaccine years (2007–2011), hospitalization rates for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children under 5 years old were 5.5, 4.3, 3.1 and 3.9 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively. In the post-vaccine years (2011–2015), the rates were 3.0, 3.5, 0.8 and 0.6 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively. The hospitalization rate decreased significantly in the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 seasons compared to the average of the seasons before vaccine introduction (P < 0.0001). In one pre-vaccine year (2010–2011), the number of outpatient visits due to the rotavirus infection was 66. In the post-vaccine years (2011–2015), the numbers for each season was 23, 23, 7 and 5, respectively. The most dominant rotavirus genotype shifted from G3P[8] to G1P[8] and to G2P[4]. The coverage of one dose of rotavirus vaccine in Tsu City was 56.5% in 2014. Conclusion After the vaccine introduction, the hospitalization rates and outpatient visits for rotavirus gastroenteritis greatly decreased. PMID:28246579

  20. Effect of monovalent rotavirus vaccine on rotavirus disease burden and circulating rotavirus strains among children in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Azzouzi Idrissi, Meryem; Rguig, Ahmed; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh; Elaouad, Rajae

    2015-06-01

    Rotarix(TM) vaccine was introduced into the National Program of Immunization of Morocco in October 2010, reaching quickly 87% of the target population of children nationally. The incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and the prevalence of circulating rotavirus strains has been monitored in three sentinel hospitals since June 2006. The average percentage of rotavirus positive cases among all children under 5 years old hospitalized for gastroenteritis during the pre-vaccine period (2006-2010) was 44%. This percentage dropped to 29%, 15% and 24% in the 3 years post vaccine introduction (2011, 2012 and 2013), which is a decline of 34%, 66%, and 45%, respectively. Declines in prevalence were greatest among children 0-1 years of age (53%) and were most prominent during the winter and autumn rotavirus season. The prevalence of the G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotype sharply increased in the post vaccine period (2011-2013) compared to the previous seasons (2006-2010). Rotavirus vaccines have reduced greatly the number of children hospitalized due to rotavirus infection at the three sentinel hospitals; it is however unclear if the predominance of G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotypes is related to the vaccine introduction, or if this is attributable to normal genotype fluctuations. Continued surveillance will be pivotal to answer this question in the future.

  1. Transmission, attenuation and reflection of shear waves in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Erik H; Genin, Guy M; Bayly, Philip V

    2012-11-07

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are caused by acceleration of the skull or exposure to explosive blast, but the processes by which mechanical loads lead to neurological injury remain poorly understood. We adapted motion-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging methods to measure the motion of the human brain in vivo as the skull was exposed to harmonic pressure excitation (45, 60 and 80 Hz). We analysed displacement fields to quantify the transmission, attenuation and reflection of distortional (shear) waves as well as viscoelastic material properties. Results suggest that internal membranes, such as the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli, play a key role in reflecting and focusing shear waves within the brain. The skull acts as a low-pass filter over the range of frequencies studied. Transmissibility of pressure waves through the skull decreases and shear wave attenuation increases with increasing frequency. The skull and brain function mechanically as an integral structure that insulates internal anatomic features; these results are valuable for building and validating mathematical models of this complex and important structural system.

  2. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  3. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injury in stroke rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei; Yu, Xinguang; Han, Xiao; Hou, Jincai; Guo, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the femoral vein could exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia via a mechanism associated with the ability to attenuate axonal injury. The results of behavioral tests, infarction volume analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that cerebral ischemia caused severe damage to the myelin sheath and axons. After rats were intravenously transplanted with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the levels of axon and myelin sheath-related proteins, including microtubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, and growth-associated protein 43, were elevated, infarct volume was decreased and neural function was improved in cerebral ischemic rats. These findings suggest that intravenously transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote neural function. Possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects include resistance to demyelination after cerebral ischemia, prevention of axonal degeneration, and promotion of axonal regeneration. PMID:25657721

  4. Impact of Rotavirus Vaccine on Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Emmanuel; Le Gal, Grégoire; Lemaitre, Thomas; Oger, Emmanuel; Poulhazan, Elise; Giroux, Jean-Dominique; Garenne, Armelle; Gagneur, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Infants born preterm are at a higher risk of complications and hospitalization in cases of rotavirus diarrhea than children born at term. We evaluated the impact of a rotavirus vaccination campaign (May 2007 to May 2010) on hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis in a population of children under 3 years old born prematurely (before 37 weeks of gestation) in the Brest University Hospital birth zone. Active surveillance from 2002 to 2006 and a prospective collection of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea were initiated in the pediatric units of Brest University Hospital until May 2010. Numbers of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea among the population of children born prematurely, before and after the start of the vaccination program, were compared using a Poisson regression model controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation. A total of 217 premature infants were vaccinated from 2007 to 2010. Vaccine coverage for a complete course of three doses was 41.9%. The vaccine safety in premature infants was similar to that in term infants. The vaccination program led to a division by a factor of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 5.2) in the number of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea during the first two epidemic seasons following vaccine introduction and by a factor of 11 (95% CI, 3.5 to 34.8) during the third season. We observed significant effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine on the number of hospitalizations in a population of prematurely born infants younger than 3 years of age. A multicenter national study would provide better assessment of this impact. (This study [Impact of Systematic Infants Vaccination Against Rotavirus on Gastroenteritis Hospitalization: a Prospective Study in Brest District, France (IVANHOE)] has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00740935.) PMID:25080553

  5. Impact of rotavirus vaccine on premature infants.

    PubMed

    Roué, Jean-Michel; Nowak, Emmanuel; Le Gal, Grégoire; Lemaitre, Thomas; Oger, Emmanuel; Poulhazan, Elise; Giroux, Jean-Dominique; Garenne, Armelle; Gagneur, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    Infants born preterm are at a higher risk of complications and hospitalization in cases of rotavirus diarrhea than children born at term. We evaluated the impact of a rotavirus vaccination campaign (May 2007 to May 2010) on hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis in a population of children under 3 years old born prematurely (before 37 weeks of gestation) in the Brest University Hospital birth zone. Active surveillance from 2002 to 2006 and a prospective collection of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea were initiated in the pediatric units of Brest University Hospital until May 2010. Numbers of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea among the population of children born prematurely, before and after the start of the vaccination program, were compared using a Poisson regression model controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation. A total of 217 premature infants were vaccinated from 2007 to 2010. Vaccine coverage for a complete course of three doses was 41.9%. The vaccine safety in premature infants was similar to that in term infants. The vaccination program led to a division by a factor of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 5.2) in the number of hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea during the first two epidemic seasons following vaccine introduction and by a factor of 11 (95% CI, 3.5 to 34.8) during the third season. We observed significant effectiveness of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine on the number of hospitalizations in a population of prematurely born infants younger than 3 years of age. A multicenter national study would provide better assessment of this impact. (This study [Impact of Systematic Infants Vaccination Against Rotavirus on Gastroenteritis Hospitalization: a Prospective Study in Brest District, France (IVANHOE)] has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00740935.).

  6. Antibody-Independent Protection against Rotavirus Infection of Mice Stimulated by Intranasal Immunization with Chimeric VP4 or VP6 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; McNeal, Monica M.; Clements, John D.; Ward, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    This study was to determine whether individual rotavirus capsid proteins could stimulate protection against rotavirus shedding in an adult mouse model. BALB/c mice were intranasally or intramuscularly administered purified Escherichia coli-expressed murine rotavirus strain EDIM VP4, VP6, or truncated VP7 (TrVP7) protein fused to the 42.7-kDa maltose-binding protein (MBP). One month after the last immunization, mice were challenged with EDIM and shedding of rotavirus antigen was measured. When three 9-μg doses of one of the three rotavirus proteins fused to MBP were administered intramuscularly with the saponin adjuvant QS-21, serum rotavirus immunoglobulin G (IgG) was induced by each protein. Following EDIM challenge, shedding was significantly (P = 0.02) reduced (i.e., 38%) in MBP::VP6-immunized mice only. Three 9-μg doses of chimeric MBP::VP6 or MBP::TrVP7 administered intranasally with attenuated E. coli heat-labile toxin LT(R192G) also induced serum rotavirus IgG, but MBP::VP4 immunization stimulated no detectable rotavirus antibody. No protection against EDIM shedding was observed in the MBP::TrVP7-immunized mice. However, shedding was reduced 93 to 100% following MBP::VP6 inoculation and 56% following MBP::VP4 immunization relative to that of controls (P = <0.001). Substitution of cholera toxin for LT(R192G) as the adjuvant, reduction of the number of doses to 1, and challenge of the mice 3 months after the last immunization did not reduce the level of protection stimulated by intranasal administration of MBP::VP6. When MBP::VP6 was administered intranasally to B-cell-deficient μMt mice that made no rotavirus antibody, shedding was still reduced to <1% of that of controls. These results show that mice can be protected against rotavirus shedding by intranasal administration of individual rotavirus proteins and that this protection can occur independently of rotavirus antibody. PMID:10438847

  7. Protective effects of natural rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, F Raúl

    2009-03-01

    Rotavirus is a ubiquitous infection that is the leading cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Severe infections are most commonly observed in the first 2 years of life. Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality rates and socioeconomic costs with adverse outcomes particularly prevalent in developing countries. The natural history of rotavirus infection can provide guidance for the development and optimization of an effective vaccine. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that children who acquire natural rotavirus infections develop immunity to subsequent infections, with the protective effect increasing with each natural infection. Natural infections also decrease the severity of any subsequent rotavirus infections. Notably, asymptomatic infections provide protection similar to that induced by symptomatic infections. Data also suggest that the antibody response to natural infection is heterotypic, and therefore may provide protection against multiple serotypes. These data suggest that the development of a vaccine that produces asymptomatic infection at an optimal time point may provide effective immunity. An effective vaccine should mimic protection provided by natural infection and provide protection against the most common rotavirus serotypes (ie, G1, G2, G3, G4, G9) and be able to decrease disease severity, reduce hospitalizations, and decrease disease-related costs.

  8. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2012.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Susie; Bishop, Ruth F; Barnes, Graeme L

    2014-03-31

    This report from the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, describes the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 January to 31 December 2012. During the survey period, 1,300 faecal samples were referred to the centre for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these 748 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 491 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 257 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis revealed that G1P[8] was the dominant type in this reporting period, identified in 35% of strains nationally. Genotype G2P[4] was the second most common strain nationally, representing 28% of samples, followed by genotype G12P[8] (23%). This represents the first report where G12P[8] strains are a major cause of disease in this community. Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G2P[4] was more common in states and territories using Rotarix while G1P[8] was more common in states using RotaTeq. This survey of rotavirus strains circulating in 2012 highlights the continued fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes, with an annual change in dominant genotypes as well as emergence of a previously rare genotype, suggesting a dynamic wild-type population.

  9. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways. PMID:23453730

  10. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-04-08

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways.

  11. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  12. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  13. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies. PMID:26587712

  14. Characterization of a triple-recombinant, reassortant rotavirus strain from the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Esona, Mathew D; Roy, Sunando; Rungsrisuriyachai, Kunchala; Sanchez, Jacqueline; Vasquez, Lina; Gomez, Virgen; Rios, Lourdes Aviles; Bowen, Michael D; Vazquez, Marietta

    2017-02-01

    We report the genome of a novel human triple-recombinant G4P[6-8_R] mono-reassortant strain identified in a stool sample from the Dominican Republic during routine facility-based rotavirus strain surveillance. The strain was designated as RVA/Human-wt/DOM/2013840364/2013/G4P[6-8_R], with a genomic constellation of G4-P[6-8_R]-I1-R1-C1-M1-(A1-A8_R)-N1-(T1-T7_R)-E1-H1. Recombinant gene segments NSP1 and NSP3 were generated as a result of recombination between genogroup 1 rotavirus A1 human strain and a genotype A8 porcine strain and between genogroup 1 rotavirus T1 human strain and a genotype T7 bovine strain, respectively. Analyses of the RNA secondary structures of gene segment VP4, NSP1 and NSP3 showed that all the recombinant regions appear to start in a loop (single-stranded) region and terminate in a stem (double-stranded) structure. Also, the VP7 gene occupied lineage VII within the G4 genotypes consisting of mostly porcine or porcine-like G4 strains, suggesting the occurrence of reassortment. The remaining gene segments clustered phylogenetically with genogroup 1 strains. This exchange of whole or partial genetic materials between rotaviruses by recombination and reassortment contributes directly to their diversification, adaptation and evolution.

  15. Cultivation and characterization of three strains of murine rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H B; Vo, P T; Jones, R

    1986-01-01

    Three distinct strains of murine rotavirus were adapted to growth in cell culture. These strains are genetically related but not identical; they are serotypically heterogeneous. The cultivatable strains were substantially more infectious (approximately 10(6)-fold) for suckling mice than heterologous simian rotaviruses were. Homologous murine rotavirus strains spread from inoculated to uninoculated litter mates and caused diarrhea, while heterologous rotaviruses did not spread and cause illness. Images PMID:3003390

  16. Epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa: a review to assess the need for rotavirus immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, N. A.; Kilgore, P. E.; Bresee, J. S.; Steele, A. D.; Luo, N.; Hart, C. A.; Glass, R. I.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid progress towards the development of rotavirus vaccines has prompted a reassessment of the disease burden of rotavirus diarrhoea in developing countries and the possible impact of these vaccines in reducing diarrhoeal morbidity and mortality among infants and young children. We examined the epidemiology and disease burden of rotavirus diarrhoea among hospitalized and clinic patients in African countries through a review of 43 published studies of the etiology of diarrhoea. The studies were carried out from 1975 through 1992, and only those in which a sample of more than 100 patients with diarrhoea were specifically screened for rotavirus by using an established diagnostic test were included. Rotavirus was detected in a median of 24% of children hospitalized for diarrhoea and in 23% who were treated as outpatients; 38% of the hospitalized patients with rotavirus were < 6 months and 81% were < 1 year of age. Rotavirus was detected year-round in nearly every country and generally exhibited distinct seasonal peaks during the dry months. In 5 countries where rotavirus strains had been G-typed, 74% of strains were of one of the four common serotypes (G1 to G4), G1 was the predominant serotype, and 26% were non-typeable. This cumulative experience from 15 African countries suggests that rotavirus is the most important cause of severe diarrhoea in African children and that most strains in circulation today belong to common G types that are included in reassortant vaccines. Wherever large numbers of cases of rotavirus diarrhoea occur early in infancy, immunization at birth may protect the children before their first symptomatic infection. PMID:9868844

  17. Whole-genome analyses reveals the animal origin of a rotavirus G4P[6] detected in a child with severe diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Magaly; Galeano, Maria E; Akopov, Asmik; Palacios, Ruth; Russomando, Graciela; Kirkness, Ewen F; Parra, Gabriel I

    2014-10-01

    Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Currently, two rotavirus vaccines are being used in vaccination programs, and one of the factors involved in lower vaccine efficacy is the mismatch among the circulating strains and the vaccine strains. Thus, the emergence of animal strains in the human population could affect the efficacy of vaccination programs. Here we report the presence of a G4P[6] strain in a Paraguayan child presenting acute gastroenteritis in 2009. Genomic analyses revealed that the strain presents a porcine-like genome (G4-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1), suggesting a direct animal-to-human transmission. Continuous surveillance of rotaviruses in humans and animals will help us to better understand rotavirus epidemiology and evolution.

  18. Geochemical Controls on Natural Attenuation of Arsenic Solubilized by Human-Induced Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, A.; Hering, J. G.; Harrington, J.; Horst, J.; Burris, D.; Reisinger, H. J.

    2005-12-01

    Naturally-occurring arsenic (As) in soils can be solubilized into groundwater as a result of anthropogenic changes in subsurface redox conditions. However, the presence of As in groundwater may not lead to human exposure if As is attenuated before intercepting a water source. Dissolved As can be attenuated by sorption and precipitation processes whose effectiveness may be strongly influenced by redox transformations. Anaerobic bioremediation has been employed at a site in the Northeastern U.S. to treat a tetrachloroethene (PCE) plume in groundwater. An organic carbon source is injected via a transect of wells oriented perpendicular to groundwater flow. The resulting anaerobic reducing zone extends 30 meters down gradient of the injection transect. At the down gradient edge of the reducing zone, dissolved As and Fe concentrations have been observed at over 0.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and 450 mg/L, respectively. However, 60 m down gradient (and outside of the reducing zone), As and Fe concentrations have been maintained at levels below their detection limits (0.005 mg/L and 1 mg/L) for over 900 days, demonstrating natural attenuation of As. The sorption of As onto Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides under changing geochemical conditions is investigated by using the reactive transport modeling program Geochemist's Work Bench (GWB). Down gradient conditions are simulated where reduced constituents of contaminated groundwater react with Fe(III) and Mn(III, IV) oxyhydroxides in the soil/aquifer matrix or with dissolved oxygen in uncontaminated groundwater at the periphery of the reducing zone. Dissolved Fe(II) and Mn(II) are re-oxidized and precipitate as oxyhydroxide coatings on the soil or aquifer sediments. These coatings then serve as sorbents for both As(III) and As(V). Simulations allow us to examine As sequestration as a function of groundwater composition (e.g., pH and competing sorbates such as phosphate) and of the rate and extent of the precipitation of Fe(III) and Mn

  19. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2014.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Suzie

    2015-09-30

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, reports the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis. During the survey period of 1 January to 31 December 2014, 1,022 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these 733 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 480 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 253 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 733 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 29.6% of strains nationally. Genotype G1P[8] was the 2nd most common strain nationally, representing 22.9% of samples, followed by genotype G3P[8] (14.9%). This report highlights the continued significance of G12P[8] strains as the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G1P[8] being the dominant genotype (29%) followed by G12P[8] as the 2nd most common genotype (26%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G1P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction. The continuation of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the dynamic and diversity present in the wild-type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  20. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2013.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Roczo-Farkas, Susie

    2014-12-31

    This report from the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, describes the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 January to 31 December 2013. During the survey period, 1,035 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis. Of these 828 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 503 specimens were collected from children under 5 years of age, while 325 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of the 828 rotavirus samples collected from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 33% of strains nationally. Genotype G3P[8] was the second most common strain nationally, representing 31% of samples, followed by genotype G2P[4] (14%). This represents the first report where G12P[8] strains are the major cause of disease in this population. The genotype distribution was slightly altered when the analysis was restricted to samples collected from children under 5 years of age, with G3P[8] being the dominant genotype (39.2%) followed by G12P[8] as the second most common genotype (31%). Fluctuations in genotype distribution were also observed based on the vaccine type in use. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states and territories using RotaTeq, while G3P[8] was more common in the locations using Rotarix. This survey highlights the yearly fluctuations in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction, with changes in dominant genotypes an annual event. The emergence of G12P[8] as the dominant genotype further illustrates the ongoing changes in the wild type rotavirus population evident in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  1. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Michikami, Daisaku; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Hayano, Junichiro; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Mano, Tadaaki

    2004-05-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied muscles remain unknown. We hypothesized that bed rest would augment sympathetic responses to isometric exercise using antigravity leg muscles in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were subjected to 14-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Before and after bed rest, they performed isometric exercises using leg (plantar flexion) and forearm (handgrip) muscles, followed by 2-min postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) that continues to stimulate the muscle metaboreflex. These exercises were sustained to fatigue. We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral resting leg by microneurography. In both pre- and post-bed-rest exercise tests, exercise intensities were set at 30 and 70% of the maximum voluntary force measured before bed rest. Bed rest attenuated the increase in MSNA in response to fatiguing plantar flexion by approximately 70% at both exercise intensities (both P < 0.05 vs. before bed rest) and reduced the maximal voluntary force of plantar flexion by 15%. In contrast, bed rest did not alter the increase in MSNA response to fatiguing handgrip and had no effects on the maximal voluntary force of handgrip. Although PEMI sustained MSNA activation before bed rest in all trials, bed rest entirely eliminated the PEMI-induced increase in MSNA in leg exercises but partially attenuated it in forearm exercises. These results do not support our hypothesis but indicate that bed rest causes a reduction in isometric exercise-induced sympathetic activation in (probably atrophied) antigravity leg muscles.

  2. Resolvins attenuate inflammation and promote resolution in cigarette smoke-exposed human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Croasdell, Amanda; Thatcher, Thomas H; Kottmann, R Matthew; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Serhan, Charles N; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2015-10-15

    Inflammation is a protective response to injury, but it can become chronic, leading to tissue damage and disease. Cigarette smoke causes multiple inflammatory diseases, which account for thousands of deaths and cost billions of dollars annually. Cigarette smoke disrupts the function of immune cells, such as macrophages, by prolonging inflammatory signaling, promoting oxidative stress, and impairing phagocytosis, contributing to increased incidence of infections. Recently, new families of lipid-derived mediators, "specialized proresolving mediators" (SPMs), were identified. SPMs play a critical role in the active resolution of inflammation by counterregulating proinflammatory signaling and promoting resolution pathways. We have identified dysregulated concentrations of lipid mediators in exhaled breath condensate, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In human alveolar macrophages from COPD and non-COPD patients, D-series resolvins decreased inflammatory cytokines and enhanced phagocytosis. To further investigate the actions of resolvins on human cells, macrophages were differentiated from human blood monocytes and treated with D-series resolvins and then exposed to cigarette smoke extract. Resolvins significantly suppressed macrophage production of proinflammatory cytokines, enzymes, and lipid mediators. Resolvins also increased anti-inflammatory cytokines, promoted an M2 macrophage phenotype, and restored cigarette smoke-induced defects in phagocytosis, highlighting the proresolving functions of these molecules. These actions were receptor-dependent and involved modulation of canonical and noncanonical NF-κB expression, with the first evidence for SPM action on alternative NF-κB signaling. These data show that resolvins act on human macrophages to attenuate cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory effects through proresolving mechanisms and provide new evidence of the therapeutic potential of SPMs.

  3. Increasing cognitive load attenuates right arm swing in healthy human walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, Tim; Easthope, Christopher S.; Filli, Linard; Lőrincz, Lilla; Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Brugger, Peter; Linnebank, Michael; Curt, Armin; Zörner, Björn; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human arm swing looks and feels highly automated, yet it is increasingly apparent that higher centres, including the cortex, are involved in many aspects of locomotor control. The addition of a cognitive task increases arm swing asymmetry during walking, but the characteristics and mechanism of this asymmetry are unclear. We hypothesized that this effect is lateralized and a Stroop word-colour naming task-primarily involving left hemisphere structures-would reduce right arm swing only. We recorded gait in 83 healthy subjects aged 18-80 walking normally on a treadmill and while performing a congruent and incongruent Stroop task. The primary measure of arm swing asymmetry-an index based on both three-dimensional wrist trajectories in which positive values indicate proportionally smaller movements on the right-increased significantly under dual-task conditions in those aged 40-59 and further still in the over-60s, driven by reduced right arm flexion. Right arm swing attenuation appears to be the norm in humans performing a locomotor-cognitive dual-task, confirming a prominent role of the brain in locomotor behaviour. Women under 60 are surprisingly resistant to this effect, revealing unexpected gender differences atop the hierarchical chain of locomotor control.

  4. Increasing cognitive load attenuates right arm swing in healthy human walking

    PubMed Central

    Easthope, Christopher S.; Filli, Linard; Lőrincz, Lilla; Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Brugger, Peter; Linnebank, Michael; Curt, Armin; Zörner, Björn; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human arm swing looks and feels highly automated, yet it is increasingly apparent that higher centres, including the cortex, are involved in many aspects of locomotor control. The addition of a cognitive task increases arm swing asymmetry during walking, but the characteristics and mechanism of this asymmetry are unclear. We hypothesized that this effect is lateralized and a Stroop word-colour naming task—primarily involving left hemisphere structures—would reduce right arm swing only. We recorded gait in 83 healthy subjects aged 18–80 walking normally on a treadmill and while performing a congruent and incongruent Stroop task. The primary measure of arm swing asymmetry—an index based on both three-dimensional wrist trajectories in which positive values indicate proportionally smaller movements on the right—increased significantly under dual-task conditions in those aged 40–59 and further still in the over-60s, driven by reduced right arm flexion. Right arm swing attenuation appears to be the norm in humans performing a locomotor-cognitive dual-task, confirming a prominent role of the brain in locomotor behaviour. Women under 60 are surprisingly resistant to this effect, revealing unexpected gender differences atop the hierarchical chain of locomotor control. PMID:28280596

  5. EPA attenuates ultraviolet radiation-induced downregulation of aquaporin-3 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byoung-Kook; Kang, Moon-Kyung; Lee, Ghang-Tai; Lee, Kun-Kuk; Lee, Ho-Sub; Woo, Won-Hong; Mun, Yeun-Ja

    2015-08-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA) that protects against photodamage and photocarcinogenesis in mammals. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a water/glycerol transport protein that is found in basal layer keratinocytes. In this study, we have investigated the protective effect of EPA against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced AQP3 downregulation in human keratinocytes. EPA treatment was found to increase AQP3 gene and protein expression in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Using a specific inhibitor, we observed that the effect of EPA on AQP3 expression was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. UVB radiation induced AQP3 downregulation in HaCaT cells, and it was found that EPA treatment attenuated UVB-induced AQP3 reduction and the associated cell death. UVB-induced downregulation of AQP3 was blocked by EPA and p38 inhibitor SB203580. Collectively, the present results show that EPA increased AQP3 expression and that this led to a reduction UVB-induced photodamage.

  6. Rutin inhibits proliferation, attenuates superoxide production and decreases adhesion and migration of human cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Pagano, Alessandra; Mousslim, Mohamed; Ammari, Youssef; Kovacic, Hervé; Luis, José

    2016-12-01

    Lung and colorectal cancer are the principal causes of death in the world. Rutin, an active flavonoid compound, is known for possessing a wide range of biological activities. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on the viability, superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon (HT29 and Caco-2) cancer cell lines. In order to control the harmlessness of the tested concentrations of rutin, the viability of cancer cell lines was assessed using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. ROS generation was measured by lucigenin chemiluminescence detecting superoxide ions. To investigate the effect of rutin on the behavior of human lung and colon cancer cell lines, we performed adhesion assays, using various purified extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Finally, in vitro cell migration assays were explored using modified Boyden chambers. The viability of cancerous cells was inhibited by rutin. It also significantly attenuated the superoxide production in HT29 cells. In addition, rutin affected adhesion and migration of A549 and HT29 cell. These findings indicate that rutin, a natural molecule, might have potential as anticancer agent against lung and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  7. Antiviral effects of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 and Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205 and SPM1206 on rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells and a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo Yeon; Lee, Do Kyung; Ha, Nam Joo; Shin, Hea Soon

    2015-11-01

    Rotavirus is worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis including severe diarrhea and fatal dehydration in infants and young children. There is an available vaccination program for preventing rotavirus infection, but it has limits and restrictions. Probiotics therapy could be an alternative method of antiviral prevention and modulation against rotavirus infection. In this study, we screened the antiviral activity of probiotic bacteria such as 3 Lactobacillus spp. and 14 Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from young Korean. Three of the bacteria, Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211, Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205, and SPM1206, inhibited human strain Wa rotavirus infection in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, these bacterial strains inhibited rotavirus replication in a rotavirus-infected neonatal mouse model. To clarify the mechanism of inhibition, we investigated gene expression of Interferon (IFN)-signaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors. All 3 probiotics increased IFN-α and IFN-β levels compared with the control. Gene expression of IFNsignaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors also increased. Overall, these results indicate that L. ruminis SPM0211, B. longum SPM1205 and 1206 efficiently inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro and in vivo. Especially, the antiviral effect of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 is worthy of notice. This is the first report of L. ruminis with antiviral activity. Anti-rotaviral effects of the 3 probiotics are likely due to their modulation of the immune response through promoting type I IFNs, which are key regulators in IFN signaling pathway.

  8. Identification of the two rotavirus genes determining neutralization specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Offit, P.A.; Blavat, G.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus NCDV and simian rotavirus SA-11 represent two distinct rotavirus serotypes. A genetic approach was used to determine which viral gene segments segregated with serotype-specific viral neutralization. There were 16 reassortant rotarviruses derived by coinfection of MA-104 cells in vitro with the SA-11 and NCDV strains. The parental origin of reassortant rotavirus double-stranded RNA segments was determined by gene segment mobility in polyacrylamide gels and by hybridization with radioactively labeled parental viral transcripts. The authors found that two rotavirus gene segments found previously to code for outer capsid proteins vp3 and vp7 cosegreated with virus neutralization specificities.

  9. Vaccine-Acquired Rotavirus in Infants with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niraj C.; Hertel, Paula M.; Estes, Mary K.; de la Morena, Maite; Petru, Ann M.; Noroski, Lenora M.; Revell, Paula A.; Celine Hanson, I.; Paul, Mary E.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Abramson, Stuart L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Live pentavalent human–bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine is recommended in the United States for routine immunization of infants. We describe three infants, two with failure to thrive, who had dehydration and diarrhea within 1 month after their first or second rotavirus immunization and subsequently received a diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency. Rotavirus was detected, by means of reverse-transcriptase–polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay, in stool specimens obtained from all three infants, and gene-sequence analysis revealed the presence of vaccine rotavirus. These infections raise concerns regarding the safety of rotavirus vaccine in severely immunocompromised patients. PMID:20107217

  10. Musashi-2 Attenuates AHR Signaling to Expand Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rentas, Stefan; Voisin, Veronique; Wilhelm, Brian T; Bader, Gary D; Yeo, Gene W; Hope, Kristin J

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential in many life saving regenerative therapies, but their low number in CB units has significantly restricted their clinical use despite the advantages they provide during transplantation1. Select small molecules that enhance hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion in culture have been identified2,3, however, in many cases their mechanisms of action or the nature of the pathways they impinge on are poorly understood. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways that underpin the unique human HSC self-renewal program will facilitate the development of targeted strategies that expand these critical cell types for regenerative therapies. Whereas transcription factor networks have been shown to influence the self-renewal and lineage decisions of human HSCs4,5, the post-transcriptional mechanisms guiding HSC fate have not been closely investigated. Here we show that overexpression of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Musashi-2 (MSI2) induces multiple pro-self-renewal phenotypes, including a 17-fold increase in short-term repopulating cells and a net 23-fold ex vivo expansion of long-term repopulating HSCs. By performing a global analysis of MSI2-RNA interactions, we determined that MSI2 directly attenuates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling through post-transcriptional downregulation of canonical AHR pathway components in CB HSPCs. Our study provides new mechanistic insight into RBP-controlled RNA networks that underlie the self-renewal process and give evidence that manipulating such networks ex vivo can provide a novel means to enhance the regenerative potential of human HSCs. PMID:27121842

  11. Artemisia dracunculus L. extract ameliorates insulin sensitivity by attenuating inflammatory signalling in human skeletal muscle culture

    PubMed Central

    Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R.; Wicks, Shawna E.; Bermudez, Estrellita M.; Mendoza, Tamra M.; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Bioactives of Artemisia dracunculus L. (termed PMI 5011) have been shown to improve insulin action by increasing insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. However, it has not known if PMI 5011’s effects are retained during an inflammatory condition. We examined the attenuation of insulin action and whether PMI 5011 enhances insulin signalling in the inflammatory environment with elevated cytokines. Methods Muscle cell cultures derived from lean, overweight and diabetic obese subjects were used. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes and inflammatory response of human myotubes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Insulin signalling and activation of inflammatory pathways in human myotubes were evaluated by Multiplex protein assays. Results We found increased gene expression of MCP1 and TNFα, and basal activity of the NFkB pathway in myotubes derived from diabetic-obese subjects as compared to myotubes derived from normal-lean subjects. In line with this, basal Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) was significantly higher, while insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) was lower in myotubes from normal-overweight and diabetic-obese subjects compared to normal-lean subjects. PMI 5011 treatment reduced basal phosphorylation of Akt and enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in the presence of cytokines in human myotubes. PMI 5011 treatment led to an inhibition of cytokine-induced activation of inflammatory signalling pathways such as Erk1/2 and IkBα-NFkB and moreover, NFkB target gene expression, possibly by preventing further propagation of the inflammatory response within muscle tissue. Conclusions PMI 5011 improved insulin sensitivity in diabetic-obese myotubes to the level of normal-lean myotubes despite the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24521217

  12. Characterization of in vivo anti-rotavirus activities of saponin extracts from Quillaja Saponaria Molina

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Ka Ian; Roner, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide with approximately 300,000 pre-adolescent deaths each year. Quillaja saponins are a natural aqueous extract obtained from the Chilean soapbark tree. The extract is approved for use in humans by the FDA for use in beverages as a food addictive. We have demonstrated that Quillaja extracts have strong antiviral activities in vitro against six different viruses. In this study, we evaluated the in vivo antiviral activity of these extracts against rhesus rotavirus (RRV) using a mouse model. We established that at a dosage of 0.015 mg/mouse of saponin extract, RRV induced diarrhea can be significantly reduced from 79% to 11% when mice are exposed to 500 plaque-forming-units (PFU) for each of five consecutive days. Additionally, while a reduction of RRV induced diarrhea depended both on the concentration of virus introduced and on the amount of Quillaja extract given to each mouse, the severity and interval of diarrhea under a variety of conditions tested, in all the treated mice were greatly reduced when compared to those that did not receive the Quillaja extracts. Mechanistically, there is strong evidence that the Quillaja extracts are able to “block” rotavirus infection by inhibiting virus-host attachment through disruption of cellular membrane proteins and/or virus receptors. We believe that Quillaja extracts have promise as antivirals to reduce rotavirus infection and the severity of the disease in humans. PMID:21549151

  13. Rotavirus vaccination within the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L Mapaseka; Page, Nicola A; Mawela, Mothahadini P B; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Steele, A Duncan

    2012-09-07

    Diarrhoeal diseases are ranked the third major cause of childhood mortality in South African children less than 5 years, where the majority of deaths are among black children. Acute severe dehydrating rotavirus diarrhoea remains an important contributor towards childhood mortality and morbidity and has been well documented in South Africa. As the preventive strategy to control rotavirus diarrhoea, South Africa became the first country in the WHO African Region to adopt the rotavirus vaccine in the national childhood immunisation programme in August 2009. The rotavirus vaccine in use, Rotarix, GSK Biologicals, is given at 6 and 14 weeks of age, along with other vaccines as part of Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). Studies which facilitated the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in South Africa included the burden of rotavirus disease and strain surveillance, economic burden of rotavirus infection and clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of vaccine candidates. This paper reviews the epidemiology of rotavirus in South Africa, outlines some of the steps followed to introduce rotavirus vaccine in the EPI, and highlights the early positive impact of vaccination in reducing the rotavirus burden of disease based on the post-marketing surveillance studies at Dr George Mukhari hospital, a sentinel site at University of Limpopo teaching hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, which has conducted rotavirus surveillance for >20 years.

  14. Recombinant human leptin attenuates stress axis activity in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Marnix; Bernier, Nicholas J; Manuel, Remy; de Gelder, Stefan; Metz, Juriaan R; Huising, Mark O; Flik, Gert

    2012-08-01

    Proper functioning of the endocrine stress axis requires communication between the stress axis and other regulatory mechanisms. We here describe an intimate interplay between the stress axis and recombinant human leptin (rhLeptin) in a teleostean fish, the common carp Cyprinus carpio. Restraint stress (by netting up to 96h) increased plasma cortisol but did not affect hepatic leptin expression. Perifusion of pituitary glands or head kidneys with rhLeptin revealed direct effects of rhLeptin on both tissues. RhLeptin suppresses basal and CRF-induced ACTH-secretion in a rapid and concentration-dependent manner. The rhLeptin effect persisted for over an hour after administration had been terminated. RhLeptin decreases basal interrenal cortisol secretion in vitro, and by doing so attenuates ACTH-stimulated cortisol production; rhLeptin does not affect interrenal ACTH-sensitivity. Our findings show that the endocrine stress axis activity and leptin are inseparably linked in a teleostean fish, a notion relevant to further our insights in the evolution of leptin physiology in vertebrates.

  15. Local L-NG-monomethyl-arginine attenuates the vasodilator action of bradykinin in the human forearm.

    PubMed Central

    O'Kane, K P; Webb, D J; Collier, J G; Vallance, P J

    1994-01-01

    1. Studies in animals indicate that bradykinin relaxes blood vessels directly through an action on smooth muscle and indirectly through the release of endothelium-derived mediators. Its precise mechanism of action in the human arterial circulation is not yet known. 2. In this study the effects of a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, L-NG-monomethyl-arginine (L-NMMA) and noradrenaline on the vasodilator responses to bradykinin were examined in the forearm arterial bed of healthy volunteers. Noradrenaline was used as a control for vasoconstriction by L-NMMA; glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) as a control vasodilator acting independently of the NO synthase enzyme. 3. L-NMMA (4 mumol min-1; 5 min) alone reduced resting forearm blood flow by 44% (P < 0.01; n = 6) confirming that nitric oxide plays an important role in regulating vascular tone. 4. Bradykinin (10 and 100 pmol min-1; 3 min each dose) and GTN (2 and 5 nmol min-1; 3 min each dose) increased forearm blood flow in a dose-dependent manner (percentage changes 171 +/- 17% and 398 +/- 35%, and 176 +/- 21% and 268 +/- 42%, respectively; n = 6). 5. The response to bradykinin, but not that to GTN, was attenuated by L-NMMA compared with noradrenaline (P < 0.05; n = 6), suggesting that bradykinin-induced vasodilatation in the forearm is mediated, at least in part, by stimulating release of nitric oxide. PMID:7833219

  16. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2015.

    PubMed

    Roczo-Farkas, Susie; Kirkwood, Carl D; Bines, Julie E

    2016-12-24

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program, together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide, reports the rotavirus genotypes responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 January to 31 December 2015. During the survey period, 1,383 faecal samples were referred for rotavirus G and P genotype analysis, and of these, 1,031 were confirmed as rotavirus positive. A total of 634 specimens had been collected from children under 5 years of age, while 397 were from older children and adults. Genotype analysis of samples from both children and adults revealed that G12P[8] was the dominant genotype in this reporting period, identified in 48.2% of strains nationally. Genotype G3P[8] was the second most common strain nationally, representing 22.8% of samples, followed by G2P[4] and G1P[8] (9% and 8% respectively). G3P[8] was further divided as equine-like G3P[8] (13.2% of all strains) and other wild-type G3P[8] (9.6%). This report highlights the continued predominance of G12P[8] strains as the major cause of disease in this population. Genotype distribution was distinct between jurisdictions using RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines. Genotype G12P[8] was more common in states using RotaTeq, while equine-like G3P[8] and G2P[4] were more common in the states and territories using Rotarix. This survey highlights the dynamic change in rotavirus genotypes observed since vaccine introduction, including the emergence of a novel equine-like G3P[8] as a major strain. The prolonged dominance of G12P[8] for a 4th consecutive year further illustrates the unexpected trends in the wild type rotaviruses circulating in the Australian population since vaccine introduction.

  17. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Steele, A. Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings. PMID:27260009

  18. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Steele, A Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E Anthony S; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings.

  19. Reduction in Rotavirus Disease and Sustained Predominance of G2P[4] Rotavirus Strain following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Fernanda Maria Ulisses; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Germano, Eliane Mendes; Correia, Nancy Barros; Souza, Edvaldo da Silva; Nakagomi, Osamu; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Cuevas, Luis E; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Correia, Jailson B

    2015-06-01

    Rotavirus vaccination was introduced in Brazil in March 2006. We describe the distribution of rotavirus genotypes in children with acute gastroenteritis in a hospital in Recife, Brazil, during pre- and post-vaccination periods. There was a 43.8% reduction in the proportion of diarrhea episodes due to rotavirus. Nevertheless, we observed a sustained predominance of G2P[4] as the main genotype identified in the post-vaccination period.

  20. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 deficiency attenuates growth while promoting chemosensitivity of human endometrial xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Anne M.; Zhang, Ling; Pru, Cindy A.; Clark, Nicole C.; McCallum, Melissa L.; Blok, Leen J.; Shioda, Toshi; Peluso, John J.; Rueda, Bo R.; Pru, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the leading gynecologic cancer in women in the United States with 52,630 women predicted to be diagnosed with the disease in 2014. The objective of this study was to determine if progesterone (P4) receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) influenced endometrial cancer cell viability in response to chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. A Jentiviral-based shRNA knockdown approach was used to generate stable PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines that also lacked expression of the classical progesterone receptor (PGR). Progesterone treatment inhibited mitosis of PGRMC1-intact, but not PGRMC1-deplete cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 mediates the anti-mitotic actions of P4.To test the hypothesis that PGRMC1 attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete cells were treated in vitro with vehicle, P4 (1 μM), doxorubicin (Dox. 2 μg/ml). or P4 + Dox for 48 h. Doxorubicin treatment of PGRMC1-intact cells resulted in a significant increase in cell death; however, co-treatment with P4 significantly attenuated Dex-induced cell death. This response to P4 was lost in PGRMC1-deplete cells. To extend these observations in vivo, a xenograft model was employed where PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete endometrial tumors were generated following subcutaneous and intraperitonea l inoculation of immunocompromised NOD/SCIO and nude mice, respectively. Tumors derived from PGRMC1-deplete cells grew slower than tumors from PGRMC1-intact cells. Mice harboring endometrial tumors were then given three treatments of vehicle (1:1 cremophor EL: ethanol + 0.9% saline) or chemotherapy [Paclitaxel (15 mg/kg, i.p.) followed after an interval of 30 minutes by CARBOplatin (SO mg/kg)] at five day intervals. In response to chemotherapy, tumor volume decreased approximately four-fold more in PGRMC1-deplete tumors when compared with PGRMC1 intact control tumors, suggesting that PGRMC1 promotes tumor cell viability during

  1. The first case of Kawasaki disease in a 20-month old baby following immunization with rotavirus vaccine and hepatitis A vaccine in China: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Liubao, Peng; Chongqing, Tan; Xiaomin, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) after rotavirus and hepatitis A vaccination has not previously been reported in a baby in China. Herein, we describe a 20-month-old child who developed Kawasaki disease after receiving her second dose of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine (LLR) and her first dose of freeze-dried live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine. The case report was conducted by collecting and analyzing the hospital in-patient medical records and reviewing both the domestic and foreign pertinent literature. These findings will be important to note this possible side effect and to further investigate the association between the above 2 vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

  2. Incidence of Rotavirus and Circulating Genotypes in Northeast Brazil during 7 Years of National Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel, Ricardo Q.; Alvarez, Alberto De Juan; Rodrigues, Alda; Ribeiro, Robergson R.; Dolabella, Sílvio S.; Da Mota, Natanael L.; Santos, Victor S.; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Cuevas, Luis E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rotavirus causes severe diarrhoea and Brazil introduced the Rotarix G1P[8] vaccine in 2006. We aimed to describe changes in rotavirus incidence and diarrhoea epidemiology before and after vaccine introduction. Methods Design: (i) hospital-based survey of children with diarrhoea (2006–2012); (ii) diarrhea-mortality and hospitalization surveillance (1999–2012). Setting (i) Aracaju and (ii) state and national level. Results 1841 children were enrolled and 231 (12.5%) had rotavirus. Rotavirus was less frequent from January-June than from July-December (9.4% versus 20.9%, p<0.01), but the seasonal variation was less defined after 2009. Very few rotavirus cases (8–3.9%) were detected in 2011, with an increase in 2012 (13–18.5%). In 2006, unvaccinated children were more likely to have rotavirus, but thereafter unvaccinated and vaccinated children had equally low incidence. Older children and those with rotavirus were more likely to have severe diarrhea episodes. The most frequent genotype from 2006 to 2010 was G2P[4]; except in 2009, when most cases were G1P[8]. Very few G2P[4] were detected from 2011 and 50% cases in 2012 were G8P[4]. Diarrhoea-hospitalizations decreased nationally from 89,934 (2003) to 53,705 (2012; 40.3% reduction) and in the state from 1729 to 748 (56.7% reduction). Diarrhoea-deaths decreased nationally from 4368 in 1999 to 697 in 2012 (84% reduction, p<0.001) and in the state from 132 to 18 (86% reduction). These changes were much larger after vaccine introduction. Conclusions The vaccine was associated with substantial reductions in rotavirus incidence and diarrhoea-hospitalizations and deaths. The G2P[4] genotype predominance disappeared over time and may be replaced by other heterotypic genotypes. PMID:25360784

  3. Understanding internalization of rotavirus VP6 nanotubes by cells: towards a recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mabel; Wood, Christopher; Sanchez-López, Rosana; Castro-Acosta, Ricardo M; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus VP6 nanotubes are an attractive option for a recombinant vaccine against rotavirus disease. Protection against rotavirus infection and an adjuvant effect have been observed upon immunization with VP6 nanotubes. However, little information exists on how VP6 nanotubes interact with cells and trigger an immune response. In this work, the interaction between VP6 nanotubes and different cell lines was characterized. VP6 nanotubes were not cytotoxic to any of the animal or human cell lines tested. Uptake of nanotubes into cells was cell-line-dependent, as only THP1 and J774 macrophage cells internalized them. Moreover, the size and spatial arrangement of VP6 assembled into nanotubes allowed their uptake by macrophages, as double-layered rotavirus-like particles also displaying VP6 in their surface were not taken up. The internalization of VP6 nanotubes was inhibited by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, but not by genistein, indicating that nanotube entry is specific, depends on the presence of cholesterol in the plasma membrane, and does not require the activity of tyrosine kinases. The information generated here expands our understanding of the interaction of protein nanotubes with cells, which is useful for the application of VP6 nanotubes as a vaccine.

  4. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in preventing cases and hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in Navarre, Spain.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Beristain, Xabier; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Navascués, Ana; García Cenoz, Manuel; Alvarez, Nerea; Polo, Isabel; Mazón, Ana; Gil-Setas, Alberto; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2012-01-11

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been available since 2006. This study evaluates the effectiveness of these vaccines using a test-negative case-control design in Navarre, Spain. We included children 3-59 months of age who sought medical care for gastroenteritis and for whom stool samples were taken between January 2008 and June 2011. About 9% had received the pentavalent vaccine (RotaTeq) and another 8% received the monovalent vaccine (Rotarix). Cases were the 756 children with confirmed rotavirus and controls were the 6036 children who tested negative for rotavirus. Thirty-five percent of cases and 9% of controls had required hospitalization (p<0.0001). The adjusted effectiveness of complete vaccination was 78% (95% CI: 68-85%) in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis and 83% (95% CI: 65-93%) in preventing hospitalization for rotavirus gastroenteritis. No differences between the two vaccines were detected (p=0.4523). Both vaccines were highly effective in preventing cases and hospital admissions in children due to rotavirus gastroenteritis.

  5. Building laboratory capacity to support the global rotavirus surveillance network.

    PubMed

    2013-05-24

    In 2001, in anticipation of rotavirus vaccine licensure and introduction, the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners established regional laboratory surveillance networks for rotavirus detection and strain type monitoring among hospitalized children aged <5 years. In 2006, two WHO-prequalified oral rotavirus vaccines were licensed: a 2-dose, single-strain vaccine (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) and a 3-dose, multistrain vaccine (RotaTeq, Merck). Both vaccines provide protection against a range of rotavirus strain types, generally classified as G and P types based on specific viral proteins. Based on results of clinical trial data, disease burden data from surveillance networks, and findings from vaccine impact studies, WHO recommends that all countries include rotavirus vaccination in national immunization programs. Vaccination is recommended to help reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with rotavirus, a leading cause of diarrhea in children aged <5 years that was responsible for approximately 450,000 deaths in 2008. This report describes the expansion of the regional rotavirus laboratory surveillance networks to a global surveillance network, the implementation of data quality assurance measures to ensure quality laboratory data reporting to support rotavirus surveillance activities, and data reporting through the surveillance network. Timely, quality surveillance data can provide baseline estimates of rotavirus disease burden to inform decisions regarding rotavirus vaccine introduction in national immunization programs and can help monitor the impact of vaccine introduction on disease trends.

  6. Rotavirus Seasonal Distribution and Prevalence Before and After the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine in a Peri-Urban Community of Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Millie R.; Velapatiño, Grace; Campos, Miguel; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Baiocchi, Nelly; Cleary, Thomas G.; Ochoa, Theresa J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the monthly distribution of rotavirus diarrhea in a cohort of children 12–24 months of age followed as part of a diarrhea clinical trial in a peri-urban community of Lima. We observed a peak of rotavirus diarrhea in the winter months and a decrease in rotavirus prevalence after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Peru. PMID:25778507

  7. Attenuated thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation after 14-day bed rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Michikami, Daisaku; Kamiya, Atsunori; Fu, Qi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days on thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation in humans. Fluid intake was ad libitum during HDBR. We induced whole body heating by increasing skin temperature for 1 h with a water-perfused blanket through which hot water (42 degrees C) was circulated. The experimental room was air-conditioned (27 degrees C, 30-40% relative humidity). We measured skin blood flow (chest and forearm), skin temperatures (chest, upper arm, forearm, thigh, and calf), and tympanic temperature. We also measured sweat rate by the ventilated capsule method in which the skin area for measurement was drained by dry air conditioned at 27 degrees C under similar skin temperatures in both trials. We calculated cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean blood pressure. From tympanic temperature-sweat rate and -CVC relationships, we assessed the threshold temperature and sensitivity as the slope response of variables to a given change in tympanic temperature. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for sweating by 0.31 degrees C at the chest and 0.32 degrees C at the forearm, whereas it reduced sensitivity by 40% at the chest and 31% at the forearm. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for cutaneous vasodilation, whereas it decreased sensitivity. HDBR reduced plasma volume by 11%, whereas it did not change plasma osmolarity. The increase in the threshold temperature for sweating correlated with that for cutaneous vasodilation. In conclusion, HDBR attenuated thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation by increasing the threshold temperature and decreasing sensitivity. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for sweating and cutaneous vasodilation by similar magnitudes, whereas it decreased their sensitivity by different magnitudes.

  8. Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kox, Matthijs; van Eijk, Lucas T.; Zwaag, Jelle; van den Wildenberg, Joanne; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Excessive or persistent proinflammatory cytokine production plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. Acute activation of the sympathetic nervous system attenuates the innate immune response. However, both the autonomic nervous system and innate immune system are regarded as systems that cannot be voluntarily influenced. Herein, we evaluated the effects of a training program on the autonomic nervous system and innate immune response. Healthy volunteers were randomized to either the intervention (n = 12) or control group (n = 12). Subjects in the intervention group were trained for 10 d in meditation (third eye meditation), breathing techniques (i.a., cyclic hyperventilation followed by breath retention), and exposure to cold (i.a., immersions in ice cold water). The control group was not trained. Subsequently, all subjects underwent experimental endotoxemia (i.v. administration of 2 ng/kg Escherichia coli endotoxin). In the intervention group, practicing the learned techniques resulted in intermittent respiratory alkalosis and hypoxia resulting in profoundly increased plasma epinephrine levels. In the intervention group, plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased more rapidly after endotoxin administration, correlated strongly with preceding epinephrine levels, and were higher. Levels of proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were lower in the intervention group and correlated negatively with IL-10 levels. Finally, flu-like symptoms were lower in the intervention group. In conclusion, we demonstrate that voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system results in epinephrine release and subsequent suppression of the innate immune response in humans in vivo. These results could have important implications for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive or persistent inflammation, such as autoimmune diseases. PMID:24799686

  9. The Dynamic cerebral autoregulatory adaptive response to noradrenaline is attenuated during systemic inflammation in humans.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-07-01

    Vasopressor support is used widely for maintaining vital organ perfusion pressure in septic shock, with implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA). This study investigated whether a noradrenaline-induced steady state increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) would enhance dCA following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion, a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during early sepsis. The dCA in eight healthy males was examined prior to and during an intended noradrenaline-induced MAP increase of approximately 30 mmHg. This was performed at baseline and repeated after a 4-h intravenous LPS infusion. The assessments of dCA were based on transfer function analysis of spontaneous oscillations between MAP and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the low frequency range (0.07-0.20 Hz). Prior to LPS, noradrenaline administration was associated with a decrease in gain (1.18 (1.12-1.35) vs 0.93 (0.87-0.97) cm/mmHg per s; P < 0.05) with no effect on phase (0.71 (0.93-0.66) vs 0.94 (0.81-1.10) radians; P = 0.58). After LPS, noradrenaline administration changed neither gain (0.91 (0.85-1.01) vs 0.87 (0.81-0.97) cm/mmHg per s; P = 0.46) nor phase (1.10 (1.04-1.30) vs 1.37 (1.23-1.51) radians; P = 0.64). The improvement of dCA to a steady state increase in MAP is attenuated during an LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response. This may suggest that vasopressor treatment with noradrenaline offers no additional neuroprotective effect by enhancing dCA in patients with early sepsis.

  10. Broadband measurements of the frequency dependence of attenuation coefficient and velocity in amniotic fluid, urine and human serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prashant K; Humphrey, Victor F; Duck, Francis A

    2005-10-01

    The frequency dependence of attenuation coefficient in amniotic fluid, urine and 4.5% and 20% human serum albumin solutions over the frequency range 5 MHz to 25 MHz was measured at both room temperature and physiological temperature using a variable path length technique. A 15 MHz (13 mm diameter) transducer was used to produce a broadband single-cycle pulse and a 4 mm diameter bilaminar polyvinylidene difluoride membrane hydrophone was used to detect the attenuated pulse. Standard time-of-flight measurement techniques were used to measure the acoustic velocity in the same fluid samples. At physiological temperature, the attenuation coefficients in amniotic fluid, urine and 4.5% and 20% human albumin solution were found to be 0.0053 f(1.65), 0.0047 f(1.67), 0.019 f(1.57) and 0.167 f(1.27) dB cm(-1), respectively, where f is in MHz. The velocities in amniotic fluid, urine and 4.5% human albumin solution at physiological temperature were found to be 1541.1 m s(-1) +/- 1.3 m s(-1), 1551.3 m s(-1) +/- 1.3 ms(-1) and 1547.3 m s(-1) +/- 1.0 m s(-1), respectively. The results provide unique data over the diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasonic frequency range that can be used as input data for theoretical models that attempt to simulate nonlinear pressure fields and temperature rises from medical ultrasonic transducers.

  11. Comparison of human and monkey cells for the ability to attenuate transcripts that begin at the adenovirus major late promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Seiberg, M.; Aloni, Y. ); Levine, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Late transcription from the adenovirus major late promoter can terminate prematurely at a site 182 to 188 nucleotides downstream. Experiments have been designed, with run-on transcription in nuclei in vitro or riboprobe protection of RNA obtained both in vivo and in vitro, that demonstrate that the ratio of attenuator RNA to readthrough RNA is greater in monkey cells (CV-1) than in human cells (HeLa). This may explain, in part, why the human adenoviruses replicate more poorly in CV-1 cells than in HeLa cells. A mutant adenovirus that replicates better than wild-type virus in monkey cells produces less of the attenuator RNA than wild-type adenovirus does in monkey cells. Monkey cell extracts have been shown to contain a factor that, when added to human cell extracts transcribing adenovirus DNA in vitro, increases the production of attenuator RNA in these reactions. These observations help to explain a portion of the block to the production of infectious adenoviruses in monkey cells.

  12. Mutation distribution in the NSP4 protein in rotaviruses isolated from Mexican children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Menchaca, Griselda E; Hernández, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Tamez, Reyes S; Contreras, Juan F

    2013-03-11

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88%) were vomiting and 35 (70%) had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26%) cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46%) moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28%) severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  13. Rotavirus Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... including a severe allergy to latex. Babies with “severe combined immunodeficiency” (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called “intussusception” should not get ... moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor if ...

  14. Whole genome analyses of African G2, G8, G9, and G12 rotavirus strains using sequence-independent amplification and 454® pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Jere, Khuzwayo C; Mlera, Luwanika; O'Neill, Hester G; Potgieter, A Christiaan; Page, Nicola A; Seheri, Mapaseka L; van Dijk, Alberdina A

    2011-11-01

    High mortality rates caused by rotaviruses are associated with several strains such as G2, G8, G9, and G12 rotaviruses. Rotaviruses with G9 and G12 genotypes emerged worldwide in the past two decades. G2 and G8 rotaviruses are however also characterized frequently across Africa. To understand the genetic constellation of African G2, G8, G9, and G12 rotavirus strains and their possible origin, sequence-independent cDNA synthesis, amplification, and 454(®) pyrosequencing of the whole genomes of five human African rotavirus strains were performed. RotaC and phylogenetic analysis were used to assign and confirm the genotypes of the strains. Strains RVA/Human-wt/MWI/1473/2001/G8P[4], RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3203WC/2009/G2P[4], RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3133WC/2009/G12P[4], RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3176WC/2009/G12P[6], and RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/GR10924/1999/G9P[6] were assigned G8-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, G2-P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2, G12-P[4]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, G12-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, and G9-P[6]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 genotypes, respectively. The detection of both Wa- and DS-1-like genotypes in strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/3133WC/2009/G12P[4] and Wa-like, DS-1-like and P[6] genotypes in strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/GR10924/1999/G9P[6] implies that these two strains were generated through intergenogroup genome reassortment. The close similarity of the genome segments of strain RVA/Human-wt/MWI/1473/2001/G8P[4] to artiodactyl-like, human-bovine reassortant strains and human rotavirus strains suggests that it originated from or shares a common origin with bovine strains. It is therefore possible that this strain might have emerged through interspecies genome reassortment between human and artiodactyl rotaviruses. This study illustrates the swift characterization of all the 11 rotavirus genome segments by using a single set of universal primers for cDNA synthesis followed by 454(®) pyrosequencing and RotaC analysis.

  15. Rotavirus Infection Is Not Associated with Small Intestinal Fluid Secretion in the Adult Mouse▿

    PubMed Central

    Kordasti, Shirin; Istrate, Claudia; Banasaz, Mahanez; Rottenberg, Martin; Sjövall, Henrik; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to humans, adult but not infant small animals are resistant to rotavirus diarrhea. The pathophysiological mechanism behind this age-restricted diarrhea is currently unresolved, and this question was investigated by studying the secretory state of the small intestines of adult mice infected with rotavirus. Immunohistochemistry and histological examinations revealed that rotavirus (strain EDIM) infects all parts of the small intestines of adult mice, with significant numbers of infected cells in the ilea at 2 and 4 days postinfection. Furthermore, quantitative PCR revealed that 100-fold more viral RNA was produced in the ilea than in the jejuna or duodena of adult mice. In vitro perfusion experiments of the small intestine did not reveal any significant changes in net fluid secretion among mice infected for 3 days or 4 days or in those that were noninfected (37 ± 9 μl · h−1 · cm−1, 22 ± 13 μl · h−1 · cm−1, and 33 ± 6 μl · h−1 · cm−1, respectively) or in transmucosal potential difference (4.0 ± 0.3 mV versus 3.9 ± 0.4 mV), a marker for active chloride secretion, between control and rotavirus-infected mice. In vivo experiments also did not show any differences in potential difference between uninfected and infected small intestines. Furthermore, no significant differences in weight between infected and uninfected small intestines were found, nor were any differences in fecal output observed between infected and control mice. Altogether, these data suggest that rotavirus infection is not sufficient to stimulate chloride and water secretion from the small intestines of adult mice. PMID:16943290

  16. Molecular detection of viruses in Kenyan bats and discovery of novel astroviruses, caliciviruses and rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Waruhiu, Cecilia; Ommeh, Sheila; Obanda, Vincent; Agwanda, Bernard; Gakuya, Francis; Ge, Xing-Yi; Yang, Xing-Lou; Wu, Li-Jun; Zohaib, Ali; Hu, Ben; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2017-04-06

    This is the first country-wide surveillance of bat-borne viruses in Kenya spanning from 2012-2015 covering sites perceived to have medium to high level bat-human interaction. The objective of this surveillance study was to apply a non-invasive approach using fresh feces to detect viruses circulating within the diverse species of Kenyan bats. We screened for both DNA and RNA viruses; specifically, astroviruses (AstVs), adenoviruses (ADVs), caliciviruses (CalVs), coronaviruses (CoVs), flaviviruses, filoviruses, paramyxoviruses (PMVs), polyomaviruses (PYVs) and rotaviruses. We used family-specific primers, amplicon sequencing and further characterization by phylogenetic analysis. Except for filoviruses, eight virus families were detected with varying distributions and positive rates across the five regions (former provinces) studied. AstVs (12.83%), CoVs (3.97%), PMV (2.4%), ADV (2.26%), PYV (1.65%), CalVs (0.29%), rotavirus (0.19%) and flavivirus (0.19%). Novel CalVs were detected in Rousettus aegyptiacus and Mops condylurus while novel Rotavirus-A-related viruses were detected in Taphozous bats and R. aegyptiacus. The two Rotavirus A (RVA) strains detected were highly related to human strains with VP6 genotypes I2 and I16. Genotype I16 has previously been assigned to human RVA-strain B10 from Kenya only, which raises public health concern, particularly considering increased human-bat interaction. Additionally, 229E-like bat CoVs were detected in samples originating from Hipposideros bats roosting in sites with high human activity. Our findings confirm the presence of diverse viruses in Kenyan bats while providing extended knowledge on bat virus distribution. The detection of viruses highly related to human strains and hence of public health concern, underscores the importance of continuous surveillance.

  17. A lattice-based model of rotavirus epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Sagahón, A.; Govezensky, T.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.; José, M. V.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic recurrence of childhood rotavirus epidemics in unvaccinated populations provides one of the best documented phenomena in population dynamics and can become a paradigm for epidemic studies. Herein we analyse the monthly incidence of rotavirus infection from the city of Melbourne, Australia during 1976-2003. We show that there is an inverse nonlinear relationship of the cumulative distribution of the number of cases per month in a log-log plot. It is also shown that the rate of transmission of rotavirus infection follows a symmetric distribution centered on zero. A wavelet phase analysis of rotavirus epidemics is also carried out. We test the hypothesis that rotavirus dynamics could be a realization of a forest-fire model with sparks and with immune trees. Some statistical properties of this model turn out to be similar to the above results of actual rotavirus data.

  18. Options for improving effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tissera, Marion S; Cowley, Daniel; Bogdanovic-Sakran, Nada; Hutton, Melanie L; Lyras, Dena; Kirkwood, Carl D; Buttery, Jim P

    2016-11-11

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a leading global cause of mortality and morbidity in young children due to diarrhea and dehydration. Over 85% of deaths occur in developing countries. In industrialised countries, 2 live oral rotavirus vaccines licensed in 2006 quickly demonstrated high effectiveness, dramatically reducing severe rotavirus gastroenteritis admissions in many settings by more than 90%. In contrast, the same vaccines reduced severe rotavirus gastroenteritis by only 30-60% in developing countries, but have been proven life-saving. Bridging this "efficacy gap" offers the possibility to save many more lives of children under the age of 5. The reduced efficacy of rotavirus vaccines in developing settings may be related to differences in transmission dynamics, as well as host luminal, mucosal and immune factors. This review will examine strategies currently under study to target the issue of reduced efficacy and effectiveness of oral rotavirus vaccines in developing settings.

  19. A study on neonatal calf diarrhea induced by rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, G; Ferrari, M; Frigeri, F; Traldi, V; Angelillo, V

    1994-01-01

    This review summarizes the results of a study on rotaviruses isolated from calves affected by neonatal diarrhea. The results indicated that rotavirus infection is widespread and supported the evidence for an etiologic role of these viruses in neonatal diarrhea. Differences in virulence among bovine rotaviruses appeared also to be confirmed. Conventionally reared calves were fully susceptible to the experimental infection induced by rotaviruses originating from heterologous hosts, i.e. monkeys, pigs and rabbits. When rotavirus strains of bovine, simian and rabbit origin were compared by cross neutralization tests, it was found the simian and porcine strains were indistinguishable and both appeared to relate antigenically to the bovine strain. Finally, it was proven that feeding newborn calves with colostrum and first milk of their dams, previously vaccinated with an inactivated adjuvanted rotavirus vaccine, could prevent the neonatal diarrhea from occurring.

  20. Rotavirus vaccines: safety, efficacy and public health impact.

    PubMed

    Gray, J

    2011-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the cause of acute gastroenteritis, and disease is widespread amongst infants and young children throughout the world. Also, rotavirus is associated with significant mortality in developing countries with more than 500 000 children dying each year as a result of the severe dehydration associated with rotavirus disease. Efforts have been ongoing for more than 30 years to develop a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine. Currently, two vaccines, RotaRix and RotaTeq, have been licensed for use in many countries throughout the world following comprehensive safety and efficiency trials. Monitoring their effectiveness after licensure has confirmed that their incorporation into early childhood vaccination schedules can significantly prevent severe rotavirus diarrhoea, which would have resulted in hospitalizations, emergency room visits or increased diarrhoea-related mortality. Although the efficacy of both vaccines is lower at approximately 40-59% in developing countries, their use could significantly reduce the mortality associated with rotavirus disease that is concentrated in these countries.

  1. Clinical characteristics of rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized Romanian infants.

    PubMed

    Lesanu, Gabriela; Becheanu, Cristina Adriana; Vlad, Raluca Maria; Pacurar, Daniela; Tincu, Iulia Florentina; Smadeanu, Roxana Elena

    2013-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of rotavirus enteritis were evaluated by comparison with acute diarrhea of other etiologies. We reviewed the medical records of children (aged 0-12 months) admitted with acute diarrhea in our hospital between January and December 2011. Of the 839 patients, 49.3% had rotavirus diarrhea. The incidence of severe disease was significantly higher for rotavirus diarrhea (65.2%, P < 0.01) than for other types of diarrheal disease.

  2. Recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine candidates containing a 3′ genomic promoter mutation and L polymerase mutations are attenuated and protective in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Sheila M.; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Bradley, Konrad; Kim, Olivia S.; Bier, Stacia; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Davis, Stephanie; St. Claire, Marisa; Elkins, Randy; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Schaap-Nutt, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we identified several attenuating mutations in the L polymerase protein of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) and genetically stabilized those mutations using reverse genetics (Nolan et al., 2005). Here we describe the discovery of an attenuating mutation at nucleotide 15 (15T→C) in the 3′ genomic promoter that was also present in the previously characterized mutants. We evaluated the properties of this promoter mutation alone and in various combinations with the L polymerase mutations. Amino acid substitutions at L protein positions 460 (460A or 460P) or 948 (948L), or deletion of amino acids 1724 and 1725 (Δ1724), each conferred a temperature sensitivity (ts) phenotype whereas the 15T→C mutation did not. The 460A and 948L mutations each contributed to restricted replication in the lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, but the Δ1724 mutation increased attenuation only in certain combinations with other mutations. We constructed two highly attenuated viruses, rV94(15C)/460A/948L and rV94(15C)/948L/Δ1724, that were immunogenic and protective against challenge with wild-type HPIV2 in African green monkeys and, therefore, appear to be suitable for evaluation in humans. PMID:17658669

  3. Tandem truncated rotavirus VP8* subunit protein with T cell epitope as non-replicating parenteral vaccine is highly immunogenic

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Yuan, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    The two currently available live oral rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, are highly efficacious in the developed countries. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in resource deprived countries in Africa and Southeast Asia is low. We reported previously that a bacterially-expressed rotavirus P2-P[8] ΔVP8* subunit vaccine candidate administered intramuscularly elicited high-titers of neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs and mice and significantly shortened the duration of diarrhea in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs upon oral challenge with virulent human rotavirus Wa strain. To further improve its vaccine potential and provide wider coverage against rotavirus strains of global and regional epidemiologic importance, we constructed 2 tandem recombinant VP8* proteins, P2-P[8] ΔVP8*-P[8] ΔVP8* and P2-P[8] ΔVP8*-P[6] ΔVP8* based on Escherichia coli expression system. The two resulting recombinant tandem proteins were highly soluble and P2-P[8] ΔVP8*-P[8] ΔVP8* was generated with high yield. Moreover, guinea pigs immunized intramuscularly by 3 doses of the P2-P[8] ΔVP8*-P[8] ΔVP8* or P2-P[8] ΔVP8*-P[6] ΔVP8* vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant developed high titers of homotypic and heterotypic neutralizing antibodies against human rotaviruses bearing G1-G4, G8, G9 and G12 with P[8], P[4] or P[6] combination. The results suggest that these 2 subunit vaccines in monovalent or bivalent formulation can provide antigenic coverage to almost all the rotavirus G (VP7) types and major P (VP4) types of global as well as regional epidemiologic importance. PMID:26091081

  4. Activation and genetic modification of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Michael, Agnieszka; John, Justin; Meyer, Brendan; Pandha, Hardev

    2010-03-05

    Live attenuated bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella typhimurium, have shown promise as delivery vehicles for DNA. We have examined two new strains of S. typhimurium and their impact on dendritic cell maturation (CD12-sifA/aroC mutant and WT05-ssaV/aroC, both in TML background). Strain WT05 matured dendritic cells in a more efficient way; caused higher release of cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta; and was efficient for gene transfer. These findings suggest that the genetic background of the attenuation can influence the pattern of inflammatory immune response to Salmonella infection.

  5. Adenosine receptor inhibition with theophylline attenuates the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans.

    PubMed

    Fieger, Sarah M; Wong, Brett J

    2010-09-01

    Mechanisms underlying the robust cutaneous vasodilatation in response to local heating of human skin remain unresolved. Adenosine receptor activation has been shown to induce vasodilatation via nitric oxide, and a substantial portion of the plateau phase to local heating of human skin has been shown to be dependent on nitric oxide. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential role for adenosine receptor activation in cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans. Six subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres on the ventral forearm. Sites were randomly assigned to receive one of the following four treatments: (1) lactated Ringer solution to serve as a control; (2) 4 mM theophylline, a competitive, non-selective A(1)/A(2) adenosine receptor antagonist; (3) 10 mM Nomega(-)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit NO synthase; or (4) combined 4 mm theophylline + 10 mM L-NAME. Following baseline measurements, each site was locally heated from a baseline temperature of 33 degrees C to 42 degrees C at a rate of 1 degrees C (10 s)(-1), and skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF divided by mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (CVC(max)) via local heating to 43 degrees C and infusion of 28 mM sodium nitroprusside. The initial peak was significantly reduced in theophylline (68 +/- 2% CVC(max)) and L-NAME sites (54 +/- 5% CVC(max)) compared with control sites (81 +/- 2% CVC(max); P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). Combined theophylline + L-NAME (52 +/- 5% CVC(max)) reduced the initial peak compared with control and theophylline sites, but was not significantly different compared with L-NAME sites. The secondary plateau was attenuated in theophylline (77 +/- 2% CVC(max)), L-NAME (60 +/- 2% CVC(max)) and theophylline + L-NAME (53 +/- 1% CVC(max)) compared with control sites (94 +/- 2% CVC(max); P < 0.001 for all conditions). The secondary plateau

  6. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  7. [A rare cause of afebrile convulsion: rotavirus gastroenteritis].

    PubMed

    Karabel, Müsemma; Karabel, Duran; Kara, Semra; Halıcı Taş, Tuğba; Türkay, Sadi

    2013-04-01

    Rotavirus is the most common infectious diarrhea that causes important mortality and morbidities in small children, severe dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Extraintestinal signs are rare in rotavirus infections. Recently, afebrile seizures associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis but without encephalopathy, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance or hypoglycemia have being reported. In this article, the fact that rotavirus, which is seen commonly in our country, can be confronted with various clinical manifestations was emphasized by reminding that it can be seen not only in infants with neurologic and systemic disease but also in healthy infants.

  8. Role of somatosensory and vestibular cues in attenuating visually induced human postural sway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the contribution of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory cues to the maintenance of stance in humans. Postural sway was induced by full field, sinusoidal visual surround rotations about an axis at the level of the ankle joints. The influences of vestibular and somatosensory cues were characterized by comparing postural sway in normal and bilateral vestibular absent subjects in conditions that provided either accurate or inaccurate somatosensory orientation information. In normal subjects, the amplitude of visually induced sway reached a saturation level as stimulus amplitude increased. The saturation amplitude decreased with increasing stimulus frequency. No saturation phenomena was observed in subjects with vestibular loss, implying that vestibular cues were responsible for the saturation phenomenon. For visually induced sways below the saturation level, the stimulus-response curves for both normal and vestibular loss subjects were nearly identical implying that (1) normal subjects were not using vestibular information to attenuate their visually induced sway, possibly because sway was below a vestibular-related threshold level, and (2) vestibular loss subjects did not utilize visual cues to a greater extent than normal subjects; that is, a fundamental change in visual system 'gain' was not used to compensate for a vestibular deficit. An unexpected finding was that the amplitude of body sway induced by visual surround motion could be almost three times greater than the amplitude of the visual stimulus in normals and vestibular loss subjects. This occurred in conditions where somatosensory cues were inaccurate and at low stimulus amplitudes. A control system model of visually induced postural sway was developed to explain this finding. For both subject groups, the amplitude of visually induced sway was smaller by a factor of about four in tests where somatosensory cues provided accurate versus inaccurate orientation information. This

  9. Role of somatosensory and vestibular cues in attenuating visually induced human postural sway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Benolken, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory cues to the maintenance of stance in humans. Postural sway was induced by full-field, sinusoidal visual surround rotations about an axis at the level of the ankle joints. The influences of vestibular and somatosensory cues were characterized by comparing postural sway in normal and bilateral vestibular absent subjects in conditions that provided either accurate or inaccurate somatosensory orientation information. In normal subjects, the amplitude of visually induced sway reached a saturation level as stimulus amplitude increased. The saturation amplitude decreased with increasing stimulus frequency. No saturation phenomena were observed in subjects with vestibular loss, implying that vestibular cues were responsible for the saturation phenomenon. For visually induced sways below the saturation level, the stimulus-response curves for both normal subjects and subjects experiencing vestibular loss were nearly identical, implying (1) that normal subjects were not using vestibular information to attenuate their visually induced sway, possibly because sway was below a vestibular-related threshold level, and (2) that subjects with vestibular loss did not utilize visual cues to a greater extent than normal subjects; that is, a fundamental change in visual system "gain" was not used to compensate for a vestibular deficit. An unexpected finding was that the amplitude of body sway induced by visual surround motion could be almost 3 times greater than the amplitude of the visual stimulus in normal subjects and subjects with vestibular loss. This occurred in conditions where somatosensory cues were inaccurate and at low stimulus amplitudes. A control system model of visually induced postural sway was developed to explain this finding. For both subject groups, the amplitude of visually induced sway was smaller by a factor of about 4 in tests where somatosensory cues provided

  10. Epidemiology of Rotavirus-Norovirus Co-Infection and Determination of Norovirus Genogrouping among Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nasab, Seyed Dawood Mousavi; Sabahi, Farzaneh; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samiee, Siamak Mirab; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Ravanshad, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteric viruses, particularly human rotavirus and norovirus, have been shown to replace bacteria and parasites, as the most common pathogens responsible for acute diarrhea. However, there are still few epidemiological data on the simultaneous occurrence of these viruses in Iran. In this regard, the aim of this study was to assess the useful epidemiological data on the gastroenteritis associated with rotavirus-norovirus mixed infection and to examine the prevalence of norovirus genogrouping among children aged less than five years old in Iran. Methods: A total of 170 stool samples were collected from children under five years of age with the clinical signs and symptoms of acute gastroenteritis, from May 2013 to May 2014. For the detection of both rotavirus and norovirus, total RNA was extracted from all samples, followed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). For both detected rotaviruses and noroviruses, genogrouping was performed. Results: Of 170 samples, 49 (28.8%) and 15 (8.8%) samples were found to be positive for rotavirus and norovirus infections by RT-PCR. Interestingly, 6 (3.5%) patients were positive for both infections. Among the 15 norovirus-positive patients, 13 (86.6%) and 2 (13.3%) belonged to genogroups GII and GI. Conclusion: The norovirus genogroup GII and rotavirus lead to the serious infections in children with acute gastroenteritis. However, more well-designed studies are needed to further elucidate the role of other enteric viruses in acute gastroenteritis PMID:27137790

  11. Endothelial expression of human cytochrome P450 epoxygenases lowers blood pressure and attenuates hypertension-induced renal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Craig R.; Imig, John D.; Edin, Matthew L.; Foley, Julie; DeGraff, Laura M.; Bradbury, J. Alyce; Graves, Joan P.; Lih, Fred B.; Clark, James; Myers, Page; Perrow, A. Ligon; Lepp, Adrienne N.; Kannon, M. Alison; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.; Alkayed, Nabil J.; Falck, John R.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2010-01-01

    Renal cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) regulate sodium transport and blood pressure. Although endothelial CYP-derived EETs are potent vasodilators, their contribution to the regulation of blood pressure remains unclear. Consequently, we developed transgenic mice with endothelial expression of the human CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 epoxygenases to increase endothelial EET biosynthesis. Compared to wild-type littermate controls, an attenuated afferent arteriole constrictor response to endothelin-1 and enhanced dilator response to acetylcholine was observed in CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 transgenic mice. CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 transgenic mice demonstrated modestly, but not significantly, lower mean arterial pressure under basal conditions compared to wild-type controls. However, mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in both CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 transgenic mice during coadministration of N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and indomethacin. In a separate experiment, a high-salt diet and subcutaneous angiotensin II was administered over 4 wk. The angiotensin/high-salt-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular injury was significantly attenuated in CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 transgenic mice compared to wild-type controls. Collectively, these data demonstrate that increased endothelial CYP epoxygenase expression attenuates afferent arteriolar constrictor reactivity and hypertension-induced increases in blood pressure and renal injury in mice. We conclude that endothelial CYP epoxygenase function contributes to the regulation of blood pressure.—Lee, C. R., Imig, J. D., Edin, M. E., Foley, J., DeGraff, L. M., Bradbury, J. A., Graves, J. P., Lih, F. B., Clark, J., Myers, P., Perrow, A. L., Lepp, A. N., Kannon, M. A., Ronnekleiv, O. K., Alkayed, N. J., Falck, J. R., Tomer, K. B., Zeldin, D. C. Endothelial expression of human cytochrome P450 epoxygenases lowers blood pressure and attenuates hypertension-induced renal injury in mice. PMID:20495177

  12. The assembly conformation of rotavirus VP6 determines its protective efficacy against rotavirus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ana Ruth; Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Contreras, Martha A; Esquivel, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Viral protein assemblies have shown to be superior immunogens used in commercial vaccines. However, little is known about the effect of protein assembly structure in immunogenicity and the protection conferred by a vaccine. In this work, rotavirus VP6, a polymorphic protein that assembles into nanotubes, icosahedra (dlRLP) or trimers was used to compare the immune response elicited by three different assemblies. VP6 is the most antigenic and abundant rotavirus structural protein. It has been demonstrated that antibodies against VP6 interfere with the replication cycle of rotavirus, making it a vaccine candidate. Groups of mice were immunized with either nanotubes, dlRLP or trimers and the humoral response (IgG and IgA titers) was measured. Immunized mice were challenged with EDIM rotavirus and protection against rotavirus infection, measured as viral shedding, was evaluated. Immunization with nanotubes resulted in the highest IgG titers, followed by immunization with dlRLP. While immunization with one dose of nanotubes was sufficient to reduce viral shedding by 70%, two doses of dlRLP or trimers were required to obtain a similar protection. The results show that the type of assembly of VP6 results in different humoral responses and protection efficacies against challenge with live virus. This information is important for the design of recombinant vaccines in general.

  13. Interferon γ Attenuates Insulin Signaling, Lipid Storage, and Differentiation in Human Adipocytes via Activation of the JAK/STAT Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    McGillicuddy, Fiona C.; Chiquoine, Elise H.; Hinkle, Christine C.; Kim, Roy J.; Shah, Rachana; Roche, Helen M.; Smyth, Emer M.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports demonstrate T-cell infiltration of adipose tissue in early obesity. We hypothesized that interferon (IFN) γ, a major T-cell inflammatory cytokine, would attenuate human adipocyte functions and sought to establish signaling mechanisms. Differentiated human adipocytes were treated with IFNγ ± pharmacological inhibitors prior to insulin stimulation. [3H]Glucose uptake and AKT phosphorylation were assessed as markers of insulin sensitivity. IFNγ induced sustained loss of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in human adipocytes, coincident with reduced Akt phosphorylation and down-regulation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and GLUT4. Loss of adipocyte triglyceride storage was observed with IFNγ co-incident with reduced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, adiponectin, perilipin, fatty acid synthase, and lipoprotein lipase. Treatment with IFNγ also blocked differentiation of pre-adipocytes to the mature phenotype. IFNγ-induced robust STAT1 phosphorylation and SOCS1 mRNA expression, with modest, transient STAT3 phosphorylation and SOCS3 induction. Preincubation with a non-selective JAK inhibitor restored glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation while completely reversing IFNγ suppression of adipogenic mRNAs and adipocyte differentiation. Specific inhibition of JAK2 or JAK3 failed to block IFNγ effects suggesting a predominant role for JAK1-STAT1. We demonstrate that IFNγ attenuates insulin sensitivity and suppresses differentiation in human adipocytes, an effect most likely mediated via sustained JAK-STAT1 pathway activation. PMID:19776010

  14. Novel Rotavirus VP7 Typing Assay Using a One-Step Reverse Transcriptase PCR Protocol and Product Sequencing and Utility of the Assay for Epidemiological Studies and Strain Characterization, Including Serotype Subgroup Analysis

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Daniel J.; Kraiouchkine, Nikolai; Mallette, Laura; Maliga, Marianne; Kulnis, Gregory; Keller, Paul M.; Clark, H. Fred; Shaw, Alan R.

    2005-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis in infants. To date, 10 different serotypes of rotavirus have been identified in human stools. While four or five serotypes dominate, serotype circulation varies with season and geography. Since our laboratory has been involved in the development of a multivalent rotavirus vaccine, it is important to identify the serotypes of rotavirus encountered during our clinical trials. We have developed methodologies for the molecular identification of rotavirus strains based on VP7 gene segment sequence. A 365-bp reverse transcriptase PCR product was generated from the VP7 gene segment using a pair of novel degenerate primers. All serotypes tested (both animal and human) yielded an identically sized product after amplification. Sequencing of these products is performed using truncated versions of the original primers. The sequence generated is compared against a database of rotavirus VP7 sequences, with the G type determined, based on the sequence homology. Using this assay, we have correctly identified human VP7 strains from a panel of available serotypes, as well as numerous animal strains. The assay was qualified using rotavirus positive stool samples, negative stool samples, and rotavirus-spiked stool samples. In addition, samples from cases of acute gastroenteritis collected at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have been evaluated and indicate that the assay is able to discriminate subtle differences within serotypes. The assay has been utilized in the testing of >3,000 antigen-positive (enzyme immunoassay) samples collected during clinical trials of a rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq) and identified a serotype in ∼92% of samples (3, 17, 19). PMID:16333070

  15. A Multi-Center, Qualitative Assessment of Pediatrician and Maternal Perspectives on Rotavirus Vaccines and the Detection of Porcine circovirus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2010, researchers using novel laboratory techniques found that US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contain DNA or DNA fragments from Porcine circovirus (PCV), a virus common among pigs but not believed to cause illness in humans. We sought to understand pediatricians' and mothers' perspectives on this finding. Methods We conducted three iterations of focus groups for pediatricians and non-vaccine hesitant mothers in Seattle, WA, Cincinnati, OH, and Rochester, NY. Focus groups explored perceptions of rotavirus disease, rotavirus vaccination, and attitudes about the detection of PCV material in rotavirus vaccines. Results Pediatricians understood firsthand the success of rotavirus vaccines in preventing severe acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children. They measured this benefit against the theoretical risk of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines, determining overall that the PCV finding was of no clinical significance. Particularly influential was the realization that the large, randomized clinical trials that found both vaccines to be highly effective and safe were conducted with DNA material from PCV already in the vaccines. Most mothers supported the ideal of full disclosure regarding vaccination risks and benefits. However, with a scientific topic of this complexity, simplified information regarding PCV material in rotavirus vaccines seemed frightening and suspicious, and detailed information was frequently overwhelming. Mothers often remarked that if they did not understand a medical or technical topic regarding their child's health, they relied on their pediatrician's guidance. Many mothers and pediatricians were also concerned that persons who abstain from pork consumption for religious or personal reasons may have unsubstantiated fears of the PCV finding. Conclusions Pediatricians considered the detection of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines a "non-issue" and reported little hesitation in continuing to recommend the

  16. Vaccine-Derived NSP2 Segment in Rotaviruses from Vaccinated Children with Gastroenteritis in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Rippinger, Christine M.; Svensson, Lennart; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix™ (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq™ (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (~90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007–2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggests that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs. PMID:22487061

  17. Characterization of rotavirus genotypes before and after the introduction of a monovalent rotavirus vaccine in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Carvajal, Dioselina; Cotes-Cantillo, Karol; Paternina-Caicedo, Angel; Gentsch, Jon; de la Hoz-Restrepo, Fernando; Patel, Manish

    2014-06-01

    Strain monitoring for emergence of novel strains after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine is an integral component of routine rotavirus immunization programs. Using a laboratory based strain surveillance system between 2008 and 2012, a wide variation in strain pattern in Colombia was founded both before and after the introduction of a monovalent rotavirus vaccine in 2009. G2P[4], a strain fully heterotypic to the vaccine was predominant before vaccine introduction in 2008 (47%) and after vaccine introduction in 2010 (54%), 2011 (86%), and 2012 (32%). The presence of this strain before the introduction of vaccine and decreasing prevalence during the most recent surveillance year suggests secular variation rather than vaccine pressure as a cause for this fluctuation. While strain monitoring can be valuable after vaccine introduction, these surveillance data alone without information on disease incidence or strain specific vaccine effectiveness can be prone to misinterpretation with regard to the role of vaccine pressure on emergence of new or persistent strains.

  18. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhagen, Jan O. Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H.; Faul, David; Scheffler, Klaus

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  19. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea: the IVANHOE study.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Arnaud; Nowak, Emmanuel; Lemaitre, Thomas; Segura, Jean-Francois; Delaperrière, Nadège; Abalea, Lydie; Poulhazan, Elise; Jossens, Anne; Auzanneau, Lucie; Tran, Adissa; Payan, Christopher; Jay, Nadine; de Parscau, Loic; Oger, Emmanuel

    2011-05-12

    The aim of the IVANHOE study was to determine the real-world impact of the rotavirus vaccine, controlling for epidemic-to-epidemic variation in disease burden. A population-based prospective cohort study was conducted in Brest City and 7 suburban districts (CUB area), North-western Brittany, France (210,000 inhabitants; 5500 births per year). The vaccination program started in May 2007 for a 2-year period for all infants born in the Brest birth zone through pediatricians, public outpatient clinics and general practitioners. To determine vaccine impact we monitored trends in hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea using an active hospital-based surveillance system initiated 5 years before vaccine introduction. The number of hospitalizations for rotavirus-specific diarrhea during the 2008/2009 epidemic in infants less than 2 years of age whose parents lived within the CUB area was modelled as a function of (1) the number of hospitalizations in infants 2-5 years of age to control for epidemic-to-epidemic variation and (2) vaccine introduction. A total of 4684 infants received at least one dose. Of these, 2635 lived within the CUB area. Vaccine coverage for a complete schedule in the CUB area was 47.1%. Poisson modelling revealed a reduction by a factor of 2.04 (1.56-2.66) in the number of hospitalizations during the last epidemic season (2008/2009), the number of observed cases being equal to 30, against an expected number of 61. Relative risk reduction for hospitalizations for rotavirus diarrhea was 98% (95% CI: 83-100%). We observed a noticeable impact of vaccination on rotavirus diarrhea hospitalizations within 2 years of vaccine introduction integrating for the first time rotavirus epidemics variation. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number, NCT00740935.

  20. Production of IL-8, IL-17, IFN-gamma and IP-10 in human astrocytes correlates with alphavirus attenuation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bi-Hung; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Popov, Vsevolod L; Zacks, Michele A; Estes, D Mark; Campbell, Gerald A; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-05-03

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an important, naturally emerging zoonotic pathogen. Recent outbreaks in Venezuela and Colombia in 1995 indicate that VEEV still poses a serious public health threat. Astrocytes may be target cells in human and mouse infection and they play an important role in repair through gliosis. In this study, we report that virulent VEEV efficiently infects cultured normal human astrocytes, three different murine astrocyte cell lines and astrocytes in the mouse brain. The attenuation of virus replication positively correlates with the increased levels of production of IL-8, IL-17, IFN-gamma and IP-10. In addition, VEEV infection induces release of basic fibroblast growth factor and production of potent chemokines such as RANTES and MIP-1-beta from cultured human astrocytes. This growth factor and cytokine profile modeled by astrocytes in vitro may contribute to both neuroprotection and repair and may play a role in leukocyte recruitment in vivo.

  1. Attenuation of maternal psychophysiological stress responses and the maternal cortisol awakening response over the course of human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Entringer, Sonja; Buss, Claudia; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Cammack, Alison L; Yim, Ilona S; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A; Wadhwa, Pathik D

    2010-05-01

    The effects of maternal stress during pregnancy may depend, in part, on the timing in gestation of the occurrence of stress. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of stage of gestation on maternal psychophysiological responses to stress using a standardized laboratory paradigm and on the cortisol response to awakening (CAR). A longitudinal design was employed to quantify maternal psychophysiological stress reactivity [changes in heart rate (HR), blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and psychological distress in response to the trier social stress test (TSST)] and the CAR at approximately 17 and 31 weeks gestation in a sample of 148 women. To account for the possible effects of habituation when being exposed to the same stress protocol twice, a non-pregnant comparison group (CG, N = 36) also underwent these assessments at two time points, with a comparable time interval between the assessments. In both groups, the TSST elicited significant changes in maternal HR, mean arterial pressure, and psychological distress levels but not a significant increase in cortisol levels. Among the pregnant women (pregnant group(PG)), the stressor-induced increases in HR, blood pressure, and psychological distress were significantly lower at the second (31 weeks gestation) compared to the first (17 weeks gestation) assessment of pregnancy (all p < 0.01). The maternal CAR was also significantly attenuated in later compared to earlier gestation (p = 0.003). In the CG, there were no significant differences in psychophysiological stress responses and in the CAR across the two assessments. Among pregnant women there is a progressive attenuation of psychophysiological stress responses with advancing gestation. This attenuation is unlikely to be attributable to habituation. Individual differences in the degree of attenuation of stress responses over gestation may represent a novel marker of stress susceptibility in human pregnancy.

  2. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the geant4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization. PMID:26520720

  3. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  4. Rotavirus interaction with isolated membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Alonso-Torre, S R; Charpilienne, A; Vasseur, M; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J; Alvarado, F

    1994-06-01

    To gain information about the mechanism of epithelial cell infection by rotavirus, we studied the interaction of bovine rotavirus, RF strain, with isolated membrane vesicles from apical membrane of pig enterocytes. Vesicles were charged with high (quenching) concentrations of either carboxyfluorescein or calcein, and the rate of fluorophore release (dequenching) was monitored as a function of time after mixing with purified virus particles. Purified single-shelled particles and untrypsinized double-shelled ones had no effect. Trypsinized double-shelled virions induced carboxyfluorescein release according to sigmoid curves whose lag period and amplitude were a function of virus concentration and depended on both temperature and pH. The presence of 100 mM salts (Tris Cl, NaCl, or KCl) was required, since there was no reaction in isoosmotic salt-free sorbitol media. Other membrane vesicle preparations such as apical membranes of piglet enterocyte and rat placenta syncytiotrophoblasts, basolateral membranes of pig enterocytes, and the undifferentiated plasma membrane of cultured MA104 cells all gave qualitatively similar responses. Inhibition by a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that the active species causing carboxyfluorescein release is VP5*. Ca2+ (1 mM), but not Mg2+, inhibited the reaction. In situ solubilization of the outer capsid of trypsinized double-shelled particles changed release kinetics from sigmoidal to hyperbolic and was not inhibited by Ca2+. Our results indicate that membrane destabilization caused by trypsinized outer capsid proteins of rotavirus leads to fluorophore release. From the data presented here, a hypothetical model of the interaction of the various states of the viral particles with the membrane lipid phase is proposed. Membrane permeabilization induced by rotavirus may be related to the mechanism of entry of the virus into the host cell.

  5. Phosphatidylserine and caffeine attenuate postexercise mood disturbance and perception of fatigue in humans.

    PubMed

    Wells, Adam J; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Mangine, Gerald T; McCormack, William P; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Robinson, Edward H

    2013-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) may attenuate the adverse effects of physical fatigue. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a multi-ingredient supplement containing 400 mg/d PS and 100 mg/d caffeine (supplement [SUP]) for 2 weeks on measures of cognitive function (CF), reaction time (RT), and mood (MD) following an acute exercise stress. It is hypothesized that PS will maintain preexercise CF and RT scores, while attenuating postexercise fatigue. Participants completed 2 acute bouts of resistance exercise (T1 and T2) separated by 2-week ingestion of SUP or control (CON). Outcome measures were assessed pre- and postexercise. When collapsed across groups, a significant decrease in RT performance was seen in the 60-second reaction drill from pre- to postexercise at T1. All other RT tests were similar from pre- to postexercise at T1. Reaction time was not significantly changed by PS. When collapsed across groups, a significant increase in performance of the serial subtraction test was seen. A significant increase (8.9% and 7.1%) in the number of correct answers and a significant decrease (8.0% and 7.5%) in time to answer were seen from pre- to postworkout at T1 and T2, respectively. A significant increase in total MD score from pre- to postworkout was observed for CON but not for PS at T2. Phosphatidylserine significantly attenuated pre- to postexercise perception of fatigue compared to CON. Ingestion of SUP for 14 days appears to attenuate postexercise MD scores and perception of fatigue, but does not affect CF or RT, in recreationally trained individuals.

  6. Prolyl Oligopeptidase Inhibition Attenuates Steatosis in the L02 Human Liver Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Da; Li, Bing-Hang; Wang, Jing; Ding, Yong-Nian; Dong, Yan; Chen, Yuan-Wen; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that is widely distributed in vivo, particularly in the liver. Significant changes in functional mitochondrial proteins involved with mitochondrial oxidoreductases/transporters and nucleic acid binding proteins were observed after POP inhibition in the liver, which suggested a role of POP in regulating liver energy metabolism. Steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with disturbances in lipid and energy metabolism in hepatocytes. Here, we aimed to study the effect of POP on hepatocyte steatosis. Methods The human liver cell line L02 was used to investigate the biological effects of POP. An in vitro cell model of steatosis was successfully induced with oleic acid and palmitic acid. L02 cells were also subjected to S17092 (a POP inhibitor) at different concentrations for 24 or 48 h. Ac-SDKP levels and POP activity were measured to assess the rate of inhibition of POP by S17092. The POP gene and protein expression levels were detected using real-time PCR and Western blots, respectively. Oil red O staining was performed and the triglyceride levels in the L02 cells were also measured. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected using CCK-8 and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism was detected using real-time PCR. The effects of POP inhibition on LC3B II were detected by Western blot. Results Compared with the control, the POP mRNA levels increased by approximately 30%, and the POP protein levels increased by almost 60% in the steatotic L02 cells. After S17092 (0.026~130 μM) incubation for 24 or 48 h, cell proliferation was significantly decreased in the free fatty acid (FFA)-treated cells at 26–130 μM; however, S17092 did not affect the proliferation of L02 cells after 24 h of incubation with S17092 at 0.026–65 μM without FFA treatment. S17092 treatment (13 and 26 μM) also elicited no significant effect on apoptosis in

  7. Aquifer heterogeneity controls on adverse human health effects and the concept of the hazard attenuation factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, F. P. J.; Bellin, A.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dagan, G.; Fiori, A.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the probability distribution of the hazard attenuation factor for a noncarcinogenic reactive compound captured by a well in heterogeneous porous formations. The hazard attenuation factor is defined as the ratio between the hazard index HI at a detection well and at the source. Heterogeneity of the aquifer is represented through the multi-indicator model (a collection of blocks of independent permeability) while flow and transport are solved by the means of the self-consistent approach that is able to deal with any degree of heterogeneity. Due to formation heterogeneity, HI is a random variable and similar for hazard attenuation index. The latter can be fully characterized by its cumulative distribution function (CDF), which in turn can be related to the statistics of the travel time of solute particles, from the source to the detection well. The approach is applied to the case of a solute which undergoes decay and a well with a screen much smaller than the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity. The results show that the probability of exceeding a given acceptable threshold of the hazard index is significantly affected by the level of heterogeneity comparable to the one observed for the MADE site, and the distance between the source and the well.

  8. Development of improved vaccine cell lines against rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weilin; Orr-Burks, Nichole; Karpilow, Jon; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of severe gastroenteritis among very young children. In developing countries, rotavirus is the major cause of mortality in children under five years old, causing up to 20% of all childhood deaths in countries with high diarrheal disease burden, with more than 90% of these deaths occurring in Africa and Asia. Rotavirus vaccination mimics the first infection without causing illness, thus inducing strong and broad heterotypic immunity against prospective rotavirus infections. Two live vaccines are available, Rotarix and RotaTeq, but vaccination efforts are hampered by high production costs. Here, we present a dataset containing a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen that identified silencing events that enhanced rotavirus replication. Evaluated against several rotavirus vaccine strains, hits were validated in a Vero vaccine cell line as well as CRISPR/Cas9 generated cells permanently and stably lacking the genes that affect RV replication. Knockout cells were dramatically more permissive to RV replication and permitted an increase in rotavirus replication. These data show a means to improve manufacturing of rotavirus vaccine. PMID:28248921

  9. Hospitalizations associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain, 2001–2005

    PubMed Central

    López-de-Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Galarza, Patricia Graciela; de Miguel, Ángel Gil

    2008-01-01

    Background This study aims to describe and analyze hospital admissions in Spain due to rotavirus infections among children aged 5 years or under during the period 2001–2005, along with the associated health cost. Methods To update estimates of rotavirus hospitalizations rates in Spain, we conducted a retrospective study of 5 years of national hospitalization data associated with acute gastroenteritis using the Minimum Basic Data Set. Results During the study period, a total of 17.1% of all admissions due to acute gastroenteritis of any etiology in children aged ≤ 5 years were attributable to rotavirus infection as determined by the rotavirus-specific International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification code. A mean incidence of 135 hospital admissions attributable to rotavirus per 100,000 children aged ≤ 5 years was found. Hospitalizations associated with rotavirus had a marked winter-time seasonality. The estimated cost of hospital admission attributable to rotavirus has risen from 3 million euros estimated for 2001 to almost 7 million euros estimated in 2005. Conclusion Rotavirus gastroenteritis remains an important cause of hospitalizations in Spanish children, mostly during the winter season. PMID:18397512

  10. Possible sex differences in the susceptibility of calves to rotavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hasso, S A; Pandey, R

    1986-01-01

    The agar gel precipitation test was used to detect rotavirus antibodies in the serum of 562 calves and bovine rotavirus antigen in the feces of 347 calves. Significantly more females had rotavirus antibodies in the serum (P less than 0.01) and rotavirus antigen in the feces (P less than 0.1) than did male calves. Female buffalo calves were also found to be more susceptible than male buffalo calves to rotavirus infection. PMID:3019501

  11. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  12. A rapid, automated approach for quantitation of rotavirus and reovirus infectivity.

    PubMed

    Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Willis, Janet Z; Guan, John; Morse, E Ashley; Ikizler, Miné; Wetzel, J Denise; Dermody, Terence S; Contractor, Nikhat

    2012-09-01

    Current microscopy-based approaches for immunofluorescence detection of viral infectivity are time consuming and labor intensive and can yield variable results subject to observer bias. To circumvent these problems, we developed a rapid and automated infrared immunofluorescence imager-based infectivity assay for both rotavirus and reovirus that can be used to quantify viral infectivity and infectivity inhibition. For rotavirus, monolayers of MA104 cells were infected with simian strain SA-11 or SA-11 preincubated with rotavirus-specific human IgA. For reovirus, monolayers of either HeLa S3 cells or L929 cells were infected with strains type 1 Lang (T1L), type 3 Dearing (T3D), or either virus preincubated with a serotype-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb). Infected cells were fixed and incubated with virus-specific polyclonal antiserum, followed by an infrared fluorescence-conjugated secondary antibody. Well-to-well variation in cell number was normalized using fluorescent reagents that stain fixed cells. Virus-infected cells were detected by scanning plates using an infrared imager, and results were obtained as a percent response of fluorescence intensity relative to a virus-specific standard. An expected dose-dependent inhibition of both SA-11 infectivity with rotavirus-specific human IgA and reovirus infectivity with T1L-specific mAb 5C6 and T3D-specific mAb 9BG5 was observed, confirming the utility of this assay for quantification of viral infectivity and infectivity blockade. The imager-based viral infectivity assay fully automates data collection and provides an important advance in technology for applications such as screening for novel modulators of viral infectivity. This basic platform can be adapted for use with multiple viruses and cell types.

  13. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  14. Nicotinamide attenuates aquaporin 3 overexpression induced by retinoic acid through inhibition of EGFR/ERK in cultured human skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiuzu; Xu, Aie; Pan, Wei; Wallin, Brittany; Kivlin, Rebecca; Lu, Shan; Cao, Cong; Bi, Zhigang; Wan, Yinsheng

    2008-08-01

    The most common adverse effects that are related to all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment are irritation and dryness of the skin. atRA therapy is reported to impair barrier function as achieved by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). Treatment with nicotinamide prior to initiation of atRA therapy provides additional barrier protection and thus reduces susceptibility of retinoic acid. Our previous studies showed that atRA upregulates aquaporin 3 (AQP3) in cultured human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Others have demonstrated that in atopic dermatitis, overexpression of AQP3 is linked to elevated TEWL and that nicotinamide treatment reduces skin TEWL. In this study, we observed that while atRA upregulates AQP3 expression in cultured human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), nicotinamide attenuates the effect of atRA in a concentration-dependent manner. atRA treatment induces EGFR and ERK activation. PD153035, an EGFR inhibitor, and U0126, an ERK inhibitor, inhibit atRA-induced upregulation of AQP3. Nicotinamide also inhibits atRA-induced activation of EGFR/ERK signal transduction and decreases water permeability by downregulating AQP3 expression. Collectively, our results indicate that the effect of atRA on AQP3 expression is at least partly mediated by EGFR/ERK signaling in cultured human skin keratinocytes. Nicotinamide attenuates atRA-induced AQP3 expression through inhibition of EGFR/ERK signal transduction and eventually decreases water permeability and water loss. Our study provides insights into the molecular mechanism through which nicotinamide reverses the side effects of dryness in human skin after treatment with atRA.

  15. [Seasonality of rotavirus infection in Venezuela: relationship between monthly rotavirus incidence and rainfall rates].

    PubMed

    González Chávez, Rosabel

    2015-09-01

    In general, it has been reported that rotavirus infection was detected year round in tropical countries. However, studies in Venezuela and Brazil suggest a seasonal behavior of the infection. On the other hand, some studies link infection with climatic variables such as rainfall. This study analyzes the pattern of behavior of the rotavirus infection in Carabobo-Venezuela (2001-2005), associates the seasonality of the infection with rainfall, and according to the seasonal pattern, estimates the age of greatest risk for infection. The analysis of the rotavirus temporal series and accumulated precipitation was performed with the software SPSS. The infection showed two periods: high incidence (November-April) and low incidence (May-October). Accumulated precipitation presents an opposite behavior. The highest frequency of events (73.8% 573/779) for those born in the period with a low incidence of the virus was recorded at an earlier age (mean age 6.5 +/- 2.0 months) when compared with those born in the station of high incidence (63.5% 568/870, mean age 11.7 +/- 2.2 months). Seasonality of the infection and the inverse relationship between virus incidence and rainfall was demonstrated. In addition, it was found that the period of birth determines the age and risk of infection. This information generated during the preaccine period will be helpful to measure the impact of the vaccine against the rotavirus.

  16. Oncolytic virotherapy for human bone and soft tissue sarcomas using live attenuated poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Satoru; Matsumine, Akihiko; Toyoda, Hidemi; Niimi, Rui; Iino, Takahiro; Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsubara, Takao; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Komada, Yoshihiro; Uchida, Atsumasa; Sudo, Akihiro

    2012-09-01

    The poliovirus receptor CD155, is essential for poliovirus to infect and induce death in neural cells. Recently, CD155 has been shown to be selectively expressed on certain types of tumor cells originating from the neural crest, including malignant glioma and neuroblastoma. However, the expression pattern of CD155 in soft tissue sarcoma has not been examined. Therefore, we first examined CD155 expression in sarcoma cell lines, and found the expression of both CD155 mRNA and protein in 12 soft and bone tissue sarcoma cell lines. Furthermore, we examined the effect of live attenuated poliovirus (LAPV) on 6 bone and soft tissue sarcoma cell lines in vitro, and found that LAPV induced apoptosis by activating caspases 7 and 3 in all of these cell lines. Furthermore, in BALB/c nu/nu mice xenotransplanted with HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, administration of live attenuated poliovirus caused growth suppression of the tumors. These results suggest that oncolytic therapy using a LAPV may represent a new option for the treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  17. Multigate Doppler measurements of ultrasonic attenuation and blood hematocrit in human arteries.

    PubMed

    Secomski, Wojciech; Nowicki, Andrzej; Tortoli, Piero; Olszewski, Robert

    2009-02-01

    A clinically applicable method for noninvasive measurement of hematocrit based on 20 MHz multigate Doppler ultrasound was developed. The ultrasound attenuation coefficient in blood is obtained by measuring the power of the signal coming from gates at different depths. A robust averaging method is introduced, which provides stable and repeatable results by using the echo signals from all depths inside the vessel. In vitro measurements have been done on porcine blood with hematocrit ranging from 3.0% to 65.0%. Steady and pulsatile flow conditions have been simulated using a peristaltic pump. The attenuation coefficient indicated the linear relation to hematocrit. The resulting correlation coefficient was R = 0.999 for the continuous blood flow and R = 0.992 for pulsatile flow. In vivo measurements have been performed in the brachial artery in 43 patients with hematocrit in the range of 32.0% to 49.3%. The mean absolute error has been 3.24% with a standard deviation of 3.72%.

  18. Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody and cytokine responses in Bangladeshi children with rotavirus diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Azim, Tasnim; Zaki, M Hasan; Podder, Goutam; Sultana, Novera; Salam, M Abdus; Rahman, S Moshfiqur; Sefat-e-Khuda; Sack, David A

    2003-02-01

    Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody responses and cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-10, were measured in children 7-24 months of age with rotavirus diarrhoea (n = 29); the responses were compared with children with watery diarrhoea from whom no enteric pathogens were isolated (controls; n = 11). All children had diarrhoea for < 5 days and were enrolled from the Dhaka Hospital of the Centre for Health and Population Research. Samples of blood and stools were collected on the day of enrollment and 18-21 days after the onset of diarrhoea. Children showing a > or = 4-fold rise in antibody titre between the acute and convalescent stages were considered to have a response. The numbers of children with rotavirus-specific IgA and IgA1 responses in stool were similar in the two groups of children. In the plasma, more children with rotavirus diarrhoea had rotavirus-specific IgA, IgA1, IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 responses than did control children (P = 0.049, 0.007, 0.001, 0.002, and 0.012, respectively). IgA2 was not detectable. Among cytokines measured in supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured for 6 and 24 hr, IFN-gamma was the only cytokine that was higher in children with rotavirus diarrhoea compared with controls (P = 0.013). Severity of illness did not correlate with nutritional status or antibody titres, but severity did correlate with TNF-alpha during the acute stage of illness. IFN-gamma correlated positively with IgG1 titres. These findings suggest a role for IFN-gamma in the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection, but this needs confirmation by other studies. The immune responses described are relevant to future vaccine trials, as immune responses in vaccinees should mimic those in natural infection.

  19. Comparative analysis of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain and G1P[8] rotaviruses detected before and after vaccine introduction in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Tamim, Sana; McAllen, John K.; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Akopov, Asmik; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of human rotavirus infections worldwide. The effect of universal mass vaccination with rotavirus vaccines on circulating G1P[8] rotaviruses is still poorly understood. Therefore we analyzed the complete genomes of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain, and 70 G1P[8] rotaviruses, detected between 1999 and 2010 in Belgium (36 before and 34 after vaccine introduction) to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on circulating G1P[8] strains. All rotaviruses possessed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation, but frequent intra-genogroup reassortments were observed as well as multiple different cluster constellations circulating in a single season. In addition, identical cluster constellations were found to circulate persistently over multiple seasons. The Rotarix™ vaccine strain possessed a unique cluster constellation that was not present in currently circulating G1P[8] strains. At the nucleotide level, the VP6, VP2 and NSP2 gene segments of Rotarix™ were relatively distantly related to any Belgian G1P[8] strain, but other gene segments of Rotarix™ were found in clusters also containing circulating Belgian strains. At the amino acid level, the genetic distance between Rotarix™ and circulating Belgian strains was considerably lower, except for NSP1. When we compared the Belgian G1P[8] strains collected before and after vaccine introduction a reduction in the proportion of strains that were found in the same cluster as the Rotarix™ vaccine strain was observed for most gene segments. The reduction in the proportion of strains belonging to the same cluster may be the result of the vaccine introduction, although natural fluctuations cannot be ruled out. PMID:28070453

  20. Comparative analysis of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain and G1P[8] rotaviruses detected before and after vaccine introduction in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Heylen, Elisabeth; Tamim, Sana; McAllen, John K; Kirkness, Ewen F; Akopov, Asmik; De Coster, Sarah; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are responsible for the majority of human rotavirus infections worldwide. The effect of universal mass vaccination with rotavirus vaccines on circulating G1P[8] rotaviruses is still poorly understood. Therefore we analyzed the complete genomes of the Rotarix™ vaccine strain, and 70 G1P[8] rotaviruses, detected between 1999 and 2010 in Belgium (36 before and 34 after vaccine introduction) to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on circulating G1P[8] strains. All rotaviruses possessed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation, but frequent intra-genogroup reassortments were observed as well as multiple different cluster constellations circulating in a single season. In addition, identical cluster constellations were found to circulate persistently over multiple seasons. The Rotarix™ vaccine strain possessed a unique cluster constellation that was not present in currently circulating G1P[8] strains. At the nucleotide level, the VP6, VP2 and NSP2 gene segments of Rotarix™ were relatively distantly related to any Belgian G1P[8] strain, but other gene segments of Rotarix™ were found in clusters also containing circulating Belgian strains. At the amino acid level, the genetic distance between Rotarix™ and circulating Belgian strains was considerably lower, except for NSP1. When we compared the Belgian G1P[8] strains collected before and after vaccine introduction a reduction in the proportion of strains that were found in the same cluster as the Rotarix™ vaccine strain was observed for most gene segments. The reduction in the proportion of strains belonging to the same cluster may be the result of the vaccine introduction, although natural fluctuations cannot be ruled out.

  1. Bile tolerant Lactobacillus reuteri isolated from pig feces inhibits enteric bacterial pathogens and porcine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byeong Joo; Mun, Mi Ran; J, Rejish Kumar V; Kim, Chul-Joong; Lee, Insun; Chang, Young-Hyo; Park, Yong-Ha

    2010-04-01

    Lactic acid producing bacterial strain Probio-16 was isolated from the swine excrements under anaerobic conditions and characterized by morphology and biochemical characteristics. The strain was further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogeneitc analysis. The antimicrobial activity of the strain was assayed by testing for growth inhibition of thirteen pathogenic microorganisms. The strain was tested for antiviral activity against porcine rotavirus in vitro in African green monkey epithelial cell line TF-104. Antibiotic susceptibility of the strain against 13 antibiotics was tested using disk diffusion method. Phenotypically and through 16S rRNA gene sequences, Probio-16 was identified and named as Lactobacillus reuteri Probio-16. This strain was resistant to pH 2.0, 5% porcine bile and exhibited antimicrobial activity against all the thirteen enteric bacterial pathogens tested. Probio-16 supernatant inhibited porcine rotavirus in vitro in TF-104 cell lines. Except for erythromycin and penicillin G at a concentration of 4 microg/ml, Probio-16 showed resistance to all other thirteen antibiotics tested. This study indicates L. reuteri Probio-16 as a novel strain with its tolerance to low pH and bile, antimicrobial activity, antibiotic resistance and antiviral activity against rotavirus, and an ideal probiotic candidate for animal and human application after the proper in vivo experiments.

  2. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo.

  3. Evaluating the safety of a rotavirus vaccine: the REST of the story

    PubMed Central

    Kuter, Barbara J; Dallas, Michael J; Heaton, Penny

    2008-01-01

    The Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST) was a blinded, placebo-controlled study of the live pentavalent human-bovine vaccine, RotaTeq® (Merck & Co. Inc., West Point, PA). REST was noteworthy because its primary objective was to evaluate the safety of RotaTeq® with regard to intussusception, a rare intestinal illness that occurs with a background incidence of approximately 50 cases per 100 000 infant years. The study involved approximately 70 000 infants at over 500 study sites in 11 countries. The study demonstrated that the risk of intussusception was similar in vaccine and placebo recipients and that the vaccine prevented rotavirus gastroenteritis, ameliorated the severity of disease in those who had any disease, and substantially reduced rotavirus-associated hospitalizations and other health care contacts. This report provides an in-depth review of the background, statistical and regulatory considerations, and execution of REST. We describe the rationale and methods used for sample size, continuous safety monitoring, group sequential design, and detailed study execution. The results of the study have been reported elsewhere. The design and conduct of this study may serve as a useful model for planning other future large-scale clinical trials, especially those evaluating uncommon adverse events. PMID:18375651

  4. A DltA mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi Is partially attenuated in its ability to cause pustules in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane; Leduc, Isabelle; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Elkins, Christopher; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-02-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi produces two outer membrane proteins, called DltA (H. ducreyi lectin A) and DsrA (H. ducreyi serum resistance A), that contribute to the ability of the organism to evade complement-mediated serum killing. In contrast to their isogenic parent strain, 35000HP, the DsrA mutant FX517 exhibits 0% survival in 50% normal human serum and the DltA mutant FX533 exhibits 23% survival. Compared to 35000HP, FX517 does not cause pustule formation in human volunteers. To test whether DltA was required for virulence in humans, seven volunteers were experimentally infected with 35000HP and FX533. Four subjects were inoculated with fixed doses of 35000HP (101 CFU or 130 CFU) at three sites on one arm and escalating doses of FX533 (range, 46 CFU to 915 CFU) at three sites on the other arm. Pustules only developed at mutant-injected sites at doses nearly twofold higher than that of the parent, suggesting that FX533 was partially attenuated. Three subjects were inoculated with similar doses of the parent (67 CFU) and mutant (104 CFU) at three sites. Pustules formed at five of nine parent sites and one of nine mutant sites. Overall, the papule and pustule formation rates for 35000HP and FX533 were similar for the trial. However, for the five subjects who received similar doses of the parent and mutant, pustules developed at 7 of 15 sites (46.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.9% to 76.5%) inoculated with the parent and at 1 of 15 (6.7%; 95% CI, 0.1% to 18.4%) sites inoculated with the mutant (P = 0.043). We concluded that the DltA mutant was attenuated in its ability to cause disease at doses similar to that of the parent.

  5. Repeated administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor attenuates nicotine taking in rats and smoking behavior in human smokers.

    PubMed

    Ashare, R L; Kimmey, B A; Rupprecht, L E; Bowers, M E; Hayes, M R; Schmidt, H D

    2016-01-19

    Tobacco smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death worldwide and current smoking cessation medications have limited efficacy. Thus, there is a clear need for translational research focused on identifying novel pharmacotherapies for nicotine addiction. Our previous studies demonstrated that acute administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) attenuates nicotine taking and seeking in rats and suggest that AChEIs could be repurposed for smoking cessation. Here, we expand upon these findings with experiments designed to determine the effects of repeated AChEI administration on voluntary nicotine taking in rats as well as smoking behavior in human smokers. Rats were trained to self-administer intravenous infusions of nicotine (0.03 mg kg(-1) per 0.59 ml) on a fixed-ratio-5 schedule of reinforcement. Once rats maintained stable nicotine taking, galantamine or donepezil was administered before 10 consecutive daily nicotine self-administration sessions. Repeated administration of 5.0 mg kg(-1) galantamine and 3.0 mg kg(-1) donepezil attenuated nicotine self-administration in rats. These effects were reinforcer-specific and not due to adverse malaise-like effects of drug treatment as repeated galantamine and donepezil administration had no effects on sucrose self-administration, ad libitum food intake and pica. The effects of repeated galantamine (versus placebo) on cigarette smoking were also tested in human treatment-seeking smokers. Two weeks of daily galantamine treatment (8.0 mg (week 1) and 16.0 mg (week 2)) significantly reduced smoking rate as well as smoking satisfaction and reward compared with placebo. This translational study indicates that repeated AChEI administration reduces nicotine reinforcement in rats and smoking behavior in humans at doses not associated with tolerance and/or adverse effects.

  6. Elevation of iron storage in humans attenuates the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bart, Nicole K; Curtis, M Kate; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Hungerford, Sara L; McLaren, Ross; Petousi, Nayia; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Sustained hypoxia over several hours induces a progressive rise in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Administration of intravenous iron immediately prior to the hypoxia exposure abrogates this effect, suggesting that manipulation of iron stores may modify hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Iron (ferric carboxymaltose) administered intravenously has a plasma half-life of 7-12 h. Thus any therapeutic use of intravenous iron would require its effect on PASP to persist long after the iron-sugar complex has been cleared from the blood. To examine this, we studied PASP during sustained (6 h) hypoxia on 4 separate days (days 0, 1, 8, and 43) in 22 participants. On day 0, the rise in PASP with hypoxia was well matched between the iron and saline groups. On day 1, each participant received either 1 g of ferric carboxymaltose or saline in a double-blind manner. After administration of intravenous iron, the rise in PASP with hypoxia was attenuated by ∼50%, and this response remained suppressed on both days 8 and 43 (P < 0.001). Following administration of intravenous iron, values for ferritin concentration, transferrin saturation, and hepcidin concentration rose significantly (P < 0.001, P < 0.005, and P < 0.001, respectively), and values for transferrin concentration fell significantly (P < 0.001). These changes remained significant at day 43 We conclude that the attenuation of the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia by elevation of iron stores persists long after the artificial iron-sugar complex has been eliminated from the blood. The persistence of this effect suggests that intravenous iron may be of benefit in some forms of pulmonary hypertension.

  7. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program annual report, 2007/08.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Cannan, David; Boniface, Karen; Bishop, Ruth F; Barnes, Graeme L

    2008-12-01

    The National Rotavirus Reference Centre together with collaborating laboratories Australia-wide conducts a laboratory based rotavirus surveillance program. This report describes the types of rotavirus strains responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2008, the first complete year of surveillance following introduction of rotavirus into the National Immunisation Program. Six hundred faecal samples from across Australia were examined using a combined approach of monoclonal antibody immunoassays and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Of the 419 confirmed as rotavirus positive, serotype G1 was the dominant serotype nationally, representing 52% of specimens, followed by serotype G2 (19.8%), serotype G9 (12.2%), and serotype G3 (11%). No serotype G4 strains were identified. All G1, G3 and G9 strains assayed for P genotype contained the P[8] genotype, while all G2 strains contained the P[4] genotype, except one G2 strain which possessed a P[8]. Uncommon rotavirus genotypes, G8 (n = 2) and P[9] (n = 2) were identified during this study period. There was no evidence of unexpected changes in serotype distribution during the first 12 months of rotavirus vaccine use in the National Immunisation Program.

  8. Expression of rotavirus VP2 produces empty corelike particles.

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, M; Charpilienne, A; Crawford, S E; Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1991-01-01

    The complete VP2 gene of bovine rotavirus strain RF has been inserted into the baculovirus transfer vector pVL941 under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. Cotransfection of Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells with wild-type baculovirus DNA and transfer vector DNA led to the formation of recombinant baculoviruses which contain bovine rotavirus gene 2. Infection of S. frugiperda cells with this recombinant virus resulted in the production of a protein similar in size and antigenic properties to the authentic rotavirus VP2. The protein binds double-stranded RNA and DNA in an overlay protein blot assay. Expressed VP2 assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells in corelike particles 45 nm in diameter. These corelike particles were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation and found to be devoid of nucleic acid. Coexpression of VP2 and VP6 from heterologous rotavirus strains (bovine and simian) resulted in the formation of single-shelled particles. These results definitively show the existence of an innermost protein shell in rotavirus which is formed independently of other rotavirus proteins. These results have implications for schemes of rotavirus morphogenesis. Images PMID:1851866

  9. WHO working group on the quality, safety and efficacy of japanese encephalitis vaccines (live attenuated) for human use, Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 February 2012.

    PubMed

    Trent, Dennis W; Minor, Philip; Jivapaisarnpong, Teeranart; Shin, Jinho

    2013-11-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most important viral encephalitides in Asia. Two live-attenuated vaccines have been developed and licensed for use in countries in the region. Given the advancement of immunization of humans with increasing use of live-attenuated vaccines to prevent JE, there is increased interest to define quality standards for their manufacture, testing, nonclinical studies, and clinical studies to assess their efficacy and safety in humans. To this end, WHO convened a meeting with a group of international experts in February 2012 to develop guidelines for evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy of live-attenuated JE virus vaccines for prevention of human disease. This report summarizes collective views of the participants on scientific and technical issues that need to be considered in the guidelines.

  10. Lycopene attenuates Aβ1-42 secretion and its toxicity in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Mao, Liuqun; Xing, Huanhuan; Xu, Lei; Fu, Xiang; Huang, Liyingzi; Huang, Dongling; Pu, Zhijun; Li, Qinghua

    2015-11-03

    Growing evidence suggests concentration of lycopene was reduced in plasma of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family, has been identified as an antioxidant to attenuate oxidative damage and has neuroprotective role in several AD models. However, whether lycopene is involved in the pathogenesis of AD and molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this study, we found that lycopene can significantly delay paralysis in the Aβ1-42-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain GMC101. Lycopene treatment reduced Aβ1-42 secretion in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw). Next, we found lycopene can down-regulate expression level of β-amyloid precursor protein(APP) in APPsw cells. Moreover, lycopene treatment can not change endogenous reactive oxygen species level and apoptosis in APPsw cells. However, lycopene treatment protected against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and copper-induced damage in APPsw cells. Collectively, our data support that elevated lycopene contributes to the lower pathogenesis of AD. Our findings suggest that increasing lycopene in neurons may be a novel approach to attenuate onset and development of AD.

  11. Rotavirus-associated immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qi; Yin, Jing; Chen, Sen; Qiao, Lijin; Luo, Na

    2016-10-01

    Certain studies have previously indicated that an association may exist between rotavirus infection and primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present retrospective study aimed to investigate whether rotavirus may cause ITP in children. Firstly, the incidence of ITP in children with or without rotavirus diarrhea was compared. A 14.58% incident rate was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea compared with a 7.22% incident rate in children without rotavirus diarrhea. Subsequently, the clinical features of ITP children with or without rotavirus infection were compared. The results indicated that ITP children with rotavirus infection were significantly younger, showed significantly decreased mean platelet volume (MPV) levels and presented a significantly higher frequency of bleeding score of 3 against ITP children without rotavirus infection. In conclusion, these findings suggest that rotavirus serves a causative role in ITP.

  12. Multi-frequency characterization of the speed of sound and attenuation coefficient for longitudinal transmission of freshly excised human skulls.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Samuel; Sin, Vivian W; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-07

    For medical applications of ultrasound inside the brain, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the apparent density of skull bone and its corresponding speed of sound and attenuation coefficient. Although there have been previous studies exploring this phenomenon, there is still a need to extend the measurements to cover more of the clinically relevant frequency range. The results of measurements of the longitudinal speed of sound and attenuation coefficient are presented for specimens of human calvaria. The study was performed for the frequencies of 0.27, 0.836, 1.402, 1.965 and 2.525 MHz. Specimens were obtained from fresh cadavers through a protocol with the Division of Anatomy of the University of Toronto. The protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The specimens were mounted in polycarbonate supports that were marked for stereoscopic positioning. Computer tomography (CT) scans of the skulls mounted on their supports were performed, and a three-dimensional skull surface was reconstructed. This surface was used to guide a positioning system to ensure the normal sound incidence of an acoustic signal. This signal was produced by a focused device with a diameter of 5 cm and a focal length of 10 cm. Measurements of delay in time of flight were carried out using a needle hydrophone. Measurements of effective transmitted energy were carried out using a radiation force method with a 10 µg resolution scale. Preliminary functions of speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, both of which are related to apparent density, were established using a multi-layer propagation model that takes into account speed of sound, density and thickness of the layer. An optimization process was executed from a large set of random functions and the best functions were chosen for those ones that closest reproduced the experimental observations. The final functions were obtained after a second pass of the optimization

  13. Multi-frequency characterization of the speed of sound and attenuation coefficient for longitudinal transmission of freshly excised human skulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Sin, Vivian W.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    For medical applications of ultrasound inside the brain, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the apparent density of skull bone and its corresponding speed of sound and attenuation coefficient. Although there have been previous studies exploring this phenomenon, there is still a need to extend the measurements to cover more of the clinically relevant frequency range. The results of measurements of the longitudinal speed of sound and attenuation coefficient are presented for specimens of human calvaria. The study was performed for the frequencies of 0.27, 0.836, 1.402, 1.965 and 2.525 MHz. Specimens were obtained from fresh cadavers through a protocol with the Division of Anatomy of the University of Toronto. The protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The specimens were mounted in polycarbonate supports that were marked for stereoscopic positioning. Computer tomography (CT) scans of the skulls mounted on their supports were performed, and a three-dimensional skull surface was reconstructed. This surface was used to guide a positioning system to ensure the normal sound incidence of an acoustic signal. This signal was produced by a focused device with a diameter of 5 cm and a focal length of 10 cm. Measurements of delay in time of flight were carried out using a needle hydrophone. Measurements of effective transmitted energy were carried out using a radiation force method with a 10 µg resolution scale. Preliminary functions of speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, both of which are related to apparent density, were established using a multi-layer propagation model that takes into account speed of sound, density and thickness of the layer. An optimization process was executed from a large set of random functions and the best functions were chosen for those ones that closest reproduced the experimental observations. The final functions were obtained after a second pass of the optimization

  14. Intrahepatic portal-vein gas associated with rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Esposito, F; Senese, R; Salvatore, P; Vallone, G

    2011-03-01

    Rotavirus enteritis is an infectious disease of the small bowel caused by an RNA reovirus. It is manifested by cytotoxic diarrhea [1]. Rotavirus is the most common viral cause of enteritis (incidence 15-35%) [2]. In infants and children with abdominal pain and diarrhea, ultrasonography is the diagnostic study of choice, and its use has increased significantly in young patients. We describe two cases in which portal-vein gas was detected on abdominal ultrasound scans in children with severe dehydration secondary to rotavirus gastroenteritis, which resolved rapidly after treatment.

  15. Prevalence of Rotavirus Genotypes in Children Younger than 5 Years of Age before the Introduction of a Universal Rotavirus Vaccination Program: Report of Rotavirus Surveillance in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Riza; Kalaycioglu, Atila Taner; Acar, Sumeyra; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Karagoz, Alper; Korukluoglu, Gulay; Ertek, Mustafa; Torunoglu, Mehmet Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age throughout the world. This sentinel surveillance study was aimed to obtain baseline data on the rotavirus G and P genotypes across Turkey before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program. Methods Rotavirus antigen-positive samples were collected from 2102 children less than 5 years of age who attended hospitals participating in the Turkish Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Rotavirus antigen was detected in the laboratories of participating hospitals by commercial serological tests such as latex agglutination, immunochromatographic test or enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using consensus primers detecting the VP7 and VP4 genes, followed by semi-nested type-specific multiplex PCR. Results RT-PCR found rotavirus RNA in 1644 (78.2%) of the samples tested. The highest rate of rotavirus positivity (38.7%) was observed among children in the 13 to 24 month age group, followed by children in the age group of 25 to 36 months (28.3%). A total of eight different G types, six different P types, and 42 different G–P combinations were obtained. Four common G types (G1, G2, G3, and G9) and two common P types (P[8] and P[4]) accounted for 95.1% and 98.8% of the strains, respectively. G9P[8] was the most common G/P combination found in 40.5% of the strains followed by G1P[8] (21.6%), G2P[8] (9.3%), G2P[4] (6.5%), G3P[8] (3.5%), and finally, G4P[8] (3.4%). These six common genotypes included 83.7% of the strains tested in this study. The rate of uncommon genotypes was 14%. Conclusion The majority of the strains analyzed belonged to the G1–G4 and G9 genotypes, suggesting high coverage of current rotavirus vaccines. This study also demonstrates a dramatic increase in G9 genotype across the country. PMID:25437502

  16. Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva extract attenuates ultraviolet B radiation-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piao, M J; Kim, K C; Zheng, J; Yao, C W; Cha, J W; Kang, H K; Yoo, E S; Koh, Y S; Ko, M H; Lee, N H; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the protective effects of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva (GBE) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human HaCaT keratinocytes. GBE exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. In addition, both the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical were scavenged by GBE in cell-free systems. GBE absorbed light in the UVB range (280-320 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum and lessened the extent of UVB-induced oxidative damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and DNA. Finally, GBE-treated keratinocytes showed a reduction in UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that GBE exerts cytoprotective actions against UVB-stimulated oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby attenuating injury to cellular constituents and preventing cell death.

  17. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: conceptual design of the vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    West Nile virus has become an important epidemiological problem attracting significant attention of health authorities, mass media, and the public. Although there are promising advancements toward addressing the vaccine need, the perspectives of the commercial availability of the vaccine remain uncertain. To a large extent this is due to lack of a sustained interest for further commercial development of the vaccines already undergoing the preclinical and clinical development, and a predicted insignificant cost effectiveness of mass vaccination. There is a need for a safe, efficacious and cost effective vaccine, which can improve the feasibility of a targeted vaccination program. In the present report, we summarize the background, the rationale, and the choice of the development pathway that we selected for the design of a live attenuated human West Nile vaccine in a novel infectious DNA format.

  18. Psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition are attenuated by ketanserin in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Quednow, Boris B; Kometer, Michael; Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-02-01

    The serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related inhibitory gating and behavioral inhibition deficits of schizophrenia patients. The hallucinogen psilocybin disrupts automatic forms of sensorimotor gating and response inhibition in humans, but it is unclear so far whether the 5-HT(2A)R or 5-HT(1A)R agonist properties of its bioactive metabolite psilocin account for these effects. Thus, we investigated whether psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition in healthy humans could be attenuated by the 5-HT(2A/2C)R antagonist ketanserin. A total of 16 healthy participants received placebo, ketanserin (40 mg p.o.), psilocybin (260 μg/kg p.o.), or psilocybin plus ketanserin in a double-blind, randomized, and counterbalanced order. Sensorimotor gating was measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. The effects on psychopathological core dimensions and behavioral inhibition were assessed by the altered states of consciousness questionnaire (5D-ASC), and the Color-Word Stroop Test. Psilocybin decreased PPI at short lead intervals (30 ms), increased all 5D-ASC scores, and selectively increased errors in the interference condition of the Stroop Test. Stroop interference and Stroop effect of the response latencies were increased under psilocybin as well. Psilocybin-induced alterations were attenuated by ketanserin pretreatment, whereas ketanserin alone had no significant effects. These findings suggest that the disrupting effects of psilocybin on automatic and controlled inhibition processes are attributable to 5-HT(2A)R stimulation. Sensorimotor gating and attentional control deficits of schizophrenia patients might be due to changes within the 5-HT(2A)R system.

  19. Molecular characterization of the porcine group A rotavirus NSP2 and NSP5/6 genes from São Paulo State, Brazil, in 2011/12.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Bruna Rocha Passos; Bernardes, Nara Thiers Cacciatori Galleti; Beserra, Laila Andreia Rodrigues; Gregori, Fábio

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses are responsible for the acute diarrhea in various mammalian and avian species. The nonstructural proteins NSP2 and NSP5 are involved in the rotavirus replication and the formation of viroplasm, cytoplasmic inclusion bodies within which new viral particles morphogenesis and viral RNA replication occur. There are few studies on the genetic diversity of those proteins; thus this study aims at characterizing the diversity of rotavirus based on NSP2 and NSP5 genes in rotaviruses circulating in Brazilian pig farms. For this purpose, 63 fecal samples from pig farms located in six different cities in the São Paulo State, Brazil, were screened by nested RT-PCR. Seven strains had the partial nucleotide sequencing for NSP2, whereas in six, the total sequencing for NSP5. All were characterized as genotype H1 and N1. The nucleotide identity of NSP2 genes ranged from 100% to 86.4% and the amino acid identity from 100% to 91.5%. For NSP5, the nucleotide identity was from 100% to 95.1% and the amino acid identity from 100% to 97.4%. It is concluded that the genotypes of the strains circulating in the region of study are in agreement with those reported in the literature for swine and that there is the possibility of interaction between human and animal rotaviruses.

  20. Sialic acid attenuates puromycin aminonucleoside-induced desialylation and oxidative stress in human podocytes.

    PubMed

    Pawluczyk, Izabella Z A; Ghaderi Najafabadi, Maryam; Patel, Samita; Desai, Priyanka; Vashi, Dipti; Saleem, Moin A; Topham, Peter S

    2014-01-15

    Sialoglycoproteins make a significant contribution to the negative charge of the glomerular anionic glycocalyx-crucial for efficient functioning of the glomerular permselective barrier. Defects in sialylation have serious consequences on podocyte function leading to the development of proteinuria. The aim of the current study was to investigate potential mechanisms underlying puromycin aminonucleosisde (PAN)-induced desialylation and to ascertain whether they could be corrected by administration of free sialic acid. PAN treatment of podocytes resulted in a loss of sialic acid from podocyte proteins. This was accompanied by a reduction, in the expression of sialyltransferases and a decrease in the key enzyme of sialic acid biosynthesis N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE). PAN treatment also attenuated expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (mSOD) and concomitantly increased the generation of superoxide anions. Sialic acid supplementation rescued podocyte protein sialylation and partially restored expression of sialyltransferases. Sialic acid also restored mSOD mRNA expression and quenched the oxidative burst. These data suggest that PAN-induced aberrant sialylation occurs as a result of modulation of enzymes involved sialic acid metabolism some of which are affected by oxidative stress. These data suggest that sialic acid therapy not only reinstates functionally important negative charge but also acts a source of antioxidant activity.

  1. Species-specific but not genotype-specific primary and secondary isotype-specific NSP4 antibody responses in gnotobiotic calves and piglets infected with homologous host bovine (NSP4[A]) or porcine (NSP4[B]) rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Honma, Shinjiro; Ishida, Shin-Ichi; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Kapikian, Albert Z; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2004-12-05

    Using recombinant baculoviruses expressing rotavirus NSP4 [A], [B], [C], and [D] genotypes of bovine, porcine, human, simian, or murine origin, we analyzed serum antibody responses to NSP4s in gnotobiotic calves and piglets infected by the oral/alimentary or intraamniotic route with bovine (NSP4[A]) (Wyatt, R.G., Mebus, C.A., Yolken, R.H., Kalica, A.R., James, H.D., Jr., Kapikian, A.Z., Chanock, R.M., 1979. Rotaviral immunity in gnotobiotic calves: heterologous resistance to human virus induced by bovine virus. Science 203(4380), 548-550) or porcine (NSP4[B]) (Hoshino, Y., Saif, L.J., Sereno, M.M., Chanock, R.M., Kapikian, A.Z., 1988. Infection immunity of piglets to either VP3 or VP7 outer capsid protein confers resistance to challenge with a virulent rotavirus bearing the corresponding antigen. J. Virol. 62(3), 744-748) rotaviruses. Following primary infection and challenge with virulent rotaviruses, the animals developed higher or significantly higher antibody titers to homologous host homotypic NSP4s than to heterologous host homotypic or heterologous host heterotypic NSP4s, indicating that antibody responses were species specific rather than genotype specific. Antibody responses to NSP4s corresponded closely with the phylogenetic relationships of NSP4s within a species-specific region of amino acids (aa) 131-141. In contrast, NSP4 genotypes determined by amino acid full-length sequence identity predicted poorly their "serotypes". In piglets, antibodies to NSP4 induced by previous oral infection failed to confer protection against challenge from a porcine rotavirus bearing serotypically different VP4 and VP7 but essentially identical NSP4 to the porcine rotavirus in primary infection. Thus, in an approach to immunization with a live oral rotavirus vaccine, the NSP4 protein does not appear to play an important role in protection against rotavirus disease and infection.

  2. Methods for recovering poliovirus and rotavirus from oysters.

    PubMed Central

    Speirs, J I; Pontefract, R D; Harwig, J

    1987-01-01

    Polioviruses and rotaviruses are potential indicators of sewage pollution of water and shellfish. Several methods for detecting these viruses in oysters were assessed. Elution-precipitation involving Catfloc for clarification and skim milk for subsequent flocculation resulted in the recovery of an average of 79% of poliovirus type 1 and 37% of rotavirus SA-11 from oyster homogenates inoculated with low numbers of these viruses. Adsorption-elution-precipitation did not improve the recovery of poliovirus and was detrimental to the recovery of rotavirus. Ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation resulted in improved recovery of rotavirus but also in higher toxicity of oyster extracts to cell cultures. We recommend the use of the described elution-precipitation method for detecting viral pollutants in sample of oysters. PMID:2827573

  3. Neonatal Gut Microbiota and Human Milk Glycans Cooperate to Attenuate Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; He, Yingying

    2015-12-01

    Glycans of the intestinal mucosa and oligosaccharides of human milk influence the early colonization of the infant gut and establishment of mucosal homeostasis, and differences in colonization of the gut influence the ontogeny of glycans on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, proinflammatory signaling, homeostasis, and resilience to insult. This interkingdom reciprocal interaction is typical of a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. The period in which the infant gut most needs protection from hypersensitive inflammation overlaps with the recommended period of exclusive nursing; electively substituting artificial formula that lacks human milk protective glycans seems ill advised, especially for premature infants.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Cats in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Iturriza-Gómara, M.; Dove, W.; Sandrasegaram, M.; Nakagomi, T.; Nakagomi, O.; Cunliffe, N.; Radford, A. D.; Morgan, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  5. Association of Maternal Immunity with Rotavirus Vaccine Immunogenicity in Zambian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Chilengi, Roma; Simuyandi, Michelo; Beach, Lauren; Mwila, Katayi; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Emperador, Devy M.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Bosomprah, Samuel; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Live attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus (RV) have been shown to be less efficacious in children from developing countries. Reasons for this disparity are not fully understood. We assessed the role of maternal factors including breast milk RV-specific IgA, transplacentally acquired infant serum RV-specific IgG and maternal HIV status in seroconversion among Zambian infants routinely immunized with Rotarix™ (RV1). Methods 420 mother-child pairs were recruited at infant age 6–12 weeks in Lusaka. Clinical information and samples were collected at baseline and at one month following the second dose of RV1. Determination of breast milk RV-specific IgA and serum RV-specific IgA and IgG was done using standardized ELISA. Seroconversion was defined as a ≥ 4 fold rise in serum IgA titre from baseline to one-month post RV1 dose 2, while seropositivity of IgA was defined as serum titre ≥ 40 and antibody variables were modelled on log-base 2. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of the odds of seroconversion. Results Baseline infant seropositivity was 25.5% (91/357). The seroconversion frequency was 60.2% (130/216). Infants who were IgA seropositive at baseline were less likely to seroconvert compared to their seronegative counterparts (P = 0.04). There was no evidence of an association between maternal HIV status and seroconversion (P = 0.25). Higher titres of breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA were associated with a lower frequency of seroconverson (Nonparametric test for trend Z = -2.84; P<0.01): a two-fold increase in breast milk RV-specific IgA titres was associated with a 22% lower odds of seroconversion (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.68–0.94; P = 0.01). There was seasonal variation in baseline breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA titres, with significantly higher GMTs during the cold dry months (P = 0.01). Conclusion Low immunogenicity of RV1 vaccine could be explained in part by exposure to high antibody titres in breast milk and

  6. Haze is an important medium for the spread of rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Fu, Jun-Feng; Mao, Jian-Hua; Shen, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Xue-Jun; Shao, Wen-Xia; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Wu, Yi-Feng

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated whether the rotavirus infection rate in children is associated with temperature and air pollutants in Hangzhou, China. This study applied a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) to assess the effects of daily meteorological data and air pollutants on the rotavirus positive rate among outpatient children. There was a negative correlation between temperature and the rotavirus infection rate. The impact of temperature on the detection rate of rotavirus presented an evident lag effect, the temperature change shows the greatest impact on the detection rate of rotavirus approximate at lag one day, and the maximum relative risk (RR) was approximately 1.3. In 2015, the maximum cumulative RR due to the cumulative effect caused by the temperature drop was 2.5. Particulate matter (PM) 2.5 and PM10 were the primary air pollutants in Hangzhou. The highest RR of rotavirus infection occurred at lag 1-1.5 days after the increase in the concentration of these pollutants, and the RR increased gradually with the increase in concentration. Based on the average concentrations of PM2.5 of 53.9 μg/m(3) and PM10 of 80.6 μg/m(3) in Hangzhou in 2015, the cumulative RR caused by the cumulative effect was 2.5 and 2.2, respectively. The current study suggests that temperature is an important factor impacting the rotavirus infection rate of children in Hangzhou. Air pollutants significantly increased the risk of rotavirus infection, and dosage, lag and cumulative effects were observed.

  7. Serotype G9 Rotavirus Infections in Adults in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rubilar-Abreu, Elba; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Svensson, Lennart; Mittelholzer, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis. By examining 1,517 stool samples collected in 2001 and 2002 from Swedish adults with acute diarrhea, rotavirus was found in 3.2%, with the emerging G9P[8] serotype being the one most commonly identified (42.9%). This is the first documentation of G9 infections in adults in Europe. PMID:15750111

  8. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive) since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR) age was 11 (5-21) months. A total of 790 (48%) cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants <6 months of age and 21% in children >24 months of age. A total of 220 (13%) cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%)] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants <3 months old. A sizeable fraction of cases occurred in children too young to have been vaccinated according to current recommendations. PMID:20540748

  9. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hong; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  10. Measurements of the thermal coefficient of optical attenuation at different depth regions of in vivo human skins using optical coherence tomography: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Su, Ya; Yao, X Steve; Li, Zhihong; Meng, Zhuo; Liu, Tiegen; Wang, Longzhi

    2015-02-01

    We present detailed measurement results of optical attenuation's thermal coefficients (referenced to the temperature of the skin surface) in different depth regions of in vivo human forearm skins using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We first design a temperature control module with an integrated optical probe to precisely control the surface temperature of a section of human skin. We propose a method of using the correlation map to identify regions in the skin having strong correlations with the surface temperature of the skin and find that the attenuation coefficient in these regions closely follows the variation of the surface temperature without any hysteresis. We observe a negative thermal coefficient of attenuation in the epidermis. While in dermis, the slope signs of the thermal coefficient of attenuation are different at different depth regions for a particular subject, however, the depth regions with a positive (or negative) slope are different in different subjects. We further find that the magnitude of the thermal coefficient of attenuation coefficient is greater in epidermis than in dermis. We believe the knowledge of such thermal properties of skins is important for several noninvasive diagnostic applications, such as OCT glucose monitoring, and the method demonstrated in this paper is effective in studying the optical and biological properties in different regions of skin.

  11. Curcumin Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Premature Senescence via the Activation of SIRT1 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueliu; Hu, Xiaorong; Hu, Gangying; Xu, Changwu; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial senescence has been proposed to be involved in endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. Curcumin, a natural phenol, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of curcumin on endothelial senescence is unclear. This study explores the effect of curcumin on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced endothelial premature senescence and the mechanisms involved. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured, and premature senescence was induced with 100 µM H2O2. Results showed that pretreatment with curcumin significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced HUVECs' premature senescence, which was evidenced by a decreased percentage of senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells, improved cell division and decreased expression of senescence-associated protein p21 (all p<0.05). Pretreatment with curcumin decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis in H2O2-treated HUVECs. Treatment of HUVECs with H2O2 also down-regulated the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), decreased the level of nitric oxide in the culture medium, and inhibited the protein expression and enzymatic activity of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), while pretreatment with curcumin partly reversed these effects (all p<0.05). Treatment with curcumin alone enhanced the enzymatic activity of SIRT1, but didn't affect cellular senescence, cell growth or apoptosis compared to the Control. The inhibition of SIRT1 using SIRT1 short interfering RNA (siRNA) could decrease the expression and phosphorylation of eNOS and abrogate the protective effect of curcumin on H2O2-induced premature senescence. These findings suggest that curcumin could attenuate oxidative stress-induced HUVECs' premature senescence via the activation of SIRT1.

  12. Oleic acid attenuates trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid-mediated inflammatory gene expression in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Meaghan; Gobern, Semone; Martinez, Kristina; Shen, Wan; Reid, Tanya; McIntosh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The weight loss supplement conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) consists of an equal mixture of trans-10,cis-12 (10,12) and cis-9,trans-11 (9,11) isomers. However, high levels of mixed CLA isomers, or the 10,12 isomer, causes chronic inflammation, lipodystrophy, or insulin resistance. We previously demonstrated that 10,12 CLA decreases de novo lipid synthesis along with the abundance and activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1, a δ-9 desaturase essential for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Thus, we hypothesized that the 10,12 CLA-mediated decrease in SCD-1, with the subsequent decrease in MUFA, was responsible for the observed effects. To test this hypothesis, 10,12 CLA-treated human adipocytes were supplemented with oleic acid for 12 h to 7 days, and inflammatory gene expression, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipid content were measured. Oleic acid reduced inflammatory gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, and restored the lipid content of 10,12 CLA-treated adipocytes without improving insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast, supplementation with stearic acid, a substrate for SCD-1, or 9,11 CLA did not prevent inflammatory gene expression by 10,12 CLA. Notably, 10,12 CLA impacted the expression of several G-protein coupled receptors that was attenuated by oleic acid. Collectively, these data show that oleic acid attenuates 10,12 CLA-induced inflammatory gene expression and lipid content, possibly by alleviating cell stress caused by the inhibition of MUFA needed for phospholipid and neutral lipid synthesis.

  13. Economic Impact of a Rotavirus Vaccine in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Constenla, Dagna O.; Linhares, Alexandre C.; Rheingans, Richard D.; Antil, Lynn R.; Waldman, Eliseu A.; da Silva, Luiz J.

    2008-01-01

    The study was done to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a national rotavirus vaccination programme in Brazilian children from the healthcare system perspective. A hypothetical annual birth-cohort was followed for a five-year period. Published and national administrative data were incorporated into a model to quantify the consequences of vaccination versus no vaccination. Main outcome measures included the reduction in disease burden, lives saved, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. A rotavirus vaccination programme in Brazil would prevent an estimated 1,804 deaths associated with gastroenteritis due to rotavirus, 91,127 hospitalizations, and 550,198 outpatient visits. Vaccination is likely to reduce 76% of the overall healthcare burden of rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis in Brazil. At a vaccine price of US$ 7-8 per dose, the cost-effectiveness ratio would be US$ 643 per DALY averted. Rotavirus vaccination can reduce the burden of gastroenteritis due to rotavirus at a reasonable cost-effectiveness ratio. PMID:19069617

  14. Characteristics of Rotavirus Diarrhea in Hospitalized Children in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Shala, Muje; Azemi, Mehmedali; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta; Avdiu, Muharrem; Spahiu, Shqipe; Jaha, Luan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea is a leading cause of child mortality worldwide. Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe diarrhea and dehydration in children. Authors reviewed epidemiological and clinical data of the rotavirus diarrhea in Kosovo. Methods: This is a prospective study carried between January 1st and December 31st 2011. All data, comprising demographics, nutrition, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, management and outcome of the rotavirus diarrhea are collected on the specially designed form. Results: 116 children with rotavirus diarrhea are included in the study. The majority boys (74.4%) and children aged 0 – 12 months (82.75%). Mean age of children in the study was 16.38 months. Almost every third child in the study was hypotrophic (29.2%). More than half of the infants (55.2%) were on mixed food, somewhat more than every third was breast feeding (36.45%), and every twelfth (8.33%) was on artificial milk (animal or formula). Apart from diarrhea, present in all patients, vomiting (97.41%) and fever (43.96%) were characteristics of the clinical presentation of the diarrhea. Two thirds of the children had mild grade dehydration (70.7%). All patients recovered with no sequels. Conclusion: Rotavirus continues to be responsible for a significant portion of acute diarrhea in Kosovo. Clinical features, epidemiological data and the agglutination test are safe enough to establish the diagnosis. Treated correctly rotavirus diarrhea has a favorable outcome. PMID:25568634

  15. Safety and Immunogenicity of Sequential Rotavirus Vaccine Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Libster, Romina; McNeal, Monica; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Shane, Andi L.; Winokur, Patricia; Cress, Gretchen; Berry, Andrea A.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Sarpong, Kwabena; Turley, Christine B.; Harrison, Christopher J.; Pahud, Barbara A.; Marbin, Jyothi; Dunn, John; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Barrett, Jill

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although both licensed rotavirus vaccines are safe and effective, it is often not possible to complete the schedule by using the same vaccine formulation. The goal of this study was to investigate the noninferiority of the immune responses to the 2 licensed rotavirus vaccines when administered as a mixed schedule compared with administering a single vaccine formulation alone. METHODS: Randomized, multicenter, open-label study. Healthy infants (6–14 weeks of age) were randomized to receive rotavirus vaccines in 1 of 5 different schedules (2 using a single vaccine for all doses, and 3 using mixed schedules). The group receiving only the monovalent rotavirus vaccine received 2 doses of vaccine and the other 4 groups received 3 doses of vaccine. Serum for immunogenicity testing was obtained 1 month after the last vaccine dose and the proportion of seropositive children (rotavirus immunoglobulin A ≥20 U/mL) were compared in all the vaccine groups. RESULTS: Between March 2011 and September 2013, 1393 children were enrolled and randomized. Immune responses to all the sequential mixed vaccine schedules were shown to be noninferior when compared with the 2 single vaccine reference groups. The proportion of children seropositive to at least 1 vaccine antigen at 1 month after vaccination ranged from 77% to 96%, and was not significantly different among all the study groups. All schedules were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Mixed schedules are safe and induced comparable immune responses when compared with the licensed rotavirus vaccines given alone. PMID:26823540

  16. Rotavirus landscape in Africa-Towards prevention and control: A report of the 8th African rotavirus symposium, Livingstone, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Cheryl; Mwenda, Jason; Chilengi, Roma

    2015-06-26

    The 8th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Livingstone, Zambia from the 12-13 June 2014. Over 130 delegates from 35 countries - 28 from African nations - participated in this symposium, which included scientists, clinicians, immunisation managers, public health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers. The theme for the symposium was Rotavirus Landscape in Africa-Towards Prevention and Control. At the time of the symposium, a total of 21 African countries had introduced the rotavirus vaccine into their national immunisation schedules. This meeting was particularly timely and relevant to review early data on vaccine adoption and impact from these countries. The concluding panel discussion proposed several recommendations for areas of focus moving forward in rotavirus advocacy and research.

  17. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are not important for rotavirus clearance or the early antibody response to rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Amber D; Blutt, Sarah E; Conner, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells produce TGF-β that contributes to IgA induction by intestinal commensal bacteria but their importance in IgA responses to pathogens has not been determined. Immunity against the enteropathogen, rotavirus, is dependent on intestinal IgA, but whether FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells contribute to this IgA is unknown. Infection with rotavirus increased the numbers of intestinal FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Depletion of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells altered leukocyte activation but did not significantly alter rotavirus clearance or specific antibody levels. These data suggest FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells are not critical for the early antibody response to rotavirus infection.

  18. Monovalent rotavirus vaccine provides protection against an emerging fully heterotypic G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Yen, Catherine; Figueroa, Jesùs Reyna; Uribe, Edgar Sánchez; Carmen-Hernández, Luz Del; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Richardson López-Collado, Vesta

    2011-09-01

    After the introduction of monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in Mexico in 2006-2007, diarrhea mortality and morbidity declined substantially among Mexican children under 5 years of age. In January 2010, surveillance identified the emergence of a novel G9P[4] rotavirus strain nationwide. We conducted a case-control study to assess the field effectiveness of RV1 against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by this unusual strain and to determine whether the G9P[4] emergence was related to vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate. RV1 was 94% effective (95% confidence interval, 16%-100%) against G9P[4] rotavirus-related hospitalization, indicating that its emergence was likely unrelated to vaccine pressure.

  19. Determination of cholesterol concentration in human milk samples using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamelska, A. M.; Pietrzak-Fiećko, R.; Bryl, K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of an inexpensive and rapid evaluation of the cholesterol concentration in human milk using ATR-FTIR techniques are presented. The FTIR spectrum of pure cholesterol was characterized and quantitatively estimated in the region between 2800 and 3200 cm-1. 125 samples at different stages of lactation were analyzed. There were no differences between the cholesterol concentrations in the samples of early (1-3 months), medium (4-6 months), and late (> 6 months) lactation stages ( p = 0.096968). The cholesterol concentration ranged from 4.30 to 21.77 mg/100 cm3. Such a broad range was due to the differences between the samples from different women ( p = 0.000184). The results indicate that ATR-FTIR has potential for rapid estimation of cholesterol concentration in human milk.

  20. [NP gene of pandemic H1N1 virus attenuates virulence of mouse-adapted human influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Zhirnov, O P; Syrtsev, V V; Schwalm, F; Klenk, H D

    2011-01-01

    The authors studied a possible role of the caspase cleavage motif located in the nucleoprotein (NP) of pandemic influenza virus H1N1 in the regulation of viral virulence properties. A reverse genetics method was used to obtain chimeric seasonal-like mouse-adapted influenza virus hvA/PE/8/34 (H1N10) carrying either the NP gene of wild type pandemic virus with incomplete caspase motif ETGC or mutated pandemic NP with natural caspase cleavage site of human type ETDG. The wild-type NP gene of the pandemic virus was found to poorly fit to the gene pattern of closely related seasonal-like hvA/PR/8/34 virus (H1N1) and did not rescue mature virus production whereas a mutated NP with human-type caspase cleavage site maintained gene fitness, giving rise to a chimeric virus. The generated chimeric virus hvA/PR/8/34 carrying the mutated pandemic NP successfully replicated in the murine lung, but was attenuated and did not reach the virulence level of seasonal-like mouse-adapted virus hvA/PR/8/34. The findings indicate that the NP caspase cleavage site plays a role in viral adaptation and viral virulence in mammals.

  1. Kukoamine A inhibits human glioblastoma cell growth and migration through apoptosis induction and epithelial-mesenchymal transition attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiaoping; Li, Haiyan; Sun, Zhen; Dong, Lihua; Gao, Ling; Liu, Chunlan; Wang, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Cortex lycii radicis is the dried root bark of Lycium chinense, a traditional Chinese herb used in multiple ailments. The crude extract of Cortex lycii radicis has growth inhibition effect on GBM cells. Kukoamine A (KuA) is a spermine alkaloid derived from it. KuA possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities, but its anticancer activity is unknown. In this study, the growth and migration inhibition effect of KuA on human GBM cells and the possible mechanism of its activity were investigated. After KuA treatment, proliferation and colony formation of GBM cells were decreased significantly; apoptotic cells were increased; the cell cycle was arrested G0/G1 phase; the migration and invasion were decreased, the growth of tumors initiated from GBM cells was inhibited significantly; the expressions of 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) were decreased, apoptotic proteins, Bax and caspase-3 were increased, and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was decreased significantly; The expressions of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ), N-cadherin, vimentin, twist and snail+slug were decreased significantly, while the expression of E-cadherin was increased significantly in KuA treated GBM cells and tumor tissues. KuA inhibited human glioblastoma cell growth and migration in vitro and in vivo through apoptosis induction and epithelial-mesenchymal transition attenuation by downregulating expressions of 5-LOX and C/EBPβ. PMID:27824118

  2. Methamphetamine toxicity is attenuated in mice that overexpress human manganese superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Maragos, W F; Jakel, R; Chesnut, D; Pocernich, C B; Butterfield, D A; St Clair, D; Cass, W A

    2000-09-29

    We have investigated methamphetamine (MA) toxicity in transgenic mice that overexpress the human form of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Our results reveal a significant reduction in the long-term depletion of striatal dopamine and protein oxidation following repeated administration of MA in transgenic vs. non-transgenic littermates. These findings support the notion that ROS contribute to MA-induced brain damage and suggest that mitochondria may play an important role in this form of neurodegeneration.

  3. Report of the 7th African Rotavirus Symposium, Cape Town, South Africa, 8th November 2012.

    PubMed

    Seheri, L M; Mwenda, J M; Page, N

    2014-11-12

    The 7th African Rotavirus Symposium was held in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 8th November 2012 as a Satellite Symposium at the First International African Vaccinology Conference. Over 150 delegates participated in this symposium including scientists, clinicians, health officials, policymakers and vaccine manufacturers from across Africa. Key topics discussed included rotavirus surveillance, rotavirus vaccine introduction, post rotavirus vaccine impact analysis and intussusception data and surveillance in Africa. The symposium provided early rotavirus vaccine adopter countries in Africa (South Africa, Ghana and Botswana) an opportunity to share up-to-date information on vaccine introduction, and allowed colleagues to share experiences in establishing routine rotavirus surveillance (Tanzania, Niger and Rwanda). Overall, the symposium highlighted the high burden of rotavirus in Africa, and the need to continue to strengthen efforts in preventing rotavirus diarrhoea in Africa.

  4. Connective tissue growth factor hammerhead ribozyme attenuates human hepatic stellate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Run-Ping; Brigstock, David R

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of hammerhead ribozyme targeting connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) on human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function. METHODS: CCN2 hammerhead ribozyme cDNA plus two self-cleaving sequences were inserted into pTriEx2 to produce pTriCCN2-Rz. Each vector was individually transfected into cultured LX-2 human HSCs, which were then stimulated by addition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 to the culture medium. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA levels for CCN2 or collagen I, while protein levels of each molecule in cell lysates and conditioned medium were measured by ELISA. Cell-cycle progression of the transfected cells was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: In pTriEx2-transfected LX-2 cells, TGF-β1 treatment caused an increase in the mRNA level for CCN2 or collagen I, and an increase in produced and secreted CCN2 or extracellular collagen I protein levels. pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells showed decreased basal CCN2 or collagen mRNA levels, as well as produced and secreted CCN2 or collagen I protein. Furthermore, the TGF-β1-induced increase in mRNA or protein for CCN2 or collagen I was inhibited partially in pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells. Inhibition of CCN2 using hammerhead ribozyme cDNA resulted in fewer of the cells transitioning into S phase. CONCLUSION: Endogenous CCN2 is a mediator of basal or TGF-β1-induced collagen I production in human HSCs and regulates entry of the cells into S phase. PMID:19673024

  5. Targeting of rotavirus VP6 to DEC-205 induces protection against the infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Badillo-Godinez, O; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, L; Plett-Torres, T; Pedroza-Saavedra, A; Gonzalez-Jaimes, A; Chihu-Amparan, L; Maldonado-Gama, M; Espino-Solis, G; Bonifaz, L C; Esquivel-Guadarrama, F

    2015-08-20

    Rotavirus (RV) is the primary etiologic agent of severe gastroenteritis in human infants. Although two attenuated RV-based vaccines have been licensed to be applied worldwide, they are not so effective in low-income countries, and the induced protection mechanisms have not been clearly established. Thus, it is important to develop new generation vaccines that induce long lasting heterotypic immunity. VP6 constitutes the middle layer protein of the RV virion. It is the most conserved protein and it is the target of protective T-cells; therefore, it is a potential candidate antigen for a new generation vaccine against the RV infection. We determined whether targeting the DEC-205 present in dendritic cells (DCs) with RV VP6 could induce protection at the intestinal level. VP6 was cross-linked to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against murine DEC-205 (αDEC-205:VP6), and BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) twice with the conjugated containing 1.5 μg of VP6 in the presence of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) as adjuvant. As controls and following the same protocol, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) cross-linked to the mAb anti-DEC-205 (αDEC-205:OVA), VP6 cross-linked to a control isotype mAb (Isotype:VP6), 3 μg of VP6 alone, Poly I:C or PBS. Two weeks after the last inoculation, mice were orally challenged with a murine RV. Mice immunized with α-DEC-205:VP6 and VP6 alone presented similar levels of serum Abs to VP6 previous to the virus challenge. However, after the virus challenge, only α-DEC-205:VP6 induced up to a 45% IgA-independent protection. Memory T-helper (Th) cells from the spleen and the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) showed a Th1-type response upon antigen stimulation in vitro. These results show that when VP6 is administered parenterally targeting DEC-205, it can induce protection at the intestinal level at a very low dose, and this protection may be Th1-type cell dependent.

  6. Pretreatment with Lycopene Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yong; Lee, Jai-Sung; Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jun Hee; Bae, Inhyu; Yoon, Yeo Min; Kwon, Sang Mo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used in cell-based therapy to promote revascularization after peripheral or myocardial ischemia. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the senescence and apoptosis of MSCs, causing defective neovascularization. Here, we examined the effect of the natural antioxidant lycopene on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in MSCs. Although H2O2 (200 μM) increased intracellular ROS levels in human MSCs, lycopene (10 μM) pretreatment suppressed H2O2-induced ROS generation and increased survival. H2O2-induced ROS increased the levels of phosphorylated p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), and p53, which were inhibited by lycopene pretreatment. Furthermore, lycopene pretreatment decreased the expression of cleaved poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and caspase-3 and increased the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), which were induced by H2O2 treatment. Moreover, lycopene significantly increased manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) expression and decreased cellular ROS levels via the PI3K-Akt pathway. Our findings show that lycopene pretreatment prevents ischemic injury by suppressing apoptosis-associated signal pathway and enhancing anti-oxidant protein, suggesting that lycopene could be developed as a beneficial broad-spectrum agent for the successful MSC transplantation in ischemic diseases. PMID:26535076

  7. Mechanisms by which interleukin-6 attenuates cell invasion and tumorigenesis in human bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Chung, Li-Chuan; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Lee, Tzu-Yi; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-6, a multifunctional cytokine, contributes to tumor cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the biological mechanisms that are affected by the expression of interleukin-6 in bladder cancer cells remain unclear. We evaluated the effects of interleukin-6 expression in human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The results of interleukin-6-knockdown experiments in T24 cells and interleukin-6-overexpression experiments in HT1376 cells revealed that interleukin-6 reduced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. Xenograft animal studies indicated that the overexpression of interleukin-6 downregulated tumorigenesis of bladder cells and that interleukin-6 knockdown reversed this effect. The results of RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and reporter assays indicated that the overexpression of interleukin-6 upregulated the expression of the mammary serine protease inhibitor (MASPIN), N-myc downstream gene 1 (NDRG1), and KAI1 proteins in HT1376 cells and that interleukin-6 knockdown reduced the expression of these proteins in T24 cells. In addition, results of immunoblotting assays revealed that interleukin-6 modulated epithelial-mesenchymal transitions by upregulating the expression of the E-cadherin, while downregulation N-cadherin and vimentin proteins. Our results suggest that the effects of interleukin-6 on the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and the expressions of the MASPIN, NDRG1, and KAI1 genes attribute to the modulation of tumorigenesis in human bladder carcinoma cells.

  8. Tetrandrine Exerts a Radiosensitization Effect on Human Glioma through Inhibiting Proliferation by Attenuating ERK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji-wei; Zhang, Yong; Ye, Ji-cheng; Li, Ru; Wen, Yu-Lin; Huang, Jian-xian; Zhong, Xue-yun

    2017-01-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has been reported to have a radiosensitization effect on tumors. However, its effects on human glioma and the specific molecular mechanisms of these effects remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Tet has a radiosensitization effect on human glioma cells. It has been hypothesized that Tet has a radiosensitization effect on glioma cells by affecting the glioma cell cycle and DNA repair mechanism and that ERK mediates these activities. Therefore, we conducted detailed analyses of the effects of Tet on the cell cycle by performing flow cytometric analysis and on DNA repair by detecting the expression of phosphorylated H2AX by immunofluorescence. We used western blot analysis to investigate the role of ERK in the effect of Tet on the cell cycle and DNA repair. The results revealed that Tet exerts its radiosensitization effect on glioma cells by inhibiting proliferation and decreasing the expression of phosphorylated ERK and its downstream proteins. In summary, our data indicate that ERK is involved in Tet-induced radiosensitization of glioma cells via inhibition of glioma cell proliferation or of the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. PMID:27829269

  9. Metagenomic identification of novel enteric viruses in urban wild rats and genome characterization of a group A rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sachsenröder, Jana; Braun, Anne; Machnowska, Patrycja; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Deng, Xutao; Guenther, Sebastian; Bernstein, Samuel; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Delwart, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Rats are known as reservoirs and vectors for several zoonotic pathogens. However, information on the viruses shed by urban wild rats that could pose a zoonotic risk to human health is scare. Here, intestinal contents from 20 wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) collected in the city of Berlin, Germany, were subjected to metagenomic analysis of viral nucleic acids. The determined faecal viromes of rats consisted of a variety of known and unknown viruses, and were highly variable among the individuals. Members of the families Parvoviridae and Picobirnaviridae represented the most abundant species. Novel picornaviruses, bocaviruses, sapoviruses and stool-associated circular ssDNA viruses were identified, which showed only low sequence identity to known representatives of the corresponding taxa. In addition, noroviruses and rotaviruses were detected as potential zoonotic gastroenteritis viruses. However, partial-genome sequence analyses indicated that the norovirus was closely related to the recently identified rat norovirus and the rotavirus B was closely related to the rat rotavirus strain IDIR; both viruses clustered separately from respective human virus strains in phylogenetic trees. In contrast, the rotavirus A sequences showed high identity to human and animal strains. Analysis of the nearly complete genome of this virus revealed the known genotypes G3, P[3] and N2 for three of the genome segments, whereas the remaining eight genome segments represented the novel genotypes I20–R11–C11–M10–A22–T14–E18–H13. Our results indicated a high heterogeneity of enteric viruses present in urban wild rats; their ability to be transmitted to humans remains to be assessed in the future. PMID:25121550

  10. Metagenomic identification of novel enteric viruses in urban wild rats and genome characterization of a group A rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Sachsenröder, Jana; Braun, Anne; Machnowska, Patrycja; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Deng, Xutao; Guenther, Sebastian; Bernstein, Samuel; Ulrich, Rainer G; Delwart, Eric; Johne, Reimar

    2014-12-01

    Rats are known as reservoirs and vectors for several zoonotic pathogens. However, information on the viruses shed by urban wild rats that could pose a zoonotic risk to human health is scare. Here, intestinal contents from 20 wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) collected in the city of Berlin, Germany, were subjected to metagenomic analysis of viral nucleic acids. The determined faecal viromes of rats consisted of a variety of known and unknown viruses, and were highly variable among the individuals. Members of the families Parvoviridae and Picobirnaviridae represented the most abundant species. Novel picornaviruses, bocaviruses, sapoviruses and stool-associated circular ssDNA viruses were identified, which showed only low sequence identity to known representatives of the corresponding taxa. In addition, noroviruses and rotaviruses were detected as potential zoonotic gastroenteritis viruses. However, partial-genome sequence analyses indicated that the norovirus was closely related to the recently identified rat norovirus and the rotavirus B was closely related to the rat rotavirus strain IDIR; both viruses clustered separately from respective human virus strains in phylogenetic trees. In contrast, the rotavirus A sequences showed high identity to human and animal strains. Analysis of the nearly complete genome of this virus revealed the known genotypes G3, P[3] and N2 for three of the genome segments, whereas the remaining eight genome segments represented the novel genotypes I20-R11-C11-M10-A22-T14-E18-H13. Our results indicated a high heterogeneity of enteric viruses present in urban wild rats; their ability to be transmitted to humans remains to be assessed in the future.

  11. Immune response of pregnant cows to bovine rotavirus immunization.

    PubMed

    Saif, L J; Smith, K L; Landmeier, B J; Bohl, E H; Theil, K W; Todhunter, D A

    1984-01-01

    Fifteen pregnant Holstein cows were freely assigned to 3 experimental groups (5 cows in each group). Cows in group I were inoculated IM and intramammarily (IMm) with Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) tissue culture-propagated modified-live Nebraska calf diarrhea bovine rotavirus with added adjuvant (OARDC vaccine-immunized cows). Group II cows were given IM injections of a commercial modified-live rotavirus-coronavirus vaccine (commercial vaccine-immunized cows), and the remaining 5 cows were noninoculated controls (group III). Rotavirus antibody in colostrum and milk was mainly associated with immunoglobulin (Ig)G1, and less so with IgG2, IgA, and IgM, as analyzed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using monospecific anti-bovine IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and IgA sera. In serum, the rotavirus antibody was distributed almost equally between IgG1 and IgG2. The same relationships appeared in both immunized and nonvaccinated cows. All OARDC vaccine-injected cows had virus-neutralization (VN) and ELISA IgG1 rotavirus antibody titers in serum and mammary secretions at significantly increased levels (at least 100-fold; P less than 0.05) compared with the titers in groups II (commercial vaccine-immunized cows) and III (controls). Serum, colostrum, and milk antibody titers from these latter 2 groups did not differ statistically. The ELISA IgG2, IgA, and IgM rotavirus antibody titers also were significantly greater in mammary secretions from OARDC vaccine-immunized cows than in groups II and III cows. There was a high correlation between ELISA IgG1 and VN rotavirus antibody titers for all samples tested (r = 0.97, P less than 0.001), but ELISA IgG1 antibody titers were consistently higher than VN titers. The ELISA IgG1 and VN antibody titers of milk samples collected from cows 30 days after parturition were higher from the OARDC vaccine-immunized cows (ELISA IgG1, geometric mean titer (GMT) = 3,511; VN GMT = 1,689) than were titers from the

  12. Drosophila Brat and Human Ortholog TRIM3 Maintain Stem Cell Equilibrium and Suppress Brain Tumorigenesis by Attenuating Notch Nuclear Transport.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Subhas; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Zhang, Changming; Moberg, Kenneth; Read, Renee; Hadjipanayis, Costas; Brat, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem cells exert enormous influence on neoplastic behavior, in part by governing asymmetric cell division and the balance between self-renewal and multipotent differentiation. Growth is favored by deregulated stem cell division, which enhances the self-renewing population and diminishes the differentiation program. Mutation of a single gene in Drosophila, Brain Tumor (Brat), leads to disrupted asymmetric cell division resulting in dramatic neoplastic proliferation of neuroblasts and massive larval brain overgrowth. To uncover the mechanisms relevant to deregulated cell division in human glioma stem cells, we first developed a novel adult Drosophila brain tumor model using brat-RNAi driven by the neuroblast-specific promoter inscuteable Suppressing Brat in this population led to the accumulation of actively proliferating neuroblasts and a lethal brain tumor phenotype. brat-RNAi caused upregulation of Notch signaling, a node critical for self-renewal, by increasing protein expression and enhancing nuclear transport of Notch intracellular domain (NICD). In human glioblastoma, we demonstrated that the human ortholog of Drosophila Brat, tripartite motif-containing protein 3 (TRIM3), similarly suppressed NOTCH1 signaling and markedly attenuated the stem cell component. We also found that TRIM3 suppressed nuclear transport of active NOTCH1 (NICD) in glioblastoma and demonstrated that these effects are mediated by direct binding of TRIM3 to the Importin complex. Together, our results support a novel role for Brat/TRIM3 in maintaining stem cell equilibrium and suppressing tumor growth by regulating NICD nuclear transport. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2443-52. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Exploration of attenuated total reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration to measure immunoglobulin G in human sera.

    PubMed

    Hou, Siyuan; Riley, Christopher B; Mitchell, Cynthia A; Shaw, R Anthony; Bryanton, Janet; Bigsby, Kathryn; McClure, J Trenton

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is crucial for the protection of the host from invasive pathogens. Due to its importance for human health, tools that enable the monitoring of IgG levels are highly desired. Consequently there is a need for methods to determine the IgG concentration that are simple, rapid, and inexpensive. This work explored the potential of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy as a method to determine IgG concentrations in human serum samples. Venous blood samples were collected from adults and children, and from the umbilical cord of newborns. The serum was harvested and tested using ATR infrared spectroscopy. Partial least squares (PLS) regression provided the basis to develop the new analytical methods. Three PLS calibrations were determined: one for the combined set of the venous and umbilical cord serum samples, the second for only the umbilical cord samples, and the third for only the venous samples. The number of PLS factors was chosen by critical evaluation of Monte Carlo-based cross validation results. The predictive performance for each PLS calibration was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient, scatter plot and Bland-Altman plot, and percent deviations for independent prediction sets. The repeatability was evaluated by standard deviation and relative standard deviation. The results showed that ATR infrared spectroscopy is potentially a simple, quick, and inexpensive method to measure IgG concentrations in human serum samples. The results also showed that it is possible to build a united calibration curve for the umbilical cord and the venous samples.

  14. Human transcriptome response to immunization with live-attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vaccine (TC-83): Analysis of whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Erwin-Cohen, Rebecca A.; Porter, Aimee I.; Pittman, Phillip R.; Rossi, Cynthia A.; DaSilva, Luis

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an important human and animal alphavirus pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes. The virus is endemic in Central and South America, but has also caused equine outbreaks in southwestern areas of the United States. In an effort to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the development of immunity to this important pathogen, we performed transcriptional analysis from whole, unfractionated human blood of patients who had been immunized with the live-attenuated vaccine strain of VEEV, TC-83. We compared changes in the transcriptome between naïve individuals who were mock vaccinated with saline to responses of individuals who received TC-83. Significant transcriptional changes were noted at days 2, 7, and 14 following vaccination. The top canonical pathways revealed at early and intermediate time points (days 2 and 7) included the involvement of the classic interferon response, interferon-response factors, activation of pattern recognition receptors, and engagement of the inflammasome. By day 14, the top canonical pathways included oxidative phosphorylation, the protein ubiquitination pathway, natural killer cell signaling, and B-cell development. Biomarkers were identified that differentiate between vaccinees and control subjects, at early, intermediate, and late stages of the development of immunity as well as markers which were common to all 3 stages following vaccination but distinct from the sham-vaccinated control subjects. The study represents a novel examination of molecular processes that lead to the development of immunity against VEEV in humans and which may be of value as diagnostic targets, to enhance modern vaccine design, or molecular correlates of protection. PMID:27870591

  15. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  16. Antibodies against human BLyS and APRIL attenuate EAE development in marmoset monkeys.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Heijmans, Nicole; Oh, Luke; Bauer, Jan; Blezer, Erwin L A; Laman, Jon D; Migone, Thi-Sau; Devalaraja, Matt N; 't Hart, Bert A

    2012-09-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS, also indicated as BAFF (B-cell activating factor) and CD257), and A Proliferation Inducing Ligand (APRIL, CD256) are two members of the TNF superfamily with a central role in B cell survival. Antibodies against these factors have potential therapeutic relevance in autoimmune inflammatory disorders with a proven pathogenic contribution of B cells, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In the current study we performed a multi-parameter efficacy comparison of monoclonal antibodies against human anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). A MS-like disease was induced by immunization with recombinant human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (rhMOG) in complete Freund's adjuvant. The results show that the anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL antibody cause significant depletion of circulating CD20+ B cells, but a small subset of CD20 + CD40(high) B cells was not depleted. Induction of CD20+ B cell depletion from lymph nodes was only observed in the anti-BLyS treated monkeys. Both antibodies had a significant inhibitory effect on disease development, but all monkeys developed clinically evident EAE. Anti-BLyS treated monkeys were sacrificed with the same clinical signs as saline-treated monkeys, but nevertheless displayed significantly reduced spinal cord demyelination. This effect was not observed in the anti-APRIL treated monkeys. The two antibodies had a different effect on T cell subset activation and the profiles of ex vivo released cytokines. In conclusion, treatment with anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL delays the development of neurological disease in a relevant preclinical model of MS. The two mAbs achieve this effect via different mechanisms.

  17. Determinants of Parents' Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, E.; Bettinger, J. A.; Halperin, B.; Bradet, R.; Lavoie, F.; Sauvageau, C.; Gilca, V.; Boulianne, N.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus disease is a common cause of health care utilization and almost all children are affected by the age of 5 years. In Canada, at the time of this survey (2008-09), immunization rates for rotavirus were less than 20%. We assessed the determinants of a parent's acceptance to have their child immunized against rotavirus. The survey…

  18. Infection-enhancing lipopeptides do not improve intranasal immunization of cotton rats with a delta-G candidate live-attenuated human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tien Nguyen, D; Boes, Jolande; van Amerongen, Geert; van Remmerden, Yvonne; Yüksel, Selma; Guichelaar, Teun; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; de Swart, Rik L

    2013-12-01

    Development of live-attenuated human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) vaccines has proven to be difficult. Several vaccine candidates were found to be over-attenuated and displayed limited immunogenicity. Recently, we identified three synthetic cationic lipopeptides that enhanced paramyxovirus infections in vitro. The infection enhancement proved to be mediated by enhanced virus binding to target cells. We hypothesized that these lipopeptides can be used as adjuvants to promote immune responses induced by live-attenuated paramyxovirus vaccines. This hypothesis was tested in a vaccination and challenge model in cotton rats, using a previously described recombinant live-attenuated candidate HRSV vaccine lacking the gene encoding the G glycoprotein (rHRSVΔG). Surprisingly, intranasal vaccination of cotton rats with rHRSVΔG formulated in infection-enhancing lipopeptides resulted in reduced virus loads in nasopharyngeal lavages, reduced seroconversion levels and reduced protection from wild-type HRSV challenge. In conclusion, we were unable to demonstrate the feasibility of lipopeptides as adjuvants for a candidate live-attenuated HRSV vaccine in the cotton rat model.

  19. Genomic characterization and molecular investigation of VP7 epitopes of uncommon G10P[8] group A rotavirus strains detected in Italy in 2009.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2015-07-01

    Rotavirus strains with the uncommon genotype G10 have been detected sporadically in cases of acute gastroenteritis in humans and are thought to be transmitted zoonotically. During 2009, 10 G10P[8] rotavirus strains were detected in the stools of children hospitalized with acute diarrhoea in several paediatric hospitals in Italy. The phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene of the Italian G10P[8] strains analysed revealed nucleotide identities ranging from 94 to 99 %. Molecular characterization of the 11 genomic segments was performed for one of the G10 strains, which displayed a complete genomic constellation 1 for the non-G genes. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the G10 VP7 epitopes revealed low amino acid identity with common human strains of different G genotype and with the VP7 proteins included in both anti-rotavirus commercial vaccines (Rotarix and RotaTeq). Amongst the common G genotypes, the VP7 amino acid sequence of the G10 strains showed a high similarity with sequences from G9 strains. A hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) of the VP7 protein including aa 20-298 was performed for the G10 Italian sequences in comparison with the major human group A rotavirus G genotypes. The HCA analysis confirmed the findings obtained previously by amino acid analysis of the VP7 epitopes, detecting a genotype-specific pattern of hydrophobicity in the hypervariable regions of the major outer capsid protein.

  20. Cannabidiol Attenuates the Appetitive Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Humans Smoking Their Chosen Cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia JA; Freeman, Tom P; Schafer, Gráinne L; Curran, H Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide cannabis dependence is increasing, as is the concentration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in street cannabis. At the same time, the concentration of the second most abundant cannabinoid in street cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), is decreasing. These two cannabinoids have opposing effects both pharmacologically and behaviorally when administered in the laboratory. No research has yet examined how the ratio of these constituents impacts on the appetitive/reinforcing effects of cannabis in humans. A total of 94 cannabis users were tested 7 days apart, once while non-intoxicated and once while acutely under the influence of their own chosen smoked cannabis on dependence-related measures. Using an unprecedented methodology, a sample of cannabis (as well as saliva) was collected from each user and analyzed for levels of cannabinoids. On the basis of CBD : THC ratios in the cannabis, individuals from the top and bottom tertiles were directly compared on indices of the reinforcing effects of drugs, explicit liking, and implicit attentional bias to drug stimuli. When intoxicated, smokers of high CBD : THC strains showed reduced attentional bias to drug and food stimuli compared with smokers of low CBD : THC. Those smoking higher CBD : THC strains also showed lower self-rated liking of cannabis stimuli on both test days. Our findings suggest that CBD has potential as a treatment for cannabis dependence. The acute modulation of the incentive salience of drug cues by CBD may possibly generalize to a treatment for other addictive disorders. PMID:20428110

  1. Smoking attenuated the association between IκBα rs696 polymorphism and defective spermatogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ding, Q; Zheng, T; Jiang, L; Li, Q; Sun, X; Bai, C; Huang, Z

    2015-11-01

    Defective spermatogenesis is prevalent in infertile men, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its aetiology are largely unknown. In this study, a proposed association between IκBα SNPs, smoking-related ROS and sperm quality was investigated. Two polymorphisms in the IκBα gene, rs2233406 and rs696 were genotyped in 342 controls and 338 patients with defective spermatogenesis from a southern Chinese population. The results showed the rs696 AA genotype to be significantly more common (21.60% versus 14.33%, P = 0.013) and the rs696 GG genotype to be significantly rarer (28.99% versus 37.13%, P = 0.024) in the cases than in the controls. After subjects were stratified into smokers and nonsmokers, these differences were only observed in nonsmokers. Further analysis showed the rs696 AA genotype to be significantly closely associated with defective spermatogenesis in all subjects (P = 0.014, OR = 1.647) and in nonsmokers (P = 0.036, OR = 1.889). In a TM3 cell model, exposure to cigarette smoke condensate was found to activate NF-κB luciferase activity and altered transcriptional level of NF-κB pathway genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between functional polymorphisms of the IκBα rs696 and cigarette smoking with the risk of defective spermatogenesis, suggesting some interaction between the NF-κB signalling pathway and smoking-related ROS in human spermatogenesis.

  2. Attenuated Fast Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials During Human Sleep.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Omer; Nir, Yuval

    2017-02-25

    During sleep, external sensory events rarely elicit a behavioral response or affect perception. However, how sensory processing differs between wakefulness and sleep remains unclear. A major difficulty in this field stems from using brief auditory stimuli that often trigger nonspecific high-amplitude "K-complex" responses and complicate interpretation. To overcome this challenge, here we delivered periodic visual flicker stimulation across sleep and wakefulness while recording high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in humans. We found that onset responses can be separated from frequency-specific steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) selectively observed over visual cortex. Sustained SSVEPs in response to fast (8/10 Hz) stimulation are substantially stronger in wakefulness than in both nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep, whereas SSVEP responses to slow (3/5 Hz) stimulation are stronger in both NREM and REM sleep than in wakefulness. Despite wake-like spontaneous activity, responses in REM sleep were similar to those in NREM sleep and different than wakefulness, in accordance with perceptual disconnection during REM sleep. Finally, analysis of amplitude and phase in single trials revealed that stronger fast SSVEPs in wakefulness are driven by more consistent phase locking and increased induced power. These results suggest that the sleeping brain is unable to effectively synchronize large neuronal populations in response to rapid sensory stimulation.

  3. First genetic characterization of rotavirus C in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zhirakovskaia, Elena; Tikunov, Artem; Klemesheva, Vera; Loginovskikh, Natalia; Netesov, Sergey; Tikunova, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Rotaviruses C (RVC) cause sporadic cases and outbreaks of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. The aim of this study was to monitor RVC during a surveillance study of sporadic cases of viral gastroenteritis in the Novosibirsk and Omsk regions of Russia from 2006 to 2011. A total of 2144 stool samples from children and adults hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis were tested for RVC by RT-PCR. Sixteen RVC-positive stool samples were detected at a rate of 0.6% (13/2037) in children and 2.8% (3/107) in adults. The low detection rate suggested that RVC infection was an uncommon cause of hospitalization in Russia. The complete VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 gene sequences were determined. It was found that RVCs with at least two different genome backgrounds circulated in Siberia. VP4, VP6, and NSP4 gene sequences of most Russian RVC strains clustered with South Asian strains, while the VP7 gene showed a closer relationship to European strains. Meanwhile, only VP4 and NSP4 sequences of the strain Omsk08-386 clustered with South Asian strains, while its VP6 and VP7 sequences clustered with European strains. This is the first genetic characterization of Russian RVC strains and the first report on the prevalence of RVC in the Asian part of Russia.

  4. Porcine Rotaviruses: Epidemiology, Immune Responses and Control Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Amimo, Joshua O.; Saif, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in young animals and children worldwide. Immunocompetent adults of different species become resistant to clinical disease due to post-infection immunity, immune system maturation and gut physiological changes. Of the 9 RV genogroups (A–I), RV A, B, and C (RVA, RVB, and RVC, respectively) are associated with diarrhea in piglets. Although discovered decades ago, porcine genogroup E RVs (RVE) are uncommon and their pathogenesis is not studied well. The presence of porcine RV H (RVH), a newly defined distinct genogroup, was recently confirmed in diarrheic pigs in Japan, Brazil, and the US. The complex epidemiology, pathogenicity and high genetic diversity of porcine RVAs are widely recognized and well-studied. More recent data show a significant genetic diversity based on the VP7 gene analysis of RVB and C strains in pigs. In this review, we will summarize previous and recent research to provide insights on historic and current prevalence and genetic diversity of porcine RVs in different geographic regions and production systems. We will also provide a brief overview of immune responses to porcine RVs, available control strategies and zoonotic potential of different RV genotypes. An improved understanding of the above parameters may lead to the development of more optimal strategies to manage RV diarrheal disease in swine and humans. PMID:28335454

  5. Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program: annual report, 2009/2010.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Boniface, Karen; Bishop, Ruth F; Barnes, Graeme L

    2010-12-01

    The Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program together with 15 collaborating laboratories Australia-wide conducts a laboratory based rotavirus surveillance program. This report describes the genotypes of rotavirus strains responsible for the hospitalisation of children with acute gastroenteritis during the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010, the 3rd year of surveillance following introduction of rotavirus vaccines into the National Immunisation Program. Seven hundred and seventy-eight faecal samples were referred to the centre for G and P genotype analysis using hemi-nested multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Of the 422 confirmed as rotavirus positive, genotype G1P[8] was the dominant type nationally, representing 49.3%, followed by genotype G2P[4] (21.1%). Genotypes G3P[8], G4P[8] and G9P[8] each represented less than 3% of circulating strains nationally. The dominance of G1P[8] was in part associated with a large outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory in 2010. The identification of uncommon rotavirus genotype combinations has increased si