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Sample records for attract olfactory ensheathing

  1. Immunocytochemical characterisation of olfactory ensheathing cells of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Bettini, Simone; Franceschini, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Continuous lifelong neurogenesis is typical of the vertebrate olfactory system. The regenerative ability of olfactory receptor neurons is dependent on the glial cell type specific to the olfactory pathway, designated ‘olfactory ensheathing cells'. Several studies to date have focused on mammalian olfactory ensheathing cells, owing to their potential roles in cell-based therapy for spinal cord injury repair. However, limited information is available regarding this glial cell type in non-mammalian vertebrates, particularly anamniotes. In the current immunocytochemical study, we analysed the features of olfactory ensheathing cells in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Fish provide a good model for studying glial cells associated with the olfactory pathway of non-mammalian vertebrates. In particular, zebrafish has numerous valuable features that enable its use as a prime model organism for genetic, neurobiological and developmental studies, as well as toxicology and genomics research. Paraffin sections from decalcified heads of zebrafish were processed immunocytochemically to detect proteins used in the research on mammalian olfactory ensheathing cells, including glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), S100, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), polysialylated NCAM (PSA-NCAM), vimentin (VIM), p75NTR and galactin (Gal)-1. Notably, GFAP, S100, NCAM and Gal-1 were clearly observed, whereas no vimentin staining was detected. Weak immunostaining for PSA-NCAM and p75NTR was evident. Moreover the degree of marker expression was not uniform in various tracts of the zebrafish olfactory pathway. The immunostaining patterns of the zebrafish olfactory system are distinct from those of other fish to some extent, suggesting interspecific differences. We also showed that the olfactory pathway of zebrafish expresses markers of mammalian olfactory ensheathing cells. The olfactory systems of vertebrates have similarities but there are also marked variations between them. The issue of whether

  2. Olfactory ensheathing cells: biology in neural development and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhida; He, Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) constitute a unique population of glia that accompany and ensheath the primary olfactory axons. They are thought to be critical for spontaneous growth of olfactory axons within the developing and adult olfactory nervous system, and have recently emerged as potential candidates for cell-mediated repair of neural injuries. Here, based on the current research, we give an overview of the biology of OECs in neural development and regeneration. This review starts with a detailed description of the cellular and molecular biological properties of OECs. Their functions in olfactory neurogenesis, olfactory axonal growth and olfactory bulb formation are sequently discussed. We also describe therapeutic applications of OECs for the treatment of a variety of neural lesions, including spinal cord injury, stroke, degenerative diseases, and PNS injuries. Finally, we address issues that may foster a better understanding of OECs in neural development and regeneration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Olfactory ensheathing glia and Schwann cells: two of a kind?

    PubMed

    Wewetzer, Konstantin; Verdú, Enrique; Angelov, Doychin N; Navarro, Xavier

    2002-09-01

    Both olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells have been shown to promote axonal regrowth and remyelination in the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems under experimental conditions. During development, OECs and Schwann cells emerge from the olfactory placode and the neural crest, respectively, thus sharing a common "peripheral" origin. Both cell types are known to express a number of different molecular markers in common, to display a similar morphological phenotype in culture and to respond to the same growth-promoting molecules. Contrary to Schwann cells, OECs are found in association with neuronal processes in the CNS constituting the olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. OECs maintain their growth-promoting capacity in the CNS during adult life supporting the lifelong axonal growth of olfactory receptor neurons. Thus, OECs are considered an intermediate cell type combining a "central" location with "peripheral" permissiveness. Recently, the regenerative potential of OECs has been demonstrated in a variety of studies. However, OECs are still less clearly defined than Schwann cells. On designing future therapeutical strategies for nerve injury and disease, the important question arises as to whether OECs and Schwann cells are comparable cell types or whether they, indeed, mediate specific effects, making either the one or the other suitable for special applications. The present review summarizes recent data on the in vitro and in vivo properties of OECs and critically compares the analogies and differences in the biology of both cell types relevant in the above-mentioned context.

  4. Telomerase protects adult rodent olfactory ensheathing glia from early senescence.

    PubMed

    Llamusí, María-Beatriz; Rubio, Mari-Paz; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena

    2011-05-01

    Adult olfactory bulb ensheathing glia (OB-OEG) promote the repair of acute, subacute, and chronic spinal cord injuries and autologous transplantation is a feasible approach. There are interspecies differences between adult rodent and primate OB-OEG related to their longevity in culture. Whereas primate OB-OEG exhibit a relatively long life span, under the same culture conditions rodent OB-OEG divide just three to four times, are sensitive to oxidative stress and become senescent after the third week in vitro. Telomerase is a "physiological key regulator" of the life span of normal somatic cells and also has extratelomeric functions such as increased resistance to oxidative stress. To elucidate whether telomerase has a role in the senescence of rodent OB-OEG, we have introduced the catalytic subunit of telomerase mTERT into cultures of these cells by retroviral infection. Native and modified adult rat OB-OEG behaved as telomerase-competent cells as they divided while expressing mTERT but entered senescence once the gene switched off. After ectopic expression of mTERT, OB-OEG resumed division at a nonsenescent rate, expressed p75 and other OEG markers, and exhibited the morphology of nonsenescent OB-OEG. The nonsenescent period of mTERT-OEG lasted 9weeks and then ectopic mTERT switched off and cells entered senescence again. Our results suggest a role of telomerase in early senescence of adult rodent OB-OEG cultures and a protection from oxidative damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair.

  5. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Express α7 Integrin to Mediate Their Migration on Laminin

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Norianne T.; Khankan, Rana R.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    The unique glia located in the olfactory system, called olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), are implicated as an attractive choice for transplantation therapy following spinal cord injury because of their pro-regenerative characteristics. Adult OECs are thought to improve functional recovery and regeneration after injury by secreting neurotrophic factors and making cell-to-cell contacts with regenerating processes, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We show first that α7 integrin, a laminin receptor, is highly expressed at the protein level by OECs throughout the olfactory system, i.e., in the olfactory mucosa, olfactory nerve, and olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Then we asked if OECs use the α7 integrin receptor directly to promote neurite outgrowth on permissive and neutral substrates, in vitro. We co-cultured α7+/+ and α7lacZ/lacZ postnatal cerebral cortical neurons with α7+/+ or α7lacZ/lacZ OECs and found that genotype did not effect the ability of OECs to enhance neurite outgrowth by direct contact. Loss of α7 integrin did however significantly decrease the motility of adult OECs in transwell experiments. Twice as many α7+/+ OECs migrated through laminin-coated transwells compared to α7+/+ OECs on poly-L-lysine (PLL). This is in contrast to α7lacZ/lacZ OECs, which showed no migratory preference for laminin substrate over PLL. These results demonstrate that OECs express α7 integrin, and that laminin and its α7 integrin receptor contribute to adult OEC migration in vitro and perhaps also in vivo. PMID:27078717

  6. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Express α7 Integrin to Mediate Their Migration on Laminin.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Norianne T; Khankan, Rana R; Phelps, Patricia E

    2016-01-01

    The unique glia located in the olfactory system, called olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), are implicated as an attractive choice for transplantation therapy following spinal cord injury because of their pro-regenerative characteristics. Adult OECs are thought to improve functional recovery and regeneration after injury by secreting neurotrophic factors and making cell-to-cell contacts with regenerating processes, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We show first that α7 integrin, a laminin receptor, is highly expressed at the protein level by OECs throughout the olfactory system, i.e., in the olfactory mucosa, olfactory nerve, and olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Then we asked if OECs use the α7 integrin receptor directly to promote neurite outgrowth on permissive and neutral substrates, in vitro. We co-cultured α7+/+ and α7lacZ/lacZ postnatal cerebral cortical neurons with α7+/+ or α7lacZ/lacZ OECs and found that genotype did not effect the ability of OECs to enhance neurite outgrowth by direct contact. Loss of α7 integrin did however significantly decrease the motility of adult OECs in transwell experiments. Twice as many α7+/+ OECs migrated through laminin-coated transwells compared to α7+/+ OECs on poly-L-lysine (PLL). This is in contrast to α7lacZ/lacZ OECs, which showed no migratory preference for laminin substrate over PLL. These results demonstrate that OECs express α7 integrin, and that laminin and its α7 integrin receptor contribute to adult OEC migration in vitro and perhaps also in vivo.

  7. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Promotes the Migration of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Through TRPC Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Teng, Hong-Lin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Fan; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Huang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells with axonal growth-promoting properties in the olfactory system. Organized migration of OECs is essential for neural regeneration and olfactory development. However, the molecular mechanism of OEC migration remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on OEC migration. Initially, the "scratch" migration assay, the inverted coverslip and Boyden chamber migration assays showed that BDNF could promote the migration of primary cultured OECs. Furthermore, BDNF gradient attracted the migration of OECs in single-cell migration assays. Mechanistically, TrkB receptor expressed in OECs mediated BDNF-induced OEC migration, and BDNF triggered calcium signals in OECs. Finally, transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPCs) highly expressed in OECs were responsible for BDNF-induced calcium signals, and required for BDNF-induced OEC migration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that BDNF promotes the migration of cultured OECs and an unexpected finding is that TRPCs are required for BDNF-induced OEC migration. GLIA 2016;64:2154-2165.

  8. Immunocytochemical characterisation of ensheathing glia in the olfactory and vomeronasal systems of Ambystoma mexicanum (Caudata: Ambystomatidae).

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Bettini, Simone; Franceschini, Valeria

    2016-03-01

    The olfactory and vomeronasal systems of vertebrates are characterised by neurogenesis occurring throughout life. The regenerative ability of olfactory receptor neurons relies on specific glial cells, the olfactory and vomeronasal axon-surrounding cells. Numerous studies have examined mammalian olfactory ensheathing cells which are considered potential candidates for spinal cord injury repair using cell-based therapy. With regard to non-mammalian vertebrates, limited information is available on these glial cells in fish, and there is no information on them in terrestrial anamniotes, the amphibians. In the present research, we studied the immunocytochemical characteristics of axon-surrounding cells in Ambystoma mexicanum. Urodeles have relatively simple olfactory and vomeronasal systems, and represent a good model for studying ensheathing cells in extant representatives of basal tetrapods. Sections from the decalcified heads of A. mexicanum were immunocytochemically processed for the detection of proteins used in research on mammalian olfactory-ensheathing cells. S100, GFAP and NCAM were clearly observed. p75NTR, Gal-1 and PSA-NCAM showed weak staining. No vimentin immunopositivity was observed. The corresponding areas of the olfactory and vomeronasal pathways displayed the same staining characteristics, with the exception of Gal-1, p75NTR and PSA-NCAM in the mucosae. The degree of marker expression was not uniform throughout the sensory pathways. In contrast to fish, both olfactory and vomeronasal nerves displayed uniform staining intensity. This study showed that some markers for mammalian and fish-ensheathing glia are also applicable in urodeles. The olfactory systems of vertebrates show similarities, and also clear dissimilarities. Further investigations are required to ascertain the functional significance of these regional and interspecific differences.

  9. Endothelin uncouples gap junctions in sustentacular cells and olfactory ensheathing cells of the olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, Mikaël; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Grebert, Denise; Congar, Patrice; Meunier, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Several factors modulate the first step of odour detection in the rat olfactory mucosa (OM). Among others, vasoactive peptides such as endothelin might play multifaceted roles in the different OM cells. Like their counterparts in the central nervous system, the olfactory sensory neurons are encompassed by different glial-like non-neuronal OM cells; sustentacular cells (SCs) surround their cell bodies, whereas olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) wrap their axons. Whereas SCs maintain both the structural and ionic integrity of the OM, OECs assure protection, local blood flow control and guiding of olfactory sensory neuron axons toward the olfactory bulb. We previously showed that these non-neuronal OM cells are particularly responsive to endothelin in vitro. Here, we confirmed that the endothelin system is strongly expressed in the OM using in situ hybridization. We then further explored the effects of endothelin on SCs and OECs using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging approaches on both in vitro and ex vivo OM preparations. Endothelin induced both robust calcium signals and gap junction uncoupling in both types of cells. This latter effect was mimicked by carbenoxolone, a known gap junction uncoupling agent. However, although endothelin is known for its antiapoptotic effect in the OM, the uncoupling of gap junctions by carbenoxolone was not sufficient to limit the cellular death induced by serum deprivation in OM primary culture. The functional consequence of the endothelin 1-induced reduction of the gap junctional communication between OM non-neuronal cells thus remains to be elucidated. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The culture of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs)—a distinct glial cell type

    PubMed Central

    Higginson, Jennifer R.; Barnett, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have become a popular candidate for the transplant-mediated repair of the damaged CNS. In this review a description is made of the origins of these cells and a historical development of their purification and maintenance in culture. In addition, we illustrate the cellular and molecular characteristics of OECs and emphasise that although they share many properties with Schwann cells, they possess several inherent differences which may allow them to be more beneficial for CNS repair. In summary, OECs are distinct glial cells and the detailed understanding of their biological and molecular properties is essential in ensuring their clinical efficacy after cell transplantation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. PMID:20816825

  11. [Comparison of therapeutic effects of olfactory ensheathing cells derived from olfactory mucosa or olfactory bulb on spinal cord injury mouse models].

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Yang, Ping; Liang, Xueyun; Ma, Lijun; Wei, Jun

    2014-04-01

    To isolate and culture olfactory ensheathing cells from different origins, compare their different biological characteristics, and evaluate their therapeutic effect on spinal cord injury mouse models. The olfactory ensheathing cells from olfactory mucosa or olfactory bulb were isolated and cultured by differential adhesion method. The expressions of S100 and P75 proteins were examined by immunofluorescence staining; their growth curves were drawn by MTT colorimetric assay; the secretion of neurotrophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) was measured by ELISA; the gene expressions of BDNF, NGF, NT-3, neurotrophin-4 (NT-4), growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), and microtubule-associated protein (MAP-2) were quantified by real-time PCR; the therapeutic effect on spinal cord injury mouse models was evaluated by Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, which had been carried out daily for 8 weeks after the olfactory ensheathing cells of the two different origins were respectively grafted to the mouse models. The two types of olfactory ensheathing cells showed bipolar or tripolar shape; both of them were S100 and P75 protein positive; both of them expressing the gene of BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and NT-4; the olfactory bulb-derived cells did not express MAP-2, but it highly expressed GAP-43 gene; the olfactory mucosa-derived cells displayed a low expression of MAP-2 and GAP-43; the growth speed of olfactory bulb-derived cells was faster than that of the olfactory mucosa-derived cells. Both of them could secrete BDNF, NGF, and NT-3, but the neurotrophic factor levels secreted in the olfactory mucosa-derived cells were higher. The daily neurological BBB scoring showed that the therapeutic effect of olfactory mucosa-derived cells on spinal cord injury mouse models was better than that of the olfactory bulb-derived cells. There exist biological differences between the olfactory mucosa

  12. The mannose receptor is expressed by olfactory ensheathing cells in the rat olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Litia A; Nobrega, Alberto F; Soares, Igor D P; Carvalho, Sergio L; Allodi, Silvana; Baetas-da-Cruz, Wagner; Cavalcante, Leny A

    2013-12-01

    Complex carbohydrate structures are essential molecules of infectious bacteria, parasites, and host cells and are involved in cell signaling associated with immune responses, glycoprotein homeostasis, and cell migration. The uptake of mannose-tailed glycans is usually carried out by professional phagocytes to trigger MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation or, alternatively, to end inflammation. We have detected the mannose receptor (MR) in cultured olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), so we investigated by flow cytometry whether recently dissociated cells of the olfactory bulb (OB) nerve fiber layer (ONL) could bind a mannosylated ligand (fluorescein conjugate of mannosyl bovine serum albumin; Man/BSA-FITC) in a specific manner. In addition, we estimated the relative proportion of ONL OECs, microglia, and astrocytes, tagged by 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), by the B4 isolectin of Griffonia simplicifonia (IB4), and by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively, that were Man/BSA-FITC(+) . We also determined by histochemistry and/or immunohistochemistry whether Man/BSA-FITC or an anti-MR antibody (anti-C-terminal MR peptide; anti-cMR) labeled OECs and/or parenchymal microglia. In addition, we confirmed by Western blot with the K1K2 (against the entire MR molecule) antibody that a band of about 180 kDA is expressed in the OB. Our findings are compatible with a prospective sentinel role of OECs against pathogens of the upper airways and/or damage-associated glycidic patterns as well as with homeostasis of OB mannosylated glycoproteins.

  13. Olfactory cues modulate facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Demattè, M Luisa; Osterbauer, Robert; Spence, Charles

    2007-07-01

    We report an experiment designed to investigate whether olfactory cues can influence people's judgments of facial attractiveness. Sixteen female participants judged the attractiveness of a series of male faces presented briefly on a computer monitor using a 9-point visual rating scale. While viewing each face, the participants were simultaneously presented with either clean air or else with 1 of 4 odorants (the odor was varied on a trial-by-trial basis) from a custom-built olfactometer. We included 2 pleasant odors (geranium and a male fragrance) and 2 unpleasant odors (rubber and body odor) as confirmed by pilot testing. The results showed that the participants rated the male faces as being significantly less attractive in the presence of an unpleasant odor than when the faces were presented together with a pleasant odor or with clean air (these conditions did not differ significantly). These results demonstrate the cross-modal influence that unpleasant odors can have on people's judgments of facial attractiveness. Interestingly, this pattern of results was unaffected by whether the odors were body relevant (the body odor and the male fragrance) or not (the rubber and geranium odors).

  14. Ultrastructural analysis of olfactory ensheathing cells derived from olfactory bulb and nerve of neonatal and juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rosa M; Ghotme, Kemel; Botero, Lucía; Bernal, Jaime E; Pérez, Rosalía; Barreto, George E; Bustos, Rosa Helena

    2016-02-01

    Olfactory nerve derived and olfactory bulb derived olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have the ability to promote axonal regeneration and remyelination, both of which are essential in a successful cell transplant. Thus, morphological identification of OECs is a key aspect to develop an applicable cell therapy for injuries to the nervous system. However, there is no clear definition regarding which developmental stage or anatomical origin of OECs is more adequate for neural repair. In the present study, an ultrastructural comparison was made between OECs recovered from primary cultures of olfactory nerve and bulb in two developmental stages. The most notorious difference between cells obtained from olfactory nerve and bulb was the presence of indented nuclei in bulb derived OECs, suggesting a greater ability for possible chemotaxis. In neonatal OECs abundant mitochondria, lipid vacuoles, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum were detected, suggesting an active lipid metabolism, probably involved in synthesis of myelin. Our results suggest that neonatal OECs obtained from olfactory bulb have microscopic properties that could make them more suitable for neural repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Rescue Optic Nerve Fibers in a Rat Glaucoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Khaw, Peng T.; Yin, Zheng Qin; Li, Daqing; Raisman, Geoffrey; Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) can reduce loss of optic nerve axons after raised intraocular pressure (IOP) in the rat. Methods: OECs cultured from the adult olfactory mucosa were transplanted into the region of the optic disc. The IOP was raised by injection of magnetic microspheres into the anterior chamber. Results: At 4 weeks after raising the IOP, the transplanted OECs had migrated into the dorsal area of the optic nerve head (ONH) where they surrounded the optic nerve fibers with a non-myelinated ensheathment. The mean amount of damage to the ONH astrocytic area in rats was 51.0% compared with 85.8% in those without OEC transplants (P < 0.02) and the mean loss of axons in the optic nerve was 51.0% compared with 80.3% in the absence of OECs (P < 0.01). Conclusions: OECs transplanted into the region of the ONH of the rat can reduce the loss of axons and the damage to ONH astrocytes caused by raised IOP. Translational Relevance: Confirmation of these preliminary experimental data, further understanding of possible mechanisms of axonal protection by OECs, and the longer-term time course of protection could provide a basis for future human clinical trials of autografted OECs, which would be available from autologous nasal epithelial biopsies. PMID:24049703

  16. Delayed olfactory ensheathing cell transplants reduce nociception after dorsal root injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ann; Lauschke, Jenny L; Gorrie, Catherine A; Cameron, Nicholas; Hayward, Ian; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Waite, Phil M E

    2011-05-01

    Injury to cervical dorsal roots mimics the deafferentation component of brachial plexus injury in humans, with intractable neuropathic pain in the deafferented limb being a common consequence. Such lesions are generally not amenable to surgical repair. The use of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) for dorsal root repair, via acute transplantation, has been successful in several studies. From a clinical point of view, delayed transplantation of OECs would provide a more realistic timeframe for repair. In this study we investigated the effect of delayed OEC transplantation on functional recovery of skilled forepaw movements and amelioration of neuropathic pain, using a C7 and C8 dorsal root injury rat model previously established in our lab. We found that OEC transplantation to the dorsal horn 1 week after root injury effectively attenuated neuropathic disturbances associated with dorsal root injury, including spontaneous pain behavior, tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The sensory controls of complex, goal-oriented skilled reaching and ladder walking, however, were not improved by delayed OEC transplantation. We did not detect any significant influence of transplanted OECs on injury-induced central reorganisation and afferent sprouting. The anti-nociceptive effect mediated by OEC transplants may therefore be explained by alternative mechanisms such as modification of inflammation and astrogliosis. The significant effect of OEC transplants in mitigating neuropathic pain may be clinically useful in intractable pain syndromes arising from deafferentation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair.

  17. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Rescue Optic Nerve Fibers in a Rat Glaucoma Model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao; Khaw, Peng T; Yin, Zheng Qin; Li, Daqing; Raisman, Geoffrey; Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    To determine if transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) can reduce loss of optic nerve axons after raised intraocular pressure (IOP) in the rat. OECs cultured from the adult olfactory mucosa were transplanted into the region of the optic disc. The IOP was raised by injection of magnetic microspheres into the anterior chamber. At 4 weeks after raising the IOP, the transplanted OECs had migrated into the dorsal area of the optic nerve head (ONH) where they surrounded the optic nerve fibers with a non-myelinated ensheathment. The mean amount of damage to the ONH astrocytic area in rats was 51.0% compared with 85.8% in those without OEC transplants (P < 0.02) and the mean loss of axons in the optic nerve was 51.0% compared with 80.3% in the absence of OECs (P < 0.01). OECs transplanted into the region of the ONH of the rat can reduce the loss of axons and the damage to ONH astrocytes caused by raised IOP. Confirmation of these preliminary experimental data, further understanding of possible mechanisms of axonal protection by OECs, and the longer-term time course of protection could provide a basis for future human clinical trials of autografted OECs, which would be available from autologous nasal epithelial biopsies.

  18. BDNF production by olfactory ensheathing cells contributes to axonal regeneration of cultured adult CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Pastrana, Erika; Moreno-Flores, Maria Teresa; Avila, Jesus; Wandosell, Francisco; Minichiello, Liliana; Diaz-Nido, Javier

    2007-02-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are the main glial cell type that populates mammalian olfactory nerves. These cells have a great capacity to promote the regeneration of axons when transplanted into the injured adult mammalian CNS. However, little is still known about the molecular mechanisms they employ in mediating such a task. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was identified as a candidate molecule in a genomic study that compared three functionally different OEC populations: Early passage OECs (OEC Ep), Late passage OECs (OEC Lp) and the OEC cell line TEG3 [Pastrana, E., Moreno-Flores, M.T., Gurzov, E.N., Avila, J., Wandosell, F., Diaz-Nido, J., 2006. Genes associated with adult axon regeneration promoted by olfactory ensheathing cells: a new role for matrix metalloproteinase 2. J. Neurosci. 26, 5347-5359]. We have here set out to determine the role played by BDNF in the stimulation of axon outgrowth by OECs. We compared the extracellular BDNF levels in the three OEC populations and show that it is produced in significant amounts by the OECs that can stimulate axon regeneration in adult retinal neurons (OEC Ep and TEG3) but it is absent from the extracellular medium of OEC Lp cells which lack this capacity. Blocking BDNF signalling impaired axonal regeneration of adult retinal neurons co-cultured with TEG3 cells and adding BDNF increased the proportion of adult neurons that regenerate their axons on OEC Lp monolayers. Combining BDNF with other extracellular proteins such as Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) further augmented this effect. This study shows that BDNF production by OECs plays a direct role in the promotion of axon regeneration of adult CNS neurons.

  19. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Yang, Bao-lin; Liu, Zeng-xu; Yu, Qing; Zhang, Wen-jun; Yuan, Keng; Zeng, Hui-hong; Zhu, Gao-chun; Liu, De-ming; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4–5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4–5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26487865

  20. The protective effect of curcumin in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Roberta; Musumeci, Teresa; Russo, Cristina; Pellitteri, Rosalia

    2017-02-05

    Curcumin, a phytochemical component derived from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, has shown a great variety of pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-depression and anti-oxidant activity. Therefore, in the last years it has been used as a therapeutic agent since it confers protection in different neurodegenerative diseases, cerebral ischemia and excitotoxicity. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (OECs) are glial cells of the olfactory system. They are able to secrete several neurotrophic growth factors, promote axonal growth and support the remyelination of damaged axons. OEC transplantation has emerged as a possible experimental therapy to induce repair of spinal cord injury, even if the functional recovery is still limited. Since hypoxia is a secondary effect in spinal cord injury, this in vitro study investigates the protective effect of curcumin in OECs exposed to hypoxia. Primary OECs were obtained from neonatal rat olfactory bulbs and placed both in normal and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, some cells were grown with basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) and/or curcumin at different concentration and times. The results obtained through immunocytochemical procedures and MTT test show that curcumin stimulates cell viability in OECs grown in normal and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of curcumin and bFGF is the most effective exerting protection on OECs. Since spinal cord injury is often accompanied by secondary insults, such as ischemia or hypoxia, our results suggest that curcumin in combination with bFGF might be considered a possible approach for restoration in injuries.

  1. Globose, cystic olfactory ensheathing cell tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaoling; Wei, Minghai; Yang, Kang; Tan, Zeshi; Sun, Xu; Li, Xinyu; Che, Ningwei; Luan, Lan; Wang, Guanyu; Wang, Xiaofeng; Sun, Yuqiang; Yin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cell tumor (OECT) is one of the most rare intracranial, extra-axial tumors located in the anterior cranial fossa. The present study reports a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with a history of hyposmia for 1 year, as well as a gradual dizziness and emotional lability for 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a globose, well-defined cystic mass at the midline of the anterior cranial fossa, which was confirmed as an OECT by histology and was completely resected by bifrontal craniotomy. According to the immunostaining results, the tumor was positive for vimentin and S100 protein, and negative for epithelial membrane antigen, glial fibrillary acidic protein and cluster of differentiation 57 (also known as Leu-7). The presentation, imaging findings, histopathological examination and histogenesis of OECT are discussed in the present study, along with a literature review. PMID:27895759

  2. Olfactory ensheathing cell tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MU, QINGCHUN; GAO, HAIJUN; LIU, PENGFEI; HU, XITONG; ZHENG, XU; LI, PEIWEN; LEI, TING; SUN, YUXUE; ZHAO, GANG; HUANG, HAIYAN; HONG, XINYU

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cell tumors (OECTs) are rare malignancies that occur in the anterior fossa. Little is known with regard to their clinical, radiological and immunohistochemical characteristics. The current study reports the case of a 20-year-old male with an OECT, who presented with a severe headache and a generalized convulsion. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed heterogeneous enhancement of the tumor in the left anterior fossa. Complete removal of the tumor via a left frontal craniotomy was conducted, which relieved the patient's headache; however, this resulted in left-sided anosmia that remained during the two-month follow-up. The tumor was immunopositive for vimentin and S-100, and immunonegative for epithelial membrane antigen and Leu-7. The clinical data, imaging features, intraoperative findings and immunohistochemical characteristics of an additional seven cases reported in the literature are also reviewed and analyzed, providing important clinical information for the pre-operative diagnosis and intraoperative removal of OECTs. PMID:26137016

  3. Therapeutic Potential of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Anna, Zadroga; Katarzyna, Jezierska-Woźniak; Joanna, Czarzasta; Barczewska, Monika; Joanna, Wojtkiewicz; Wojciech, Maksymowicz

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition that affects individuals worldwide, significantly reducing quality of life, for both patients and their families. In recent years there has been a growing interest in cell therapy potential in the context of spinal cord injuries. The present review aims to discuss and compare the restorative approaches based on the current knowledge, available spinal cord restorative cell therapies, and use of selected cell types. However, treatment options for spinal cord injury are limited, but rehabilitation and experimental technologies have been found to help maintain or improve remaining nerve function in some cases. Mesenchymal stem cells as well as olfactory ensheathing cells seem to show therapeutic impact on damaged spinal cord and might be useful in neuroregeneration. Recent research in animal models and first human trials give patients with spinal cord injuries hope for recovery.

  4. Axon Regeneration Can Facilitate or Suppress Hindlimb Function after Olfactory Ensheathing Glia Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takeoka, Aya; Jindrich, Devin L.; Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Zhong, Hui; van den Brand, Rubia; Pham, Daniel L.; Ziegler, Matthias D.; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2011-01-01

    Reports based primarily on anatomical evidence suggest that olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) transplantation promotes axon regeneration across a complete spinal cord transection in adult rats. Based on functional, electrophysiological, and anatomical assessments, we found that OEG promoted axon regeneration across a complete spinal cord transection and that this regeneration altered motor responses over time. At 7 months after transection, 70% of OEG-treated rats showed motor-evoked potentials in hindlimb muscles after transcranial electric stimulation. Furthermore, a complete spinal cord retransection performed 8 months after injury demonstrated that this axon regeneration suppressed locomotor performance and decreased the hypersensitive hindlimb withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation. OEG transplantation alone promoted reorganization of lumbosacral locomotor networks and, when combined with long-term training, enhanced some stepping measures. These novel findings demonstrate that OEG promote regeneration of mature axons across a complete transection and reorganization of spinal circuitry, both of which contribute to sensorimotor function. PMID:21411671

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Anna, Zadroga; Joanna, Czarzasta; Barczewska, Monika; Wojciech, Maksymowicz

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition that affects individuals worldwide, significantly reducing quality of life, for both patients and their families. In recent years there has been a growing interest in cell therapy potential in the context of spinal cord injuries. The present review aims to discuss and compare the restorative approaches based on the current knowledge, available spinal cord restorative cell therapies, and use of selected cell types. However, treatment options for spinal cord injury are limited, but rehabilitation and experimental technologies have been found to help maintain or improve remaining nerve function in some cases. Mesenchymal stem cells as well as olfactory ensheathing cells seem to show therapeutic impact on damaged spinal cord and might be useful in neuroregeneration. Recent research in animal models and first human trials give patients with spinal cord injuries hope for recovery. PMID:28298927

  6. Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells to evaluate functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Guerout, Nicolas; Paviot, Alexandre; Bon-Mardion, Nicolas; Honoré, Axel; Obongo, Rais; Duclos, Célia; Marie, Jean-Paul

    2014-02-23

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are neural crest cells which allow growth and regrowth of the primary olfactory neurons. Indeed, the primary olfactory system is characterized by its ability to give rise to new neurons even in adult animals. This particular ability is partly due to the presence of OECs which create a favorable microenvironment for neurogenesis. This property of OECs has been used for cellular transplantation such as in spinal cord injury models. Although the peripheral nervous system has a greater capacity to regenerate after nerve injury than the central nervous system, complete sections induce misrouting during axonal regrowth in particular after facial of laryngeal nerve transection. Specifically, full sectioning of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) induces aberrant axonal regrowth resulting in synkinesis of the vocal cords. In this specific model, we showed that OECs transplantation efficiently increases axonal regrowth. OECs are constituted of several subpopulations present in both the olfactory mucosa (OM-OECs) and the olfactory bulbs (OB-OECs). We present here a model of cellular transplantation based on the use of these different subpopulations of OECs in a RLN injury model. Using this paradigm, primary cultures of OB-OECs and OM-OECs were transplanted in Matrigel after section and anastomosis of the RLN. Two months after surgery, we evaluated transplanted animals by complementary analyses based on videolaryngoscopy, electromyography (EMG), and histological studies. First, videolaryngoscopy allowed us to evaluate laryngeal functions, in particular muscular cocontractions phenomena. Then, EMG analyses demonstrated richness and synchronization of muscular activities. Finally, histological studies based on toluidine blue staining allowed the quantification of the number and profile of myelinated fibers. All together, we describe here how to isolate, culture, identify and transplant OECs from OM and OB after RLN section-anastomosis and how

  7. Clinical application of adult olfactory bulb ensheathing glia for nervous system repair.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Cueto, Almudena; Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia

    2011-05-01

    The ability of adult olfactory bulb ensheathing glia (OB-OEG) to promote histological and functional neural repair has been broadly documented. Pre-clinical studies show that beneficial effects of adult OB-OEG are repeatable in the same type of spinal cord injury initially tested, in other spinal cord and CNS injury models, in different species and after the administration of these cells in different forms (either alone or in combination with other cells, drugs, products or devices). These studies demonstrate the reproducibility, robustness, fundamental nature and relevance of the findings. Therefore, the use of adult OB-OEG for spinal cord injury repair meets the scientific criteria established by the International Campaign for Cures of Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis (ICCP) for the translation to human application. Because there is so much heterogeneity in the way adult OEG is administered, each of these different OEG-based therapies must be individually categorized to determine whether they fulfill the requisites dictated by the consolidated regulatory body to be considered or not as a medicine. In the case they do, in Europe, they shall be subjected to the Regulatory European Framework for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products and the European Clinical Trials Directive (Directives 2001/20/EC and 2009/120/EC). After a deep analysis of the European Regulation we have concluded that grafts consisting of suspensions of purified adult OEG, to be used for the promotion of axonal regeneration in the CNS, do not comply with the definition of Medicinal Product provided by the European Medicines Agency. In contrast, experimental therapies using OEG in combination with other cell types, drugs, products or devices, or genetically-modified OEG fall under the definitions of Medicinal Product. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A lab-on-a-chip device for investigating the fusion process of olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Munaz, Ahmed; Vadivelu, Raja K; John, James A St; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-08-07

    Understanding the process of fusion of olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids will lead to improvement of cell transplantation therapies to repair spinal cord injuries. The successful fusion of transplanted spheroids will enable alternative transplantation strategies to be developed for in vivo applications. This paper describes the use of a microfluidic device to trap and fuse olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids. The velocity, the pressure distribution in the device were simulated numerically to predict the trapping location. The simulation predicted the optimum flow rates for trapping the spheroids in the later experiments. Simulated particle trajectories were verified experimentally with tracing of fluorescent micro particles. The fusion process of the spheroids was investigated over a period of 48 hours. The microfluidic platform presented here can be used for testing potential drugs that can promote the fusion process and improve the transplantation therapy.

  9. Biofunctionalization of conductive hydrogel coatings to support olfactory ensheathing cells at implantable electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hassarati, Rachelle T; Marcal, Helder; John, L; Foster, R; Green, Rylie A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical discrepancies between conventional platinum (Pt) electrodes and neural tissue often result in scar tissue encapsulation of implanted neural recording and stimulating devices. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a supportive glial cell in the olfactory nervous system which can transition through glial scar tissue while supporting the outgrowth of neural processes. It has been proposed that this function can be used to reconnect implanted electrodes with the target neural pathways. Conductive hydrogel (CH) electrode coatings have been proposed as a substrate for supporting OEC survival and proliferation at the device interface. To determine an ideal CH to support OECs, this study explored eight CH variants, with differing biochemical composition, in comparison to a conventional Pt electrodes. All CH variants were based on a biosynthetic hydrogel, consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) and heparin, through which the conductive polymer (CP) poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) was electropolymerized. The biochemical composition was varied through incorporation of gelatin and sericin, which were expected to provide cell adherence functionality, supporting attachment, and cell spreading. Combinations of these biomolecules varied from 1 to 3 wt %. The physical, electrical, and biological impact of these molecules on electrode performance was assessed. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrated that the addition of these biological molecules had little significant effect on the coating's ability to safely transfer charge. Cell attachment studies, however, determined that the incorporation of 1 wt % gelatin in the hydrogel was sufficient to significantly increase the attachment of OECs compared to the nonfunctionalized CH.

  10. Potential of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells from Different Sources for Spinal Cord Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mayeur, Anne; Duclos, Célia; Honoré, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Drouot, Laurent; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Bon-Mardion, Nicolas; Jean, Laetitia; Vérin, Eric; Emery, Evelyne; Lemarchant, Sighild; Vivien, Denis; Boyer, Olivier; Marie, Jean-Paul; Guérout, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces a permanent disability in patients. To this day no curative treatment can be proposed to restore lost functions. Therefore, extensive experimental studies have been conducted to induce recovery after SCI. One of the most promising therapies is based on the use of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs). OECs can be obtained from either the olfactory bulbs (OB-OECs) or from olfactory mucosa (OM-OECs), involving a less invasive approach for autotransplantation. However the vast majority of experimental transplantations have been focusing on OB-OECs although the OM represents a more accessible source of OECs. Importantly, the ability of OM-OECs in comparison to OB-OECs to induce spinal cord recovery in the same lesion paradigm has never been described. We here present data using a multiparametric approach, based on electrophysiological, behavioral, histological and magnetic resonance imaging experiments on the repair potential of OB-OECs and OM-OECs from either primary or purified cultures after a severe model of SCI. Our data demonstrate that transplantation of OECs obtained from OB or OM induces electrophysiological and functional recovery, reduces astrocyte reactivity and glial scar formation and improves axonal regrowth. We also show that the purification step is essential for OM-OECs while not required for OB-OECs. Altogether, our study strongly indicates that transplantation of OECs from OM represents the best benefit/risk ratio according to the safety of access of OM and the results induced by transplantations of OM-OECs. Indeed, purified OM-OECs in addition to induce recovery can integrate and survive up to 60 days into the spinal cord. Therefore, our results provide strong support for these cells as a viable therapy for SCI. PMID:23638158

  11. Low-Dose Curcumin Stimulates Proliferation, Migration and Phagocytic Activity of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tello Velasquez, Johana; Watts, Michelle E.; Todorovic, Michael; Nazareth, Lynnmaria; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Quinn, Ronald J.; John, James A. St

    2014-01-01

    One of the promising strategies for neural repair therapies is the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) which are the glial cells of the olfactory system. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the behaviour of mouse OECs to determine if it could be of use to further enhance the therapeutic potential of OECs. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol compound found in the spice turmeric, is known for its anti-cancer properties at doses over 10 µM, and often at 50 µM, and it exerts its effects on cancer cells in part by activation of MAP kinases. In contrast, we found that low-dose curcumin (0.5 µM) applied to OECs strikingly modulated the dynamic morphology, increased the rate of migration by up to 4-fold, and promoted significant proliferation of the OECs. Most dramatically, low-dose curcumin stimulated a 10-fold increase in the phagocytic activity of OECs. All of these potently stimulated behavioural characteristics of OECs are favourable for neural repair therapies. Importantly, low-dose curcumin gave a transient activation of p38 kinases, which is in contrast to the high dose curcumin effects on cancer cells in which these MAP kinases tend to undergo prolonged activation. Low-dose curcumin mediated effects on OECs demonstrate cell-type specific stimulation of p38 and ERK kinases. These results constitute the first evidence that low-dose curcumin can modulate the behaviour of olfactory glia into a phenotype potentially more favourable for neural repair and thereby improve the therapeutic use of OECs for neural repair therapies. PMID:25360677

  12. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadivelu, Raja K.; Ooi, Chin H.; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures.

  13. Linckosides enhance proliferation and induce morphological changes in human olfactory ensheathing cells.

    PubMed

    Tello Velasquez, Johana; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Lim, Filip; Han, Chunguang; Ojika, Makoto; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Quinn, Ronald J; John, James A St

    2016-09-01

    Linckosides are members of the steroid glycoside family isolated from the starfish Linckia laevigata. These natural compounds have notable neuritogenic activity and synergistic effects on NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Neurogenic factors or molecules that are able to mimic their activities are known to be involved in the survival, proliferation and migration of neurons and glial cells; however how glial cells respond to specific neurogenic molecules such as linckosides has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the effect of three different linckosides (linckoside A, B and granulatoside A) on the morphological properties, proliferation and migration of human olfactory ensheathing cells (hOECs). The proliferation rate after all the treatments was higher than control as detected by MTS assay. Additionally, hOECs displayed dramatic morphological changes characterized by a higher number of processes after linckoside treatment. Interestingly changes in microtubule organization and expression levels of some early neuronal markers (GAP43 and βIII-tubulin) were also observed. An increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 after addition of the compounds suggests that this pathway may be involved in the linckoside-mediated effects particularly those related to morphological changes. These results are the first description of the stimulating effects of linckosides on hOECs and raise the potential for this natural compound or its derivatives to be used to regulate and enhance the therapeutic properties of OECs, particularly for cell transplantation therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Subtractive hybridization identifies genes differentially expressed by olfactory ensheathing cells and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia Esperanza; Torres-Ruíz, Nadia Magali; Gudiño-Cabrera, Graciela; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells into glia has received relatively limited attention to date when compared with the interest in the generation of neurons. We are interested in a particular glial phenotype, the aldynoglia, and their differentiation from multipotential neural precursors (MNP), since this type of glia can promote neuronal regeneration. We constructed cDNA libraries from cultures of purified olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), an aldynoglia cell type, and MNP to perform subtractive hybridization. As a result, we isolated four genes from the OEC: one tenascin C (Tn-C) isoform, Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (Igfbp-5), cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COX1) and a phosphodiesterase for cyclic nucleotides (CNPase). With the exception of CNPase, these genes are expressed more strongly in the OEC than in the MNP and moreover, the expression of all four is induced when MNP were exposed to OEC conditioned media. The data suggest a role for these genes in MNP differentiation, and their products appear to represent characteristic proteins of the aldynoglia phenotype. Copyright 2009 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Raja K.; Ooi, Chin H.; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures. PMID:26462469

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae resists intracellular killing by olfactory ensheathing cells but not by microglia

    PubMed Central

    Macedo-Ramos, Hugo; Ruiz-Mendoza, Susana; Mariante, Rafael M.; Guimarães, Erick V.; Quadros-de-Souza, Lucas C.; Paiva, Mauricio M.; Ferreira, Eliane de O.; Pinto, Tatiana C. A.; Teixeira, Lucia M.; Allodi, Silvana; Baetas-da-Cruz, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a type of specialized glial cell currently considered as having a double function in the nervous system: one regenerative, and another immune. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major agent of severe infections in humans, including meningitis. It is commonly found in the nasopharynx of asymptomatic carriers, and, under certain still unknown conditions, can invade the brain. We evaluated whether pneumococcal cells recovered from lysed OECs and microglia are able to survive by manipulating the host cell activation. An intracellular-survival assay of S. pneumoniae in OECs showed a significant number of bacterial CFU recovered after 3 h of infection. In contrast, microglia assays resulted in a reduced number of CFU. Electron-microscopy analysis revealed a large number of pneumococci with apparently intact morphology. However, microglia cells showed endocytic vesicles containing only bacterial cell debris. Infection of OEC cultures resulted in continuous NF-κB activation. The IFN-γ-induced increase of iNOS expression was reversed in infected OECs. OECs are susceptible to S. pneumoniae infection, which can suppress their cytotoxic mechanisms in order to survive. We suggest that, in contrast to microglia, OECs might serve as safe targets for pneumococci, providing a more stable environment for evasion of the immune system. PMID:27827453

  17. Single-cell printing to form three-dimensional lines of olfactory ensheathing cells.

    PubMed

    Othon, Christina M; Wu, Xingjia; Anders, Juanita J; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2008-09-01

    Biological laser printing (BioLP) is a unique tool capable of printing high resolution two- and three-dimensional patterns of living mammalian cells, with greater than 95% viability. These results have been extended to primary cultured olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), harvested from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. OECs have been found to provide stimulating environments for neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. BioLP is unique in that small load volumes ( approximately microLs) are required to achieve printing, enabling low numbers of OECs to be harvested, concentrated and printed. BioLP was used to form several 8 mm lines of OECs throughout a multilayer hydrogel scaffold. The line width was as low as 20 microm, with most lines comprising aligned single cells. Fluorescent confocal microscopy was used to determine the functionality of the printed OECs, to monitor interactions between printed OECs, and to determine the extent of cell migration throughout the 3D scaffold. High-resolution printing of low cell count, harvested OECs is an important advancement for in vitro study of cell interactions and functionality. In addition, these cell-printed scaffolds may provide an alternative for spinal cord repair studies, as the single-cell patterns formed here are on relevant size scales for neurite outgrowth.

  18. Olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium protects astrocytes exposed to hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Jinbo, Liu; Zhiyuan, Liu; Zhijian, Zhang; WenGe, Ding

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of olfactory ensheathing cell conditioned medium (OECCM) on damaged astrocytes after exposure to H2O2 in vitro. OECCM was used to treat astrocytes after injury, which was induced by exposure to 500 μmol/L H2O2 for 20 min. The cell morphology was then observed under a light microscope, cell viability assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell ultrastructure observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and apoptosis assessed by Annexin V staining followed by cytometry and Western blot. H2O2 induced severe damage to astrocytes as evidenced by decreased cell number, pathological changes in cell morphology, and significantly elevated cell apoptosis. Cells incubated with OECCM displayed significantly improved cell viability and decreased cell apoptotic rate. Under TEM, H2O2-treated cells showed partially broken plasma membranes, swollen rough endoplasmic reticula, visible vacuoles, and swollen or deformed mitochondria with ruptured cristae. Incubation with OECCM significantly ameliorated these pathological changes in astrocytes. These results suggest that OECCM may protect astrocytes from oxidative damage by promoting cell survival while reducing apoptosis of the damaged cells.

  19. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  20. Chronic Spinal Injury Repair by Olfactory Bulb Ensheathing Glia and Feasibility for Autologous Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Santos-Benito, Fernando F.; Llamusí, M. Beatriz; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory bulb ensheathing glia (OB-OEG) promote repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats after transplantation at acute or subacute (up to 45 days) stages. The most relevant clinical scenario in humans, however, is chronic SCI, in which no more major cellular or molecular changes occur at the injury site; this occurs after the third month in rodents. Whether adult OB-OEG grafts promote repair of severe chronic SCI has not been previously addressed. Rats with complete SCI that were transplanted with OB-OEG 4 months after injury exhibited progressive improvement in motor function and axonal regeneration from different brainstem nuclei across and beyond the SCI site. A positive correlation between motor outcome and axonal regeneration suggested a role for brainstem neurons in the recovery. Functional and histological outcomes did not differ at subacute or chronic stages. Thus, autologous transplantation is a feasible approach as there is time for patient stabilization and OEG preparation in human chronic SCI; the healing effects of OB-OEG on established injuries may offer new therapeutic opportunities for chronic SCI patients. PMID:19915486

  1. Nose-to-brain delivery: evaluation of polymeric nanoparticles on olfactory ensheathing cells uptake.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Teresa; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Spatuzza, Michela; Puglisi, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    The nasal route has received a great deal of attention as a convenient and reliable method for the brain target on administration of drugs. When drugs are loaded into nanoparticles (NPs) the interaction with mucosa transports directly into the brain, skipping the blood-brain barrier and achieving rapid cerebrospinal fluid levels. Poly-lactic acid (PLA), poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), and chitosan (CS) were chosen to prepare NPs. After optimization of CS nanocarriers, our goal was to evaluate the different type of NPs uptake into olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs). We then correlated obtained biological data to zeta potential measurements of cells treated with NPs. Rodhamine-loaded NPs were used to study the uptake of OECs carried out by confocal microscopy at different times (1, 2, and 4 h). Our results showed that uptake of rodhamine-NPs by OECs was time dependent and it was influenced by the carrier charge. Confocal imaging of OECs demonstrated that NPPLGA showed a higher increase in uptake compared with NPPLA and NPCS after 1 h and it increased at 2-4 h. Zeta potential values of treated cells were more amplified with respect to untreated cells. The highest values were showed by unloaded NPPLGA, confirming microscopy data.

  2. Influence of Biphasic Stimulation on Olfactory Ensheathing Cells for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hassarati, Rachelle T.; Foster, L. John R.; Green, Rylie A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) assisted regeneration of injured spinal cord has seen a rising interest in the use of these cells in tissue-engineered systems. Previously shown to support neural cell growth through glial scar tissue, OECs have the potential to assist neural network formation in living electrode systems to produce superior neuroprosthetic electrode surfaces. The following study sought to understand the influence of biphasic electrical stimulation (ES), inherent to bionic devices, on cell survival and function, with respect to conventional metallic and developmental conductive hydrogel (CH) coated electrodes. The CH utilized in this study was a biosynthetic hydrogel consisting of methacrylated poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA), heparin and gelatin through which poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was electropolymerised. OECs cultured on Pt and CH surfaces were subjected to biphasic ES. Image-based cytometry yielded little significant difference between the viability and cell cycle of OECs cultured on the stimulated and passive samples. The significantly lower voltages measured across the CH electrodes (147 ± 3 mV) compared to the Pt (317 ± 5 mV), had shown to influence a higher percentage of viable cells on CH (91–93%) compared to Pt (78–81%). To determine the functionality of these cells following electrical stimulation, OECs co-cultured with PC12 cells were found to support neural cell differentiation (an indirect measure of neurotrophic factor production) following ES. PMID:27757072

  3. Synergetic effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and olfactory ensheathing cells on optic nerve reparation (complete translation)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Dan-ping; Chen, Qing-ying; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    At present, there is no effective treatment for the repair of the optic nerve after injury, or improvement of its microenvironment for regeneration. Intravitreally injected ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) promote the long-distance regrowth of severed optic nerve fibers after intracranial injury. Here, we examined the efficacy of these techniques alone and in combination, in a rat model of optic nerve injury. We injected condensed OEC suspension at the site of injury, or CNTF into the vitreous body, or both simultaneously. Retrograde tracing techniques showed that 4 weeks postoperatively, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells and their axonal density in the optic nerve were greater in rats subjected to OEC injection only than in those receiving CNTF injection only. Furthermore, combined OEC + CNTF injection achieved better results than either monotherapy. These findings confirm that OECs are better than CNTF at protecting injured neurons in the eye, but that combined OEC and CNTF therapy is notably more effective than either treatment alone. PMID:27482233

  4. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Raja K; Ooi, Chin H; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A

    2015-10-14

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures.

  5. Short Report: Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Promote Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells and Robust Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Rosh; Sethi, Roshan; Redmond, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Aims The goal of this study was to gain insight into the signaling between olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). We sought to understand the impact of OECs on NSC differentiation and neurite extension and to begin to elucidate the factors involved in these interactions to provide new targets for therapeutic interventions. Materials and Methods We utilized lines of OECs that have been extremely well characterized in vitro and in vivo along with well studied NSCs in gels to determine the impact of the coculture in three dimensions. To further elucidate the signaling, we used conditioned media from the OECs as well as fractioned components on NSCs to determine the molecular weight range of the soluble factors that was most responsible for the NSC behavior. Results We found that the coculture of NSCs and OECs led to robust NSC differentiation and extremely long neural processes not usually seen with NSCs in three dimensional gels in vitro. Through culture of NSCs with fractioned OEC media, we determined that molecules larger than 30 kDa have the greatest impact on the NSC behavior. Conclusions Overall, our findings suggest that cocultures of NSCs and OECs may be a novel combination therapy for neural injuries including spinal cord injury (SCI). Furthermore, we have identified a class of molecules which plays a substantial role in the behavior that provides new targets for investigating pharmacological therapies. PMID:24996386

  6. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: An 18-year bibliometric analysis based on the Web of Science.

    PubMed

    Leng, Zikuan; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Dong; Cao, Kai

    2013-05-15

    Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation is a promising new approach for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an increasing number of scientific publications are devoted to this treatment strategy. This bibliometric analysis was conducted to assess global research trends in OEC transplantation for SCI. All of the data in this study originate from the Web of Science maintained by the Institute for Scientific Information, USA, and includes SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, A&HCI, CPCI-S, CPCI-SSH, BKCI-S, BKCI-SSH, CCR-EXPANDED and IC. The Institute for Scientific Information's Web of Science was searched using the keywords "olfactory ensheathing cells" or "OECs" or "olfactory ensheathing glia" or "OEG" or "olfactory ensheathing glial cells" or "OEGs" and "spinal cord injury" or "SCI" or "spinal injury" or "spinal transection" for literature published from January 1898 to May 2012. Original articles, reviews, proceedings papers and meeting abstracts, book chapters and editorial materials on OEC transplantation for SCI were included. Simultaneously, unpublished literature and literature for which manual information retrieval was required were excluded. ALL SELECTED LITERATURES ADDRESSING OEC TRANSPLANTATION FOR SCI WERE EVALUATED IN THE FOLLOWING ASPECTS: publication year, document type, language, author, institution, times cited, Web of Science category, core source title, countries/territories and funding agency. In the Web of Science published by the Institute for Scientific Information, the earliest literature record was in April, 1995. Four hundred and fourteen publications addressing OEC transplantation for SCI were added to the data library in the past 18 years, with an annually increasing trend. Of 415 records, 405 publications were in English. Two hundred and fifty-nine articles ranked first in the distribution of document type, followed by 141 reviews. Thirty articles and 20 reviews, cited more than 55 times by the date the publication data were

  7. Electrical regulation of olfactory ensheathing cells using conductive polypyrrole/chitosan polymers.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fengyu; Wang, Yuqing; Ma, Teng; Zhu, Shu; Zeng, Wen; Hu, Xueyu; Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-02-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) applied to a conductive nerve graft holds the great potential to improve nerve regeneration and functional recovery in the treatment of lengthy nerve defects. A conductive nerve graft can be obtained by a combination of conductive nerve scaffold and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which are known to enhance axonal regeneration and to produce myelin after transplantation. However, when ES is applied through the conductive graft, the impact of ES on OECs has never been investigated. In this study, a biodegradable conductive composite made of conductive polypyrrole (PPy, 2.5%) and biodegradable chitosan (97.5%) was prepared in order to electrically stimulate OECs. The tolerance of OECs to ES was examined by a cell apoptosis assay. The growth of the cells was characterized using DAPI staining and a CCK-8 assay. The mRNA and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and neurite outgrowth inhibitor-A (NOGO-A) in OECs were assayed by RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the amount of BDNF, NGF, N-CAM, VEGF and NOGO-A secreted was determined by an ELISA assay. The results showed that the PPy/chitosan membranes supported cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation with or without ES. Interestingly, ES applied through the PPy/chitosan composite dramatically enhanced the expression and secretion of BDNF, NGF, N-CAM and VEGF, but decreased the expression and secretion of NOGO-A when compared with control cells without ES. These findings highlight the possibility of enhancing nerve regeneration in conductive scaffolds through ES increased neurotrophin secretion in OECs.

  8. Transplantation of neural stem cells, Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells for spinal cord injury : A Web of Science-based literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Yin, Fei; Guo, Li; Zhao, Dongxu; Gong, Gu; Gao, Lei; Zhu, Qingsan

    2012-12-15

    To identify global research trends in transplantation of neural stem cells, Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells for spinal cord injury. We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on transplantation of neural stem cells, Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells for spinal cord injury published from 2002 to 2011 and retrieved from the Web of Science, using the key words spinal cord injury along with either neural stem cell, Schwann cell or olfactory ensheathing cell. (a) peer-reviewed published articles on neural stem cells, Schwann cells or olfactory ensheathing cells for spinal cord injury indexed in the Web of Science; (b) original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial materials and news items; and (c) published between 2002 and 2011. (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) documents that were not published in the public domain; and (c) corrected papers. (1) Annual publication output, distribution by journal, distribution by institution and top-cited articles on neural stem cells; (2) annual publication output, distribution by journal, distribution by institution and top-cited articles on Schwann cells; (3) annual publication output, distribution by journal, distribution by institution and top-cited articles on olfactory ensheathing cells. This analysis, based on articles indexed in the Web of Science, identified several research trends among studies published over the past 10 years in transplantation of neural stem cells, Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing cells for spinal cord injury. The number of publications increased over the 10-year period examined. Most papers appeared in journals with a focus on neurology, such as Journal of Neurotrauma, Experimental Neurology and Glia. Research institutes publishing on the use of neural stem cells to repair spinal cord injury were mostly in the USA and Canada. Those publishing on the use of Schwann cells were

  9. Peripheral Nerve Injuries and Transplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells for Axonal Regeneration and Remyelination: Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2012-01-01

    Successful nerve regeneration after nerve trauma is not only important for the restoration of motor and sensory functions, but also to reduce the potential for abnormal sensory impulse generation that can occur following neuroma formation. Satisfying functional results after severe lesions are difficult to achieve and the development of interventional methods to achieve optimal functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury is of increasing clinical interest. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have been used to improve axonal regeneration and functional outcome in a number of studies in spinal cord injury models. The rationale is that the OECs may provide trophic support and a permissive environment for axonal regeneration. The experimental transplantation of OECs to support and enhance peripheral nerve regeneration is much more limited. This chapter reviews studies using OECs as an experimental cell therapy to improve peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:23202929

  10. Selective stimulatory action of olfactory ensheathing glia-conditioned medium on oligodendroglial differentiation, with additional reference to signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Litia A; Vitorino, Louise C; Guimarães, Roberta P M; Allodi, Silvana; de Melo Reis, Ricardo A; Cavalcante, Leny A

    2014-07-04

    We examined the effects of conditioned medium from olfactory ensheathing glia (OEGCM) on the differentiation of oligodendrocytes in mixed cultures of early postnatal hippocampi. Differentiation was judged from the numerical density (ND) of cells immunoreactive to 2'3' cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase (CNPase) and O4 antibodies. NDs increased according to inverted-U dose-response curves, particularly for CNPase+ cells (9-fold at optimal dilution) and these changes were blocked by inhibitors of ERK1, p38-MAPK, and PI3K. Our results raise the possibility that OEG secreted factor(s) may counteract demyelination induced by trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and advanced age, and should stimulate novel methods to deliver these factors and/or potentiating chemicals.

  11. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for spinal cord injury: An 18-year bibliometric analysis based on the Web of Science★

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Zikuan; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Dong; Cao, Kai

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation is a promising new approach for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an increasing number of scientific publications are devoted to this treatment strategy. This bibliometric analysis was conducted to assess global research trends in OEC transplantation for SCI. DATA SOURCE: All of the data in this study originate from the Web of Science maintained by the Institute for Scientific Information, USA, and includes SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, A&HCI, CPCI-S, CPCI-SSH, BKCI-S, BKCI-SSH, CCR-EXPANDED and IC. The Institute for Scientific Information's Web of Science was searched using the keywords “olfactory ensheathing cells” or “OECs” or “olfactory ensheathing glia” or “OEG” or “olfactory ensheathing glial cells” or “OEGs” and “spinal cord injury” or “SCI” or “spinal injury” or “spinal transection” for literature published from January 1898 to May 2012. DATA SELECTION: Original articles, reviews, proceedings papers and meeting abstracts, book chapters and editorial materials on OEC transplantation for SCI were included. Simultaneously, unpublished literature and literature for which manual information retrieval was required were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All selected literatures addressing OEC transplantation for SCI were evaluated in the following aspects: publication year, document type, language, author, institution, times cited, Web of Science category, core source title, countries/territories and funding agency. RESULTS: In the Web of Science published by the Institute for Scientific Information, the earliest literature record was in April, 1995. Four hundred and fourteen publications addressing OEC transplantation for SCI were added to the data library in the past 18 years, with an annually increasing trend. Of 415 records, 405 publications were in English. Two hundred and fifty-nine articles ranked first in the distribution of document type, followed by 141

  12. Calcium-induced calcium release and gap junctions mediate large-scale calcium waves in olfactory ensheathing cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Stavermann, Maren; Meuth, Patrick; Doengi, Michael; Thyssen, Anne; Deitmer, Joachim W; Lohr, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a specialised type of glial cells, supporting axon growth and guidance during development and regeneration of the olfactory nerve and the nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. We measured calcium signalling in OECs in olfactory bulb in-toto preparations using confocal and epifluorescence microscopy and the calcium indicator Fluo-4. We identified two subpopulations of olfactory bulb OECs: OECs in the outer sublamina of the nerve layer responded to purinergic neurotransmitters such as adenosine triphosphate with calcium transients, while OECs in the inner sublamina of the nerve layer did not respond to neurotransmitters. However, the latter generated spontaneous calcium waves that covered hundreds of cells. These calcium waves persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin and in calcium-free saline, but were abolished after calcium store depletion with cyclopiazonic acid or inositol trisphosphate receptor blockage with 2-APB. Calcium waves could be triggered by laser photolysis of caged inositol trisphosphate. Blocking purinoceptors with PPADS had no effect on calcium wave propagation, whereas blocking gap junctions with carbenoxolone or meclofenamic acid entirely suppressed calcium waves. Increasing calcium buffer capacity in OECs with NP-EGTA ("caged" Ca(2+)) prevented calcium wave generation, and laser photolysis of NP-EGTA in a small group of OECs resulted in a calcium increase in the irradiated cells followed by a calcium wave. We conclude that calcium waves in OECs can be initiated by calcium-induced calcium release via InsP3 receptors and propagate through gap junctions, while purinergic signalling is not involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction of olfactory ensheathing cells with other cell types in vitro and after transplantation: glial scars and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Meng Inn; Hale, David M; West, Adrian K

    2011-05-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have been investigated extensively as a therapy to promote repair in the injured CNS, with variable efficacy in numerous studies over the previous decade. In many studies that report anatomical and functional recovery, the beneficial effects have been attributed to the ability of OECs to cross the PNS-CNS boundary, their production of growth factors, cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins that promote and guide axon growth, and their ability to remyelinate axons. In this brief review, we focus on the interaction between OECs and astrocytes in vivo and in vitro, in the context of how OECs may be overcoming the deleterious effects of the glial scar. Drawing from a selection of different experimental models of spinal injury, we discuss the morphological alterations of the glial scar associated with OEC transplants, and the in vitro research that has begun to elucidate the interaction between OECs and the cell types that compose the glial scar. We also discuss recent research showing that OECs bear properties of immune cells and the consequent implication that they may modulate neuroinflammation when transplanted into CNS injury sites. Future studies in unraveling the molecular interaction between OECs and other glial cells may help explain some of the variability in outcomes when OECs are used as transplants in CNS injury and more importantly, contribute to the optimization of OECs as a cell-based therapy for CNS injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Olfactory ensheathing glia: their contribution to primary olfactory nervous system regeneration and their regenerative potential following transplantation into the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Elske H P; de Bree, Freddy M; Verhaagen, Joost

    2007-11-01

    Olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) are a specialized type of glia that guide primary olfactory axons from the neuroepithelium in the nasal cavity to the brain. The primary olfactory system is able to regenerate after a lesion and OEG contribute to this process by providing a growth-supportive environment for newly formed axons. In the spinal cord, axons are not able to restore connections after an injury. The effects of OEG transplants on the regeneration of the injured spinal cord have been studied for over a decade. To date, of all the studies using only OEG as a transplant, 41 showed positive effects, while 13 studies showed limited or no effects. There are several contradictory reports on the migratory and axon growth-supporting properties of transplanted OEG. Hence, the regenerative potential of OEG has become the subject of intense discussion. In this review, we first provide an overview of the molecular and cellular characteristics of OEG in their natural environment, the primary olfactory nervous system. Second, their potential to stimulate regeneration in the injured spinal cord is discussed. OEG influence scar formation by their ability to interact with astrocytes, they are able to remyelinate axons and promote angiogenesis. The ability of OEG to interact with scar tissue cells is an important difference with Schwann cells and may be a unique characteristic of OEG. Because of these effects after transplantation and because of their role in primary olfactory system regeneration, the OEG can be considered as a source of neuroregeneration-promoting molecules. To identify these molecules, more insight into the molecular biology of OEG is required. We believe that genome-wide gene expression studies of OEG in their native environment, in culture and after transplantation will ultimately reveal unique combinations of molecules involved in the regeneration-promoting potential of OEG.

  15. Subarachnoid Space Transplantation of Schwann and/or Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Following Severe Spinal Cord Injury Fails to Improve Locomotor Recovery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Nategh, Mohsen; Firouzi, Masoumeh; Naji-Tehrani, Mehdi; Oryadi Zanjani, Leila; Hassannejad, Zahra; Nabian, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollah Zadegan, Shayan; Karimi, Mehrbod; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of spinal cord injury by exogenous cells has brought both successful and unsuccessful results. Olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells have been widely used for transplantation purposes. In this study, we investigated the effects of these cells on contused spinal cord by introducing cells into subarachnoid space. Fifty thousand Schwann cells or olfactory ensheathing cells or a mixture of both cell types were transplanted one week after a 3-second clip compression injury at T-9 spinal cord level in rats. Starting from the day one of spinal cord injury, animals were assessed for six months by BBB test and then were sacrificed for immunohistochemistry labeling of the spinal cord injury site. There was no locomotor recovery in any of the treatment groups including controls. Immunohistochemistry assessment indicated positive labeling of P75 and S100 markers in the cell-transplanted groups compared with control. Our data suggest that transplantation of Schwann cells and/or olfactory ensheathing cells into the subarachnoid space does not improve motor recovery in severely injured spinal cord, at least with the number of cells transplanted here. This, however, should not be regarded as an essentially negative outcome, and further studies which consider higher densities of cells are required.

  16. The supraorbital keyhole approach via an eyebrow incision applied to obtain the olfactory bulb as a source of olfactory ensheathing cells--radiological feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Czyż, Marcin; Tabakow, Paweł; Gheek, Daniel; Miś, Marcin; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz; Raisman, Geoffrey

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND. The purpose of the study was to test the suitability of supraorbital keyhole craniotomy with an eyebrow incision for obtaining olfactory bulb for therapeutic purposes. METHODS. Fifty three high-resolution axial head computed tomography images of patients with a mean age of 55 ± 15 years were used. The exclusion criterion was a pathology of the anterior skull base. The virtual keyhole supraorbital craniotomy was placed on each side of a three-dimensional skull model with respect to the anatomical landmarks. Trajectories of neurosurgical instrument transitions to the anterior and posterior aspects of olfactory grooves (OGs) were subsequently designed with the use of a neuronavigation planning station and measured with correction allowing the avoidance of collisions with skull base structures. Three types of anatomical configuration were divided, reflecting the extent of the correction needed to reach the bottom of OG. RESULTS. Simulation of the surgical access and consequent metrological analysis was performed on 97 skull sides - 9 (8.5%) sides were excluded due to the large frontal sinus. The mean length of the craniotomy basis was 30.71 mm, lengths of the anterior and posterior trajectories were 53.25 and 58.24 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 37% of cases the value of the corrections exceeded the depth of OG. CONCLUSIONS. The supraorbital keyhole approach via an eyebrow incision may be applied to obtain the olfactory bulb as a source of olfactory ensheathing cells in over 60% of cases. Further verification and evaluation of the surgical handiness based on cadaver specimens is justifiable.

  17. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation after a Complete Spinal Cord Transection Mediates Neuroprotective and Immunomodulatory Mechanisms to Facilitate Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Khankan, Rana R; Griffis, Khris G; Haggerty-Skeans, James R; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Phelps, Patricia E

    2016-06-08

    Multiple neural and peripheral cell types rapidly respond to tissue damage after spinal cord injury to form a structurally and chemically inhibitory scar that limits axon regeneration. Astrocytes form an astroglial scar and produce chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), activate microglia, and recruit blood-derived immune cells to the lesion for debris removal. One beneficial therapy, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation, results in functional improvements and promotes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. The lack of an OEC-specific marker, however, has limited the investigation of mechanisms underlying their proregenerative effects. We compared the effects of enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled fibroblast (FB) and OEC transplants acutely after a complete low-thoracic spinal cord transection in adult rats. We assessed the preservation of neurons and serotonergic axons, the levels of inhibitory CSPGs and myelin debris, and the extent of immune cell activation between 1 and 8 weeks postinjury. Our findings indicate that OECs survive longer than FBs post-transplantation, preserve axons and neurons, and reduce inhibitory molecules in the lesion core. Additionally, we show that OECs limit immune-cell activation and infiltration, whereas FBs alter astroglial scar formation and increase immune-cell infiltration and concomitant secondary tissue damage. Administration of cyclosporine-A to enhance graft survival demonstrated that immune suppression can augment OEC contact-mediated protection of axons and neurons during the first 2 weeks postinjury. Collectively, these data suggest that OECs have neuroprotective and immunomodulatory mechanisms that create a supportive environment for neuronal survival and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury creates physical and chemical barriers to axon regeneration. We used a complete spinal cord transection model and olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) or fibroblast (FB; control

  18. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation after a Complete Spinal Cord Transection Mediates Neuroprotective and Immunomodulatory Mechanisms to Facilitate Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Griffis, Khris G.; Haggerty-Skeans, James R.; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2016-01-01

    Multiple neural and peripheral cell types rapidly respond to tissue damage after spinal cord injury to form a structurally and chemically inhibitory scar that limits axon regeneration. Astrocytes form an astroglial scar and produce chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), activate microglia, and recruit blood-derived immune cells to the lesion for debris removal. One beneficial therapy, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation, results in functional improvements and promotes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. The lack of an OEC-specific marker, however, has limited the investigation of mechanisms underlying their proregenerative effects. We compared the effects of enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled fibroblast (FB) and OEC transplants acutely after a complete low-thoracic spinal cord transection in adult rats. We assessed the preservation of neurons and serotonergic axons, the levels of inhibitory CSPGs and myelin debris, and the extent of immune cell activation between 1 and 8 weeks postinjury. Our findings indicate that OECs survive longer than FBs post-transplantation, preserve axons and neurons, and reduce inhibitory molecules in the lesion core. Additionally, we show that OECs limit immune-cell activation and infiltration, whereas FBs alter astroglial scar formation and increase immune-cell infiltration and concomitant secondary tissue damage. Administration of cyclosporine-A to enhance graft survival demonstrated that immune suppression can augment OEC contact-mediated protection of axons and neurons during the first 2 weeks postinjury. Collectively, these data suggest that OECs have neuroprotective and immunomodulatory mechanisms that create a supportive environment for neuronal survival and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord injury creates physical and chemical barriers to axon regeneration. We used a complete spinal cord transection model and olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) or

  19. Gene Expression Changes in the Injured Spinal Cord Following Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Espín, Abel; Hernández, Joaquim; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) or olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC) have demonstrated beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI), providing tissue protection and improving the functional recovery. However, the changes induced by these cells after their transplantation into the injured spinal cord remain largely unknown. We analyzed the changes in the spinal cord transcriptome after a contusion injury and MSC or OEC transplantation. The cells were injected immediately or 7 days after the injury. The mRNA of the spinal cord injured segment was extracted and analyzed by microarray at 2 and 7 days after cell grafting. The gene profiles were analyzed by clustering and functional enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology database. We found that both MSC and OEC transplanted acutely after injury induce an early up-regulation of genes related to tissue protection and regeneration. In contrast, cells transplanted at 7 days after injury down-regulate genes related to tissue regeneration. The most important change after MSC or OEC transplant was a marked increase in expression of genes associated with foreign body response and adaptive immune response. These data suggest a regulatory effect of MSC and OEC transplantation after SCI regarding tissue repair processes, but a fast rejection response to the grafted cells. Our results provide an initial step to determine the mechanisms of action and to optimize cell therapy for SCI. PMID:24146830

  20. Remyelination of the nonhuman primate spinal cord by transplantation of H-transferase transgenic adult pig olfactory ensheathing cells

    PubMed Central

    Radtke, Christine; Akiyama, Yukinori; Brokaw, Jane; Lankford, Karen L.; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Fodor, William L.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have been shown to mediate remyelination and to stimulate axonal regeneration in a number of in vivo rodent spinal cord studies. However, whether OECs display similar properties in the primate model has not been tested so far. In the present study, we thus transplanted highly-purified OECs isolated from transgenic pigs expressing the α1,2 fucosyltransferase gene (H-transferase or HT) gene into a demyelinated lesion of the African green monkey spinal cord. Four weeks posttransplantation, robust remyelination was found in 62.5% of the lesion sites, whereas there was virtually no remyelination in the nontransplanted controls. This together with the immunohistochemical demonstration of the grafted cells within the lesioned area confirmed that remyelination was indeed achieved by OECs. Additional in vitro assays demonstrated 1) that the applied cell suspension consisted of >98% OECs, 2) that the majority of the cells expressed the transgene, and 3) that expression of the HT gene reduced complement activation more than twofold compared with the nontransgenic control. This is the first demonstration that xenotransplantation of characterized OECs into the primate spinal cord results in remyelination. PMID:14657003

  1. Electrophysiological characterisation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced by olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Yunsheng; Liu, Jingfang; Lu, Ming; Tao, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhenyan; Chen, Xin; Yang, Kui; Li, Chuntao; Liu, Zhixiong

    2013-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood-derived marrow stromal cells (UCB-MSCs) with high proliferation capacity and immunomodulatory properties are considered to be a good candidate for cell-based therapies. But until now, little work has been focused on the differentiation of UCB-MSCs. In this work, UCB-MSCs were demonstrated to be negative for CD34 and CD45 expression but positive for CD90 and CD105 expression. The gate values of UCB-MSCs for CD90 and CD105 were 99.3 and 98.6 %, respectively. Two weeks after treatment, the percentage of neuron-like cells differentiated from UCB-MSCs was increased to 84 ± 12 % in the experimental group [treated with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs)-conditioned medium] and they were neuron-specific enolase positive; few neuron-like cells were found in the control group (without OECs-conditioned medium). Using whole-cell recording, sodium and potassium currents were recorded in UCB-MSCs after differentiation by OECs. Thus, human UCB-MSCs could be differentiated to neural cells by secreted secretion from OECs and exhibited electrophysiological properties similar to mature neurons after 2 weeks post-induction. These results imply that OECs can be used as a new strategy for stem cell differentiation and provide an alternative neurogenesis pathway for generating sufficient numbers of neural cells for cell therapy.

  2. Neuroprotective potentials of neurotrophin rich olfactory ensheathing cell's conditioned media against 6OHDA-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Shukla, A; Mohapatra, T M; Parmar, D; Seth, K

    2014-05-01

    On the basis of recent reports, we propose that impaired neurotrophin signaling (PI3k/Akt), low antioxidant levels, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) conjointly participate in the progressive events responsible for the dopaminergic cell loss in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study we tried to target these deficits collectively through multiple neurotrophic factors (NTFs) support in the form of Olfactory Ensheathing Cell's Conditioned Media (OEC CM) using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line exposed to 6 hydroxydopamine (6OHDA). 6OHDA exposure induced, oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic cell death viz. enhanced ROS generation, diffused cytosolic cytochrome c (cyt c), impaired Bcl-2: Bax levels along with decrease in GSH content. These changes were accompanied by loss in Akt phosphorylation and TH levels in SH-SY5Y cells. OEC CM significantly checked apoptotic cell death by preserving pAkt levels which coincided with enhanced GSH and suppressed oxidative injury. Functional integrity of OEC CM supported cells was evident by maintained tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression. Intercepting Akt signaling by specific inhibitor LY294002 blocked the protective effect. Taken together our findings provide important evidence that the key to protective effect of multiple NTF support via OEC CM is enhanced Akt survival signaling which promotes antioxidant defense leading to suppression of oxidative damage.

  3. Schwann cells but not olfactory ensheathing cells inhibit CNS myelination via the secretion of connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lamond, Rebecca; Barnett, Susan C

    2013-11-20

    Cell transplantation is a promising strategy to promote CNS repair and has been studied for several decades with a focus on glial cells. Promising candidates include Schwann cells (SCs) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs). Both cell types are thought to be neural crest derived and share many properties in common, although OECs appear to be a better candidate for transplantation by evoking less astrogliosis. Using CNS mixed myelinating rat cultures plated on to a monolayer of astrocytes, we demonstrated that SCs, but not OECs, secrete a heat labile factor(s) that inhibits oligodendrocyte myelination. Comparative qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that SCs expressed higher levels of mRNA and protein for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) than OECs. Anti-CTGF reversed the SCM-mediated effects on myelination. Both SCM and CTGF inhibited the differentiation of purified rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Furthermore, pretreatment of astrocyte monolayers with SCM inhibited CNS myelination and led to transcriptional changes in the astrocyte, corresponding to upregulation of bone morphogenic protein 4 mRNA and CTGF mRNA (inhibitors of OPC differentiation) and the downregulation of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA (promoter of OPC differentiation). CTGF pretreatment of astrocytes increased their expression of CTGF, suggesting that this inhibitory factor can be positively regulated in astrocytes. These data provide evidence for the advantages of using OECs, and not mature SCs, for transplant-mediated repair and provide more evidence that they are a distinct and unique glial cell type.

  4. Morphological study of a connexin 43-GFP reporter mouse highlights glial heterogeneity, amacrine cells, and olfactory ensheathing cells.

    PubMed

    Theofilas, Panos; Steinhäuser, Christian; Theis, Martin; Derouiche, Amin

    2017-03-30

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the main astrocytic connexin and forms the basis of the glial syncytium. The morphology of connexin-expressing cells can be best studied in transgenic mouse lines expressing cytoplasmic fluorescent reporters, since immunolabeling the plaques can obscure the shapes of the individual cells. The Cx43kiECFP mouse generated by Degen et al. (FASEBJ 26:4576, 2012) expresses cytosolic ECFP and has previously been used to establish that Cx43 may not be expressed by all astrocytes within a population, and this can vary in a region-dependent way. To establish this mouse line as a tool for future astrocyte and connexin research, we sought to consolidate reporter authenticity, studying cell types and within-region population heterogeneity. Applying anti-GFP, all cell types related to astroglia were positive-namely, protoplasmic astrocytes in the hippocampus, cortex, thalamus, spinal cord, olfactory bulb, cerebellum with Bergmann glia and astrocytes also in the molecular layer, and retinal Müller cells and astrocytes. Labeled cell types further comprise white matter astrocytes, olfactory ensheathing cells, radial glia-like stem cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, ependymal cells, and meningeal cells. We furthermore describe a retinal Cx43-expressing amacrine cell morphologically reminiscent of ON-OFF wide-field amacrine cells, representing the first example of a mammalian CNS neuron-expressing Cx43 protein. In double staining with cell type-specific markers (GFAP, S100ß, glutamine synthetase), Cx43 reporter expression in the hippocampus and cortex was restricted to GFAP(+) astrocytes. Altogether, this mouse line is a highly reliable tool for studies of Cx43-expressing CNS cells and astroglial cell morphology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A novel method using intranasal delivery of EdU demonstrates that accessory olfactory ensheathing cells respond to injury by proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James A

    2014-03-20

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) play an important role in the continuous regeneration of the primary olfactory nervous system throughout life and for regeneration of olfactory neurons after injury. While it is known that several individual OEC subpopulations with distinct properties exist in different anatomical locations, it remains unclear how these different subpopulations respond to a major injury. We have examined the proliferation of OECs from one distinct location, the peripheral accessory olfactory nervous system, following large-scale injury (bulbectomy) in mice. We used crosses of two transgenic reporter mouse lines, S100ß-DsRed and OMP-ZsGreen, to visualise OECs, and main/accessory olfactory neurons, respectively. We surgically removed one olfactory bulb including the accessory olfactory bulb to induce degeneration, and found that accessory OECs in the nerve bundles that terminate in the accessory olfactory bulb responded by increased proliferation with a peak occurring 2 days after the injury. To label proliferating cells we used the thymidine analogue ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) using intranasal delivery instead of intraperitoneal injection. We compared and quantified the number of proliferating cells at different regions at one and four days after EdU labelling by the two different methods and found that intranasal delivery method was as effective as intraperitoneal injection. We demonstrated that accessory OECs actively respond to widespread degeneration of accessory olfactory axons by proliferating. These results have important implications for selecting the source of OECs for neural regeneration therapies and show that intranasal delivery of EdU is an efficient and reliable method for assessing proliferation of olfactory glia.

  6. Global cellular responses to β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) by olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Welch, Jeffrey H; Gehringer, Michelle M; Guillemin, Gilles J; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-06-01

    This study utilised a proteomics approach to identify any differential protein expression in a glial cell line, rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), treated with the cyanotoxin β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA). Five proteins of interest were identified, namely Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDP1), Nck-associated protein 1 (NCKAP1), voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1), 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type-2 (3hCoAdh2), and ubiquilin-4 (UBQLN4). Four of these candidates, nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (Nur77), cyclophilin A (CyPA), RhoGDP1 and VDAC1, have been reported to be involved in cell growth. A microarray identified UBQLN4, palladin and CyPA, which have been implicated to have roles in excitotoxicity. Moreover, the NCKAP1, UBQLN4, CyPA and 3hCoAdh2 genes have been associated with abnormal protein aggregation. Differential expression of genes involved in mitochondrial activity, Nur77, 3hCoAdh2, VDAC1 and UBQLN4, were also identified. Confirmatory reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of transcripts generated from the genes of interest corroborated the differential expression trends identified in the global protein analysis. BMAA induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of OEC and apoptosis after 48 h at concentrations of 250 μM and 500 μM. Collectively, this work advances our understanding of the mechanism of BMAA-mediated glial-toxicity in vitro.

  7. Olfactory Receptor Response to the Cockroach Sexual Attractant.

    PubMed

    Boeckh, J; Priesner, E; Schneider, D; Jacobson, M

    1963-08-23

    The recently isolated sex attractant of the female American cockroach elicits an electical response in the antennae of males, females, and mymphs of this species. These electroantennograms are known to be summated receptor (generator) potentials of many olfactory sensillae stimulated simultaneously. Many other odorous substances also elicit such responses in the cockroach antenna.

  8. Predators Are Attracted to the Olfactory Signals of Prey

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Nelika K.; Price, Catherine J.; Banks, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Predator attraction to prey social signals can force prey to trade-off the social imperatives to communicate against the profound effect of predation on their future fitness. These tradeoffs underlie theories on the design and evolution of conspecific signalling systems and have received much attention in visual and acoustic signalling modes. Yet while most territorial mammals communicate using olfactory signals and olfactory hunting is widespread in predators, evidence for the attraction of predators to prey olfactory signals under field conditions is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings To redress this fundamental issue, we examined the attraction of free-roaming predators to discrete patches of scents collected from groups of two and six adult, male house mice, Mus domesticus, which primarily communicate through olfaction. Olfactorily-hunting predators were rapidly attracted to mouse scent signals, visiting mouse scented locations sooner, and in greater number, than control locations. There were no effects of signal concentration on predator attraction to their prey's signals. Conclusions/Significance This implies that communication will be costly if conspecific receivers and eavesdropping predators are simultaneously attracted to a signal. Significantly, our results also suggest that receivers may be at greater risk of predation when communicating than signallers, as receivers must visit risky patches of scent to perform their half of the communication equation, while signallers need not. PMID:20927352

  9. Predators are attracted to the olfactory signals of prey.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nelika K; Price, Catherine J; Banks, Peter B

    2010-09-30

    Predator attraction to prey social signals can force prey to trade-off the social imperatives to communicate against the profound effect of predation on their future fitness. These tradeoffs underlie theories on the design and evolution of conspecific signalling systems and have received much attention in visual and acoustic signalling modes. Yet while most territorial mammals communicate using olfactory signals and olfactory hunting is widespread in predators, evidence for the attraction of predators to prey olfactory signals under field conditions is lacking. To redress this fundamental issue, we examined the attraction of free-roaming predators to discrete patches of scents collected from groups of two and six adult, male house mice, Mus domesticus, which primarily communicate through olfaction. Olfactorily-hunting predators were rapidly attracted to mouse scent signals, visiting mouse scented locations sooner, and in greater number, than control locations. There were no effects of signal concentration on predator attraction to their prey's signals. This implies that communication will be costly if conspecific receivers and eavesdropping predators are simultaneously attracted to a signal. Significantly, our results also suggest that receivers may be at greater risk of predation when communicating than signallers, as receivers must visit risky patches of scent to perform their half of the communication equation, while signallers need not.

  10. Neuronal Basis of Innate Olfactory Attraction to Ethanol in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Andrea; Ruppert, Manuela; Hendrich, Oliver; Giang, Thomas; Ogueta, Maite; Hampel, Stefanie; Vollbach, Marvin; Büschges, Ansgar; Scholz, Henrike

    2012-01-01

    The decision to move towards a mating partner or a food source is essential for life. The mechanisms underlying these behaviors are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of octopamine – the invertebrate analogue of noradrenaline – in innate olfactory attraction to ethanol. We confirmed that preference is caused via an olfactory stimulus by dissecting the function of the olfactory co-receptor Orco (formally known as OR83b). Orco function is not required for ethanol recognition per se, however it plays a role in context dependent recognition of ethanol. Odor-evoked ethanol preference requires the function of Tbh (Tyramine β hydroxalyse), the rate-limiting enzyme of octopamine synthesis. In addition, neuronal activity in a subset of octopaminergic neurons is necessary for olfactory ethanol preference. Notably, a specific neuronal activation pattern of tyraminergic/octopaminergic neurons elicit preference and is therefore sufficient to induce preference. In contrast, dopamine dependent increase in locomotor activity is not sufficient for olfactory ethanol preference. Consistent with the role of noradrenaline in mammalian drug induced rewards, we provide evidence that in adult Drosophila the octopaminergic neurotransmitter functions as a reinforcer and that the molecular dissection of the innate attraction to ethanol uncovers the basic properties of a response selection system. PMID:23284851

  11. Central nervous system lesions that can and those that cannot be repaired with the help of olfactory bulb ensheathing cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    2003-11-01

    Growth-promoting macroglia (aldynoglia) with growth properties and immunological markers similar to Schwann cells, are found in loci of the mammalian CNS where axon regeneration occurs throughout life, like the olfactory sytem, hypothalamus-hypophysis and the pineal gland. Contrary to Schwann cells, aldynoglia mingle freely with astrocytes and can migrate in brain and spinal cord. Transplantation of cultured and immunopurified olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in the spinal cord after multiple central rhizotomy, promoted sensory and central axon growth and partial functional restoration, judging by anatomical, electrophysiological and behavioural criteria. OEC transplants suppressed astrocyte reactivity, thus generally favouring axon growth after a lesion. However, the functional repair promoted by OEC transplants was partial in the best cases, depending on lesion type and location. Cyst formation after photochemical cord lesion was partially prevented but neither the corticospinal tract, interrupted by a mild contusion, nor the sectioned medial longitudinal fascicle, did regrow after OEC transplantation in the injured area.

  12. A New Approach in Gene Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells as a Novel Carrier for Suicide Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mansoureh; Fallah, Ali; Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Arjmand, Babak; Yazdani, Nasrin; Verdi, Javad; Ghodsi, Seyed Mohammad; Miri, Seyed Mojtaba; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza

    2016-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) of human olfactory mucosa are a type of glial-like cells that possess good migratory and tropism properties. We believe that neuronal-derived vehicle may have better capability to receive to the site of injury. In addition to, obtaining of such vehicle from the patient reduces risk of unwanted complications. So, in this study, we investigate whether human olfactory ensheathing cells can be used as a cell source for the first time in gene delivery to assay the tumoricidal effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk) on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We obtained OECs from superior turbinate of human nasal cavity mucosa, and cell phenotype was confirmed by the expression of cell-specific antigens including low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75 neurotrophin receptor), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2), and S100 calcium binding protein B (S100-beta) using immunocytochemistry. Then, these cells were transduced by lentiviral vector for transient and stable expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (OEC-tk). The migratory capacity of OEC-tk, their potency to convert prodrug ganciclovir to toxic form, and cytotoxic effect on astrocyte cells were assayed in vitro. The OECs showed fibroblast-like morphology and expressed specific antigens such as p75 neurotrophin receptor, S100-beta, and MAP2. Our results indicated that OECs-tk were able to migrate toward primary cultured human glioblastoma multiforme and affected survival rate of tumor cells according to exposure time and concentration of ganciclovir. Also, OECs-HSV-tk was capable of inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. Our findings suggest that human OECs could employ as a possible tool to transfer anticancer agent in gene therapy of brain tumor.

  13. Regeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic axons after transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells and fibroblasts prevents fibrotic scar formation at the lesion site.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xichuan; Nagata, Isao; Li, Hong-Peng; Kimura-Kuroda, Junko; Sango, Kazunori; Kawamura, Koki; Raisman, Geoffrey; Kawano, Hitoshi

    2008-11-01

    The fibrotic scar formed after central nervous system injury has been considered an obstacle to axonal regeneration. The present study was designed to examine whether cell transplantation into a damaged central nervous system can reduce fibrotic scar formation and promote axonal regeneration. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic axons were unilaterally transected in rats and cultures of olfactory-ensheathing cells (OECs), and olfactory nerve fibroblasts were transplanted into the lesion site. In the absence of transplants, few tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive axons extended across the lesion 2 weeks after the transection. Reactive astrocytes increased around the lesion, and a fibrotic scar containing type IV collagen deposits developed in the lesion center. The immunoreactivity of chondroitin sulfate side chains and core protein of NG2 proteoglycan increased in and around the lesion. One and 2 weeks after transection and simultaneous transplantation, dopaminergic axons regenerated across the transplanted tissues, which consisted of p75-immunoreactive OECs and fibronectin-immunoreactive fibroblasts. Reactive astrocytes and chondroitin sulfate immunoreactivity increased around the transplants, whereas the deposition of type IV collagen and fibrotic scar formation were completely prevented at the lesion site. Transplantation of meningeal fibroblasts similarly prevented the formation of the fibrotic scar, although its effect on regeneration was less potent than transplantation of OECs and olfactory nerve fibroblasts. The present results suggest that elimination of the inhibitory fibrotic scar is important for neural regeneration.

  14. The Glia Response after Peripheral Nerve Injury: A Comparison between Schwann Cells and Olfactory Ensheathing Cells and Their Uses for Neural Regenerative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthew J.; St John, James; Clarke, Mary; Wright, Alison; Ekberg, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) exhibits a much larger capacity for regeneration than the central nervous system (CNS). One reason for this difference is the difference in glial cell types between the two systems. PNS glia respond rapidly to nerve injury by clearing debris from the injury site, supplying essential growth factors and providing structural support; all of which enhances neuronal regeneration. Thus, transplantation of glial cells from the PNS is a very promising therapy for injuries to both the PNS and the CNS. There are two key types of PNS glia: olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which populate the olfactory nerve, and Schwann cells (SCs), which are present in the rest of the PNS. These two glial types share many similar morphological and functional characteristics but also exhibit key differences. The olfactory nerve is constantly turning over throughout life, which means OECs are continuously stimulating neural regeneration, whilst SCs only promote regeneration after direct injury to the PNS. This review presents a comparison between these two PNS systems in respect to normal physiology, developmental anatomy, glial functions and their responses to injury. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms and differences between the two systems is crucial for the development of future therapies using transplantation of peripheral glia to treat neural injuries and/or disease. PMID:28146061

  15. Species-specific control of cellular proliferation and the impact of large animal models for the use of olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in spinal cord repair.

    PubMed

    Wewetzer, Konstantin; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    Autologous transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells (SCs) is considered a promising option to promote axonal regrowth and remyelination after spinal cord injury in humans. However, if the experimental data from the rodent model can be directly extrapolated to humans, as widely believed, remains to be established. While limitations of the rodent system have recently been discussed with regard to the distinct organization of the motor systems, the question whether OECs and SCs may display species-specific properties has not been fully addressed. Prompted by recent studies on canine and porcine glia, we performed a detailed analysis of the in vitro and in vivo properties of OECs and SCs and show that rodent but not human, monkey, porcine, and canine glia require mitogens for in vitro expansion, display a complex response to elevated intracellular cAMP, and undergo spontaneous immortalization upon prolonged mitogen stimulation. These data indicate fundamental inter-species differences of the control of cellular proliferation. Whether OECs and SCs from large animals and humans share growth-promoting in vivo properties with their rodent counterpart is not yet clear. Autologous implantation studies in humans did not reveal adverse effects of cell transplantation so far. However, in vivo studies of large animal or human glia and rodent recipients mainly focused on the remyelinating potential of the transplanted cells. Thus, further experimental in vivo studies in large animals are essential to fully define the axonal growth-promoting potential of OECs and SCs. Based on the homology of the in vitro growth control between porcine, canine and human glia, it is concluded that these species may serve as valuable translational models for scaling up human procedures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Myelin-associated proteins block the migration of olfactory ensheathing cells: an in vitro study using single-cell tracking and traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, Sara; Reginensi, Diego; Garcia, Simón; Carulla, Patricia; Moreno-Flores, María Teresa; Wandosell, Francisco; Trepat, Xavier; Bribian, Ana; del Río, José A

    2012-05-01

    Newly generated olfactory receptor axons grow from the peripheral to the central nervous system aided by olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs). Thus, OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising therapy for spinal cord injuries and for other neural diseases. However, these cells do not present a uniform population, but instead a functionally heterogeneous population that exhibits a variety of responses including adhesion, repulsion, and crossover during cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Some studies report that the migratory properties of OECs are compromised by inhibitory molecules and potentiated by chemical gradients. Here, we demonstrated that rodent OECs express all the components of the Nogo receptor complex and that their migration is blocked by myelin. Next, we used cell tracking and traction force microscopy to analyze OEC migration and its mechanical properties over myelin. Our data relate the decrease of traction force of OEC with lower migratory capacity over myelin, which correlates with changes in the F-actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion distribution. Lastly, OEC traction force and migratory capacity is enhanced after cell incubation with the Nogo receptor inhibitor NEP1-40.

  17. Effects of Neural Stem Cell and Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Co-transplants on Tissue Remodelling After Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Augestad, Ingrid Lovise; Nyman, Axel Karl Gottfrid; Costa, Alex Ignatius; Barnett, Susan Carol; Sandvig, Axel; Håberg, Asta Kristine; Sandvig, Ioanna

    2017-01-24

    Effective transplant-mediated repair of ischemic brain lesions entails extensive tissue remodeling, especially in the ischemic core. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are promising reparative candidates for stroke induced lesions, however, their survival and integration with the host-tissue post-transplantation is poor. In this study, we address this challenge by testing whether co-grafting of NSCs with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), a special type of glia with proven neuroprotective, immunomodulatory, and angiogenic effects, can promote graft survival and host tissue remodelling. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced in adult rats by a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) followed by reperfusion. Ischemic lesions were verified by neurological testing and magnetic resonance imaging. Transplantation into the globus pallidus of NSCs alone or in combination with OECs was performed at two weeks post-MCAo, followed by histological analyses at three weeks post-transplantation. We found evidence of extensive vascular remodelling in the ischemic core as well as evidence of NSC motility away from the graft and into the infarct border in severely lesioned animals co-grafted with OECs. These findings support a possible role of OECs as part of an in situ tissue engineering paradigm for transplant mediated repair of ischemic brain lesions.

  18. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Samantha J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Crossman, David K.; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; St. John, James

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs. PMID:27091931

  19. Sciatic nerve repair with tissue engineered nerve: Olfactory ensheathing cells seeded poly(lactic-co-glygolic acid) conduit in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C W; Ng, M H; Ohnmar, H; Lokanathan, Y; Nur-Hidayah, H; Roohi, S A; Ruszymah, BHI; Nor-Hazla, M H; Shalimar, A; Naicker, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Synthetic nerve conduits have been sought for repair of nerve defects as the autologous nerve grafts causes donor site morbidity and possess other drawbacks. Many strategies have been investigated to improve nerve regeneration through synthetic nerve guided conduits. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) that share both Schwann cell and astrocytic characteristics have been shown to promote axonal regeneration after transplantation. The present study was driven by the hypothesis that tissue-engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) seeded with OECs would improve peripheral nerve regeneration in a long sciatic nerve defect. Materials and Methods: Sciatic nerve gap of 15 mm was created in six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and implanted with PLGA seeded with OECs. The nerve regeneration was assessed electrophysiologically at 2, 4 and 6 weeks following implantation. Histopathological examination, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination and immunohistochemical analysis were performed at the end of the study. Results: Nerve conduction studies revealed a significant improvement of nerve conduction velocities whereby the mean nerve conduction velocity increases from 4.2 ΁ 0.4 m/s at week 2 to 27.3 ΁ 5.7 m/s at week 6 post-implantation (P < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed presence of spindle-shaped cells. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated the expression of S100 protein in both cell nucleus and the cytoplasm in these cells, hence confirming their Schwann-cell-like property. Under SEM, these cells were found to be actively secreting extracellular matrix. Conclusion: Tissue-engineered PLGA conduit seeded with OECs provided a permissive environment to facilitate nerve regeneration in a small animal model. PMID:24379458

  20. Cell type- and isotype-specific expression and regulation of β-tubulins in primary olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Hansmann, Florian; Kreutzer, Robert; Kreutzer, Mihaela; Brandes, Gudrun; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2013-05-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells (SCs) are closely-related cell types with regeneration-promoting properties. Comparative gene expression analysis is particularly relevant since it may explain cell type-specific effects and guide the use of each cell type into special clinical applications. In the present study, we focused on β-tubulin isotype expression in primary adult canine glia as a translational large animal model. β-tubulins so far have been studied mainly in non-neuronal tumors and implied in tumorigenic growth. We show here that primary OECs and SCs expressed βII-V isotype mRNA. Interestingly, βIII-tubulin mRNA and protein expression was high in OECs and low in SCs, while fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) induced its down-regulation in both cell types to the same extent. This was in contrast to βV-tubulin mRNA which was similarly expressed in both cell types and unaltered by FGF-2. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that OEC cultures contained a higher percentage of βIII-tubulin-positive cells compared to SC cultures. Addition of FGF-2 reduced the number of βIII-tubulin-positive cells in both cultures and significantly increased the percentage of cells with a multipolar morphology. Taken together, we demonstrate cell type-specific expression (βIII) and isotype-specific regulation (βIII, βV) of β-tubulin isotypes in OECs and SCs. While differential expression of βIII-tubulin in primary glial cell types with identical proliferative behaviour argues for novel functions unrelated to tumorigenic growth, strong βIII-tubulin expression in OECs may help to explain the specific properties of this glial cell type.

  1. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation in Experimental Spinal Cord Injury: Effect size and Reporting Bias of 62 Experimental Treatments: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Emily S.; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation is a candidate cellular treatment approach for human spinal cord injury (SCI) due to their unique regenerative potential and autologous origin. The objective of this study was, through a meta-epidemiologic approach, (i) to assess the efficacy of OEC transplantation on locomotor recovery after traumatic experimental SCI and (ii) to estimate the likelihood of reporting bias and/or missing data. A study protocol was finalized before data collection. Embedded into a systematic review and meta-analysis, we conducted a literature research of databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science from 1949/01 to 2014/10 with no language restrictions, screened by two independent investigators. Studies were included if they assessed neurobehavioral improvement after traumatic experimental SCI, administrated no combined interventions, and reported the number of animals in the treatment and control group. Individual effect sizes were pooled using a random effects model. Details regarding the study design were extracted and impact of these on locomotor outcome was assessed by meta-regression. Missing data (reporting bias) was determined by Egger regression and Funnel-plotting. The primary study outcome assessed was improvement in locomotor function at the final time point of measurement. We included 49 studies (62 experiments, 1,164 animals) in the final analysis. The overall improvement in locomotor function after OEC transplantation, measured using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) score, was 20.3% (95% CI 17.8–29.5). One missing study was imputed by trim and fill analysis, suggesting only slight publication bias and reducing the overall effect to a 19.2% improvement of locomotor activity. Dose-response ratio supports neurobiological plausibility. Studies were assessed using a 9-point item quality score, resulting in a median score of 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 3–5). In conclusion, OEC transplantation exerts

  2. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation in Experimental Spinal Cord Injury: Effect size and Reporting Bias of 62 Experimental Treatments: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Watzlawick, Ralf; Rind, Julian; Sena, Emily S; Brommer, Benedikt; Zhang, Tian; Kopp, Marcel A; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation is a candidate cellular treatment approach for human spinal cord injury (SCI) due to their unique regenerative potential and autologous origin. The objective of this study was, through a meta-epidemiologic approach, (i) to assess the efficacy of OEC transplantation on locomotor recovery after traumatic experimental SCI and (ii) to estimate the likelihood of reporting bias and/or missing data. A study protocol was finalized before data collection. Embedded into a systematic review and meta-analysis, we conducted a literature research of databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science from 1949/01 to 2014/10 with no language restrictions, screened by two independent investigators. Studies were included if they assessed neurobehavioral improvement after traumatic experimental SCI, administrated no combined interventions, and reported the number of animals in the treatment and control group. Individual effect sizes were pooled using a random effects model. Details regarding the study design were extracted and impact of these on locomotor outcome was assessed by meta-regression. Missing data (reporting bias) was determined by Egger regression and Funnel-plotting. The primary study outcome assessed was improvement in locomotor function at the final time point of measurement. We included 49 studies (62 experiments, 1,164 animals) in the final analysis. The overall improvement in locomotor function after OEC transplantation, measured using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) score, was 20.3% (95% CI 17.8-29.5). One missing study was imputed by trim and fill analysis, suggesting only slight publication bias and reducing the overall effect to a 19.2% improvement of locomotor activity. Dose-response ratio supports neurobiological plausibility. Studies were assessed using a 9-point item quality score, resulting in a median score of 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 3-5). In conclusion, OEC transplantation exerts

  3. Transplantation of Schwann cells and olfactory ensheathing glia after spinal cord injury: does pretreatment with methylprednisolone and interleukin-10 enhance recovery?

    PubMed

    Pearse, Damien Daniel; Marcillo, Alexander Eduardo; Oudega, Martin; Lynch, Michael Paul; Wood, Patrick McGhee; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2004-09-01

    Methylprednisolone (MP) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) are tissue protective acutely after spinal cord injury (SCI); their combination offers additive protection (Takami et al., 2002a). Our study examined if acute administration of MP (30 mg/kg i.v. at 5 min, and 2 and 4 h after injury) and IL-10 (30 mg/kg i.p. at 30 min after injury) increases the efficacy of Schwann cell (SC) or SC plus olfactory ensheathing glia (SC/OEG) grafts transplanted into rat thoracic cord 1 week after contusive injury. Efficacy was determined by histology, anterograde and retrograde tracing, immunohistochemistry for gliosis and specific nerve fibers, and several behavioral tests. Administration of MP/IL-10 or SC or SC/OEG transplantation significantly increased the total volume of a 9-mm segment of cord encompassing the injury site at 12 weeks. The combination of either SC or SC/OEG transplantation with MP/IL-10 most significantly reduced cavitation. The individual treatments all significantly increased the volume of normal-appearing tissue compared to injury-only controls; however, significant decreases in the volume of normal-appearing tissue were seen when MP/IL-10 and cell grafts were combined compared to MP/IL-10 alone. SC/OEG grafts were effective in promoting serotonergic fiber growth into the graft and led to more reticulospinal fibers caudal to the graft; combination with MP/IL-10 did not further increase fiber number. Only the combination of MP/IL-10 with SC/OEG transplants significantly improved gross locomotor performance (BBB scores) over injury-only controls. MP/IL-10 given prior to SC-only transplants, however, worsened behavioral outcome. Because beneficial effects of MP/IL-10 were not always additive when combined with cell transplantation, we need to understand (1) how tissue protective agents may transform the milieu of the injured spinal cord to the benefit or detriment of later transplanted cells and (2) whether neuroprotectants need to be re-administered at the time of

  4. Xenografts of expanded primate olfactory ensheathing glia support transient behavioral recovery that is independent of serotonergic or corticospinal axonal regeneration in nude rats following spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Guest, J D; Herrera, L; Margitich, I; Oliveria, M; Marcillo, A; Casas, C E

    2008-08-01

    Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEG) may improve the outcome from spinal cord injury. Proof-of-principle studies in primates are desirable and the feasibility and efficacy of using in vitro expanded OEG should be tested. An intermediate step between the validation of rodent studies and human clinical trials is to study expanded primate OEG (POEG) xenografts in immunotolerant rodents. In this study the time course to generate purified POEG was evaluated as well as their survival, effect on damaged axons of the corticospinal and serotonergic systems, tissue sparing, and chronic locomotor recovery following transplantation. Fifty-seven nude rats underwent T9/10 spinal cord transection. Thirty-eight rats received POEG, 19 controls were injected with cell medium, and 10 received lentivirally-GFP-transfected POEG. Histological evaluation was conducted at 6 weeks, 8 weeks, 14 weeks and 23-24 weeks. Of these 57 rats, 18 were studied with 5-HT immunostaining, 16 with BDA anterograde CST labeling, and six were used for transmission electron microscopy. In grafted animals, behavioral recovery, sprouting and limited regeneration of 5-HT fibers, and increased numbers of proximal collateral processes but not regeneration of CST fibers was observed. Grafted animals had less cavitation in the spinal cord stumps than controls. Behavioral recovery peaked at three months and then declined. Five POEG-transplanted animals that had shown behavioral recovery underwent retransection and behavioral scores did not change significantly, suggesting that long tract axonal regeneration did not account for the locomotor improvement. At the ultrastructural level presumptive POEG were found to have direct contacts with astrocytes forming the glia limitans, distinct from those formed by Schwann cells. At 6 weeks GFP expression was detected in cells within the lesion site and within nerve roots but did not match the pattern of Hoechst nuclear labeling. At 3.5 months only GFP

  5. Select Drosophila glomeruli mediate innate olfactory attraction and aversion.

    PubMed

    Semmelhack, Julia L; Wang, Jing W

    2009-05-14

    Fruitflies show robust attraction to food odours, which usually excite several glomeruli. To understand how the representation of such odours leads to behaviour, we used genetic tools to dissect the contribution of each activated glomerulus. Apple cider vinegar triggers robust innate attraction at a relatively low concentration, which activates six glomeruli. By silencing individual glomeruli, here we show that the absence of activity in two glomeruli, DM1 and VA2, markedly reduces attraction. Conversely, when each of these two glomeruli was selectively activated, flies showed as robust an attraction to vinegar as wild-type flies. Notably, a higher concentration of vinegar excites an additional glomerulus and is less attractive to flies. We show that activation of the extra glomerulus is necessary and sufficient to mediate the behavioural switch. Together, these results indicate that individual glomeruli, rather than the entire pattern of active glomeruli, mediate innate behavioural output.

  6. Select Drosophila glomeruli mediate innate olfactory attraction and aversion

    PubMed Central

    Semmelhack, Julia L.; Wang, Jing W.

    2009-01-01

    Fruit flies exhibit robust attraction to food odors, which usually excite multiple glomeruli. To understand how the representation of such odors leads to behavior, we used genetic tools to dissect the contribution of each activated glomerulus. Apple cider vinegar triggers robust innate attraction at a relatively low concentration, which activates six glomeruli. By silencing individual glomeruli, we found that the absence of activity in two glomeruli, DM1 and VA2, markedly reduced attraction. Conversely, when each of these two glomeruli was selectively activated, flies exhibited as robust an attraction to vinegar as wild type flies. Notably, a higher concentration of vinegar excites an additional glomerulus and is less attractive to flies. Here we show that the activation of the additional glomerulus is necessary and sufficient to mediate the behavioral switch. Together, these results indicate that individual glomeruli, rather than the entire pattern of active glomeruli, mediate innate behavioral output. PMID:19396157

  7. Age-specific olfactory attraction between Western honey bee drones (Apis mellifera) and its chemical basis.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Florian; Savarit, Fabrice; Lafon, Grégory; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    During the mating season, drones (males) of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) form congregations numbering thousands high in the air. Virgin queens arrive at these congregations after they have formed and mate on the fly with 15-20 drones. To explain the formation of drone congregations, a drone-produced aggregation pheromone has been proposed many years ago but due to the low accessibility of natural mating sites in bees, its study has progressed slowly. Recently, we used a walking simulator in controlled laboratory conditions to show that drones are indeed attracted by groups of other drones. Since these previous experiments were carried out with drones captured when flying out of the hive, it is currently unclear if this olfactory attraction behaviour is related to the drones' sexual maturity (usually reached between 9 and 12 days) and may thus be indicative of a possible role in congregation formation, or if it is observed at any age and may represent in-hive aggregation. We thus assessed here the dependency of drone olfactory attraction on their age. First, we performed behavioural experiments in the walking simulator to measure olfactory preferences of drones in three age groups from 2-3 to 12-15 days. Then, we performed chemical analyses in the same age groups to evaluate whether chemical substances produced by the drones may explain age differences in olfactory attraction. We show that honey bee drones are attracted by conspecifics of the same age when they are sexually mature (12-15 days old) but not when they are younger (2-3 and 7-8 days old). In parallel, our data show that drones' chemical profile changes with age, including its most volatile fraction. These results are discussed in the context of drone mutual attraction both within the hive and at drone congregations.

  8. Response of Tabanidae (Diptera) to natural and synthetic olfactory attractants.

    PubMed

    Krcmar, Stjepan; Hribar, Lawrence J; Kopi, Marija

    2005-06-01

    The attraction of female tabanids to Malaise traps and canopy traps baited with aged horse urine, 1-octen-3-ol, or a combination of aged horse urine and acetone was studied in the Kopacki rit Nature Park in Eastern Croatia. Malaise traps captured very few tabanids relative to canopy traps. The number of females of Tabanus tergestinus and Haematopotapluvialis collected from 1-octen-3-ol baited canopy traps differed significantly from traps baited with aged horse urine. However, the number of females of Tabanus bromius, Atylotus loewianus, and Tabanus maculicornis collected from canopy traps baited with 1-octen-3-ol and aged horse urine did not differ significantly. Canopy traps baited with aged horse urine collected significantly more Tabanus sudeticus than did traps baited with 1-octen-3-ol. Canopy traps baited with 1-octen-3-ol collected eight times more tabanids than unbaited traps, whereas canopy traps baited with aged horse urine and a combination of aged horse urine and acetone collected seven and four times as many tabanids, respectively, as did unbaited traps. It appears that 1-octen-3-oland aged horse urine are very effective attractants for tabanids in this part of Europe. Tabanus bromius was the most abundant species with 53.14% in the sample collected by canopy traps.

  9. Calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Li, L; Yang, P; Ma, Z

    2017-02-01

    The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium. Transcriptome comparison between third- and fourth-stadium nymphs showed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways are significantly enriched. Amongst the genes present in GPCR pathways, the expression level of calmodulin in locust brains significantly increased from the third- to the fourth-stadium nymphs. Amongst the four octopamine receptors (OARs) belonging to the GPCR family, only OAR α1 showed similar expression patterns to those of calmodulin, and knockdown of OAR α1 reduced the expression level of calmodulin. RNA interference of calmodulin decreased locomotion and induced the loss of olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Moreover, the activation of OAR α1 in calmodulin-knockdown locusts did not induce olfactory attraction of the nymphs to gregarious volatiles. Thus, calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 (OA-OAR α1) signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Overall, this study provides novel insights into the mechanism of OA-OAR α1 signalling involved in olfactory attraction of gregarious locusts.

  10. Dedicated olfactory neurons mediating attraction behavior to ammonia and amines in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Min, Soohong; Ai, Minrong; Shin, Seul A; Suh, Greg S B

    2013-04-02

    Animals across various phyla exhibit odor-evoked innate attraction behavior that is developmentally programmed. The mechanism underlying such behavior remains unclear because the odorants that elicit robust attraction responses and the neuronal circuits that mediate this behavior have not been identified. Here, we describe a functionally segregated population of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and projection neurons (PNs) in Drosophila melanogaster that are highly specific to ammonia and amines, which act as potent attractants. The OSNs express IR92a, a member of the chemosensory ionotropic receptor (IR) family and project to a pair of glomeruli in the antennal lobe, termed VM1. In vivo calcium-imaging experiments showed that the OSNs and PNs innervating VM1 were activated by ammonia and amines but not by nonamine odorants. Flies in which the IR92a(+) neurons or IR92a gene was inactivated had impaired amine-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Tracing neuronal pathways to higher brain centers showed that VM1-PN axonal projections within the lateral horn are topographically segregated from those of V-PN and DC4-PN, which mediate innate avoidance behavior to carbon dioxide and acidity, respectively, suggesting that these sensory stimuli of opposing valence are represented in spatially distinct neuroanatomic loci within the lateral horn. These experiments identified the neurons and their cognate receptor for amine detection, and mapped amine attractive olfactory inputs to higher brain centers. This labeled-line mode of amine coding appears to be hardwired to attraction behavior.

  11. Attraction of female grapevine moth to common and specific olfactory cues from 2 host plants.

    PubMed

    Tasin, Marco; Bäckman, Anna-Carin; Anfora, Gianfranco; Carlin, Silvia; Ioriatti, Claudio; Witzgall, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In herbivorous insects with more than 1 host plant, attraction to host odor could conceptually be mediated by common compounds, by specific compounds released by each plant or by combinations of common and specific compounds. We have compared the attraction of female grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, with specific and common (shared) odors from 2 different plants: a wild host (Daphne gnidium) and a recently colonized host (Vitis vinifera). Odor blends eliciting female attraction to V. vinifera have previously been identified. In this study, olfactory cues from D. gnidium were identified by electroantennographic detection and chemical analysis. The attraction of mated females to synthetic odor blends was then tested in a wind tunnel bioassay. Female attraction was elicited by a blend of compounds released by both from D. gnidium and V. vinifera and by 2 blends with the compounds released specifically from each host. However, more complete odor blends of the 2 plants elicited stronger attraction. The common compounds in combination with the specific compounds of D. gnidium were the most attractive blend. This blend was tested with the common compounds presented both in the ratio emitted by D. gnidium and by V. vinifera, but there was no difference in female attraction. Our findings suggest that specific as well as common plant odor cues play a role in L. botrana host recognition and that there is plasticity in attraction to partial blends. The results are discussed in relation to mechanisms behind host odor recognition and the evolution of insect-plant associations.

  12. Olfactory channels associated with the Drosophila maxillary palp mediate short- and long-range attraction

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, Hany KM; Ebrahim, Shimaa AM; Khallaf, Mohammed A; Koenig, Christopher; Farhan, Abu; Stieber, Regina; Weißflog, Jerrit; Svatoš, Aleš; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2016-01-01

    The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster is equipped with two peripheral olfactory organs, antenna and maxillary palp. The antenna is involved in finding food, oviposition sites and mates. However, the functional significance of the maxillary palp remained unknown. Here, we screened the olfactory sensory neurons of the maxillary palp (MP-OSNs) using a large number of natural odor extracts to identify novel ligands for each MP-OSN type. We found that each type is the sole or the primary detector for a specific compound, and detects these compounds with high sensitivity. We next dissected the contribution of MP-OSNs to behaviors evoked by their key ligands and found that MP-OSNs mediate short- and long-range attraction. Furthermore, the organization, detection and olfactory receptor (Or) genes of MP-OSNs are conserved in the agricultural pest D. suzukii. The novel short and long-range attractants could potentially be used in integrated pest management (IPM) programs of this pest species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.001 PMID:27213519

  13. Olfactory Attraction of the Hornet Vespa velutina to Honeybee Colony Odors and Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Antoine; Monceau, Karine; Bonnard, Olivier; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen), which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets’ hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species. PMID:25549358

  14. Olfactory attraction of the hornet Vespa velutina to honeybee colony odors and pheromones.

    PubMed

    Couto, Antoine; Monceau, Karine; Bonnard, Olivier; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, the number of biological invasions has continuously increased worldwide. Due to their environmental and economical consequences, invasive species are now a major concern. Social wasps are particularly efficient invaders because of their distinctive biology and behavior. Among them, the yellow-legged hornet, Vespa velutina, is a keen hunter of domestic honeybees. Its recent introduction to Europe may induce important beekeeping, pollination, and biodiversity problems. Hornets use olfactory cues for the long-range detection of food sources, in this case the location of honeybee colonies, but the exact nature of these cues remains unknown. Here, we studied the orientation behavior of V. velutina workers towards a range of hive products and protein sources, as well as towards prominent chemical substances emitted by these food sources. In a multiple choice test performed under controlled laboratory conditions, we found that hornets are strongly attracted to the odor of some hive products, especially pollen and honey. When testing specific compounds, the honeybee aggregation pheromone, geraniol, proved highly attractive. Pheromones produced by honeybee larvae or by the queen were also of interest to hornet workers, albeit to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that V. velutina workers are selectively attracted towards olfactory cues from hives (stored food, brood, and queen), which may signal a high prey density. This study opens new perspectives for understanding hornets' hunting behavior and paves the way for developing efficient trapping strategies against this invasive species.

  15. Li(+) activated nanohydroxyapatite doped with Eu(3+) ions enhances proliferative activity and viability of human stem progenitor cells of adipose tissue and olfactory ensheathing cells. Further perspective of nHAP:Li(+), Eu(3+) application in theranostics.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Sobierajska, Paulina; Smieszek, Agnieszka; Maredziak, Monika; Wiglusz, Katarzyna; Wiglusz, Rafal J

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) often require simultaneous regeneration of nerve tissue and bone. Hydroxyapatites are described as bioresorbable materials with proper biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, therefore its application for spinal surgery is considered. In this paper, we present repeatable method for developing nanocrystalline calcium hydroxyapatites structurally modified with Li(+) ions (nHAP:Li(+)). Obtained biomaterials were profoundly characterized in terms of their physicochemical properties. Moreover, we have shown that nHAP:Li(+) doped with europium (Eu(3+)) may serve as a theranostic agent, what additionally extend its potential usage for SCI treatment. The biocompatibility of nHAP:Li(+) was determined using human olfactory ensheathing cells (hOECs) and adipose tissue-derived multipotent stromal cells (hASCs). Both population of cells are eagerly applied for cell-based therapies in SCI, mainly due to their paracrine activity. The extensive in vitro studies showed that nHAP:Li(+) promotes the cells proliferation, viability and cell-cell interactions. Obtained results provides encouraging approach that may have potential application in regenerative medicine and that could fulfil the promise of personalized medicine - important in SCI treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Attractiveness of fruit and flower odorants detected by olfactory receptor neurons in the fruit chafer Pachnoda marginata.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mattias C; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Bice, Shannon B; Hansson, Bill S

    2003-05-01

    We studied the attraction of the African fruit chafer Pachnoda marginata Drury (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) to banana and 34 synthetic plant compounds previously shown to be detected by P. marginata olfactory receptor neurons. The behavioral studies were carried out in a two-choice olfactometer, where the attraction of beetles to lures and controls was monitored in 30-min intervals during whole days. Monitoring of the attraction over time gave additional information when comparing relative attractiveness of different compounds. Seventeen of the test compounds, primarily phenylic compounds, fruit esters, isovaleric acid, acetoin, and some floral or fruit terpenes, were attractive to P. marginata. Compounds showing no attractiveness included green leaf volatiles, lactones. and several alcohols, but also phenylic compounds and esters. One case of blend synergism was demonstrated, as well as some examples of sexual dimorphism in attraction. The significance of certain compounds and receptor neurons for olfactory-guided behavior of phytophagous scarabs is discussed.

  17. [Differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells into neural cells induced by serum-free conditioned medium of olfactory ensheathing cells and cell viability detection of differentiated cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Duan, Da; Zhao, Zhenyu; Teng, Xiaohua; Liu, Bo; Ge, Lite; Lu, Ming

    2014-05-01

    To study the possibility of the C17.2 neural stem cells (NSCs) differentiating into neural cells induced by serum-free condition medium of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and to detect the cell viability of the differentiated cells. OECs were isloated and cultured from the olfactory bulbs of 3-day-old postnatal mouse to prepare serum-free condition medium of OECs. After C17.2 NSCs were cultured with H-DMEM/F12 medium containing 15% FBS and the cell fusion reached 80%, the 3rd passage cells were induced by serum-free condition medium of OECs in the experimental group, by H-DMEM/F12 in the control group, and non-induced C17.2 NSCs served as the blank control group. The growth condition of cells was observed with inverted microscope. After 5 days, the immunofluorescence staining [microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) and beta-tubulin-III] and Western blot (Nestin, beta-tubulin-III, and MAP-2) were carried out to identify the neural cells derived from NSCs. The cell viabilities were measured by MTT assay and the quantity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the medium. In the experimental group, the C17.2 NSCs bodies began to contract at 24 hours after induction, and the differentiated cells increased obviously with long synapse at 3 days after induction; in the control group, the cell morphology showed no obvious change at 24 hours, cell body shrinkage, condensation of nuclear chromatin, and lysis were observed at 3 days. The immunofluorescence staining showed that beta3-tubulin-III and MAP-2 of C17.2 NSCs were positive at 5 days after induction, and Western blot suggested that the expression of Nestin protein declined significantly and the expressions of beta-tubulin-III and MAP-2 protein were increased in the experimental group, showing significant differences when compared with those in the control group and blank control group (P < 0.05). The LDH release and the cell viability were 130.60% +/- 6.86% and 62.20% +/- 3.82% in the experimental group, and

  18. Exposure to Guava Affects Citrus Olfactory Cues and Attractiveness to Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    PubMed

    Barman, Jagadish Chandra; Campbell, Stuart A; Zeng, Xinnian

    2016-06-01

    Intercropping can reduce agricultural pest incidence, and represents an important sustainable alternative to conventional pest control methods. Understanding the ecological mechanisms for intercropping could help optimize its use, particularly in tropical systems which present a large number of intercropping possibilities. Citrus is threatened worldwide by greening disease (huanglongbing, HLB) vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Control of HLB and citrus psyllid can be partially achieved through intercropping with guava, Psidium guajava L., but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that guava olfactory cues affect psyllid behavior by altering the attractiveness of citrus through plant-plant interactions. In choice and no-choice cage experiments, psyllid settlement was reduced on citrus shoots that had been exposed to guava shoot odors for at least 2 h. In Y-tube olfactometer experiments, psyllids oriented to odors of unexposed, compared with guava-exposed, citrus shoots. These behavioral results indicate that a mechanism for the success of guava intercropping for sustainable, ecological disease management may be the indirect effect of guava on citrus attractiveness.

  19. Caspase Inhibition in Select Olfactory Neurons Restores Innate Attraction Behavior in Aged Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Ken-ichi; Masuyama, Kaoru; Tonoki, Ayako; Davis, Ronald L.; Wang, Jing W.; Miura, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Sensory and cognitive performance decline with age. Neural dysfunction caused by nerve death in senile dementia and neurodegenerative disease has been intensively studied; however, functional changes in neural circuits during the normal aging process are not well understood. Caspases are key regulators of cell death, a hallmark of age-related neurodegeneration. Using a genetic probe for caspase-3-like activity (DEVDase activity), we have mapped age-dependent neuronal changes in the adult brain throughout the lifespan of Drosophila. Spatio-temporally restricted caspase activation was observed in the antennal lobe and ellipsoid body, brain structures required for olfaction and visual place memory, respectively. We also found that caspase was activated in an age-dependent manner in specific subsets of Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), Or42b and Or92a neurons. These neurons are essential for mediating innate attraction to food-related odors. Furthermore, age-induced impairments of neural transmission and attraction behavior could be reversed by specific inhibition of caspase in these ORNs, indicating that caspase activation in Or42b and Or92a neurons is responsible for altering animal behavior during normal aging. PMID:24967585

  20. Olfactory attractants and parity affect prenatal androgens and territoriality of coyote breeding pairs.

    PubMed

    Schell, Christopher J; Young, Julie K; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Mateo, Jill M; Santymire, Rachel M

    2016-10-15

    Hormones are fundamental mediators of personality traits intimately linked with reproductive success. Hence, alterations to endocrine factors may dramatically affect individual behavior that has subsequent fitness consequences. Yet it is unclear how hormonal or behavioral traits change with environmental stressors or over multiple reproductive opportunities, particularly for biparental fauna. To simulate an environmental stressor, we exposed captive coyote (Canis latrans) pairs to novel coyote odor attractants (i.e. commercial scent lures) mid-gestation to influence territorial behaviors, fecal glucocorticoid (FGMs) and fecal androgen metabolites (FAMs). In addition, we observed coyote pairs as first-time and experienced breeders to assess the influence of parity on our measures. Treatment pairs received the odors four times over a 20-day period, while control pairs received water. Odor-treated pairs scent-marked (e.g. urinated, ground scratched) and investigated odors more frequently than control pairs, and had higher FAMs when odors were provided. Pairs had higher FAMs as first-time versus experienced breeders, indicating that parity also affected androgen production during gestation. Moreover, repeatability in scent-marking behaviors corresponded with FGMs and FAMs, implying that coyote territoriality during gestation is underpinned by individually-specific hormone profiles. Our results suggest coyote androgens during gestation are sensitive to conspecific olfactory stimuli and prior breeding experience. Consequently, fluctuations in social or other environmental stimuli as well as increasing parity may acutely affect coyote traits essential to reproductive success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Southern pine beetle: Olfactory receptor and behavior discrimination of enantiomers of the attractant pheromone frontalin

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.L.; Berisford, C.W.; Blum, M.S.; Dickens, J.C.; Hedden, R.L.; Mori, K.; Richerson, J.V.; Vite, J.P.; West, J.R.

    1982-05-01

    In a laboratory and field bioassays, the response of Dendroctonus frontalis was significantly greater to the mixture of (1S,55R)-(-)-frontalin and alpha-pinene than to (1R,5S)-(+)-frontalin and alpha-pinene. Electrophysiologrical studies revealed that antennal olfactory receptor cells were significantly more responsive to (1S,5R)-(-)-frontalin than to 1R,5S)-(+) -frontalin. Both enanitiomers stimulated the same olfactory cells which suggests that each cell possesses at least two types of enanitomer-specific acceptors.

  2. Visual and olfactory disruption of orientation by the western pine beetle to attractant-baited traps

    Treesearch

    B.L. Strom; R.A. Goyer; P.J. Shea

    2001-01-01

    Olfactory deterrents have been proposed as tree protectants against attack by bark beetles, but their development has been hindered by a lack of knowledge of host selection behavior. Among the primary tree-killing (aggressive) Dendroctonus, vision appears to be an integral part of the host selection process. We evaluated the importance of vision in...

  3. A diffusible signal attracts olfactory sensory axons toward their target in the developing brain of the moth.

    PubMed

    Oland, Lynne A; Pott, Wendy M; Howard, Charles T; Inlow, Mark; Buckingham, Jocelyn

    2003-07-01

    The signals that olfactory receptor axons use to navigate to their target in the CNS are still not well understood. In the moth Manduca sexta, the primary olfactory pathway develops postembryonically, and the receptor axons navigate from an experimentally accessible sensory epithelium to the brain along a pathway long enough for detailed study of regions in which axon behavior changes. The current experiments ask whether diffusible factors contribute to receptor axon guidance. Explants were made from the antennal receptor epithelium and co-cultured in a collagen gel matrix with slices of various regions of the brain. Receptor axons were attracted toward the central regions of the brain, including the protocerebrum and antennal lobe. Receptor axons growing into a slice of the most proximal region of the antennal nerve, where axon sorting normally occurs, showed no directional preference. When the antennal lobe was included in the slice, the receptor axons entering the sorting region grew directly toward the antennal lobe. Taken together with the previous in vivo experiments, the current results suggest that an attractive diffusible factor can serve as one cue to direct misrouted olfactory receptor axons toward the medial regions of the brain, where local cues guide them to the antennal lobe. They also suggest that under normal circumstances, in which the receptor axons follow a pre-existing pupal nerve to the antennal lobe, the diffusible factor emanating from the lobe acts in parallel and at short range to maintain the fidelity of the path into the antennal lobe. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Neurobiol 56: 24-40, 2003

  4. Love makes smell blind: mating suppresses pheromone attraction in Drosophila females via Or65a olfactory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Grabe, Veit; Omondi, Aman B.; Ignell, Rickard; Becher, Paul G.; Hansson, Bill S.; Sachse, Silke; Witzgall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, the male sex pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) elicits aggregation and courtship, through the odorant receptor Or67d. Long-lasting exposure to cVA suppresses male courtship, via a second channel, Or65a. In females, the role of Or65a has not been studied. We show that, shortly after mating, Drosophila females are no longer attracted to cVA and that activation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing Or65a generates this behavioral switch: when silencing Or65a, mated females remain responsive to cVA. Neurons expressing Or67d converge into the DA1 glomerulus in the antennal lobe, where they synapse onto projection neurons (PNs), that connect to higher neural circuits generating the attraction response to cVA. Functional imaging of these PNs shows that the DA1 glomerulus is inhibited by simultaneous activation of Or65a OSNs, which leads to a suppression of the attraction response to cVA. The behavioral role of postmating cVA exposure is substantiated by the observation that matings with starved males, which produce less cVA, do not alter the female response. Moreover, exposure to synthetic cVA abolishes attraction and decreases sexual receptivity in unmated females. Taken together, Or65a mediates an aversive effect of cVA and may accordingly regulate remating, through concurrent behavioral modulation in males and females. PMID:25406576

  5. Attraction, Oviposition Preferences, and Olfactory Responses of Corn-Infesting Ulidiidae (Diptera) to Various Host-Based Substrates.

    PubMed

    Owens, D; Nuessly, G S; Kendra, P E; Colquhoun, T A; Seal, D R

    2017-08-01

    Fresh market sweet corn (Zea mays L., convar. saccharata var. rugosa, Poales: Poaceae) ears produced in Florida are damaged by the larvae of Euxesta stigmatias Loew, Euxesta eluta Loew, and Chaetopsis massyla Walker (Diptera: Ulidiidae) that renders ears unmarketable. No standard lure exists for monitoring these pests. Oviposition substrate and attractant bioassays were designed to identify attractive substrates for further semiochemical investigation. Frass from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was more attractive than other ovipositional substrates tested for E. eluta and C. massyla, and resulted in greater ovipositional output. Tassel-derived armyworm frass was more attractive than leaf-derived frass for oviposition. Frass also resulted in greater oviposition output by two species. In attraction bioassays, frass was generally preferred over the corresponding corn tissue, and only C. massyla demonstrated a preference for silk-frass over tassel-frass. The most promising substrates were then evaluated by electroantennography (EAG) to quantify olfactory responses. Frass volatiles also elicited greater antennal responses than corn volatiles. With tassel-frass, greater amplitude EAG responses were recorded from immature E. eluta female antennae, while mature female E. stigmatias exhibited greater responses. Equivalent antennal response to silk-frass was observed from E. eluta. Overall, silk-frass elicited the greatest EAG responses among all three fly species. Our results indicate that armyworm frass is an important resource in the chemical ecology of corn-infesting silk flies, and this substrate warrants further investigation for potential attractants that may facilitate development of novel management tools for these pests. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Beauty is mostly in the eye of the beholder: olfactory versus visual cues of attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joshua D

    2008-12-01

    Olfaction is an important determinant of attractiveness, possibly even more so than vision when judgments are made by women. However, research that directly compares these cues using actual stimuli (e.g., t-shirt odors) is lacking. In this study, 44 women rated the attractiveness of t-shirt odors and facial photographs of 21 men either independently (i.e., first rated t-shirts, then rated photographs) or together (i.e., made overall ratings on the basis of t-shirts and photographs presented simultaneously). Photograph ratings were far more predictive of overall attractiveness than were t-shirt ratings. This was true for female participants who were fertile or infertile (i.e., using hormonal birth control). Body odor only predicted overall attractiveness when fertile women made the ratings.

  7. The fecal odor of sick hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) mediates olfactory attraction of the tick Ixodes hexagonus.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, Toni; Hanisch, Kerstin; Hardege, Jörg D; Breithaupt, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Parasite loads of animals vary among individuals, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully identified. Here, we investigated whether health status of hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) is correlated with tick burden, and whether chemical cues linked to the health status of the host mediate attraction of the tick Ixodes hexagonus. An ecological survey conducted over 10 years, involving 226 wild hedgehogs, revealed a strong association between health status and tick burden of hedgehogs, with healthy animals being less likely to carry ticks than unhealthy ones. Behavioral choice tests demonstrated that ticks display a preference for the fecal odor from sick hedgehogs compared with healthy ones. Chemical analysis of fecal odors using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed differences in the odor profile between sick and healthy hedgehogs. Sick animals tended to exhibit raised levels of the volatile aromatic heterocyclic compound indole in their feces. Ticks were attracted to indole when given the choice between indole and a solvent control. However, fecal matter from healthy hosts, with the addition of indole, was not attractive to ticks, suggesting that indole interacts with other, undetected compounds in mediating attraction. This study implies that it is the attraction to fecal odor that causes higher tick burdens in sick hedgehogs. Ticks might benefit from this preference by avoiding possible repulsion mechanisms of healthy hosts. We suggest that ticks potentially choose their host based on odor linked to the host's health status.

  8. Acute olfactory response of Culex mosquitoes to a human- and bird-derived attractant.

    PubMed

    Syed, Zainulabeuddin; Leal, Walter S

    2009-11-03

    West Nile virus, which is transmitted by Culex mosquitoes while feeding on birds and humans, has emerged as the dominant vector borne disease in North America. We have identified natural compounds from humans and birds, which are detected with extreme sensitivity by olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antennae of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus). One of these semiochemicals, nonanal, dominates the odorant spectrum of pigeons, chickens, and humans from various ethnic backgrounds. We determined the specificity and sensitivity of all ORN types housed in different sensilla types on Cx. quinquefasciatus antennae. Here, we present a comprehensive map of all antennal ORNs coding natural ligands and their dose-response functions. Nonanal is detected by a large array of sensilla and is by far the most potent stimulus; thus, supporting the assumption that Cx. quinquefasciatus can smell humans and birds. Nonanal and CO(2) synergize, thus, leading to significantly higher catches of Culex mosquitoes in traps baited with binary than in those with individual lures.

  9. Attraction of the bark beetle parasitoid Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) to host-associated olfactory cues

    Treesearch

    Brian T. Sullivan; Eva M. Pettersson; Katja C. Seltmann; C. Wayne Berisford

    2000-01-01

    Studies were conducted to identify host location cues used by Roptrocerus xylophagorum (Ratzeburg), a larval/pupal parasitoid of bark beetles. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays, female R. xylophagorum were attracted to infested bark (i.e., phloem, cambium, and outer corky bark tissues) removed from bolts of loblolly pine,...

  10. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits. PMID:27782186

  11. Attraction of the oriental fruit fly, Dacus dorsalis, to methyl eugenol and related olfactory stimulants.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, R L; Mitchell, W C; Fukuto, T R; Metcalf, E R

    1975-01-01

    The attraction of male oriental fruit flies to methyl eugenol and 34 analogues was investigated quantitatively using the characteristic feeding response. Methyl eugenol was the most active compound studied, with a feeding response to 0.01 mug, but saturation of the allyl side chain or replacement of allyl by allyloxy produced compounds almost as effective. Replacement of the methoxy groups by methylenedioxy, methyl, or chloro groups abolished all response. The ring geometry of the methoxy groups was critical, with orthodimethoxy most active and meta-dimethoxy inactive. Replacement of methoxy with hydroxy, methylthio, or amino groups did not abolish the response. The failure of the oriental fruit fly to respond to the methyl and chloro isosteres of methyl eugenol was contrasted with the response of a human odor panel which perceived these compounds as having weak floral odors. PMID:1058469

  12. Innate responses to putative ancestral hosts: is the attraction of Western flower thrips to pine pollen a result of relict olfactory receptors?

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Zayed S; Ficken, Katherine J; Greenfield, Bethany P J; Butt, Tariq M

    2014-06-01

    Pollinophagy is widely documented in the order Thysanoptera, with representative individuals from six of the nine divergent families known to feed on pollen. Various pollens of the genus Pinus increase the development time, fecundity, longevity, and settling preference of Western Flower Thrips (WFT), Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Certain species of flower thrips discriminate among pollen types, but no studies have elucidated the olfactory cues that play a role in their pollen preferences. In this study, the volatile organic compounds emitted by pollens of the genus Pinus were elucidated. Various chemicals from pollen headspace elicited electrophysiological responses from WFT antennae. The compound (S)-(-)-verbenone, identified in pollen headspace, attracted WFT in a 4-arm olfactometer. This compound has potential for use in integrated pest management programs against the pest. We present the hypothesis that this polyphagous insect may have retained ancestral 'relict' olfactory receptors through the course of evolution, to explain this attraction to pine pollen. This attraction has allowed the insect to find and exploit an unusual nutrient source that significantly increases its fitness. The study demonstrates how fossil record analysis and subsequent evolutionary knowledge can aid in explaining possibilities as to why some insects sense and respond to chemicals that would otherwise seem peculiar to their ecology, allowing insight into the evolutionary forces that may shape insect olfactory systems over time.

  13. Dine or dash? Turbulence inhibits blue crab navigation in attractive-aversive odor plumes by altering signal structure encoded by the olfactory pathway.

    PubMed

    Weissburg, Marc; Atkins, Lorin; Berkenkamp, Kimberly; Mankin, Danielle

    2012-12-01

    Blue crabs can distinguish and navigate to attractive (food) odors even when aversive odors (injured crab metabolites) are released nearby. Blue crabs in these conditions detect the aversive odor and avoid it, but find the attractive source with nearly the same success rate as when the attractive source is presented alone. Spatially and temporally distinct odor filaments appear to signal to foragers that the two odor sources are not co-located, and hence navigating to the attractive odor entails an acceptable risk of predation. However, environmentally produced turbulence suppresses tracking by homogenizing the two odors; blue crabs fail to track to the attractive source when the aversive source is present, even though turbulence does not substantially inhibit tracking to the attractive source alone. Removal of sensory input from aesthetascs on the antennules, but not chemosensors on the legs, rescues navigation to attractive-aversive dual plumes in turbulent conditions. These results suggest that mixing in the natural environment may amplify the effects of predators by suppressing tracking to food odors when aversive cues are present, and that the olfactory pathway mediates the response.

  14. Ultra-high olfactory sensitivity for the human sperm-attractant aromatic aldehyde bourgeonal in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Linda; Laska, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that certain aromatic aldehydes are ligands for olfactory receptors expressed in mammalian sperm cells and induce sperm chemotaxis. Using a conditioning paradigm, the olfactory sensitivity of five CD-1 mice for seven aromatic aldehydes was investigated. With all seven stimuli, the mice discriminated concentrations as low as 0.01 ppm (parts per million) from the solvent, and with bourgeonal the animals even detected concentrations as low as 0.1 ppq (parts per quadrillion) which constitutes the lowest olfactory detection threshold value reported in this species so far. The presence of a tertiary butyl group in para-position (relative to the functional aldehyde group) combined with a lack of an additional alkyl group next to the functional aldehyde group may be responsible for the extraordinary sensitivity of the mice for bourgeonal.

  15. Season-long volatile emissions from peach and pear trees in situ, overlapping profiles, and olfactory attraction of an oligophagous fruit moth in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Najar-Rodriguez, A; Orschel, B; Dorn, S

    2013-03-01

    Insect herbivores that have more than one generation per year and reproduce on different host plants are confronted with substantial seasonal variation in the volatile blends emitted by their hosts. One way to deal with such variation is to respond to a specific set of compounds common to all host plants. The oriental fruit moth Cydia (=Grapholita) molesta is a highly damaging invasive pest. The stone fruit peach (Prunus persica) is its primary host, whereas pome fruits such as pear (Pyrus communis) are considered secondary hosts. In some parts of their geographic range, moth populations switch from stone to pome fruit orchards during the growing season. Here, we tested whether this temporal switch is facilitated by female responses to plant volatiles. We collected volatiles from peach and pear trees in situ and characterized their seasonal dynamics by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We also assessed the effects of the natural volatile blends released by the two plant species on female attraction by using Y-tube olfactometry. Finally, we related variations in volatile emissions to female olfactory responses. Our results indicate that the seasonal host switch from peach to pear is facilitated by the changing olfactory effect of the natural volatile blends being emitted. Peach volatiles were only attractive early and mid season, whereas pear volatiles were attractive from mid to late season. Blends from the various attractive stages shared a common set of five aldehydes, which are suggested to play an essential role in female attraction to host plants. Particular attention should be given to these aldehydes when designing candidate attractants for oriental fruit moth females.

  16. Attractant and repellent cues cooperate in guiding a subset of olfactory sensory axons to a well-defined protoglomerular target.

    PubMed

    Taku, Alemji A; Marcaccio, Christina L; Ye, Wenda; Krause, Gregory J; Raper, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory axons target well-defined intermediate targets in the zebrafish olfactory bulb called protoglomeruli well before they form odorant receptor-specific glomeruli. A subset of olfactory sensory neurons are labeled by expression of the or111-7:IRES:GAL4 transgene whose axons terminate in the central zone (CZ) protoglomerulus. Previous work has shown that some of these axons misproject to the more dorsal and anterior dorsal zone (DZ) protoglomerulus in the absence of Netrin 1/Dcc signaling. In search of additional cues that guide these axons to the CZ, we found that Semaphorin 3D (Sema3D) is expressed in the anterior bulb and acts as a repellent that pushes them towards the CZ. Further analysis indicates that Sema3D signaling is mediated through Nrp1a, while Nrp2b also promotes CZ targeting but in a Sema3D-independent manner. nrp1a, nrp2b and dcc transcripts are detected in or111-7 transgene-expressing neurons early in development and both Nrp1a and Dcc act cell-autonomously in sensory neurons to promote accurate targeting to the CZ. dcc and nrp1a double mutants have significantly more DZ misprojections than either single mutant, suggesting that the two signaling systems act independently and in parallel to direct a specific subset of sensory axons to their initial protoglomerular target.

  17. Attractant and repellent cues cooperate in guiding a subset of olfactory sensory axons to a well-defined protoglomerular target

    PubMed Central

    Taku, Alemji A.; Marcaccio, Christina L.; Ye, Wenda; Krause, Gregory J.; Raper, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory axons target well-defined intermediate targets in the zebrafish olfactory bulb called protoglomeruli well before they form odorant receptor-specific glomeruli. A subset of olfactory sensory neurons are labeled by expression of the or111-7:IRES:GAL4 transgene whose axons terminate in the central zone (CZ) protoglomerulus. Previous work has shown that some of these axons misproject to the more dorsal and anterior dorsal zone (DZ) protoglomerulus in the absence of Netrin 1/Dcc signaling. In search of additional cues that guide these axons to the CZ, we found that Semaphorin 3D (Sema3D) is expressed in the anterior bulb and acts as a repellent that pushes them towards the CZ. Further analysis indicates that Sema3D signaling is mediated through Nrp1a, while Nrp2b also promotes CZ targeting but in a Sema3D-independent manner. nrp1a, nrp2b and dcc transcripts are detected in or111-7 transgene-expressing neurons early in development and both Nrp1a and Dcc act cell-autonomously in sensory neurons to promote accurate targeting to the CZ. dcc and nrp1a double mutants have significantly more DZ misprojections than either single mutant, suggesting that the two signaling systems act independently and in parallel to direct a specific subset of sensory axons to their initial protoglomerular target. PMID:26732841

  18. Olfactory Attraction of the Larval Parasitoid, Hyposoter horticola, to Plants Infested with Eggs of the Host Butterfly, Melitaea cinxia

    PubMed Central

    Castelo, Marcela K.; van Nouhuys, Saskya; Corley, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitoids locate inconspicuous hosts in a heterogeneous habitat using plant volatiles, some of which are induced by the hosts. Hyposoter horticola Gravenhost (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) is a parasitoid of the Glanville fritillary butterfly Melitaea cinxia L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Melitaea cinxia lays eggs in clusters on leaves of Plantago lanceolata L. (Lamiales: Plantaginaceae) and Veronica spicata L. (Lamiales: Plantaginaceae). The parasitoid oviposits into host larvae that have not yet hatched from the egg. Thus, though H. horticola is a parasitoid of Melitaea cinxia larvae, it must find host eggs on plants that have not been fed on by the larvae. Using a Y-tube olfactometer, the response of H. horticola to odors of Melitaea cinxia and extracts of the attacked plant species were tested. Three week-old eggs (near hatching) were attractive to young H. horticola, but one week-old eggs were attractive only to old or experienced H. horticola. Melitaea cinxia larvae were not attractive. A water extract of P. lanceolata was attractive, but ethanol or hexane extracts were not. None of the extracts of V. spicata were attractive. Leaves of V. spicata were attractive only if harboring eggs, but P. lanceolata leaves with eggs were not. Free flying H. horticola in a large outdoor enclosure were presented with host and plant cues. As in the olfactometer, V. spicata was attractive only when eggs were on it, and P. lanceolata was somewhat attractive with or without eggs. This study shows for the first time that a parasitoid of larvae uses egg volatiles or oviposition-induced plant volatiles, to find host larvae, and that Melitaea cinxia eggs or traces of oviposition induce the production of these volatiles by the plant. Based on the results, and given the natural distribution of the plants and M. cinxia eggs, parasitism of Melitaea cinxia eggs on P. lanceolata would be expected to be low. Instead, under natural conditions, a fraction of the eggs in virtually all egg

  19. Attraction, oviposition preferences, and olfactory responses of corn-infesting Ulidiidae (Diptera) to various host-based substrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fresh market sweet corn produced in Florida is threatened by larval damage by Euxesta stigmatias Loew, E. eluta Loew, and Chaetopsis massyla Walker (Diptera: Ulidiidae) that renders ears unmarketable. No standard lure exists for monitoring these pests. Oviposition and attraction bioassays were desig...

  20. Axonal Ensheathment and Intercellular Barrier Formation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blauth, Kevin; Banerjee, Swati; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells are critical players in every major aspect of nervous system development, function, and disease. Other than their traditional supportive role, glial cells perform a variety of important functions such as myelination, synapse formation and plasticity, and establishment of blood–brain and blood–nerve barriers in the nervous system. Recent studies highlight the striking functional similarities between Drosophila and vertebrate glia. In both systems, glial cells play an essential role in neural ensheathment thereby isolating the nervous system and help to create a local ionic microenvironment for conduction of nerve impulses. Here, we review the anatomical aspects and the molecular players that underlie ensheathment during different stages of nervous system development in Drosophila and how these processes lead to the organization of neuroglial junctions. We also discuss some key aspects of the invertebrate axonal ensheathment and junctional organization with that of vertebrate myelination and axon–glial interactions. Finally, we highlight the importance of intercellular junctions in barrier formation in various cellular contexts in Drosophila. We speculate that unraveling the genetic and molecular mechanisms of ensheathment across species might provide key insights into human myelin-related disorders and help in designing therapeutic interventions. PMID:20801419

  1. [Pathogenesis of spinal cord injuries and mechanisms of repair induced by olfactory ensheathing cells].

    PubMed

    Botero, Lucía; Gomez, Rosa Margarita; Chaparro, Orlando

    2013-05-16

    Introduccion. La lesion medular es un evento catastrofico, cuyas consecuencias persisten durante toda la vida del paciente. La investigacion en tratamiento se ha basado principalmente en el desarrollo de terapias que reduzcan la discapacidad, pero desde los anos noventa hay un avance significativo y se han probado varios trasplantes celulares en modelos animales de lesion medular, celulas de Schwann, astrocitos y celulas de la glia envolvente olfatoria (CGEO). Objetivo. Hacer un recuento detallado de la patogenia de la lesion medular primaria y secundaria y de los mecanismos por los cuales las CGEO inducirian sus posibles efectos regenerativos descritos en la bibliografia. Desarrollo. Despues del traumatismo, la lesion se desarrolla en dos fases, la primaria se caracteriza por las lesiones de compresion y la secundaria se produce por una serie de factores que se dan en paralelo y que incluyen factores vasculares, celulares, moleculares y formacion de cicatriz glial. La mayoria de los modelos de lesion medular y trasplante con CGEO han comunicado recuperacion funcional, remielinizacion y regeneracion axonal. Estas celulas ejercen su accion de manera indirecta a traves de la produccion de factores de crecimiento y de manera directa induciendo regeneracion neuronal, axonal y remielinizacion. Conclusiones. Las CGEO son una opcion terapeutica en pacientes con lesion medular debido a que inducen de modo directo o indirecto regeneracion neuronal, axonal, remielinizacion de axones, disminucion de cicatriz glial y otros efectos que conducen a la recuperacion funcional.

  2. Microarray analysis of striatal embryonic stem cells induced to differentiate by ensheathing cell conditioned media.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia Esperanza; Torres-Ruíz, Nadia Magali; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Gudiño-Cabrera, Graciela

    2008-04-01

    The mammalian central nervous system contains well-defined regions of plasticity in which cells of the aldynoglia phenotype promote neuronal growth and regeneration. Only now are the factors that regulate the production of new cells from multipotential neural precursors (MNP) starting to be identified. We are interested in understanding how differentiation towards the aldynoglia phenotype is controlled, and to study these events we have induced the differentiation of embryonic MNP towards this phenotype in vitro. Accordingly, we have used microarrays to analyze gene expression in three different cell populations: olfactory bulb ensheathing cells (EC), a prototypic aldynoglia cell type; undifferentiated MNP; and MNP differentiated in vitro for 24 hr in EC-conditioned media. The expression profiles identified support the idea that the EC are more closely related to Schwann cells and astrocytes than to oligodendrocytes. Following MNP differentiation, more strongly expressed genes define a neuroglial cell phenotype. RT-PCR confirms that S100a6, Mtmr2, and Col5a were highly expressed by EC, whereas Pou3f3 were more strongly expressed in MNP than in EC, and SafB1 and Mash1 expression were induced in MNP by EC-conditioned media. The profile of gene expression after differentiation suggests that Wnt signaling may be inactivated during this process, while activation of the BMP pathway may be elicited through the BMPr1A. These results provide us with a starting point to study the genes involved in the induction of aldynoglia differentiation from MNP. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Olfactory Behavioral Testing in the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    M. Witt, Rochelle; M. Galligan, Meghan; R. Despinoy, Jennifer; Segal, Rosalind

    2009-01-01

    The rodent olfactory system is of increasing interest to scientists, studied, in part, in systems biology because of its stereotyped, yet accessible circuitry. In addition, this area's unique ability to generate new neurons throughout an organism's lifetime makes it an attractive system for developmental and regenerative biologists alike. Such interest necessitates a means for a quick, yet reliable assessment of olfactory function. Many tests of olfactory ability are complex, variable or not specifically designed for mice. Also, some tests are sensitive to memory deficits as well as defects in olfactory abilities, confounding obtained results. Here, we describe a simple battery of tests designed to identify defects in olfactory sensitivity and preference. First, an initial general health assessment allows for the identification of animals suitable for further testing. Second, mice are exposed to various dilutions of scents to ascertain whether there is a threshold difference. Third, mice are presented with various scents, both attractive and aversive, that allow for the assessment of olfactory preference. These simple studies should make the initial characterization of olfactory behavior accessible for labs of varied resources and expertise. PMID:19229182

  4. Olfactory behavioral testing in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Witt, Rochelle M; Galligan, Meghan M; Despinoy, Jennifer R; Segal, Rosalind

    2009-01-28

    The rodent olfactory system is of increasing interest to scientists, studied, in part, in systems biology because of its stereotyped, yet accessible circuitry. In addition, this area's unique ability to generate new neurons throughout an organism's lifetime makes it an attractive system for developmental and regenerative biologists alike. Such interest necessitates a means for a quick, yet reliable assessment of olfactory function. Many tests of olfactory ability are complex, variable or not specifically designed for mice. Also, some tests are sensitive to memory deficits as well as defects in olfactory abilities, confounding obtained results. Here, we describe a simple battery of tests designed to identify defects in olfactory sensitivity and preference. First, an initial general health assessment allows for the identification of animals suitable for further testing. Second, mice are exposed to various dilutions of scents to ascertain whether there is a threshold difference. Third, mice are presented with various scents, both attractive and aversive, that allow for the assessment of olfactory preference. These simple studies should make the initial characterization of olfactory behavior accessible for labs of varied resources and expertise.

  5. Olfactory mucosa for transplant-mediated repair: a complex tissue for a complex injury?

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Susan L; Riddell, John S; Barnett, Susan C

    2010-01-15

    Damage to the brain and spinal cord leads to permanent functional disability because of the very limited capacity of the central nervous system (CNS) for repair. Transplantation of cells into regions of CNS damage represents one approach to enhancing this repair. At present, the ideal cell type for transplant-mediated repair has not been identified but autologous transplantation would be advantageous. Olfactory tissue, in part because of its capacity for regeneration, has emerged as a promising source of cells and several clinical centers are using olfactory cells or tissues in the treatment of CNS damage. Until now, the olfactory ensheathing cell, a specialized glial cell of the olfactory system has been the main focus of attention. Transplants of this cell have been shown to have a neuroprotective function, support axonal regeneration, and remyelinate demyelinated axons. However, the olfactory mucosa is a heterogeneous tissue, composed of a variety of cells supporting both its normal function and its regenerative capacity. It is therefore possible that it contains several cell types that could participate in CNS repair including putative stem cells as well as glia. Here we review the cellular composition of the olfactory tissue and the evidence that equivalent cell types exist in both rodent and human olfactory mucosa suggesting that it is potentially a rich source of autologous cells for transplant-mediated repair of the CNS.

  6. Olfactory neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.A.; McLean, P.; Juillard, G.J.; Parker, R.G.

    1989-06-15

    Fifteen patients with olfactory neuroblastoma were treated during the 17-year period of 1969 to 1986. Data was analyzed with respect to age at presentation, sex, presenting signs and symptoms, stage, and results of treatment. Age ranged from 4 to 67 years with the median age being 27 years. Median follow-up was 8 years. Local control was achieved in nine of nine patients or 100% with successful surgical resection, i.e., minimal residual disease, followed by postoperative radiation therapy (45 to 65 Gy) was employed. There were no distant failures when the primary site was controlled. Regional lymph node metastases were infrequent: only 13% (two of 15 patients) presented with positive nodes. Three of four patients treated initially with surgery alone had a local recurrence, two of which were successfully salvaged by combined therapy. There were four patients treated with radiation therapy alone: three had persistent disease after radiation therapy, and one patient was controlled with 65 Gy. Olfactory neuroblastoma has a propensity to recur locally when treated with surgery alone. The authors' experience suggests excellent local control can be achieved with surgery immediately followed by radiation therapy. Thus the authors recommend planned combined treatment for all resectable lesions.

  7. Regarding several points of doubt of the structure of the olfactory bulb: as described by T. Blanes.

    PubMed

    Levine, Catherine; Marcillo, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    In order to complement the studies on the fila olfactoria completed by Dr. Santiago Ramón y Cajal, we have included a translation of "Sobre Algunos Puntos Dudosos de la Estructura del Bulbo Olfatorio" by T. Blanes, a student of Dr. Cajal. This work describes in stunning detail additional morphological aspects of the olfactory pathway, including what was at the time the modestly studied neuroglia. The neuroglia of the olfactory system has been revisited in the last several decades for its importance in the field of regenerative neuroscience. Olfactory ensheathing glia has the unique quality of providing ensheathment to neurons which traverse from the central to the peripheral nervous system and are being used as a candidate in present-day transplantation studies to mimic this phenomenon at the dorsal root entry zone after a central nervous system injury. Although this fine work has passed its centennial anniversary since initial publication, it has been widely cited throughout the years, and of recent when Pressler and Stowbridge reported Blanes cell electrophysiological recordings (Neuron V 49, 6; p 889-904, 2006). An English translation the details of what Blanes initially documented with unduplicated precision can now be made available to a wider audience in the field of neuroscience, and is especially important now that more and more present-day studies require a precise and complete understanding of the anatomical structures contained within the olfactory system. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Limits to the capacity of transplants of olfactory glia to promote axonal regrowth in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gudiño-Cabrera, G; Pastor, A M; de la Cruz, R R; Delgado-García, J M; Nieto-Sampedro, M

    2000-02-28

    Olfactory bulb ensheathing cell (OBEC) transplants promoted axonal regeneration in the spinal cord dorsal root entry zone and in the corticospinal tract. However, OBECs failed to promote abducens internuclear neuron axon regeneration when transplanted at the site of nerve fibre transection. In experiments performed in both cats and rats, OBECs survived for up to 2 months, lining themselves up along the portion of the regrowing axons proximal to the interneuron cell body. However, OBECs migrated preferentially towards abducens somata, in the direction opposite to the oculomotor nucleus target. OBECs seem to promote nerve fibre regeneration only where preferred direction of glial migration coincides with the direction of axonal growth towards its target.

  9. Aversion and attraction through olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory cues that predict reward or punishment are fundamental drivers of animal behavior. For example, attractive odors of palatable food or a potential mate predict reward while aversive odors of pathogen-laced food or a predator predict punishment. Aversive and attractive odors can be detected by intermingled sensory neurons that express highly related olfactory receptors and display similar central projections. These findings raise basic questions of how innate odor valence is extracted from olfactory circuits, how such circuits are developmentally endowed and modulated by state, and the relationship between innate and learned odor responses. Here, we review odors, receptors, and neural circuits associated with stimulus valence, discussing salient principles derived from studies on nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Understanding the organization of neural circuitry that mediates odor aversion and attraction will provide key insights into how the brain functions. PMID:25649823

  10. Local neurons play key roles in the mammalian olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Saghatelyan, Armen; Carleton, Alan; Lagier, Samuel; de Chevigny, Antoine; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Over the past few decades, research exploring how the brain perceives, discriminates, and recognizes odorant molecules has received a growing interest. Today, olfaction is no longer considered a matter of poetry. Chemical senses entered the biological era when an increasing number of scientists started to elucidate the early stages of the olfactory pathway. A combination of genetic, biochemical, cellular, electrophysiological and behavioral methods has provided a picture of how odor information is processed in the olfactory system as it moves from the periphery to higher areas of the brain. Our group is exploring the physiology of the main olfactory bulb, the first processing relay in the mammalian brain. From different electrophysiological approaches, we are attempting to understand the cellular rules that contribute to the synaptic transmission and plasticity at this central relay. How olfactory sensory inputs, originating from the olfactory epithelium located in the nasal cavity, are encoded in the main olfactory bulb remains a crucial question for understanding odor processing. More importantly, the persistence of a high level of neurogenesis continuously supplying the adult olfactory bulb with newborn local neurons provides an attractive model to investigate how basic olfactory functions are maintained when a large proportion of local neurons are continuously renewed. For this purpose, we summarize the current ideas concerning the molecular mechanisms and organizational strategies used by the olfactory system to encode and process information in the main olfactory bulb. We discuss the degree of sensitivity of the bulbar neuronal network activity to the persistence of this high level of neurogenesis that is modulated by sensory experience. Finally, it is worth mentioning that analyzing the molecular mechanisms and organizational strategies used by the olfactory system to transduce, encode, and process odorant information in the olfactory bulb should aid in

  11. Fray, a Drosophila serine/threonine kinase homologous to mammalian PASK, is required for axonal ensheathment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiserson, W. M.; Harkins, E. W.; Keshishian, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fray is a serine/threonine kinase expressed by the peripheral glia of Drosophila, whose function is required for normal axonal ensheathment. Null fray mutants die early in larval development and have nerves with severe swelling and axonal defasciculation. The phenotype is associated with a failure of the ensheathing glia to correctly wrap peripheral axons. When the fray cDNA is expressed in the ensheathing glia of fray mutants, normal nerve morphology is restored. Fray belongs to a novel family of Ser/Thr kinases, the PF kinases, whose closest relatives are the PAK kinases. Rescue of the Drosophila mutant phenotype with PASK, the rat homolog of Fray, demonstrates a functional homology among these proteins and suggests that the Fray signaling pathway is widely conserved.

  12. TNFa/TNFR2 signaling is required for glial ensheathment at the dorsal root entry zone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cody J; Wheeler, Michael A; Marjoram, Lindsay; Bagnat, Michel; Deppmann, Christopher D; Kucenas, Sarah

    2017-04-05

    Somatosensory information from the periphery is routed to the spinal cord through centrally-projecting sensory axons that cross into the central nervous system (CNS) via the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ). The glial cells that ensheath these axons ensure rapid propagation of this information. Despite the importance of this glial-axon arrangement, how this afferent nerve is assembled during development is unknown. Using in vivo, time-lapse imaging we show that as centrally-projecting pioneer axons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) enter the spinal cord, they initiate expression of the cytokine TNFalpha. This induction coincides with ensheathment of these axons by associated glia via a TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2)-mediated process. This work identifies a signaling cascade that mediates peripheral glial-axon interactions and it functions to ensure that DRG afferent projections are ensheathed after pioneer axons complete their navigation, which promotes efficient somatosensory neural function.

  13. TNFa/TNFR2 signaling is required for glial ensheathment at the dorsal root entry zone

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cody J.; Bagnat, Michel; Deppmann, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Somatosensory information from the periphery is routed to the spinal cord through centrally-projecting sensory axons that cross into the central nervous system (CNS) via the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ). The glial cells that ensheath these axons ensure rapid propagation of this information. Despite the importance of this glial-axon arrangement, how this afferent nerve is assembled during development is unknown. Using in vivo, time-lapse imaging we show that as centrally-projecting pioneer axons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) enter the spinal cord, they initiate expression of the cytokine TNFalpha. This induction coincides with ensheathment of these axons by associated glia via a TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2)-mediated process. This work identifies a signaling cascade that mediates peripheral glial-axon interactions and it functions to ensure that DRG afferent projections are ensheathed after pioneer axons complete their navigation, which promotes efficient somatosensory neural function. PMID:28379965

  14. Enhanced trapping of stable flies via olfactory and visual cues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adult stable flies are highly attracted to the so-called Alsynite cylinder trap; however this trap is expensive. Here we report the development of a cheaper and better white panel trap with options of adding visual and olfactory stimuli for enhanced stable fly trapping. The white panel trap attracte...

  15. Chemical olfactory signals and parenthood in mammals.

    PubMed

    Corona, Rebeca; Lévy, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". In mammalian species, odor cues emitted by the newborn are essential to establish maternal behavior at parturition and coordinate early mother-infant interactions. Offspring odors become potent attractive stimuli at parturition promoting the contact with the young to ensure that normal maternal care develops. In some species odors provide a basis for individual recognition of the offspring and highly specialized neural mechanisms for learning the infant signals have evolved. Both the main and the accessory olfactory systems are involved in the onset of maternal care, but only the former contributes to individual odor discrimination of the young. Electrophysiological and neurochemical changes occur in the main olfactory bulb leading to a coding of the olfactory signature of the familiar young. Olfactory neurogenesis could also contribute to motherhood and associated learning. Parturition and interactions with the young influence neurogenesis and some evidence indicates a functional link between olfactory neurogenesis and maternal behavior. Although a simple compound has been found which regulates anogenital licking in the rat, studies identifying the chemical nature of these odors are lacking. Neonatal body odors seem to be particularly salient to human mothers who are able to identify their infant's odors. Recent studies have revealed some neural processing of these cues confirming the importance of mother-young chemical communication in our own species.

  16. Facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C

    2014-11-01

    Facial attractiveness has important social consequences. Despite a widespread belief that beauty cannot be defined, in fact, there is considerable agreement across individuals and cultures on what is found attractive. By considering that attraction and mate choice are critical components of evolutionary selection, we can better understand the importance of beauty. There are many traits that are linked to facial attractiveness in humans and each may in some way impart benefits to individuals who act on their preferences. If a trait is reliably associated with some benefit to the perceiver, then we would expect individuals in a population to find that trait attractive. Such an approach has highlighted face traits such as age, health, symmetry, and averageness, which are proposed to be associated with benefits and so associated with facial attractiveness. This view may postulate that some traits will be universally attractive; however, this does not preclude variation. Indeed, it would be surprising if there existed a template of a perfect face that was not affected by experience, environment, context, or the specific needs of an individual. Research on facial attractiveness has documented how various face traits are associated with attractiveness and various factors that impact on an individual's judgments of facial attractiveness. Overall, facial attractiveness is complex, both in the number of traits that determine attraction and in the large number of factors that can alter attraction to particular faces. A fuller understanding of facial beauty will come with an understanding of how these various factors interact with each other. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:621-634. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1316 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  17. Development of a glial network in the olfactory nerve: role of calcium and neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Koussa, Mounir A; Tolbert, Leslie P; Oland, Lynne A

    2010-11-01

    In adult olfactory nerves of mammals and moths, a network of glial cells ensheathes small bundles of olfactory receptor axons. In the developing antennal nerve (AN) of the moth Manduca sexta, the axons of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) migrate from the olfactory sensory epithelium toward the antennal lobe. Here we explore developmental interactions between ORN axons and AN glial cells. During early stages in AN glial-cell migration, glial cells are highly dye coupled, dividing glia are readily found in the nerve and AN glial cells label strongly for glutamine synthetase. By the end of this period, dye-coupling is rare, glial proliferation has ceased, glutamine synthetase labeling is absent, and glial processes have begun to extend to enwrap bundles of axons, a process that continues throughout the remainder of metamorphic development. Whole-cell and perforated-patch recordings in vivo from AN glia at different stages of network formation revealed two potassium currents and an R-like calcium current. Chronic in vivo exposure to the R-type channel blocker SNX-482 halted or greatly reduced AN glial migration. Chronically blocking spontaneous Na-dependent activity by injection of tetrodotoxin reduced the glial calcium current implicating an activity-dependent interaction between ORNs and glial cells in the development of glial calcium currents.

  18. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  19. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  20. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population.

  1. Response of olfactory axons to loss of synaptic targets in the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Yona; de la Puente, Rafael; Toledo, Rafael; Isgor, Ceylan; Guthrie, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Glomerular convergence has been proposed to rely on interactions between like olfactory axons, however topographic targeting is influenced by guidance molecules encountered in the olfactory bulb. Disruption of these cues during development misdirects sensory axons, however little is known about the role of bulb-derived signals in later life, as new axons arise during turnover of the olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) population. To evaluate the contribution of bulb neurons in maintaining topographic projections in adults, we ablated them with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in P2-IRES-tauLacZ mice and examined how sensory axons responded to loss of their postsynaptic partners. NMDA lesion eliminated bulb neurons without damage to sensory axons or olfactory ensheathing glia. P2 axons contained within glomeruli at the time of lesion maintained convergence at these locations; there was no evidence of compensatory growth into the remnant tissue. Delayed apoptosis of OSNs in the target-deprived epithelium led to declines in P2 neuron number as well as the gradual atrophy, and in some cases complete loss, of P2 glomeruli in lesioned bulbs by three weeks. Increased cell proliferation in the epithelium partially restored the OSN population, and by eight weeks, new P2 axons distributed within diverse locations in the bulb remnant and within the anterior olfactory nucleus. Prior studies have suggested that initial development of olfactory topography does not rely on synapse formation with target neurons, however the present data demonstrate that continued maintenance of the sensory map requires the presence of sufficient numbers and/or types of available bulbar synaptic targets. PMID:17674970

  2. CNS-derived glia ensheath peripheral nerves and mediate motor root development.

    PubMed

    Kucenas, Sarah; Takada, Norio; Park, Hae-Chul; Woodruff, Elvin; Broadie, Kendal; Appel, Bruce

    2008-02-01

    Motor function requires that motor axons extend from the spinal cord at regular intervals and that they are myelinated by Schwann cells. Little attention has been given to another cellular structure, the perineurium, which ensheaths the motor nerve, forming a flexible, protective barrier. Consequently, the origin of perineurial cells and their roles in motor nerve formation are poorly understood. Using time-lapse imaging in zebrafish, we show that perineurial cells are born in the CNS, arising as ventral spinal-cord glia before migrating into the periphery. In embryos lacking perineurial glia, motor neurons inappropriately migrated outside of the spinal cord and had aberrant axonal projections, indicating that perineurial glia carry out barrier and guidance functions at motor axon exit points. Additionally, reciprocal signaling between perineurial glia and Schwann cells was necessary for motor nerve ensheathment by both cell types. These insights reveal a new class of CNS-born glia that critically contributes to motor nerve development.

  3. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  4. Pharmacology of mammalian olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard S; Peterlin, Zita; Araneda, Ricardo C

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian species have evolved a large and diverse number of odorant receptors (ORs). These proteins comprise the largest family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known, amounting to ~1,000-different receptors in the rodent. From the perspective of olfactory coding, the availability of such a vast number of chemosensory receptors poses several fascinating questions; in addition, such a large repertoire provides an attractive biological model to study ligand-receptor interactions. The limited functional expression of these receptors in heterologous systems, however, has greatly hampered attempts to deorphanize them. We have employed a successful approach that combines electrophysiological and imaging techniques to analyze the response profiles of single sensory neurons. Our approach has enabled us to characterize the "odor space" of a population of native aldehyde receptors and the molecular range of a genetically engineered receptor, OR-I7.

  5. Innate olfactory preferences in dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Dormont, Laurent; Jay-Robert, Pierre; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Rapior, Sylvie; Lumaret, Jean-Pierre

    2010-09-15

    The effects of insect larval diet on adult olfactory responses to host-plant or food volatiles are still debated. The induction of adult host preferences has been studied in insects with diverse ecologies, including parasitoids, flower-visitors and phytophagous species. We investigated this question for the first time in a coprophagous insect species. Larvae of the French scarab dung beetle Agrilinus constans were reared on four different artificial substrates containing dung from cattle, horse, sheep or wild boar, and responses of imagos to dung volatiles were then behaviourally tested in an olfactometer. We also reported the first analysis of the composition of different mammal dung volatiles. We showed that adult beetles were more attracted to cattle and sheep dung odours, and that larval feeding experience had no effect on the adult olfactory responses to dung volatiles. A second experiment showed that the presence of other insects inside the dung resource affects the process of dung selection by adults. We identified 64 chemical compounds from dung emissions, and showed that dung volatiles clearly differed among different mammal species, allowing olfactory discrimination by dung beetles. Our results suggest that resource selection in coprophagous insects may be based on innate olfactory preferences. Further experiments should examine whether Agrilinus adults can learn new dung odours, and whether larval diet may influence the behaviour of adults in other coprophagous species.

  6. Beta and gamma oscillatory activities associated with olfactory memory tasks: different rhythms for different functional networks?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claire; Ravel, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory processing in behaving animals, even at early stages, is inextricable from top down influences associated with odor perception. The anatomy of the olfactory network (olfactory bulb, piriform, and entorhinal cortices) and its unique direct access to the limbic system makes it particularly attractive to study how sensory processing could be modulated by learning and memory. Moreover, olfactory structures have been early reported to exhibit oscillatory population activities easy to capture through local field potential recordings. An attractive hypothesis is that neuronal oscillations would serve to “bind” distant structures to reach a unified and coherent perception. In relation to this hypothesis, we will assess the functional relevance of different types of oscillatory activity observed in the olfactory system of behaving animals. This review will focus primarily on two types of oscillatory activities: beta (15–40 Hz) and gamma (60–100 Hz). While gamma oscillations are dominant in the olfactory system in the absence of odorant, both beta and gamma rhythms have been reported to be modulated depending on the nature of the olfactory task. Studies from the authors of the present review and other groups brought evidence for a link between these oscillations and behavioral changes induced by olfactory learning. However, differences in studies led to divergent interpretations concerning the respective role of these oscillations in olfactory processing. Based on a critical reexamination of those data, we propose hypotheses on the functional involvement of beta and gamma oscillations for odor perception and memory. PMID:25002840

  7. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform…

  8. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform…

  9. Eigenvalue Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis

    2016-02-01

    We prove that the complex conjugate (c.c.) eigenvalues of a smoothly varying real matrix attract (Eq. 15). We offer a dynamical perspective on the motion and interaction of the eigenvalues in the complex plane, derive their governing equations and discuss applications. C.c. pairs closest to the real axis, or those that are ill-conditioned, attract most strongly and can collide to become exactly real. As an application we consider random perturbations of a fixed matrix M. If M is Normal, the total expected force on any eigenvalue is shown to be only the attraction of its c.c. (Eq. 24) and when M is circulant the strength of interaction can be related to the power spectrum of white noise. We extend this by calculating the expected force (Eq. 41) for real stochastic processes with zero-mean and independent intervals. To quantify the dominance of the c.c. attraction, we calculate the variance of other forces. We apply the results to the Hatano-Nelson model and provide other numerical illustrations. It is our hope that the simple dynamical perspective herein might help better understanding of the aggregation and low density of the eigenvalues of real random matrices on and near the real line respectively. In the appendix we provide a Matlab code for plotting the trajectories of the eigenvalues.

  10. Attracting Wildlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Jay

    1979-01-01

    The artcile answers some questions frequently asked by growing numbers of bird and animal feeders regarding what types of feeders and seed to use and what kinds of birds can be attracted to a given area. It discusses problems which can arise from this enjoyable year-round recreation. (SB)

  11. Attracting Wildlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Jay

    1979-01-01

    The artcile answers some questions frequently asked by growing numbers of bird and animal feeders regarding what types of feeders and seed to use and what kinds of birds can be attracted to a given area. It discusses problems which can arise from this enjoyable year-round recreation. (SB)

  12. Identification and molecular regulation of neural stem cells in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Beites, Crestina L; Kawauchi, Shimako; Crocker, Candice E; Calof, Anne L

    2005-06-10

    The sensory neurons that subserve olfaction, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), are regenerated throughout life, making the neuroepithelium in which they reside [the olfactory epithelium (OE)] an excellent model for studying how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate stem cell dynamics and neurogenesis during development and regeneration. Numerous studies indicate that transcription factors and signaling molecules together regulate generation of ORNs from stem and progenitor cells during development, and work on regenerative neurogenesis indicates that these same factors may operate at postnatal ages as well. This review describes our current knowledge of the identity of the OE neural stem cell; the different cell types that are thought to be the progeny (directly or indirectly) of this stem cell; and the factors that influence cell differentiation in the OE neuronal lineage. We review data suggesting that (1) the ORN lineage contains three distinct proliferating cell types--a stem cell and two populations of transit amplifying cells; (2) in established OE, these three cell types are present within the basal cell compartment of the epithelium; and (3) the stem cell that gives rise ultimately to ORNs may also generate two glial cell types of the primary olfactory pathway: sustentacular cells (SUS), which lie within OE proper; and olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), which envelope the olfactory nerve. In addition, we describe factors that are both made by and found within the microenvironment of OE stem and progenitor cells, and which exert crucial growth regulatory effects on these cells. Thus, as with other regenerating tissues, the basis of regeneration in the OE appears be a population of stem cells, which resides within a microenvironment (niche) consisting of factors crucial for maintenance of its capacity for proliferation and differentiation.

  13. Identification and molecular regulation of neural stem cells in the olfactory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Beites, Crestina L.; Kawauchi, Shimako; Crocker, Candice E.; Calof, Anne L. . E-mail: alcalof@uci.edu

    2005-06-10

    The sensory neurons that subserve olfaction, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), are regenerated throughout life, making the neuroepithelium in which they reside [the olfactory epithelium (OE)] an excellent model for studying how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate stem cell dynamics and neurogenesis during development and regeneration. Numerous studies indicate that transcription factors and signaling molecules together regulate generation of ORNs from stem and progenitor cells during development, and work on regenerative neurogenesis indicates that these same factors may operate at postnatal ages as well. This review describes our current knowledge of the identity of the OE neural stem cell; the different cell types that are thought to be the progeny (directly or indirectly) of this stem cell; and the factors that influence cell differentiation in the OE neuronal lineage. We review data suggesting that (1) the ORN lineage contains three distinct proliferating cell types-a stem cell and two populations of transit amplifying cells; (2) in established OE, these three cell types are present within the basal cell compartment of the epithelium; and (3) the stem cell that gives rise ultimately to ORNs may also generate two glial cell types of the primary olfactory pathway: sustentacular cells (SUS), which lie within OE proper; and olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), which envelope the olfactory nerve. In addition, we describe factors that are both made by and found within the microenvironment of OE stem and progenitor cells, and which exert crucial growth regulatory effects on these cells. Thus, as with other regenerating tissues, the basis of regeneration in the OE appears be a population of stem cells, which resides within a microenvironment (niche) consisting of factors crucial for maintenance of its capacity for proliferation and differentiation.

  14. Peripheral and central olfactory tuning in a moth.

    PubMed

    Ong, Rose C; Stopfer, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Animals can be innately attracted to certain odorants. Because these attractants are particularly salient, they might be expected to induce relatively strong responses throughout the olfactory pathway, helping animals detect the most relevant odors but limiting flexibility to respond to other odors. Alternatively, specific neural wiring might link innately preferred odors to appropriate behaviors without a need for intensity biases. How nonpheromonal attractants are processed by the general olfactory system remains largely unknown. In the moth Manduca sexta, we studied this with a set of innately preferred host plant odors and other, neutral odors. Electroantennogram recordings showed that, as a population, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) did not respond with greater intensity to host plant odors, and further local field potential recordings showed that no specific amplification of signals induced by host plant odors occurred between the first olfactory center and the second. Moreover, when odorants were mutually diluted to elicit equally intense output from the ORNs, moths were able to learn to associate all tested odorants equally well with food reward. Together, these results suggest that, although nonpheromonal host plant odors activate broadly distributed responses, they may be linked to attractive behaviors mainly through specific wiring in the brain.

  15. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities

    PubMed Central

    Grimaud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout. PMID:27194792

  16. Classical Olfactory Conditioning in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xin Nian

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME), a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning. PMID:25837420

  17. Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia Li; Chen, Xiao Yan; Zeng, Xin Nian

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME), a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

  18. Chemistry of sex attraction.

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, W L

    1995-01-01

    The chemical communication system used to attract mates involves not only the overt chemical signals but also indirectly a great deal of chemistry in the emitter and receiver. As an example, in emitting female moths, this includes enzymes (and cofactors, mRNA, genes) of the pheromone biosynthetic pathways, hormones (and genes) involved in controlling pheromone production, receptors and second messengers for the hormones, and host plant cues that control release of the hormone. In receiving male moths, this includes the chemistry of pheromone transportation in antennal olfactory hairs (binding proteins and sensillar esterases) and the chemistry of signal transduction, which includes specific dendritic pheromone receptors and a rapid inositol triphosphate second messenger signal. A fluctuating plume structure is an integral part of the signal since the antennal receptors need intermittent stimulation to sustain upwind flight. Input from the hundreds of thousands of sensory cells is processed and integrated with other modalities in the central nervous system, but many unknown factors modulate the information before it is fed to motor neurons for behavioral responses. An unknown brain control center for pheromone perception is discussed relative to data from behavioral-threshold studies showing modulation by biogenic amines, such as octopamine and serotonin, from genetic studies on pheromone discrimination, and from behavioral and electrophysiological studies with behavioral antagonists. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7816846

  19. The odorous attractant of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana (L.). I. Quantitative aspects of the response to the attractant.

    PubMed

    WHARTON, D R; MILLER, G L; WHARTON, M L

    1954-03-01

    1. Procedures have been developed for studying quantitatively the response of the male American cockroach to the odorous attractant of the female. 2. The percentage of male roaches responding to extracts of the attractant of the female has been found to vary with the log of the concentration of the attractant throughout a wide range. 3. Adaptation to the olfactory stimulus has been demonstrated. 4. A theory of adaptation is offered.

  20. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization

    PubMed Central

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens. PMID:27069253

  1. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2016-05-15

    The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. A large fraction of neocortical myelin ensheathes axons of local inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Micheva, Kristina D; Wolman, Dylan; Mensh, Brett D; Pax, Elizabeth; Buchanan, JoAnn; Smith, Stephen J; Bock, Davi D

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is best known for its role in increasing the conduction velocity and metabolic efficiency of long-range excitatory axons. Accordingly, the myelin observed in neocortical gray matter is thought to mostly ensheath excitatory axons connecting to subcortical regions and distant cortical areas. Using independent analyses of light and electron microscopy data from mouse neocortex, we show that a surprisingly large fraction of cortical myelin (half the myelin in layer 2/3 and a quarter in layer 4) ensheathes axons of inhibitory neurons, specifically of parvalbumin-positive basket cells. This myelin differs significantly from that of excitatory axons in distribution and protein composition. Myelin on inhibitory axons is unlikely to meaningfully hasten the arrival of spikes at their pre-synaptic terminals, due to the patchy distribution and short path-lengths observed. Our results thus highlight the need for exploring alternative roles for myelin in neocortical circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15784.001 PMID:27383052

  3. Olfactory toxicity in fishes.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Keith B; Baldwin, David H; Hara, Toshiaki J; Ross, Peter S; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Kennedy, Christopher J

    2010-01-21

    Olfaction conveys critical environmental information to fishes, enabling activities such as mating, locating food, discriminating kin, avoiding predators and homing. All of these behaviors can be impaired or lost as a result of exposure to toxic contaminants in surface waters. Historically, teleost olfaction studies have focused on behavioral responses to anthropogenic contaminants (e.g., avoidance). More recently, there has been a shift towards understanding the underlying mechanisms and functional significance of contaminant-mediated changes in fish olfaction. This includes a consideration of how contaminants affect the olfactory nervous system and, by extension, the downstream physiological and behavioral processes that together comprise a normal response to naturally occurring stimuli (e.g., reproductive priming or releasing pheromones). Numerous studies spanning several species have shown that ecologically relevant exposures to common pollutants such as metals and pesticides can interfere with fish olfaction and disrupt life history processes that determine individual survival and reproductive success. This represents one of the pathways by which toxic chemicals in aquatic habitats may increasingly contribute to the decline and at-risk status of many commercially and ecologically important fish stocks. Despite our emerging understanding of the threats that pollution poses for chemical communication in aquatic communities, many research challenges remain. These include: (1) the determination of specific mechanisms of toxicity in the fish olfactory sensory epithelium; (2) an understanding of the impacts of complex chemical mixtures; (3) the capacity to assess olfactory toxicity in fish in situ; (4) the impacts of toxins on olfactory-mediated behaviors that are still poorly understood for many fish species; and (5) the connections between sublethal effects on individual fish and the long-term viability of wild populations. This review summarizes and integrates

  4. Primary Events in Olfactory Reception

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-08

    sustentacular cells and Bowman’s glands and that it is deposited in the lower mucus layer of olfactory neuroepithelium. Next, we extracted mRNA from...protrude from the dendritic tips of olfactory receptor neurons. These cilia are surrounded by a layer of mucus that lines the olfactory...neuroepithelium. Odorants that enter the nasal cavity with the inspired air partition into and diffuse through this aqueous mucus layer on their way to odorant

  5. Sildenafil affects olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Gudziol, V; Mück-Weymann, M; Seizinger, O; Rauh, R; Siffert, W; Hummel, T

    2007-01-01

    Sildenafil is the first member of a new class of oral drugs effective for erectile dysfunction. However, approximately 20% of patients complain about nasal congestion after sildenafil administration. Because nasal airflow and olfaction are closely linked, the sense of smell was evaluated in 20 young, healthy volunteers after the administration of 50 and 100 mg sildenafil, and placebo in a double-blinded, crossover study. Olfactory function was evaluated using a standardized and validated test (Sniffin' Sticks). To investigate a possible impact of G-protein beta3 subunit C825T polymorphism on the effect of sildenafil on olfaction the genotype of all subjects was determined. The effect of sildenafil on olfaction was only present at a dose of 100 mg but not at a dose of 50 mg sildenafil. The genotypes TT, CC and TC of the G-protein beta3 C825T polymorphism had no impact on the change in olfactory function. Higher sildenafil doses may produce decreased olfactory sensitivity.

  6. Recent Trend in Development of Olfactory Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Yasuyuki

    An olfactory display is a device that generates scented air with desired concentration of aroma, and delivers it to the user's olfactory organ. In this article, the nature of olfaction is briefly described from the view point of how to configure olfactory displays. Next, component technologies to compose olfactory displays, i.e., making scents and delivering scents, are categorized. Several existing olfactory display systems are introduced to show the current status of research and development of olfactory displays.

  7. [Olfactory receptors and odour coding].

    PubMed

    Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Sanz, Guenhaël; Briand, Loïc

    2006-09-01

    The first step of olfactory detection involves interactions between odorant molecules and neuronal protein receptors. Odour coding results from the combinatory activation of a set of receptors and rests on their clonal expression and olfactory neurone connexion, which lead to formation of a specific sensory map in the cortex. This system, sufficient to discriminate myriads of odorants with a mere 350 different receptors, allows humans to smell molecules that are not natural (new cooking flavours, synthetic chemicals...). The extreme olfactory genome diversity explains the absence of odour semantics. Olfactory receptors are also involved in cellular chemotaxis.

  8. Using Single Sensillum Recording to Detect Olfactory Neuron Responses of Bed Bugs to Semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Nannan

    2016-01-18

    The insect olfactory system plays an important role in detecting semiochemicals in the environment. In particular, the antennal sensilla which house single or multiple neurons inside, are considered to make the major contribution in responding to the chemical stimuli. By directly recording action potential in the olfactory sensillum after exposure to stimuli, single sensillum recording (SSR) technique provides a powerful approach for investigating the neural responses of insects to chemical stimuli. For the bed bug, which is a notorious human parasite, multiple types of olfactory sensillum have been characterized. In this study, we demonstrated neural responses of bed bug olfactory sensilla to two chemical stimuli and the dose-dependent responses to one of them using the SSR method. This approach enables researchers to conduct early screening for individual chemical stimuli on the bed bug olfactory sensilla, which would provide valuable information for the development of new bed bug attractants or repellents and benefits the bed bug control efforts.

  9. Recovery of olfactory function after bilateral bulbectomy.

    PubMed

    Wright, J W; Harding, J W

    1982-04-16

    Mice were trained to discriminate between scented and unscented air. After olfactory bulbs were removed, discrimination was lost, but returned with the formation of synaptic connections between regenerated primary olfactory neurons and the cortex of the forebrain. The acquisition of a second olfactory-mediated task by long-term bulbectomized mice and controls was indistinguishable. The results emphasize the plasticity of the nervous system, correlate the presence of neural connections between olfactory mucosa and forebrain with the recovery of olfactory function, suggest that olfactory-mediated memory resides at least in part outside the olfactory bulbs, and demonstrate that the bulbs are not required for the acquisition of olfactory tasks.

  10. Starvation promotes concerted modulation of appetitive olfactory behavior via parallel neuromodulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kang I; Root, Cory M; Lindsay, Scott A; Zaninovich, Orel A; Shepherd, Andrew K; Wasserman, Steven A; Kim, Susy M; Wang, Jing W

    2015-01-01

    The internal state of an organism influences its perception of attractive or aversive stimuli and thus promotes adaptive behaviors that increase its likelihood of survival. The mechanisms underlying these perceptual shifts are critical to our understanding of how neural circuits support animal cognition and behavior. Starved flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to attractive odors and reduced sensitivity to aversive odors. Here, we show that a functional remodeling of the olfactory map is mediated by two parallel neuromodulatory systems that act in opposing directions on olfactory attraction and aversion at the level of the first synapse. Short neuropeptide F sensitizes an antennal lobe glomerulus wired for attraction, while tachykinin (DTK) suppresses activity of a glomerulus wired for aversion. Thus we show parallel neuromodulatory systems functionally reconfigure early olfactory processing to optimize detection of nutrients at the risk of ignoring potentially toxic food resources. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08298.001 PMID:26208339

  11. Starvation promotes concerted modulation of appetitive olfactory behavior via parallel neuromodulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kang I; Root, Cory M; Lindsay, Scott A; Zaninovich, Orel A; Shepherd, Andrew K; Wasserman, Steven A; Kim, Susy M; Wang, Jing W

    2015-07-24

    The internal state of an organism influences its perception of attractive or aversive stimuli and thus promotes adaptive behaviors that increase its likelihood of survival. The mechanisms underlying these perceptual shifts are critical to our understanding of how neural circuits support animal cognition and behavior. Starved flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to attractive odors and reduced sensitivity to aversive odors. Here, we show that a functional remodeling of the olfactory map is mediated by two parallel neuromodulatory systems that act in opposing directions on olfactory attraction and aversion at the level of the first synapse. Short neuropeptide F sensitizes an antennal lobe glomerulus wired for attraction, while tachykinin (DTK) suppresses activity of a glomerulus wired for aversion. Thus we show parallel neuromodulatory systems functionally reconfigure early olfactory processing to optimize detection of nutrients at the risk of ignoring potentially toxic food resources.

  12. Mammalian social odours: attraction and individual recognition

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Peter A; Kendrick, Keith M

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian social systems rely on signals passed between individuals conveying information including sex, reproductive status, individual identity, ownership, competitive ability and health status. Many of these signals take the form of complex mixtures of molecules sensed by chemosensory systems and have important influences on a variety of behaviours that are vital for reproductive success, such as parent–offspring attachment, mate choice and territorial marking. This article aims to review the nature of these chemosensory cues and the neural pathways mediating their physiological and behavioural effects. Despite the complexities of mammalian societies, there are instances where single molecules can act as classical pheromones attracting interest and approach behaviour. Chemosignals with relatively high volatility can be used to signal at a distance and are sensed by the main olfactory system. Most mammals also possess a vomeronasal system, which is specialized to detect relatively non-volatile chemosensory cues following direct contact. Single attractant molecules are sensed by highly specific receptors using a labelled line pathway. These act alongside more complex mixtures of signals that are required to signal individual identity. There are multiple sources of such individuality chemosignals, based on the highly polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or lipocalins such as the mouse major urinary proteins. The individual profile of volatile components that make up an individual odour signature can be sensed by the main olfactory system, as the pattern of activity across an array of broadly tuned receptor types. In addition, the vomeronasal system can respond highly selectively to non-volatile peptide ligands associated with the MHC, acting at the V2r class of vomeronasal receptor. The ability to recognize individuals or their genetic relatedness plays an important role in mammalian social behaviour. Thus robust systems for olfactory

  13. Elements of olfactory reception in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Martin, Fernando; Boto, Tamara; Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Alcorta, Esther

    2013-09-01

    The olfactory system of Drosophila has become an attractive and simple model to investigate olfaction because it follows the same organizational principles of vertebrates, and the results can be directly applied to other insects with economic and sanitary relevance. Here, we review the structural elements of the Drosophila olfactory reception organs at the level of the cells and molecules involved. This article is intended to reflect the structural basis underlying the functional variability of the detection of an olfactory universe composed of thousands of odors. At the genetic level, we further detail the genes and transcription factors (TF) that determine the structural variability. The fly's olfactory receptor organs are the third antennal segments and the maxillary palps, which are covered with sensory hairs called sensilla. These sensilla house the odorant receptor neurons (ORNs) that express one or few odorant receptors in a stereotyped pattern regulated by combinations of TF. Also, perireceptor events, such as odor molecules transport to their receptors, are carried out by odorant binding proteins. In addition, the rapid odorant inactivation to preclude saturation of the system occurs by biotransformation and detoxification enzymes. These additional events take place in the lymph that surrounds the ORNs. We include some data on ionotropic and metabotropic olfactory transduction, although this issue is still under debate in Drosophila.

  14. Environmental Toxicants-Induced Immune Responses in the Olfactory Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Fumiaki; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are the receptor cells for the sense of smell. Although cell bodies are located in the olfactory mucosa (OM) of the nasal cavity, OSN axons directly project to the olfactory bulb (OB) that is a component of the central nervous system (CNS). Because of this direct and short connection from this peripheral tissue to the CNS, the olfactory system has attracted attention as a port-of-entry for environmental toxicants that may cause neurological dysfunction. Selected viruses can enter the OB via the OM and directly affect the CNS. On the other hand, environmental toxicants may induce inflammatory responses in the OM, including infiltration of immune cells and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, these inflammatory responses cause the loss of OSNs that are then replaced with newly generated OSNs that re-connect to the OB after inflammation has subsided. It is now known that immune cells and cytokines in the OM play important roles in both degeneration and regeneration of OSNs. Thus, the olfactory system is a unique neuroimmune interface where interaction between nervous and immune systems in the periphery significantly affects the structure, neuronal circuitry, and immunological status of the CNS. The mechanisms by which immune cells regulate OSN loss and the generation of new OSNs are, however, largely unknown. To help develop a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we have provided a review of key research that has investigated how the immune response in the OM affects the pathophysiology of OSNs. PMID:27867383

  15. Environmental Toxicants-Induced Immune Responses in the Olfactory Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Fumiaki; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are the receptor cells for the sense of smell. Although cell bodies are located in the olfactory mucosa (OM) of the nasal cavity, OSN axons directly project to the olfactory bulb (OB) that is a component of the central nervous system (CNS). Because of this direct and short connection from this peripheral tissue to the CNS, the olfactory system has attracted attention as a port-of-entry for environmental toxicants that may cause neurological dysfunction. Selected viruses can enter the OB via the OM and directly affect the CNS. On the other hand, environmental toxicants may induce inflammatory responses in the OM, including infiltration of immune cells and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, these inflammatory responses cause the loss of OSNs that are then replaced with newly generated OSNs that re-connect to the OB after inflammation has subsided. It is now known that immune cells and cytokines in the OM play important roles in both degeneration and regeneration of OSNs. Thus, the olfactory system is a unique neuroimmune interface where interaction between nervous and immune systems in the periphery significantly affects the structure, neuronal circuitry, and immunological status of the CNS. The mechanisms by which immune cells regulate OSN loss and the generation of new OSNs are, however, largely unknown. To help develop a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we have provided a review of key research that has investigated how the immune response in the OM affects the pathophysiology of OSNs.

  16. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated. Significance Statement The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic

  17. Olfactory dysfunction and daily life.

    PubMed

    Frasnelli, Johannes; Hummel, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with parosmia suffer more in their daily life than patients who experience only quantitative olfactory loss. Two hundred five outpatients of the Smell and Taste Clinic and 25 healthy controls were included. The newly developed Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders (QOD) was administered in combination with other psychometric tests (Beck Depression Inventory, "Befindlichkeitsskala" and the Short Form-36 Health Survey) along with an olfactory test ("Sniffin' Sticks"). Results of the QOD were found to be an appropriate and valid measure of the impact of olfactory dysfunction on daily life. Patients with parosmia and quantitative olfactory dysfunction show higher rates of daily life complaints when compared to patients suffering from quantitative olfactory impairment only (QOD-PS: P=0.005). In addition, hyposmic and anosmic patients indicated significantly more complaints compared to patients with normosmia. Further, female patients seemed to suffer more from olfactory dysfunction than male patients. In conclusion, the assessment of the degree of qualitative olfactory dysfunction may be possible by the use of instruments based on questionnaires regarding daily life problems.

  18. Olfactory illusions: where are they?

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Richard J

    2011-12-01

    It has been suggested that there maybe no olfactory illusions. This manuscript examines this claim and argues that it arises because olfactory illusions are not typically accompanied by an awareness of their illusory nature. To demonstrate that olfactory illusions do occur, the relevant empirical literature is reviewed, by examining instances of where the same stimulus results in different percepts, and of where different stimuli result in the same percept. The final part of the manuscript evaluates the evidence favoring the existence of olfactory illusions, and then examines why they may not typically be accompanied by awareness. Three contributory mechanisms are discussed, relating to difficulty of verification and paucity of olfactory knowledge, the role of change blindness, and restricted access consciousness in this sense.

  19. A Novel Neural Substrate for the Transformation of Olfactory Inputs into Motor Output

    PubMed Central

    Derjean, Dominique; Moussaddy, Aimen; Atallah, Elias; St-Pierre, Melissa; Auclair, François; Chang, Steven; Ren, Xiang; Zielinski, Barbara; Dubuc, Réjean

    2010-01-01

    It is widely recognized that animals respond to odors by generating or modulating specific motor behaviors. These reactions are important for daily activities, reproduction, and survival. In the sea lamprey, mating occurs after ovulated females are attracted to spawning sites by male sex pheromones. The ubiquity and reliability of olfactory-motor behavioral responses in vertebrates suggest tight coupling between the olfactory system and brain areas controlling movements. However, the circuitry and the underlying cellular neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using lamprey brain preparations, and electrophysiology, calcium imaging, and tract tracing experiments, we describe the neural substrate responsible for transforming an olfactory input into a locomotor output. We found that olfactory stimulation with naturally occurring odors and pheromones induced large excitatory responses in reticulospinal cells, the command neurons for locomotion. We have also identified the anatomy and physiology of this circuit. The olfactory input was relayed in the medial part of the olfactory bulb, in the posterior tuberculum, in the mesencephalic locomotor region, to finally reach reticulospinal cells in the hindbrain. Activation of this olfactory-motor pathway generated rhythmic ventral root discharges and swimming movements. Our study bridges the gap between behavior and cellular neural mechanisms in vertebrates, identifying a specific subsystem within the CNS, dedicated to producing motor responses to olfactory inputs. PMID:21203583

  20. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-10-17

    The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic spines, the complexity of multisynaptic innervations and the degree of the perisynaptic astroglial ensheathment that controls synaptic homeostasis. These findings show a pivotal role of Reelin in GC synaptogenesis and provide a foundation for structural circuit alterations caused by Reelin deregulation that may occur in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  1. Response of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Screwworm Oviposition Attractant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sheep blow fly, Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causes sheep myiasis in various parts of the world. The females are attracted to sheep, following various olfactory cues emanating from the sheep's body, and oviposit on suitable substrates on sheep ultimately causing myiasis. Ear...

  2. A Single Pair of Serotonergic Neurons Counteracts Serotonergic Inhibition of Ethanol Attraction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Andrea; Gräber, Nikolas; Schläger, Laura; Ritze, Yvonne; Scholz, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Attraction to ethanol is common in both flies and humans, but the neuromodulatory mechanisms underlying this innate attraction are not well understood. Here, we dissect the function of the key regulator of serotonin signaling—the serotonin transporter–in innate olfactory attraction to ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster. We generated a mutated version of the serotonin transporter that prolongs serotonin signaling in the synaptic cleft and is targeted via the Gal4 system to different sets of serotonergic neurons. We identified four serotonergic neurons that inhibit the olfactory attraction to ethanol and two additional neurons that counteract this inhibition by strengthening olfactory information. Our results reveal that compensation can occur on the circuit level and that serotonin has a bidirectional function in modulating the innate attraction to ethanol. Given the evolutionarily conserved nature of the serotonin transporter and serotonin, the bidirectional serotonergic mechanisms delineate a basic principle for how random behavior is switched into targeted approach behavior. PMID:27936023

  3. A Single Pair of Serotonergic Neurons Counteracts Serotonergic Inhibition of Ethanol Attraction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; He, Jianzheng; Kaiser, Andrea; Gräber, Nikolas; Schläger, Laura; Ritze, Yvonne; Scholz, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Attraction to ethanol is common in both flies and humans, but the neuromodulatory mechanisms underlying this innate attraction are not well understood. Here, we dissect the function of the key regulator of serotonin signaling-the serotonin transporter-in innate olfactory attraction to ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster. We generated a mutated version of the serotonin transporter that prolongs serotonin signaling in the synaptic cleft and is targeted via the Gal4 system to different sets of serotonergic neurons. We identified four serotonergic neurons that inhibit the olfactory attraction to ethanol and two additional neurons that counteract this inhibition by strengthening olfactory information. Our results reveal that compensation can occur on the circuit level and that serotonin has a bidirectional function in modulating the innate attraction to ethanol. Given the evolutionarily conserved nature of the serotonin transporter and serotonin, the bidirectional serotonergic mechanisms delineate a basic principle for how random behavior is switched into targeted approach behavior.

  4. Olfactory receptor gene expression in tiger salamander olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Marchand, James E; Yang, Xinhai; Chikaraishi, Dona; Krieger, Jurgen; Breer, Heinz; Kauer, John S

    2004-06-28

    Physiological studies of odor-elicited responses from the olfactory epithelium and bulb in the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, have elucidated a number of features of olfactory coding that appear to be conserved across several vertebrate species. This animal model has provided an accessible in vivo system for observing individual and ensemble olfactory responses to odorant stimulation using biochemical, neurophysiological, and behavioral assays. In this paper we have complemented these studies by characterizing 35 candidate odorant receptor genes. These receptor sequences are similar to those of the large families of olfactory receptors found in mammals and fish. In situ hybridization, using RNA probes to 20 of these sequences, demonstrates differential distributions of labeled cells across the extent and within the depth of the olfactory epithelium. The distributions of cells labeled with probes to different receptors show spatially restricted patterns that are generally localized to different degrees in medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions. The patterns of receptor expression in the ventral olfactory epithelium (OE) are mirrored in the dorsal OE. We present a hypothesis as to how the sensory neuron populations expressing different receptor types responding to a particular odorant may relate to the distribution patterns of epithelial and bulbar responses previously characterized using single-unit and voltage-sensitive dye recording methods. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective loss to certain odours, not hitherto described. The evoked potentials were significantly delayed but of comparable amplitude to a control matched population. Of the 73 patients studied only 37 had a technically satisfactory record containing a clear response to both gases and of these, 12 were delayed. For H2S there was more delay on stimulating the right nostril than the left. Some patients with normal smell identification test scores had delayed evoked potentials. In the pathological examination of olfactory bulbs from eight brains, changes characteristic of Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies) were seen in every olfactory bulb, particularly in the anterior olfactory nucleus, and were sufficiently distinct to allow a presumptive diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Olfactory damage in Parkinson's disease is consistent and severe and may provide an important clue to the aetiology of the disease.

  6. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. METHODS: A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective loss to certain odours, not hitherto described. The evoked potentials were significantly delayed but of comparable amplitude to a control matched population. Of the 73 patients studied only 37 had a technically satisfactory record containing a clear response to both gases and of these, 12 were delayed. For H2S there was more delay on stimulating the right nostril than the left. Some patients with normal smell identification test scores had delayed evoked potentials. In the pathological examination of olfactory bulbs from eight brains, changes characteristic of Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies) were seen in every olfactory bulb, particularly in the anterior olfactory nucleus, and were sufficiently distinct to allow a presumptive diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. CONCLUSIONS: Olfactory damage in Parkinson's disease is consistent and severe and may provide an important clue to the aetiology of the disease. Images PMID:9153598

  7. Antennal olfactory sensilla responses to insect chemical repellents in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Haynes, Kenneth F; Appel, Arthur G; Liu, Nannan

    2014-06-01

    Populations of the common bed bug Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera; Cimicidae), a temporary ectoparasite on both humans and animals, have surged in many developed countries. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, C. lectularius relies on its olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment, including both attractants and repellents. To elucidate the olfactory responses of the common bed bug to commonly used insect chemical repellents, particularly haematophagous repellents, we investigated the neuronal responses of individual olfactory sensilla in C. lectularius' antennae to 52 insect chemical repellents, both synthetic and botanic. Different types of sensilla displayed highly distinctive response profiles. While C sensilla did not respond to any of the insect chemical repellents, Dγ sensilla proved to be the most sensitive in response to terpene-derived insect chemical repellents. Different chemical repellents elicited neuronal responses with differing temporal characteristics, and the responses of the olfactory sensilla to the insect chemical repellents were dose-dependent, with an olfactory response to the terpene-derived chemical repellent, but not to the non-terpene-derived chemical repellents. Overall, this study furnishes a comprehensive map of the olfactory response of bed bugs to commonly used insect chemical repellents, providing useful information for those developing new agents (attractants or repellents) for bed bug control.

  8. Olfactory Mucosa Autografts in Human Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Carlos; Pratas-Vital, José; Escada, Pedro; Hasse-Ferreira, Armando; Capucho, Clara; Peduzzi, Jean D

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: Olfactory mucosa is a readily accessible source of olfactory ensheathing and stem-like progenitor cells for neural repair. To determine the safety and feasibility of transplanting olfactory mucosa autografts into patients with traumatically injured spinal cords, a human pilot clinical study was conducted. Methods: Seven patients ranging from 18 to 32 years of age (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] class A) were treated at 6 months to 6.5 years after injury. Olfactory mucosa autografts were transplanted into lesions ranging from 1 to 6 cm that were present at C4–T6 neurological levels. Operations were performed from July 2001 through March 2003. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and ASIA neurological and otolaryngological evaluations were performed before and after surgery. Results: MRI studies revealed moderate to complete filling of the lesion sites. Two patients reported return of sensation in their bladders, and one of these patients regained voluntary contraction of anal sphincter. Two of the 7 ASIA A patients became ASIA C. Every patient had improvement in ASIA motor scores. The mean increase for the 3 subjects with tetraplegia in the upper extremities was 6.3 ± 1.2 (SEM), and the mean increase for the 4 subjects with paraplegia in the lower extremities was 3.9 ± 1.0. Among the patients who improved in their ASIA sensory neurological scores (all except one patient), the mean increase was 20.3 ± 5.0 for light touch and 19.7 ± 4.6 for pinprick. Most of the recovered sensation below the initial level of injury was impaired. Adverse events included sensory decrease in one patient that was most likely caused by difficulty in locating the lesion, and there were a few instances of transient pain that was relieved by medication. EMG revealed motor unit potential when the patient was asked to perform movement. Conclusion: This study shows that olfactory mucosa autograft transplantation into the human injured

  9. Taxis assays measure directional movement of mosquitoes to olfactory cues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria control methods targeting indoor-biting mosquitoes have limited impact on vectors that feed and rest outdoors. Exploiting mosquito olfactory behaviour to reduce blood-feeding outdoors might be a sustainable approach to complement existing control strategies. Methodologies that can objectively quantify responses to odour under realistic field conditions and allow high-throughput screening of many compounds are required for development of effective odour-based control strategies. Methods The olfactory responses of laboratory-reared Anopheles gambiae in a semi-field tunnel and A. arabiensis females in an outdoor field setting to three stimuli, namely whole human odour, a synthetic blend of carboxylic acids plus carbon dioxide and CO2 alone at four distances up to 100 metres were measured in two experiments using three-chambered taxis boxes that allow mosquito responses to natural or experimentally-introduced odour cues to be quantified. Results Taxis box assays could detect both activation of flight and directional mosquito movement. Significantly more (6-18%) A. arabiensis mosquitoes were attracted to natural human odour in the field up to 30 metres compared to controls, and blended synthetic human odours attracted 20% more A. gambiae in the semi-field tunnel up to 70 metres. Whereas CO2 elicited no response in A. arabiensis in the open field, it was attractive to A. gambiae up to 50 metres (65% attraction compared to 36% in controls). Conclusions We have developed a simple reproducible system to allow for the comparison of compounds that are active over medium- to long-ranges in semi-field or full-field environments. Knowing the natural range of attraction of anopheline mosquitoes to potential blood sources has substantial implications for the design of malaria control strategies, and adds to the understanding of olfactory behaviour in mosquitoes. This experimental strategy could also be extended from malaria vectors to other motile arthropods of

  10. Taxis assays measure directional movement of mosquitoes to olfactory cues.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Lena M; Keane, Aidan; Moore, Jason D; Munk, Cristina J; Seeholzer, Laura; Mseka, Antony; Simfukwe, Emmanuel; Ligamba, Joseph; Turner, Elizabeth L; Biswaro, Lubandwa R; Okumu, Fredros O; Killeen, Gerry F; Mukabana, Wolfgang R; Moore, Sarah J

    2013-05-03

    Malaria control methods targeting indoor-biting mosquitoes have limited impact on vectors that feed and rest outdoors. Exploiting mosquito olfactory behaviour to reduce blood-feeding outdoors might be a sustainable approach to complement existing control strategies. Methodologies that can objectively quantify responses to odour under realistic field conditions and allow high-throughput screening of many compounds are required for development of effective odour-based control strategies. The olfactory responses of laboratory-reared Anopheles gambiae in a semi-field tunnel and A. arabiensis females in an outdoor field setting to three stimuli, namely whole human odour, a synthetic blend of carboxylic acids plus carbon dioxide and CO(2) alone at four distances up to 100 metres were measured in two experiments using three-chambered taxis boxes that allow mosquito responses to natural or experimentally-introduced odour cues to be quantified. Taxis box assays could detect both activation of flight and directional mosquito movement. Significantly more (6-18%) A. arabiensis mosquitoes were attracted to natural human odour in the field up to 30 metres compared to controls, and blended synthetic human odours attracted 20% more A. gambiae in the semi-field tunnel up to 70 metres. Whereas CO(2) elicited no response in A. arabiensis in the open field, it was attractive to A. gambiae up to 50 metres (65% attraction compared to 36% in controls). We have developed a simple reproducible system to allow for the comparison of compounds that are active over medium- to long-ranges in semi-field or full-field environments. Knowing the natural range of attraction of anopheline mosquitoes to potential blood sources has substantial implications for the design of malaria control strategies, and adds to the understanding of olfactory behaviour in mosquitoes. This experimental strategy could also be extended from malaria vectors to other motile arthropods of medical, veterinary and

  11. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients.

  12. Multifunctional hybrid nanocarrier: magnetic CNTs ensheathed with mesoporous silica for drug delivery and imaging system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajendra K; Patel, Kapil D; Kim, Jung-Ju; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Shin, Ueon Sang; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-02-26

    Here we communicate the development of a novel multifunctional hybrid nanomaterial, magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) ensheathed with mesoporous silica, for the simultaneous applications of drug delivery and imaging. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were first decorated onto the multiwalled CNTs, which was then layered with mesoporous silica (mSiO2) to facilitate the loading of bioactive molecules to a large quantity while exerting magnetic properties. The hybrid nanomaterial showed a high mesoporosity due to the surface-layered mSiO2, and excellent magnetic properties, including magnetic resonance imaging in vitro and in vivo. The mesoporous and magnetic hybrid nanocarriers showed high loading capacity for therapeutic molecules including drug gentamicin and protein cytochrome C. In particular, genetic molecule siRNA was effectively loaded and then released over a period of days to a week. Furthermore, the hybrid nanocarriers exhibited a high cell uptake rate through magnetism, while eliciting favorable biological efficacy within the cells. This novel hybrid multifunctional nanocarrier may be potentially applicable as drug delivery and imaging systems.

  13. Integration of Visual and Olfactory Cues in Host Plant Identification by the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    PubMed Central

    L.Yv, Fei; Hai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Zhigang; Yan, Aihua; Liu, Bingxiang; Bi, Yongguo

    2015-01-01

    Some insects use host and mate cues, including odor, color, and shape, to locate and recognize their preferred hosts and mates. Previous research has shown that the Asian longicorn beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), uses olfactory cues to locate host plants and differentiate them from non-host plants. However, whether A. glabripennis adults use visual cues or a combination of visual and olfactory cues remains unclear. In this study, we tested the host location and recognition behavior in A. glabripennis, which infests a number of hardwood species and causes considerable economic losses in North America, Europe and Asia. We determined the relative importance of visual and olfactory cues from Acer negundo in host plant location and recognition, as well as in the discrimination of non-host plants (Sabina chinensis and Pinus bungeana), by female and male A. glabripennis. Visual and olfactory cues from the host plants (A. negundo), alone and combined, attracted significantly more females and males than equivalent cues from non-host plants (S. chinensis and P. bungeana). Furthermore, the combination of visual and olfactory cues of host plants attracted more adults than either cue alone, and visual cues alone attracted significantly more adults than olfactory cues alone. This finding suggests that adult A. glabripennis has an innate preference for the visual and/or olfactory cues of its host plants (A. negundo) over those of the non-host plant and visual cues are initially more important than olfactory cues for orientation; furthermore, this finding also suggests that adults integrate visual and olfactory cues to find their host plants. Our results indicate that different modalities of host plant cues should be considered together to understand fully the communication between host plants and Asian longhorned beetles. PMID:26556100

  14. Evolution of insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Christine; Dweck, Hany KM; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory sense detects a plethora of behaviorally relevant odor molecules; gene families involved in olfaction exhibit high diversity in different animal phyla. Insects detect volatile molecules using olfactory (OR) or ionotropic receptors (IR) and in some cases gustatory receptors (GRs). While IRs are expressed in olfactory organs across Protostomia, ORs have been hypothesized to be an adaptation to a terrestrial insect lifestyle. We investigated the olfactory system of the primary wingless bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata (Archaeognatha), the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma) and the neopteran leaf insect Phyllium siccifolium (Phasmatodea). ORs and the olfactory coreceptor (Orco) are with very high probability lacking in Lepismachilis; in Thermobia we have identified three Orco candidates, and in Phyllium a fully developed OR/Orco-based system. We suggest that ORs did not arise as an adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle, but evolved later in insect evolution, with Orco being present before the appearance of ORs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.001 PMID:24670956

  15. Key Odorants Regulate Food Attraction in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Giang, Thomas; He, Jianzheng; Belaidi, Safaa; Scholz, Henrike

    2017-01-01

    In insects, the search for food is highly dependent on olfactory sensory input. Here, we investigated whether a single key odorant within an odor blend or the complexity of the odor blend influences the attraction of Drosophila melanogaster to a food source. A key odorant is defined as an odorant that elicits a difference in the behavioral response when two similar complex odor blends are offered. To validate that the observed behavioral responses were elicited by olfactory stimuli, we used olfactory co-receptor Orco mutants. We show that within a food odor blend, ethanol functions as a key odorant. In addition to ethanol other odorants might serve as key odorants at specific concentrations. However, not all odorants are key odorants. The intensity of the odor background influences the attractiveness of the key odorants. Increased complexity is only more attractive in a concentration-dependent range for single compounds in a blend. Orco is necessary to discriminate between two similarly attractive odorants when offered as single odorants and in food odor blends, supporting the importance of single odorant recognition in odor blends. These data strongly indicate that flies use more than one strategy to navigate to a food odor source, depending on the availability of key odorants in the odor blend and the alternative odor offered.

  16. Key Odorants Regulate Food Attraction in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Thomas; He, Jianzheng; Belaidi, Safaa; Scholz, Henrike

    2017-01-01

    In insects, the search for food is highly dependent on olfactory sensory input. Here, we investigated whether a single key odorant within an odor blend or the complexity of the odor blend influences the attraction of Drosophila melanogaster to a food source. A key odorant is defined as an odorant that elicits a difference in the behavioral response when two similar complex odor blends are offered. To validate that the observed behavioral responses were elicited by olfactory stimuli, we used olfactory co-receptor Orco mutants. We show that within a food odor blend, ethanol functions as a key odorant. In addition to ethanol other odorants might serve as key odorants at specific concentrations. However, not all odorants are key odorants. The intensity of the odor background influences the attractiveness of the key odorants. Increased complexity is only more attractive in a concentration-dependent range for single compounds in a blend. Orco is necessary to discriminate between two similarly attractive odorants when offered as single odorants and in food odor blends, supporting the importance of single odorant recognition in odor blends. These data strongly indicate that flies use more than one strategy to navigate to a food odor source, depending on the availability of key odorants in the odor blend and the alternative odor offered. PMID:28928642

  17. Penguins are attracted to dimethyl sulphide at sea.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kyran L B; Pichegru, Lorien; Ryan, Peter G

    2011-08-01

    Breeding Spheniscus penguins are central place foragers that feed primarily on schooling pelagic fish. They are visual hunters, but it is unclear how they locate prey patches on a coarse scale. Many petrels and storm petrels (Procellariiformes), the penguins' closest relatives, use olfactory cues to locate prey concentrations at sea, but this has not been demonstrated for penguins. Procellariiforms are attracted to a variety of olfactory cues, including dimethyl sulphide (DMS), an organosulphur compound released when phytoplankton is grazed, as well as fish odorants such as cod liver oil. A recent study found that African penguins Spheniscus demersus react to DMS on land. We confirm this result and show that African penguins are also attracted by DMS at sea. DMS-scented oil slicks attracted 2-3 times more penguins than control slicks, whereas penguins showed no response to slicks containing cod liver oil. The number of penguins attracted to DMS increased for at least 30 min, suggesting penguins could travel up to 2 km to reach scent cues. Repeats of land-based trials confirmed previous results showing DMS sensitivity of penguins on land. Our results also support the hypothesis that African penguins use DMS as an olfactory cue to locate prey patches at sea from a distance, which is particularly important given their slow commuting speed relative to that of flying seabirds.

  18. Virgin queen attraction toward males in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Florian; Cholé, Hanna; Lafon, Grégory; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2017-07-24

    Although the honeybee is a crucial agricultural agent and a prominent scientific model organism, crucial aspects of its reproductive behaviour are still unknown. During the mating season, honeybee males, the drones, gather in congregations 10-40 m above ground. Converging evidence suggests that drones emit a pheromone that can attract other drones, thereby increasing the size of the congregation. Virgin queens join the vicinity of the congregation after it has formed, and mate with as many as 20 males in mid-air. It is still unclear which sensory cues help virgin queens find drone congregations in the first place. Beside visual cues for long-range orientation, queens may use olfactory cues. We thus tested virgin queens' olfactory orientation on a walking simulator in which they have full control over odour stimulation. We show that sexually-mature virgin queens are attracted to the odour bouquet from a group of living drones. They are not attracted to the bouquet from a group of workers. In addition, non-sexually receptive females (workers) of the same age are not attracted to the drone odour bouquet. Interpreted in the context of mating, these results may suggest that virgin queens use volatile olfactory cues from the drones to find the congregations.

  19. Paraneoplastic syndromes in olfactory neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gabrych, Anna; Czapiewski, Piotr; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare malignant neoplasm of sinonasal tract, derived from olfactory epithelium. Unilateral nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sinusitis, and headaches are common symptoms. Olfactory neuroblastoma shows neuroendocrine differentiation and similarly to other neuroendocrine tumors can produce several types of peptic substances and hormones. Excess production of these substances can be responsible for different types of endocrinological paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS). Moreover, besides endocrinological, in ONB may also occur neurological PNS, caused by immune cross-reactivity between tumor and normal host tissues in the nervous system. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB include: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS), humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), hypertension due to catecholamine secretion by tumor, opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (OMA) and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB tend to have atypical features, therefore diagnosis may be difficult. In this review, we described initial symptoms, patterns of presentation, treatment and outcome of paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB, reported in the literature. PMID:26199564

  20. Olfactory epithelium in the olfactory recess: a case study in new world leaf-nosed bats.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Smith, Timothy D; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2014-11-01

    The olfactory recess (OR) is a restricted space at the back of the nasal fossa in many mammals that is thought to improve olfactory function. Mammals that have an olfactory recess are usually described as keen-scented, while those that do not are typically thought of as less reliant on olfaction. However, the presence of an olfactory recess is not a binary trait. Many mammal families have members that vary substantially in the size and complexity of the olfactory recess. There is also variation in the amount of olfactory epithelium (OE) that is housed in the olfactory recess. Among New World leaf-nosed bats (family Phyllostomidae), species vary by over an order of magnitude in how much of their total OE lies within the OR. Does this variation relate to previously documented neuroanatomical proxies for olfactory reliance? Using data from 12 species of phyllostomid bats, we addressed the hypothesis that the amount of OE within the OR relates to a species' dependence on olfaction, as measured by two commonly used neuroanatomical metrics, the size of the olfactory bulb, and the number of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb, which are the first processing units within the olfactory signal cascade. We found that the percentage of OE within the OR does not relate to either measure of olfactory "ability." This suggests that olfactory reliance is not reflected in the size of the olfactory recess. We explore other roles that the olfactory recess may play. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pheromones mediating copulation and attraction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, Hany K. M.; Ebrahim, Shimaa A. M.; Thoma, Michael; Mohamed, Ahmed A. M.; Keesey, Ian W.; Trona, Federica; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Svatoš, Aleš; Sachse, Silke; Knaden, Markus; Hansson, Bill S.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific olfactory signals known as pheromones play important roles in insect mating systems. In the model Drosophila melanogaster, a key part of the pheromone-detecting system has remained enigmatic through many years of research in terms of both its behavioral significance and its activating ligands. Here we show that Or47b-and Or88a-expressing olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) detect the fly-produced odorants methyl laurate (ML), methyl myristate, and methyl palmitate. Fruitless (fruM)-positive Or47b-expressing OSNs detect ML exclusively, and Or47b- and Or47b-expressing OSNs are required for optimal male copulation behavior. In addition, activation of Or47b-expressing OSNs in the male is sufficient to provide a competitive mating advantage. We further find that the vigorous male courtship displayed toward oenocyte-less flies is attributed to an oenocyte-independent sustained production of the Or47b ligand, ML. In addition, we reveal that Or88a-expressing OSNs respond to all three compounds, and that these neurons are necessary and sufficient for attraction behavior in both males and females. Beyond the OSN level, information regarding the three fly odorants is transferred from the antennal lobe to higher brain centers in two dedicated neural lines. Finally, we find that both Or47b- and Or88a-based systems and their ligands are remarkably conserved over a number of drosophilid species. Taken together, our results close a significant gap in the understanding of the olfactory background to Drosophila mating and attraction behavior; while reproductive isolation barriers between species are created mainly by species-specific signals, the mating enhancing signal in several Drosophila species is conserved. PMID:25964351

  2. Farnesol-Detecting Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ronderos, David S.; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Potter, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to deorphanize a subset of putative Drosophila odorant receptors expressed in trichoid sensilla using a transgenic in vivo misexpression approach. We identified farnesol as a potent and specific activator for the orphan odorant receptor Or83c. Farnesol is an intermediate in juvenile hormone biosynthesis, but is also produced by ripe citrus fruit peels. Here, we show that farnesol stimulates robust activation of Or83c-expressing olfactory neurons, even at high dilutions. The CD36 homolog Snmp1 is required for normal farnesol response kinetics. The neurons expressing Or83c are found in a subset of poorly characterized intermediate sensilla. We show that these neurons mediate attraction behavior to low concentrations of farnesol and that Or83c receptor mutants are defective for this behavior. Or83c neurons innervate the DC3 glomerulus in the antennal lobe and projection neurons relaying information from this glomerulus to higher brain centers target a region of the lateral horn previously implicated in pheromone perception. Our findings identify a sensitive, narrowly tuned receptor that mediates attraction behavior to farnesol and demonstrates an effective approach to deorphanizing odorant receptors expressed in neurons located in intermediate and trichoid sensilla that may not function in the classical “empty basiconic neuron” system. PMID:24623773

  3. Differential Contributions of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in a Drosophila Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Newquist, Gunnar; Novenschi, Alexandra; Kohler, Donovan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability of an animal to detect, discriminate, and respond to odors depends on the functions of its olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). The extent to which each ORN, upon activation, contributes to chemotaxis is not well understood. We hypothesized that strong activation of each ORN elicits a different behavioral response in the Drosophila melanogaster larva by differentially affecting the composition of its navigational behavior. To test this hypothesis, we exposed Drosophila larvae to specific odorants to analyze the effect of individual ORN activity on chemotaxis. We used two different behavioral paradigms to analyze the chemotaxis response of larvae to odorants. When tested with five different odorants that elicit strong physiological responses from single ORNs, larval behavioral responses toward each odorant differed in the strength of attraction as well as in the composition of discrete navigational elements, such as runs and turns. Further, behavioral responses to odorants did not correlate with either the strength of odor gradients tested or the sensitivity of each ORN to its cognate odorant. Finally, we provide evidence that wild-type larvae with all ORNs intact exhibit higher behavioral variance than mutant larvae that have only a single pair of functional ORNs. We conclude that individual ORNs contribute differently to the olfactory circuit that instructs chemotactic responses. Our results, along with recent studies from other groups, suggest that ORNs are functionally nonequivalent units. These results have implications for understanding peripheral odor coding. PMID:27570823

  4. Cholesterol Biosynthesis Supports Myelin Gene Expression and Axon Ensheathment through Modulation of P13K/Akt/mTor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Emily S.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin, which ensheaths and insulates axons, is a specialized membrane highly enriched with cholesterol. During myelin formation, cholesterol influences membrane fluidity, associates with myelin proteins such as myelin proteolipid protein, and assembles lipid-rich microdomains within membranes. Surprisingly, cholesterol also is required by oligodendrocytes, glial cells that make myelin, to express myelin genes and wrap axons. How cholesterol mediates these distinct features of oligodendrocyte development is not known. One possibility is that cholesterol promotes myelination by facilitating signal transduction within the cell, because lipid-rich microdomains function as assembly points for signaling molecules. Signaling cascades that localize to cholesterol-rich regions of the plasma membrane include the PI3K/Akt pathway, which acts upstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major driver of myelination. Through manipulation of cholesterol levels and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in zebrafish, we discovered that mTOR kinase activity in oligodendrocytes requires cholesterol. Drawing on a combination of pharmacological and rescue experiments, we provide evidence that mTOR kinase activity is required for cholesterol-mediated myelin gene expression. On the other hand, cholesterol-dependent axon ensheathment is mediated by Akt signaling, independent of mTOR kinase activity. Our data reveal that cholesterol-dependent myelin gene expression and axon ensheathment are facilitated by distinct signaling cascades downstream of Akt. Because mTOR promotes cholesterol synthesis, our data raise the possibility that cholesterol synthesis and mTOR signaling engage in positive feedback to promote the formation of myelin membrane. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The speed of electrical impulse movement through axons is increased by myelin, a specialized, cholesterol-rich glial cell membrane that tightly wraps axons. During development, myelin membrane grows dramatically, suggesting a

  5. Accelerated age-related olfactory decline among type 1 Usher patients

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João Carlos; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Pereira, Paulo; António, Natália; Hummel, Thomas; Paiva, António; Silva, Eduardo D.

    2016-01-01

    Usher Syndrome (USH) is a rare disease with hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and, sometimes, vestibular dysfunction. A phenotype heterogeneity is reported. Recent evidence indicates that USH is likely to belong to an emerging class of sensory ciliopathies. Olfaction has recently been implicated in ciliopathies, but the scarce literature about olfaction in USH show conflicting results. We aim to evaluate olfactory impairment as a possible clinical manifestation of USH. Prospective clinical study that included 65 patients with USH and 65 normal age-gender-smoking-habits pair matched subjects. A cross culturally validated version of the Sniffin’ Sticks olfaction test was used. Young patients with USH have significantly better olfactory scores than healthy controls. We observe that USH type 1 have a faster ageing olfactory decrease than what happens in healthy subjects, leading to significantly lower olfactory scores in older USH1 patients. Moreover, USH type 1 patients showed significantly higher olfactory scores than USH type 2, what can help distinguishing them. Olfaction represents an attractive tool for USH type classification and pre diagnostic screening due to the low cost and non-invasive nature of the testing. Olfactory dysfunction should be considered among the spectrum of clinical manifestations of Usher syndrome. PMID:27329700

  6. Cell death triggers olfactory circuit plasticity via glial signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Hokto; Yaksi, Emre; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila antennal lobe is organized into glomerular compartments where olfactory receptor neurons synapse onto projection neurons. Projection neuron dendrites also receive input from local neurons which interconnect glomeruli. In this study, we investigated how activity in this circuit changes over time when sensory afferents are chronically removed in vivo. In the normal circuit, excitatory connections between glomeruli are weak. However, after we chronically severed receptor neuron axons projecting to a subset of glomeruli, we found that odor-evoked lateral excitatory input to deafferented projection neurons was potentiated several-fold. This was due at least in part to strengthened electrical synapses from excitatory local neurons onto projection neurons, as well as increased activity in excitatory local neurons. Merely silencing receptor neurons was not sufficient to elicit these changes, implying that severing receptor neuron axons is the relevant signal. When we expressed the neuroprotective gene Wallerian degeneration slow (WldS) in receptor neurons prior to severing their axons, this blocked the induction of plasticity. Because expressing WldS prevents severed axons from recruiting glia, this result suggests a role for glia. Consistent with this, we found that blocking endocytosis in ensheathing glia blocked the induction of plasticity. In sum, these results reveal a novel injury response whereby severed sensory axons recruit glia, which in turn signal to central neurons to upregulate their activity. By strengthening excitatory interactions between neurons in a deafferented brain region, this mechanism might help boost activity to compensate for lost sensory input. PMID:21613475

  7. Cell death triggers olfactory circuit plasticity via glial signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Hokto; Yaksi, Emre; Wilson, Rachel I

    2011-05-25

    The Drosophila antennal lobe is organized into glomerular compartments, where olfactory receptor neurons synapse onto projection neurons. Projection neuron dendrites also receive input from local neurons, which interconnect glomeruli. In this study, we investigated how activity in this circuit changes over time when sensory afferents are chronically removed in vivo. In the normal circuit, excitatory connections between glomeruli are weak. However, after we chronically severed receptor neuron axons projecting to a subset of glomeruli, we found that odor-evoked lateral excitatory input to deafferented projection neurons was potentiated severalfold. This was caused, at least in part, by strengthened electrical coupling from excitatory local neurons onto projection neurons, as well as increased activity in excitatory local neurons. Merely silencing receptor neurons was not sufficient to elicit these changes, implying that severing receptor neuron axons is the relevant signal. When we expressed the neuroprotective gene Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld(S)) in receptor neurons before severing their axons, this blocked the induction of plasticity. Because expressing Wld(S) prevents severed axons from recruiting glia, this result suggests a role for glia. Consistent with this, we found that blocking endocytosis in ensheathing glia blocked the induction of plasticity. In sum, these results reveal a novel injury response whereby severed sensory axons recruit glia, which in turn signal to central neurons to upregulate their activity. By strengthening excitatory interactions between neurons in a deafferented brain region, this mechanism might help boost activity to compensate for lost sensory input.

  8. Hypothyroidism Affects Olfactory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Świdziński, Teodor; Czerniejewska-Wolska, Hanna; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Owecki, Maciej; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Frankowska, Anna; Łącka, Katarzyna; Glapiński, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Szaniec, Zofia; Świdziński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background. Objective electrophysiological methods for investigations of the organ of smell consist in recordings of olfactory cortex responses to specific, time restricted odor stimuli. In hypothyroidism have impaired sense of smell. Material and Methods. Two groups: control of 31 healthy subjects and study group of 21 with hypothyroidism. The inclusion criterion for the study group was the TSH range from 3.54 to 110 μIU/mL. Aim. Assessment of the latency time of evoked responses from the olfactory nerve N1 and the trigeminal nerve N5 using two smells of mint and anise in hypothyroidism. Results. The smell perception in subjective olfactory tests was normal in 85% of the hypothyroid group. Differences were noticed in the objective tests. The detailed intergroup analysis of latency times of recorded cortical responses PN5 and PN1 performed by means between the groups of patients with overt clinical hypothyroidism versus subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.05) whereas no such differences were found between the control group versus subclinical hypothyroidism group (p > 0.05). Conclusion. We can conclude that registration of cortex potentials at irritation of olfactory and trigeminal nerves offers possibilities for using this method as an objective indicator of hypothyroidism severity and prognostic process factor. PMID:27656655

  9. Hypothyroidism Affects Olfactory Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Świdziński, Teodor; Linkowska-Świdzińska, Kamila; Czerniejewska-Wolska, Hanna; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Owecki, Maciej; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Frankowska, Anna; Łącka, Katarzyna; Glapiński, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Szaniec, Zofia; Świdziński, Piotr

    Background. Objective electrophysiological methods for investigations of the organ of smell consist in recordings of olfactory cortex responses to specific, time restricted odor stimuli. In hypothyroidism have impaired sense of smell. Material and Methods. Two groups: control of 31 healthy subjects and study group of 21 with hypothyroidism. The inclusion criterion for the study group was the TSH range from 3.54 to 110 μIU/mL. Aim. Assessment of the latency time of evoked responses from the olfactory nerve N1 and the trigeminal nerve N5 using two smells of mint and anise in hypothyroidism. Results. The smell perception in subjective olfactory tests was normal in 85% of the hypothyroid group. Differences were noticed in the objective tests. The detailed intergroup analysis of latency times of recorded cortical responses PN5 and PN1 performed by means between the groups of patients with overt clinical hypothyroidism versus subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.05) whereas no such differences were found between the control group versus subclinical hypothyroidism group (p > 0.05). Conclusion. We can conclude that registration of cortex potentials at irritation of olfactory and trigeminal nerves offers possibilities for using this method as an objective indicator of hypothyroidism severity and prognostic process factor.

  10. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Study of Olfactory Perception and Learning in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Sandoz, Jean Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The honeybee Apis mellifera has been a central insect model in the study of olfactory perception and learning for more than a century, starting with pioneer work by Karl von Frisch. Research on olfaction in honeybees has greatly benefited from the advent of a range of behavioral and neurophysiological paradigms in the Lab. Here I review major findings about how the honeybee brain detects, processes, and learns odors, based on behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological approaches. I first address the behavioral study of olfactory learning, from experiments on free-flying workers visiting artificial flowers to laboratory-based conditioning protocols on restrained individuals. I explain how the study of olfactory learning has allowed understanding the discrimination and generalization ability of the honeybee olfactory system, its capacity to grant special properties to olfactory mixtures as well as to retain individual component information. Next, based on the impressive amount of anatomical and immunochemical studies of the bee brain, I detail our knowledge of olfactory pathways. I then show how functional recordings of odor-evoked activity in the brain allow following the transformation of the olfactory message from the periphery until higher-order central structures. Data from extra- and intracellular electrophysiological approaches as well as from the most recent optical imaging developments are described. Lastly, I discuss results addressing how odor representation changes as a result of experience. This impressive ensemble of behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological data available in the bee make it an attractive model for future research aiming to understand olfactory perception and learning in an integrative fashion. PMID:22163215

  11. Behavioral and neurophysiological study of olfactory perception and learning in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Jean Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The honeybee Apis mellifera has been a central insect model in the study of olfactory perception and learning for more than a century, starting with pioneer work by Karl von Frisch. Research on olfaction in honeybees has greatly benefited from the advent of a range of behavioral and neurophysiological paradigms in the Lab. Here I review major findings about how the honeybee brain detects, processes, and learns odors, based on behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological approaches. I first address the behavioral study of olfactory learning, from experiments on free-flying workers visiting artificial flowers to laboratory-based conditioning protocols on restrained individuals. I explain how the study of olfactory learning has allowed understanding the discrimination and generalization ability of the honeybee olfactory system, its capacity to grant special properties to olfactory mixtures as well as to retain individual component information. Next, based on the impressive amount of anatomical and immunochemical studies of the bee brain, I detail our knowledge of olfactory pathways. I then show how functional recordings of odor-evoked activity in the brain allow following the transformation of the olfactory message from the periphery until higher-order central structures. Data from extra- and intracellular electrophysiological approaches as well as from the most recent optical imaging developments are described. Lastly, I discuss results addressing how odor representation changes as a result of experience. This impressive ensemble of behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological data available in the bee make it an attractive model for future research aiming to understand olfactory perception and learning in an integrative fashion.

  12. Strong single-fiber sensory inputs to olfactory cortex: implications for olfactory coding.

    PubMed

    Franks, Kevin M; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2006-02-02

    Olfactory information is first encoded in a combinatorial fashion by olfactory bulb glomeruli, which individually represent distinct chemical features of odors. This information is then transmitted to piriform (olfactory) cortex, via axons of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells, where it is presumed to form the odor percept. However, mechanisms governing the integration of sensory information in mammalian olfactory cortex are unclear. Here we show that single M/T cells can make powerful connections with cortical pyramidal cells, and coincident input from few M/T cells is sufficient to elicit spike output. These findings suggest that odor coding is broad and distributed in olfactory cortex.

  13. A molecular readout of long-term olfactory adaptation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; Lee, Jin I; L'etoile, Noelle; O'Halloran, Damien

    2012-12-22

    During sustained stimulation most sensory neurons will adapt their response by decreasing their sensitivity to the signal. The adaptation response helps shape attention and also protects cells from over-stimulation. Adaptation within the olfactory circuit of C. elegans was first described by Colbert and Bargmann(1,2). Here, the authors defined parameters of the olfactory adaptation paradigm, which they used to design a genetic screen to isolate mutants defective in their ability to adapt to volatile odors sensed by the Amphid Wing cells type C (AWC) sensory neurons. When wildtype C. elegans animals are exposed to an attractive AWC-sensed odor(3) for 30 min they will adapt their responsiveness to the odor and will then ignore the adapting odor in a chemotaxis behavioral assay for ~1 hr. When wildtype C. elegans animals are exposed to an attractive AWC-sensed odor for ~1 hr they will then ignore the adapting odor in a chemotaxis behavioral assay for ~3 hr. These two phases of olfactory adaptation in C. elegans were described as short-term olfactory adaptation (induced after 30 min odor exposure), and long-term olfactory adaptation (induced after 60 min odor exposure). Later work from L'Etoile et al.,(4) uncovered a Protein Kinase G (PKG) called EGL-4 that is required for both the short-term and long-term olfactory adaptation in AWC neurons. The EGL-4 protein contains a nuclear localization sequence that is necessary for long-term olfactory adaptation responses but dispensable for short-term olfactory adaptation responses in the AWC(4). By tagging EGL-4 with a green fluorescent protein, it was possible to visualize the localization of EGL-4 in the AWC during prolonged odor exposure. Using this fully functional GFP-tagged EGL-4 (GFP::EGL-4) molecule we have been able to develop a molecular readout of long-term olfactory adaptation in the AWC(5). Using this molecular readout of olfactory adaptation we have been able to perform both forward and reverse genetic screens to

  14. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  15. Feeding regulates sex pheromone attraction and courtship in Drosophila females

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Trona, Federica; Borrero-Echeverry, Felipe; Bilz, Florian; Grabe, Veit; Becher, Paul G.; Carlsson, Mikael A.; Nässel, Dick R.; Hansson, Bill S.; Sachse, Silke; Witzgall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, gender-specific behavioural responses to the male-produced sex pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) rely on sexually dimorphic, third-order neural circuits. We show that nutritional state in female flies modulates cVA perception in first-order olfactory neurons. Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes. Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males. Upregulation of sensitivity and behavioural responsiveness to cVA in fed females is paralleled by a strong increase in receptivity to male courtship. Functional imaging of the antennal lobe (AL), the olfactory centre in the insect brain, shows that olfactory input to DA1 and VM2 glomeruli is also modulated by starvation. Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females. PMID:26255707

  16. Evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues in lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Ke; Huertas, Mar; Baker, Cindy F.; Jia, Liang; Hayes, Michael C.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on a mosaic of complex information to find and evaluate mates. Pheromones, often comprised of multiple components, are considered to be particularly important for species-recognition in many species. While the evolution of species-specific pheromone blends is well-described in many insects, very few vertebrate pheromones have been studied in a macro-evolutionary context. Here, we report a phylogenetic comparison of multi-component male odours that guide reproduction in lampreys. Chemical profiling of sexually mature males from eleven species of lamprey, representing six of ten genera and two of three families, indicated the chemical profiles of sexually mature male odours are partially shared among species. Behavioural assays conducted with four species sympatric in the Laurentian Great Lakes indicated asymmetric female responses to heterospecific odours, where Petromyzon marinus were attracted to male odour collected from all species tested but other species generally preferred only the odour of conspecifics. Electro-olfactogram recordings from P. marinusindicated that although P. marinus exhibited behavioural responses to odours from males of all species, at least some of the compounds that elicited olfactory responses were different in conspecific male odours compared to heterospecific male odours. We conclude that some of the compounds released by sexually mature males are shared among species and elicit olfactory and behavioural responses in P. marinus, and suggest that our results provide evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues among lampreys. Further characterization of the chemical identities of odour components is needed to confirm shared pheromones among species.

  17. [Study of the olfactory response in the Drosophila homeotic mutant leg-aristae-wing complex gene].

    PubMed

    Simonova, O B; Sukhoverkhova, T I; Zhuravel', D A; Romanova, L G; Korochkin, L I

    2000-11-01

    Antennae are known to be olfactory organs in Drosophila. The leg-aristae-wing complex (lawc) mutation causes a homeotic transformation of the arista (the fifth element of antenna) into tarsal elements. To test how the homeotic transformation of the arista into the tarsus can affect behavior, we studied the olfactory response in the lawc mutants. The data were carefully processed by statistical methods. In spite of a low penetrance of the trait of arista transformation, the mutant flies were found to be approximately half as perceptible to attractant odors than the wild-type flies.

  18. Extremely Sparse Olfactory Inputs Are Sufficient to Mediate Innate Aversion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaojing J.; Clandinin, Thomas R.; Luo, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Innate attraction and aversion to odorants are observed throughout the animal kingdom, but how olfactory circuits encode such valences is not well understood, despite extensive anatomical and functional knowledge. In Drosophila melanogaster, ~50 types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) each express a unique receptor gene, and relay information to a cognate type of projection neurons (PNs). To examine the extent to which the population activity of ORNs is required for olfactory behavior, we developed a genetic strategy to block all ORN outputs, and then to restore output in specific types. Unlike attraction, aversion was unaffected by simultaneous silencing of many ORNs, and even single ORN types previously shown to convey neutral valence sufficed to mediate aversion. Thus, aversion may rely on specific activity patterns in individual ORNs rather than the number or identity of activated ORNs. ORN activity is relayed into the brain by downstream circuits, with excitatory PNs (ePN) representing a major output. We found that silencing the majority of ePNs did not affect aversion, even when ePNs directly downstream of single restored ORN types were silenced. Our data demonstrate the robustness of olfactory aversion, and suggest that its circuit mechanism is qualitatively different from attraction. PMID:25927233

  19. Extremely sparse olfactory inputs are sufficient to mediate innate aversion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaojing J; Clandinin, Thomas R; Luo, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Innate attraction and aversion to odorants are observed throughout the animal kingdom, but how olfactory circuits encode such valences is not well understood, despite extensive anatomical and functional knowledge. In Drosophila melanogaster, ~50 types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) each express a unique receptor gene, and relay information to a cognate type of projection neurons (PNs). To examine the extent to which the population activity of ORNs is required for olfactory behavior, we developed a genetic strategy to block all ORN outputs, and then to restore output in specific types. Unlike attraction, aversion was unaffected by simultaneous silencing of many ORNs, and even single ORN types previously shown to convey neutral valence sufficed to mediate aversion. Thus, aversion may rely on specific activity patterns in individual ORNs rather than the number or identity of activated ORNs. ORN activity is relayed into the brain by downstream circuits, with excitatory PNs (ePN) representing a major output. We found that silencing the majority of ePNs did not affect aversion, even when ePNs directly downstream of single restored ORN types were silenced. Our data demonstrate the robustness of olfactory aversion, and suggest that its circuit mechanism is qualitatively different from attraction.

  20. The Smell of Blue Light: A New Approach toward Understanding an Olfactory Neuronal Network.

    PubMed

    Störtkuhl, Klemens F; Fiala, André

    2011-01-01

    Olfaction is one of the most important senses throughout the animal kingdom. It enables animals to discriminate between a wide variety of attractive and repulsive odorants and often plays a decisive role in species specific communication. In recent years the analysis of olfactory systems both invertebrates and invertebrates has attracted much scientific interest. In this context a pivotal question is how the properties and connectivities of individual neurons contribute to a functioning neuronal network that mediates odor-guided behavior. As a novel approach to analyze the role of individual neurons within a circuitry, techniques have been established that make use of light-sensitive proteins. In this review we introduce a non-invasive, optogenetic technique which was used to manipulate the activity of individual neurons in the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Both channelrhodopsin-2 and the photosensitive adenylyl cyclase PAC α in individual olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) of the olfactory system of Drosophila larvae allows stimulating individual receptor neurons by light. Depending on which particular ORN is optogenetically activated, repulsion or attraction behavior can be induced, indicating which sensory neurons underlie which type of behavior.

  1. Olfactory dysfunction, olfactory bulb pathology and urban air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Aiello-Mora, Mario; Maronpot, Robert R.; Doty, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8 ± 8.5 y were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 62 MC / 25 controls 21.2 ±2.7 y. MC subjects had significantly lower UPSIT scores: 34.24 ± 0.42 versus controls 35.76 ± 0.40, p=0.03. Olfaction deficits were present in 35.5% MC and 12% of controls. MC APOE ε 4 carriers failed 2.4 ± 0.54 items in the 10-item smell identification scale from the UPSIT related to Alzheimer's disease, while APOE 2/3 and 3/3 subjects failed 1.36 ± 0.16 items, p = 0.01. MC residents exhibited OB endothelial hyperplasia, neuronal accumulation of particles (2/35), and immunoreactivity to beta amyloid βA42 (29/35) and/or α-synuclein (4/35) in neurons, glial cells and/or blood vessels. Ultrafine particles were present in OBs endothelial cytoplasm and basement membranes. Control OBs were unremarkable. Air pollution exposure is associated with olfactory dysfunction and OB pathology, APOE 4 may confer greater susceptibility to such abnormalities, and ultrafine particles could play a key role in the OB pathology. This study contributes to our understanding of the influences of air pollution on olfaction and its potential contribution to neurodegeneration. PMID:19297138

  2. Human pheromones and sexual attraction.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Karl; Fink, Bernhard; Neave, Nick

    2005-02-01

    Olfactory communication is very common amongst animals, and since the discovery of an accessory olfactory system in humans, possible human olfactory communication has gained considerable scientific interest. The importance of the human sense of smell has by far been underestimated in the past. Humans and other primates have been regarded as primarily 'optical animals' with highly developed powers of vision but a relatively undeveloped sense of smell. In recent years this assumption has undergone major revision. Several studies indicate that humans indeed seem to use olfactory communication and are even able to produce and perceive certain pheromones; recent studies have found that pheromones may play an important role in the behavioural and reproduction biology of humans. In this article we review the present evidence of the effect of human pheromones and discuss the role of olfactory cues in human sexual behaviour.

  3. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  4. Profiling of Olfactory Receptor Gene Expression in Whole Human Olfactory Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Tarabichi, Maxime; Gregoire, Françoise; Dumont, Jacques E.; Chatelain, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems), containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men). Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose) were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were found in the

  5. Olfactory neuroblastoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    USLU, GONCA HANEDAN; CANYILMAZ, EMINE; ZENGIN, AHMET YASAR; MUNGAN, SEVDEGUL; YONEY, ADNAN; BAHADIR, OSMAN; GOCMEZ, HUSEYIN

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ON) is a rare type of malignant neoplasm originating from the olfactory neuroepithelial cells of the nasal cavity. ON is also known as esthesioneuroblastoma or neuroendocrine carcinoma. The malignancy accounts for <3% of tumors originating in the nasal cavity. Through the nasal cavity, ON may infiltrate the sinuses, the orbit and the cranium. The tumor is characterized by a pattern of slow growth and local recurrences. Treatment options are surgical excision or surgery combined with a radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy combination treatment. The present study reports the case of a 69-year-old patient with a mass in the nasal cavity who was treated by combined surgical excision and RT. The literature for ON and the treatment of the tumor are also discussed. PMID:26788185

  6. Linking local circuit inhibition to olfactory behavior: a critical role for granule cells in olfactory discrimination.

    PubMed

    Strowbridge, Ben W

    2010-02-11

    In this issue of Neuron, Abraham et al. report a direct connection between inhibitory function and olfactory behavior. Using molecular methods to alter glutamate receptor subunit composition in olfactory bulb granule cells, the authors found a selective modulation in the time required for difficult, but not simple, olfactory discrimination tasks.

  7. Role of Centrifugal Projections to the Olfactory Bulb in Olfactory Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselycznyk, Carly L.; Zhang, Steven; Linster, Christine

    2006-01-01

    While there is evidence that feedback projections from cortical and neuromodulatory structures to the olfactory bulb are crucial for maintaining the oscillatory dynamics of olfactory bulb processing, it is not clear how changes in dynamics are related to odor perception. Using electrical lesions of the olfactory peduncle, sparing output from the…

  8. Role of Centrifugal Projections to the Olfactory Bulb in Olfactory Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselycznyk, Carly L.; Zhang, Steven; Linster, Christine

    2006-01-01

    While there is evidence that feedback projections from cortical and neuromodulatory structures to the olfactory bulb are crucial for maintaining the oscillatory dynamics of olfactory bulb processing, it is not clear how changes in dynamics are related to odor perception. Using electrical lesions of the olfactory peduncle, sparing output from the…

  9. Human olfactory receptor responses to odorants

    PubMed Central

    Mainland, Joel D; Li, Yun R; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Wen Ling L; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the human olfactory system is capable of discriminating a vast number of odors, we do not currently understand what chemical features are encoded by olfactory receptors. In large part this is due to a paucity of data in a search space covering the interactions of hundreds of receptors with billions of odorous molecules. Of the approximately 400 intact human odorant receptors, only 10% have a published ligand. Here we used a heterologous luciferase assay to screen 73 odorants against a clone library of 511 human olfactory receptors. This dataset will allow other researchers to interrogate the combinatorial nature of olfactory coding. PMID:25977809

  10. An argument for an olfactory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Kay, Leslie M; Sherman, S Murray

    2007-02-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is unique in that sensory receptors synapse directly into the olfactory bulb of the forebrain without the thalamic relay that is common to all other sensory pathways. We argue that the olfactory bulb has an equivalent role to the thalamus, because the two regions have very similar structures and functions. Both the thalamus and the olfactory bulb are the final stage in sensory processing before reaching target cortical regions, at which there is a massive increase in neuron and synapse numbers. Thus, both structures act as a bottleneck that is a target for various modulatory inputs, and this arrangement enables efficient control of information flow before cortical processing occurs.

  11. OLFACTORY RESPONSES OF BLOWFLIES TO ALIPHATIC ALDEHYDES

    PubMed Central

    Dethier, V. G.

    1954-01-01

    The response of the blowfly Phormia regina to stimulation by aldehydes in the vapor phase has been studied by means of a specially designed olfactometer. The median rejection threshold and the maximum acceptance threshold were selected as criteria of response. For both acceptance and rejection the distribution of thresholds in the population is normal with respect to the logarithm of concentration. When thresholds are expressed as molar concentrations, the values decrease progressively as chain length is increased. There is no attraction beyond decanal and no rejection beyond dodecanal. When thresholds are expressed as activities, most members of the aldehyde series are approximately equally stimulating at rejection and equally stimulating at acceptance. The relationship is most exact over the middle range of chain lengths. There is a tendency for the terminal members to stimulate at higher activities. These relationships are in close agreement with those which were found earlier to apply to the normal aliphatic alcohols. The similarity between the relative actions of the members of the two series suggests that the relation of equal olfactory stimulation at equal thermodynamic activities by homologous aliphatic compounds at least for homologues of intermediate chain length may be of rather general application in olfaction. PMID:13174780

  12. Exploiting interspecific olfactory communication to monitor predators.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Patrick M; Glen, Alistair S; Clout, Mick N; Wyse, Sarah V; Nichols, Margaret; Pech, Roger P

    2017-03-01

    Olfaction is the primary sense of many mammals and subordinate predators use this sense to detect dominant species, thereby reducing the risk of an encounter and facilitating coexistence. Chemical signals can act as repellents or attractants and may therefore have applications for wildlife management. We devised a field experiment to investigate whether dominant predator (ferret Mustela furo) body odor would alter the behavior of three common mesopredators: stoats (Mustela erminea), hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus), and ship rats (Rattus rattus). We predicted that apex predator odor would lead to increased detections, and our results support this hypothesis as predator kairomones (interspecific olfactory messages that benefit the receiver) provoked "eavesdropping" behavior by mesopredators. Stoats exhibited the most pronounced responses, with kairomones significantly increasing the number of observations and the time spent at a site, so that their occupancy estimates changed from rare to widespread. Behavioral responses to predator odors can therefore be exploited for conservation and this avenue of research has not yet been extensively explored. A long-life lure derived from apex predator kairomones could have practical value, especially when there are plentiful resources that reduce the efficiency of food-based lures. Our results have application for pest management in New Zealand and the technique of using kairomones to monitor predators could have applications for conservation efforts worldwide.

  13. [Sexual attraction: its dimensionality].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Juan; Quiroga, María Angeles; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a new Sexual Attraction Questionnaire (SAQ) [Cuestionario de Atracción Sexual, CAS]. The goal was to determine whether sexual attraction could be represented as two different clusters (Attraction to men and Attraction to women), which would imply two negatively correlated factors or a bipolar one. Three studies were carried out with 182, 118, and 425 participants, respectively. Cluster and exploratory factor analyses were performed. The results obtained show satisfactory psychometric properties for the SAQ, the two clusters, and the two predicted negatively related factors or the bipolar factor. Results are discussed in the context of the different conceptions of sexual attraction and the fourfold typology: attracted to both sexes, to men, to women, or to neither sex.

  14. Regulators of AWC-Mediated Olfactory Plasticity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    O'Halloran, Damien M.; L'Etoile, Noelle D.

    2009-01-01

    While most sensory neurons will adapt to prolonged stimulation by down-regulating their responsiveness to the signal, it is not clear which events initiate long-lasting sensory adaptation. Likewise, we are just beginning to understand how the physiology of the adapted cell is altered. Caenorhabditis elegans is inherently attracted to specific odors that are sensed by the paired AWC olfactory sensory neurons. The attraction diminishes if the animal experiences these odors for a prolonged period of time in the absence of food. The AWC neuron responds acutely to odor-exposure by closing calcium channels. While odortaxis requires a Gα subunit protein, cGMP-gated channels, and guanylyl cyclases, adaptation to prolonged odor exposure requires nuclear entry of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, EGL-4. We asked which candidate members of the olfactory signal transduction pathway promote nuclear entry of EGL-4 and which molecules might induce long-term adaptation downstream of EGL-4 nuclear entry. We found that initiation of long-term adaptation, as assessed by nuclear entry of EGL-4, is dependent on G-protein mediated signaling but is independent of fluxes in calcium levels. We show that long-term adaptation requires polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may act on the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel type V OSM-9 downstream of EGL-4 nuclear entry. We also present evidence that high diacylglycerol (DAG) levels block long-term adaptation without affecting EGL-4 nuclear entry. Our analysis provides a model for the process of long-term adaptation that occurs within the AWC neuron of C. elegans: G-protein signaling initiates long-lasting olfactory adaptation by promoting the nuclear entry of EGL-4, and once EGL-4 has entered the nucleus, processes such as PUFA activation of the TRP channel OSM-9 may dampen the output of the AWC neuron. PMID:20011101

  15. Evolution of Acid-Sensing Olfactory Circuits in Drosophilids.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Godino, Lucia L; Rytz, Raphael; Cruchet, Steeve; Bargeton, Benoîte; Abuin, Liliane; Silbering, Ana F; Ruta, Vanessa; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Benton, Richard

    2017-02-08

    Animals adapt their behaviors to specific ecological niches, but the genetic and cellular basis of nervous system evolution is poorly understood. We have compared the olfactory circuits of the specialist Drosophila sechellia-which feeds exclusively on Morinda citrifolia fruit-with its generalist cousins D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We show that D. sechellia exhibits derived odor-evoked attraction and physiological sensitivity to the abundant Morinda volatile hexanoic acid and characterize how the responsible sensory receptor (the variant ionotropic glutamate receptor IR75b) and attraction-mediating circuit have evolved. A single amino acid change in IR75b is sufficient to recode it as a hexanoic acid detector. Expanded representation of this sensory pathway in the brain relies on additional changes in the IR75b promoter and trans-acting loci. By contrast, higher-order circuit adaptations are not apparent, suggesting conserved central processing. Our work links olfactory ecology to structural and regulatory genetic changes influencing nervous system anatomy and function.

  16. Transition from sea to land: olfactory function and constraints in the terrestrial hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus.

    PubMed

    Krång, Anna-Sara; Knaden, Markus; Steck, Kathrin; Hansson, Bill S

    2012-09-07

    The ability to identify chemical cues in the environment is essential to most animals. Apart from marine larval stages, anomuran land hermit crabs (Coenobita) have evolved different degrees of terrestriality, and thus represent an excellent opportunity to investigate adaptations of the olfactory system needed for a successful transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. Although superb processing capacities of the central olfactory system have been indicated in Coenobita and their olfactory system evidently is functional on land, virtually nothing was known about what type of odourants are detected. Here, we used electroantennogram (EAG) recordings in Coenobita clypeatus and established the olfactory response spectrum. Interestingly, different chemical groups elicited EAG responses of opposite polarity, which also appeared for Coenobita compressus and the closely related marine hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus. Furthermore, in a two-choice bioassay with C. clypeatus, we found that water vapour was critical for natural and synthetic odourants to induce attraction or repulsion. Strikingly, also the physiological response was found much greater at higher humidity in C. clypeatus, whereas no such effect appeared in the terrestrial vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. In conclusion, our results reveal that the Coenobita olfactory system is restricted to a limited number of water-soluble odourants, and that high humidity is most critical for its function.

  17. Transition from sea to land: olfactory function and constraints in the terrestrial hermit crab Coenobita clypeatus

    PubMed Central

    Krång, Anna-Sara; Knaden, Markus; Steck, Kathrin; Hansson, Bill S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to identify chemical cues in the environment is essential to most animals. Apart from marine larval stages, anomuran land hermit crabs (Coenobita) have evolved different degrees of terrestriality, and thus represent an excellent opportunity to investigate adaptations of the olfactory system needed for a successful transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. Although superb processing capacities of the central olfactory system have been indicated in Coenobita and their olfactory system evidently is functional on land, virtually nothing was known about what type of odourants are detected. Here, we used electroantennogram (EAG) recordings in Coenobita clypeatus and established the olfactory response spectrum. Interestingly, different chemical groups elicited EAG responses of opposite polarity, which also appeared for Coenobita compressus and the closely related marine hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus. Furthermore, in a two-choice bioassay with C. clypeatus, we found that water vapour was critical for natural and synthetic odourants to induce attraction or repulsion. Strikingly, also the physiological response was found much greater at higher humidity in C. clypeatus, whereas no such effect appeared in the terrestrial vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. In conclusion, our results reveal that the Coenobita olfactory system is restricted to a limited number of water-soluble odourants, and that high humidity is most critical for its function. PMID:22673356

  18. Induction of Associative Olfactory Memory by Targeted Activation of Single Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Takato; Lee, Chi-Yu; Yoshida-Kasikawa, Maki; Honjo, Ken; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo

    2014-01-01

    It has been postulated that associative memory is formed by at least two sets of external stimuli, CS and US, that are transmitted to the memory centers by distinctive conversing pathways. However, whether associative memory can be induced by the activation of only the olfactory CS and a biogenic amine-mediated US pathways remains to be elucidated. In this study, we substituted the reward signals with dTrpA1-mediated thermogenetic activation of octopaminergic neurons and the odor signals by ChR2-mediated optical activation of a specific class of olfactory neurons. We show that targeted activation of the olfactory receptor and the octopaminergic neurons is indeed sufficient for the formation of associative olfactory memory in the larval brain. We also show that targeted stimulation of only a single type of olfactory receptor neurons is sufficient to induce olfactory memory that is indistinguishable from natural memory induced by the activation of multiple olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:24762789

  19. Nematophagous fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora mimics olfactory cues of sex and food to lure its nematode prey

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Gronquist, Matthew R; Schwarz, Erich M; Nath, Ravi David; Lee, Ching-Han; Gharib, Shalha; Schroeder, Frank C; Sternberg, Paul W

    2017-01-01

    To study the molecular basis for predator-prey coevolution, we investigated how Caenorhabditis elegans responds to the predatory fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. C. elegans and other nematodes were attracted to volatile compounds produced by A. oligospora. Gas-chromatographic mass-spectral analyses of A. oligospora-derived volatile metabolites identified several odors mimicking food cues attractive to nematodes. One compound, methyl 3-methyl-2-butenoate (MMB) additionally triggered strong sex- and stage-specific attraction in several Caenorhabditis species. Furthermore, when MMB is present, it interferes with nematode mating, suggesting that MMB might mimic sex pheromone in Caenorhabditis species. Forward genetic screening suggests that multiple receptors are involved in sensing MMB. Response to fungal odors involves the olfactory neuron AWCs. Single-cell RNA-seq revealed the GPCRs expressed in AWC. We propose that A. oligospora likely evolved the means to use olfactory mimicry to attract its nematode prey through the olfactory neurons in C. elegans and related species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20023.001 PMID:28098555

  20. Intelligence and Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    This brief research note aims to estimate the magnitude of the association between general intelligence and physical attractiveness with large nationally representative samples from two nations. In the United Kingdom, attractive children are more intelligent by 12.4 IQ points (r=0.381), whereas in the United States, the correlation between…

  1. An Active Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Joseph C.; Buzzelli, Cary

    1992-01-01

    Describes a unit on magnetism that utilizes hands-on activities in which students make hypotheses for discrepant behavior, discover whether a magnet attracts one object through another, measure the strength of magnets, explore levitating paper clips, and play a game dependent on magnetic attraction. (MDH)

  2. Intelligence and Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    This brief research note aims to estimate the magnitude of the association between general intelligence and physical attractiveness with large nationally representative samples from two nations. In the United Kingdom, attractive children are more intelligent by 12.4 IQ points (r=0.381), whereas in the United States, the correlation between…

  3. American Cockroach Sex Attractant.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Beroza, M

    1965-02-12

    The structure (2,2-dimethyl-3-isopropylidenecyclopropyl propionate) previously assigned to the sex attractant of the American cockroach has now been shown by additional physical and chemical data and biological inactivity of the synthetic preparation to be incorrect. The structure of this attractant remains to be determined.

  4. Assertiveness and Physical Attractiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleim, David M.; And Others

    Earlier research investigating the relationship between physical attractiveness and assertiveness found that physically attractive females were more assertive than other females. To investigate this relationship further and to broaden the scope of the study, 69 students were videotaped in groups of five to ten while responding to open-ended…

  5. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  6. Nasal gel and olfactory cleft.

    PubMed

    Herranz González-Botas, Jesús; Padín Seara, Anselmo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether a nasal gel, administrated using a radial-hole inhaler, reaches the olfactory cleft and if a different administration method influences distribution. Sixteen healthy volunteers underwent a nasal endoscopy at 1 and 7minutes after the administration of a intranasal gel, with a different method in each fossa. No dye deposition was identified at the olfactory cleft, middle turbinate or middle meatus. In all cases the gel was identified at the nasal vestibule. On the right side, the second most frequent dye identification area was the inferior turbinate, with a rate of 87% at the first minute and 75% at 7 minutes. It was followed by the septum (75 and 62%) and the inferior meatus (6.2 and 12.5%). On the left side, the second most frequent stained area was the septum (18.7 and 13.5%), followed by the inferior meatus (6.5 and 65%). No inferior turbinate staining was found in the left side. There was a significant difference in the deposition rate at the septum (P<.01) and inferior turbinate (P<.001), when both administration methods were compared. No nasal gel, administrated using a radial-hole inhaler, was found at the olfactory cleft, middle turbinate or middle meatus. Gel distribution was located at the anterior and inferior portion of the nose, independent of the administration method used. Significantly different gel distribution rates were found at the septum and inferior turbinate when the 2 administration methods were compared. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  8. Concurrent modulation of neuronal and behavioural olfactory responses to sex and host plant cues in a male moth

    PubMed Central

    Kromann, Sophie H.; Saveer, Ahmed M.; Binyameen, Muhammad; Bengtsson, Marie; Birgersson, Göran; Hansson, Bill S.; Schlyter, Fredrik; Witzgall, Peter; Ignell, Rickard; Becher, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Mating has profound effects on animal physiology and behaviour, not only in females but also in males, which we show here for olfactory responses. In cotton leafworm moths, Spodoptera littoralis, odour-mediated attraction to sex pheromone and plant volatiles are modulated after mating, producing a behavioural response that matches the physiological condition of the male insect. Unmated males are attracted by upwind flight to sex pheromone released by calling females, as well as to volatiles of lilac flowers and green leaves of the host plant cotton, signalling adult food and mating sites, respectively. Mating temporarily abolishes male attraction to females and host plant odour, but does not diminish attraction to flowers. This behavioural modulation is correlated with a response modulation in the olfactory system, as shown by electro-physiological recordings from antennae and by functional imaging of the antennal lobe, using natural odours and synthetic compounds. An effect of mating on the olfactory responses to pheromone and cotton plant volatiles but not to lilac flowers indicates the presence of functionally independent neural circuits within the olfactory system. Our results indicate that these circuits interconnect and weigh perception of social and habitat odour signals to generate appropriate behavioural responses according to mating state. PMID:25621329

  9. Ranking facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Knight, Helen; Keith, Olly

    2005-08-01

    The first aim of this investigation was to assemble a group of photographs of 30 male and 30 female faces representing a standardized spectrum of facial attractiveness, against which orthognathic treatment outcomes could be compared. The second aim was to investigate the influence of the relationship between ANB differences and anterior lower face height (ALFH) percentages on facial attractiveness. The initial sample comprised standardized photographs of 41 female and 35 male Caucasian subjects. From these, the photographs of two groups of 30 male and 30 female subjects were compiled. A panel of six clinicians and six non-clinicians ranked the photographs. The results showed there to be a good level of reliability for each assessor when ranking the photographs on two occasions, particularly for the clinicians (female subjects r = 0.76-0.97, male subjects r = 0.72-0.94). Agreement among individuals within each group was also high, particularly when ranking facial attractiveness in male subjects (female subjects r = 0.57-0.84, male subjects r = 0.91-0.94). Antero-posterior (AP) discrepancies, as measured by soft tissue ANB, showed minimal correlation with facial attractiveness. However, a trend emerged that would suggest that in faces where the ANB varies widely from 5 degrees, the face is considered less attractive. The ALFH percentage also showed minimal correlation with facial attractiveness. However, there was a trend that suggested that greater ALFH percentages are considered less attractive in female faces, while in males the opposite trend was seen. Either of the two series of ranked photographs as judged by clinicians and non-clinicians could be used as a standard against which facial attractiveness could be assessed, as both were in total agreement about the most attractive faces. However, to judge the outcome of orthognathic treatment, the series of ranked photographs produced by the non-clinician group should be used as the 'standard' to reflect lay

  10. Functional Sub-Circuits of the Olfactory System Viewed from the Olfactory Bulb and the Olfactory Tubercle.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Understanding of the olfactory neural circuits has progressed beyond analysis of how odor information from the external environment is processed in the brain. While spatially-organized sub-circuits were found to exist up to the olfactory bulb (OB), the arrangement in the olfactory cortex (OC), especially in its representative piriform cortex (PC), appears diffuse and dispersed. An emerging view is that the activity of OC neurons may not simply encode odor identity but rather encode plastic odor information such as odor value. Although many studies support this notion, odor value can be either positive or negative, and the existence of sub-circuits corresponding to individual value types is not well explored. To address this question, I introduce here two olfactory areas other than the PC, OB and olfactory tubercle (OT) whose analysis may facilitate understanding of functional sub-circuits related to different odor values. Peripheral and centrifugal inputs to the OB are considered to relate to odor identity and odor value, respectively and centrifugal inputs to the OB potentially represent different odor values during different behavioral periods. The OT has spatially-segregated functional domains related to distinct motivated and hedonic behaviors. Thus, the OT provides a good starting point from which functional sub-circuits across various olfactory regions can be traced. Further analysis across wide areas of the olfactory system will likely reveal the functional sub-circuits that link odor identity with distinct odor values and direct distinct odor-induced motivated and hedonic behaviors.

  11. Attraction modulated by spacing of pheromone components and anti-attractants in a bark beetle and a moth.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Martin N; Binyameen, Muhammad; Sadek, Medhat M; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2011-08-01

    Orientation for insects in olfactory landscapes with high semiochemical diversity may be a challenging task. The partitioning of odor plumes into filaments that are interspersed with pockets of 'clean air' may help filament discrimination and upwind flight to attractive sources in the face of inhibitory signals. We studied the effect of distance between odor sources on trap catches of the beetle, Ips typographus, and the moth, Spodoptera littoralis. Insects were tested both to spatially separated pheromone components [cis-verbenol and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol for Ips; (Z,E)-9,11-tetradecadienyl acetate and (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate for Spodoptera], and to separated pheromone and anti-attractant sources [non-host volatile (NHV) blend for Ips; (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate for Spodoptera]. Trap catch data were complemented with simulations of plume structure and plume overlap from two separated sources using a photo ionization detector and soap bubble generators. Trap catches of the beetle and the moth were both affected when odor sources in the respective traps were increasingly separated. However, this effect on trap catch occurred at smaller (roughly by an order of magnitude) odor source separation distances for the moth than for the beetle. This may reflect differences between the respective olfactory systems and central processing. For both species, the changes in trap catches in response to separation of pheromone components occurred at similar spacing distances as for separation of pheromone and anti-attractant sources. Overlap between two simulated plumes depended on distance between the two sources. In addition, the number of detected filaments and their concentration decreased with downwind distance. This implies that the response to separated odor sources in the two species might take place under different olfactory conditions. Deploying multiple sources of anti-attractant around a pheromone trap indicated long-distance (meter scale) effects of NHV on

  12. Neuromodulation of olfactory sensitivity in the peripheral olfactory organs of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Jung, Je Won; Kim, Jin-Hee; Pfeiffer, Rita; Ahn, Young-Joon; Page, Terry L; Kwon, Hyung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory sensitivity exhibits daily fluctuations. Several studies have suggested that the olfactory system in insects is modulated by both biogenic amines and neuropeptides. However, molecular and neural mechanisms underlying olfactory modulation in the periphery remain unclear since neuronal circuits regulating olfactory sensitivity have not been identified. Here, we investigated the structure and function of these signaling pathways in the peripheral olfactory system of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, utilizing in situ hybridization, qRT-PCR, and electrophysiological approaches. We showed that tachykinin was co-localized with the octopamine receptor in antennal neurons located near the antennal nerves. In addition, the tachykinin receptor was found to be expressed in most of the olfactory receptor neurons in antennae. Functionally, the effects of direct injection of tachykinin peptides, dsRNAs of tachykinin, tachykinin receptors, and octopamine receptors provided further support for the view that both octopamine and tachykinin modulate olfactory sensitivity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that octopamine and tachykinin in antennal neurons are olfactory regulators in the periphery. We propose here the hypothesis that octopamine released from neurons in the brain regulates the release of tachykinin from the octopamine receptor neurons in antennae, which in turn modulates the olfactory sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons, which house tachykinin receptors.

  13. Intravenous olfactory test latency correlates with improvement in post-infectious olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Horikiri, Kyohei; Kikuta, Shu; Kanaya, Kaori; Shimizu, Yuya; Nishijima, Hironobu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kondo, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    This cohort study showed that onset latency in the intravenous olfactory test (IVO) may help predict when olfaction in patients with post-infectious olfactory dysfunction (PIOD) improves. To identify factors that predict the olfactory improvement period in patients with PIOD. All consecutive patients presenting with PIOD in 1994-2014 who were followed up for 2 years were identified retrospectively. The ability of demographic/clinical factors (age, sex, body mass index, presence/absence of allergic rhinitis, treatment/non-treatment with herbal medicines, patient dependence on herbal medicine treatment, presence/absence of diabetes mellitus, and smoking status) and olfactory test factors (response/no response and onset latency and duration in the IVO test, and detection and recognition scores on the T&T olfactory test) to predict the olfactory improvement period (defined respectively as the time from PIOD onset or olfactory testing to the first self-report of olfaction improvement) was analyzed by univariate and multivariate regression. Of the 187 PIOD patients, the prognostic ability of demographic/clinical factors was analyzed in 65. None predicted the olfactory improvement period. Of the 65 patients, 20 did not respond in the IVO test. In the remaining 45 patients, onset latency (but not the other olfactory test factors) was a significant prognosticator of olfactory improvement period (R(2)=0.24, p = 0.003).

  14. Floral Reward, Advertisement and Attractiveness to Honey Bees in Dioecious Salix caprea

    PubMed Central

    Dötterl, Stefan; Glück, Ulrike; Jürgens, Andreas; Woodring, Joseph; Aas, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward) than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i) to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues) in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii) to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii) to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants. PMID:24676333

  15. Floral reward, advertisement and attractiveness to honey bees in dioecious Salix caprea.

    PubMed

    Dötterl, Stefan; Glück, Ulrike; Jürgens, Andreas; Woodring, Joseph; Aas, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward) than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i) to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues) in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii) to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii) to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants.

  16. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  17. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  18. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device. (a) Identification. An olfactory test device is used to determine whether an olfactory loss is present. The device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device. (a) Identification. An olfactory test device is used to determine whether an olfactory loss is present. The device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section...

  20. The nature and development of sex attractant specificity in cockroaches of the genus Periplaneta. IV. electrophysiological study of attractant specificity and its determination by juvenile hormone.

    PubMed

    Schafer, R

    1977-02-01

    The antennae of male Periplaneta americana acquire a large number of olfactory receptors at the adult stage. Electrophysiological methods (single unit and electroantennogram recording) show that a portion of the receptors added at the adult ecdysis are sex attractant receptors. Sex attractant receptors are not present in large numbers on larval and adult female antennae. The differentiation of pheromone receptors is inhibited during normal larval development by juvenile hormone. Topical application of juvenile hormone-mimic to male antennae during the terminal larval instar inhibits their development. Comparative electrophysiological studies indicate a high degree of cross-reactivity of the P. americana sex attractant among four other species within the genus Periplaneta.

  1. Detection of Olfactory Dysfunction Using Olfactory Event Related Potentials in Young Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Caminiti, Fabrizia; De Salvo, Simona; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia; Ciurleo, Rosella

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies reported olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis. The estimate of the incidence of olfactory deficits in multiple sclerosis is uncertain; this may arise from different testing methods that may be influenced by patients' response bias and clinical, demographic and cognitive features. Aims To evaluate objectively the olfactory function using Olfactory Event Related Potentials. Materials and Methods We tested the olfactory function of 30 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (mean age of 36.03±6.96 years) and of 30 age, sex and smoking–habit matched healthy controls by using olfactory potentials. A selective and controlled stimulation of the olfactory system to elicit the olfactory event related potentials was achieved by a computer-controlled olfactometer linked directly with electroencephalograph. Relationships between olfactory potential results and patients' clinical characteristics, such as gender, disability status score, disease-modifying therapy, and disease duration, were evaluated. Results Seven of 30 patients did not show olfactory event related potentials. Sixteen of remaining 23 patients had a mean value of amplitude significantly lower than control group (p<0.01). The presence/absence of olfactory event related potentials was associated with dichotomous expanded disability status scale (p = 0.0433), as well as inversely correlated with the disease duration (r = −0.3641, p = 0.0479). Conclusion Unbiased olfactory dysfunction of different severity found in multiple sclerosis patients suggests an organic impairment which could be related to neuroinflammatory and/or neurodegenerative processes of olfactory networks, supporting the recent findings on neurophysiopathology of disease. PMID:25047369

  2. Caffeine and the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, M G

    1997-08-01

    Caffeine, a popular CNS stimulant, is the most widely used neuroactive drug. Present in coffee, tea, chocolate, and soft drinks as well as over-the-counter and prescription medications, it influences millions of users. This agent has achieved recent notoriety because its dependency consequences and addictive potential have been re-examined and emphasized. Caffeine's central actions are thought to be mediated through adenosine (A) receptors and monoamine neurotransmitters. The present article suggests that the olfactory bulb (OB) may be an important site in the brain that is responsible for caffeine's central actions in several species. This conclusion is based on the extraordinarily robust and selective effects of caffeine on norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and particularly serotonin (5HT) utilization in the OB of mice. We believe that these phenomena should be given appropriate consideration as a basis for caffeine's central actions, even in primates. Concurrently, we review a rich rodent literature concerned with A, 5HT, NE, and DA receptors in the OB and related structures along with other monoamine parameters. We also review a more limited literature concerned with the primate OB. Finally, we cite the literature that treats the dependency and addictive effects of caffeine in humans, and relate the findings to possible olfactory mechanisms.

  3. Attracting Water Drops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Ron Garan perform the Attracting Water Drops experiment from Chabad Hebrew Academy in San Diego, Calif. This research determines if a free-floating water drop can be att...

  4. Adolescent attraction to cults.

    PubMed

    Hunter, E

    1998-01-01

    This article details the reasons behind adolescents' attraction to cults. It is recommended that parents, teachers, and counselors familiarize themselves with the warning signs. Suggestions are offered on how to make adolescents less vulnerable to cult overtures.

  5. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another.

  6. Physical Attractiveness and Courtship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Irwin

    1971-01-01

    This study shows a high and disquieting degree of similarity in physical attractiveness between dating partners, and suggests also that more similar partners tend to form stronger romantic attachments. (Author)

  7. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Chen Peihua; Liu Qingjun; Wang Ping; Yang Wei

    2009-05-23

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  8. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care.

  9. Information processing in the mammalian olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Gheusi, Gilles; Vincent, Jean-Didier

    2005-01-01

    Recently, modern neuroscience has made considerable progress in understanding how the brain perceives, discriminates, and recognizes odorant molecules. This growing knowledge took over when the sense of smell was no longer considered only as a matter for poetry or the perfume industry. Over the last decades, chemical senses captured the attention of scientists who started to investigate the different stages of olfactory pathways. Distinct fields such as genetic, biochemistry, cellular biology, neurophysiology, and behavior have contributed to provide a picture of how odor information is processed in the olfactory system as it moves from the periphery to higher areas of the brain. So far, the combination of these approaches has been most effective at the cellular level, but there are already signs, and even greater hope, that the same is gradually happening at the systems level. This review summarizes the current ideas concerning the cellular mechanisms and organizational strategies used by the olfactory system to process olfactory information. We present findings that exemplified the high degree of olfactory plasticity, with special emphasis on the first central relay of the olfactory system. Recent observations supporting the necessity of such plasticity for adult brain functions are also discussed. Due to space constraints, this review focuses mainly on the olfactory systems of vertebrates, and primarily those of mammals.

  10. Implications of olfactory lamina propria transplantation on hyperreflexia and myelinated fiber regeneration in rats with complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Centenaro, Lígia Aline; da Cunha Jaeger, Mariane; Ilha, Jocemar; de Souza, Marcelo Alves; Balbinot, Luciane Fachin; do Nascimento, Patrícia Severo; Marcuzzo, Simone; Achaval, Matilde

    2013-02-01

    Transplantation with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) has been adopted after several models of spinal cord injury (SCI) with the purpose of creating a favorable environment for the re-growth of injured axons. However, a consensus on the efficacy of this cellular transplantation has yet to be reached. In order to explore alternative parameters that could demonstrate the possible restorative properties of such grafts, the present study investigated the effects of olfactory lamina propria (OLP) transplantation on hyperreflexia and myelinated fiber regeneration in adult rats with complete spinal cord transection. The efficacy of OLP (graft containing OECs) and respiratory lamina propria (RLP, graft without OECs) was tested at different post-injury times (acutely, 2- and 4-week delayed), to establish the optimum period for transplantation. In the therapeutic windows used, OLP and RLP grafts produced no considerable improvements in withdrawal reflex responses or on the low-frequency dependent depression of H-reflex. Both lamina propria grafts produced comparable results for the myelinated fiber density and for the estimated total number of myelinated fibers at the lesion site, indicating that the delayed transplantation approach does not seem to limit the regenerative effects. However, animals transplanted with OLP 2 or 4 weeks after injury exhibit smaller myelin sheath thickness and myelinated fiber area and diameter at the lesion site compared to their respective RLP groups. Despite the ongoing clinical use of OECs, it is important to emphasize the need for more experimental studies to clarify the exact nature of the repair capacity of these grafts in the treatment of SCI.

  11. Response of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Screwworm Oviposition Attractant.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, M F; Zhu, J J; Skoda, S R

    2015-07-01

    The sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causes sheep myiasis in various parts of the world. Female flies are attracted to sheep following various olfactory cues emanating from the sheep's body, and oviposit on suitable substrates on sheep ultimately causing myiasis. Earlier workers attempted to reduce fly population in the field, with some success, using traps baited with various attractants. This research was conducted to determine if L. sericata would respond to a recently developed synthetic attractant that has attracted gravid screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel, and stimulated them to oviposit. Results of the laboratory bioassays demonstrated that gravid females L. sericata were attracted to substrates treated with the synthetic screwworm attractant composed of five compounds--dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, phenol, p-cresol, and indole. Tests with various combinations of these compounds suggest that the sulfur compounds and indole are the most important compounds to elicit attraction and stimulate oviposition, while phenol and p-cresol may have minor roles. Semiochemical baits based on these compounds may be useful in the field to trap gravid L. sericata. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Inhaled nanoparticles can migrate to the brain via the olfactory bulb, as demonstrated in experiments in several animal species. This route of exposure may be the mechanism behind the correlation between air pollution and human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Objectives This manuscript aims to (1) estimate the dose of inhaled nanoparticles that deposit in the human olfactory epithelium during nasal breathing at rest and (2) compare the olfactory dose in humans with our earlier dose estimates for rats. Materials and methods An anatomically-accurate model of the human nasal cavity was developed based on computed tomography scans. The deposition of 1–100 nm particles in the whole nasal cavity and its olfactory region were estimated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Our CFD methods were validated by comparing our numerical predictions for whole-nose deposition with experimental data and previous CFD studies in the literature. Results In humans, olfactory dose of inhaled nanoparticles is highest for 1–2 nm particles with approximately 1% of inhaled particles depositing in the olfactory region. As particle size grows to 100 nm, olfactory deposition decreases to 0.01% of inhaled particles. Discussion and conclusion Our results suggest that the percentage of inhaled particles that deposit in the olfactory region is lower in humans than in rats. However, olfactory dose per unit surface area is estimated to be higher in humans due to their larger minute volume. These dose estimates are important for risk assessment and dose-response studies investigating the neurotoxicity of inhaled nanoparticles. PMID:26194036

  13. Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Schroeter, Jeffry D; Kimbell, Julia S

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles can migrate to the brain via the olfactory bulb, as demonstrated in experiments in several animal species. This route of exposure may be the mechanism behind the correlation between air pollution and human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. This article aims to (i) estimate the dose of inhaled nanoparticles that deposit in the human olfactory epithelium during nasal breathing at rest and (ii) compare the olfactory dose in humans with our earlier dose estimates for rats. An anatomically-accurate model of the human nasal cavity was developed based on computed tomography scans. The deposition of 1-100 nm particles in the whole nasal cavity and its olfactory region were estimated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Our CFD methods were validated by comparing our numerical predictions for whole-nose deposition with experimental data and previous CFD studies in the literature. In humans, olfactory dose of inhaled nanoparticles is highest for 1-2 nm particles with ∼1% of inhaled particles depositing in the olfactory region. As particle size grows to 100 nm, olfactory deposition decreases to 0.01% of inhaled particles. Our results suggest that the percentage of inhaled particles that deposit in the olfactory region is lower in humans than in rats. However, olfactory dose per unit surface area is estimated to be higher in humans in the 1--7 nm size range due to the larger inhalation rate in humans. These dose estimates are important for risk assessment and dose-response studies investigating the neurotoxicity of inhaled nanoparticles.

  14. Stomatin-related olfactory protein, SRO, specifically expressed in the murine olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kobayakawa, Ko; Hayashi, Reiko; Morita, Kenji; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Oka, Yuichiro; Tsuboi, Akio; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2002-07-15

    We identified a stomatin-related olfactory protein (SRO) that is specifically expressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). The mouse sro gene encodes a polypeptide of 287 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 32 kDa. SRO shares 82% sequence similarity with the murine stomatin, 78% with Caenorhabditis elegans MEC-2, and 77% with C. elegans UNC-1. Unlike other stomatin-family genes, the sro transcript was present only in OSNs of the main olfactory epithelium. No sro expression was seen in vomeronasal neurons. SRO was abundant in most apical dendrites of OSNs, including olfactory cilia. Immunoprecipitation revealed that SRO associates with adenylyl cyclase type III and caveolin-1 in the low-density membrane fraction of olfactory cilia. Furthermore, anti-SRO antibodies stimulated cAMP production in fractionated cilia membrane. SRO may play a crucial role in modulating odorant signals in the lipid rafts of olfactory cilia.

  15. The Olfactory Mosaic: Bringing an Olfactory Network Together for Odor Perception.

    PubMed

    Courtiol, Emmanuelle; Wilson, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Olfactory perception and its underlying neural mechanisms are not fixed, but rather vary over time, dependent on various parameters such as state, task, or learning experience. In olfaction, one of the primary sensory areas beyond the olfactory bulb is the piriform cortex. Due to an increasing number of functions attributed to the piriform cortex, it has been argued to be an associative cortex rather than a simple primary sensory cortex. In fact, the piriform cortex plays a key role in creating olfactory percepts, helping to form configural odor objects from the molecular features extracted in the nose. Moreover, its dynamic interactions with other olfactory and nonolfactory areas are also critical in shaping the olfactory percept and resulting behavioral responses. In this brief review, we will describe the key role of the piriform cortex in the larger olfactory perceptual network, some of the many actors of this network, and the importance of the dynamic interactions among the piriform-trans-thalamic and limbic pathways.

  16. Evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Buchinger, Tyler J; Li, Ke; Huertas, Mar; Baker, Cindy F; Jia, Liang; Hayes, Michael C; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S

    2017-02-01

    Animals rely on a mosaic of complex information to find and evaluate mates. Pheromones, often consisting of multiple components, are considered to be particularly important for species-recognition in many species. Although the evolution of species-specific pheromone blends is well described in many insects, very few vertebrate pheromones have been studied in a macro-evolutionary context. Here, we report a phylogenetic comparison of multi-component male odours that guide reproduction in lampreys. Chemical profiling of sexually mature males from eleven species of lamprey, representing six of ten genera and two of three families, indicated that the chemical profiles of sexually mature male odours are partially shared among species. Behavioural assays conducted with four species sympatric in the Laurentian Great Lakes indicated asymmetric female responses to heterospecific odours, where Petromyzon marinus were attracted to male odour collected from all species tested, but other species generally preferred only the odour of conspecifics. Electro-olfactogram recordings from P. marinus indicated that although P. marinus exhibited behavioural responses to odours from males of all species, at least some of the compounds that elicited olfactory responses were different in conspecific male odours compared with heterospecific male odours. We conclude that some of the compounds released by sexually mature males are shared among species and elicit olfactory and behavioural responses in P. marinus, and suggest that our results provide evidence for partial overlap of male olfactory cues among lampreys. Further characterization of the chemical identities of odour components is needed to confirm shared pheromones among species. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Deciphering the olfactory repertoire of the tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Fabrizio; Salvemini, Marco; Fiorillo, Carmine; Nolan, Tony; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Ribeiro, José M; Arcà, Bruno

    2017-10-11

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is a highly invasive species and competent vector of several arboviruses (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, Zika) and parasites (e.g. dirofilaria) of public health importance. Compared to other mosquito species, Ae. albopictus females exhibit a generalist host seeking as well as a very aggressive biting behaviour that are responsible for its high degree of nuisance. Several complex mosquito behaviours such as host seeking, feeding, mating or oviposition rely on olfactory stimuli that target a range of sensory neurons localized mainly on specialized head appendages such as antennae, maxillary palps and the mouthparts. With the aim to describe the Ae. albopictus olfactory repertoire we have used RNA-seq to reveal the transcriptome profiles of female antennae and maxillary palps. Male heads and whole female bodies were employed as reference for differential expression analysis. The relative transcript abundance within each tissue (TPM, transcripts per kilobase per million) and the pairwise differential abundance in the different tissues (fold change values and false discovery rates) were evaluated. Contigs upregulated in the antennae (620) and maxillary palps (268) were identified and relative GO and PFAM enrichment profiles analysed. Chemosensory genes were described: overall, 77 odorant binding proteins (OBP), 82 odorant receptors (OR), 60 ionotropic receptors (IR) and 30 gustatory receptors (GR) were identified by comparative genomics and transcriptomics. In addition, orthologs of genes expressed in the female/male maxillary palps and/or antennae and involved in thermosensation (e.g. pyrexia and arrestin1), mechanosensation (e.g. piezo and painless) and neuromodulation were classified. We provide here the first detailed transcriptome of the main Ae. albopictus sensory appendages, i.e. antennae and maxillary palps. A deeper knowledge of the olfactory repertoire of the tiger mosquito will help to better understand its biology and may

  18. Unraveling Cajal's view of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, María; Gutiérrez, Yolanda; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system has a highly regular organization of interconnected synaptic circuits from the periphery. It is therefore an excellent model for understanding general principles about how the brain processes information. Cajal revealed the basic cell types and their interconnections at the end of the XIX century. Since his original descriptions, the observation and analysis of the olfactory system and its components represents a major topic in neuroscience studies, providing important insights into the neural mechanisms. In this review, we will highlight the importance of Cajal contributions and his legacy to the actual knowledge of the olfactory system. PMID:25071462

  19. Differential interactions of sex pheromone and plant odour in the olfactory pathway of a male moth.

    PubMed

    Deisig, Nina; Kropf, Jan; Vitecek, Simon; Pevergne, Delphine; Rouyar, Angela; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Lucas, Philippe; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia; Barrozo, Romina

    2012-01-01

    Most animals rely on olfaction to find sexual partners, food or a habitat. The olfactory system faces the challenge of extracting meaningful information from a noisy odorous environment. In most moth species, males respond to sex pheromone emitted by females in an environment with abundant plant volatiles. Plant odours could either facilitate the localization of females (females calling on host plants), mask the female pheromone or they could be neutral without any effect on the pheromone. Here we studied how mixtures of a behaviourally-attractive floral odour, heptanal, and the sex pheromone are encoded at different levels of the olfactory pathway in males of the noctuid moth Agrotis ipsilon. In addition, we asked how interactions between the two odorants change as a function of the males' mating status. We investigated mixture detection in both the pheromone-specific and in the general odorant pathway. We used a) recordings from individual sensilla to study responses of olfactory receptor neurons, b) in vivo calcium imaging with a bath-applied dye to characterize the global input response in the primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe and c) intracellular recordings of antennal lobe output neurons, projection neurons, in virgin and newly-mated males. Our results show that heptanal reduces pheromone sensitivity at the peripheral and central olfactory level independently of the mating status. Contrarily, heptanal-responding olfactory receptor neurons are not influenced by pheromone in a mixture, although some post-mating modulation occurs at the input of the sexually isomorphic ordinary glomeruli, where general odours are processed within the antennal lobe. The results are discussed in the context of mate localization.

  20. Differential Interactions of Sex Pheromone and Plant Odour in the Olfactory Pathway of a Male Moth

    PubMed Central

    Deisig, Nina; Kropf, Jan; Vitecek, Simon; Pevergne, Delphine; Rouyar, Angela; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Lucas, Philippe; Gadenne, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Most animals rely on olfaction to find sexual partners, food or a habitat. The olfactory system faces the challenge of extracting meaningful information from a noisy odorous environment. In most moth species, males respond to sex pheromone emitted by females in an environment with abundant plant volatiles. Plant odours could either facilitate the localization of females (females calling on host plants), mask the female pheromone or they could be neutral without any effect on the pheromone. Here we studied how mixtures of a behaviourally-attractive floral odour, heptanal, and the sex pheromone are encoded at different levels of the olfactory pathway in males of the noctuid moth Agrotis ipsilon. In addition, we asked how interactions between the two odorants change as a function of the males' mating status. We investigated mixture detection in both the pheromone-specific and in the general odorant pathway. We used a) recordings from individual sensilla to study responses of olfactory receptor neurons, b) in vivo calcium imaging with a bath-applied dye to characterize the global input response in the primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe and c) intracellular recordings of antennal lobe output neurons, projection neurons, in virgin and newly-mated males. Our results show that heptanal reduces pheromone sensitivity at the peripheral and central olfactory level independently of the mating status. Contrarily, heptanal-responding olfactory receptor neurons are not influenced by pheromone in a mixture, although some post-mating modulation occurs at the input of the sexually isomorphic ordinary glomeruli, where general odours are processed within the antennal lobe. The results are discussed in the context of mate localization. PMID:22427979

  1. Repeated formaldehyde inhalation impaired olfactory function and changed SNAP25 proteins in olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Yan, Weiqun; Bai, Yang; Zhu, Yingqiao; Ma, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Formaldehyde inhalation exposure, which can occur through occupational exposure, can lead to sensory irritation, neurotoxicity, mood disorders, and learning and memory impairment. However, its influence on olfactory function is unclear. To investigate the mechanism and the effect of repeated formaldehyde inhalation exposure on olfactory function. Rats were treated with formaldehyde inhalation (13·5±1·5 ppm, twice 30 minutes/day) for 14 days. Buried food pellet and locomotive activity tests were used to detect olfactory function and locomotion. Western blots were used to evaluate synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25) protein levels in the olfactory bulb (OB) lysate and synaptosome, as well as mature and immature olfactory sensory neuron markers, olfactory marker protein (OMP), and Tuj-1. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect SNAP25 mRNA amounts. Repeated formaldehyde inhalation exposure impaired olfactory function, whereas locomotive activities were unaffected. SNAP25 protein decreased significantly in the OB, but not in the occipital lobe. SNAP25 also decreased in the OB synaptosome when synaptophysin did not change after formaldehyde treatment. mRNA levels of SNAP25A and SNAP25B were unaffected. Mature and immature olfactory sensory neuron marker, OMP, and Tuj-1, did not change after formaldehyde treatment. Repeated formaldehyde exposure impaired olfactory function by disturbing SNAP25 protein in the OB.

  2. Regulation of Distinct Attractive and Aversive Mechanisms Mediating Benzaldehyde Chemotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nuttley, William M.; Harbinder, Singh; van der Kooy, Derek

    2001-01-01

    Olfactory-mediated chemotaxis in nematodes provides a relatively simple system to study biological mechanisms of information processing. Analysis of the kinetics of chemotaxis in response to 100% benzaldehyde revealed an initial attractive response that is followed by a strong aversion to the odorant. We show that this behavior is mediated by two genetically separable attraction- and aversion-mediating response pathways. The attraction initially dominates behavior but with prolonged exposure habituation leads to a behavioral change, such that the odorant becomes repulsive. This olfactory habituation is susceptible to dishabituation, thereby re-establishing the attractive response to the odorant. Re-examination of the putative olfactory adaptation mutant adp-1(ky20) revealed that the phenotype observed in this line is due to a supersensitivity to a dishabituating stimulus, rather than a defect in the adaptation to odorants per se. A modified benzaldehyde chemotaxis assay was developed and used for the isolation of a mutant with a specific defect in habituation kinetics, expressed as a persistence of the attractive response. PMID:11390637

  3. Attracting girls to physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Anne; Sui, Manling

    2013-03-01

    Large regional differences remain in the number of girls studying physics and the number of female physicists in academic positions. While many countries struggle with attracting female students to university studies in physics, climbing the academic ladder is the main challenge for these women. Furthermore, for many female physicists the working climate is not very supportive. The workshop Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the 4th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, South Africa 2011, addressed attitudes among education-seeking teenagers and approaches for attracting young girls to physics through successful recruitment plans, including highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications. The current paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from this workshop.

  4. Correlation between olfactory severity ratings based on olfactory function test scores and self-reported severity rating of olfactory loss.

    PubMed

    Seok, Jungirl; Shim, Ye Ji; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2017-07-01

    Olfactory test scores are significantly correlated with self-rated severity scales. However, the statistical rating based on olfactory tests did not strongly agree with the self-reported severity rating. This suggests that there is a discrepancy between olfactory test results and the severity described by patients themselves. This study aimed to identify the correlation between statistical ratings based on test scores and self-rating of the severity of olfactory loss. A total of 1555 subjects were asked to rate olfactory loss severity by one of five scales. Olfactory tests consist of the butanol threshold test (BTT) and cross-cultural smell identification test (CCSIT). There were significant correlations between BTT scores and self-rated severity scales (r = 0.619, p < 0.001) and between CCSIT scores and self-rated severity scales (r = 0.597, p < 0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, and medical conditions. Using discriminant analysis for both BTT and CCSIT, scores 0-4 could be statistically rated as anosmia, scores 5 and 6 as severe hyposmia, scores 7 and 8 as moderate hyposmia, and scores 9-12 as normosmia (Wilks's lambda = 0.605, p < 0.001 for BTT and Wilks's lambda = 0.597, p < 0.001 for CCSIT).

  5. Olfactory experience modifies semiochemical responses in a bark beetle predator.

    PubMed

    Costa, Arnaud; Reeve, John D

    2011-11-01

    A typical feature of forest insect pests is their tendency to undergo large fluctuations in abundance, which can jeopardize the persistence of their predaceous natural enemies. One strategy that these predators may adopt to cope with these fluctuations would be to respond to sensory cues for multiple prey species. Another possible adaptation to temporal variation in the prey community could involve the learning of prey cues and switching behavior. We conducted three experiments to investigate the ability of the generalist bark beetle predator Thanasimus dubius (F.) (Coleoptera: Cleridae) to respond to different prey signals and to investigate the effect of olfactory experience. We first conducted a field choice test and a wind tunnel experiment to examine the kairomonal response of individual predators toward prey pheromone components (frontalin, ipsenol, ipsdienol, sulcatol) along with the pine monoterpene α-pinene, which is a volatile compound from the host of the prey. We also presented semiochemically naive predators with two prey pheromone components, frontalin and ipsenol, alone or associated with a reward. Our results showed that T. dubius populations are composed of generalists that can respond to a broad range of kairomonal signals. Naive T. dubius also were more attracted to ipsenol following its association with a reward. This work constitutes the first evidence that the behavior of a predatory insect involved in bark beetle population dynamics is influenced by previous olfactory experience, and provides a potential explanation for the pattern of prey switching observed in field studies.

  6. Olfactory eavesdropping by a competitively foraging stingless bee, Trigona spinipes.

    PubMed Central

    Nieh, James C.; Barreto, Lillian S.; Contrera, Felipe A. L.; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera L.

    2004-01-01

    Signals that are perceived over long distances or leave extended spatial traces are subject to eavesdropping. Eavesdropping has therefore acted as a selective pressure in the evolution of diverse animal communication systems, perhaps even in the evolution of functionally referential communication. Early work suggested that some species of stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini) may use interceptive olfactory eavesdropping to discover food sources being exploited by competitors, but it is not clear if any stingless bee can be attracted to the odour marks deposited by an interspecific competitor. We show that foragers of the aggressive meliponine bee, Trigona spinipes, can detect and orient towards odour marks deposited by a competitor, Melipona rufiventris, and then rapidly take over the food source, driving away or killing their competitors. When searching for food sources at new locations that they are not already exploiting, T. spinipes foragers strongly prefer M. rufiventris odour marks to odour marks deposited by their own nest-mates, whereas they prefer nest-mate odour marks over M. rufiventris odour marks at a location already occupied by T. spinipes nest-mates. Melipona rufiventris foragers flee from T. spinipes odour marks. This olfactory eavesdropping may have played a role in the evolution of potentially cryptic communication mechanisms such as shortened odour trails, point-source only odour marking and functionally referential communication concealed at the nest. PMID:15306311

  7. Teneurins Instruct Synaptic Partner Matching in an Olfactory Map

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Weizhe; Mosca, Timothy J.; Luo, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    Neurons are interconnected with extraordinary precision to assemble a functional nervous system. Compared to axon guidance, far less is understood about how individual pre- and post-synaptic partners are matched. To ensure the proper relay of olfactory information in flies, axons of ~50 classes of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) form one-to-one connections with dendrites of ~50 classes of projection neurons (PNs). Using genetic screens, we identified two evolutionarily conserved EGF-repeat transmembrane Teneurins, Ten-m and Ten-a, as synaptic partner matching molecules between PN dendrites and ORN axons. Ten-m and Ten-a are highly expressed in select PN-ORN matching pairs. Teneurin loss- and gain-of-function cause specific mismatching of select ORNs and PNs. Finally, Teneurins promote homophilic interactions in vitro, and Ten-m co-expression in non-partner PNs and ORNs promotes their ectopic connections in vivo. We propose that Teneurins instruct matching specificity between synaptic partners through homophilic attraction. PMID:22425994

  8. Attracting Girls to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandow, Barbara; Marks, Ann; Borg, Anne

    2009-04-01

    In most countries the number of girls studying physics, as well female physicists in academic positions, is still low. Active recruitment at all levels is essential to change this situation. In some countries a large proportion of students are female, but career progression is difficult. Highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications is a major approach in attracting girls to physics. This paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from the workshop, Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, Seoul, 2008.

  9. Modeling Olfactory Bulb Evolution through Primate Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive characterizations of primates have usually included a reduction in olfactory sensitivity. However, this inference of derivation and directionality assumes an ancestral state of olfaction, usually by comparison to a group of extant non-primate mammals. Thus, the accuracy of the inference depends on the assumed ancestral state. Here I present a phylogenetic model of continuous trait evolution that reconstructs olfactory bulb volumes for ancestral nodes of primates and mammal outgroups. Parent-daughter comparisons suggest that, relative to the ancestral euarchontan, the crown-primate node is plesiomorphic and that derived reduction in olfactory sensitivity is an attribute of the haplorhine lineage. The model also suggests a derived increase in olfactory sensitivity at the strepsirrhine node. This oppositional diversification of the strepsirrhine and haplorhine lineages from an intermediate and non-derived ancestor is inconsistent with a characterization of graded reduction through primate evolution. PMID:25426851

  10. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  11. Methods to measure olfactory behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Mice rely on the sense of olfaction to detect food sources, recognize social and mating partners, and avoid predators. Many behaviors of mice including learning and memory, social interaction, fear, and anxiety are closely associated with their function of olfaction, and behavior tasks designed to evaluate those brain functions may use odors as cues. Accurate assessment of olfaction is not only essential for the study of olfactory system but also critical for proper interpretation of various mouse behaviors especially learning and memory, emotionality and affect, and sociality. Here we describe a series of behavior experiments that offer multidimensional and quantitative assessments for mouse’s olfactory function, including olfactory habituation, discrimination, odor preference, odor detection sensitivity, and olfactory memory, to both social and nonsocial odors. PMID:25645244

  12. A multisensory network for olfactory processing

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Joost X.; Blankenship, Meredith L.; Li, Jennifer X.; Katz, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Primary gustatory cortex (GC) is connected (both mono- and poly-synaptically) to primary olfactory (piriform) cortex (PC)—connections that might be hypothesized to underlie the construction of a “flavor” percept when both gustatory and olfactory stimuli are present. Here, we use multi-site electrophysiology and optical inhibition of GC neurons (GCx, produced via infection with ArchT) to demonstrate that, indeed, during gustatory stimulation, taste-selective information is transmitted from GC to PC. We go on to show that these connections impact olfactory processing even in the absence of gustatory stimulation: GCx alters PC responses to olfactory stimuli presented alone, enhancing some and eliminating others, despite leaving the path from nasal epithelium to PC intact. Finally, we show the functional importance of this latter phenomenon, demonstrating that GCx renders rats unable to properly recognize odor stimuli. This sequence of findings suggests that sensory processing may be more intrinsically integrative than previously thought. PMID:26441351

  13. Serotonin mediates a learned increase in attraction to high concentrations of benzaldehyde in aged C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tsui, David; van der Kooy, Derek

    2008-11-01

    We utilized olfactory-mediated chemotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans to examine the effect of aging on information processing and animal behavior. Wild-type (N2) young adults (day 4) initially approach and eventually avoid a point source of benzaldehyde. Aged adult animals (day 7) showed a stronger initial approach and a delayed avoidance to benzaldehyde compared with young adults. This delayed avoidance is due to an increased attraction rather than a decreased avoidance to benzaldehyde because (1) aged odr-3 mutants that are defective in odor attraction showed no delayed benzaldehyde avoidance, and (2) the delay in avoidance was also observed with another attractant diacetyl, but not the repellent octanol. Interestingly, the stronger expression of attractive behavior was only observed at benzaldehyde concentrations of 1% or higher. When worms were grown on nonbacterial growth media instead of Escherichia coli, thus removing the contingency between odors released from the food and the food itself, the increase in attraction to benzaldehyde disappeared. The increased attraction recovered after reinitiating the odor-food contingency by returning animals to E. coli food or supplementing axenic media with benzaldehyde. Moreover, serotonin-deficient mutants showed a deficit in the age-enhanced attraction. These results suggest that the increased attraction to benzaldehyde in aged worms is (1) serotonin mediated, (2) specific to high concentration of odorants, and (3) dependent on a learned association of odor metabolites with the presence of food. We propose that associative learning may selectively modify pathways at or downstream from a low-affinity olfactory receptor.

  14. Cladistic Analysis of Olfactory and Vomeronasal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2010-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies’ view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical “cortex.” We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses. PMID:21290004

  15. Cladistic analysis of olfactory and vomeronasal systems.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2011-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies' view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical "cortex." We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses.

  16. Dimorphic olfactory lobes in the arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E

    2009-07-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description, there is no evidence for similar structures occurring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods.

  17. Correlates of Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prisbell, Marshall

    A study assessed the relationship of the independent variables of interpersonal attraction to the dependent variables of feeling good, relational safety, and uncertainty level. Subjects were 75 elementary and secondary school teachers, 61 communication students, 18 child development professionals, and 8 service club members. Each subject completed…

  18. Science Can Be Attractive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the properties of neodymium magnets and magnets in general and how magnets can be used to teach students important scientific principles, such as attraction, repulsion, and polarity; the role of magnetic forces in electronic communications and computers; the magnetic properties of the earth and compasses; and the relationship between…

  19. Attracting Philosophy Students--1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A., Ed.

    This is the first in a series of occasional papers designed as a vehicle for the collection and dissemination of ideas for increasing philosophy course enrollments in two-year colleges. A project of the Subcommittee on Attracting Philosophy Students of the American Philosophical Association's Committee on Teaching Philosophy in Two-Year Colleges,…

  20. Adolescent Attraction to Cults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Eagan

    1998-01-01

    Details the reasons behind adolescents' attraction to cults. and distinguishes functions of cults and the term "cult." Identifies various cults, and describes the process of involvement. Notes that in the absence of authentic, stabilizing standards, some youth are especially vulnerable. Provides recommendations for adults working with…

  1. Science Can Be Attractive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the properties of neodymium magnets and magnets in general and how magnets can be used to teach students important scientific principles, such as attraction, repulsion, and polarity; the role of magnetic forces in electronic communications and computers; the magnetic properties of the earth and compasses; and the relationship between…

  2. Cortical Feedback Control of Olfactory Bulb Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alison M.; Sturgill, James F.; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  3. A new dopaminergic nigro-olfactory projection.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Günter U; Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Djufri, Miriam; Windolph, Andrea; Keber, Ursula; Borta, Andreas; Ries, Vincent; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Scheller, Dieter; Oertel, Wolfgang H

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by massive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Whereas onset of motor impairments reflects a rather advanced stage of the disorder, hyposmia often marks the beginning of the disease. Little is known about the role of the nigro-striatal system in olfaction under physiological conditions and the anatomical basis of hyposmia in PD. Yet, the early occurrence of olfactory dysfunction implies that pathogens such as environmental toxins could incite the disease via the olfactory system. In the present study, we demonstrate a dopaminergic innervation from neurons in the substantia nigra to the olfactory bulb by axonal tracing studies. Injection of two dopaminergic neurotoxins-1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydroxydopamine-into the olfactory bulb induced a decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In turn, ablation of the nigral projection led to impaired olfactory perception. Hyposmia following dopaminergic deafferentation was reversed by treatment with the D1/D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist rotigotine. Hence, we demonstrate for the first time the existence of a direct dopaminergic projection into the olfactory bulb and identify its origin in the substantia nigra in rats. These observations may provide a neuroanatomical basis for invasion of environmental toxins into the basal ganglia and for hyposmia as frequent symptom in PD.

  4. Olfactory processing in a changing brain.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Gheusi, Gilles

    2003-09-15

    The perception of odorant molecules provides the essential information that allows animals to explore their surrounding. We describe here how the external world of scents may sculpt the activity of the first central relay of the olfactory system, i.e., the olfactory bulb. This structure is one of the few brain areas to continuously replace one of its neuronal populations: the local GABAergic interneurons. How the newly generated neurons integrate into a pre-existing neural network and how basic olfactory functions are maintained when a large percentage of neurons are subjected to continuous renewal, are important questions that have recently received new insights. Furthermore, we shall see how the adult neurogenesis is specifically subjected to experience-dependent modulation. In particular, we shall describe the sensitivity of the bulbar neurogenesis to the activity level of sensory inputs from the olfactory epithelium and, in turn, how this neurogenesis may adjust the neural network functioning to optimize odor information processing. Finally, we shall discuss the behavioral consequences of the bulbar neurogenesis and how it may be appropriate for the sense of smell. By maintaining a constitutive turnover of bulbar interneurons subjected to modulation by environmental cues, we propose that adult ongoing neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb is associated with improved olfactory memory. These recent findings not only provide new fuel for the molecular and cellular bases of sensory perception but should also shed light onto cellular bases of learning and memory.

  5. Marketing to attract women.

    PubMed

    Dearing, R H

    1987-01-01

    Patient care and marketing programs sensitive to women can help Catholic facilities increase maternity care patient volumes. Four factors influence hospitals' ability to attract women. Women today are better educated and more sophisticated than ever before about health care needs, and they have more providers from which to choose. With limited resources, providers must be discriminating in the type of services they deliver and how. Finally, women make most of the health care decisions for the families. To attract women, providers should offer them personalized care, participation in decisions, information about treatment, attractive facilities, convenience, and affordable costs. Many providers believe Catholic facilities fail to attract maternity patients because they do not perform tubal ligations; however, parents generally see childbirth as a separate event from sterilization. Providers also believe that non-Catholic patients will not use their facilities, but today's patients choose a hospital because of what it offers, not sponsorship. Some patients may not choose Catholic facilities because they see them as less progressive, but this image can be corrected through marketing Catholic facilities' common strengths include their focus on care rather than profit, their compassionate, individualized care, the image of women caring for women, and their stability. Catholic facilities have built on their strengths to attract women patients by reinforcing positive perceptions with innovative programs, marketing directly to women, educating physicians in how to respond to women's needs, increasing linkages with all women in the community, ensuring that the mission of care is reflected in the physical plant, using a marketing program to help employees carry out compassionate care, and surveying patients for feedback on how their needs are met.

  6. Developmental experience-dependent plasticity in the first synapse of the Drosophila olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Randall M; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-12-01

    Evidence accumulating over the past 15 years soundly refutes the dogma that the Drosophila nervous system is hardwired. The preponderance of studies reveals activity-dependent neural circuit refinement driving optimization of behavioral outputs. We describe developmental, sensory input-dependent plasticity in the brain olfactory antennal lobe, which we term long-term central adaption (LTCA). LTCA is evoked by prolonged exposure to an odorant during the first week of posteclosion life, resulting in a persistently decreased response to aversive odors and an enhanced response to attractive odors. This limited window of early-use, experience-dependent plasticity represents a critical period of olfactory circuit refinement tuned by initial sensory input. Consequent behavioral adaptations have been associated with changes in the output of olfactory projection neurons to higher brain centers. Recent studies have indicated a central role for local interneuron signaling in LTCA presentation. Genetic and molecular analyses have implicated the mRNA-binding fragile X mental retardation protein and ataxin-2 regulators, Notch trans-synaptic signaling, and cAMP signal transduction as core regulatory steps driving LTCA. In this article, we discuss the structural, functional, and behavioral changes associated with LTCA and review our current understanding of the molecular pathways underlying these developmental, experience-dependent changes in the olfactory circuitry.

  7. Testing olfactory foraging strategies in an Antarctic seabird assemblage.

    PubMed

    Nevitt, Gabrielle; Reid, Keith; Trathan, Phil

    2004-09-01

    Procellariiform seabirds (petrels, albatrosses and shearwaters) forage over thousands of square kilometres for patchily distributed prey resources. While these birds are known for their large olfactory bulbs and excellent sense of smell, how they use odour cues to locate prey patches in the vast ocean is not well understood. Here, we investigate species-specific responses to 3-methyl pyrazine in a sub-Antarctic species assemblage near South Georgia Island (54 degrees 00 ' S, 36 degrees 00 ' W). Pyrazines are scented compounds found in macerated Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), a primary prey item for many seabird species in this region. To examine behavioural attraction to this odour, we presented birds with either scented or 'unscented' vegetable oil slicks at sea. As a positive control for our experiments, we also compared birds' responses to a general olfactory attractant, herring oil. Responses to pyrazine were both highly species specific and consistent with results from earlier studies investigating responses to crude krill extracts. For example, Cape petrels (Daption capense), giant petrels (Macronectes sp.) and white-chinned petrels (Procellaria aequinoctialis) were sighted at least 1.8-4 times as often at pyrazine-scented slicks than at control slicks. Black-browed albatrosses (Diomedea melanophris) were only sighted at pyrazine-scented slicks and never at control slicks. Wilson's storm-petrels (Oceanites oceanicus), black-bellied storm-petrels (Fregetta tropica), great shearwaters (Puffinus gravis) and prions (Pachyptila sp.) were sighted with equal frequency at control and pyrazine-scented slicks. As expected, responses to herring oil were more common. With the exception of great shearwaters (Puffinus gravis), each of these species was sighted up to five times as often at slicks scented with herring oil compared with control slicks. Together, the results support the hypothesis that Antarctic procellariiforms use species-specific foraging strategies

  8. Ensheathing cell-conditioned medium directs the differentiation of human umbilical cord blood cells into aldynoglial phenotype cells.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Regalado, María Dolores; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Zarate, Carlos Beas; Gudiño-Cabrera, Graciela

    2012-06-01

    Despite their similarities to bone marrow precursor cells (PC), human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) PCs are more immature and, thus, they exhibit greater plasticity. This plasticity is evident by their ability to proliferate and spontaneously differentiate into almost any cell type, depending on their environment. Moreover, HUCB-PCs yield an accessible cell population that can be grown in culture and differentiated into glial, neuronal and other cell phenotypes. HUCB-PCs offer many potential therapeutic benefits, particularly in the area of neural replacement. We sought to induce the differentiation of HUCB-PCs into glial cells, known as aldynoglia. These cells can promote neuronal regeneration after lesion and they can be transplanted into areas affected by several pathologies, which represents an important therapeutic strategy to treat central nervous system damage. To induce differentiation to the aldynoglia phenotype, HUCB-PCs were exposed to different culture media. Mononuclear cells from HUCB were isolated and purified by identification of CD34 and CD133 antigens, and after 12 days in culture, differentiation of CD34+ HUCB-PCs to an aldynoglia phenotypic, but not that of CD133+ cells, was induced in ensheathing cell (EC)-conditioned medium. Thus, we demonstrate that the differentiation of HUCB-PCs into aldynoglia cells in EC-conditioned medium can provide a new source of aldynoglial cells for use in transplants to treat injuries or neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  10. Damage to Olfactory Progenitor Cells Is Involved in Cigarette Smoke-Induced Olfactory Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ueha, Rumi; Ueha, Satoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kikuta, Shu; Kanaya, Kaori; Nishijima, Hironobu; Matsushima, Kouji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is a major cause of olfactory dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms by which cigarette smoke interferes with the highly regenerative olfactory nerve system remain unclear. To investigate whether cigarette smoke induces olfactory dysfunction by disrupting cell proliferation and cell survival in the olfactory epithelium (OE), we developed a mouse model of smoking that involved intranasal administration of a cigarette smoke solution (CSS). Immunohistological analyses and behavioral testing showed that CSS administration during a period of 24 days reduced the number of olfactory marker protein-positive mature olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the OE and induced olfactory dysfunction. These changes coincided with a reduction in the number of SOX2(+) ORN progenitors and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells in the basal layer of the OE, an increase in the number of caspase-3(+) apoptotic cells, and an increase in the expression of mRNA for the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. Notably, the proliferating ORN progenitor population recovered after cessation of treatment with CSS, resulting in the subsequent restoration of mature ORN numbers and olfaction. These results suggest that SOX2(+) ORN progenitors are targets of CSS-induced impairment of the OE, and that by damaging the ORN progenitor population and increasing ORN death, CSS exposure eventually overwhelms the regenerative capacity of the epithelium, resulting in reduced numbers of mature ORNs and olfactory dysfunction.

  11. Olfactory Fear Conditioning Induces Field Potential Potentiation in Rat Olfactory Cortex and Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messaoudi, Belkacem; Granjon, Lionel; Mouly, Anne-Marie; Sevelinges, Yannick; Gervais, Remi

    2004-01-01

    The widely used Pavlovian fear-conditioning paradigms used for studying the neurobiology of learning and memory have mainly used auditory cues as conditioned stimuli (CS). The present work assessed the neural network involved in olfactory fear conditioning, using olfactory bulb stimulation-induced field potential signal (EFP) as a marker of…

  12. The location of olfactory receptors within olfactory epithelium is independent of odorant volatility and solubility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to study the pattern of olfactory receptor expression within the dorsal and ventral regions of the mouse olfactory epithelium. We hypothesized that olfactory receptors were distributed based on the chemical properties of their ligands: e.g. receptors for polar, hydrophilic and weakly volatile odorants would be present in the dorsal region of olfactory epithelium; while receptors for non-polar, more volatile odorants would be distributed to the ventral region. To test our hypothesis, we used micro-transplantation of cilia-enriched plasma membranes derived from dorsal or ventral regions of the olfactory epithelium into Xenopus oocytes for electrophysiological characterization against a panel of 100 odorants. Findings Odorants detected by ORs from the dorsal and ventral regions showed overlap in volatility and water solubility. We did not find evidence for a correlation between the solubility and volatility of odorants and the functional expression of olfactory receptors in the dorsal or ventral region of the olfactory epithelia. Conclusions No simple clustering or relationship between chemical properties of odorants could be associated with the different regions of the olfactory epithelium. These results suggest that the location of ORs within the epithelium is not organized based on the physico-chemical properties of their ligands. PMID:21548958

  13. Olfactory imprinting is correlated with changes in gene expression in the olfactory epithelia of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harden, Maegan V; Newton, Lucy A; Lloyd, Russell C; Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2006-11-01

    Odors experienced as juveniles can have significant effects on the behavior of mature organisms. A dramatic example of this occurs in salmon, where the odors experienced by developing fish determine the river to which they return as adults. Further examples of olfactory memories are found in many animals including vertebrates and invertebrates. Yet, the cellular and molecular bases underlying the formation of olfactory memory are poorly understood. We have devised a series of experiments to determine whether zebrafish can form olfactory memories much like those observed in salmonids. Here we show for the first time that zebrafish form and retain olfactory memories of an artificial odorant, phenylethyl alcohol (PEA), experienced as juveniles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to PEA results in changes in gene expression within the olfactory sensory system. These changes are evident by in situ hybridization in the olfactory epithelium of the developing zebrafish. Strikingly, our analysis by in situ hybridization demonstrates that the transcription factor, otx2, is up regulated in the olfactory sensory epithelia in response to PEA. This increase is evident at 2-3 days postfertilization and is maintained in the adult animals. We propose that the changes in otx2 gene expression are manifest as an increase in the number of neuronal precursors in the cells olfactory epithelium of the odor-exposed fish. Thus, our results reveal a role for the environment in controlling gene expression in the developing peripheral nervous system.

  14. Notch1 activity in the olfactory bulb is odour-dependent and contributes to olfactory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Nimpf, Johannes; Kretz, Robert; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2014-11-01

    Notch signalling plays an important role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory functions in both Drosophila and rodents. In this paper, we report that this feature is not restricted to hippocampal networks but also involves the olfactory bulb (OB). Odour discrimination and olfactory learning in rodents are essential for survival. Notch1 expression is enriched in mitral cells of the mouse OB. These principal neurons are responsive to specific input odorants and relay the signal to the olfactory cortex. Olfactory stimulation activates a subset of mitral cells, which show an increase in Notch activity. In Notch1cKOKln mice, the loss of Notch1 in mitral cells affects the magnitude of the neuronal response to olfactory stimuli. In addition, Notch1cKOKln mice display reduced olfactory aversion to propionic acid as compared to wildtype controls. This indicates, for the first time, that Notch1 is involved in olfactory processing and may contribute to olfactory behaviour. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Relation of the volume of the olfactory bulb to psychophysical measures of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Mazal, Patricia Portillo; Haehner, Antje; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate whether changes in olfactory bulb volume relate to changes in specific olfactory functions. We studied currently available peer-reviewed articles on the volume of the human olfactory bulb that also included a psychophysical measure of olfactory function. In the present review, we observed a very clear and consistent correlation between general olfactory function and olfactory bulb (OB) volume. We were not able to find a clear relationship between a specific smell component and OB volume, even when analyzing pathologic conditions separately. In some cases, changes were observed for different subtests, but these changes did not significantly correlate with OB volume or had only a borderline correlation. In other cases, we found contradictory data. Several factors may contribute to the difficulties in finding correlations with the different components of smell: (1) the OB volume may be influenced by information from olfactory receptor neurons (bottom-up effect), information from central nervous system (top-down effect) and by direct damage; (2) most pathologic conditions affect more than one area of the olfactory pathway; (3) small sample sizes of hyposmic subjects were used. We believe that it is necessary to do further studies with larger numbers of subjects to answer the currently investigated question.

  16. Olfactory Fear Conditioning Induces Field Potential Potentiation in Rat Olfactory Cortex and Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messaoudi, Belkacem; Granjon, Lionel; Mouly, Anne-Marie; Sevelinges, Yannick; Gervais, Remi

    2004-01-01

    The widely used Pavlovian fear-conditioning paradigms used for studying the neurobiology of learning and memory have mainly used auditory cues as conditioned stimuli (CS). The present work assessed the neural network involved in olfactory fear conditioning, using olfactory bulb stimulation-induced field potential signal (EFP) as a marker of…

  17. Dissociating Averageness and Attractiveness: Attractive Faces Are Not Always Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.; Unger, Layla; Little, Anthony C.; Feinberg, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Although the averageness hypothesis of facial attractiveness proposes that the attractiveness of faces is mostly a consequence of their averageness, 1 study has shown that caricaturing highly attractive faces makes them mathematically less average but more attractive. Here the authors systematically test the averageness hypothesis in 5 experiments…

  18. Roles of olfactory cues, visual cues, and mating status in orientation of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to four different host plants.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, Erik J; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Hall, David G

    2009-02-01

    Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is an important worldwide pest of citrus that vectors bacteria (Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) responsible for huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). We examined the behavioral responses of mated and unmated D. citri of both sexes to odors from host plants in a Y-tube olfactometer, with and without visual cues. The host plants tested were 'Duncan' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfayden), sour orange (Citrus aurantium L.), navel orange (C. sinensis L.), and Murraya paniculata L. Jack. Responses varied by plant species, psyllid sex and mating status, and the presence of a visual cue. Evidence of attraction generally was stronger in females and in mated individuals of both sexes relative to virgins. The presence of a visual cue typically enhanced attractiveness of olfactory cues; in no case did unmated individuals show evidence of attraction to host plant odors in the absence of avisual cue. In the absence of visual cues, mated females and males showed evidence of attraction only to odors from sour orange and navel orange, respectively. Psyllids exhibited anemotactic responses when assayed with plant odors alone but showed strong evidence of attraction only when olfactory and visual cues were combined, suggesting that olfactory cues facilitate orientation to host plants but may be insufficient alone. Antennal responses to citrus volatiles were confirmed by electroantennogram. The results reported here provide evidence that D. citri uses olfactory and visual cues in orientation to host plants and suggest the possibility of using plant volatiles in monitoring and management of this pest.

  19. Antipsychotics and physical attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-10-01

    Antipsychotics are effective in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia, but they may induce adverse effects, some of which-those that impact negatively on physical appearance-have not been sufficiently discussed in the psychiatric literature. Through a narrative review, to catalog antipsychotic side effects that interfere with physical attractiveness and to suggest ways of addressing them. PubMed databases were searched for information on the association between "antipsychotic side effects" and "attractiveness" using those two search phrases plus the following terms: "weight," "teeth," "skin," "hair," "eyes," "gait," "voice," "odor." Data from relevant qualitative and quantitative articles were considered, contextualized, and summarized. Antipsychotics, as a group, increase weight and may lead to dry mouth and bad breath, cataracts, hirsutism, acne, and voice changes; they may disturb symmetry of gait and heighten the risk for tics and spasms and incontinence, potentially undermining a person's attractiveness. Clinicians need to be aware of the impact of therapeutic drugs on appearance and how important this issue is to patients. Early in treatment, they need to plan preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  20. Microanatomy and surgical relevance of the olfactory cistern.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Sen; Zheng, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fa-Hui; Jing, Jun-Jie; Wang, Ru-Mi

    2008-01-01

    All surgical approaches to the anterior skull base involve the olfactory cistern and have the risk of damaging the olfactory nerve. The purpose of this study was to describe the microanatomical features of the olfactory cistern and discuss its surgical relevance. In this study, the olfactory cisterns of 15 formalin-fixed adult cadaveric heads were dissected using a surgical microscope. The results showed that the olfactory cistern was situated in the superficial part of the olfactory sulcus, which separated the gyrus retus from the orbital gyrus. In coronal section, the cistern was triangular in shape; its anterior part enveloped the olfactory bulbs and was high and broad; its posterior part was medial-superior to internal carotid artery and was also much broader. There were one or several openings in the inferior wall of the posterior part in 53.4% of the cisterns. The olfactory cistern communicated with the surrounding subarachnoind cisterns through these openings. The middle part of the olfactory cistern gradually narrowed down posteriorly. Most cisterns were spacious with a few fibrous trabeculas and bands between the olfactory nerves and cistern walls. However 23% of the cisterns were narrow with the cistern walls tightly encasing the olfactory nerve. There were two or three of arterial loops in each olfactory sulcus, from which long, fine olfactory arteries originated. The olfactory arteries coursed along the olfactory nerve and gave off many terminal branches to provide the main blood supply to the olfactory nerve in most cisterns, but the blood supply was in segmental style in a few cisterns. Moreover, the veins of the cistern appeared to be more segmental than the olfactory arteries in most cisterns. These results suggested that most olfactory cisterns are spacious with relatively independent blood supply, and it is reasonable to separate the olfactory tract with its independent blood supply from the frontal lobe by 1-2 cm in the subfrontal approach, the

  1. Attractiveness Is Multimodal: Beauty Is Also in the Nose and Ear of the Beholder

    PubMed Central

    Groyecka, Agata; Pisanski, Katarzyna; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Havlíček, Jan; Karwowski, Maciej; Puts, David; Roberts, S. Craig; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Attractiveness plays a central role in human non-verbal communication and has been broadly examined in diverse subfields of contemporary psychology. Researchers have garnered compelling evidence in support of the evolutionary functions of physical attractiveness and its role in our daily lives, while at the same time, having largely ignored the significant contribution of non-visual modalities and the relationships among them. Acoustic and olfactory cues can, separately or in combination, strongly influence the perceived attractiveness of an individual and therefore attitudes and actions toward that person. Here, we discuss the relative importance of visual, auditory and olfactory traits in judgments of attractiveness, and review neural and behavioral studies that support the highly complex and multimodal nature of person perception. Further, we discuss three alternative evolutionary hypotheses aimed at explaining the function of multiple indices of attractiveness. In this review, we provide several lines of evidence supporting the importance of the voice, body odor, and facial and body appearance in the perception of attractiveness and mate preferences, and therefore the critical need to incorporate cross-modal perception and multisensory integration into future research on human physical attractiveness. PMID:28572777

  2. Attractiveness Is Multimodal: Beauty Is Also in the Nose and Ear of the Beholder.

    PubMed

    Groyecka, Agata; Pisanski, Katarzyna; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Havlíček, Jan; Karwowski, Maciej; Puts, David; Roberts, S Craig; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Attractiveness plays a central role in human non-verbal communication and has been broadly examined in diverse subfields of contemporary psychology. Researchers have garnered compelling evidence in support of the evolutionary functions of physical attractiveness and its role in our daily lives, while at the same time, having largely ignored the significant contribution of non-visual modalities and the relationships among them. Acoustic and olfactory cues can, separately or in combination, strongly influence the perceived attractiveness of an individual and therefore attitudes and actions toward that person. Here, we discuss the relative importance of visual, auditory and olfactory traits in judgments of attractiveness, and review neural and behavioral studies that support the highly complex and multimodal nature of person perception. Further, we discuss three alternative evolutionary hypotheses aimed at explaining the function of multiple indices of attractiveness. In this review, we provide several lines of evidence supporting the importance of the voice, body odor, and facial and body appearance in the perception of attractiveness and mate preferences, and therefore the critical need to incorporate cross-modal perception and multisensory integration into future research on human physical attractiveness.

  3. Inhibition among olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Van der Goes van Naters, Wynand

    2013-01-01

    Often assumed to be epiphenomena of a cell’s activity, extracellular currents and resulting potential changes are increasingly recognized to influence the function of other cells in the vicinity. Experimental evidence shows that even small electric fields can modulate spike timing in neurons. Moreover, when neurons are brought close together experimentally or in pathological conditions, activity in one neuron can excite its neighbors. Inhibitory ephaptic mechanisms, however, may depend on more specialized coupling among cells. Recent studies in the Drosophila olfactory system have shown that excitation of a sensory neuron can inhibit its neighbor, and it was speculated that this interaction was ephaptic. Here we give an overview of ephaptic interactions that effect changes in spike timing, excitation or inhibition in diverse systems with potential relevance to human neuroscience. We examine the mechanism of the inhibitory interaction in the Drosophila system and that of the well-studied ephaptic inhibition of the Mauthner cell in more detail. We note that both current towards and current away from the local extracellular environment of a neuron can inhibit it, but the mechanism depends on the specific architecture of each system. PMID:24167484

  4. Electroantennogram response and attraction of Anastrepha suspensa to volatiles of various sugar sources and aged sugar solutions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the aim of finding new, sugar-based volatile attractants for economically important tephritid fruit fly species, we used electroantennography (EAG) to quantify olfactory responses of female Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), to volatiles of six different sugars (refined white and ...

  5. Zincergic innervation from the anterior olfactory nucleus to the olfactory bulb displays plastic responses after mitral cell loss.

    PubMed

    Airado, Carmen; Gómez, Carmela; Recio, Javier S; Baltanás, Fernando C; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R

    2008-12-01

    Zinc ions are selectively accumulated in certain neurons (zinc-enriched neurons). The mouse olfactory bulb is richly innervated by zinc-enriched terminals. Here, the plasticity of the zincergic system was studied in the olfactory bulb of the Purkinje Cell Degeneration mutant mouse, an animal with specific postnatal neurodegeneration of the main projection neurons of the olfactory bulb. The analysis focused particularly on the anterior olfactory nucleus since most centrifugal afferents coming to the olfactory bulb arise from this structure. Zinc-enriched terminals in the olfactory bulb and zinc-enriched somata in the anterior olfactory nucleus were visualized after selenite injections. Immunohistochemistry against the vesicular zinc transporter was also carried out to confirm the distribution pattern of zinc-enriched terminals in the olfactory bulb. The mutant mice showed a clear reorganization of zincergic centrifugal projections from the anterior olfactory nucleus to the olfactory bulb. First, all zincergic contralateral neurons projecting to the olfactory bulb were absent in the mutant mice. Second, a significant increase in the number of stained somata was detected in the ipsilateral anterior olfactory nucleus. Since no noticeable changes were observed in the zinc-enriched terminals in the olfactory bulb, it is conceivable that mitral cell loss could induce a reorganization of zinc-enriched projections coming from the anterior olfactory nucleus, probably directed at balancing the global zincergic centrifugal modulation. These results show that zincergic anterior olfactory nucleus cells projecting to the olfactory bulb undergo plastic changes to adapt to the loss of mitral cells in the olfactory bulb of Purkinje Cell Degeneration mutant mice.

  6. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  7. Effect of Olfactory Stimulus on the Flight Course of a Honeybee, Apis mellifera, in a Wind Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Ikeno, Hidetoshi; Akamatsu, Tadaaki; Hasegawa, Yuji; Ai, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, uses olfactory stimulus as important information for orienting to food sources. Several studies on olfactory-induced orientation flight have been conducted in wind tunnels and in the field. From these studies, optical sensing is used as the main information with the addition of olfactory signals and the navigational course followed by these sensory information. However, it is not clear how olfactory information is reflected in the navigation of flight. In this study, we analyzed the detailed properties of flight when oriented to an odor source in a wind tunnel. We recorded flying bees with a video camera to analyze the flight area, speed, angular velocity and trajectory. After bees were trained to be attracted to a feeder, the flight trajectories with or without the olfactory stimulus located upwind of the feeder were compared. The results showed that honeybees flew back and forth in the proximity of the odor source, and the search range corresponded approximately to the odor spread area. It was also shown that the angular velocity was different inside and outside the odor spread area, and trajectories tended to be bent or curved just outside the area. PMID:26462581

  8. Effect of Olfactory Stimulus on the Flight Course of a Honeybee, Apis mellifera, in a Wind Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Hidetoshi; Akamatsu, Tadaaki; Hasegawa, Yuji; Ai, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-31

    It is known that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, uses olfactory stimulus as important information for orienting to food sources. Several studies on olfactory-induced orientation flight have been conducted in wind tunnels and in the field. From these studies, optical sensing is used as the main information with the addition of olfactory signals and the navigational course followed by these sensory information. However, it is not clear how olfactory information is reflected in the navigation of flight. In this study, we analyzed the detailed properties of flight when oriented to an odor source in a wind tunnel. We recorded flying bees with a video camera to analyze the flight area, speed, angular velocity and trajectory. After bees were trained to be attracted to a feeder, the flight trajectories with or without the olfactory stimulus located upwind of the feeder were compared. The results showed that honeybees flew back and forth in the proximity of the odor source, and the search range corresponded approximately to the odor spread area. It was also shown that the angular velocity was different inside and outside the odor spread area, and trajectories tended to be bent or curved just outside the area.

  9. Physical Variables in the Olfactory Stimulation Process

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Don

    1963-01-01

    Electrical recording from small twigs of nerve in a tortoise showed that olfactory, vomeronasal, and trigeminal receptors in the nose are responsive to various odorants. No one kind of receptor was most sensitive to all odorants. For controlled stimulation, odorant was caused to appear in a stream of gas already flowing through the nose. Of the parameters definable at the naris, temperature, relative humidity, and nature of inert gas had little effect on olfactory responses to amyl acetate, whereas odorant species, odorant concentration, and volume flow rate effectively determined the responses of all nasal chemoreceptors. An intrinsic variable of accessibility to the receptors, particularly olfactory, was demonstrated. Flow dependence of chemoreceptor responses is thought to reflect the necessity for delivery of odorant molecules to receptor sites. Since the olfactory receptors are relatively exposed, plateauing of the response with flow rate for slightly soluble odorants suggests an approach to concentration equilibrium in the overlying mucus with that in the air entering the naris. Accordingly, data for responses to amyl acetate were fitted with Beidler's (1954) taste equation for two kinds of sites being active. The requirement for finite aqueous solubility, if true, suggests substitution of aqueous solutions for gaseous solutions. A suitable medium was found and results conformed to expectations. Olfactory receptors were insensitive to variation of ionic strength, pH, and osmotic pressure. PMID:13994681

  10. Olfactory coding in the honeybee lateral horn.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Edith; Carcaud, Julie; Combe, Maud; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-03

    Olfactory systems dynamically encode odor information in the nervous system. Insects constitute a well-established model for the study of the neural processes underlying olfactory perception. In insects, odors are detected by sensory neurons located in the antennae, whose axons project to a primary processing center, the antennal lobe. There, the olfactory message is reshaped and further conveyed to higher-order centers, the mushroom bodies and the lateral horn. Previous work has intensively analyzed the principles of olfactory processing in the antennal lobe and in the mushroom bodies. However, how the lateral horn participates in olfactory coding remains comparatively more enigmatic. We studied odor representation at the input to the lateral horn of the honeybee, a social insect that relies on both floral odors for foraging and pheromones for social communication. Using in vivo calcium imaging, we show consistent neural activity in the honeybee lateral horn upon stimulation with both floral volatiles and social pheromones. Recordings reveal odor-specific maps in this brain region as stimulations with the same odorant elicit more similar spatial activity patterns than stimulations with different odorants. Odor-similarity relationships are mostly conserved between antennal lobe and lateral horn, so that odor maps recorded in the lateral horn allow predicting bees' behavioral responses to floral odorants. In addition, a clear segregation of odorants based on pheromone type is found in both structures. The lateral horn thus contains an odor-specific map with distinct representations for the different bee pheromones, a prerequisite for eliciting specific behaviors.

  11. Perceptual and Neural Olfactory Similarity in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2005-01-01

    The question of whether or not neural activity patterns recorded in the olfactory centres of the brain correspond to olfactory perceptual measures remains unanswered. To address this question, we studied olfaction in honeybees Apis mellifera using the olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response. We conditioned bees to odours and tested generalisation responses to different odours. Sixteen odours were used, which varied both in their functional group (primary and secondary alcohols, aldehydes and ketones) and in their carbon-chain length (from six to nine carbons).The results obtained by presentation of a total of 16 × 16 odour pairs show that (i) all odorants presented could be learned, although acquisition was lower for short-chain ketones; (ii) generalisation varied depending both on the functional group and the carbon-chain length of odours trained; higher generalisation was found between long-chain than between short-chain molecules and between groups such as primary and secondary alcohols; (iii) for some odour pairs, cross-generalisation between odorants was asymmetric; (iv) a putative olfactory space could be defined for the honeybee with functional group and carbon-chain length as inner dimensions; (v) perceptual distances in such a space correlate well with physiological distances determined from optophysiological recordings of antennal lobe activity. We conclude that functional group and carbon-chain length are inner dimensions of the honeybee olfactory space and that neural activity in the antennal lobe reflects the perceptual quality of odours. PMID:15736975

  12. Olfactory phenotypic expression unveils human aging

    PubMed Central

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Cellerino, Alessandro; Origlia, Nicola; Barloscio, Davide; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Giulio, Camillo Di; Domenici, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of the natural aging of olfaction and its declinein the absence of any overt disease conditions remains unclear. Here, we investigated this mechanism through measurement of one of the parameters of olfactory function, the absolute threshold, in a healthy population from childhood to old age. The absolute olfactory threshold data were collected from an Italian observational study with 622 participants aged 5-105 years. A subjective testing procedure of constant stimuli was used, which was also compared to the ‘staircase’ method, with the calculation of the reliability. The n-butanol stimulus was used as an ascending series of nine molar concentrations that were monitored using an electronic nose. The data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics because of the multimodal distribution. We show that the age-related variations in the absolute olfactory threshold are not continuous; instead, there are multiple olfactory phenotypes. Three distinct age-related phenotypes were defined, termed as ‘juvenile’, ‘mature’ and ‘elder’. The frequency of these three phenotypes depends on age. Our data suggest that the sense of smell does not decrease linearly with aging. Our findings provide the basis for further understanding of olfactory loss as an anticipatory sign of aging and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27027240

  13. Olfactory and Gustatory Function After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Holinski, Franca; Menenakos, Charalambos; Haber, Georg; Olze, Heidi; Ordemann, Juergen

    2015-12-01

    Neither hormone levels nor malabsorption alone fully explains the distinct weight loss after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients. Postoperatively, patients regularly report a change in the sense of taste and the development of food aversions. Hedonic and sensory components like olfactory and gustatory stimuli significantly affect appetite and flavour. We prospectively analysed the orthonasal olfactory and gustatory function with psychophysical testing in 44 patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or adjustable gastric banding (AGB) and in 23 healthy controls. About 22.7 % of morbidly obese patients were hyposmic, showing significantly lower threshold-discrimination-identification (TDI) scores (p = 0.009) with decreased discrimination and identification ability. In addition, 22.7 % of patients were tested to be limited in gustatory function, with significantly lower taste strip test (TST) scores (p = 0.003). Six months after surgery, olfactory and gustatory function was not different when compared to healthy controls. Due to obesity, patients frequently show impaired olfactory and gustatory function. Six months after laparoscopic bariatric surgery, both chemosensory functions improve. The TDI test is an appropriate tool to measure olfactory function in obese patients.

  14. Receptor guanylyl cyclases in mammalian olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Zufall, Frank; Munger, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    The contributions of guanylyl cyclases to sensory signaling in the olfactory system have been unclear. Recently, studies of a specialized subpopulation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) located in the main olfactory epithelium have provided important insights into the neuronal function of one receptor guanylyl cyclase, GC-D. Mice expressing reporters such as β-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein in OSNs that normally express GC-D have allowed investigators to identify these neurons in situ, facilitating anatomical and physiological studies of this sparse neuronal population. The specific perturbation of GC-D function in vivo has helped to resolve the role of this guanylyl cyclase in the transduction of olfactory stimuli. Similar approaches could be useful for the study of the orphan receptor GC-G, which is expressed in another distinct subpopulation of sensory neurons located in the Grueneberg ganglion. In this review, we discuss key findings that have reinvigorated the study of guanylyl cyclase function in the olfactory system. PMID:19941039

  15. Olfactory region schwannoma: Excision with preservation of olfaction.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Pravin; Patra, Devi Prasad; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara

    2014-07-01

    Olfactory region schwannomas are rare, but when they occur, they commonly arise from the meningeal branches of the trigeminal nerve and may present without involvement of the olfaction. A 24 year old lady presented with hemifacial paraesthesias. Radiology revealed a large olfactory region enhancing lesion. She was operated through a transbasal with olfactory preserving approach. This manuscript highlights the importance of olfactory preservation in such lesions.

  16. Changes in the neural representation of odorants after olfactory deprivation in the adult mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kass, Marley D; Pottackal, Joseph; Turkel, Daniel J; McGann, John P

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory sensory deprivation during development has been shown to induce significant alterations in the neurophysiology of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), the primary sensory inputs to the brain's olfactory bulb. Deprivation has also been shown to alter the neurochemistry of the adult olfactory system, but the physiological consequences of these changes are poorly understood. Here we used in vivo synaptopHluorin (spH) imaging to visualize odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release from ORNs in adult transgenic mice that underwent 4 weeks of unilateral olfactory deprivation. Deprivation reduced odorant-evoked spH signals compared with sham-occluded mice. Unexpectedly, this reduction was equivalent between ORNs on the open and plugged sides. Changes in odorant selectivity of glomerular subpopulations of ORNs were also observed, but only in ORNs on the open side of deprived mice. These results suggest that naris occlusion in adult mice produces substantial changes in primary olfactory processing which may reflect not only the decrease in olfactory stimulation on the occluded side but also the alteration of response properties on the intact side. We also observed a modest effect of true sham occlusions that included noseplug insertion and removal, suggesting that conventional noseplug techniques may have physiological effects independent of deprivation per se and thus require more careful controls than has been previously appreciated.

  17. The projection from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb in the salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum.

    PubMed

    Mackay-Sim, A; Nathan, M H

    1984-01-01

    Odor quality may be represented as a "topographic" code of responses of receptor cells throughout the olfactory epithelium, with this code conveyed to the central nervous system by a topographic projection from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. There is good evidence for topographic differences in odor-induced receptor cell activity in the tiger salamander but there is no evidence for a topographic epithelium-to-bulb projection in this species. In the present study 3H-leucine autoradiography was used to trace the projections of olfactory receptor neurons in the tiger salamander. Thirteen animals received small injections of tritiated leucine into different regions of the dorsal or the ventral olfactory epithelium, or into the ventrolateral, "vomeronasal organ". The results show that the anterior-to-posterior axes in the dorsal and ventral epithelia are represented along the ventral-to-dorsal axis in the rostral end of the olfactory bulb. The "vomeronasal organ" projects to the caudal end of the bulb. We conclude that the central projection of the olfactory epithelium in the tiger salamander is topographically organised only along the antero-posterior axis and not the medio-lateral axis. Thus epithelial receptor cell activity along the anteroposterior axis would be represented in the glomerular layer of the bulb by activity along its ventro-dorsal axis.

  18. Application of artificial neural networks on mosquito Olfactory Receptor Neurons for an olfactory biosensor.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Luqman R; Unsworth, Charles P; Newcomb, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Various odorants such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and 1-octen-3-ol, underlie the host-seeking behaviors of the major malaria vector Anopheles Gambiae. Highlighted by the olfactory processing strength of the mosquito, such a powerful olfactory sense could serve as the sensors of an artificial olfactory biosensor. In this work, we use the firing rates of the A. Gambiae mosquito Olfactory Receptor Neurons (ORNs), to train an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for the classification of volatile odorants into their known chemical classes and assess their suitability for an olfactory biosensor. With the implementation of bootstrapping, a more representative result was obtained wherein we demonstrate the training of a hybrid ANN consisting of an array of Multi-Layer Perceptrons (MLPs) with optimal number of hidden neurons. The ANN system was able to correctly class 90.1% of the previously unseen odorants, thus demonstrating very strong evidence for the use of A. Gambiae olfactory receptors coupled with an ANN as an olfactory biosensor.

  19. Are Brazil Nuts Attractive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Duncan A.; Swift, Michael R.; Bowley, R. M.; King, P. J.

    2004-11-01

    We present event-driven simulation results for single and multiple intruders in a vertically vibrated granular bed. Under our vibratory conditions, the mean vertical position of a single intruder is governed primarily by a buoyancylike effect. Multiple intruders also exhibit buoyancy governed behavior; however, multiple neutrally buoyant intruders cluster spontaneously and undergo horizontal segregation. These effects can be understood by considering the dynamics of two neutrally buoyant intruders. We have measured an attractive force between such intruders which has a range of five intruder diameters, and we provide a mechanistic explanation for the origins of this force.

  20. Biobutanol: an attractive biofuel.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Biofuels are an attractive means to prevent a further increase of carbon dioxide emissions. Currently, gasoline is blended with ethanol at various percentages. However, butanol has several advantages over ethanol, such as higher energy content, lower water absorption, better blending ability, and use in conventional combustion engines without modification. Like ethanol, it can be produced fermentatively or petrochemically. Current crude oil prices render the biotechnological process economic again. The best-studied bacterium to perform a butanol fermentation is Clostridium acetobutylicum. Its genome has been sequenced, and the regulation of solvent formation is under intensive investigation. This opens the possibility to engineer recombinant strains with superior biobutanol-producing ability.

  1. It's Not Easy Being Blue: Are There Olfactory and Visual Trade-Offs in Plant Signalling?

    PubMed

    Valenta, Kim; Brown, Kevin A; Melin, Amanda D; Monckton, Spencer K; Styler, Sarah A; Jackson, Derek A; Chapman, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the signals used by plants to attract seed disperses is a pervasive quest in evolutionary and sensory biology. Fruit size, colour, and odour variation have long been discussed in the controversial context of dispersal syndromes targeting olfactory-oriented versus visually-oriented foragers. Trade-offs in signal investment could impose important physiological constraints on plants, yet have been largely ignored. Here, we measure the reflectance and volatile organic compounds of a community of Malagasy plants and our results indicate that extant plant signals may represent a trade-off between olfactory and chromatic signals. Blue pigments are the most visually-effective--blue is a colour that is visually salient to all known seed dispersing animals within the study system. Additionally, plants with blue-reflecting fruits are less odiferous than plants that reflect primarily in other regions of the colour spectrum.

  2. [Olfactory dysfunction: correlation of olfactory bulb volume on MRI and objective olfactometry].

    PubMed

    Bauknecht, H-C; Jach, C; Fleiner, F; Sedlmaier, B; Göktas, O

    2010-02-01

    To define the role of olfactory bulb volume measurement by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting olfactory dysfunction in comparison with objective olfactometry. Thirty patients with suspected olfactory dysfunction (16 women, 14 men; mean age 52 years, range 20 - 79 years) were examined by MRI and objective olfactometry between January 2006 and January 2009. Olfactory bulb volumes were measured by two neuroradiologists using 3D MR data sets. The olfactory function was categorized as normosmia, hyposmia, and anosmia on the basis of objective olfactometry. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for objective olfactometry and olfactory bulb volumes on MRI. ROC analysis was performed to determine whether MRI bulb volumes can serve to predict anosmia or hyposmia. The bulb volumes measured by MRI ranged from 0 to 135.9 mm (3). Based on olfactometry, anosmia was present in 11 patients (total bulb volume of 15.7 +/- 23.3 mm (3)), hyposmia in 9 patients (total bulb volume of 50.0 +/- 25.5 mm (3)), and normosmia in 10 patients (total bulb volume of 110.7 +/- 21.5 mm (3)). There was good correlation (r > 0.9) between objective olfactometry and olfactory bulb volume on MRI. ROC analysis yielded a cut-off value of 32 mm (3) for anosmia, which had a sensitivity of 0.91 and specificity of 0.947. The cut-off value for olfactory dysfunction was 80.7 mm (3) (sensitivity 0.95; specificity of 0.9). The olfactory bulb volume determined by MRI is a suitable parameter for diagnosing complete or partial loss of the sense of smell.

  3. Does post-infectious olfactory loss affect mood more severely than chronic sinusitis with olfactory loss?

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong G; Lee, Jun-Seok; Park, Gi C

    2014-11-01

    Olfactory deficits that develop after viral upper respiratory infection (URI) may have different effects on patient depression index compared to chronic sinusitis with olfactory loss. However, there have been no controlled trials to evaluate the different effects of chronic sinusitis and URI on depression index. Prospective study of 25 subjects in two groups. This study enrolled 25 participants who were diagnosed with post-URI olfactory loss as the study group and 25 patients with chronic sinusitis and olfactory loss as a control group. Control group participants were matched for age, sex, and degree of olfactory loss (threshold, discrimination, and identification [TDI]). We compared the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of each group and analyzed the correlation between TDI and BDI. The mean BDI score of the post-URI group was significantly higher than that of the control group (14.52 ± 6.59 vs. 9.32 ± 5.23; P=.002). Age, sex, and TDI score did not affect BDI score in the post-URI olfactory loss group. However, BDI score in the sinusitis group was inversely correlated with TDI score (R=-0.423; P=.035), and the BDI score of female subjects (11.00 ± 5.13) was significantly higher than that of male subjects (5.00 ± 2.16; P = .047). Post-URI olfactory loss affected patient mood more severely than chronic sinusitis with a similar degree of olfactory loss. This influence was not affected by sex, age, or TDI score in the post-URI olfactory loss group. 3b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Neural Correlates of Olfactory Learning: Critical Role of Centrifugal Neuromodulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Max L.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is well established for its remarkable capability of undergoing experience-dependent plasticity. Although this process involves changes at multiple stages throughout the central olfactory pathway, even the early stages of processing, such as the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, can display a high degree of…

  5. Individual olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information

    PubMed Central

    Secundo, Lavi; Snitz, Kobi; Weissler, Kineret; Pinchover, Liron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Loewenthal, Ron; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Frumin, Idan; Bar-Zvi, Dana; Shushan, Sagit; Sobel, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Each person expresses a potentially unique subset of ∼400 different olfactory receptor subtypes. Given that the receptors we express partially determine the odors we smell, it follows that each person may have a unique nose; to capture this, we devised a sensitive test of olfactory perception we termed the “olfactory fingerprint.” Olfactory fingerprints relied on matrices of perceived odorant similarity derived from descriptors applied to the odorants. We initially fingerprinted 89 individuals using 28 odors and 54 descriptors. We found that each person had a unique olfactory fingerprint (P < 10−10), which was odor specific but descriptor independent. We could identify individuals from this pool using randomly selected sets of 7 odors and 11 descriptors alone. Extrapolating from this data, we determined that using 34 odors and 35 descriptors we could individually identify each of the 7 billion people on earth. Olfactory perception, however, fluctuates over time, calling into question our proposed perceptual readout of presumably stable genetic makeup. To test whether fingerprints remain informative despite this temporal fluctuation, building on the linkage between olfactory receptors and HLA, we hypothesized that olfactory perception may relate to HLA. We obtained olfactory fingerprints and HLA typing for 130 individuals, and found that olfactory fingerprint matching using only four odorants was significantly related to HLA matching (P < 10−4), such that olfactory fingerprints can save 32% of HLA tests in a population screen (P < 10−6). In conclusion, a precise measure of olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information. PMID:26100865

  6. Neural Correlates of Olfactory Learning: Critical Role of Centrifugal Neuromodulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Max L.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is well established for its remarkable capability of undergoing experience-dependent plasticity. Although this process involves changes at multiple stages throughout the central olfactory pathway, even the early stages of processing, such as the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, can display a high degree of…

  7. Individual olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

    PubMed

    Secundo, Lavi; Snitz, Kobi; Weissler, Kineret; Pinchover, Liron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Loewenthal, Ron; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Frumin, Idan; Bar-Zvi, Dana; Shushan, Sagit; Sobel, Noam

    2015-07-14

    Each person expresses a potentially unique subset of ∼ 400 different olfactory receptor subtypes. Given that the receptors we express partially determine the odors we smell, it follows that each person may have a unique nose; to capture this, we devised a sensitive test of olfactory perception we termed the "olfactory fingerprint." Olfactory fingerprints relied on matrices of perceived odorant similarity derived from descriptors applied to the odorants. We initially fingerprinted 89 individuals using 28 odors and 54 descriptors. We found that each person had a unique olfactory fingerprint (P < 10(-10)), which was odor specific but descriptor independent. We could identify individuals from this pool using randomly selected sets of 7 odors and 11 descriptors alone. Extrapolating from this data, we determined that using 34 odors and 35 descriptors we could individually identify each of the 7 billion people on earth. Olfactory perception, however, fluctuates over time, calling into question our proposed perceptual readout of presumably stable genetic makeup. To test whether fingerprints remain informative despite this temporal fluctuation, building on the linkage between olfactory receptors and HLA, we hypothesized that olfactory perception may relate to HLA. We obtained olfactory fingerprints and HLA typing for 130 individuals, and found that olfactory fingerprint matching using only four odorants was significantly related to HLA matching (P < 10(-4)), such that olfactory fingerprints can save 32% of HLA tests in a population screen (P < 10(-6)). In conclusion, a precise measure of olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

  8. Reading cinnamon activates olfactory brain regions.

    PubMed

    González, Julio; Barros-Loscertales, Alfonso; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Meseguer, Vanessa; Sanjuán, Ana; Belloch, Vicente; Avila, César

    2006-08-15

    Some words immediately and automatically remind us of odours, smells and scents, whereas other language items do not evoke such associations. This study investigated, for the first time, the abstract linking of linguistic and odour information using modern neuroimaging techniques (functional MRI). Subjects passively read odour-related words ('garlic', 'cinnamon', 'jasmine') and neutral language items. The odour-related terms elicited activation in the primary olfactory cortex, which include the piriform cortex and the amygdala. Our results suggest the activation of widely distributed cortical cell assemblies in the processing of olfactory words. These distributed neuron populations extend into language areas but also reach some parts of the olfactory system. These distributed neural systems may be the basis of the processing of language elements, their related conceptual and semantic information and the associated sensory information.

  9. Patch-clamping arthropod olfactory receptor neurons to study mechanisms of olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Hatt, H; Ache, B W

    1996-10-21

    The olfactory organ of arthropods such as lobsters and insects consists of an array of hair-like sensilla located on the antenna. Each sensillum contains from two to several hundred primary olfactory receptor neurons. The receptor neurons can be patch-clamped in three different types of preparations: intact cells in situ, cultured cells and outer dendrites. These preparations permit using a wide range of experimental strategies to study mechanisms of olfactory transduction. The ability to integrate data from three complementary preparations is a particular advantage of using arthropod models to understand how odor information is encoded by the primary receptor cell in olfaction.

  10. NTE/PNPLA6 is expressed in mature Schwann cells and is required for glial ensheathment of Remak fibers.

    PubMed

    McFerrin, Janis; Patton, Bruce L; Sunderhaus, Elizabeth R; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2017-02-16

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) or patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 6 (PNPLA6) was first linked with a neuropathy occurring after organophosphate poisoning and was later also found to cause complex syndromes when mutated, which can include mental retardation, spastic paraplegia, ataxia, and blindness. NTE/PNPLA6 is widely expressed in neurons but experiments with its Drosophila orthologue Swiss-cheese (SWS) suggested that it may also have glial functions. Investigating whether NTE/PNPLA6 is expressed in glia, we found that NTE/PNPLA6 is expressed by Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve of adult mice with the most prominent expression in nonmyelinating Schwann cells. Within Schwann cells, NTE/PNPLA6 is enriched at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and around the nucleus. When analyzing postnatal expression patterns, we did not detect NTE/PNPLA6 in promyelinating Schwann cells, while weak expression was detectable at postnatal day 5 in Schwann cells and increased with their maturation. Interestingly, NTE/PNPLA6 levels were upregulated after nerve crush and localized to ovoids forming along the nerve fibers. Using a GFAP-based knock-out of NTE/PNPLA6, we detected an incomplete ensheathment of Remak fibers whereas myelination did not appear to be affected. These results suggest that NTE/PNPLA6 is involved in the maturation of nonmyelinating Schwann cells during development and de-/remyelination after neuronal injury. Since Schwann cells play an important role in maintaining axonal viability and function, it is therefore likely that changes in Schwann cells contribute to the locomotory deficits and neuropathy observed in patients carrying mutations in NTE.

  11. Laminar disorganisation of mitral cells in the olfactory bulb does not affect topographic targeting of primary olfactory axons.

    PubMed

    Royal, S J; Gambello, M J; Wynshaw-Boris, A; Key, B; Clarris, H J

    2002-04-05

    Primary olfactory neurons expressing the same odorant receptor protein typically project to topographically fixed olfactory bulb sites. While cell adhesion molecules and odorant receptors have been implicated in guidance of primary olfactory axons, the postsynaptic mitral cells may also have a role in final target selection. We have examined the effect of disorganisation of the mitral cell soma layer in mutant mice heterozygous for the beta-subunit of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (Lis1(-/+)) on the targeting of primary olfactory axons. Lis1(-/+) mice display abnormal lamination of neurons in the olfactory bulb. Lis1(-/+) mice were crossed with the P2-IRES-tau:LacZ line of transgenic mice that selectively expresses beta-galactosidase in primary olfactory neurons expressing the P2 odorant receptor. LacZ histochemistry revealed blue-stained P2 axons that targeted topographically fixed glomeruli in these mice in a manner similar to that observed in the parent P2-IRES-tau:LacZ line. Thus, despite the aberrant organisation of postsynaptic mitral cells in Lis1(-/+) mice, primary olfactory axons continued to converge and form glomeruli at correct sites in the olfactory bulb. Next we examined whether challenging primary olfactory axons in adult Lis(-/+) mice with regeneration would affect their ability to converge and form glomeruli. Following partial chemical ablation of the olfactory neuroepithelium with dichlobenil, primary olfactory neurons die and are replaced by newly differentiating neurons that project axons to the olfactory bulb where they converge and form glomeruli. Despite the aberrant mitral cell layer in Lis(-/+) mice, primary olfactory axons continued to converge and form glomeruli during regeneration. Together these results demonstrate that the convergence of primary olfactory axons during development and regeneration is not affected by gross perturbations to the lamination of the mitral cell layer. Thus, these results support evidence from

  12. Measuring Olfactory Processes in Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Schellinck, Heather

    2017-09-04

    This paper briefly reviews the literature that describes olfactory acuity and odor discrimination learning. The results of current studies that examined the role of neurotransmitters in odor discrimination learning are discussed as are those that investigated pattern recognition and models of human disease. The methodology associated with such work is also described and its role in creating disparate results assessed. Recommendations for increasing the reliability and validity of experiments so as to further our understanding of olfactory processes in both healthy mice and those modelling human disease are made throughout the paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Olfactory regulation of mosquito–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zwiebel, L.J.; Takken, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes that act as disease vectors rely upon olfactory cues to direct several important behaviors that are fundamentally involved in establishing their overall vectorial capacity. Of these, the propensity to select humans for blood feeding is arguably the most important of these olfactory driven behaviors in so far as it significantly contributes to the ability of these mosquitoes to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and most significantly human malaria. Here, we review significant advances in behavioral, physiological and molecular investigations into mosquito host preference, with a particular emphasis on studies that have emerged in the post-genomic era that seek to combine these approaches. PMID:15242705

  14. Male- and female-biased gene expression of olfactory-related genes in the antennae of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Asian corn borer (ACB), Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), is a destructive pest insect of cultivated corn crops, for which antennal-expressed receptors are important to detect olfactory cues for mate attraction and oviposition. Non-normalized male and female O. furnacalis antennal cDNA libraries we...

  15. Rules of Attraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image composite shows two of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's magnets, the 'capture' magnet (upper portion of left panel) and the 'filter' magnet (lower portion of left panel). Scientists use these tools to study the origins of martian dust in the atmosphere. The left panel was taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The four panels to the right, taken by the microscopic imager, show close-up views of the two magnets. The bull's-eye appearance of the capture magnet is a result of alternating magnetic fields, which are used to increase overall magnetic force. The filter magnet lacks these alternating fields and consequently produces a weaker magnetic force. This weaker force selectively attracts only strong magnetic particles.

    Scientists were surprised by the large dark particles on the magnets because airborne particles are smaller in size. They theorize that these spots might be aggregates of small particles that clump together in a magnetic field.

  16. Rules of Attraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image composite shows two of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's magnets, the 'capture' magnet (upper portion of left panel) and the 'filter' magnet (lower portion of left panel). Scientists use these tools to study the origins of martian dust in the atmosphere. The left panel was taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The four panels to the right, taken by the microscopic imager, show close-up views of the two magnets. The bull's-eye appearance of the capture magnet is a result of alternating magnetic fields, which are used to increase overall magnetic force. The filter magnet lacks these alternating fields and consequently produces a weaker magnetic force. This weaker force selectively attracts only strong magnetic particles.

    Scientists were surprised by the large dark particles on the magnets because airborne particles are smaller in size. They theorize that these spots might be aggregates of small particles that clump together in a magnetic field.

  17. Same same but different: the case of olfactory imagery

    PubMed Central

    Arshamian, Artin; Larsson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we present an overview of experimental findings corroborating olfactory imagery observations with the visual and auditory modalities. Overall, the results indicate that imagery of olfactory information share many features with those observed in the primary senses although some major differences are evident. One such difference pertains to the considerable individual differences observed, with the majority being unable to reproduce olfactory information in their mind. Here, we highlight factors that are positively related to an olfactory imagery capacity, such as semantic knowledge, perceptual experience, and olfactory interest that may serve as potential moderators of the large individual variation. PMID:24550862

  18. Accessory Olfactory Bulb Function is Modulated by Input from the Main Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    While it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the VNO. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mice were frankly anosmic when tested with pheromonal and non-pheromonal odors and failed to engage in aggressive behavior. Treated juvenile females failed to show puberty acceleration subsequent to exposure to bedding from adult males. Activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos and electro-vomeronasogram recording confirmed the integrity of the vomeronasal system in zinc sulfate treated mice. These results support the hypothesis that odor detection by the main olfactory epithelium is required to initiate sampling by the vomeronasal system. PMID:20377623

  19. Olfactory sensations produced by high-energy photon irradiation of the olfactory receptor mucosa in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Thomas, R.J.; Loverock, L.T.; Spittle, M.F. )

    1991-04-01

    During irradiation of volumes that incorporate the olfactory system, a proportion of patients have complained of a pungent smell. A retrospective study was carried out to determine the prevalence of this side-effect. A questionnaire was sent to 40 patients whose treatment volumes included the olfactory region and also to a control group treated away from this region. The irradiated tumor volumes included the frontal lobe, whole brain, nasopharynx, pituitary fossa, and maxillary antrum. Of the 25 patients who replied, 60% experienced odorous symptoms during irradiation. They described the odor as unpleasant and consistent with ozone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors is considered to be caused by the radiochemical formation of ozone and free radicals in the mucus overlying the olfactory mucosa.

  20. Accessory olfactory bulb function is modulated by input from the main olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Burton; Restrepo, Diego; Schellinck, Heather; Archbold, Georgina; Price, Stephen; Lin, Weihong

    2010-03-01

    Although it is now established that sensory neurons in both the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ may be activated by both general and pheromonal odorants, it remains unclear what initiates sampling by the vomeronasal organ. Anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase was used to determine that adequate intranasal syringing with zinc sulfate interrupted all inputs to the main olfactory bulb but left intact those to the accessory olfactory bulb. Adult male treated mice were frankly anosmic when tested with pheromonal and non-pheromonal odors and failed to engage in aggressive behavior. Treated juvenile females failed to show puberty acceleration subsequent to exposure to bedding from adult males. Activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos and electrovomeronasogram recording confirmed the integrity of the vomeronasal system in zinc sulfate-treated mice. These results support the hypothesis that odor detection by the main olfactory epithelium is required to initiate sampling by the vomeronasal system.

  1. An olfactory circuit increases the fidelity of visual behavior.

    PubMed

    Chow, Dawnis M; Theobald, Jamie C; Frye, Mark A

    2011-10-19

    Multimodal integration allows neural circuits to be activated in a behaviorally context-specific manner. In the case of odor plume tracking by Drosophila, an attractive odorant increases the influence of yaw-optic flow on steering behavior in flight, which enhances visual stability reflexes, resulting in straighter flight trajectories within an odor plume. However, it is not well understood whether context-specific changes in optomotor behavior are the result of an increased sensitivity to motion inputs (e.g., through increased visual attention) or direct scaling of motor outputs (i.e., increased steering gain). We address this question by examining the optomotor behavior of Drosophila melanogaster in a tethered flight assay and demonstrate that whereas olfactory cues decrease the gain of the optomotor response to sideslip optic flow, they concomitantly increase the gain of the yaw optomotor response by enhancing the animal's ability to follow transient visual perturbations. Furthermore, ablating the mushroom bodies (MBs) of the fly brain via larval hydroxyurea (HU) treatment results in a loss of olfaction-dependent increase in yaw optomotor fidelity. By expressing either tetanus toxin light chain or diphtheria toxin in gal4-defined neural circuits, we were able to replicate the loss of function observed in the HU treatment within the lines expressing broadly in the mushroom bodies, but not within specific mushroom body lobes. Finally, we were able to genetically separate the yaw responses and sideslip responses in our behavioral assay. Together, our results implicate the MBs in a fast-acting, memory-independent olfactory modification of a visual reflex that is critical for flight control.

  2. On the organization of olfactory and vomeronasal cortices.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2009-01-12

    Classically, the olfactory and vomeronasal pathways are thought to run in parallel non-overlapping axes in the forebrain subserving different functions. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (primary projections), which in turn project to different areas of the telencephalon in a non-topographic fashion (secondary projections) and so on (tertiary projections). New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs converge widely in the rostral basal telencephalon. In contrast, in the vomeronasal system, cloning two classes of vomeronasal receptors (V1R and V2R) has led to the distinction of two anatomically and functionally independent pathways that reach some common, but also some different, targets in the amygdala. Tertiary projections from the olfactory and vomeronasal amygdalae are directed to the ventral striatum, which thus becomes a site for processing and potential convergence of chemosensory stimuli. Functional data indicate that the olfactory and vomeronasal systems are able to detect and process volatiles (presumptive olfactory cues) as well as pheromones in both epithelia and bulbs. Collectively, these data indicate that the anatomical and functional distinction between the olfactory and vomeronasal systems should be re-evaluated. Specifically, the recipient cortex should be reorganized to include olfactory, vomeronasal (convergent and V1R and V2R specific areas) and mixed (olfactory and vomeronasal) chemosensory cortices. This new perspective could help to unravel olfactory and vomeronasal interactions in behavioral paradigms.

  3. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulate maturation of olfactory glomerular circuitry.

    PubMed

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Datta, Sandeep R; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-12-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (Shh(Ala/Ala)), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature Shh(Ala/Ala) mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry.

  4. Shh-Proteoglycan Interactions Regulate Maturation of Olfactory Glomerular Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M.; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L.; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Datta, Sandeep R.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (ShhAla/Ala), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature ShhAla/Ala mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry. PMID:24913191

  5. Functional classification and central nervous projections of olfactory receptor neurons housed in antennal trichoid sensilla of female yellow fever mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Ghaninia, Majid; Ignell, Rickard; Hansson, Bill S

    2007-09-01

    Mosquitoes are highly dependent on their olfactory system for, e.g. host location and identification of nectar-feeding and oviposition sites. Odours are detected by olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) housed in hair-shaped structures, sensilla, on the antennae and maxillary palps. In order to unravel the function of the olfactory system in the yellow fever vector, Aedes aegypti, we performed single-sensillum recordings from trichoid sensilla on female antennae. These sensilla are divided into four distinct morphological types. Based on the response to a set of 16 odour compounds, we identified 18 different ORN types, housed in 10 sensillum types. The ORNs responded to behaviourally relevant olfactory cues, such as oviposition attractants and sweat-borne compounds, including 4-methylcyclohexanol and indole, respectively. Two ORNs housed in these sensilla, as well as two ORNs housed in an additional sensillum type, did not respond to any of the compounds tested. The ORNs housed in individual sensilla exhibited stereotypical pairing and displayed differences in signalling mode (excitatory and inhibitory) as well as in temporal response patterns. In addition to physiological characterization, we performed anterograde neurobiotin stainings of functionally identified ORNs in order to define the functional map among olfactory glomeruli in the primary olfactory centre, the antennal lobe. The targeted glomeruli were compared with an established 3D map. Our data showed that the ORN types sent their axons to defined antennal lobe glomeruli in a stereotypic pattern.

  6. Fine processes of Nestin-GFP–positive radial glia-like stem cells in the adult dentate gyrus ensheathe local synapses and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jonathan; Gebara, Elias; Sánchez-Pascual, Irene; O’Laoi, Ruadhan; El M’Ghari, Imane; Kocher-Braissant, Jacqueline; Ellisman, Mark H.; Toni, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis relies on the activation of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus, their division, and differentiation of their progeny into mature granule neurons. The complex morphology of radial glia-like (RGL) stem cells suggests that these cells establish numerous contacts with the cellular components of the neurogenic niche that may play a crucial role in the regulation of RGL stem cell activity. However, the morphology of RGL stem cells remains poorly described. Here, we used light microscopy and electron microscopy to examine Nestin-GFP transgenic mice and provide a detailed ultrastructural reconstruction analysis of Nestin-GFP–positive RGL cells of the dentate gyrus. We show that their primary processes follow a tortuous path from the subgranular zone through the granule cell layer and ensheathe local synapses and vasculature in the inner molecular layer. They share the ensheathing of synapses and vasculature with astrocytic processes and adhere to the adjacent processes of astrocytes. This extensive interaction of processes with their local environment could allow them to be uniquely receptive to signals from local neurons, glia, and vasculature, which may regulate their fate. PMID:27091993

  7. Sphenoid esthesioneuroblastoma arising from the hindmost olfactory filament.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Mami; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-04-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB), or olfactory neuroblastoma, is a rare malignant neoplasm arising from the olfactory neuroepithelium. Typically, ENBs are found in the olfactory cleft with extension to the ethmoid sinuses or anterior skull base. Here we report a case of ENB located in the sphenoid sinus, which had been considered as an ectopic ENB. However, endoscopic resection revealed the continuity of the tumor with the hindmost olfactory filament. The present case suggests that an ENB in the sphenoid sinus was not ectopic, but arose from the normal olfactory neuroepithelium. This continuity of the ENB with this filament indicated that the tumor was not ectopic, and that there was possible tumor invasion into the olfactory neuroepithelium in the cribriform niche. Therefore, pathological examination of the olfactory neuroepithelium in the cribriform niche may be necessary in case of sphenoid ENBs.

  8. Olfactory perception, communication, and the nose-to-brain pathway.

    PubMed

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Pietrowsky, Reinhard

    2004-10-30

    The present paper's aim is of to give an overview about the basic knowledge as well as actual topics of olfaction--with a special regard on behavior. We summarize different functions of the nose and the olfactory system in human physiology and psychology. We will first describe the functional anatomy of the olfactory system in man. Afterwards, the function of the olfactory system will be viewed from an evolutionary and phylogenetic perspective. We will further outline the main features of olfactory perception, and will show how olfactory perception is influenced by learning. Olfactory signals are relevant stimuli that affect communication. Consequently, the role of the olfactory system in social interaction and mood will be described and gender differences will be addressed. Finally, the function of the nose as an interface to the brain, including implications for pharmacology, will be discussed.

  9. Communication and Culture: Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lydia Ledesma; Emry, Robert A.

    Cultural differences in interpersonal attraction were studied using 93 black, 112 Chicano, and 112 white college students who completed 40 Likert-type rating scales for each of four concepts of attraction (intimate, friendship, acquaintance, and stranger attraction). When a factor solution was generated, differences were noted in the amount of…

  10. Perceived Attractiveness and Classroom Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob

    1977-01-01

    Adams and Cohen (1974) demonstrated that facial attractiveness was a salient factor in differential student-teacher interactions. This research investigates further the interaction between teachers and children perceived to be attractive or unattractive by those teachers. It was hypothesized that attractive children would exhibit more "positive,"…

  11. Changes in Olfactory Sensory Neuron Physiology and Olfactory Perceptual Learning After Odorant Exposure in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Marley D.; Guang, Stephanie A.; Moberly, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    The adult olfactory system undergoes experience-dependent plasticity to adapt to the olfactory environment. This plasticity may be accompanied by perceptual changes, including improved olfactory discrimination. Here, we assessed experience-dependent changes in the perception of a homologous aldehyde pair by testing mice in a cross-habituation/dishabituation behavioral paradigm before and after a week-long ester-odorant exposure protocol. In a parallel experiment, we used optical neurophysiology to observe neurotransmitter release from olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) terminals in vivo, and thus compared primary sensory representations of the aldehydes before and after the week-long ester-odorant exposure in individual animals. Mice could not discriminate between the aldehydes during pre-exposure testing, but ester-exposed subjects spontaneously discriminated between the homologous pair after exposure, whereas home cage control mice cross-habituated. Ester exposure did not alter the spatial pattern, peak magnitude, or odorant-selectivity of aldehyde-evoked OSN input to olfactory bulb glomeruli, but did alter the temporal dynamics of that input to make the time course of OSN input more dissimilar between odorants. Together, these findings demonstrate that odor exposure can induce both physiological and perceptual changes in odor processing, and suggest that changes in the temporal patterns of OSN input to olfactory bulb glomeruli could induce differences in odor quality. PMID:26514410

  12. The diversified function and potential therapy of ectopic olfactory receptors in non-olfactory tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Hong; Fu, Nian; Chen, Linxi

    2017-03-24

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are mainly distributed in olfactory neurons and play a key role in detecting volatile odorants, eventually resulting in the production of smell perception. Recently, it is also reported that ORs are expressed in non-olfactory tissues including heart, lung, sperm, skin, and cancerous tissues. Interestingly, ectopic ORs are associated with the development of diseases in non-olfactory tissues. For instance, ectopic ORs initiate the hypoxic ventilatory responses and maintain the oxygen homeostasis of breathing in the carotid body when oxygen levels decline. Ectopic ORs induce glucose homeostasis in diabetes. Ectopic ORs regulate systemic blood pressure by increasing renin secretion and vasodilation. Ectopic ORs participate in the process of tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, and invasiveness. Ectopic ORs accelerate the occurrence of obesity, angiogenesis and wound-healing processes. Ectopic ORs affect fetal hemoglobin levels in sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. Finally, we also elaborate some ligands targeting for ORs. Obviously, the diversified function and related signal pathway of ectopic ORs may play a potential therapeutic target in non-olfactory tissues. Thus, this review focuses on the latest research results about the diversified function and therapeutic potential of ectopic ORs in non-olfactory tissues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Encoding olfactory signals via multiple chemosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minghong

    2007-01-01

    Most animals have evolved multiple olfactory systems to detect general odors as well as social cues. The sophistication and interaction of these systems permit precise detection of food, danger, and mates, all crucial elements for survival. In most mammals, the nose contains two well described chemosensory apparatuses (the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ), each of which comprises several subtypes of sensory neurons expressing distinct receptors and signal transduction machineries. In many species (e.g., rodents), the nasal cavity also includes two spatially segregated clusters of neurons forming the septal organ of Masera and the Grueneberg ganglion. Results of recent studies suggest that these chemosensory systems perceive diverse but overlapping olfactory cues and that some neurons may even detect the pressure changes carried by the airflow. This review provides an update on how chemosensory neurons transduce chemical (and possibly mechanical) stimuli into electrical signals, and what information each system brings into the brain. Future investigation will focus on the specific ligands that each system detects with a behavioral context and the processing networks that each system involves in the brain. Such studies will lead to a better understanding of how the multiple olfactory systems, acting in concert, offer a complete representation of the chemical world.

  14. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  15. Acid sensing by the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Min, Soohong; Grosjean, Yael; Leblanc, Charlotte; Bell, Rati; Benton, Richard; Suh, Greg S B

    2010-12-02

    The odour of acids has a distinct quality that is perceived as sharp, pungent and often irritating. How acidity is sensed and translated into an appropriate behavioural response is poorly understood. Here we describe a functionally segregated population of olfactory sensory neurons in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, that are highly selective for acidity. These olfactory sensory neurons express IR64a, a member of the recently identified ionotropic receptor (IR) family of putative olfactory receptors. In vivo calcium imaging showed that IR64a+ neurons projecting to the DC4 glomerulus in the antennal lobe are specifically activated by acids. Flies in which the function of IR64a+ neurons or the IR64a gene is disrupted had defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioural responses, but their responses to non-acidic odorants remained unaffected. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of IR64a+ neurons elicited avoidance responses. Taken together, these results identify cellular and molecular substrates for acid detection in the Drosophila olfactory system and support a labelled-line mode of acidity coding at the periphery.

  16. Olfactory Learning in Individually Assayed Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Sabine; Stocker, Reinhard F.; Gerber, Bertram

    2003-01-01

    Insect and mammalian olfactory systems are strikingly similar. Therefore, Drosophila can be used as a simple model for olfaction and olfactory learning. The brain of adult Drosophila, however, is still complex. We therefore chose to work on the larva with its yet simpler but adult-like olfactory system and provide evidence for olfactory learning in individually assayed Drosophila larvae. We developed a differential conditioning paradigm in which odorants are paired with positive (“+” fructose) or negative (“-” quinine or sodium chloride) gustatory reinforcers. Test performance of individuals from two treatment conditions is compared—one received odorant A with the positive reinforcer and odorant B with a negative reinforcer (A+/B-); animals from the other treatment condition were trained reciprocally (A-/B+). During test, differences in choice between A and B of individuals having undergone either A+/B- or A-/B+ training therefore indicate associative learning. We provide such evidence for both combinations of reinforcers; this was replicable across repetitions, laboratories, and experimenters. We further show that breaks improve performance, in accord with basic principles of associative learning. The present individual assay will facilitate electrophysiological studies, which necessarily use individuals. As such approaches are established for the larval neuromuscular synapse, but not in adults, an individual larval learning paradigm will serve to link behavioral levels of analysis to synaptic physiology. PMID:12773586

  17. Propagation of olfactory information in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Root, Cory M; Semmelhack, Julia L; Wong, Allan M; Flores, Jorge; Wang, Jing W

    2007-07-10

    Investigating how information propagates between layers in the olfactory system is an important step toward understanding the olfactory code. Each glomerular output projection neuron (PN) receives two sources of input: the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) of the same glomerulus and interneurons that innervate many glomeruli. We therefore asked how these inputs interact to produce PN output. We used receptor gene mutations to silence all of the ORNs innervating a specific glomerulus and recorded PN activity with two-photon calcium imaging and electrophysiology. We found evidence for balanced excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs but saw little or no response in the absence of direct ORN input. We next asked whether any transformation of activity occurs at successive layers of the antennal lobe. We found a strong link between PN firing and dendritic calcium elevation, the latter of which is tightly correlated with calcium activity in ORN axons, supporting the idea of glomerular propagation of olfactory information. Finally, we showed that odors are represented by a sparse population of PNs. Together, these results are consistent with the idea that direct receptor input provides the main excitatory drive to PNs, whereas interneurons modulate PN output. Balanced excitatory and inhibitory interneuron input may provide a mechanism to adjust PN sensitivity.

  18. Adult Neurogenesis and the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Mary C.; Greer, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Though initially described in the early 1960s, it is only within the past decade that the concept of continuing adult neurogenesis has gained widespread acceptance. Neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) into the olfactory bulb, where they differentiate into interneurons. Neuroblasts from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal formation show relatively little migratory behavior, and differentiate into dentate gyrus granule cells. In sharp contrast to embryonic and perinatal development, these newly differentiated neurons must integrate into a fully functional circuit, without disrupting ongoing performance. Here, after a brief historical overview and introduction to olfactory circuitry, we review recent advances in the biology of neural stem cells, mechanisms of migration in the RMS and olfactory bulb, differentiation and survival of new neurons, and finally mechanisms of synaptic integration. Our primary focus is on the olfactory system, but we also contrast the events occurring there with those in the hippocampal formation. Although both SVZ and SGZ neurogenesis are involved in some types of learning, their full functional significance remains unclear. Since both systems offer models of integration of new neuroblasts, there is immense interest in using neural stem cells to replace neurons lost in injury or disease. Though many questions remain unanswered, new insights appear daily about adult neurogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, and the fates of the progeny. We discuss here some of the central features of these advances, as well as speculate on future research directions. PMID:19615423

  19. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  20. Olfactory Environment Design for Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, C. S.; Holland, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    Smell is usually deemed the least important of the five senses. To contradict this assertion, however, there is no shortage of scientific literature which concludes that olfaction is of very great significance to humans. Odours have been shown to have a variety of effects on humans, and are capable of changing both behaviour and cognitive processing in ways that we are frequently completely unconscious of. Examples of this include alertness, alteration of mood, capacity for ideation and intellectual performance. To date, the design of human spacecraft has concentrated on making their olfactory environments, where possible, `odour neutral' - that is ensuring that all unpleasant and/or offensive odours are removed. Here it suggested that spacecraft (and other extraterrestrial facilities for human inhabitation) might benefit from having their olfactory environments designed to be `odour positive', that is to use odours and olfaction for the positive benefit of their residents. This paper presents a summary of current olfactory research and considers both its positive and negative implications for humans in space. It then discusses `odour positive' design of spacecraft olfactory environments and the possible benefits accruing from this approach before examining its implications for the architecture of spacecraft environmental control systems.

  1. Sex differences in the human olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Junque, Carme; Giménez, Mónica; Caldú, Xavier; Segovia, Santiago; Guillamon, Antonio

    2006-10-20

    The olfactory system (accessory) implicated in reproductive physiology and behavior in mammals is sexually dimorphic. These brain sex differences present two main characteristics: they are seen in neural circuits related to sexual behavior and sexual physiology and they take one of two opposite morphological patterns (male>female or female>male). The present work reports sex differences in the olfactory system in a large homogeneous sample of men (40) and women (51) using of voxel-based morphology. Gray matter concentration showed sexual dimorphism in several olfactory regions. Women have a higher concentration in the orbitofrontal cortex involving Brodmann's areas 10, 11 and 25 and temporomedial cortex (bilateral hippocampus and right amygdala), as well as their left basal insular cortex. In contrast, men show a higher gray matter concentration in the left entorhinal cortex (Brodmann's area 28), right ventral pallidum, dorsal left insular cortex and a region of the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 25). This study supports the hypothesis that the mammalian olfactory system is a sexually dimorphic network and provides a theoretical framework for the morphofunctional approach to sex differences in the human brain.

  2. Pollinator attraction of the wasp-flower Scrophularia umbrosa (Scrophulariaceae).

    PubMed

    Brodmann, J; Emer, D; Ayasse, M

    2012-05-01

    Certain species of Scrophularia (Scrophulariaceae), such as S. nodosa and S. umbrosa, are mainly pollinated by social wasps and are consequently described as wasp-flowers. Because plants attract their pollinators with the help of various floral cues, such as floral odour and/or optical cues, we have investigated the role of olfactory and visual floral signals responsible for wasp attraction in S. umbrosa. Using a combination of chemical (GC, GC-MS) and electrophysiological analyses (GC-EAD), we identified ten compounds in the complex floral odour bouquet that are detectable by the wasps' antennae. As in the wasp-flower Epipactis helleborine, we found so-called 'green leaf volatiles' (GLVs) in the floral odour; these GLVs are highly attractive to the wasps. GLVs, mostly six-carbon aldehydes, alcohols and acetates, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are emitted by many plants infested with herbivores, e.g. caterpillars. In contrast to other investigated wasp-flowers, behavioural experiments have demonstrated that, in addition to the floral odour of S. umbrosa, visual cues are involved in pollinator attraction. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Bats Are Acoustically Attracted to Mutualistic Carnivorous Plants.

    PubMed

    Schöner, Michael G; Schöner, Caroline R; Simon, Ralph; Grafe, T Ulmar; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Ji, Liaw Lin; Kerth, Gerald

    2015-07-20

    Mutualisms between plants and animals shape the world's ecosystems. In such interactions, achieving contact with the partner species is imperative. Plants regularly advertise themselves with signals that specifically appeal to the partner's perceptual preferences. For example, many plants have acquired traits such as brightly colored, fragrant flowers that attract pollinators with visual, olfactory, or--in the case of a few bat-pollinated flowers--even acoustic stimuli in the form of echo-reflecting structures. However, acoustic attraction in plants is rare compared to other advertisements and has never been found outside the pollination context and only in the Neotropics. We hypothesized that this phenomenon is more widespread and more diverse as plant-bat interactions also occur in the Paleotropics. In Borneo, mutualistic bats fertilize a carnivorous pitcher plant while roosting in its pitchers. The pitcher's orifice features a prolonged concave structure, which we predicted to distinctively reflect the bats' echolocation calls for a wide range of angles. This structure should facilitate the location and identification of pitchers even within highly cluttered surroundings. Pitchers lacking this structure should be less attractive for the bats. Ensonifications of the pitchers around their orifice revealed that this structure indeed acts as a multidirectional ultrasound reflector. In behavioral experiments where bats were confronted with differently modified pitchers, the reflector's presence clearly facilitated the finding and identification of pitchers. These results suggest that plants have convergently acquired reflectors in the Paleotropics and the Neotropics to acoustically attract bats, albeit for completely different ecological reasons.

  4. Quantifying male attractiveness.

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I; Marques Dos Santos, Miguel; Kokko, Hanna; Brooks, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Genetic models of sexual selection are concerned with a dynamic process in which female preference and male trait values coevolve. We present a rigorous method for characterizing evolutionary endpoints of this process in phenotypic terms. In our phenotypic characterization the mate-choice strategy of female population members determines how attractive females should find each male, and a population is evolutionarily stable if population members are actually behaving in this way. This provides a justification of phenotypic explanations of sexual selection and the insights into sexual selection that they provide. Furthermore, the phenotypic approach also has enormous advantages over a genetic approach when computing evolutionarily stable mate-choice strategies, especially when strategies are allowed to be complex time-dependent preference rules. For simplicity and clarity our analysis deals with haploid mate-choice genetics and a male trait that is inherited phenotypically, for example by vertical cultural transmission. The method is, however, easily extendible to other cases. An example illustrates that the sexy son phenomenon can occur when there is phenotypic inheritance of the male trait. PMID:14561306

  5. Attracting Girls Into Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Hala M.; Kahil, Heba M.

    2005-10-01

    From our national statistics, it is evident that in the population of physicists there are considerably fewer women than men. Our role is to attract girls to physics and thus decrease this gap. The institutional structure in Egypt provides an equal opportunity for girls to study sciences, including physics. It is reckoned that girls refrain from studying physics due to a group of social and economic factors. We will discuss teaching physics at schools and present some ideas to develop it. The media should play a role in placing female physicists in the spotlight. Unfortunately, careers that require intellectual skills are considered men's careers. This necessitates that society changes the way it sees women and trusts more in their skills and talents. We therefore call for the cooperation of governmental and nongovernmental bodies, together with universities and the production sectors involved. This will ultimately lead to enhancing the entrepreneurial projects related to physics and technology on the one hand, and will encourage girls to find challenging opportunities on the other.

  6. Olfactory perception, cognition, and dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    The main functions of olfaction relate to finding food, avoiding predators and disease, and social communication. Its role in detecting food has resulted in a unique dual mode sensory system. Environmental odorants are 'smelled' via the external nostrils, while volatile chemicals in food-detected by the same receptors-arrive via the nasopharynx, contributing to flavor. This arrangement allows the brain to link the consequences of eating with a food's odor, and then later to use this information in the search for food. Recognizing an odorant-a food, mate, or predator-requires the detection of complex chemical blends against a noisy chemical background. The brain solves this problem in two ways. First, by rapid adaptation to background odorants so that new odorants stand out. Second, by pattern matching the neural representation of an odorant to prior olfactory experiences. This account is consistent with olfactory sensory physiology, anatomy, and psychology. Odor perception, and its products, may be subject to further processing-olfactory cognition. While olfactory cognition has features in common with visual or auditory cognition, several aspects are unique, and even those that are common may be instantiated in different ways. These differences can be productively used to evaluate the generality of models of cognition and consciousness. Finally, the olfactory system can breakdown, and this may be predictive of the onset of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's, as well as having prognostic value in other disorders such as schizophrenia. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:273-284. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1224 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Olfactory Cues Are Subordinate to Visual Stimuli in a Neotropical Generalist Weevil

    PubMed Central

    Otálora-Luna, Fernando; Lapointe, Stephen L.; Dickens, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    The tropical root weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus is a major pest of multiple crops in the Caribbean Islands and has become a serious constraint to citrus production in the United States. Recent work has identified host and conspecific volatiles that mediate host- and mate-finding by D. abbreviatus. The interaction of light, color, and odors has not been studied in this species. The responses of male and female D. abbreviatus to narrow bandwidths of visible light emitted by LEDs offered alone and in combination with olfactory stimuli were studied in a specially-designed multiple choice arena combined with a locomotion compensator. Weevils were more attracted to wavelengths close to green and yellow compared with blue or ultraviolet, but preferred red and darkness over green. Additionally, dim green light was preferred over brighter green. Adult weevils were also attracted to the odor of its citrus host + conspecifics. However, the attractiveness of citrus + conspecific odors disappeared in the presence of a green light. Photic stimulation induced males but not females to increase their speed. In the presence of light emitted by LEDs, turning speed decreased and path straightness increased, indicating that weevils tended to walk less tortuously. Diaprepes abbreviatus showed a hierarchy between chemo- and photo-taxis in the series of experiments presented herein, where the presence of the green light abolished upwind anemotaxis elicited by the pheromone + host plant odor. Insight into the strong responses to visual stimuli of chemically stimulated insects may be provided when the amount of information supplied by vision and olfaction is compared, as the information transmission capacity of compound eyes is estimated to be several orders of magnitude higher compared with the olfactory system. Subordination of olfactory responses by photic stimuli should be considered in the design of strategies aimed at management of such insects. PMID:23341926

  8. Making vasectomy attractive.

    PubMed

    Herndon, N

    1992-08-01

    In 1989, Pro-Pater, a private, nonprofit family planning organization in Brazil, used attractive ads with the message Vasectomy, An Act of Love to promote vasectomy. The number of vasectomies performed/day at Pro-Pater clinics increased from 11 to 20 during the publicity campaign and fell after the ads stopped but continued at higher levels. Word of mouth communication among friends, neighbors, and relatives who had vasectomies maintained these high levels. This type of communication reduced the fear that often involves vasectomies because men hear from men they know and trust that vasectomies are harmless and do not deprive them of potency. In Sao Paulo, the percentage of men familiar with vasectomies and how they are performed increased after the campaign, but in Salvador, knowledge did not increase even though the number of vasectomies in Pro-Pater clinics increased. Organizations in Colombia and Guatemala have also been effective in educating men about vasectomies. These successes were especially relevant in Latin American where machismo has been an obstacle of family planning programs. The no-scalpel technique 1st introduced in China in 1974 reduces the fear of vasectomy and has fewer complications than the conventional technique. Further trained physicians can perform the no-scalpel technique in about 10 minutes compared with 15 minutes for the conventional technique. In 1987 during a 1-day festival in Thailand, physicians averaged 57 no-scalpel vasectomies/day compared with only 33 for conventional vasectomies. This technique has not spread to Guatemala, Brazil, Colombia, the US, and some countries in Asia and Africa. Extensive research does not indicate that vasectomy has an increased risk of testicular cancer, prostate cancer, and myocardial infarction. Physicians are working on ways to improve vasectomy.

  9. Genetic dissection of pheromone processing reveals main olfactory system-mediated social behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohiko; Hattori, Tatsuya; Asaba, Akari; Inoue, Naokazu; Kanomata, Nobuhiro; Kikusui, Takefumi; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko

    2015-01-20

    Most mammals have two major olfactory subsystems: the main olfactory system (MOS) and vomeronasal system (VNS). It is now widely accepted that the range of pheromones that control social behaviors are processed by both the VNS and the MOS. However, the functional contributions of each subsystem in social behavior remain unclear. To genetically dissociate the MOS and VNS functions, we established two conditional knockout mouse lines that led to either loss-of-function in the entire MOS or in the dorsal MOS. Mice with whole-MOS loss-of-function displayed severe defects in active sniffing and poor survival through the neonatal period. In contrast, when loss-of-function was confined to the dorsal MOB, sniffing behavior, pheromone recognition, and VNS activity were maintained. However, defects in a wide spectrum of social behaviors were observed: attraction to female urine and the accompanying ultrasonic vocalizations, chemoinvestigatory preference, aggression, maternal behaviors, and risk-assessment behaviors in response to an alarm pheromone. Functional dissociation of pheromone detection and pheromonal induction of behaviors showed the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON)-regulated social behaviors downstream from the MOS. Lesion analysis and neural activation mapping showed pheromonal activation in multiple amygdaloid and hypothalamic nuclei, important regions for the expression of social behavior, was dependent on MOS and AON functions. Identification of the MOS-AON-mediated pheromone pathway may provide insights into pheromone signaling in animals that do not possess a functional VNS, including humans.

  10. Modulation by octopamine of olfactory responses to nonpheromone odorants in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana L.

    PubMed

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna I

    2012-06-01

    Olfactory receptor cells in insects are modulated by neurohormones. Recordings from cockroach olfactory sensilla showed that a subset of sensory neurons increase their responses to selected nonpheromone odorants after octopamine application. With octopamine application, recordings demonstrated increased firing rates by the short but not the long alcohol-sensitive sensilla to the nonpheromone volatile, hexan-1-ol. Within the same sensillum, individual receptor cells are shown to be modulated independently from each other, indicating that the octopamine receptors reside in the receptor not in the accessory cells. A uniform decrease in the amplitude of electroantennogram, which is odorant independent, is suggested to reflect the rise in octopamine concentration in the antennal hemolymph. Perception of general odorants measured as behavioral responses changed qualitatively under octopamine treatment: namely, repulsive hexan-1-ol became neutral, whereas neutral eucalyptol became attractive. Octopamine induced a change in male behavioral responses to general odors that were essentially the same as in the state of sexual arousal. Our findings suggest that sensitivity to odors having different biological significances is modulated selectively at the peripheral as well as other levels of olfactory processing.

  11. The olfactory neuron AWC promotes avoidance of normally palatable food following chronic dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Changes in metabolic state alter foraging behavior and food preference in animals. Here, I show that normally attractive food becomes repulsive to Caenorhabditis elegans if animals are chronically undernourished as a result of alimentary tract defects. This behavioral plasticity is achieved in two ways: increased food leaving and induction of aversive behavior towards food. A particularly strong food avoider is defective in the chitin synthase that makes the pharyngeal lining. Food avoidance induced by underfeeding is mediated by cGMP signaling in the olfactory neurons AWC and AWB, and the gustatory neurons ASJ and ASK. Food avoidance is enhanced by increased population density and is reduced if the animals are unable to correctly interpret their nutritional state as a result of defects in the AMP kinase or TOR/S6kinase pathways. The TGF-β/DBL-1 pathway suppresses food avoidance and the cellular basis for this is distinct from its role in aversive olfactory learning of harmful food. This study suggests that nutritional state feedback via nutrient sensors, population size and olfactory neurons guides food preference in C. elegans. PMID:24577446

  12. Genetic dissection of pheromone processing reveals main olfactory system-mediated social behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Tomohiko; Hattori, Tatsuya; Asaba, Akari; Inoue, Naokazu; Kanomata, Nobuhiro; Kikusui, Takefumi; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Most mammals have two major olfactory subsystems: the main olfactory system (MOS) and vomeronasal system (VNS). It is now widely accepted that the range of pheromones that control social behaviors are processed by both the VNS and the MOS. However, the functional contributions of each subsystem in social behavior remain unclear. To genetically dissociate the MOS and VNS functions, we established two conditional knockout mouse lines that led to either loss-of-function in the entire MOS or in the dorsal MOS. Mice with whole-MOS loss-of-function displayed severe defects in active sniffing and poor survival through the neonatal period. In contrast, when loss-of-function was confined to the dorsal MOB, sniffing behavior, pheromone recognition, and VNS activity were maintained. However, defects in a wide spectrum of social behaviors were observed: attraction to female urine and the accompanying ultrasonic vocalizations, chemoinvestigatory preference, aggression, maternal behaviors, and risk-assessment behaviors in response to an alarm pheromone. Functional dissociation of pheromone detection and pheromonal induction of behaviors showed the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON)-regulated social behaviors downstream from the MOS. Lesion analysis and neural activation mapping showed pheromonal activation in multiple amygdaloid and hypothalamic nuclei, important regions for the expression of social behavior, was dependent on MOS and AON functions. Identification of the MOS-AON–mediated pheromone pathway may provide insights into pheromone signaling in animals that do not possess a functional VNS, including humans. PMID:25564662

  13. The olfactory sense: a developmental and lifespan perspective.

    PubMed

    Wittmann-Price, Ruth A

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this literature review is to discuss human olfactory development, function and assessment through the lifespan. This article will highlight the importance of accurate olfactory function assessment. Olfactory function in humans is an understudied sense and may contribute significantly to patient safety and quality of life. Studies related to olfactory function are presented for different life stages. Olfactory development is reviewed as is terminology used to describe functionality. This article highlights the need for nursing assessment of olfactory function to develop holistic nursing interventions since there are implications for patient safety, quality of life issues related to respiratory function, bonding and nutrition. Literature review. Articles were searched in CINAHL, PsychInfo and PubMed limited to those published in English to 2010 with the key terms 'olfactory and nursing'. The search yielded 47 articles that were clinically based on patient care. Those articles that dealt specifically with traumatic brain syndrome were excluded. However, peer reviewed and research article were both specified. There is evidence that olfactory assessment should be completed by nurses on high risk populations to ensure patent safety and enhance quality of life. More studies are needed to improve clinical knowledge about the role of olfactory function. Nurses are in a prime position to assess olfactory function for patients at high risk for deficits to provide holistic nursing care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Gyrodactylus salmonis infection impairs the olfactory system of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Lari, E; Pyle, G G

    2017-01-20

    Monogenean worms are ectoparasites that are known to be infectious to a wide variety of fish. Few species of monogenean parasites have been reported in the olfactory chamber of fish in current peer-reviewed literature. However, the impacts of these parasites on the olfactory system are not well understood. In this study, the effects of Gyrodactylus salmonis on the olfactory system structure and performance were investigated in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The olfactory performance of the infected fish was examined using an electro-olfactography (EOG) technique, while the ultrastructure of the olfactory rosette was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). The infected rainbow trout displayed reduced responses to two standard olfactory cues (L-alanine and TCA). The SEM micrographs revealed that many regions of the olfactory epithelium in the infected fish were heavily pitted and the LM examination of the olfactory epithelium showed local proliferation of mucous cells in the sensory regions as compared to the control group. The results of this study demonstrated that G. salmonis causes physical damage to the olfactory system of fish that lead to olfactory impairment.

  15. Beyond initial attraction: physical attractiveness in newlywed marriage.

    PubMed

    McNulty, James K; Neff, Lisa A; Karney, Benjamin R

    2008-02-01

    Physical appearance plays a crucial role in shaping new relationships, but does it continue to affect established relationships, such as marriage? In the current study, the authors examined how observer ratings of each spouse's facial attractiveness and the difference between those ratings were associated with (a) observations of social support behavior and (b) reports of marital satisfaction. In contrast to the robust and almost universally positive effects of levels of attractiveness on new relationships, the only association between levels of attractiveness and the outcomes of these marriages was that attractive husbands were less satisfied. Further, in contrast to the importance of matched attractiveness to new relationships, similarity in attractiveness was unrelated to spouses' satisfaction and behavior. Instead, the relative difference between partners' levels of attractiveness appeared to be most important in predicting marital behavior, such that both spouses behaved more positively in relationships in which wives were more attractive than their husbands, but they behaved more negatively in relationships in which husbands were more attractive than their wives. These results highlight the importance of dyadic examinations of the effects of spouses' qualities on their marriages.

  16. Early olfactory experience induces structural changes in the primary olfactory center of an insect brain.

    PubMed

    Arenas, A; Giurfa, M; Sandoz, J C; Hourcade, B; Devaud, J M; Farina, W M

    2012-03-01

    The antennal lobe (AL) is the first olfactory center of the insect brain and is constituted of different functional units, the glomeruli. In the AL, odors are coded as spatiotemporal patterns of glomerular activity. In honeybees, olfactory learning during early adulthood modifies neural activity in the AL on a long-term scale and also enhances later memory retention. By means of behavioral experiments, we first verified that olfactory learning between the fifth and eighth day of adulthood induces better retention performances at a late adult stage than the same experience acquired before or after this period. We checked that the specificity of memory for the odorants used was improved. We then studied whether such early olfactory learning also induces long-term structural changes in the AL consistent with the formation of long-term olfactory memories. We also measured the volume of 15 identified glomeruli in the ALs of 17-day-old honeybees that either experienced an odor associated with sucrose solution between the fifth and eighth day of adulthood or were left untreated. We found that early olfactory experience induces glomerulus-selective increases in volume that were specific to the learned odor. By comparing our volumetric measures with calcium-imaging recordings from a previous study, performed in 17-day-old bees subjected to the same treatment and experimental conditions, we found that glomeruli that showed structural changes after early learning were those that exhibited a significant increase in neural activity. Our results make evident a correlation between structural and functional changes in the AL following early olfactory learning.

  17. Olfactory Cleft Endoscopy Scale correlates with olfactory metrics in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Zachary M.; Hyer, J. Madison; Karnezis, Tom T.; Schlosser, Rodney J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Olfactory loss affects a majority of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Traditional objective measures of disease severity, including endoscopy scales, focus upon the paranasal sinuses and often have weak correlation to olfaction. Methods Adults with CRS were prospectively evaluated by blinded reviewers with a novel Olfactory Cleft Endoscopy Scale (OCES) that evaluated discharge, polyps, edema, crusting and scarring of the olfactory cleft. Objective olfactory function was assessed using “Sniffin’ Sticks testing, including composite threshold-discrimination-identification (TDI) scores. Olfactory-specific quality-of-life was evaluated using the short modified version of the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders (QOD-NS). Inter- and intra-rater reliability was assessed among 3 reviewers for OCES grading. Multivariate linear regression was then used to test associations between OCES scores and measures of olfaction, controlling for potential confounding factors. Results The OCES score was evaluated in 38 patients and had a high overall reliability (ICC=0.92; 95% CI: 0.91–0.96). The OCES significantly correlated with objective olfaction as measured by TDI score (p<0.001), with TDI score falling by 1.13 points for every 1 point increase in OCES score. Similar significant associations were found for threshold, discrimination, and identification scores (p<0.003 for all) after controlling for age, gender, race, and reviewer/review. The OCES was also highly associated with patient-reported QOD-NS scores (p=0.009). Conclusion A novel olfactory cleft endoscopy scale shows high reliability and correlates with both objective and patient-reported olfaction in patients with CRS. Further studies to determine prognostic value and responsiveness to change are warranted. PMID:26718315

  18. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche.

  19. Differential Muscarinic Modulation in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard S.; Hu, Ruilong; DeSouza, Andre; Eberly, Christian L.; Krahe, Krista; Chan, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation of olfactory circuits by acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in odor discrimination and learning. Early processing of chemosensory signals occurs in two functionally and anatomically distinct regions, the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOB and AOB), which receive extensive cholinergic input from the basal forebrain. Here, we explore the regulation of AOB and MOB circuits by ACh, and how cholinergic modulation influences olfactory-mediated behaviors in mice. Surprisingly, despite the presence of a conserved circuit, activation of muscarinic ACh receptors revealed marked differences in cholinergic modulation of output neurons: excitation in the AOB and inhibition in the MOB. Granule cells (GCs), the most abundant intrinsic neuron in the OB, also exhibited a complex muscarinic response. While GCs in the AOB were excited, MOB GCs exhibited a dual muscarinic action in the form of a hyperpolarization and an increase in excitability uncovered by cell depolarization. Furthermore, ACh influenced the input–output relationship of mitral cells in the AOB and MOB differently showing a net effect on gain in mitral cells of the MOB, but not in the AOB. Interestingly, despite the striking differences in neuromodulatory actions on output neurons, chemogenetic inhibition of cholinergic neurons produced similar perturbations in olfactory behaviors mediated by these two regions. Decreasing ACh in the OB disrupted the natural discrimination of molecularly related odors and the natural investigation of odors associated with social behaviors. Thus, the distinct neuromodulation by ACh in these circuits could underlie different solutions to the processing of general odors and semiochemicals, and the diverse olfactory behaviors they trigger. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT State-dependent cholinergic modulation of brain circuits is critical for several high-level cognitive functions, including attention and memory. Here, we provide new evidence that cholinergic

  20. Olfactory Cues, Visual Cues, and Semiochemical Diversity Interact During Host Location by Invasive Forest Beetles.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jessica L; Kelly, Dave; Bader, Martin K-F; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G

    2017-01-01

    Plant-feeding insects use visual and olfactory cues (shape, color, plant volatiles) for host location, but the relative importance of different cues and interactions with non-host-plant volatiles in ecosystems of varying plant biodiversity is unclear for most species. We studied invasive bark beetles and wood borers associated with pine trees to characterize interactions among color, host and non-host volatiles, by employing traps that mimic tree trunks. Cross-vane flight intercept traps (black, green, red, white, yellow, clear) and black funnel traps were used with and without attractants (α-pinene + ethanol), repellents (non-host green leaf volatiles, 'GLV'), and attractant/repellent combinations in four pine forests in New Zealand. We trapped 274,594 Hylurgus ligniperda, 7842 Hylastes ater, and 16,301 Arhopalus ferus. Trap color, attractant, and color × attractant effects were highly significant. Overall, black and red traps had the highest catches, irrespective of the presence of attractants. Alpha-pinene plus ethanol increased trap catch of H. ligniperda 200-fold but only 6-fold for H. ater and 2-fold for A. ferus. Green leaf volatiles had a substantial repellent effect on trap catch of H. ligniperda but less on H. ater and A. ferus. Attack by H. ligniperda was halved when logs were treated with GLV, and a similar effect was observed when logs were placed among broadleaved understory shrubs emitting GLV. Overall, H. ligniperda was most strongly affected by the olfactory cues used, whereas H. ater and A. ferus were more strongly affected by visual cues. Collectively, the results support the semiochemical diversity hypothesis, indicating that non-host plant volatiles from diverse plant communities or artificial dispensers can contribute to resistance against herbivores by partly disrupting host location.

  1. Odor detection ability and thallium-201 transport in the olfactory nerve of traumatic olfactory-impaired mice.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Yayoi; Washiyama, Kohshin; Ogawa, Daisuke; Amano, Ryohei; Hirota, Kyoko; Tsukatani, Toshiaki; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Miwa, Takaki

    2008-09-01

    Although olfactory nerve damage is a contributing factor in the diagnosis of posttraumatic olfactory loss, at present, there are no methods to directly assess injury to these nerves. We have shown that following olfactory nerve injury in mice, thallium-201 (201 Tl) transport from the nasal cavity to the olfactory bulb decreases. To determine if olfactory function after nerve injury could be assessed with nasal administration of 201 Tl, we measured the correlation between odor detection ability (ODA) and the rate of transport of 201 Tl in olfactory nerves. Both ODA and 201 Tl transport were measured after bilateral olfactory nerve transection for a 4-week period. Cycloheximide solution was used for ODA against tap water. 201 Tl transport was measured as the ratio of radioactivity in the nasal cavity and olfactory bulb with gamma spectrometry. There was a significant correlation between ODA and the rate of 201 Tl transport in the olfactory nerve. These findings suggest that olfactory function after nerve injury can be objectively evaluated with the nasal administration of 201 Tl.

  2. Olfactory sensory neurons are trophically dependent on the olfactory bulb for their prolonged survival.

    PubMed

    Schwob, J E; Szumowski, K E; Stasky, A A

    1992-10-01

    In most neural systems, developing neurons are trophically dependent on contact with their synaptic target for their survival and for some features of their differentiation. However, in the olfactory system, it is unclear whether or not the survival and differentiation of olfactory sensory neurons depend on contact with the olfactory bulb (normally the sole synaptic target for these neurons). In order to address this issue, we examined neuronal life-span and differentiation in adult rats subjected to unilateral olfactory bulb ablation at least 1 month prior to use. Life-span of a newly generated cohort of olfactory neurons was determined by labeling them at their "birth" via the incorporation of 3H-thymidine. In the absence of the bulb, neurons are continually produced at a twofold greater rate. However, the epithelium on the ablated side is thinner, indicating that average neuronal life-span must be reduced in the targetless epithelium. Indeed, nearly 90% of the labeled neurons disappear from the bulbectomized side between 5 d and 2 weeks of neuronal age. Moreover, on electron microscopic examination, olfactory axons are degenerating in large numbers on the ablated side. Since labeled neurons migrate apically through the width of the epithelium during this same period, it appears that most, if not all, neurons on the ablated side have a life-span on the order of 2 weeks or less. In contrast, there is a more moderate degree of neuronal loss on the unoperated side of the same animals during the first 2 weeks after tracer injection, and that occurs while the neurons are concentrated in the deeper half of the epithelium, suggesting that there is a preexisting population of neurons in the control epithelium that does not die during this period. Likewise, degenerating axons are much less frequent on the unoperated side. We conclude that life-span is significantly shorter for olfactory neurons born in the targetless epithelium and that olfactory neurons are trophically

  3. Tunicamycin impairs olfactory learning and synaptic plasticity in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jia; Okutani, Fumino; Murata, Yoshihiro; Taniguchi, Mutsuo; Namba, Toshiharu; Wang, Yu-Jie; Kaba, Hideto

    2017-03-06

    Tunicamycin (TM) induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inhibits N-glycosylation in cells. ER stress is associated with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, and most patients complain of the impairment of olfactory recognition. Here we examined the effects of TM on aversive olfactory learning and the underlying synaptic plasticity in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). Behavioral experiments demonstrated that the intrabulbar infusion of TM disabled aversive olfactory learning without affecting short-term memory. Histological analyses revealed that TM infusion upregulated C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a marker of ER stress, in the mitral and granule cell layers of MOB. Electrophysiological data indicated that TM inhibited tetanus-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the dendrodendritic excitatory synapse from mitral to granule cells. A low dose of TM (250nM) abolished the late phase of LTP, and a high dose (1μM) inhibited the early and late phases of LTP. Further, high-dose, but not low-dose, TM reduced the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of TM on LTP are partially mediated through the presynaptic machinery. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that TM-induced ER stress impairs olfactory learning by inhibiting synaptic plasticity via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms in MOB.

  4. Morphology and physiology of the olfactory system of blood-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Guidobaldi, F; May-Concha, I J; Guerenstein, P G

    2014-01-01

    Several blood-feeding (hematophagous) insects are vectors of a number of diseases including dengue, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis which persistently affect public health throughout Latin America. The vectors of those diseases include mosquitoes, triatomine bugs and sandflies. As vector control is an efficient way to prevent these illnesses it is important to understand the sensory biology of those harmful insects. We study the physiology of the olfactory system of those insects and apply that knowledge on the development of methods to manipulate their behavior. Here we review some of the latest information on insect olfaction with emphasis on hematophagous insects. The insect olfactory sensory neurons are housed inside hair-like organs called sensilla which are mainly distributed on the antenna and mouthparts. The identity of many of the odor compounds that those neurons detect are already known in hematophagous insects. They include several constituents of host (vertebrate) odor, sex, aggregation and alarm pheromones, and compounds related to egg-deposition behavior. Recent work has contributed significant knowledge on how odor information is processed in the insect first odor-processing center in the brain, the antennal lobe. The quality, quantity, and temporal features of the odor stimuli are encoded by the neural networks of the antennal lobe. Information regarding odor mixtures is also encoded. While natural mixtures evoke strong responses, synthetic mixtures that deviate from their natural counterparts in terms of key constituents or proportions of those constituents evoke weaker responses. The processing of olfactory information is largely unexplored in hematophagous insects. However, many aspects of their olfactory behavior are known. As in other insects, responses to relevant single odor compounds are weak while natural mixtures evoke strong responses. Future challenges include studying how information about odor mixtures is processed in their brain

  5. Responses of round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) olfactory epithelium to steroids released by reproductive males.

    PubMed

    Laframboise, Alyson J; Zielinski, Barbara S

    2011-10-01

    The wild perciform teleost Neogobius melanostomus (the round goby) originated from the Ponto-Caspian region and is now a highly successful invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Males may attract females into their nests for spawning by releasing reproductive pheromones, and it has been previously shown that reproductive males synthesize and release the 5β-reduced and 3α-hydroxyl steroids 3α-hydroxy-5β-androstane-11,17-dione (11-oxo-etiocholanolone; 11-O-ETIO) and 3α-hydroxy-5β-androstane-11,17-dione 3-sulfate (11-oxo-etiocholanolone-3-sulfate; 11-O-ETIO-3-s) and 3α,17β-dihydroxy-5β-androstan-11-one 17-sulfate. In this study, we investigated properties of these released steroids by recording field potential responses from the olfactory epithelium (electro-olfactogram, EOG). The steroid 3α,17β-dihydroxy-5β-androstan-11-one 17-sulfate did not elicit olfactory responses while both 11-O-ETIO and 11-O-ETIO-3-s stimulated olfactory field potentials in the round goby, but not in the goldfish. Cross-adaptation analysis demonstrated that round gobies discriminated between11-O-ETIO and 11-O-ETIO-3-s (as well as etiocholanolone, ETIO) at the sensory level. Second messenger cascades depending on both cAMP and IP(3) were inferred for steroids from pharmacological inhibition studies, while the canonical teleost odors taurocholic acid (a bile acid) and L: -alanine (an amino acid) used only cAMP and IP(3), respectively. The round goby presents itself as an excellent species for the study of olfactory function of fish in the wild, given its possible use of these released steroids as pheromones.

  6. Olfactory drug effects approached from human-derived data.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Knothe, Claudia; Lippmann, Catharina; Ultsch, Alfred; Hummel, Thomas; Walter, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    The complexity of the sense of smell makes adverse olfactory effects of drugs highly likely, which can impact a patient's quality of life. Here, we present a bioinformatics approach that identifies drugs with potential olfactory effects by connecting drug target expression patterns in human olfactory tissue with drug-related information and the underlying molecular drug targets taken from publically available databases. We identified 71 drugs with listed olfactory effects and 147 different targets. Taking the target-based approach further, we found additional drugs with potential olfactory effects, including 152 different substances interacting with genes expressed in the human olfactory bulb. Our proposed bioinformatics approach provides plausible hypotheses about mechanistic drug effects for drug discovery and repurposing and, thus, would be appropriate for use during drug development.

  7. Localization of neurotrophin receptors in olfactory epithelium and bulb.

    PubMed

    Deckner, M L; Frisén, J; Verge, V M; Hökfelt, T; Risling, M

    1993-12-13

    We used in situ hybridization to localize trk, trkB and trkC mRNA, in rat and cat olfactory bulb. Expression of mRNA encoding truncated trkB receptors was seen in all layers, while only very modest full-length trkB expression could be detected. trkC hybridization was seen in all layers, most dense in the mitral cell layer. The localization of full-length tyrosine kinase trkB receptor in olfactory bulb and epithelium was examined with immunohistochemistry. trkB-like immunoreactivity was seen in the fila olfactoria, epithelium and in vitro, in olfactory sensory neurones. Since BDNF is expressed by olfactory sensory neurone target cells in the olfactory bulb, these data suggest that BDNF may act as a target derived neurotrophic factor in the primary olfactory system.

  8. Neural Sensitivity to Odorants in Deprived and Normal Olfactory Bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Francisco B.; Huerta, Ramón; Aylwin, Maria de la Luz

    2013-01-01

    Early olfactory deprivation in rodents is accompanied by an homeostatic regulation of the synaptic connectivity in the olfactory bulb (OB). However, its consequences in the neural sensitivity and discrimination have not been elucidated. We compared the odorant sensitivity and discrimination in early sensory deprived and normal OBs in anesthetized rats. We show that the deprived OB exhibits an increased sensitivity to different odorants when compared to the normal OB. Our results indicate that early olfactory stimulation enhances discriminability of the olfactory stimuli. We found that deprived olfactory bulbs adjusts the overall excitatory and inhibitory mitral cells (MCs) responses to odorants but the receptive fields become wider than in the normal olfactory bulbs. Taken together, these results suggest that an early natural sensory stimulation sharpens the receptor fields resulting in a larger discrimination capability. These results are consistent with previous evidence that a varied experience with odorants modulates the OB's synaptic connections and increases MCs selectivity. PMID:23580211

  9. Antennal transcriptome and differential expression of olfactory genes in the yellow peach moth, Conogethes punctiferalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Hai-Xiang; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Min-Zhao; Wei, Chun-Hua; Qin, Xiao-Chun; Ji, Wei-Rong; Falabella, Patrizia; Du, Yan-Li

    2016-01-01

    The yellow peach moth (YPM), Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée), is a multivoltine insect pest of crops and fruits. Antennal-expressed receptors are important for insects to detect olfactory cues for host finding, mate attraction and oviposition site selection. However, few olfactory related genes were reported in YPM until now. In the present study, we sequenced and characterized the antennal transcriptomes of male and female YPM. In total, 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 46 putative odorant receptors (ORs) and 7 putative ionotropic receptors (IRs) were annotated and identified as olfactory-related genes of C. punctiferalis. Further analysis of RT-qPCR revealed that all these olfactory genes are primarily or uniquely expressed in male and female antennae. Among which, 3 OBPs (OBP4, OBP8 and PBP2) and 4 ORs (OR22, OR26, OR44 and OR46) were specially expressed in male antennae, whereas 4 ORs (OR5, OR16, OR25 and OR42) were primarily expressed in female antennae. The predicted protein sequences were compared with homologs in other lepidopteran species and model insects, which showed high sequence homologies between C. punctiferalis and O. furnacalis. Our work allows for further functional studies of pheromone and general odorant detection genes, which might be meaningful targets for pest management. PMID:27364081

  10. Olfactory pathogenesis of idiopathic Parkinson disease revisited.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Alicja; Bagic, Anto

    2008-06-15

    Idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) is traditionally considered a movement disorder with hallmark lesions located in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). However, recent histopathological studies of some PD cases suggest the possibility of a multisystem disorder which progresses in a predictable sequence as described in Braak's staging criteria. The disease process starts in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmX) and anterior olfactory nucleus and bulb, and from there, spreads through the brainstem nuclei to ultimately reach the SNpc, which then presents as symptomatic PD. In this article, we would like to revisit the olfactory pathogenesis of PD based on Braak's staging system and review anatomical pathways supporting such a possibility. We also suggest some biomarkers for early stages of PD. Additionally, we present and discuss the possibility that a prion-like process underlies the neurodegenerative changes in PD.

  11. Olfactory Orientation and Navigation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lucia F.; Arter, Jennifer; Cook, Amy; Sulloway, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Although predicted by theory, there is no direct evidence that an animal can define an arbitrary location in space as a coordinate location on an odor grid. Here we show that humans can do so. Using a spatial match-to-sample procedure, humans were led to a random location within a room diffused with two odors. After brief sampling and spatial disorientation, they had to return to this location. Over three conditions, participants had access to different sensory stimuli: olfactory only, visual only, and a final control condition with no olfactory, visual, or auditory stimuli. Humans located the target with higher accuracy in the olfaction-only condition than in the control condition and showed higher accuracy than chance. Thus a mechanism long proposed for the homing pigeon, the ability to define a location on a map constructed from chemical stimuli, may also be a navigational mechanism used by humans. PMID:26083337

  12. Mirror Sniffing: Humans Mimic Olfactory Sampling Behavior

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ample evidence suggests that social chemosignaling plays a significant role in human behavior. Processing of odors and chemosignals depends on sniffing. Given this, we hypothesized that humans may have evolved an automatic mechanism driving sniffs in response to conspecific sniffing. To test this, we measured sniffing behavior of human subjects watching the movie Perfume, which contains many olfactory sniffing events. Despite the total absence of odor, observers sniffed when characters in the movie sniffed. Moreover, this effect was most pronounced in scenes where subjects heard the sniff but did not see the sniffed-at object. We liken this response to the orienting towards conspecific gaze in vision and argue that its robustness further highlights the significance of olfactory information processing in human behavior. PMID:24457159

  13. Subthreshold olfactory stimulation can enhance sweetness.

    PubMed

    Labbe, D; Rytz, A; Morgenegg, C; Ali, S; Martin, N

    2007-03-01

    The impact of olfactory perception on sweetness was explored in a model solution using odorants at subthreshold concentrations. First, the impact of 6 odorants, previously described in the literature as congruent with sweetness, was investigated at suprathreshold level in a sucrose solution. Ethyl butyrate and maltol were selected as they had the highest and the lowest sweetness-enhancing properties, respectively. Second, the impact on sweetness of the 2 odorants was investigated at subthreshold concentrations. A system delivering a continuous liquid flow at the same sucrose level, but with varying odorant concentrations, was used. At a subthreshold level, ethyl butyrate but not maltol significantly enhanced the sweetness of the sucrose solution. This study highlights that olfactory perception induced by odorants at a subthreshold level can significantly modulate taste perception. Finally, contrary to results observed with ethyl butyrate at suprathreshold levels, at subthreshold levels, the intensity of sweetness enhancement was not proportional to ethyl butyrate concentration.

  14. Mirror sniffing: humans mimic olfactory sampling behavior.

    PubMed

    Arzi, Anat; Shedlesky, Limor; Secundo, Lavi; Sobel, Noam

    2014-05-01

    Ample evidence suggests that social chemosignaling plays a significant role in human behavior. Processing of odors and chemosignals depends on sniffing. Given this, we hypothesized that humans may have evolved an automatic mechanism driving sniffs in response to conspecific sniffing. To test this, we measured sniffing behavior of human subjects watching the movie Perfume, which contains many olfactory sniffing events. Despite the total absence of odor, observers sniffed when characters in the movie sniffed. Moreover, this effect was most pronounced in scenes where subjects heard the sniff but did not see the sniffed-at object. We liken this response to the orienting towards conspecific gaze in vision and argue that its robustness further highlights the significance of olfactory information processing in human behavior.

  15. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  16. Olfactory kin recognition in a songbird.

    PubMed

    Krause, E Tobias; Krüger, Oliver; Kohlmeier, Philip; Caspers, Barbara A

    2012-06-23

    The ability to recognize close relatives in order to cooperate or to avoid inbreeding is widespread across all taxa. One accepted mechanism for kin recognition in birds is associative learning of visual or acoustic cues. However, how could individuals ever learn to recognize unfamiliar kin? Here, we provide the first evidence for a novel mechanism of kin recognition in birds. Zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) fledglings are able to distinguish between kin and non-kin based on olfactory cues alone. Since olfactory cues are likely to be genetically based, this finding establishes a neglected mechanism of kin recognition in birds, particularly in songbirds, with potentially far-reaching consequences for both kin selection and inbreeding avoidance.

  17. Endocannabinoid modulation in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Esther; Czesnik, Dirk; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Manzini, Ivan; Schild, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    Appetite, food intake, and energy balance are closely linked to the endocannabinoid system in the central nervous system. Now, endocannabinoid modulation has been discovered in the peripheral olfactory system of larval Xenopus laevis. The endocannabinoid 2-AG has been shown to influence odorant-detection thresholds according to the hunger state of the animal. Hungry animals have increased 2-AG levels due to enhanced synthesis of 2-AG in sustentacular supporting cells. This renders olfactory receptor neurons, exhibiting CB1 receptors, more sensitive at detecting lower odorant concentrations, which probably helps the animal to locate food. Since taste and vision are also influenced by endocannabinoids, this kind of modulation might boost sensory inputs of food in hungry animals.

  18. Divisive normalization in olfactory population codes

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shawn R; Bhandawat, Vikas; Wilson, Rachel Irene

    2010-01-01

    In many regions of the visual system, the activity of a neuron is normalized by the activity of other neurons in the same region. Here we show that a similar normalization occurs during olfactory processing in the Drosophila antennal lobe. We exploit the orderly anatomy of this circuit to independently manipulate feedforward and lateral input to second-order projection neurons (PNs). Lateral inhibition increases the level of feedforward input needed to drive PNs to saturation, and this normalization scales with the total activity of the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) population. Increasing total ORN activity also makes PN responses more transient. Strikingly, a model with just two variables (feedforward and total ORN activity) accurately predicts PN odor responses. Finally, we show that discrimination by a linear decoder is facilitated by two complementary transformations: the saturating transformation intrinsic to each processing channel boosts weak signals, while normalization helps equalize responses to different stimuli. PMID:20435004

  19. Descriptive epidemiology of selected olfactory tumors.

    PubMed

    Villano, J Lee; Bressler, Linda; Propp, Jennifer M; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Martin, Iman K; Dolecek, Therese A; McCarthy, Bridget J

    2010-10-01

    Olfactory tumors, especially olfactory neuroblastomas (ON) and carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation (CND), are extremely rare, and little descriptive epidemiologic information is available. The objective of this study was to more fully describe selected olfactory tumors using a large population-based cancer incidence database. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 9 registries limited-use data were reviewed from 1973 to 2006 for selected nasal cavity (C30.0) and accessory sinus (C31.0-31.9) tumors. Frequencies, incidence rates, and relative survival rates were estimated using SEER*Stat, v6.5.2. The majority of cases were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), while the incidence of ON was greater than CND. For ON, the incidence was highest in the 60-79 year age group, while for SCC, the incidence was highest in the 80+ year age group. For CND, the incidence leveled off in the oldest age groups. Survival rates were highest for ON (>70% alive at 5 years after diagnosis) and poorest for CND (44% alive at 5 years). Adjuvant radiation therapy did not improve survival over surgery alone in ON. In SCC, survival was worse in patients who received adjuvant radiation compared to patients who had surgery alone. Our analysis confirms some previously published information, and adds new information about the incidence and demographics of ON and CND. In addition, our analysis documents the lack of benefit of adjuvant radiation in ON. It is not feasible to conduct prospective trials in patients with these rare diseases, and the importance of registry data in learning about olfactory tumors is emphasized.

  20. Olfactory Stimuli Increase Presence in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Munyan, Benson G.; Neer, Sandra M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Jentsch, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure therapy (EXP) is the most empirically supported treatment for anxiety and trauma-related disorders. EXP consists of repeated exposure to a feared object or situation in the absence of the feared outcome in order to extinguish associated anxiety. Key to the success of EXP is the need to present the feared object/event/situation in as much detail and utilizing as many sensory modalities as possible, in order to augment the sense of presence during exposure sessions. Various technologies used to augment the exposure therapy process by presenting multi-sensory cues (e.g., sights, smells, sounds). Studies have shown that scents can elicit emotionally charged memories, but no prior research has examined the effect of olfactory stimuli upon the patient’s sense of presence during simulated exposure tasks. Methods 60 adult participants navigated a mildly anxiety-producing virtual environment (VE) similar to those used in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Participants had no autobiographical memory associated with the VE. State anxiety, Presence ratings, and electrodermal (EDA) activity were collected throughout the experiment. Results Utilizing a Bonferroni corrected Linear Mixed Model, our results showed statistically significant relationships between olfactory stimuli and presence as assessed by both the Igroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ: R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 6.625, p = 0.0007) and a single item visual-analogue scale (R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 5.382, p = 0.0027). State anxiety was unaffected by the presence or absence of olfactory cues. EDA was unaffected by experimental condition. Conclusion Olfactory stimuli increase presence in virtual environments that approximate those typical in exposure therapy, but did not increase EDA. Additionally, once administered, the removal of scents resulted in a disproportionate decrease in presence. Implications for incorporating the use of scents to increase the efficacy of exposure therapy is discussed. PMID

  1. Profound Olfactory Dysfunction in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Bayona, Edgardo A.; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Osman, Allen; Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease strongly identified with deficient acetylcholine receptor transmission at the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction, is accompanied by a profound loss of olfactory function. Twenty-seven MG patients, 27 matched healthy controls, and 11 patients with polymiositis, a disease with peripheral neuromuscular symptoms analogous to myasthenia gravis with no known central nervous system involvement, were tested. All were administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Picture Identification Test (PIT), a test analogous in content and form to the UPSIT designed to control for non-olfactory cognitive confounds. The UPSIT scores of the myasthenia gravis patients were markedly lower than those of the age- and sex-matched normal controls [respective means (SDs) = 20.15 (6.40) & 35.67 (4.95); p<0.0001], as well as those of the polymiositis patients who scored slightly below the normal range [33.30 (1.42); p<0.0001]. The latter finding, along with direct monitoring of the inhalation of the patients during testing, implies that the MG-related olfactory deficit is unlikely due to difficulties sniffing, per se. All PIT scores were within or near the normal range, although subtle deficits were apparent in both the MG and PM patients, conceivably reflecting influences of mild cognitive impairment. No relationships between performance on the UPSIT and thymectomy, time since diagnosis, type of treatment regimen, or the presence or absence of serum anti-nicotinic or muscarinic antibodies were apparent. Our findings suggest that MG influences olfactory function to the same degree as observed in a number of neurodegenerative diseases in which central nervous system cholinergic dysfunction has been documented. PMID:23082113

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Olfactory Responses to Stimulus Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-26

    addition, the recent molecular cloning of the olfactory neuron-specific G- protein, Golf, from rat olfactory epithelium (25), has prompted a re-evaluation... molecular cloning of a G-protein that is exclusively expressed within olfactory neurons (25) prompted a re-evaluation of the molecular identities of...Fritsch, E.F. and Maniatis, T. (1989) Plasmid vectors. In Molecular Cloning : A Laboratory Manual, pp. 1.1-1.110. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold

  3. Common volatiles are major attractants for neonate larvae of the specialist flea beetle Altica koreana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Huai-Jun; Yang, Xing-Ke

    2008-07-01

    Olfactory stimuli play an important role in the host searching of larval phytophagous insects. Previous studies indicate that larvae that have to find feeding sites after hatching are generally attracted to host volatiles. However, there are few studies on the olfactory responses of neonate larvae to host volatiles in cases when those larvae hatched on the host plant. In the present study, we determined the olfactory responses of neonate larvae of the specialist flea beetle, Altica koreana Ogloblin, to host and six non-host plants, using a static-air “arena.” Larvae responded significantly to the host plant Potentilla chinensis Ser. and five of six non-host plants, compared to the control. Larvae did not prefer the host plant over the non-host plants (except Artemisia sp.) when offered a choice. Additionally, odours of a non-host plant, which were unattractive to neonate larvae, may have masked the attractive odour of the host plant. These results indicate that common volatiles can play a major role in attracting larvae of this specialist to plants, but attraction to such odours may not be the major mechanism of host choice.

  4. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry extending from the site(s) of acquisition to the site(s) controlling memory expression? (3) How is information processed across this circuit to consolidate early-forming, disruptable memories to stable, late memories? Much progress has been made and a few strong conclusions have emerged: (1) Acquisition occurs at multiple sites within the olfactory nervous system but is mediated predominantly by the γ mushroom body neurons. (2) The expression of long-term memory is completely dependent on the synaptic output of α/β mushroom body neurons. (3) Consolidation occurs, in part, through circuit interactions between mushroom body and dorsal paired medial neurons. Despite this progress, a complete and unified model that details the pathway from acquisition to memory expression remains elusive. PMID:25225297

  5. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M.; Bobkov, Yuriy V.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Ache, Barry W.; Principe, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal’s ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments—a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  6. Zonal organization of the mammalian main and accessory olfactory systems.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, K; von Campenhause, H; Yoshihara, Y

    2000-01-01

    Zonal organization is one of the characteristic features observed in both main and accessory olfactory systems. In the main olfactory system, most of the odorant receptors are classified into four groups according to their zonal expression patterns in the olfactory epithelium. Each group of odorant receptors is expressed by sensory neurons distributed within one of four circumscribed zones. Olfactory sensory neurons in a given zone of the epithelium project their axons to the glomeruli in a corresponding zone of the main olfactory bulb. Glomeruli in the same zone tend to represent similar odorant receptors having similar tuning specificity to odorants. Vomeronasal receptors (or pheromone receptors) are classified into two groups in the accessory olfactory system. Each group of receptors is expressed by vomeronasal sensory neurons in either the apical or basal zone of the vomeronasal epithelium. Sensory neurons in the apical zone project their axons to the rostral zone of the accessory olfactory bulb and form synaptic connections with mitral tufted cells belonging to the rostral zone. Signals originated from basal zone sensory neurons are sent to mitral tufted cells in the caudal zone of the accessory olfactory bulb. We discuss functional implications of the zonal organization in both main and accessory olfactory systems. PMID:11205342

  7. Olfactory performance in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 patients.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Victor; Diaz, Rosalinda; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-05-01

    A large body of evidence has shown olfactory deficits in many neurodegenerative diseases. However, the nature of the olfactory impairment remains poorly understood partly because the majority of studies have only explored smell identification capabilities. The purpose of the present study was twofold. First we wanted to test if patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and visual loss, also have olfactory deficits. Secondly, we wanted to test the nature of the olfactory deficits by testing not only the identification level but also olfactory threshold and discrimination. Based on the olfactory dysfunction found in different neurodegenerative diseases and functional neuroimaging data showing cerebellar activation during olfaction, we hypothesized that SCA7 patients would show an olfactory impairment. To test this hypothesis we studied twenty-eight genetically confirmed SCA7 patients and twenty-seven matched controls using the Sniffing Sticks Test and the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). The results show that SCA7 patients' ability to discriminate and identify odors is significantly impaired, although their odor detection thresholds were at normal levels. These results suggest that SCA7 neurological damage affects olfactory perception but spares the patients' olfactory sensory capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated with olfactory neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yumusakhuylu, Ali Cemal; Binnetoglu, Adem; Topuz, Muhammet Fatih; Bozkurtlar, Emine Baş; Baglam, Tekin; Sari, Murat

    2013-11-01

    This study reports a patient having olfactory neuroblastoma complicated by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Olfactory neuroblastoma is a rare tumor that begins in the olfactory membrane. Only 10 cases have been reported previously. Because of having nonspecific symptoms, most patients manifest at an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. Olfactory neuroblastoma may show local invasion and/or distant metastasis. We demonstrated preoperatively clinical and biochemical parameters consistent with antidiuretic hormone syndrome turned to normal ranges after the treatment. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are the choices of treatment; among these, surgery is an indispensible treatment.

  9. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Arthur W; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line.

  10. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  11. The Measurement of Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, James C.; McCain, Thomas A.

    This paper reports a factor analytic investigation of the interpersonal attraction construct. Two hundred-fifteen subjects completed 30 Likert-type, 7-step scales concerning an acquaintance. Factor analysis indicated three dimensions of the interpersonal attraction construct which were labeled "task,""social," and "physical." Obtained internal…

  12. Physical Attractiveness and Courtship Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gregory L.

    1980-01-01

    Among college students who were casual or serious daters, greater relative attractiveness was positively correlated with greater relative availability of opposite-sexed friends and negatively correlated with worrying about partner's potential involvement with others. A 9-month follow-up revealed that similarity of attractiveness was predictive of…

  13. Physical Attractiveness and Counseling Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1982-01-01

    Searched for interaction between quality of counseling skills (presence or absence of empathy, genuineness, and positive regard) and physical attractiveness as determinants of counseling effectiveness. Attractiveness influenced perceived effectiveness of counselor's skill. Analyses of expectancy data revealed that only with good skills did…

  14. Personality Mediators of Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles D.; And Others

    The current study was an examination of the effect of personality variables on the relationship between attitude disagreement and attraction. Attraction was measured in a neutral situation, designed to maximize any existing affective predispositions toward attitude agreement-disagreements. Subjects were placed in an ambiguous face-to-face…

  15. AIM: Attracting Women into Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Icial S.

    1995-01-01

    Addresses how to attract more college women into the sciences. Attracting Women into Sciences (AIM) is a comprehensive approach that begins with advising, advertising, and ambiguity. The advising process includes dispelling stereotypes and reviewing the options open to a female basic science major. Interaction, involvement and instruction, finding…

  16. Physical Attractiveness and Counseling Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1982-01-01

    Searched for interaction between quality of counseling skills (presence or absence of empathy, genuineness, and positive regard) and physical attractiveness as determinants of counseling effectiveness. Attractiveness influenced perceived effectiveness of counselor's skill. Analyses of expectancy data revealed that only with good skills did…

  17. Aethina tumida (Coleoptera:Nitidulidae) attraction to volatiles produced by Apis mellifera(Hymenoptera: Apidae) and Bombus impatiens (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, small hive beetle attraction to whole honey bee and bumble bee colony volatiles as well as volatiles from individual colony components was investigated using four-way olfactometer choice tests. This was done to determine the role olfactory cues play in SHB host location and differenti...

  18. Semi-field evaluation of several novel alkenol analogs of 1-octen-3-ol as attractants to adult Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The compound 1-octen-3-ol is a known attractant of some mosquito species which has led to the hypothesis that olfactory stimulation by this alkenol may be associated with the following structural elements: a terminal site of unsaturation or high electron density, a structural capability for hydroge...

  19. Application of the European Test of Olfactory Capabilities in patients with olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Joussain, P; Bessy, M; Faure, F; Bellil, D; Landis, B N; Hugentobler, M; Tuorila, H; Mustonen, S; Vento, S I; Delphin-Combe, F; Krolak-Salmon, P; Rouby, C; Bensafi, M

    2016-02-01

    A central issue in olfaction concerns the characterization of loss of olfactory function: partial (hyposmia) or total (anosmia). This paper reports the application in a clinical setting of the European Test of Olfactory Capabilities (ETOC), combining odor detection and identification. The study included three phases. In phase 1, anosmics, hyposmics and controls were tested with the 16-items version of the ETOC. In phase 2, a short version of the ETOC was developed: patients with and controls without olfactory impairment were tested on a 6-items ETOC. In phase 3, to predict olfactory impairments in new individuals, the 16-items ETOC was administered on samples of young and older adults, and the 6-items version was applied in samples of young, elderly participants and Alzheimer patients. In phase 1, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of ETOC scores classified patients and controls with 87.5 % accuracy. In phase 2, LDA provided 84 % correct classification. Results of phase 3 revealed: (1) 16-items ETOC: whereas in young adults, 10 % were classified as hyposmic and 90 % as normosmic, in elderly, 1 % were classified as anosmic, 39 % hyposmic and 60 % normosmic; (2) 6-items ETOC: 15 % of the young adults were classified as having olfactory impairment, compared to 28 % in the older group and 83 % in Alzheimer patients. In conclusion, the ETOC enables characterizing the prevalence of olfactory impairment in young subjects and in normal and pathological aging. Whereas the 16-items ETOC is more discriminant, the short ETOC may provide a fast (5-10 min) tool to assess olfaction in clinical settings.

  20. Olfactory Processing and Behavior Downstream from Highly Selective Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schlief, Michelle L.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2010-01-01

    In either the vertebrate nose or the insect antenna, most olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) respond to multiple odors. However, some ORNs respond to just a single odor, or at most to a few highly related odors. It has been hypothesized that narrowly-tuned ORNs project to narrowly-tuned neurons in the brain, and that these dedicated circuits mediate innate behavioral responses to a particular ligand. Here we have investigated neural activity and behavior downstream from two narrowly-tuned ORN types in Drosophila. We found that genetically ablating either of these ORN types impairs innate behavioral attraction to their cognate ligand. Neurons in the antennal lobe postsynaptic to one of these ORN types are, like their presynaptic ORNs, narrowly tuned to a pheromone. However, neurons postsynaptic to the second ORN type are broadly tuned. These results demonstrate that some narrowly-tuned ORNs project to dedicated central circuits, ensuring a tight connection between stimulus and behavior, whereas others project to central neurons which participate in the ensemble representations of many odors. PMID:17417635

  1. African Perceptions of Female Attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Vinet; Faerber, Stella J.; Greeff, Jaco M.; Lefevre, Carmen E.; Re, Daniel E.; Perrett, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about mate choice preferences outside Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic societies, even though these Western populations may be particularly unrepresentative of human populations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to test which facial cues contribute to African perceptions of African female attractiveness and also the first study to test the combined role of facial adiposity, skin colour (lightness, yellowness and redness), skin homogeneity and youthfulness in the facial attractiveness preferences of any population. Results show that youthfulness, skin colour, skin homogeneity and facial adiposity significantly and independently predict attractiveness in female African faces. Younger, thinner women with a lighter, yellower skin colour and a more homogenous skin tone are considered more attractive. These findings provide a more global perspective on human mate choice and point to a universal role for these four facial cues in female facial attractiveness. PMID:23144734

  2. African perceptions of female attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Vinet; Faerber, Stella J; Greeff, Jaco M; Lefevre, Carmen E; Re, Daniel E; Perrett, David I

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about mate choice preferences outside Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic societies, even though these Western populations may be particularly unrepresentative of human populations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to test which facial cues contribute to African perceptions of African female attractiveness and also the first study to test the combined role of facial adiposity, skin colour (lightness, yellowness and redness), skin homogeneity and youthfulness in the facial attractiveness preferences of any population. Results show that youthfulness, skin colour, skin homogeneity and facial adiposity significantly and independently predict attractiveness in female African faces. Younger, thinner women with a lighter, yellower skin colour and a more homogenous skin tone are considered more attractive. These findings provide a more global perspective on human mate choice and point to a universal role for these four facial cues in female facial attractiveness.

  3. A natural odor attraction between lactic acid bacteria and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Im; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Subbammal Kalichamy, Saraswathi; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Il Lee, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Animal predators can track prey using their keen sense of smell. The bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans employs sensitive olfactory sensory neurons that express vertebrate-like odor receptors to locate bacteria. C. elegans displays odor-related behaviors such as attraction, aversion and adaptation, but the ecological significance of these behaviors is not known. Using a combination of food microbiology and genetics, we elucidate a possible predator–prey relationship between C. elegans and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in rotting citrus fruit. LAB produces the volatile odor diacetyl as an oxidized by-product of fermentation in the presence of citrate. We show that C. elegans is attracted to LAB when grown on citrate media or Citrus medica L, commonly known as yuzu, a citrus fruit native to East Asia, and this attraction is mediated by the diacetyl odor receptor, ODR-10. We isolated a wild LAB strain and a wild C. elegans-related nematode from rotten yuzu, and demonstrate that the wild nematode was attracted to the diacetyl produced by LAB. These results not only identify an ecological function for a C. elegans olfactory behavior, but contribute to the growing understanding of ecological relationships between the microbial and metazoan worlds. PMID:26241504

  4. A natural odor attraction between lactic acid bacteria and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Im; Yoon, Kyoung-Hye; Subbammal Kalichamy, Saraswathi; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Il Lee, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Animal predators can track prey using their keen sense of smell. The bacteriovorous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans employs sensitive olfactory sensory neurons that express vertebrate-like odor receptors to locate bacteria. C. elegans displays odor-related behaviors such as attraction, aversion and adaptation, but the ecological significance of these behaviors is not known. Using a combination of food microbiology and genetics, we elucidate a possible predator-prey relationship between C. elegans and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in rotting citrus fruit. LAB produces the volatile odor diacetyl as an oxidized by-product of fermentation in the presence of citrate. We show that C. elegans is attracted to LAB when grown on citrate media or Citrus medica L, commonly known as yuzu, a citrus fruit native to East Asia, and this attraction is mediated by the diacetyl odor receptor, ODR-10. We isolated a wild LAB strain and a wild C. elegans-related nematode from rotten yuzu, and demonstrate that the wild nematode was attracted to the diacetyl produced by LAB. These results not only identify an ecological function for a C. elegans olfactory behavior, but contribute to the growing understanding of ecological relationships between the microbial and metazoan worlds.

  5. Strategies of a bark beetle, Pityogenes bidentatus, in an olfactory landscape.

    PubMed

    Byers, J A; Zhang, Q H; Birgersson, G

    2000-11-01

    Volatiles from leaves or bark of nonhost birch (Betula pendula) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) dramatically reduced the attraction of the bark beetle, Pityogenes bidentatus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), to their aggregation pheromone components (cis-verbenol and grandisol) in the field. In addition, odors from both the needles and bark of the host Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) similarly inhibited attraction. Monoterpenes of pine and spruce (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, terpinolene, and 3-carene) as well as ethanol, chalcogran and some nonhost green leaf alcohols [(Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, and 1-hexanol], also reduced catches. Collections of volatiles from the field-tested plant tissues indicated they released monoterpenes in amounts similar to the synthetics that inhibited responses. The various plant and insect sources of these inhibitory compounds indicate that P. bidentatus bark beetles have evolved several strategies to increase their fitness by avoiding nonhost and unsuitable host trees in a complex olfactory landscape.

  6. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Pyter, Leah M; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  7. Photoperiod Mediated Changes in Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis and Olfactory Behavior in Male White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus. PMID:22912730

  8. The olfactory apparatus of the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus): fine structure and presence of a septal olfactory organ.

    PubMed Central

    Kratzing, J E

    1978-01-01

    The structure and extent of olfactory epithelium in the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus) were examined by light and electron microscopy. Sensory epithelium covers most of the dorsal conchae, though non-sensory epithelium lines ventrally facing scrolls. The middle conchae are partly covered by olfactory epithelium, the proportion of olfactory to ciliated respiratory epithelium increasing caudally. Ventral conchae are lined by non-sensory ciliated epithelium. The nasal septum ends short of the floor of the nasal cavity in its caudal two thirds. It is covered dorsally by olfactory epithelium. The ventral margin has rounded lateral extensions which carry the isolated strips of olfactory epithelium which form the septal olfactory organ. The fine structure of the olfactory epithelium is the same in all areas. Cell types include olfactory receptors, supporting cells, two types of basal cell and rarer pale and brush cells. There is considerable morphological variation in olfactory cells, and evidence suggestive of continuing turnover in the receptor cell population. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:640961

  9. α-Synuclein in the olfactory system of a mouse model of Parkinson's disease: correlation with olfactory projections.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-04-01

    Olfactory deficits are an early feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Neuropathologically, α-synucleinopathy (Lewy bodies and neurites) is observed earlier (stage 1) in the olfactory system than in the substantia nigra (stage 3), and this could underlies the early olfactory symptoms. In the present report, we analyzed the distribution of α-synuclein deposits in tertiary olfactory structures (anterior olfactory nucleus, olfactory tubercle, piriform cortex, posterolateral cortical amygdala and lateral entorhinal cortex) of homozygous transgenic mice (aged 2-8 months) overexpressing the human A53T variant of α-synuclein. To address the hypothesis of progressive α-synucleinopathy within the olfactory system, the distribution of α-synuclein was analyzed in conjunction with tracer injections into the main olfactory bulb. The time-course of α-synuclein expression revealed a significant increase in the piriform cortex at the age of 8 months compared to other brain structures. Tracing experiments revealed that olfactory projections are reduced in homozygous as compared to wild type animals. Double-labeling experiments show labeled axonal collaterals of mitral cells entering layer II of the piriform cortex in close proximity to α-synuclein-positive cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study addressing the progression of α-synuclein expression in a vulnerable neuronal pathway in PD.

  10. Interneurons and beta-amyloid in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory tubercle in APPxPS1 transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; De La Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2013-09-01

    Impaired olfaction has been described as an early symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuroanatomical changes underlying this deficit in the olfactory system are largely unknown. Given that interneuron populations are crucial in olfactory information processing, we have quantitatively analyzed somatostatin- (SOM), parvalbumin- (PV), and calretinin-expressing (CR) cells in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and olfactory tubercle in PS1 x APP double transgenic mice model of AD. The experiments were performed in wild type and double transgenic homozygous animal groups of 2, 4, 6, and 8 months of age to analyze early stages of the pathology. In addition, beta-amyloid (Aβ) expression and its correlation with SOM cells have been quantified under confocal microscopy. The results indicate increasing expressions of Aβ with aging as well as an early fall of SOM and CR expression, whereas PV was decreased later in the disease progression. These observations evidence an early, preferential vulnerability of SOM and CR cells in rostral olfactory structures during AD that may be useful to unravel neural basis of olfactory deficits associated to this neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Presentation of Olfactory-Trigeminal Mixed Stimuli Increases the Response to Subsequent Olfactory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Walliczek-Dworschak, Ute; Poncelet, Johan; Baum, Daniel; Baki, Ramona; Sinding, Charlotte; Warr, Jonathan; Hummel, Thomas

    2017-01-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of (1) the addition of trigeminal stimuli to an olfactory stimulus and (2) the congruence in the odorous mixture after repeated odor presentation. Twenty-five normosmic volunteers were enrolled and presented stimulation blocks, consisting of three habituation stimuli (H) (orange odor), one dishabituation (DH) (control condition, orange odor; congruent condition, orange odor + CO2; incongruent condition, orange odor + l-isopulegol), and one dishabituated stimulus (D) (orange odor). Olfactory event-related potentials were analyzed. Response amplitudes differed significantly in the incongruent condition (N1P2 between H3 and D; peak to peak N1P2 at electrode positions Cz, Fz, and Pz; response amplitudes between H3 and DH). The addition of CO2 modified the perception of orange odor, pronouncing a fruity note, whereas the addition of l-isopulegol as a DH pronounced the l-isopulegol note. This study provides evidence that incongruent trigeminal-olfactory stimulants increase the response to subsequent olfactory stimulus.

  12. Olfactory lateralization in homing pigeons: a GPS study on birds released with unilateral olfactory inputs.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna; Filannino, Caterina; Ioalè, Paolo; Pecchia, Tommaso; Wikelski, Martin; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-02-15

    A large body of evidence has shown that pigeons rely on an olfactory-based navigational map when homing from unfamiliar locations. Previous studies on pigeons released with one nostril occluded highlighted an asymmetry in favour of the right nostril, particularly concerning the initial orientation performance of naïve birds. Nevertheless, all pigeons experiencing only unilateral olfactory input showed impaired homing, regardless of the side of the occluded nostril. So far this phenomenon has been documented only by observing the birds' vanishing bearings. In the present work we recorded the flight tracks of pigeons with previous homing experience equipped with a GPS data logger and released from an unfamiliar location with the right or the left nostril occluded. The analysis of the tracks revealed that the flight path of the birds with the right nostril occluded was more tortuous than that of unmanipulated controls. Moreover, the pigeons smelling with the left nostril interrupted their journey significantly more frequently and displayed more exploratory activity than the control birds, e.g. during flights around a stopover site. These data suggest a more important involvement of the right olfactory system in processing the olfactory information needed for the operation of the navigational map.

  13. The complete swine olfactory subgenome: expansion of the olfactory gene repertoire in the pig genome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dinh Truong; Lee, Kyooyeol; Choi, Hojun; Choi, Min-kyeung; Le, Minh Thong; Song, Ning; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Oh, Jae-Wook; Lee, Kyungtae; Kim, Tae-Hun; Park, Chankyu

    2012-11-15

    Insects and animals can recognize surrounding environments by detecting thousands of chemical odorants. Olfaction is a complicated process that begins in the olfactory epithelium with the specific binding of volatile odorant molecules to dedicated olfactory receptors (ORs). OR proteins are encoded by the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We report here the whole genome analysis of the olfactory receptor genes of S. scrofa using conserved OR gene specific motifs and known OR protein sequences from diverse species. We identified 1,301 OR related sequences from the S. scrofa genome assembly, Sscrofa10.2, including 1,113 functional OR genes and 188 pseudogenes. OR genes were located in 46 different regions on 16 pig chromosomes. We classified the ORs into 17 families, three Class I and 14 Class II families, and further grouped them into 349 subfamilies. We also identified inter- and intra-chromosomal duplications of OR genes residing on 11 chromosomes. A significant number of pig OR genes (n = 212) showed less than 60% amino acid sequence similarity to known OR genes of other species. As the genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 covers 99.9% of the pig genome, our analysis represents an almost complete OR gene repertoire from an individual pig genome. We show that S. scrofa has one of the largest OR repertoires, suggesting an expansion of OR genes in the swine genome. A significant number of unique OR genes in the pig genome may suggest the presence of swine specific olfactory stimulation.

  14. Visualizing olfactory learning functional imaging of experience-induced olfactory bulb changes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Max L; Bendahmane, Mounir

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical organization of sensory neuron input allows odor information to be transformed into odorant-specific spatial maps of mitral/tufted cell glomerular activity. In other sensory systems, neuronal representations of sensory stimuli can be reorganized or enhanced following learning or experience. Similarly, several studies have demonstrated both structural and physiological experience-induced changes throughout the olfactory system. As experience-induced changes within this circuit likely serve as an initial site for odor memory formation, the olfactory bulb is an ideal site for optical imaging studies of olfactory learning, as they allow for the visualization of experience-induced changes in the glomerular circuit following learning and how these changes impact of odor representations with the bulb. Presently, optical imaging techniques have been used to visualize experience-induced changes in glomerular odor representations in a variety of paradigms in short-term habituation, chronic odor exposure, and olfactory associative conditioning. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. It’s Not Easy Being Blue: Are There Olfactory and Visual Trade-Offs in Plant Signalling?

    PubMed Central

    Valenta, Kim; Brown, Kevin A.; Melin, Amanda D.; Monckton, Spencer K.; Styler, Sarah A.; Jackson, Derek A.; Chapman, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the signals used by plants to attract seed disperses is a pervasive quest in evolutionary and sensory biology. Fruit size, colour, and odour variation have long been discussed in the controversial context of dispersal syndromes targeting olfactory-oriented versus visually-oriented foragers. Trade-offs in signal investment could impose important physiological constraints on plants, yet have been largely ignored. Here, we measure the reflectance and volatile organic compounds of a community of Malagasy plants and our results indicate that extant plant signals may represent a trade-off between olfactory and chromatic signals. Blue pigments are the most visually-effective – blue is a colour that is visually salient to all known seed dispersing animals within the study system. Additionally, plants with blue-reflecting fruits are less odiferous than plants that reflect primarily in other regions of the colour spectrum. PMID:26115040

  16. A Screen for Genes Expressed in the Olfactory Organs of Drosophila melanogaster Identifies Genes Involved in Olfactory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Narelle E.; Herr, Anabel; de Bruyne, Marien; Warr, Coral G.

    2012-01-01

    Background For insects the sense of smell and associated olfactory-driven behaviours are essential for survival. Insects detect odorants with families of olfactory receptor proteins that are very different to those of mammals, and there are likely to be other unique genes and genetic pathways involved in the function and development of the insect olfactory system. Methodology/Principal Findings We have performed a genetic screen of a set of 505 Drosophila melanogaster gene trap insertion lines to identify novel genes expressed in the adult olfactory organs. We identified 16 lines with expression in the olfactory organs, many of which exhibited expression of the trapped genes in olfactory receptor neurons. Phenotypic analysis showed that six of the lines have decreased olfactory responses in a behavioural assay, and for one of these we showed that precise excision of the P element reverts the phenotype to wild type, confirming a role for the trapped gene in olfaction. To confirm the identity of the genes trapped in the lines we performed molecular analysis of some of the insertion sites. While for many lines the reported insertion sites were correct, we also demonstrated that for a number of lines the reported location of the element was incorrect, and in three lines there were in fact two pGT element insertions. Conclusions/Significance We identified 16 new genes expressed in the Drosophila olfactory organs, the majority in neurons, and for several of the gene trap lines demonstrated a defect in olfactory-driven behaviour. Further characterisation of these genes and their roles in olfactory system function and development will increase our understanding of how the insect olfactory system has evolved to perform the same essential function to that of mammals, but using very different molecular genetic mechanisms. PMID:22530061

  17. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Peng; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Wang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Li-Rong; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR). High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol) i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex (Pir), ventral tenia tecta (VTT), the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt). The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice.

  18. Environmental Esthetics and Interpersonal Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchens, James T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to determine the effects of visual environmental esthetics on interpersonal attraction and concludes that visual esthetics influence participants' perspectives of their partners in live interpersonal communication settings. (MH)

  19. Depression, Schizophrenia, and Social Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, Philip C.; Murray, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    Compared the dysphoric mood induction and attraction that subjects reported after a vicarious experience with a depressed patient and a comparable experience with a schizophrenic patient. Results showed similar arousal of dysphoric mood and rejection for both patients. (RC)

  20. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  1. Dock and Pak regulate olfactory axon pathfinding in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ang, Lay-Hong; Kim, Jenny; Stepensky, Vitaly; Hing, Huey

    2003-04-01

    The convergence of olfactory axons expressing particular odorant receptor (Or) genes on spatially invariant glomeruli in the brain is one of the most dramatic examples of precise axon targeting in developmental neurobiology. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which olfactory axons pathfind to their targets are poorly understood. We report here that the SH2/SH3 adapter Dock and the serine/threonine kinase Pak are necessary for the precise guidance of olfactory axons. Using antibody localization, mosaic analyses and cell-type specific rescue, we observed that Dock and Pak are expressed in olfactory axons and function autonomously in olfactory neurons to regulate the precise wiring of the olfactory map. Detailed analyses of the mutant phenotypes in whole mutants and in small multicellular clones indicate that Dock and Pak do not control olfactory neuron (ON) differentiation, but specifically regulate multiple aspects of axon trajectories to guide them to their cognate glomeruli. Structure/function studies show that Dock and Pak form a signaling pathway that mediates the response of olfactory axons to guidance cues in the developing antennal lobe (AL). Our findings therefore identify a central signaling module that is used by ONs to project to their cognate glomeruli.

  2. Dietary sodium protects fish against copper-induced olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Azizishirazi, Ali; Dew, William A; Bougas, Berenice; Bernatchez, Louis; Pyle, Greg G

    2015-04-01

    Exposure to low concentrations of copper impairs olfaction in fish. To determine the transcriptional changes in the olfactory epithelium induced by copper exposure, wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were exposed to 20 μg/L of copper for 3 and 24h. A novel yellow perch microarray with 1000 candidate genes was used to measure differential gene transcription in the olfactory epithelium. While three hours of exposure to copper changed the transcription of only one gene, the transcriptions of 70 genes were changed after 24h of exposure to copper. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the effect of exposure duration on two specific genes of interest, two sub-units of Na/K-ATPase. At 24 and 48 h, Na/K-ATPase transcription was down-regulated by copper at olfactory rosettes. As copper-induced impairment of Na/K-ATPase activity in gills can be ameliorated by increased dietary sodium, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used to determine if elevated dietary sodium was also protective against copper-induced olfactory impairment. Measurement of the olfactory response of rainbow trout using electro-olfactography demonstrated that sodium was protective of copper-induced olfactory dysfunction. This work demonstrates that the transcriptions of both subunits of Na/K-ATPase in the olfactory epithelium of fish are affected by Cu exposure, and that dietary Na protects against Cu-induced olfactory dysfunction.

  3. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  4. Forward and Back: Motifs of Inhibition in Olfactory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable performance of the olfactory system in classifying and categorizing the complex olfactory environment is built upon several basic neural circuit motifs. These include forms of inhibition that may play comparable roles in widely divergent species. In this issue of Neuron, a new study by Stokes and Isaacson sheds light on how elementary types of inhibition dynamically interact. PMID:20696373

  5. Identity Matching-to-Sample with Olfactory Stimuli in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Tracy; Pitts, Raymond C.; Galizio, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Identity matching-to-sample has been difficult to demonstrate in rats, but most studies have used visual stimuli. There is evidence that rats can acquire complex forms of olfactory stimulus control, and the present study explored the possibility that identity matching might be facilitated in rats if olfactory stimuli were used. Four rats were…

  6. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section 874.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device....

  7. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section 874.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device....

  8. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section 874.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device....

  9. The Odorant Receptor-Dependent Role of Olfactory Marker Protein in Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dibattista, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the nasal cavity detect and transduce odorants into action potentials to be conveyed to the olfactory bulb. Odorants are delivered to ORNs via the inhaled air at breathing frequencies that can vary from 2 to 10 Hz in the mouse. Thus olfactory transduction should occur at sufficient speed such that it can accommodate repetitive and frequent stimulation. Activation of odorant receptors (ORs) leads to adenylyl cyclase III activation, cAMP increase, and opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. This makes the kinetic regulation of cAMP one of the important determinants for the response time course. We addressed the dynamic regulation of cAMP during the odorant response and examined how basal levels of cAMP are controlled. The latter is particularly relevant as basal cAMP depends on the basal activity of the expressed OR and thus varies across ORNs. We found that olfactory marker protein (OMP), a protein expressed in mature ORNs, controls both basal and odorant-induced cAMP levels in an OR-dependent manner. Lack of OMP increases basal cAMP, thus abolishing differences in basal cAMP levels between ORNs expressing different ORs. Moreover, OMP speeds up signal transduction for ORNs to better synchronize their output with high-frequency stimulation and to perceive brief stimuli. Last, OMP also steepens the dose–response relation to improve concentration coding although at the cost of losing responses to weak stimuli. We conclude that OMP plays a key regulatory role in ORN physiology by controlling multiple facets of the odorant response. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Odorant receptors (ORs) form the largest family of G-protein-coupled receptors in mammals and are expressed in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). In this paper we show how the olfactory system ensures that monogenic expression of ORs dictates the response profile and the basal noise of ORNs. Olfactory marker protein (OMP), a protein long known to be expressed in mature ORNs

  10. Creating kampong as tourist attractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, N.; Utama, R.; Hidayat, A. R. T.; Zamrony, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    Tourism attractions become one of the main components and they drive the tourism activity in a region. The quality of tourism attractions would affect tourists’ visits. Tourism power can basically be built on any conditions which can attract people to visit. Towns is full of activities which include their economic, social, cultural and physical features, if they are presented properly, they can be a tourist attraction. Kampung City, as a form of urban settlement, has the potential to be developed as a tourism attraction. Kampung is not only a physical area of housing but it has also productive activities. Even the city’s economic activities are also influenced by the productive activities of its Kampung. The shape of Kampung which varies in physical, social, economic and cultural raises special characteristics of each Kampung. When it is linked with the city’s tourism activities, these special characteristics of course could be one of the attractions to attract tourists. This paper studies about one of Kampung in the Malang City. Administratively located in the Penanggungan Village Lowokwaru District, but the potential will just be focused on RW 4. Main productive activities of this village are pottery. In contrast to ceramics, pottery is made from clay and its uniqueness in color and shape. Based on the history of pottery in the Malang, it is concentrated in Penanggungan Village. But along with its development, pottery is decreasingly in demand and number of craftsmen is dwindling. Based on these circumstances, a concept is prepared to raise the image of the region as the Kampung of pottery and to repack it as a tourism attraction of the city.

  11. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  12. Cytological organization of the alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory limbus

    PubMed Central

    Larriva-Sahd, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the microscopic organization of a wedge-shaped area at the intersection of the main (MOB) and accessory olfactory bulbs (AOBs), or olfactory limbus (OL), and an additional component of the anterior olfactory nucleus or alpha AON that lies underneath of the AOB. The OL consists of a modified bulbar cortex bounded anteriorly by the MOB and posteriorly by the AOB. In Nissl-stained specimens the OL differs from the MOB by a progressive, antero-posterior decrease in thickness or absence of the external plexiform, mitral/tufted cell, and granule cell layers. On cytoarchitectual grounds the OL is divided from rostral to caudal into three distinct components: a stripe of glomerular-free cortex or preolfactory area (PA), a second or necklace glomerular area, and a wedge-shaped or interstitial area (INA) crowned by the so-called modified glomeruli that appear to belong to the anterior AOB. The strategic location and interactions with the main and AOBs, together with the previously noted functional and connectional evidence, suggest that the OL may be related to both sensory modalities. The alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus, a slender cellular cluster (i.e., 650 × 150 μm) paralleling the base of the AOB, contains two neuron types: a pyramidal-like neuron and an interneuron. Dendrites of pyramidal-like cells (P-L) organize into a single bundle that ascends avoiding the AOB to resolve in a trigone bounded by the edge of the OL, the AOB and the dorsal part of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Utrastructurally, the neuropil of the alpha component contains three types of synaptic terminals; one of them immunoreactive to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase, isoform 67. PMID:22754506

  13. Destruction of the main olfactory epithelium reduces female sexual behavior and olfactory investigation in female mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthieu; Douhard, Quentin; Baum, Michael J; Bakker, Julie

    2006-05-01

    We studied the contribution of the main olfactory system to mate recognition and sexual behavior in female mice. Female mice received an intranasal irrigation of either a zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) solution to destroy the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) or saline (SAL) to serve as control. ZnSO4-treated female mice were no longer able to reliably distinguish between volatile as well as nonvolatile odors from an intact versus a castrated male. Furthermore, sexual behavior in mating tests with a sexually experienced male was significantly reduced in ZnSO4-treated female mice. Vomeronasal function did not seem to be affected by ZnSO4 treatment: nasal application of male urine induced similar levels of Fos protein in the mitral and granule cells of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) of ZnSO4 as well as SAL-treated female mice. Likewise, soybean agglutinin staining, which stains the axons of vomeronasal neurons projecting to the glomerular layer of the AOB was similar in ZnSO4-treated female mice compared to SAL-treated female mice. By contrast, a significant reduction of Fos in the main olfactory bulb was observed in ZnSO4-treated females in comparison to SAL-treated animals, confirming a substantial destruction of the MOE. These results show that the MOE is primarily involved in the detection and processing of odors that are used to localize and identify the sex and endocrine status of conspecifics. By contrast, both the main and accessory olfactory systems contribute to female sexual receptivity in female mice.

  14. Destruction of the Main Olfactory Epithelium Reduces Female Sexual Behavior and Olfactory Investigation in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Matthieu; Douhard, Quentin; Baum, Michael J.; Bakker, Julie

    2008-01-01

    We studied the contribution of the main olfactory system to mate recognition and sexual behavior in female mice. Female mice received an intranasal irrigation of either a zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) solution to destroy the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) or saline (SAL) to serve as control. ZnSO4-treated female mice were no longer able to reliably distinguish between volatile as well as nonvolatile odors from an intact versus a castrated male. Furthermore, sexual behavior in mating tests with a sexually experienced male was significantly reduced in ZnSO4-treated female mice. Vomeronasal function did not seem to be affected by ZnSO4 treatment: nasal application of male urine induced similar levels of Fos protein in the mitral and granule cells of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) of ZnSO4 as well as SAL-treated female mice. Likewise, soybean agglutinin staining, which stains the axons of vomeronasal neurons projecting to the glomerular layer of the AOB was similar in ZnSO4-treated female mice compared to SAL-treated female mice. By contrast, a significant reduction of Fos in the main olfactory bulb was observed in ZnSO4-treated females in comparison to SAL-treated animals, confirming a substantial destruction of the MOE. These results show that the MOE is primarily involved in the detection and processing of odors that are used to localize and identify the sex and endocrine status of conspecifics. By contrast, both the main and accessory olfactory systems contribute to female sexual receptivity in female mice. PMID:16484502

  15. Understanding smell--the olfactory stimulus problem.

    PubMed

    Auffarth, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The main problem with sensory processing is the difficulty in relating sensory input to physiological responses and perception. This is especially problematic at higher levels of processing, where complex cues elicit highly specific responses. In olfaction, this relationship is particularly obfuscated by the difficulty of characterizing stimulus statistics and perception. The core questions in olfaction are hence the so-called stimulus problem, which refers to the understanding of the stimulus, and the structure-activity and structure-odor relationships, which refer to the molecular basis of smell. It is widely accepted that the recognition of odorants by receptors is governed by the detection of physico-chemical properties and that the physical space is highly complex. Not surprisingly, ideas differ about how odor stimuli should be classified and about the very nature of information that the brain extracts from odors. Even though there are many measures for smell, there is none that accurately describes all aspects of it. Here, we summarize recent developments in the understanding of olfaction. We argue that an approach to olfactory function where information processing is emphasized could contribute to a high degree to our understanding of smell as a perceptual phenomenon emerging from neural computations. Further, we argue that combined analysis of the stimulus, biology, physiology, and behavior and perception can provide new insights into olfactory function. We hope that the reader can use this review as a competent guide and overview of research activities in olfactory physiology, psychophysics, computation, and psychology. We propose avenues for research, particularly in the systematic characterization of receptive fields and of perception. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Microsurgical removal of olfactory groove meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ri-Sheng; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Mao, Ying; Zhang, Rong; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    To explore an effective method for further improving the surgical results of treatment of olfactory groove meningiomas. Sixty seven cases of olfactory groove meningiomas were treated by microneurosurgery, among which fifty seven were de novo cases, eight were recurrent tumors and the other two re-recurrent cases. Modified Derome approach was used in 12 cases, bilateral subfrontal approach in 28 cases, modified pterional approach in 21 cases and unilateral subfrontal approach in six cases. Tumors were resected microsurgically with radical removal of invaded dura, bone, and paranasal sinus mucosa. Reconstruction was performed in patients with skull base defect. Simpson grade I removal was accomplished in 59 cases, grade II in seven cases and grade IV in one case. Among 57 patients with de novo tumor, Simpson I resection was accomplished in 54 cases. Postoperative rhinorrhea and intracranial infection occurred in one case and was cured after temporal lumbar CSF drainage and antibiotic therapy. Two patients (2.9%) died within one month after operation, i.e.one aged patient of heart failure and the other of severe hypothalamus complication. Forty seven patients (72.3%) were followed up from one to ten years with an average of five years and four months. With the exception of two cases died, among the alive 45 patients, there were only three patients with tumor recurrence, which had undergone Simpson II or IV tumor resection. No recurrence was found in cases with Simpson I tumor removal. Previous blurred vision was not improved in three patients, hemiparalysis in two patients, and the other patients recovered well, resuming previous jobs or being able to take care themselves. Total tumor removal (Simpson I) should be the surgical goal for treatment of olfactory groove meningiomas, especially for de novo cases. An appropriate approach is fundamental in the effort to remove an OGM totally. Appropriate anterior skull base reconstruction with vascularized material is

  17. Hidden consequences of olfactory dysfunction: a patient report series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The negative consequences of olfactory dysfunction for the quality of life are not widely appreciated and the condition is therefore often ignored or trivialized. Methods 1,000 patients with olfactory dysfunction participated in an online study by submitting accounts of their subjective experiences of how they have been affected by their condition. In addition, they were given the chance to answer 43 specific questions about the consequences of their olfactory dysfunction. Results Although there are less practical problems associated with impaired or distorted odor perception than with impairments in visual or auditory perception, many affected individuals report experiencing olfactory dysfunction as a debilitating condition. Smell loss-induced social isolation and smell loss-induced anhedonia can severely affect quality of life. Conclusions Olfactory dysfunction is a serious condition for those affected by it and it deserves more attention from doctors who treat affected patients as well as from scientist who research treatment options. PMID:23875929

  18. The role of olfactory stimulus in adult mammalian neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arisi, Gabriel M; Foresti, Maira L; Mukherjee, Sanjib; Shapiro, Lee A

    2012-02-14

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain in discrete regions related to olfactory sensory signaling and integration. The olfactory receptor cell population is in constant turn-over through local progenitor cells. Also, newborn neurons are added to the olfactory bulbs through a major migratory route from the subventricular zone, the rostral migratory stream. The olfactory bulbs project to different brain structures, including: piriform cortex, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, striatum and hippocampus. These structures play important roles in odor identification, feeding behavior, social interactions, reproductive behavior, behavioral reinforcement, emotional responses, learning and memory. In all of these regions neurogenesis has been described in normal and in manipulated mammalian brain. These data are reviewed in the context of a sensory-behavioral hypothesis on adult neurogenesis that olfactory input modulates neurogenesis in many different regions of the brain.

  19. Olfactory memory formation in Drosophila: from molecular to systems neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald L

    2005-01-01

    The olfactory nervous system of insects and mammals exhibits many similarities, which suggests that the mechanisms for olfactory learning may be shared. Molecular genetic investigations of Drosophila learning have uncovered numerous genes whose gene products are essential for olfactory memory formation. Recent studies of the products of these genes have continued to expand the range of molecular processes known to underlie memory formation. Recent research has also broadened the neuroanatomical areas thought to mediate olfactory learning to include the antennal lobes in addition to a previously accepted and central role for the mushroom bodies. The roles for neurons extrinsic to the mushroom body neurons are becoming better defined. Finally, the genes identified to participate in Drosophila olfactory learning have conserved roles in mammalian organisms, highlighting the value of Drosophila for gene discovery.

  20. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Odorant Receptor from the Southern House Mosquito Narrowly Tuned to the Oviposition Attractant Skatole

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, David T.; Pelletier, Julien; Luetje, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Oviposition attractants are environmental cues that allow Culex gravid female mosquitoes to locate suitable sites for egg-laying and, therefore, may be exploited for environmentally friendly strategies for controlling mosquito populations. Naturally occurring skatole has been identified as an oviposition attractant for the Southern House mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Previously, we identified in Cx. quinquefasciatus female antennae an olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) highly sensitive to skatole and an odorant-binding protein involved in the detection of this semiochemical. Here, we describe the characterization of an odorant receptor (OR), CquiOR10, which is narrowly tuned to skatole when expressed in the Xenopus oocyte system. Odorant-induced response profiles generated by heterologously expressed CquiOR10 suggest that this OR is expressed in the mosquito ORN sensitive to skatole. However, geranylacetone, which stimulates the antennal ORN, was not detected by CquiOR10-expressing oocytes, thus raising interesting questions about reception of oviposition attractants in mosquitoes. PMID:20623327

  2. Odorant receptor from the southern house mosquito narrowly tuned to the oviposition attractant skatole.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David T; Pelletier, Julien; Luetje, Charles W; Leal, Walter S

    2010-08-01

    Oviposition attractants are environmental cues that allow Culex gravid female mosquitoes to locate suitable sites for egg-laying and, therefore, may be exploited for environmentally friendly strategies for controlling mosquito populations. Naturally occurring skatole has been identified as an oviposition attractant for the Southern House mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Previously, we identified in Cx. quinquefasciatus female antennae an olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) highly sensitive to skatole and an odorant-binding protein involved in the detection of this semiochemical. Here, we describe the characterization of an odorant receptor (OR), CquiOR10, which is narrowly tuned to skatole when expressed in the Xenopus oocyte system. Odorant-induced response profiles generated by heterologously expressed CquiOR10 suggest that this OR is expressed in the mosquito ORN sensitive to skatole. However, geranylacetone, which stimulates the antennal ORN, was not detected by CquiOR10-expressing oocytes, thus raising interesting questions about reception of oviposition attractants in mosquitoes.

  3. Remote orbital recurrence of olfactory neuroblastoma (esthesioneuroblastoma).

    PubMed

    Breazzano, Mark P; Lewis, James S; Chambless, Lola B; Rohde, Sarah L; Sobel, Rachel K

    2017-03-31

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is a rare and often locally aggressive malignancy that invades the orbit via local destruction. It is known to recur in a delayed fashion, particularly to the neck lymph nodes. This is a case of a 65-year-old gentleman who presents with recurrence in the orbit and a neck lymph node 19 years after treatment for his initial disease. This report describes the longest known interval in orbital recurrence and should alert the monitoring physician that extreme delays in recurrence can occur.

  4. Canine olfactory detection of malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Leon Frederick; Farmery, Luke; George, Susannah Mary Creighton; Farrant, Paul B J

    2013-01-01

    Our patient is a 75-year-old man who presented after his pet dog licked persistently at an asymptomatic lesion behind his right ear. Examination revealed a nodular lesion in the postauricular sulcus. Histology confirmed malignant melanoma, which was subsequently excised. Canine olfactory detection of human malignancy is a well-documented phenomenon. Advanced olfaction is hypothesised to explain canine detection of bladder, breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, prostate and skin cancers. Further research in this area may facilitate the development of a highly accurate aid to diagnosis for many malignancies, including melanoma. PMID:24127369

  5. Nasal toxicity, carcinogenicity, and olfactory uptake of metals.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W

    2001-01-01

    Occupational exposures to inhalation of certain metal dusts or aerosols can cause loss of olfactory acuity, atrophy of the nasal mucosa, mucosal ulcers, perforated nasal septum, or sinonasal cancer. Anosmia and hyposmia have been observed in workers exposed to Ni- or Cd-containing dusts in alkaline battery factories, nickel refineries, and cadmium industries. Ulcers of the nasal mucosa and perforated nasal septum have been reported in workers exposed to Cr(VI) in chromate production and chrome plating, or to As(III) in arsenic smel