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Sample records for atypical antipsychotics improves

  1. Antipsychotic agents. Gradually improving treatment from the traditional oral neuroleptics to the first atypical depot.

    PubMed

    Möller, H-J

    2005-08-01

    Relapse is one of the key factors in the long-term outcome of schizophrenia. The consequences of relapse are diverse and often unpredictable, and the time to recovery and degree of recovery worsen with each successive relapse. There is now overwhelming evidence that advances in antipsychotic drug treatment have led to significant reductions in the rate of relapse. This review charts the developments that have taken place in antipsychotic therapy from the introduction of depot formulations, through atypical agents, to the development of the first long-acting atypical antipsychotic. Depot formulations of conventional antipsychotics were developed in the 1960s and led to fewer relapses and episodes of hospitalization, compared with oral equivalents. Meta-analysis has confirmed that patients receiving depot antipsychotics experience significantly greater global improvement than those receiving the respective oral agents. Conventional antipsychotics are, however, associated with a range of potentially serious adverse events. The atypical antipsychotics were introduced in the 1990s and have significant advantages over conventional agents with regard to positive and negative symptoms. There is also evidence that atypical agents can reduce the risk of relapse. Importantly, atypical antipsychotics have an improved safety profile compared with older agents, particularly with regard to extrapyramidal symptoms. One disadvantage of atypical agents has been that they are only available in an oral form. The recent development of a long-acting injectable formulation of risperidone means that a new treatment option is available to physicians.

  2. Atypical presentations of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Lind, Cpt Christopher K; Carchedi, Cpt Lisa R; Staudenmeier, Ltc James J; Diebold, Ltc P Carroll J

    2005-06-01

    The atypical antipsychotics have been touted by many as having minimal extrapyramidal symptoms. This case series from the Tripler Army Medical Center Psychiatry Graduate Medical Education Program presents the extrapyramidal symptoms observed with four different atypical antipsychotic medications. Also reviewed are the mechanisms of action that atypical antipsychotics and first-generation antipsychotics use to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia. Cases reviewed include a schizophrenic male patient whose dose of risperidone was doubled from 6mg to 12mg overnight and developed an acute dystonic reaction; a young male patient with a substance-induced psychosis who unintentionally doubled his ziprasidone dose in 24 hours, resulting in an acute dystonic reaction; a young female patient on paroxetine who also recently started olanzapine and had complaints consistent with akathisia that resolved with treatment; and an adolescent female patient on escitalopram for obsessive-compulsive disorder who after starting aripiprazole developed Parkinsonism. All four cases illustrate that even though atypical antipsychotics are less likely to cause extrapyramidal symptoms than their first generation cousins, the physician should be aware that these symptoms may still occur and need to be treated.

  3. Atypical Presentations of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Carchedi, CPT. Lisa R.; Staudenmeier, LTC. James J.; Diebold, LTC(P). Carroll J.

    2005-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotics have been touted by many as having minimal extrapyramidal symptoms. This case series from the Tripler Army Medical Center Psychiatry Graduate Medical Education Program presents the extrapyramidal symptoms observed with four different atypical antipsychotic medications. Also reviewed are the mechanisms of action that atypical antipsychotics and first-generation antipsychotics use to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia. Cases reviewed include a schizophrenic male patient whose dose of risperidone was doubled from 6mg to 12mg overnight and developed an acute dystonic reaction; a young male patient with a substance-induced psychosis who unintentionally doubled his ziprasidone dose in 24 hours, resulting in an acute dystonic reaction; a young female patient on paroxetine who also recently started olanzapine and had complaints consistent with akathisia that resolved with treatment; and an adolescent female patient on escitalopram for obsessive-compulsive disorder who after starting aripiprazole developed Parkinsonism. All four cases illustrate that even though atypical antipsychotics are less likely to cause extrapyramidal symptoms than their first generation cousins, the physician should be aware that these symptoms may still occur and need to be treated. PMID:21152153

  4. Quality improvement in resident education: a pilot project to mitigate metabolic side effects from atypical antipsychotic medications in youth

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This resident physician-led quality improvement project was conducted with aims to improve the health of youth prescribed atypical antipsychotic medications by increasing physician monitoring for metabolic side effects, while simultaneously educating trainees in quality improvement methodology. The plan, do, study, act quality improvement framework was utilized. Baseline metabolic monitoring rates of patients prescribed atypical antipsychotic medications in the two psychiatry resident outpatient clinics were obtained. Rates were stratified based on time on medication (<1 year, ≥1 year) and parameter monitored. Metabolic monitoring rates subsequent to targeted changes were obtained. Problem solving with residents revealed barriers to monitoring, such as limited awareness of specific guideline recommendations and lack of convenient access to medical equipment (calibrated scales). Residents received education about atypical antipsychotic monitoring guidelines and side effect treatment. Residents were provided with calibrated scales. Atypical antipsychotic monitoring templates were introduced. Online surveys using were conducted to determine self-reported baseline-monitoring rates and comfort with guidelines following targeted change. The baseline metabolic monitoring rates of patients prescribed atypical antipsychotic medications was 9% (range: 0 to 17.6%) for youth in their first year taking an atypical antipsychotic medication and 58.9% (range: 29% to 100%) in subsequent years on medication. The results of relatively easy changes resulted in modest improvement in monitoring rates. The metabolic monitoring rate of a patient initiated on an atypical antipsychotic medication was 29% after targeted quality improvement measures were employed. Following quality improvement changes, residents reported increased knowledge about guidelines and increased monitoring for side effects. Use of a standardized data collection instrument to track monitoring of patients increased

  5. Chronic administration of atypical antipsychotics improves behavioral and synaptic defects of STOP null mice

    PubMed Central

    Delotterie, David; Ruiz, Geoffrey; Brocard, Jacques; Schweitzer, Annie; Roucard, Corinne; Roche, Yann; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Bressand, Karine; Andrieux, Annie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that schizophrenia is associated with alterations in the synaptic connectivity involving cytoskeletal proteins. The microtubule-associated protein STOP (Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide) plays a key-role in neuronal architecture and synaptic plasticity and it has been demonstrated that STOP gene deletion in mice leads to a phenotype mimicking aspects of positive and negative symptoms and cognitive deficits classically observed in schizophrenic patients. In STOP-null mice, behavioral defects are associated with synaptic plasticity abnormalities including defects in long-term potentiation. In these mice, long-term administration of typical antipsychotics has been shown to partially alleviate behavioral defects but, as in humans, such a treatment was poorly active on deficits related to negative symptoms and cognitive impairments. Here, we assessed the effects of risperidone and clozapine, two atypical antipsychotics, on STOP-null mice behavior and synaptic plasticity. Long-term administration of either drug results in alleviation of behavioral alterations mimicking some negative symptoms and partial amelioration of some cognitive defects in STOP-null mice. Interestingly, clozapine treatment also improves synaptic plasticity of the STOP- null animals by restoring long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. All together, the pharmacological reactivity of STOP-null mice to antipsychotics evokes the pharmacological response of humans to such drugs. Totally, our study suggests that STOP-null mice may provide a useful preclinical model to evaluate pharmacological properties of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:19936716

  6. Quetiapine: a new atypical antipsychotic.

    PubMed

    Misra, L K; Erpenbach, J E; Hamlyn, H; Fuller, W C

    1998-06-01

    Quetiapine has recently been approved for treatment of psychotic disorders. In short term (6 weeks) trials this atypical antipsychotic was shown to be as efficacious as the standard antipsychotics for the treatment of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia without causing any extrapyramidal symptoms or increase in the prolactin levels. Its efficacy for treating the negative symptoms was variable. Preliminary observations suggest its potential to improve the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. It is metabolized by the p450 CYP 3A4 system with an estimated elimination half life of 6 hours. The optimal treatment is 300 mg to 400 mg/day in two to three divided oral doses. The most common side effects include dizziness, hypotension, somnolence and weight gain. Changes in the ECG, the thyroid hormone and hepatic enzymes levels appear to be clinically insignificant. Quetiapine interacts with phenytoin, carbamazepine, barbiturates, rifampin and glucocorticoids; and coadministration with these drugs may require dosage adjustment. Doses need not be adjusted when fluoxetine, imipramine, haloperidol and resperidone are coadministered. Quetiapine may enhance the effects of antihypertensive agents and may antagonize those of levodopa and dopamine. Long term efficacy of quetiapine has not been determined. Also undetermined are its effectiveness for treating the first episode and treatment-refractory schizophrenia. Data suggest that quetiapine may be used for the management of psychotic disorders in patients who may not tolerate the side effects of the typical antipsychotics and clozapine. It may also be helpful in patients whose psychotic manifestations did not adequately respond to risperidone and olanzapine.

  7. Novel antipsychotics: issues and controversies. Typicality of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed Central

    Stip, E

    2000-01-01

    The typicality of atypical antipsychotic drugs remains debatable. Preclinical studies and findings from randomized, controlled and open trials of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone and a substituted benzamide were examined. A MEDLINE search was conducted using key words, including "extrapyramidal side effects," "cognition," "schizophrenia" and the generic drug names. Over 140 articles from peer-reviewed journals were reviewed, some of which were based on a meta-analysis. New-generation neuroleptic agents were found to have greater efficacy on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia and to cause fewer unwanted extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) than the traditional antipsychotic drugs. On one hand, atypical neuroleptic agents could be strictly defined as any neuroleptic agent with antipsychotic effects at a dosage that does not cause extrapyramidal side effects. Thus, clozapine is regarded as the "standard" atypical antipsychotic drug. On the other hand, typicality is about dimension rather than category, and we suggest the use of the term "spectrum of atypicality." For example, an emphasis is placed on quetiapine to illustrate where a new compound fits in this spectrum. Although dose-related, atypicality may be more a question of prescription attitude than of a specific characteristic of a compound. The degree to which a new compound is clinically superior to another atypical antipsychotic drug, in terms of improving positive, negative or affective symptoms, cognitive function and long-term outcome, will require further a priori hypotheses based on conceptual frameworks that are clinically meaningful. In addition, the results from industry-sponsored trials should be more comparable to those obtained from investigator-leading trials. Finally, the patient characteristics that define a patient's response to a specific antipsychotic drug are unknown. PMID:10740987

  8. Atypical Antipsychotic Medication Improves Aggression, but Not Self-Injurious Behaviour, in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruedrich, S. L.; Swales, T. P.; Rossvanes, C.; Diana, L.; Arkadiev, V.; Lim, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Atypical antipsychotic medications have largely supplanted their typical counterparts, both for psychosis and for the treatment of aggression and/or self-injurious behaviour (SIB), in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, with the exception of risperidone, little systematic research supports their use in such persons.…

  9. Atypical Antipsychotic Medication Improves Aggression, but Not Self-Injurious Behaviour, in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruedrich, S. L.; Swales, T. P.; Rossvanes, C.; Diana, L.; Arkadiev, V.; Lim, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Atypical antipsychotic medications have largely supplanted their typical counterparts, both for psychosis and for the treatment of aggression and/or self-injurious behaviour (SIB), in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, with the exception of risperidone, little systematic research supports their use in such persons.…

  10. Neural basis for the ability of atypical antipsychotic drugs to improve cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Higuchi, Yuko; Uehara, Takashi

    2013-10-16

    Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT) receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs), e.g., clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone, have variable affinities for these receptors. Among the 5-HT receptor subtypes, the 5-HT1A receptor is attracting particular interests as a potential target for enhancing cognition, based on preclinical and clinical evidence. The neural network underlying the ability of 5-HT1A agonists to treat cognitive impairments of schizophrenia likely includes dopamine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid neurons. A novel strategy for cognitive enhancement in psychosis may be benefited by focusing on energy metabolism in the brain. In this context, lactate plays a major role, and has been shown to protect neurons against oxidative and other stressors. In particular, our data indicate chronic treatment with tandospirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, recover stress-induced lactate production in the prefrontal cortex of a rat model of schizophrenia. Recent advances of electrophysiological measures, e.g., event-related potentials, and their imaging have provided insights into facilitative effects on cognition of some AAPDs acting directly or indirectly on 5-HT1A receptors. These findings are expected to promote the development of novel therapeutics for the improvement of functional outcome in people with schizophrenia.

  11. Neural Basis for the Ability of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Higuchi, Yuko; Uehara, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are considered to largely affect functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia, other psychotic illnesses, or mood disorders. Specifically, there is much attention to the role of psychotropic compounds acting on serotonin (5-HT) receptors in ameliorating cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. It is noteworthy that atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs), e.g., clozapine, melperone, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, perospirone, blonanserin, and lurasidone, have variable affinities for these receptors. Among the 5-HT receptor subtypes, the 5-HT1A receptor is attracting particular interests as a potential target for enhancing cognition, based on preclinical and clinical evidence. The neural network underlying the ability of 5-HT1A agonists to treat cognitive impairments of schizophrenia likely includes dopamine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid neurons. A novel strategy for cognitive enhancement in psychosis may be benefited by focusing on energy metabolism in the brain. In this context, lactate plays a major role, and has been shown to protect neurons against oxidative and other stressors. In particular, our data indicate chronic treatment with tandospirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, recover stress-induced lactate production in the prefrontal cortex of a rat model of schizophrenia. Recent advances of electrophysiological measures, e.g., event-related potentials, and their imaging have provided insights into facilitative effects on cognition of some AAPDs acting directly or indirectly on 5-HT1A receptors. These findings are expected to promote the development of novel therapeutics for the improvement of functional outcome in people with schizophrenia. PMID:24137114

  12. Low-Dose Atypical Antipsychotic Risperidone Improves the 5-Year Outcome in Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Sleep Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Yin, You; Liu, Yan; Zhuang, Jianhua; Pan, Xiao; Li, Peng; Yang, Yuechang; Li, Yan-Peng; Zhao, Zheng-Qing; Huang, Liu-Qing; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) accelerate the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and increase the stress of caregivers. However, the long-term outcome of disturbed nocturnal sleep/wake patterns in AD and on increased stress of spousal caregivers is unclear. This study assessed the 5-year effect of nocturnal SD on the long-term outcome in AD patients. A total of 156 donepezil-treated mild-moderate AD patients (93 AD + SD and 63 AD - SD as a control group) were recruited. The AD + SD patients were formed into 4 subgroups according to the preferences of spousal caregivers for treatment with atypical antipsychotics (0.5-1 mg risperidone, n = 22), non-benzodiazepine hypnotic (5-10 mg zolpidem tartrate, n = 33), melatonin (2.55 mg, n = 9), or no-drug treatment (n = 29). SD were evaluated by polysomnography, sleep scale, and cognitive scale examinations. Moreover, all spousal caregivers of AD patients were assessed using a series of scales, including sleep, anxiety, mood, and treatment attitude scales. Our data showed that nocturnal sleep/wake disturbances were significantly associated with lower 5-year outcomes for AD patients, earlier nursing home placement, and more negative emotions of spousal caregivers. Treatment with low-dose atypical antipsychotic risperidone improved the 5-year outcome in AD + SD patients. In conclusion, low-dose atypical antipsychotic risperidone improves the 5-year outcome in AD patients with SD. Moreover, improvement of nocturnal sleep problems in AD patients will also bring better emotional stability for AD caregivers.

  13. Atypical antipsychotics for insomnia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Wade; Quay, Teo A W; Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos; Farrell, Barbara; Bjerre, Lise M

    2016-06-01

    Observational evidence suggests that atypical antipsychotics such as quetiapine are increasingly being used to manage insomnia. This is concerning given the uncertain efficacy and potential adverse effects associated with these medications. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the benefits and adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics used specifically for insomnia. The methods used in this study are systematic review and narrative synthesis. The data were collected from PubMed; EMBASE; Cochrane Library; PsycINFO; grey literature; and the manufacturers of risperidone, quetiapine and olanzapine. Adult patients ≥18 years of age using atypical antipsychotics specifically for primary or co-morbid insomnia for ≥ 1 week were compared to those receiving active intervention or placebo. Two independent reviewers screened titles, abstracts and full-text articles; extracted data; and conducted risk-of-bias analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) assessment was completed. One double-blind randomized controlled trial (n = 13) met the eligibility criteria. Statistically significant differences were not observed from baseline between quetiapine and placebo after 2 weeks for primary insomnia in terms of total sleep time (mean difference (MD) 52.68 min, 95% CI -27.27 to 132.6), reduction in sleep latency (MD 72.44 min, 95% CI -2.65 to 147.5) or improved sleep satisfaction measured with a visual analogue scale out of 100 (MD 6.16, 95% CI -12.32 to 24.64), despite a trend towards improved sleep parameters. The study was rated as very low quality. Very low quality evidence suggests that quetiapine does not significantly improve sleep parameters compared with placebo in primary insomnia, despite a trend towards clinical improvements. Atypical antipsychotics should be avoided in the first-line treatment of primary insomnia until further evidence is available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical…

  15. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical…

  16. Atypical antipsychotics for psychosis in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Datta, Soumitra S; Wright, Stephen D; Furtado, Vivek A; Russell, Paul S

    2013-10-15

    Schizophrenia often presents in adolescence, but current treatment guidelines are based largely on studies of adults with psychosis. Over the past decade, the number of studies on treatment of adolescent-onset psychosis has increased. The current systematic review collates and critiques evidence obtained on the use of various atypical antipsychotic medications for adolescents with psychosis. To investigate the effects of atypical antipsychotic medications in adolescents with psychosis. We reviewed in separate analyses various comparisons of atypical antipsychotic medications with placebo or a typical antipsychotic medication or another atypical antipsychotic medication or the same atypical antipsychotic medication but at a lower dose. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Register (October 2011), which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We inspected references of all identified studies and contacted study authors and relevant pharmaceutical companies to ask for more information. We included all relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared atypical antipsychotic medication with placebo or another pharmacological intervention or with psychosocial interventions, standard psychiatric treatment or no intervention in children and young people aged 13 to 18 years with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, acute and transient psychoses or unspecified psychosis. We included studies published in English and in other languages that were available in standardised databases. Review authors AK and SSD selected the studies, rated the quality of the studies and performed data extraction. For dichotomous data, we estimated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a fixed-effect model. When possible, for binary data presented in the 'Summary of findings' table, we calculated illustrative comparative risks. We summated continuous data using the mean difference (MD). Risk of

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, Milan; Kacirova, Ivana; Urinovska, Romana

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  18. Inverse agonist properties of atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Akam, Elizabeth; Strange, Philip G

    2004-06-01

    Mechanisms of action of several atypical antipsychotic drugs have been examined at the D(2) dopamine receptor expressed in CHO cells. The drugs tested were found to exhibit inverse agonist activity at the D(2) dopamine receptor based on their effects to potentiate forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Each of the antipsychotic drugs tested (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) increased cAMP accumulation to the same extent. The increase in cAMP was also similar to that seen with typical antipsychotic drugs. Inverse agonism at the D(2) dopamine receptor seems, therefore, to be a property common to all classes of antipsychotic drugs. The effect of sodium ions on the binding of the drugs to the receptor was also assessed. Each of the atypical antipsychotic drugs tested here bound with higher affinity in the absence of sodium ions. Previous studies have shown that some antipsychotic drugs are insensitive to sodium ions and some bind with higher affinity in the presence of sodium ions. Given that all of these antipsychotic drugs are inverse agonists, it may be concluded that this sodium ion sensitivity is unrelated to mechanisms of inverse agonism.

  19. Symptom domains of schizophrenia: the role of atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Burton, Simon

    2006-11-01

    Given their more obvious presentation, the reduction of positive symptoms and their associated behavioural problems have been considered the most important treatment outcome parameter in patients with schizophrenia. However, the development of the atypical antipsychotic agents in the early 1990s resulted in the adoption of more wide-reaching measures of therapeutic outcome. The aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of currently available atypical agents across multiple symptom domains of schizophrenia with a specific focus on negative symptoms, neurocognition, social functioning, quality of life and insight. As such, studies published between January 1990 and December 2005 that evaluated the clinical efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics in different symptom domains of schizophrenia were reviewed as identified from literature researches using MEDLINE and Embase. Abstracts and posters presented at key psychiatry and schizophrenia congresses during this period were also reviewed where available in the public domain. Results from the studies identified have consistently demonstrated that atypical antipsychotics have substantial advantages over conventional antipsychotics with a broader spectrum of efficacy across symptomatic domains of schizophrenia as proven by greater improvements in negative symptoms and cognitive function and a beneficial effect on affective symptoms and quality of life. However, their clinical advantages have often been limited by patients' partial compliance with therapy. As such, the development of a long-acting atypical antipsychotic agent may provide a new and valuable treatment option for patients with schizophrenia.

  20. Olanzapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Duggan, Lorna; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of olanzapine compared to other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the reference of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised trials that used at least single-blind (rater-blind) design, comparing oral olanzapine with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random effects model. Main results The review currently includes 50 studies and 9476 participants which provided data for six comparisons (olanzapine compared to amisulpride, aripiprazole

  1. [Atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain].

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Beata R; Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Marmurowska-Michałowska, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Introduction of a new group of antipsychotic drugs, called atypical because of the proprieties differing them from classical neuroleptics, gave hope for the beginning of a new era in treatment of psychoses, including schizophrenia. Different mechanisms of action not only resulted in a broader spectrum of action and high efficacy but also in a relative lack of extrapiramidal symptoms. However, atypical neuroleptics are not totally free from adverse effects. Symptoms such as sedation, metabolic changes and weight gain, often very quick and severe - present also in the case of classical drugs, but put to the background by extrapiramidal symptoms--have become prominent. Weight gain is important both from the clinical and subjective point of view--as associated with serious somatic consequences and as a source of enormous mental distress. These problems are addressed in this review, with the focus on weight gain associated with the use of specific atypical neuroleptics.

  2. Clozapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Leucht, Stefan

    2010-11-10

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic demonstrated to be superior in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia which causes fewer movement disorders. Clozapine, however, entails a significant risk of serious blood disorders such as agranulocytosis which could be potentially fatal. Currently there are a number of newer antipsychotics which have been developed with the purpose to find both a better tolerability profile and a superior effectiveness. To compare the clinical effects of clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics (such as amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine) in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Groups Register (June 2007) and reference lists of all included randomised controlled trials. We also manually searched appropriate journals and conference proceedings relating to clozapine combination strategies and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies. All relevant randomised, at least single-blind trials, comparing clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics, any dose and oral formulations, for people with schizophrenia or related disorders. We selected trials and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. The review currently includes 27 blinded randomised controlled trials, which involved 3099 participants. Twelve randomised control trials compared clozapine with olanzapine, five with quetiapine, nine with risperidone, one with ziprasidone and two with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (overall 30.1%), leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Clozapine had a higher attrition rate due to adverse effects than

  3. Clozapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic demonstrated to be superior in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia which causes fewer movement disorders. Clozapine, however, entails a significant risk of serious blood disorders such as agranulocytosis which could be potentially fatal. Currently there are a number of newer antipsychotics which have been developed with the purpose to find both a better tolerability profile and a superior effectiveness. Objectives To compare the clinical effects of clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics (such as amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine) in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Groups Register (June 2007) and reference lists of all included randomised controlled trials. We also manually searched appropriate journals and conference proceedings relating to clozapine combination strategies and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All relevant randomised, at least single-blind trials, comparing clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics, any dose and oral formulations, for people with schizophrenia or related disorders. Data collection and analysis We selected trials and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 27 blinded randomised controlled trials, which involved 3099 participants. Twelve randomised control trials compared clozapine with olanzapine, five with quetiapine, nine with risperidone, one with ziprasidone and two with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (overall 30.1%), leaving the interpretation

  4. Clinical pharmacology of atypical antipsychotics: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, M.C.; Paletta, S.; Maffini, M.; Colasanti, A.; Dragogna, F.; Di Pace, C.; Altamura, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This review will concentrate on the clinical pharmacology, in particular pharmacodynamic data, related to atypical antipsychotics, clozapine, risperidone, paliperidone, olanzapine, que¬tiapine, amisulpride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone and cariprazine. A summary of their acute pharmacokinetics properties are also reported. Four new second-generation antipsychotics are available: iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and in the next future cariprazine. Similar to ziprasidone and aripiprazole, these new agents are advisable for the lower propensity to give weight gain and metabolic abnormalities in comparison with older second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine or clozapine. Actually lurasidone seems to be best in terms of minimizing unwanted alterations in body weight and metabolic variables. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not strictly necessary for all of the new antipsychotic drugs because there are no unequivocal data supporting a relationship between plasma drug levels and clinical outcomes or side effects. The exception can be represented by clozapine for which plasma levels of 350-420 ng/ml are reported to be associated with an increased probability of a good clinical response. Also for olanzapine an established therapeutic range (20-50 ng/ml) is proposed to yield an optimal response and minimize side effects. PMID:26417330

  5. Atypical antipsychotics to treat the neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip E; Gill, Sudeep S; Rochon, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in older adults with dementia and can be associated with a rapid decline in cognitive and functional status. This article reviews the current literature supporting the use of atypical antipsychotic medications in this population. Among the currently available atypical antipsychotics, risperidone and olanzapine have been the most widely studied in double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Despite the common use of other atypical antipsychotic medications, their efficacy and safety in older adults with dementia has not been as extensively studied. Some controversy surrounds the use of atypical antipsychotic agents in older adults with the suggestion that they may increase the incidence of stroke or even death. Despite the potential for increased risk of harm from the use of these medications, atypical antipsychotics are often effective in treating troublesome neuropsychiatric symptoms refractory to other treatments. Whenever possible, these atypical antipsychotic drug treatments should be combined with non-pharmacological treatments to limit the need and dose of antipsychotic drugs and constant monitoring for potential harms should be maintained. The choice of which atypical antipsychotic agent can be guided by the nature and severity of the target symptom and the medication least likely to cause harm to the patient. PMID:19412500

  6. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with

  7. Indications of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McKean, Andrew; Monasterio, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAP) have become some of the most commonly prescribed medications in primary and specialist care settings. Off-label prescribing accounts for much of the expanded use of AAPs. This has become common in the elderly. Marketing by pharmaceutical companies appears to have contributed to the off-label use of AAPs, in situations where their safety and efficacy is far from established. Although evidence provides varying degrees of support for their use for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, augmentation of antidepressants in depression, anxiety, insomnia and in the management of psychosis in Parkinson's Disease, there are a number of potential problems with their expanded use in the elderly. These include weight gain, type two diabetes mellitus, sudden cardiac death and increased mortality rates in the elderly with dementia. It is recommended that whenever AAPs are used off-label, a review date is identified, informed consent is obtained and treatment and side-effects are closely monitored.

  8. Amisulpride versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; da Mota Neto, Joaquim I Silveira; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of amisulpride compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We updated this search in July 2012 and added 47 new trials to the awaiting classification section. Selection criteria We included randomised, at least single-blind, trials comparing oral amisulpride with oral forms of aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For continuous data we calculated weighted mean differences (MD), for dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results The review currently includes ten short to medium term trials with 1549 participants on three comparisons: amisulpride versus olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. The overall attrition rate was considerable (34.7%) with no significant difference between groups. Amisulpride was similarly effective as olanzapine and risperidone and more effective than ziprasidone (leaving the study early due to inefficacy: n=123, 1 RCT, RR 0.21 CI 0.05 to 0.94, NNT 8 CI 5 to 50

  9. Fluphenazine (oral) versus atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sampford, James R; Sampson, Stephanie; Li, Bao Guo; Zhao, Sai; Xia, Jun; Furtado, Vivek A

    2016-07-02

    Fluphenazine is a typical antipsychotic drug from the phenothiazine group of antipsychotics. It has been commonly used in the treatment of schizophrenia, however, with the advent of atypical antipsychotic medications, use has declined over the years. To measure the outcomes (both beneficial and harmful) of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of oral fluphenazine versus atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Studies (25 April 2013). For the economic search, we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Health Economic Database (CSzGHED) on 31 January 2014 SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing fluphenazine (oral) with any other oral atypical antipsychotics. Review authors worked independently to inspect citations and assess the quality of the studies and to extract data. For homogeneous dichotomous data we calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI), and calculated the mean differences (MDs) for continuous data. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and used GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) to rate the quality of the evidence. Four studies randomising a total of 202 people with schizophrenia are included. Oral fluphenazine was compared with oral amisulpride, risperidone, quetiapine and olanzapine.Comparing oral fluphenazine with amisulpride, there was no difference between groups for mental state using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) (1 RCT, n = 57, MD 5.10 95% CI -2.35 to 12.55, very low-quality evidence), nor was there any difference in numbers leaving the study early for any reason (2 RCTs, n = 98, RR 1.19 95% CI 0.63 to 2.28, very low-quality evidence). More people required concomitant anticholinergic medication in the fluphenazine group compared to amisulpride (1 RCT, n = 36, RR 7.82 95% CI 1.07 to 57.26, very low-quality evidence). No data were reported for important outcomes

  10. Generic penetration in the retail atypical antipsychotic market.

    PubMed

    Lenderts, Susan; Kalali, Amir H; Buckley, Peter

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we explore the penetration of generic atypical antipsychotics in the United States market before and after the availability of generic risperidone in July 2008. Analysis suggests that, overall, generic penetration into the atypical antipsychotic market has grown from approximately three percent in January 2008 to more than 25 percent in December 2009. Similar trends are uncovered when branded and generic prescriptions are analyzed by specialty.

  11. Chlorpromazine versus atypical antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Saha, Kumar B; Bo, Li; Zhao, Sai; Xia, Jun; Sampson, Stephanie; Zaman, Rashid U

    2016-04-05

    Chlorpromazine is an aliphatic phenothiazine, which is one of the widely-used typical antipsychotic drugs. Chlorpromazine is reliable for its efficacy and one of the most tested first generation antipsychotic drugs. It has been used as a 'gold standard' to compare the efficacy of older and newer antipsychotic drugs. Expensive new generation drugs are heavily marketed worldwide as a better treatment for schizophrenia, but this may not be the case and an unnecessary drain on very limited resources. To compare the effects of chlorpromazine with atypical or second generation antipsychotic drugs, for the treatment of people with schizophrenia. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register up to 23 September 2013. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared chlorpromazine with any other atypical antipsychotic drugs for treating people with schizophrenia. Adults (as defined in each trial) diagnosed with schizophrenia, including schizophreniform, schizoaffective and delusional disorders were included in this review. At least two review authors independently screened the articles identified in the literature search against the inclusion criteria and extracted data from included trials. For homogeneous dichotomous data, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For continuous data, we determined the mean difference (MD) values and 95% CIs. We assessed the risk of bias in included studies and rated the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. This review includes 71 studies comparing chlorpromazine to olanzapine, risperidone or quetiapine. None of the included trials reported any data on economic costs. 1. Chlorpromazine versus olanzapineIn the short term, there appeared to be a significantly greater clinical response (as defined in each study) in people receiving olanzapine (3 RCTs, N = 204; RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.37 to 3.99, low quality evidence). There was no difference between drugs for relapse (1 RCT

  12. Combined treatment with atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants in treatment-resistant depression: preclinical and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rogóż, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical reports have documented a beneficial effect of adding atypical antipsychotic drugs to ongoing treatments with antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, in ameliorating drug-resistant depression. The aim of this paper was to summarize some preclinical evidence describing the mechanism responsible for the therapeutic action of combined treatment with antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics and also some clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of the augmentation strategy for improving antidepressant-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics. This analysis is based on five microdialysis studies and nine behavioral studies assessing the impact of combined atypical antipsychotic and antidepressant treatments on extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats and on antidepressant-induced effects, respectively. In addition, clinical data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of augmentation strategies for treatment-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics were included. Combined treatment of rats with all studied atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, clozapine and quetiapine) and antidepressants (citalopram, fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) increased the extracellular level of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex compared to a respective drug given alone; in addition, a combination of olanzapine or quetiapine plus fluoxetine or fluvoxamine increased the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics administered in a low dose enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of antidepressants, with (among other mechanisms) the serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and adrenergic α2 receptors likely playing an important role in their action. The results support the conclusion that atypical antipsychotics may be effective as adjunctive therapy in treatment-resistant depression; however, their adverse effect profile may be

  13. Augmenting atypical antipsychotics with a cognitive enhancer (donepezil) improves regional brain activity in schizophrenia patients: a pilot double-blind placebo controlled BOLD fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Ziad; George, Mark S; Horner, Michael D; Markowitz, John S; Li, Xingbao; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Owens, Susan D; McGurk, Susan; DeVane, Lindsay; Risch, S Craig

    2003-06-01

    Cognitive impairments are cardinal features of schizophrenia and predictors of poor vocational and social outcome. Imaging studies with verbal fluency tasks (VFT) lead some to suggest that in schizophrenia, the combination of a failure to deactivate the left temporal lobe and a hypoactive frontal lobe reflects a functional disconnectivity between the left prefrontal cortex and temporal lobe. Others have theorized that an abnormal cingulate gyrus modulates such fronto-temporal connectivity. Thus addition of a cognitive enhancing medication to current antipsychotic therapy might improve functionality of networks necessary in working memory and internal concept generation. To test this hypothesis, we serially measured brain activity in 6 subjects on stable atypical antipsychotics performing a VFT, using BOLD fMRI. Measurements were made at baseline and again after groups were randomized to receive 12 weeks of donepezil (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and placebo in a blind cross-over design. Donepezil addition provided a functional normalization with an increase in left frontal lobe and cingulate activity when compared to placebo and from baseline scans. This pilot study supports the cingulate's role in modulating cognition and neuronal connectivity in schizophrenia.

  14. Clinically significant drug interactions with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William Klugh; Jann, Michael W; Kutscher, Eric C

    2013-12-01

    Atypical antipsychotics [also known as second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs)] have become a mainstay therapeutic treatment intervention for patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and other psychotic conditions. These agents are commonly used with other medications--most notably, antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs. Drug interactions can take place by various pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmaceutical mechanisms. The pharmacokinetic profile of each SGA, especially with phase I and phase II metabolism, can allow for potentially significant drug interactions. Pharmacodynamic interactions arise when agents have comparable receptor site activity, which can lead to additive or competitive effects without alterations in measured plasma drug concentrations. Additionally, the role of drug transporters in drug interactions continues to evolve and may effect both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Pharmaceutical interactions occur when physical incompatibilities take place between agents prior to drug absorption. Approximate therapeutic plasma concentration ranges have been suggested for a number of SGAs. Drug interactions that markedly increase or decrease the concentrations of these agents beyond their ranges can lead to adverse events or diminished clinical efficacy. Most clinically significant drug interactions with SGAs occur via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system. Many but not all drug interactions with SGAs are identified during drug discovery and pre-clinical development by employing a series of standardized in vitro and in vivo studies with known CYP inducers and inhibitors. Later therapeutic drug monitoring programmes, clinical studies and case reports offer methods to identify additional clinically significant drug interactions. Some commonly co-administered drugs with a significant potential for drug-drug interactions with selected SGAs include some SSRIs. Antiepileptic mood stabilizers such as carbamazepine and valproate, as

  15. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms.

  16. Hepatic Safety of Atypical Antipsychotics: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Slim, Mahmoud; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Andres; Cabello, M Rosario; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raul J

    2016-10-01

    The newer atypical antipsychotic agents (AAPs) represent an attractive therapeutic option for a wide range of psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia and bipolar mania, because of the reduced risk of disabling extrapyramidal symptoms. However, their growing use has raised questions about their tolerability over the endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular axes. Indeed, atypical antipsychotic drugs are associated, to differing extents, with mild elevation of aminotransferases related to weight gain, AAP-induced metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the hepatic safety of new AAPs seems improved over that of chlorpromazine, they can occasionally cause idiosyncratic liver injury with varying phenotypes and, rarely, lead to acute liver failure. However, AAPs are a group of heterogeneous, chemically unrelated compounds with distinct pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties and substantially different safety profiles, which precludes the notion of a class effect for hepatotoxicity risk and highlights the need for an individualized therapeutic approach. We discuss the current evidence on the hepatotoxicity potential of AAPs, the emerging underlying mechanisms, and the limitations inherent to this group of drugs for both establishing a proper causality assessment and developing strategies for risk management.

  17. RP5063, an atypical antipsychotic drug with a unique pharmacologic profile, improves declarative memory and psychosis in mouse models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Kwon, Sunoh; Huang, Mei; Michael, Eric; Bhat, Laxminarayan; Cantillon, Marc; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2017-08-14

    Various types of atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs) modestly improve the cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). RP5063 is an AAPD with a diverse and unique pharmacology, including partial agonism at dopamine (DA) D2, D3, D4, serotonin (5-HT)1A, and 5-HT2A receptors (Rs), full agonism at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh)R (nAChR), and antagonism at 5-HT2B, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7Rs. Most atypical APDs are 5-HT2A inverse agonists. The efficacy of RP5063 in mouse models of psychosis and episodic memory were studied. RP5063 blocked acute phencyclidine (PCP)-as well as amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, indicating antipsychotic activity. Acute administration of RP5063 significantly reversed subchronic (sc)PCP-induced impairment in novel object recognition (NOR), a measure of episodic memory, but not reversal learning, a measure of executive function. Co-administration of a sub-effective dose (SED) of RP5063 with SEDs of a 5-HT7R antagonist, a 5-HT1BR antagonist, a 5-HT2AR inverse agonist, or an α4β2 nAChR agonist, restored the ability of RP5063 to ameliorate the NOR deficit in scPCP mice. Pre-treatment with a 5-HT1AR, a D4R, antagonist, but not an α4β2 nAChR antagonist, blocked the ameliorating effect of RP5063. Further, co-administration of scRP5063 prior to each dose of PCP prevented the effect of PCP to produce a deficit in NOR for one week. RP5063, given to scPCP-treated mice for one week restored NOR for one week only. Acute administration of RP5063 significantly increased cortical DA efflux, which may be critical to some of its cognitive enhancing properties. These results indicate that RP5063, by itself, or as an adjunctive treatment has a multifaceted basis for improving some cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Use of atypical antipsychotics in the elderly: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Gareri, Pietro; Segura-García, Cristina; Manfredi, Valeria Graziella Laura; Bruni, Antonella; Ciambrone, Paola; Cerminara, Gregorio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; De Fazio, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in the elderly has become wider and wider in recent years; in fact, these agents have novel receptor binding profiles, good efficacy with regard to negative symptoms, and reduced extrapyramidal symptoms. However, in recent years, the use of both conventional and atypical antipsychotics has been widely debated for concerns about their safety in elderly patients affected with dementia and the possible risks for stroke and sudden death. A MEDLINE search was made using the words elderly, atypical antipsychotics, use, schizophrenia, psychosis, mood disorders, dementia, behavioral disorders, and adverse events. Some personal studies were also considered. This paper reports the receptor binding profiles and the main mechanism of action of these drugs, together with their main use in psychiatry and the possible adverse events in elderly people. PMID:25170260

  19. Patterns of atypical antipsychotic subtherapeutic dosing among Oregon Medicaid patients.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Daniel M; Wisdom, Jennifer P; Pollack, David A; Hamer, Ann M; Haxby, Dean G; Middleton, Luke; McFarland, Bentson H

    2008-10-01

    To examine a cohort of Medicaid patients with new prescriptions for atypical antipsychotic medication to determine the prevalence of subtherapeutic atypical antipsychotic medication use and to identify patient and prescribing provider characteristics associated with occurrence of subtherapeutic use. This observational cohort study examined Medicaid administrative claims data for patients aged 20 to 64 years with a new prescription for an atypical antipsychotic medication (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone) between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2004. Patient diagnostic information was identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes on submitted medical claims. Patient characteristics, prescribing provider characteristics, length of therapy, and dosing were examined. A logistic regression assessed the probability of subtherapeutic dosing. Among 830 individuals in our sample who began treatment with an atypical antipsychotic, only 15% had a documented diagnosis of schizophrenia, subtherapeutic dosing was common (up to 86% of patients taking quetiapine), and 40% continued less than 30 days with the index prescription. A logistic model indicated that a general practitioner as prescribing provider, length of therapy equal to or less than 30 days, and prescription of quetiapine were significantly associated with a subtherapeutic dose (p < .001, p = .028, and p < .001, respectively). These results suggest that there is extensive use of expensive atypical antipsychotic medications for off-label purposes such as sedation or for other practice patterns that should be explored further. Approaches that minimize off-label atypical antipsychotic use could be of considerable value to Medicaid programs. In addition, these findings support the need for the introduction or increased use of utilization monitoring and the implementation of medication practice guidelines as appropriate decision

  20. Atypical Antipsychotic Usage Among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    PubMed Central

    Goebert, Deborah; Else, Iwalani; Carlton, Barry; Matsu, Courtenay; Guerrero, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown significant ethnic differences in prescribing patterns of two or more antipsychotics. This study examined changes in atypical and typical antipsychotic prescriptions among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Five hundred consecutive charts were reviewed for antipsychotics at the time of admission and discharge from each of two inpatient psychiatric facilities in Hawai‘i. Multiple antipsychotic prescription rates were 9% at intake and 6% at discharge. For the ethnic groups studied, there were no statistically significant differences by patient ethnicity regarding antipsychotics at intake (χ2 = 29.2, df = 21, P = .110) or discharge (χ2 = 20.5, df = 24, P = .667). There were no significant differences in prescription and polypharmacy patterns among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders ethnic groups in this study. PMID:25285256

  1. Pharmacological management of atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; ElFakih, Yamily; Uzcátegui, Euderruh; Sandia, Ignacio; Tálamo, Eduardo; Araujo de Baptista, Enma; Beaulieu, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Excessive bodyweight gain was reported during the 1950s as an adverse effect of typical antipsychotic drug treatment, but the magnitude of bodyweight gain was found to be higher with the atypical antipsychotic drugs that were introduced after 1990. Clozapine and olanzapine produce the greatest bodyweight gain, ziprasidone and aripiprazole have a neutral influence, and quetiapine and risperidone cause an intermediate effect. In the CATIE study, the percentage of patients with bodyweight gain of >7% compared with baseline differed significantly between the antipsychotic drugs, i.e. 30%, 16%, 14%, 12% and 7% for olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, perphenazine (a typical antipsychotic) and ziprasidone, respectively (p<0.001). Appetite stimulation is probably a key cause of bodyweight gain, but genetic polymorphisms modify the bodyweight response during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. In addition to nutritional advice, programmed physical activity, cognitive-behavioural training and atypical antipsychotic switching, pharmacological adjunctive treatments have been assessed to counteract excessive bodyweight gain. In some clinical trials, nizatidine, amantadine, reboxetine, topiramate, sibutramine and metformin proved effective in preventing or reversing atypical antipsychotic-induced bodyweight gain; however, the results are inconclusive since few randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have been conducted. Indeed, most studies were short-term trials without adequate statistical power and, in the case of metformin, nizatidine and sibutramine, the results are contradictory. The tolerability profile of these agents is adequate. More studies are needed before formal recommendations on the use of these drugs can be made. Meanwhile, clinicians are advised to use any of these adjunctive treatments according to their individual pharmacological and tolerability profiles, and the patient's personal and family history of bodyweight gain and metabolic dysfunction.

  2. Increasing use of atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Richard A.; Bobo, William V.; Shelton, Richard C.; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Morrow, James A.; Wang, Wei; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Cooper, William O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify maternal use of atypical antipsychotics, typical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and lithium during pregnancy. Methods Tennessee birth and death records were linked to Tennessee Medicaid data to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 296,817 women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid throughout pregnancy who had a live birth or fetal death from 1985 to 2005. Results During the study time period, the adjusted rate of use of any study medication during pregnancy increased from nearly 14 to 31 per 1,000 pregnancies (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.09). Significant increases were reported in use of anticonvulsants alone among mothers with pain and other psychiatric disorders, atypical antipsychotics alone among mothers with bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders, and more than one studied medication for mothers with epilepsy, pain disorders, bipolar disorders, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders. Significant decreases were reported in use of lithium alone and typical antipsychotics alone for all clinically meaningful diagnosis groups. Conclusions There was a substantial increase in use of atypical antipsychotics alone, anticonvulsants alone, and medications from multiple studied categories among Tennessee Medicaid-insured pregnant women during the study period. Further examination of the maternal and fetal consequences of exposure to these medications during pregnancy is warranted. PMID:23124892

  3. Increasing use of atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard A; Bobo, William V; Shelton, Richard C; Arbogast, Patrick G; Morrow, James A; Wang, Wei; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Cooper, William O

    2013-07-01

    To quantify maternal use of atypical antipsychotics, typical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium during pregnancy. Tennessee birth and death records were linked to Tennessee Medicaid data to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 296,817 women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid throughout pregnancy who had a live birth or fetal death from 1985 to 2005. During the study time period, the adjusted rate of use of any study medication during pregnancy increased from nearly 14 to 31 per 1000 pregnancies (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.09). Significant increases were reported in use of anticonvulsants alone among mothers with pain and other psychiatric disorders, atypical antipsychotics alone among mothers with bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders, and more than one studied medication for mothers with epilepsy, pain disorders, bipolar disorders, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders. Significant decreases were reported in use of lithium alone and typical antipsychotics alone for all clinically meaningful diagnosis groups. There was a substantial increase in use of atypical antipsychotics alone, anticonvulsants alone, and medications from multiple studied categories among Tennessee Medicaid-insured pregnant women during the study period. Further examination of the maternal and fetal consequences of exposure to these medications during pregnancy is warranted. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Use of atypical antipsychotics in nursing homes and pharmaceutical marketing.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Camilla B; Donovan, Jennifer L; Field, Terry S; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Harrold, Leslie R; Kanaan, Abir O; Lemay, Celeste A; Mazor, Kathleen M; Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A

    2015-02-01

    To describe the current extent and type of pharmaceutical marketing in nursing homes (NHs) in one state and to provide preliminary evidence for the potential influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in NHs. Nested mixed-methods, cross-sectional study of NHs in a cluster randomized trial. Forty-one NHs in Connecticut. NH administrators, directors of nursing, and medical directors (n = 93, response rate 75.6%). Quantitative data, including prescription drug dispensing data (September 2009-August 2010) linked with Nursing Home Compare data (April 2011), were used to determine facility-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use, facility-level characteristics, NH staffing, and NH quality. Qualitative data, including semistructured interviews and surveys of NH leaders conducted in the first quarter of 2011, were used to determine encounters with pharmaceutical marketing. Leadership at 46.3% of NHs (n = 19) reported pharmaceutical marketing encounters, consisting of educational training, written and Internet-based materials, and sponsored training. No association was detected between level of atypical antipsychotic prescribing and reports of any pharmaceutical marketing by at least one NH leader. NH leaders frequently encounter pharmaceutical marketing through a variety of ways, although the impact on atypical antipsychotic prescribing is unclear. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Drug information update. Atypical antipsychotics and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: nuances and pragmatics of the association.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse event associated with the use of antipsychotics. Although atypical antipsychotics were initially considered to carry no risk of NMS, reports have accumulated over time implicating them in NMS causation. Almost all atypical antipsychotics have been reported to be associated with NMS. The clinical profile of NMS caused by certain atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has been reported to be considerably different from the NMS produced by typical antipsychotics, with diaphoresis encountered more commonly, and rigidity and tremor encountered less frequently. This article briefly discusses the evidence relating to the occurrence, presentation and management of NMS induced by atypical antipsychotics.

  6. Drug information update. Atypical antipsychotics and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: nuances and pragmatics of the association

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse event associated with the use of antipsychotics. Although atypical antipsychotics were initially considered to carry no risk of NMS, reports have accumulated over time implicating them in NMS causation. Almost all atypical antipsychotics have been reported to be associated with NMS. The clinical profile of NMS caused by certain atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has been reported to be considerably different from the NMS produced by typical antipsychotics, with diaphoresis encountered more commonly, and rigidity and tremor encountered less frequently. This article briefly discusses the evidence relating to the occurrence, presentation and management of NMS induced by atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28811916

  7. Expected incidence of tardive dyskinesia associated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Glazer, W M

    2000-01-01

    Given the problematic nature of tardive dyskinesia in persons taking conventional antipsychotics, evaluation of newer atypical antipsychotic agents should include a systematic assessment of tardive dyskinesia liability. Results of a prospective double-blind, randomized study of schizophrenic patients who participated in 3 preclinical olanzapine studies and were treated with 5 to 20 mg/day of olanzapine (N = 1192) or haloperidol (N = 522) recently indicated a significantly lower risk of development of tardive dyskinesia with olanzapine treatment than haloperidol treatment. This article discusses the known effects of atypical antipsychotic medications on tardive dyskinesia movements (both withdrawal and persistent) and the incidence rate of tardive dyskinesia among schizophrenic patients undergoing long-term treatment with olanzapine or haloperidol.

  8. Metabolic syndrome and atypical antipsychotics: Possibility of prediction and control.

    PubMed

    Franch Pato, Clara M; Molina Rodríguez, Vicente; Franch Valverde, Juan I

    Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are associated with high morbidity and mortality, due to inherent health factors, genetic factors, and factors related to psychopharmacological treatment. Antipsychotics, like other drugs, have side-effects that can substantially affect the physical health of patients, with substantive differences in the side-effect profile and in the patients in which these side-effects occur. To understand and identify these risk groups could help to prevent the occurrence of the undesired effects. A prospective study, with 24 months follow-up, was conducted in order to analyse the physical health of severe mental patients under maintenance treatment with atypical antipsychotics, as well as to determine any predictive parameters at anthropometric and/or analytical level for good/bad outcome of metabolic syndrome in these patients. There were no significant changes in the physical and biochemical parameters individually analysed throughout the different visits. The baseline abdominal circumference (lambda Wilks P=.013) and baseline HDL-cholesterol levels (lambda Wilks P=.000) were the parameters that seem to be more relevant above the rest of the metabolic syndrome constituents diagnosis criteria as predictors in the long-term. In the search for predictive factors of metabolic syndrome, HDL-cholesterol and abdominal circumference at the time of inclusion were selected, as such that the worst the baseline results were, the higher probability of long-term improvement. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Asenapine, blonanserin, iloperidone, lurasidone, and sertindole: distinctive clinical characteristics of 5 novel atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Han, Changsu; Lee, Soo-Jung; Patkar, Ashwin A; Masand, Prakash S; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious, chronic, and devastating mental illness with a substantial impact on psychological, physical, social, and economical areas of an individual and society. To treat such critical mental illness, a number of first-generation (typical) and second-generation (atypical) antipsychotics are currently available in the market. Despite such treatment options, most of patients with schizophrenia have a poor treatment outcome and become treatment resistant, causing continual deterioration on positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms, resulting in impairment of socio-occupational functioning. Hence, additional novel antipsychotics with better efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles are needed to enable clinicians to diversify treatment options to improve treatment of schizophrenia. Recently, the 3 antipsychotics, including iloperidone (2009), asenapine (2009), and lurasidone (2010), have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Two other atypical antipsychotics, including sertindole and blonanserin, are approved and used outside the United States for treatment of schizophrenia. Sertindole, after it has been voluntarily suspended by the manufacturer in 1998 due to its potential risk in causing cardiovascular-related death, was relaunched to the European market in 2005. More recently, blonanserin was approved in Japan (2008) and in Korea (2009) for the management of schizophrenia. Individual antipsychotic may have differential pros and cons compared with other antipsychotic in terms of efficacy, safety, tolerability, restoration of functional capacity, and economic aspect reflecting relapse prevention. The purpose of this review was to provide distinctive clinical characteristics and up-to-date of clinical trial data of the 5 novel atypical antipsychotics for the management of schizophrenia, which may deliver clinicians better understanding in the use of such atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia in clinical

  10. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Nursing Homes and Pharmaceutical Marketing

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Camilla B.; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Field, Terry S.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Kanaan, Abir O.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many nursing home (NH) residents are prescribed atypical antipsychotics despite US Food and Drug Administration warnings of increased risk of death in older adults with dementia. Aggressive pharmaceutical marketing has been cited as a potential cause, although data are scarce. The objectives of this study were to describe the current extent and type of pharmaceutical marketing in NHs in one state, and to provide preliminary evidence for the potential influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in NHs. DESIGN Nested mixed-methods, cross-sectional study of NHs in a cluster randomized trial. SETTING 41 NHs in Connecticut. PARTICIPANTS NH administrators, directors of nursing and medical directors (n = 93, response rate 75.6%). MEASUREMENTS Quantitative data, including prescription drug dispensing data (September 2009–August 2010) linked with Nursing Home Compare data (April 2011), were used to determine facility-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use, facility-level characteristics, NH staffing and NH quality. Qualitative data, including semi-structured interviews and surveys of NH leaders conducted in the first quarter of 2011, were used to determine encounters with pharmaceutical marketing. RESULTS Leadership at 46.3% of NHs (19/41) reported pharmaceutical marketing encounters, consisting of educational training, written/Internet-based materials and/or sponsored training. No association was detected between the level of atypical antipsychotic prescribing and reports of any pharmaceutical marketing by at least one NH leader. CONCLUSION NH leaders frequently encounter pharmaceutical marketing through a variety of ways, although the impact on atypical antipsychotic prescribing is unclear. PMID:25688605

  11. Comparative effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia: what have real-world trials taught us?

    PubMed

    Attard, Azizah; Taylor, David M

    2012-06-01

    Real-world, effectiveness studies add an important new dimension to the evaluation of the benefits of individual antipsychotics. Efficacy studies have already shown the unique effectiveness of clozapine, and suggested improved outcomes for olanzapine compared with some atypical antipsychotics and a reduced tendency to produce acute and chronic movement disorders for atypical compared with typical drugs. Recent effectiveness studies largely confirm these prior observations. The CATIE (Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness), CUtLASS (Cost Utility of the Latest Antipsychotic Drugs in Schizophrenia Study) and SOHO (Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes) programmes confirmed the superiority of clozapine over other antipsychotics; CATIE and SOHO also confirmed olanzapine as probably the second most effective antipsychotic. Effectiveness studies have confirmed the high incidence of adverse metabolic effects with clozapine, olanzapine and (with less certainty) quetiapine but the ZODIAC (Ziprasidone Observational Study of Cardiac Outcomes) study found no excess cardiovascular events or deaths for olanzapine compared with ziprasidone. Prior observations on reduced frequency of movement disorders for second-generation versus first-generation antipsychotics were also largely (but not uniformly) supported. Overall, recent real-world studies have done much to confirm prior observations from efficacy-based randomized, controlled trials.

  12. Iloperidone: a new benzisoxazole atypical antipsychotic drug. Is it novel enough to impact the crowded atypical antipsychotic market?

    PubMed

    Albers, Lawrence James; Musenga, Alessandro; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2008-01-01

    Iloperidone is a new-generation atypical antipsychotic agent, acting as a serotonin/dopamine (5-HT(2A)/D(2)) antagonist, under development by Vanda Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other psychiatric conditions. Chemically, iloperidone is a benzisoxazole, like risperidone, and shows a multiple receptor binding profile, sharing this feature with the other atypical antipsychotic agents. Administered orally, the drug is highly bound to plasma proteins and extensively metabolised. Several clinical trials have been carried out, to check efficacy, safety and side effects. In order to introduce iloperidone as an agent for the treatment of schizophrenia, a short overview of the disease and of the most important antipsychotic drugs available or under development will be reported. Iloperidone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented herein, together with an evaluation of clinical safety and efficacy results.

  13. Real-world Data on Atypical Antipsychotic Medication Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Cascade, Elisa; Kalali, Amir H; Mehra, Sagar; Meyer, Jonathan M

    2010-07-01

    In this article, we provide information on patient-reported side effects from a cross-section of real-world patients. Specifically, data on side effects were tabulated for patients taking at least one of the following atypical antipsychotic medications: aripiprazole, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone. Approximately 54 percent of the 353 respondents reported having experienced a side effect as a result of taking an atypical antipsychotic medication. Most common side effects mentioned included the following: weight gain/hunger, tiredness/lethargy, and lack of coordination/muscle problems, such as tenderness, twitches, and tremors. Of those experiencing a side effect, less than 25 percent reported this side effect to their physician.

  14. Hyperglycemia secondary to consumption of cocaine and atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Argente Villaplana, Carlos R; Civera Andrés, Miguel; Real Collado, José T; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Ascaso Gimilio, Juan F; Carmena Rodríguez, Rafael

    2008-10-01

    Drugs such as cocaine and atypical antipsychotic agents, such as olanzapine, are sometimes related to hyperglycemia. Whereas cocaine raises plasma glucose through catecholamine release, atypical antipsychotic agents mainly increase appetite and induce weight gain and the development of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the latter group of drugs also act independently from weight gain or adiposity, due to inhibition of beta pancreatic cells and reduction of peripheral insulin action. We present the case of a 29-year-old non-diabetic woman with severe acute hyperglycemia in the context of a suicide attempt through intake of olanzapine and cocaine. After discontinuation of olanzapine and cocaine consumption, glycemia was immediately normalized without subsequent diagnosis of diabetes.

  15. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Just, Marek J

    2015-01-01

    Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido), physiological arousal (lubrication/erection), orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders’ treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (α-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic). Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. PMID:26185449

  16. Quetiapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Srisurapanont, Manit; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (’atypical’) antipsychotic drugs have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. It is not clear how the effects of the various second generation antipsychotic drugs differ. Objectives To evaluate the effects of quetiapine compared with other second generation antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007), inspected references of all identified studies, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information. Selection criteria We included all randomised control trials comparing oral quetiapine with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 21 randomised control trials (RCTs) with 4101 participants. These trials provided data on four comparisons - quetiapine versus clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone or ziprasidone. A major limitation to all findings is the high number of participants leaving studies prematurely (57.6%) and the substantial risk of biases in studies. Efficacy data favoured olanzapine and risperidone compared with quetiapine (PANSS total score versus olanzapine:10 RCTs, n=1449, WMD 3.66 CI 1.93 to 5.39; versus risperidone: 9 RCTs, n=1953, WMD 3.09 CI 1.01 to 5.16), but clinical meaning is unclear

  17. Review of the evidence for the long-term efficacy of atypical antipsychotic agents in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia and related psychoses.

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin S; Stewart, Duncan W

    2006-11-01

    In schizophrenia, the objectives of long-term maintenance therapy are to achieve continuous relief from psychotic symptoms, to prevent relapse, to optimize patient functioning and improve quality of life. It is now generally accepted that atypical antipsychotic agents are more effective than conventional agents in achieving these goals over the short term. In order to define the role of atypical antipsychotics as maintenance treatment for schizophrenia, studies published between January 1994 and November 2005 that evaluated the long-term efficacy (> or =1 year) of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed as identified from literature researches using MEDLINE and EMBASE. The primary research parameters were 'atypical', 'antipsychotic', 'schizophrenia', 'relapse', 'long-term', 'maintenance' and 'efficacy'. Aspects of safety were also considered for these agents. Results from these long-term studies consistently demonstrated that atypical antipsychotics have substantial advantages over oral conventional antipsychotics as proven by fewer relapses, more effective symptom control and a lower incidence of movement disorders, although some atypical agents were associated with a higher incidence of weight gain. However, due to issues of compliance, the clinical advantage of oral atypical antipsychotics has often been limited. As such, the use of long-acting preparations of atypical antipsychotics, which provide consistent and sustained drug coverage, warrants further investigation for the successful long-term management of patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Chlorpromazine equivalent doses for the newer atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Woods, Scott W

    2003-06-01

    Several clinical and research applications require an estimation of therapeutic dose equivalence across antipsychotic medications. Since the advent of the newer atypical antipsychotics, new dose equivalent estimations have been needed. The reported minimum effective dose was identified for each newer atypical antipsychotic medication and for haloperidol across all available fixed-dose placebo-controlled studies. Reported minimum effective dose equivalence ratios to haloperidol were then converted to chlorpromazine equivalents using the "2 mg of haloperidol equals 100 mg of chlorpromazine" convention. To identify the fixed-dose studies, the following sources were searched until June 2002: MEDLINE, the bibliographies of identified reports, published meta-analyses and reviews, Cochrane reviews, Freedom of Information Act material available from the Food and Drug Administration, and abstracts from several scientific meetings from 1997 to 2002. Doses equivalent to 100 mg/day of chlorpromazine were 2 mg/day for risperidone, 5 mg/day for olanzapine, 75 mg/day for quetiapine, 60 mg/day for ziprasidone, and 7.5 mg/day for aripiprazole. These equivalency estimates may be useful for clinical and research purposes. The source of the dose equivalency estimation is evidence-based and consistent across medication.

  19. Radioreceptor binding profile of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Bymaster, F P; Calligaro, D O; Falcone, J F; Marsh, R D; Moore, N A; Tye, N C; Seeman, P; Wong, D T

    1996-02-01

    The affinities of olanzapine, clozapine, haloperidol, and four potential antipsychotics were compared on binding to the neuronal receptors of a number of neurotransmitters. In both rat tissues and cell lines transfected with human receptors olanzapine had high affinity for dopamine D1, D2, D4, serotonin (5HT)2A, 5HT2C, 5HT3, alpha 1-adrenergic, histamine H1, and five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Olanzapine had lower affinity for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and relatively low affinity for 5HT1 subtypes, GABAA, beta-adrenergic receptors, and benzodiazepine binding sites. The receptor binding affinities for olanzapine was quite similar in tissues from rat and human brain. The binding profile of olanzapine was comparable to the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, while the binding profiles for haloperidol, resperidone, remoxipride, Org 5222, and seroquel were substantially different from that of clozapine. The receptor binding profile of olanzapine is consistent with the antidopaminergic, antiserotonergic, and antimuscarinic activity observed in animal models and predicts atypical antipsychotic activity in man.

  20. Atypical antipsychotic use among Medicaid-insured children and adolescents: duration, safety, and monitoring implications.

    PubMed

    Burcu, Mehmet; Zito, Julie Magno; Ibe, Aloysius; Safer, Daniel J

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the increased use of atypical antipsychotic medications, often for unlabeled indications including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), has been profound. This study aims to characterize duration of atypical antipsychotic use by age group and Medicaid eligibility category, and among youth with noncomorbid ADHD. Administrative data on 266,590 youth 2-17 years of age, and continuously enrolled in a mid-Atlantic state Medicaid program in 2006, were assessed in terms of median days of atypical antipsychotic use using bivariate analyses and multivariable quantile regression. Also, in a subanalysis of youth diagnosed with ADHD without any reported psychiatric comorbidities (i.e., noncomorbid ADHD), age-specific adjusted odds and adjusted median days of atypical antipsychotic use by Medicaid eligibility category were assessed. Additionally, patterns of use of single atypical antipsychotic regimens and two concomitant atypical antipsychotic regimens were described. Overall, the median annual duration of atypical antipsychotic use was 180 days (interquartile range: 69-298 days). Children (2-12-year-olds) had longer durations of use than did adolescents (13-17-year-olds) (median 192 vs. 179 days), respectively. In the absence of any comorbid psychiatric diagnosis, ADHD-diagnosed foster care youth had more than threefold greater adjusted odds of atypical antipsychotic use than did youth enrolled in income-eligible Medicaid categories. Nearly one third of such ADHD-diagnosed foster care youth received atypical antipsychotics regardless of age group, with annual duration of use >250 median days in 2-12-year-olds. In concomitant atypical antipsychotic regimens, risperidone, aripiprazole, and quetiapine were the most common. Exposure to atypical antipsychotics in Medicaid-insured youth, in particular for children in foster care and those diagnosed with ADHD, was substantial, warranting outcomes research for long-term effectiveness, safety

  1. Broadened Use Of Atypical Antipsychotics: Safety, Effectiveness, And Policy Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Stephen; Olfson, Mark; Huang, Cecilia; Pincus, Harold; Gerhard, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are increasingly used for a wide range of clinical indications in diverse populations, including privately and publicly insured youth and elderly nursing home residents. These trends heighten policy challenges for payers, patients, and clinicians related to appropriate prescribing and management, patient safety, and clinical effectiveness. For clinicians and patients, balancing risks and benefits is challenging, given the paucity of effective alternative treatments. For health care systems, regulators, and policymakers, challenges include developing the evidence base on comparative risks and benefits; defining measures of treatment quality; and implementing policies that encourage evidence-based practices while avoiding unduly burdensome restrictions. PMID:19622537

  2. Hospitalization and cost after switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonlue, Tuanthon; Subongkot, Suphat; Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Pattanaprateep, Oraluck; Suanchang, Orabhorn; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Background Several clinical practice guidelines suggest using atypical over typical antipsychotics in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, cost-containment policy urged restricting usage of atypical antipsychotics and switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics. Objective This study aimed to evaluate clinical and economic impacts of switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand. Methods From October 2010 through September 2013, a retrospective cohort study was performed utilizing electronic database of two tertiary hospitals. Schizophrenia patients aged 18 years or older and being treated with atypical antipsychotics were included. Patients were classified as atypical antipsychotic switching group if they switched to typical antipsychotics after 180 days of continual atypical antipsychotics therapy. Outcomes were schizophrenia-related hospitalization and total health care cost. Logistic and Poisson regression were used to evaluate the risk of hospitalization, and generalized linear model with gamma distribution was used to determine the health care cost. All analyses were adjusted by employing propensity score and multivariable analyses. All cost estimates were adjusted according to 2013 consumer price index and converted to US$ at an exchange rate of 32.85 Thai bahts/US$. Results A total of 2,354 patients were included. Of them, 166 (7.1%) patients switched to typical antipsychotics. The adjusted odds ratio for schizophrenia-related hospitalization in atypical antipsychotic switching group was 1.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–2.83). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 2.44 (95% CI 1.57–3.79) for schizophrenia-related hospitalizations. The average total health care cost was lower in patients with antipsychotic switching (−$64; 95% CI −$459 to $332). Conclusion Switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia-related hospitalization

  3. Self-limiting Atypical Antipsychotics-induced Edema: Clinical Cases and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Musa Usman; Abdullahi, Aminu Taura

    2016-01-01

    A number of atypical antipsychotics have been associated with peripheral edema. The exact cause is not known. We report two cases of olanzapine-induced edema and a brief review of atypical antipsychotic-induced edema, possible risk factors, etiology, and clinical features. The recommendation is given on different methods of managing this side effect. PMID:27335511

  4. Cognitive Function and Depression in Symptom Resolution in Schizophrenia Patients Treated with an Atypical Antipsychotic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stip, Emmanuel; Mancini-Marie, Adham

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate which cognitive and affective features contribute most to responder/non-responder group separation during a switching trial with atypical antipsychotic. Design: A prospective open trial with an atypical antipsychotic (olanzapine). Patients: One hundred and thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for…

  5. Cognitive Function and Depression in Symptom Resolution in Schizophrenia Patients Treated with an Atypical Antipsychotic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stip, Emmanuel; Mancini-Marie, Adham

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate which cognitive and affective features contribute most to responder/non-responder group separation during a switching trial with atypical antipsychotic. Design: A prospective open trial with an atypical antipsychotic (olanzapine). Patients: One hundred and thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for…

  6. Restless leg syndrome associated with atypical antipsychotics: current status, pathophysiology, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shilpa; Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder, frequently of unclear origin, which is often associated with significant distress. There are a few case reports of atypical antipsychotic agents (AAP) causing RLS. The pathophysiological mechanisms resulting in emergence of these movements suggest central dopaminergic dysfunction. Dopamine agonists and L-dopa reduce the symptoms of RLS, and some agents that block the dopaminergic system aggravate RLS. Genetic influences are implicated in RLS and an association between gene polymorphisms and antipyschotic-associated onset of RLS has been postulated. Greater awareness of potential causes of RLS, and its differentiation from akathisia and illness related agitation might help in reducing the distress associated with it and improving patient compliance in patients using atypical antipsychotic agents.

  7. Predicting Pharmacokinetic Stability by Multiple Oral Administration of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sugita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simulation technique with pharmacokinetic parameters of each atypical antipsychotic collected from package inserts, the fluctuation index was calculated. Among the antipsychotics, the indices varied from 0.018 to 1.9, depending on dosing regimens, formulations and several pharmacokinetic properties. The order of simulated fluctuation index is active-moiety aripiprazole (b.i.d.)

  8. Role of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Hershenberg, Rachel; Gros, Daniel F; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Evidence-based treatment approaches for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) comprise psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of the two. First-line pharmacotherapy agents include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and, in certain European guidelines, pregabalin, which gained European Commission approval. Although short- and long-term efficacy have been established for these agents in controlled trials, response rates of 60-70 % are insufficient, remission rates are relatively modest, and relapse rates considerable. Moreover, questions increasingly arise regarding tolerability and side-effect profiles. As an alternative, antipsychotics have long been of interest for the treatment of anxiety disorders, but investigation had been tempered by their potential for irreversible side effects. With the improved side-effect profiles of atypical antipsychotics, these agents are increasingly being investigated across Axis I disorders. Atypical antipsychotics such as quetiapine, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and risperidone have been shown to be helpful in addressing a range of anxiety and depressive symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders, and have since been used in the treatment of a range of mood and anxiety disorders. In this article, we review the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics as adjunctive therapy and/or monotherapy for individuals with GAD, a currently off-label indication. The most evidence has accumulated for quetiapine. Findings suggest that approximately 50 % of participants tolerate the side effects, most commonly sedation and fatigue. Among this subset, those who continue treatment demonstrate significant reductions in anxiety when used as adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. The appropriateness of the use of antipsychotics in the treatment of GAD is discussed.

  9. Incidence of Tardive Dyskinesia with Atypical and Conventional Antipsychotic Medications: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Scott W.; Morgenstern, Hal; Saksa, John R.; Walsh, Barbara C.; Sullivan, Michelle C.; Money, Roy; Hawkins, Keith A.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza V.; Glazer, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Most previous studies of the incidence of tardive dyskinesia with atypical compared to conventional antipsychotics have not had tardive dyskinesia as their primary focus. The current study aimed to compare the incidence of tardive dyskinesia with atypical vs. conventional antipsychotics using methods similar to those from a previous prospective cohort study at our site in the 1980s. Method 352 initially tardive dyskinesia-free psychiatric outpatients were examined for a new diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia every 6 months for up to 4 years at a community mental health center. At baseline, subjects were receiving conventional antipsychotics only (23%), atypicals only (64%), or both (14%). Only 26 subjects had never received conventional antipsychotics. Results Compared with subjects treated with conventional antipsychotics alone since the previous visit, the adjusted tardive dyskinesia incidence rate-ratio for subjects treated with atypical antipsychotics alone was 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.29 to 1.64). The incidence and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia was similar to previous findings at this site in the 1980s. Conclusion The incidence of tardive dyskinesia with recent exposure to atypical antipsychotics alone was more similar to that for conventional antipsychotics than in most previous studies. Despite high penetration of atypical antipsychotics into clinical practice, the incidence and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia appeared relatively unchanged since the 1980s. Clinicians should continue to monitor for tardive dyskinesia, and researchers should continue to pursue efforts to treat or prevent it. PMID:20156410

  10. Atypical Antipsychotic Use in the Treatment of Psychosis in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Raphael J.; Regno, Paula Del

    2000-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are a class of novel agents increasingly employed for the treatment of psychotic disorders. The pharmacodynamic properties of the atypicals appear to impact a broader spectrum of psychotic symptoms than had been appreciated with older generation antipsychotics. In addition, the atypical agents appear to have a reduced risk of neurologic side effects compared with conventional antipsychotic use. Both of these features enhance the appeal of the atypical antipsychotics and may be associated with enhanced patient compliance. The atypical antipsychotics appear to be effective for schizophrenia as well as other psychotic disorders, including schizoaffective disorder and mood disorders with psychotic features. Consequently, atypical antipsychotics are now considered to be the first-line treatment for schizophrenia, with the exception of clozapine, which is considered a second-line agent because of risks associated with its use. This review will discuss the literature on atypical antipsychotic efficacy in psychotic disorders. Issues related to antipsychotic use, dosing, adverse effects, and drug interactions are also discussed. PMID:15014629

  11. Severe Tardive Dystonia on Low Dose Short Duration Exposure to Atypical Antipsychotics: Factors Explored

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Nilanjan C.; Sheth, Shabina A.; Mehta, Ritambhara Y.; Dave, Kamlesh R.

    2017-01-01

    Tardive dystonia (TD) is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medications, more with typical antipsychotics, that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Studies show that newer atypical antipsychotics have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report a case of 20-year-old male with hyperthymic temperament and borderline intellectual functioning, who developed severe TD after low dose short duration exposure to atypical antipsychotic risperidone and then olanzapine. The goal of this paper is to alert the reader to be judicious and cautious before using casual low dose second generation antipsychotics in patient with no core psychotic features, hyperthymic temperament, or borderline intellectual functioning suggestive of organic brain damage, who are more prone to develop adverse effects such as TD and monitor the onset of TD in patients taking atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28250568

  12. Atypical antipsychotic drugs and risk of ischaemic stroke: population based retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sudeep S; Rochon, Paula A; Herrmann, Nathan; Lee, Philip E; Sykora, Kathy; Gunraj, Nadia; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Marras, Connie; Wodchis, Walter P; Mamdani, Muhammad

    2005-01-01

    Objective To compare the incidence of admissions to hospital for stroke among older adults with dementia receiving atypical or typical antipsychotics. Design Population based retrospective cohort study. Setting Ontario, Canada. Patients 32 710 older adults (≤ 65 years) with dementia (17 845 dispensed an atypical antipsychotic and 14 865 dispensed a typical antipsychotic). Main outcome measures Admission to hospital with the most responsible diagnosis (single most important condition responsible for the patient's admission) of ischaemic stroke. Observation of patients until they were either admitted to hospital with ischaemic stroke, stopped taking antipsychotics, died, or the study ended. Results After adjustment for potential confounders, participants receiving atypical antipsychotics showed no significant increase in risk of ischaemic stroke compared with those receiving typical antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.26). This finding was consistent in a series of subgroup analyses, including ones of individual atypical antipsychotic drugs (risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine) and selected subpopulations of the main cohorts. Conclusion Older adults with dementia who take atypical antipsychotics have a similar risk of ischaemic stroke to those taking typical antipsychotics. PMID:15668211

  13. Amisulpride the 'atypical' atypical antipsychotic--comparison to haloperidol, risperidone and clozapine.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Sridhar; Reckless, Greg E; Barlow, Karren B L; Nobrega, José N; Kapur, Shitij

    2008-10-01

    Amisulpride's high and selective affinity for dopamine D2/3 (Ki 1.3/2.4 nM) receptors, lack of affinity for serotonin receptors, and its unusually high therapeutic doses (400-800 mg/day) makes it unique among atypical antipsychotics and prompted us to compare its actions with other antipsychotics in animal models. Amisulpride's effects on amphetamine and phencyclidine induced locomotor activity (AIL/PIL), conditioned avoidance response, catalepsy (CAT), subcortical Fos expression, and plasma prolactin was correlated to its time-course striatal D2/3 and prefrontal 5-HT2 receptor occupancy (D(2/3)/5-HT2RO); in comparison to haloperidol, clozapine, and risperidone. Unlike the atypicals clozapine and risperidone, amisulpride lacked 5-HT2RO and showed a 'delayed' pattern of D2/3RO: 43, 60 and 88% after 1, 2 and 6 h (100 mg/kg), respectively, despite a quick onset (1 h) and decline (6 h) of prolactin elevation. While haloperidol and risperidone were effective at D2RO>60%, clozapine at D2/3RO<50%, amisulpride was effective only when its D2RO exceeded 60% with a delayed latency and lasted longer than other antipsychotics. CAT was observed for haloperidol and risperidone when D2RO exceeded 80%, while in the case of amisulpride, CAT was not observed even when doses exceeded 90% D2/3RO. Amisulpride also displayed functional limbic selectivity in Fos expression like the other atypicals. Amisulpride's "delayed" functional profile on acute administration and the need for high doses is most likely due to its poor blood-brain-barrier penetration; however, it is distinct from other atypicals in showing low motor side-effects, activity against phencyclidine, and a mesolimbic preference, despite no action on serotonin receptors.

  14. Acute hyperglycemia associated with short-term use of atypical antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Liao, T Vivian; Phan, Stephanie V

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of metabolic disturbances associated with long-term use of antipsychotic medications has been widely reported in the literature. The use of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) has gained popularity due to a lower potential for adverse effects compared with conventional antipsychotics. However, current studies evaluating safety and efficacy of antipsychotics in the ICU setting do not include metabolic parameters as a potential adverse effect that requires monitoring. It is thought that long-term adverse effects of antipsychotics may be out of context for the intensive care setting. A literature review was conducted to investigate the prevalence of acute hyperglycemia associated with short-term use of antipsychotics, with the purpose of reviewing evidence that hyperglycemia may occur even with short-term use of atypical antipsychotics. A MEDLINE search for acute hyperglycemia from short-term use of antipsychotics resulted in studies involving animal models and healthy volunteers. These studies indicate that acute hyperglycemia may occur after short-term treatment. A review of the literature shows preliminary evidence to suggest that atypical antipsychotics impact glucose sensitivity and induce insulin resistance even after a single dose. Although no studies have been conducted evaluating the impact of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients from the short-term use of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of delirium, the potential to affect clinical outcomes exist and warrants further research in this area.

  15. Atypical antipsychotics suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines and up-regulate interleukin-10 in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Haruhiko; Futamura, Takashi; Mitsumoto, Yasuhide; Maeda, Kenji; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2009-03-17

    There is considerable evidence that schizophrenia is associated with immune system dysregulation. For example, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of proinflammatory cytokines are significantly increased in schizophrenic patients, and their normalization correlates with improvement in psychotic symptoms. In fact, typical and atypical antipsychotics are reported to modulate immune function in in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effect of antipsychotics, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and haloperidol, on serum cytokine levels in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. Atypical antipsychotics, such as clozapine, olanzapine and risperidone, but not haloperidol, suppressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6, and up-regulated IL-10. Moreover, only clozapine, robustly increased the serum levels of IL-10. Clozapine reproduced its anti-inflammatory feature in polyinsinic-polycytidylic acid sodium salt (Poly[I:C])-induced inflammation. Thus, the anti-inflammatory effect of clozapine would adapt to inflammation induced by some varieties of antigens. Several receptor ligands, such as 8-OH-DPAT, ketanserin, prazosin and scopolamine, were also examined as to their anti-inflammatory effects on serum cytokine levels in LPS-treated mice. Ketanserin and prazosin, but not 8-OH-DPAT nor scopolamine, behaved similarly to atypical antipsychotics. However, the remarkable increase of serum IL-10 level observed in clozapine was not detected in ketanserin and prazosin. These results suggest the unique efficacy of atypical antipsychotics in the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines, and the increase of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10.

  16. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of early-onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hrdlicka, Michal; Dudova, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) have been successfully used in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS). This review summarizes the randomized, double-blind, controlled studies of AAPs in EOS, including clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. No significant differences in efficacy between AAPs were found, with the exception of clozapine and ziprasidone. Clozapine demonstrated superior efficacy in treatment-resistant patients with EOS, whereas ziprasidone failed to demonstrate efficacy in the treatment of EOS. Our review also focuses on the onset of action and weight gain associated with AAPs. The data on onset of action of AAPs in pediatric psychiatry are scanty and inconsistent. Olanzapine appears to cause the most significant weight gain in patients with EOS, while ziprasidone and aripiprazole seem to cause the least. PMID:25897226

  17. Improving adherence to antipsychotic pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masand, Prakash S; Narasimhan, Meera

    2006-01-01

    To review the consequences of nonadherence to antipsychotic pharmacotherapy in patients with schizophrenia, as well as associated risk factors for nonadherence and methods of improving adherence. Review of the literature based on a MEDLINE search on the terms schizophrenia and adherence or compliance, limited to the English language, supplemented by the author's own knowledge of the topic. Nonadherence to antipsychotic therapy is a common reason for relapse and rehospitalization of patients with schizophrenia and thus contributes to the high cost of treating psychoses, adverse events, and lack of insight. Comorbid substance abuse, little family involvement, and a poor clinician-patient relationship are among the risk factors for nonadherence. Patients with a negative attitude towards treatment, which can result from adverse events, are also more likely to be nonadherent. Strategies to improve adherence include optimizing antipsychotic therapy, minimizing adverse events, encouraging patient participation in psychoeducational programs, treating comorbid substance abuse disorders, involving family members in the treatment process, and forging a close therapeutic relationship with the patient. Improving adherence is difficult but necessary for achieving optimal treatment outcomes. Careful selection of drug therapy, with emphasis on a drug's tolerability, combined with nonpharmacologic interventions, may help decrease nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Atypical antipsychotics for disruptive behaviour disorders in children and youths.

    PubMed

    Loy, Jik H; Merry, Sally N; Hetrick, Sarah E; Stasiak, Karolina

    2017-08-09

    This is an update of the original Cochrane Review, last published in 2012 (Loy 2012). Children and youths with disruptive behaviour disorders may present to health services, where they may be treated with atypical antipsychotics. There is increasing usage of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of disruptive behaviour disorders. To evaluate the effect and safety of atypical antipsychotics, compared to placebo, for treating disruptive behaviour disorders in children and youths. The aim was to evaluate each drug separately rather than the class effect, on the grounds that each atypical antipsychotic has different pharmacologic binding profile (Stahl 2013) and that this is clinically more useful. In January 2017, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and two trials registers. Randomised controlled trials of atypical antipsychotics versus placebo in children and youths aged up to and including 18 years, with a diagnosis of disruptive behaviour disorders, including comorbid ADHD. The primary outcomes were aggression, conduct problems and adverse events (i.e. weight gain/changes and metabolic parameters). The secondary outcomes were general functioning, noncompliance, other adverse events, social functioning, family functioning, parent satisfaction and school functioning. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors (JL and KS) independently collected, evaluated and extracted data. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the evidence. We performed meta-analyses for each of our primary outcomes, except for metabolic parameters, due to inadequate outcome data. We included 10 trials (spanning 2000 to 2014), involving a total of 896 children and youths aged five to 18 years. Bar two trials, all came from an outpatient setting. Eight trials assessed risperidone, one assessed quetiapine and one assessed ziprasidone. Nine trials assessed acute efficacy (over four to 10 weeks); one of which combined

  19. Newer atypical antipsychotic medication in comparison to clozapine: a systematic review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Tuunainen, Arja; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Gilbody, Simon

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of newer atypical antipsychotic drugs in comparison to clozapine for schizophrenia. Publications in all languages were searched from all relevant databases and all randomized controlled trials comparing clozapine with newer atypical drugs were included. The review and meta-analysis includes eight studies, most of them short in duration. Newer atypical drugs were broadly similar to clozapine when improvement was measured using a psychosis symptom rating scale or a global index. There was a trend for clozapine to be more effective than the others for positive symptoms, and less effective for the negative symptoms. The adverse effect profile of clozapine and newer atypical drugs was dissimilar: while clozapine produced more fatigue, hypersalivation, and orthostatic dizziness, new atypical drugs, with the exception of olanzapine, produced more extrapyramidal symptoms. As these results were obtained from few studies and a relatively small amount of patients, the equal effectiveness and tolerability of new atypical drugs in comparison with clozapine is not yet demonstrated. More trials of sufficient power, with longer duration, and measuring clinically important outcomes are urgently needed.

  20. Role of atypical antipsychotics in rapid cycling bipolar disorder: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Melanie L

    2011-05-01

    The role of atypical antipsychotics in the management of bipolar disorder continues to expand. This review summarizes the literature on use of atypicals in rapid cycling bipolar disorder in clinical practice and highlights areas for future study. A PubMed search was done using keywords rapid cycling, atypical antipsychotics, refractory bipolar, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. Reference lists from original peer-reviewed articles, review articles, and book chapters were reviewed and articles were extracted. Data on the use of atypical antipsychotics in rapid cycling bipolar disorder are sparse. Atypical antipsychotics may be effective as anti-manic agents during acute mania and may reduce depressive symptoms when used for short and intermediate durations. Their efficacy as mood stabilizers in maintenance therapy has not been demonstrated. The study of atypical antipsychotics in rapid cycling bipolar disorder is in its infancy. Although atypical antipsychotics are useful in acute mania, current data do not support their use as maintenance agents. Future double-blind, randomized studies are needed to establish their efficacy relative to traditional mood stabilizers and their utility as adjuvant agents in this subset of patients.

  1. Implications for atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: neurocognition effects and a neuroprotective hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Jann, Michael W

    2004-12-01

    Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia occurs in the early phases of the disease and remains throughout its course. The basis for cognition lies in two main brain regions: the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and proton magnetic spectroscopy studies have shown that prefrontal cortex and hippocampus activity and cell density are lower in patients with schizophrenia than in healthy controls. Dopamine remains the fundamental neurotransmitter involved with schizophrenia. Catechol- O -methyltransferase accounts for about 60% of dopamine metabolism in the prefrontal cortex. Functional polymorphism for the catechol- O -methyltransferase genotypes has been identified in patients with schizophrenia. Those with the valine-valine genotype demonstrate rapid inactivation of dopamine, and performance in cognitive testing in patients is poorer with this allele than with other genotypes. N -methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate acid receptors are also strongly associated with cognitive impairment. Changes occur in apolipoproteins D and E, cholinesterase enzyme activity, neurotensin, and neural growth factors, leading to a possible neurodegenerative process and cognitive impairment in patients with schizophrenia. A fundamental link between psychosis and neurocognition probably arises from complex interactions between these systems at the intracellular secondary messenger system and with protein phosphorylation. Atypical antipsychotics evaluated in receptor models, cell cultures, and animal behavior paradigms indicate that these agents may provide neuroprotective effects. Clinical studies with atypical antipsychotics have consistently demonstrated improvement in cognitive symptoms, and such improvement appears to be correlated with improvement of negative symptoms. A neurodevelopmental model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia aids in understanding why atypical

  2. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Depressive and Psychotic Symptoms in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Stefano; Di Vittorio, Cristina; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this naturalistic study was to investigate whether treatment with clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics for at least 2 years was associated with a reduction in psychotic and depressive symptoms and an improvement in chronic schizophrenia patients' awareness of their illness. Methods. Twenty-three adult outpatients (15 men and 8 women) treated with clozapine and 23 patients (16 men and 7 women) treated with other atypical antipsychotics were included in the study. Psychotic symptoms were evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), depressive symptoms were assessed with the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), and insight was assessed with the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD). Results. The sample as a whole had a significant reduction in positive, negative, and general symptoms, whereas the reduction in depression was significant only for patients with CDSS scores of 5 and higher at the baseline. At the follow-up, patients treated with other atypical antipsychotics reported a greater reduction in depression than patients treated with clozapine, but not when limiting the analyses to those with clinically relevant depression. Conclusions. Atypical antipsychotics may be effective in reducing psychotic and depressive symptoms and in improving insight in patients with chronic schizophrenia, with no differences in the profiles of efficacy between compounds. PMID:23401771

  3. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of depressive and psychotic symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia: a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Innamorati, Marco; Baratta, Stefano; Di Vittorio, Cristina; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Amore, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this naturalistic study was to investigate whether treatment with clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics for at least 2 years was associated with a reduction in psychotic and depressive symptoms and an improvement in chronic schizophrenia patients' awareness of their illness. Methods. Twenty-three adult outpatients (15 men and 8 women) treated with clozapine and 23 patients (16 men and 7 women) treated with other atypical antipsychotics were included in the study. Psychotic symptoms were evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), depressive symptoms were assessed with the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), and insight was assessed with the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD). Results. The sample as a whole had a significant reduction in positive, negative, and general symptoms, whereas the reduction in depression was significant only for patients with CDSS scores of 5 and higher at the baseline. At the follow-up, patients treated with other atypical antipsychotics reported a greater reduction in depression than patients treated with clozapine, but not when limiting the analyses to those with clinically relevant depression. Conclusions. Atypical antipsychotics may be effective in reducing psychotic and depressive symptoms and in improving insight in patients with chronic schizophrenia, with no differences in the profiles of efficacy between compounds.

  4. A potential mechanism underlying atypical antipsychotics-induced lipid disturbances.

    PubMed

    Cai, H L; Tan, Q Y; Jiang, P; Dang, R L; Xue, Y; Tang, M M; Xu, P; Deng, Y; Li, H D; Yao, J K

    2015-10-20

    Previous findings suggested that a four-protein complex, including sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), SREBP-cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), insulin-induced gene (INSIG) and progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), within the endoplasmic reticulum appears to be an important regulator responsible for atypical antipsychotic drug (AAPD)-induced lipid disturbances. In the present study, effects of typical antipsychotic drug and AAPDs as well as treatment outcome of steroid antagonist mifepristone (MIF) on the PGRMC1/INSIG/SCAP/SREBP pathway were investigated in rat liver using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis. In addition, serum triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, free fatty acids and various hormones including progesterone, corticosterone and insulin were measured simultaneously. Following treatment with clozapine or risperidone, both lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis were enhanced via inhibition of PGRMC1/INSIG-2 and activation of SCAP/SREBP expressions. Such metabolic disturbances, however, were not demonstrated in rats treated with aripiprazole (ARI) or haloperidol (HAL). Moreover, the add-on treatment of MIF was effective in reversing the AAPD-induced lipid disturbances by upregulating the expression of PGRMC1/INSIG-2 and subsequent downregulation of SCAP/SREBP. Taken together, our findings suggest that disturbances in lipid metabolism can occur at an early stage of AAPD treatment before the presence of weight gain. Such metabolic defects can be modified by an add-on treatment of steroid antagonist MIF enhancing the PGRMC1 pathway. Thus, it is likely that PGRMC1/INSIG-2 signaling may be a therapeutic target for AAPD-induced weight gain.

  5. Atypical antipsychotics in the management of delirium: a review of the empirical literature.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Soenke; Breitbart, William

    2005-09-01

    To review the existing literature of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of delirium and make recommendations regarding their use in the treatment of delirium. I conducted a literature search in Pubmed, Psychlit, and Embase for studies using atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of delirium. In the absence of studies, case reports were used. Overall 13 studies examined the use of risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine, two cases were reported about ziprasidone, and no publication was found using aripiprazole in the treatment of delirium. Among the existing studies were retrospective and prospective, open label studies in addition to one with a double blind design using risperidone. Risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine may be all similarly effective in the treatment of delirium, whereas there may be limited efficacy in the use of olanzapine in the hypoactive subtype of delirium in elderly populations, which may generalize to the other atypical antipsychotics. The use of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of delirium is safe and carries a low burden of side effects. Although atypical antipsychotics are widely used in the treatment of delirium, well-designed studies do not exist. Among the existing studies, stronger data supports the use of risperidone and olanzapine, and also quetiapine may be considered in the treatment of delirium. Recommendations are made based on the existing data and literature. The need for well-designed studies to validate the use of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of delirium continues.

  6. Association of Typical versus Atypical Antipsychotics with Symptoms and Quality of Life in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Koichiro; Takahashi, Terumichi; Morinobu, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Background Several reports on patients with chronic schizophrenia suggest that atypical versus typical antipsychotics are expected to lead to better quality of life (QOL) and cognitive function. Our aim was to examine the association of chronic treatment with typical or atypical antipsychotics with cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, QOL, and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in long-hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Methodology and Principal Findings The Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised (HDS-R), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale, translated into Japanese (JSQLS), and the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS) were used to evaluate cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, QOL, and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. We examined the correlation between the dose of antipsychotics and each measure derived from these psychometric tests. The student t-test was used to compare scores obtained from psychometric tests between patients receiving typical and atypical antipsychotics. Results showed significant correlations between chlorpromazine (CPZ)-equivalent doses of typical antipsychotics and atypical antipsychotics, and the total BPRS score and BPRS subscale scores for positive symptoms. CPZ-equivalent doses of typical antipsychotics were correlated with the JSQLS subscale score for dysfunction of psycho-social activity and DIEPSS score. Furthermore, the total BPRS scores, BPRS subscale score for positive symptoms, the JSQLS subscale score for dysfunction of psycho-social activity, and the DIEPSS score were significantly higher in patients receiving typical antipsychotics than atypical antipsychotics. Conclusion and Significance These findings suggest that long-term administration of typical antipsychotics has an unfavorable association with feelings of difficulties mixing in social situations in patients with chronic schizophrenia. PMID:22615901

  7. Association of typical versus atypical antipsychotics with symptoms and quality of life in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Koichiro; Takahashi, Terumichi; Morinobu, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Several reports on patients with chronic schizophrenia suggest that atypical versus typical antipsychotics are expected to lead to better quality of life (QOL) and cognitive function. Our aim was to examine the association of chronic treatment with typical or atypical antipsychotics with cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, QOL, and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in long-hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. The Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised (HDS-R), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale, translated into Japanese (JSQLS), and the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS) were used to evaluate cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, QOL, and drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. We examined the correlation between the dose of antipsychotics and each measure derived from these psychometric tests. The student t-test was used to compare scores obtained from psychometric tests between patients receiving typical and atypical antipsychotics. Results showed significant correlations between chlorpromazine (CPZ)-equivalent doses of typical antipsychotics and atypical antipsychotics, and the total BPRS score and BPRS subscale scores for positive symptoms. CPZ-equivalent doses of typical antipsychotics were correlated with the JSQLS subscale score for dysfunction of psycho-social activity and DIEPSS score. Furthermore, the total BPRS scores, BPRS subscale score for positive symptoms, the JSQLS subscale score for dysfunction of psycho-social activity, and the DIEPSS score were significantly higher in patients receiving typical antipsychotics than atypical antipsychotics. These findings suggest that long-term administration of typical antipsychotics has an unfavorable association with feelings of difficulties mixing in social situations in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

  8. Atypical antipsychotic drugs: current issues of safety and efficacy in the management of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vohora, Divya

    2007-07-01

    This review focuses on the comparative safety and efficacy profile of nine atypical antipsychotic drugs (amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine), which may ultimately affect the therapeutic options available for patients with schizophrenia. These antipsychotic compounds differ markedly in their potential to impact a number of quality-of-life measures. Furthermore, their differential effects on anxiety disorders, treatment-resistant depressive illness, cognitive functions and manic disorders may influence the selection of atypical antipsychotics for conditions associated with schizophrenia. The possible relevance of these parameters in evaluating the risk/benefit equation and probable involvement of varying receptor mechanisms is also discussed.

  9. Novel Atypical Antipsychotics: Metabolism and Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM).

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Protti, Michele; Mercolini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is continually developing and testing new drugs and drug candidates to satisfactorily address the needs of patients suffering from schizophrenia. In the last few years, some significant additions have been made to the list of widely available atypical antipsychotics. In particular, iloperidone, asenapine and lurasidone have been approved by the USA's Food and Drug Administration in 2009-10. In this paper, the most notable metabolic characteristics of these new drugs are addressed, with particular attention to their potential for pharmacokinetic interactions, and to the respective advantages and disadvantages in this regard. Moreover, current perspectives on the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of the considered drugs are discussed. Since TDM is most valuable when it allows the personalisation and optimisation of therapeutic practices, it is even more interesting in the case of novel drugs, such as those discussed here, whose real impact in terms of side and toxic effects on very large populations is still unknown. Some analytical notes, related to TDM application, are included for each drug.

  10. Estimating the Impact of Adherence to and Persistence with Atypical Antipsychotic Therapy on Health Care Costs and Risk of Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yawen; Ni, Weiyi

    2015-09-01

    antipsychotics led to lower total costs than poor adherence and persistence. Thus efforts should be made to improve adherence and persistence in patients taking atypical antipsychotics. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. Conventional and atypical antipsychotics in the elderly : a review.

    PubMed

    Gareri, Pietro; De Fazio, Pasquale; Stilo, Mariagrazia; Ferreri, Guido; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2003-01-01

    Psychoses are major mental disorders marked by derangement of personality and loss of contact with reality, and are common in the elderly. Various hypotheses suggest the pivotal role of abnormal neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems in psychotic patients, the most studied of which are the dopaminergic, serotonergic and glutamatergic systems. In particular, long-term treatment with antagonists at dopamine (D) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) receptors and agonists at glutamate receptors may improve symptoms. Treatment with antipsychotics is very common in the elderly and often indispensable. However, for successful treatment it is essential to have an adequate multidimensional assessment of the geriatric patient and of his or her polypathology and polypharmacy, together with knowledge of age-dependent pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic changes and drug-drug interactions.Conventional antipsychotics such as haloperidol, chlorpromazine, promazine, tiapride and zuclopenthixol are D(2)-receptor antagonists and inhibit dopaminergic neurotransmission in a dose-related manner. They decrease the intensity of all psychotic symptoms, although not necessarily to the same extent and with the same time course. Negative symptoms may persist to a much more striking extent than delusions, hallucinations and thought disorders, and there is a dose-related incidence of extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). Newer antipsychotics, such as clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine and ziprasidone, have a different receptor-binding profile, interacting with both D and 5-HT receptors; they less frequently cause EPS and are better tolerated in the elderly. Their use is advantageous because they are effective both on positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and may also be used in the treatment of behavioural disturbances in elderly and/or demented individuals. The use of clozapine is limited by the onset of agranulocytosis, whereas olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine

  12. Use Pattern and Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Bipolar Disorder, 1998–2002

    PubMed Central

    Demland, Jeffery A.; Jing, Yonghua; Kelton, Christina M. L.; Guo, Jeff J.; Li, Hong; Wigle, Patricia R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Postmarketing surveillance that identifies patients at high risk for receiving off-label medications will help ensure that the benefits of such treatment outweigh the risks. Because many off-label uses have little scientific support, tracking the extent to which they occur as well as the particular circumstances under which they occur is important. Objective To describe the drug-use pattern for patients with bipolar disorder, and to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with off-label use of atypical antipsychotics before US Food and Drug Administration approval for this indication. Methods Using the PHARMetrics medical claims database, a total of 105,771 adult patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder were evaluated during the 5-year (1998–2002) study period. Study drugs included mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Off-label use of an atypical antipsychotic was defined as a patient taking olanzapine before March 2000 (when it received an indication for bipolar disorder) or any other atypical antipsychotic during the entire study period. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds ratio of receiving a drug off-label. Results Utilization of and reimbursement for atypical antipsychotics increased during the 5-year period. Of the 10.5% of patients who took atypical antipsychotics, 7.1% took these drugs off-label. In addition, 11% of patients received lithium, 25% received other anticonvulsants, and 34% received antidepressants. Off-label use of atypical antipsychotics was associated with psychiatry specialist prescribers (odds ratio = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.44–1.59) and certain comorbidities, such as substance abuse (odds ratio = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.38–1.66), anxiety disorder (odds ratio = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.14–1.26), diabetes mellitus (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16–1.37), cerebral vascular disease (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.10–1.45), and hypertension (odds ratio = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05–1.20). Over

  13. [Assessment of metabolic impairments inducted by atypical antipsychotics among schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Gauthé, M; Goldberger, C; Olié, J P; Lôo, H; Gury, C; Poirier, M F

    2005-01-01

    Conventional and atypical antipsychotics are known to induce weight gain, cause glucose and lipid impairments among schizophrenic patients. These impairments contribute to the intrinsic risk factors linked to the psychiatric pathology (sedentary state, nicotin addiction, diabetes) increasing numbers of cardiovascular complications. We propose to study ponderal modifications and presence of metabolic abnormalities in a population of schizophrenic patients treated by conventional or atypical antipsychotics, depending on the received treatment; 32 patients, whose schizophrenia diagnosis had been previously made, were consecutively included over a 4 months period. They were divided into three groups: patients treated by conventional antipsychotics (n = 6), by atypical antipsychotics (n = 16) or by a combination of both (n = 10); 6 patients (18%) display overweight problems, 4 patients (12.5%) got hypertriglyceridemia and 4 other patients (12.5%) have hypercholesterolemia. No particular drug could be directly targeted, partly because of the restricted size of our sample, but the patients presenting metabolism impairment were treated by atypical antipsychotic. The observance of these abnormalities is reflected in publications and lead to some antipsychotic treatments monitoring rules.

  14. Atypical antipsychotics for disruptive behaviour disorders in children and youths.

    PubMed

    Loy, Jik H; Merry, Sally N; Hetrick, Sarah E; Stasiak, Karolina

    2012-09-12

    Disruptive behaviour disorders include conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and disruptive behaviour not otherwise specified. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently associated with disruptive behaviour disorders. The difficulties associated with disruptive behaviour disorders are demonstrated through aggression and severe behavioural problems. These often result in presentation to psychiatric services and may be treated with medications such as atypical antipsychotics. There is increasing evidence of a significant rise in the use of atypical antipsychotics for treating disruptive behaviour disorders in child and adolescent populations. To evaluate the effect and safety of atypical antipsychotics, compared to placebo, for treating disruptive behaviour disorders in children and youths.  We searched the following databases in August 2011: CENTRAL (2011, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1948 to August Week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 32), PsycINFO (1806 to August Week 2 2011), CINAHL (1937 to current), ClinicalTrials.gov (searched 15 August 2011), Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) (searched 15 August 2011), CenterWatch (searched 15 August 2011) and ICTRP (searched 15 August 2011). We included randomised controlled trials with children and youths up to and including the age of 18, in any setting, with a diagnosis of a disruptive behaviour disorder. We included trials where participants had a comorbid diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, major depression or an anxiety disorder. Two review authors independently selected the studies and disagreements were resolved by discussion. Two review authors extracted data independently. One review author entered data into Review Manager software and another checked it. We contacted trial authors for information about adverse effects and to provide missing data. We included eight randomised controlled trials, spanning 2000 to 2008. Seven assessed risperidone and one

  15. Reproductive Safety of Second-Generation Antipsychotics: Current Data From the Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lee S; Viguera, Adele C; McInerney, Kathryn A; Freeman, Marlene P; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z; Moustafa, Danna; Marfurt, Samantha P; Kwiatkowski, Molly A; Murphy, Shannon K; Farrell, Adriann M; Chitayat, David; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics are used to treat a spectrum of psychiatric illnesses in reproductive-age women. The National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics was established to determine the risk of major malformations among infants exposed to second-generation antipsychotics during pregnancy relative to a comparison group of unexposed infants of mothers with histories of psychiatric morbidity. Women were prospectively followed during pregnancy and the postpartum period; obstetric, labor, delivery, and pediatric medical records were obtained. Eligible enrollees were pregnant women ages 18-45. The Registry is based at the Center for Women's Mental Health at Massachusetts General Hospital. Women were recruited through provider referral, self-referral, and the Center's web site. As of December 2014, 487 women were enrolled: 353 who used second-generation antipsychotics and 134 comparison women. Medical records were obtained for 82% of participants. A total of 303 women had completed the study and were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. Of 214 live births with first-trimester exposure to second-generation antipsychotics, three major malformations were confirmed. In the control group (N=89), one major malformation was confirmed. The absolute risk of major malformations was 1.4% for exposed infants and 1.1% for unexposed infants. The odds ratio for major malformations comparing exposed infants with unexposed infants was 1.25 (95% CI=0.13-12.19). The results suggest that it would be unlikely for second-generation antipsychotics to raise the risk of major malformations more than 10-fold beyond that observed in the general population or among control groups using other psychotropic medications. If the estimate stabilizes around the null with ongoing data collection, findings may be reassuring for both clinicians and women trying to make risk-benefit treatment decisions about using atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy. These findings are timely given

  16. The potential role of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated the efficacy and tolerability of alternative pharmacotherapy for panic disorder. This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature regarding the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics for panic disorder. We searched for relevant published articles using Medline, the Cochrane database, and EMBASE on 19 June 2013. Prospective studies that examined the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of primary panic disorder or comorbid panic disorder (or symptoms) in other psychiatric disorders were included in this review. Seven prospective studies were included in this review. Among these, four were open-label studies for refractory panic disorder. Two of the seven included studies were randomized controlled trials among patients with panic symptoms comorbid with bipolar disorder. The remaining study was a randomized controlled trial for panic disorder or panic attack comorbid with major depression. Except one negative risperidone study, the reviewed studies showed the favorable efficacy results of atypical antipsychotics. Although the majority of the evidence regarding the efficacy of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of panic disorder comes from small, open-label studies, this review suggests the potential role of atypical antipsychotics in treating panic disorder. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Prevention of metabolic syndrome from atypical antipsychotic medications: applying Rogers' diffusion of innovations model in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    Patients who are taking atypical antipsychotic medications have a high incidence of metabolic complications, including increased weight, waist circumference, blood sugar, lipid levels, and blood pressure. In 2004, the American Diabetic Association and three other associations, including the American Psychiatric Association, developed guidelines to screen for metabolic syndrome, but in practice, adherence to the guidelines varies. This article describes a process to implement the guidelines in a suburban psychiatric day treatment hospital using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations model. Measurement of waist circumference was identified as an opportunity to improve the current metabolic screening protocol. Post-intervention evaluation revealed increased adherence to the guidelines (0% pre versus 95% post). Adherence to the guidelines demonstrates the effect of the systematic application of Rogers' model on acceptance of practice change. Fully implementing the guidelines meets recommendations for the standard of practice and can improve the health and quality of life of patients prescribed atypical antipsychotic medications.

  18. Effects of atypical (risperidone) and typical (haloperidol) antipsychotic agents on astroglial functions.

    PubMed

    Quincozes-Santos, André; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Tonial, Rafaela Pestana Leques; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Riesgo, Rudimar; Gottfried, Carmem

    2010-09-01

    Although classical and atypical antipsychotics may have different neurotoxic effects, their underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated, especially regarding neuroglial function. In the present study, we compared the atypical antipsychotic risperidone (0.01-10 μM) with the typical antipsychotic haloperidol (0.01-10 μM) regarding different aspects such as glutamate uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutathione (GSH) content, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in C6 astroglial cells. Risperidone significantly increased glutamate uptake (up to 27%), GS activity (14%), and GSH content (up to 17%). In contrast, haloperidol was not able to change any of these glial functions. However, at concentration of 10 μM, haloperidol increased (12%) ROS production. Our data contribute to the clarification of different hypothesis concerning the putative neural responses after stimulus with different antipsychotics, and may establish important insights about how brain rewiring could be enhanced.

  19. Impact of Modafinil Add-on with Atypical Anti-psychotics on Excessive Daytime Drowsiness

    PubMed Central

    Prasuna, P Lakshmi; Sudhakar, TP

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atypical antipsychotic drugs are known to cause many side effects which include daytime drowsiness. So many add on drugs are tried to reduce the same. Materials and Methods: 72 patients who were on atypical antipsychotic drugs were randomly assigned to either Modafinil or placebo and were followed for a period of 12 weeks. Daytime drowsiness, was taken at baseline, week 3, and at week 12 by using VAS, EDD scales. Results: The results were analyzed and showed that the Modafinil add on therapy significantly reduced the daytime Drowsiness. Conclusions: Modafinil could be a potential candidate in selected group of patients to decrease some of the unwanted adverse events like daytime drowsiness produced by atypical antipsychotics. PMID:26702168

  20. Atypical Antipsychotics and Other Therapeutic Options for Treatment of Resistant Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Rubo J.; MacPherson, Holly; Young, Allan H.

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant therapies, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are current first-line treatments for Major Depressive Disorder. However, over 50% of treated patients show an inadequate response to initial antidepressant therapy. If the therapeutic outcomes from two antidepressant therapies are suboptimal, potentially resulting in Treatment Resistant Depression, subsequent strategies include switching to another antidepressant or augmenting treatment by combining with other agents. When combined with SSRIs, atypical antipsychotics have supplementary action on dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems. Studies on combined treatment with atypical antipsychotics have shown significantly increased remission rates, shortened response times, and favorable side effects. Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics is now an acceptable treatment strategy which leads to increased remission rates and better outcomes for patients.

  1. Management of atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain in schizophrenic patients with topiramate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsiung; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hsiao, Mei-Chun

    2005-10-01

    Patients treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs commonly gain excess weight. Because obesity is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy, treatment of weight gain in these patients is critical. Topiramate, a fairly new anticonvulsant, promotes bodyweight loss in healthy obese subjects, patients with bipolar disorder, and patients with eating disorder. However, there are very few reports about the efficacy of topiramate for weight management in schizophrenic patients. We present the cases of three Taiwanese patients with schizophrenia whose bodyweight increased as a result of atypical antipsychotics treatment, then was controlled by topiramate without aggravation of their psychotic symptoms.

  2. Atypical Antipsychotics for Acute Manic and Mixed Episodes in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet K.; Ketter, Terence A.; Chang, Kiki D.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in children is increasing, and often requires a comprehensive treatment plan to address a complex array of symptoms and associated morbidities. Pharmacotherapy, in combination with psychotherapeutic interventions, is essential for the treatment and stabilization of disrupted mood. Current evidence collectively demonstrates, by randomized controlled design, that atypical antipsychotics have efficacy for the treatment of acute manic or mixed symptoms in children and adolescents with BD. Additional longitudinal and biological studies are warranted to characterize the effects of atypical antipsychotics on all phases and stages of bipolar illness development in children and adolescents. PMID:20205485

  3. Analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Psychiatry OPD

    PubMed Central

    Piparva, Kiran G.; Buch, J. G.; Chandrani, Kalpesh V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Novel atypical antipsychotics are superior to conventional antipsychotics as they significantly reduce both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and have lower risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). However, these drugs have separate set of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Therefore, this study was carried out to assess these ADRs, which can have impact on long-term compliance and achieving successful treatment. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of analysis of ADR of atypical antipsychotic drugs was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department. Patients of psychotic disorder (any age, either sex), who were prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs, were included. Those who were prescribed conventional antipsychotics or combinations of antipsychotics were excluded from the study. Apart from spontaneously reported ADRs, a questionnaire related to the likely ADR was used and patients’ responses were recorded in the case record form. Results: Totally 93 ADRs were recorded from 84 prescriptions. Majority of the ADRs (82 out of 93) were seen with risperidone and olanzepine, as they were the commonly prescribed drugs. Weight gain, dizziness, sleep disturbance and appetite disturbance accounted for nearly 78% of the total events. With risperidone (at 4–6 mg/day) and olanzepine (at 10–15 mg/day), gastrointestinal and sleep disturbance were observed in the initial (within 7 days to 2–3 months after treatment) course of treatment, while EPS, fatigue, seizure, increased frequency of micturition and dizziness were observed after long-term (3–9 months) use. Conclusion: The present study adds to the existing information on the prevalence of adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Role of active surveillance in post-marketing phase is also emphasized. PMID:22345840

  4. Overdose of atypical antipsychotics: clinical presentation, mechanisms of toxicity and management.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2012-07-01

    Historically, treatment for schizophrenia focused on sedation. The advent of the typical antipsychotics resulted in treatment aimed specifically at the underlying disease, but these agents were associated with numerous adverse effects, and were not particularly effective at treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. As a result, numerous atypical agents have been developed over the past 2 decades, including several agents within the past 5 years. Overdose of antipsychotics remains quite common in Western society. In 2010, poison control centres in the US received nearly 43,000 calls related to atypical antipsychotics alone. Due to underreporting, the true incidence of overdose with atypical antipsychotics is likely much greater. Following overdose of an atypical antipsychotic, the clinical effects observed, such as CNS depression, tachycardia and orthostasis are largely predictable based on the unique receptor binding profile of the agent. This article, which focuses on the atypical antipsychotics commonly used in the treatment of schizophrenia, discusses the features commonly encountered in overdose. Specifically, agents that result in QT prolongation and the corresponding potential for torsades de pointes, as well as unique features encountered with the various medications are discussed. The diagnosis of this overdose is largely based on history. Routine use of drug screens is unlikely to be beneficial. The primary goal of management is aggressive supportive care. Patients with significant CNS depression with associated loss of airway reflexes and respiratory failure need advanced airway management. Hypotension should be treated first with intravenous fluids, with the use of direct acting vasopressors reserved for persistent hypotension. Benzodiazepines should be used for seizures, with barbiturates used for refractory seizures. Intravenous magnesium can be administered for patients with a corrected QT interval exceeding 500 milliseconds.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of early responders versus early nonresponders to atypical antipsychotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaomei; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Faries, Douglas E; Stauffer, Virginia L; Kollack-Walker, Sara; Kinon, Bruce J; Kane, John M

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the cost-effectiveness of treating early responders versus early nonresponders to an atypical antipsychotic (risperidone) and the cost-effectiveness of treating early nonresponders maintained on risperidone versus those switched to olanzapine. Methods: This post hoc analysis used data from a randomized, double-blind, 12-week schizophrenia study (Study Code: HGMN, n = 628). Participants were initially assigned to risperidone therapy. Early response was defined as a ≥ 20% improvement on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score from baseline to two weeks. Early responders continued on risperidone, whereas early nonresponders were randomized in a double-blind manner to continue on risperidone or switch to olanzapine for 10 additional weeks. Early responders and early nonresponders maintained on risperidone were compared for health-state utilities (benefits) and total cost over the 12-week study; early nonresponders maintained on risperidone or switched to olanzapine were compared from randomization (10-week period). Utilities were derived from the PANSS and adverse events. Mixed models were used to assess group differences in utilities. Treatment costs were calculated based on health states. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were then utilized to compare treatment groups. Results: Early responders to risperidone had significantly greater total utility and lower total treatment costs than early nonresponders to risperidone. Compared with early nonresponders who continued on risperidone, those who were switched to olanzapine had significantly higher total utility scores at endpoint and numerically lower total treatment costs, reflecting significantly lower nonmedication treatment costs, even though medication costs were significantly higher compared with generic risperidone. Conclusion: Treatment of early responders was more cost-effective than treatment of early nonresponders to atypical antipsychotic therapy. Switching

  6. Atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and sulpiride do not antagonise amphetamine-induced stereotyped locomotion.

    PubMed

    Moore, S; Kenyon, P

    1994-02-01

    An automated tracking system which converted an animal's path between quadrants of a circular open field into a series of trips was used to analyse stereotyped locomotion in amphetamine treated rats. Amphetamine (3.5 mg/kg) increased the horizontal distance moved and the number and proportion of thigmotaxic trips around the perimeter of the apparatus (length 4 trips). To investigate the hypothesis that classic antipsychotics, but not atypical antipsychotics, would antagonise the repetitive boundary patrolling associated with amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, animals were pretreated with haloperidol (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075 mg/kg), clozapine (5, 10, 20 mg/kg) or (+/-)sulpiride (10, 20, 50 mg/kg) 30 min before 3.5 mg/kg amphetamine. The results showed that the classic antipsychotic haloperidol antagonised both hyperactivity and the increased proportion of length 4 trips. In marked contrast, the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and sulpiride antagonised hyperactivity but did not reduce the proportion of length 4 trips. The inability of atypical antipsychotics to reduce the repetitive boundary patrolling associated with amphetamine-induced hyperactivity is consistent with the action of these drugs on other forms of amphetamine-induced stereotyped behaviour, and indicates that locomotor routes under amphetamine are stereotyped. The measurement of trip lengths provides a sensitive tool for examining drug action on the spatial distribution of open field locomotion.

  7. Using Functional Analysis Methodology to Evaluate Effects of an Atypical Antipsychotic on Severe Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danov, Stacy E.; Tervo, Raymond; Meyers, Stephanie; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotic medication aripiprazole was evaluated using a randomized AB multiple baseline, double-blind, placebo-controlled design for the treatment of severe problem behavior with 4 children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Functional analysis (FA) was conducted concurrent with the medication evaluation to…

  8. Using Functional Analysis Methodology to Evaluate Effects of an Atypical Antipsychotic on Severe Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danov, Stacy E.; Tervo, Raymond; Meyers, Stephanie; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotic medication aripiprazole was evaluated using a randomized AB multiple baseline, double-blind, placebo-controlled design for the treatment of severe problem behavior with 4 children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Functional analysis (FA) was conducted concurrent with the medication evaluation to…

  9. Flow Synthesis in Hot Water: Synthesis of the Atypical Antipsychotic Iloperidone.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Jan; Kirschning, Andreas

    2016-02-24

    Inductively heated steel reactors continuously perform organic transformations in water under high temperature conditions, utilizing the unique physiochemical properties of water at subcritical conditions. We demonstrated the power of this set-up in the continuous synthesis of the atypical antipsychotic drug iloperidone, in which we performed four out of five steps under aqueous conditions.

  10. Monitoring Metabolic Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotics in People with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeluckdharry, Sadira; Sharma, Sujit; O'Rourke, Elizabeth; Tharian, Priyanka; Gondalekar, Anjali; Nainar, Feroz; Roy, Meera

    2013-01-01

    This audit was undertaken prospectively to examine the compliance of a group of psychiatrists against guidelines they developed for monitoring the onset of metabolic syndrome, a potential side effect of antipsychotic medication, especially second generation or atypical ones. Phase 1 of the audit was to set standards by a questionnaire survey of…

  11. Borderline personality disorder: bipolarity, mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics in treatment.

    PubMed

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Akbudak, Mahir

    2012-10-01

    In this article, it is aimed to review the efficacies of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics, which are used commonly in psychopharmacological treatments of bipolar and borderline personality disorders. In this context, common phenomenology between borderline personality and bipolar disorders and differential features of clinical diagnosis will be reviewed in line with the literature. Both disorders can demonstrate common features in the diagnostic aspect, and can overlap phenomenologically. Concomitance rate of both disorders is quite high. In order to differentiate these two disorders from each other, quality of mood fluctuations, impulsivity types and linear progression of disorders should be carefully considered. There are various studies in mood stabilizer use, like lithium, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine, in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Moreover, there are also studies, which have revealed efficacies of risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine as atypical antipsychotics. It is not easy to differentiate borderline personality disorder from the bipolar disorders. An intensively careful evaluation should be performed. This differentiation may be helpful also for the treatment. There are many studies about efficacy of valproate and lamotrigine in treatment of borderline personality disorder. However, findings related to other mood stabilizers are inadequate. Olanzapine and quetiapine are reported to be more effective among atypical antipsychotics. No drug is approved for the treatment of borderline personality disorder by the entitled authorities, yet. Psychotherapeutic approaches have preserved their significant places in treatment of borderline personality disorder. Moreover, symptom based approach is recommended in use of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics.

  12. Monitoring Metabolic Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotics in People with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeluckdharry, Sadira; Sharma, Sujit; O'Rourke, Elizabeth; Tharian, Priyanka; Gondalekar, Anjali; Nainar, Feroz; Roy, Meera

    2013-01-01

    This audit was undertaken prospectively to examine the compliance of a group of psychiatrists against guidelines they developed for monitoring the onset of metabolic syndrome, a potential side effect of antipsychotic medication, especially second generation or atypical ones. Phase 1 of the audit was to set standards by a questionnaire survey of…

  13. Assessing cardiovascular risks versus clinical benefits of atypical antipsychotic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Herbert Y; Davidson, Michael; Glassman, Alexander H; Vieweg, W Victor R

    2002-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drugs are a major advance in the treatment of psychosis in spite of concerns about metabolic and cardiovascular side effects that affect morbidity and mortality. Concerns about weight gain, hypoglycemia, diabetes, and increases in lipids as well as sudden death due to torsades de pointes and other cardiovascular events can temper enthusiasm about the atypical antipsychotics. The challenge for the clinician is to weigh the benefits and risks for each drug for each patient and develop a treatment plan with the individual patient in mind. This article discusses both risks and benefits of antipsychotic treatment and presents a treatment algorithm to aid the clinician in choosing medications for the psychotic patient.

  14. Prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use in psychiatric outpatients: comparison of women of childbearing age with men.

    PubMed

    Camsarı, Ulas; Viguera, Adele C; Ralston, Laurel; Baldessarini, Ross J; Cohen, Lee S

    2014-12-01

    To characterize current treatment practices, we compared the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs among women of childbearing age to men based on electronic medical records of 1073 hospital-based psychiatric outpatients given at least one second-generation antipsychotic drug. One quarter of psychiatric outpatients sampled were prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic, in more than half of cases for off-label indications. Women were significantly more likely than men to be diagnosed with mood or anxiety disorders than psychotic disorders and to be prescribed quetiapine (60.7 vs. 48.0 %) or aripiprazole (31.2 vs. 23.9 %), but less likely risperidone (15.8 vs. 26.1 %) or ziprasidone (10 vs. 14 %).

  15. Handwriting Movement Kinematics for Quantifying EPS in Patients Treated with Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Michael P.; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E.; Niculescu, Alexander B.; Lohr, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing monitoring of neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) is important to maximize treatment outcome, improve medication adherence and reduce re-hospitalization. Traditional approaches for assessing EPS such as parkinsonism, tardive akathisia, or dyskinesia rely upon clinical ratings. However, these observer-based EPS severity ratings can be unreliable and are subject to examiner bias. In contrast, quantitative instrumental methods are less subject to bias. Most instrumental methods have only limited clinical utility because of their complexity and costs. This paper describes an easy-to-use instrumental approach based on handwriting movements for quantifying EPS. Here, we present findings from psychiatric patients treated with atypical (second generation) antipsychotics. The handwriting task consisted of a sentence written several times within a 2 cm vertical boundary at a comfortable speed using an inkless pen and digitizing tablet. Kinematic variables including movement duration, peak vertical velocity and the number of acceleration peaks, and average normalized jerk (a measure of smoothness) for each up or down stroke and their submovements were analyzed. Results from 59 psychosis patients and 46 healthy comparison subjects revealed significant slowing and dysfluency in patients compared to controls. We observed differences across medications and daily dose. These findings support the ecological validity of handwriting movement analysis as an objective behavioral biomarker for quantifying the effects of antipsychotic medication and dose on the motor system. PMID:20381875

  16. Handwriting movement kinematics for quantifying extrapyramidal side effects in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Michael P; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E; Niculescu, Alexander B; Lohr, James B

    2010-05-15

    Ongoing monitoring of neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) is important to maximize treatment outcome, improve medication adherence and reduce re-hospitalization. Traditional approaches for assessing EPS such as Parkinsonism, tardive akathisia, or dyskinesia rely upon clinical ratings. However, these observer-based EPS severity ratings can be unreliable and are subject to examiner bias. In contrast, quantitative instrumental methods are less subject to bias. Most instrumental methods have only limited clinical utility because of their complexity and costs. This paper describes an easy-to-use instrumental approach based on handwriting movements for quantifying EPS. Here, we present findings from psychiatric patients treated with atypical (second generation) antipsychotics. The handwriting task consisted of a sentence written several times within a 2 cm vertical boundary at a comfortable speed using an inkless pen and digitizing tablet. Kinematic variables including movement duration, peak vertical velocity and the number of acceleration peaks, and average normalized jerk (a measure of smoothness) for each up or down stroke and their submovements were analyzed. Results from 59 psychosis patients and 46 healthy comparison subjects revealed significant slowing and dysfluency in patients compared to controls. We observed differences across medications and daily dose. These findings support the ecological validity of handwriting movement analysis as an objective behavioral biomarker for quantifying the effects of antipsychotic medication and dose on the motor system.

  17. Atypical antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Ayaka; Shimizu, Saki; Masui, Atsushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Minamimoto, Shoko; Mizuguchi, Yuto; Ochiai, Midori; Mizobe, Yusuke; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a new atypical antipsychotic drug that shows high affinities to dopamine D2 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, the mechanisms underlying its atypicality are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin, to determine if it contributes to the atypicality of blonanserin. Subcutaneous administration of AD-6048 (0.3-1mg/kg) significantly inhibited apomorphine (APO)-induced climbing behavior with an ED50 value of 0.200mg/kg, the potency being 1/3-1/5 times that of haloperidol (HAL). AD-6048 did not cause extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) even at high doses (up to 10mg/kg, s.c.), whereas HAL at doses of 0.1-3mg/kg (s.c.) significantly induced bradykinesia and catalepsy in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the therapeutic index (potency ratios of anti-APO action to that of EPS induction) of AD-6048 was much higher than that of haloperidol, illustrating that AD-6048 per se possesses atypical antipsychotic properties. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of Fos protein expression revealed that both AD-6048 and HAL significantly increased Fos expression in the shell part of the nucleus accumbens and the striatum. However, in contrast to HAL which preferentially enhanced striatal Fos expression, AD-6048 showed a preferential action to the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that AD-6048 acts as an atypical antipsychotic, which seems to at least partly contribute to the atypicality of blonanserin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sex-dependent antipsychotic capacity of 17β-estradiol in the latent inhibition model: a typical antipsychotic drug in both sexes, atypical antipsychotic drug in males.

    PubMed

    Arad, Michal; Weiner, Ina

    2010-10-01

    The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that estrogen is a natural neuroprotector in women and that exogenous estrogen may have antipsychotic potential, but results of clinical studies have been inconsistent. We have recently shown using the latent inhibition (LI) model of schizophrenia that 17β-estradiol exerts antipsychotic activity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The present study sought to extend the characterization of the antipsychotic action of 17β-estradiol (10, 50 and 150 μg/kg) by testing its capacity to reverse amphetamine- and MK-801-induced LI aberrations in gonadally intact female and male rats. No-drug controls of both sexes showed LI, ie, reduced efficacy of a previously non-reinforced stimulus to gain behavioral control when paired with reinforcement, if conditioned with two but not five tone-shock pairings. In both sexes, amphetamine (1 mg/kg) and MK-801 (50 μg/kg) produced disruption (under weak conditioning) and persistence (under strong conditioning) of LI, modeling positive and negative/cognitive symptoms, respectively. 17β-estradiol at 50 and 150 μg/kg potentiated LI under strong conditioning and reversed amphetamine-induced LI disruption in both males and females, mimicking the action of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in the LI model. 17β-estradiol also reversed MK-induced persistent LI, an effect mimicking atypical APDs and NMDA receptor enhancers, but this effect was observed in males and OVX females but not in intact females. These findings indicate that in the LI model, 17β-estradiol exerts a clear-cut antipsychotic activity in both sexes and, remarkably, is more efficacious in males and OVX females where it also exerts activity considered predictive of anti-negative/cognitive symptoms.

  19. Correlation between plasma homovanillic acid levels and the response to atypical antipsychotics in male patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Ichiro; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs-olanzapine, perospirone, and quetiapine-on plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) in male patients with chronic schizophrenia. In this prospective, open-label study, the subjects were 30 inpatients who were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, criteria for schizophrenia. The authors switched patients from typical antipsychotic drugs to olanzapine, perospirone, or quetiapine. Each patient gave informed consent for the research. pHVA was assessed before and after switching medications. After the switch, the authors found a significant improvement in psychotic symptoms, nonsignificant improvement in extrapyramidal symptoms, and a nonsignificant reduction in pHVA. In addition, the baseline pHVA correlated positively with the score changes from baseline in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) total, positive, and negative symptoms in the group with a whole sample and in the olanzapine-treated group, and with the score changes in the BPRS total and positive symptoms in the quetiapine-treated group. Our findings indicated that the preswitching pHVA levels could be used to predict changes in the psychotic symptoms of male patients with chronic schizophrenia when switching to atypical antipsychotic drugs.

  20. Movement Disorders Induced by the "Atypical" Antipsychotic Aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Selfani, Karim; Soland, Valérie L; Chouinard, Sylvain; Huot, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic that acts as a partial agonist at dopamine D2 receptors. Because of its partial agonist activity, it was believed that aripiprazole would be less susceptible than typical antipsychotics to induce extrapyramidal side effects. However, a few case-reports and case-series detailing aripiprazole-induced movement disorders have been published, suggesting that aripiprazole-induced movement disorders may arise. Here, we seek to report further cases of aripiprazole-induced movement disorders to raise the awareness of clinicians on this adverse effect. Patients referred to the André-Barbeau Movement Disorder clinic treated with aripiprazole were enrolled in this study. Their charts were retrospectively reviewed and data regarding past psychiatric history, past antipsychotic medication, duration of aripiprazole treatment, daily dose of aripiprazole administered, and resulting movement disorders were collected. We report 14 cases of parkinsonism, tardive dyskinesia and akathisia induced by aripiprazole. Some of these, mostly the parkinsonian phenotype, abated spontaneously following drug discontinuation, whereas others, mostly related to tardive phenomena, persisted after aripiprazole was discontinued, and required treatment. This case-series adds to the existing literature that suggests that movement disorders may arise following treatment with aripiprazole. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect when prescribing aripiprazole to patients.

  1. All-Cause Mortality Associated With Atypical and Conventional Antipsychotics Among Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liperoti, Rosa; Onder, Graziano; Landi, Francesco; Lapane, Kate L.; Mor, Vincent; Bernabei, Roberto; Gambassi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objective A recent meta-analysis has indicated that, in patients with dementia, the use of atypical antipsychotics is associated with an excess mortality. Later observational studies have suggested that conventional antipsychotics may pose an even greater risk of death. None of these studies could evaluate the risk associated with single antipsychotics nor could they provide any conclusive evidence concerning the risk among nursing home residents. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to compare the risk of death associated with atypical and conventional antipsychotics in a large population of nursing home residents with dementia. Method We identified 6,524 new users of atypical antipsychotics and 3,205 new users of conventional antipsychotics living in 1,581 Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in 5 US states during the years 1998–2000. The outcome measure was all-cause mortality, which was determined during 6-months of follow-up. Results After adjusting for potential confounders relative to users of atypicals, the rate of death was increased for users of conventional antipsychotics (hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% CI, 1.13–1.42). Relative to risperidone, a higher rate of death was documented for haloperidol (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.13–1.53), phenothiazines (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.00–1.38) and other conventional medications (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.99–1.80). No atypical antipsychotic was associated with a differential risk relative to risperidone. Conclusions Conventional antipsychotics are associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality than atypical agents. It seems advisable that they are not used in substitution for atypical antipsychotics among nursing home residents with dementia even when short-term therapy is being prescribed. PMID:19906339

  2. Impact of atypical antipsychotics on quality of life in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Awad, A George; Voruganti, Lakshmi N P

    2004-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a long-term disabling illness that affects approximately 1% of the population. Its course is generally chronic with acute psychotic exacerbations that may require frequent hospitalisations. The clinical picture includes a range of symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, agitation, suspiciousness, hostility, conceptual disorganisation, blunted affect, emotional and social withdrawal, lack of spontaneity, poverty of speech and a wide range of neurocognitive deficits. Over the past 50 years, antipsychotic medications have emerged as the cornerstone of management in concert with other important interventions, such as psychosocial and economic support and rehabilitation efforts. However, the unrivalled role of conventional antipsychotic medications has been continuously challenged by the wide range of adverse effects of these medications and their lack of usefulness in the treatment of neurocognitive deficits as well as deficit and negative symptoms. In addition, the lack of subjective tolerability of these agents and their negative impact on quality of life have complicated management for a large number of patients. Over the last 15 years, several new atypical antipsychotic medications have been introduced, including amisulpride, remoxipride, risperidone, sertindole, olanzapine, zotepine, quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole. In general, the new antipsychotics have shown themselves to be at least comparable in efficacy to conventional antipsychotics but with superior subjective tolerability and a more favourable adverse effect profile. The majority of quality of life studies involving new antipsychotic agents have evaluated the benefits of risperidone, olanzapine and clozapine; only a few studies have examined the effects of other new antipsychotics. While most of these studies have methodological and design limitations, the weight of evidence from them nevertheless points to a trend towards a more positive impact on quality of life with

  3. Atypical Antipsychotics Rapidly and Inappropriately Switch Peripheral Fuel Utilization to Lipids, Impairing Metabolic Flexibility in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Vary, Thomas C.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Wenner, Brett R.; Maresca, Kevin P.; Joyal, John L.; Breazeale, Steven; Elich, Tedd D.; Lang, Charles H.; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Patients taking atypical antipsychotics are frequented by serious metabolic (eg, hyperglycemia, obesity, and diabetes) and cardiac effects. Surprisingly, chronic treatment also appears to lower free fatty acids (FFAs). This finding is paradoxical because insulin resistance is typically associated with elevated not lower FFAs. How atypical antipsychotics bring about these converse changes in plasma glucose and FFAs is unknown. Chronic treatment with olanzapine, a prototypical, side effect prone atypical antipsychotic, lowered FFA in Sprague–Dawley rats. Olanzapine also lowered plasma FFA acutely, concomitantly impairing in vivo lipolysis and robustly elevating whole-body lipid oxidation. Increased lipid oxidation was evident from accelerated losses of triglycerides after food deprivation or lipid challenge, elevated FFA uptake into most peripheral tissues (∼2-fold) except heart, rises in long-chain 3-hydroxylated acyl-carnitines observed in diabetes, and rapid suppression of the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during the dark cycle. Normal rises in RER following refeeding, a sign of metabolic flexibility, were severely blunted by olanzapine. Increased lipid oxidation in muscle could be explained by ∼50% lower concentrations of the negative cytoplasmic regulator of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, malonyl-CoA. This was associated with loss of anapleurotic metabolites and citric acid cycle precursors of malonyl-CoA synthesis rather than adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase activation or direct ACC1/2 inhibition. The ability of antipsychotics to lower dark cycle RER in mice corresponded to their propensities to cause metabolic side effects. Our studies indicate that lipocentric mechanisms or altered intermediary metabolism could underlie the FFA lowering and hyperglycemia (Randle cycle) as well as some of the other side effects of atypical antipsychotics, thereby suggesting strategies for alleviating them. PMID:20494946

  4. Psychopharmacology of atypical antipsychotic drugs: From the receptor binding profile to neuroprotection and neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kusumi, Ichiro; Boku, Shuken; Takahashi, Yoshito

    2015-05-01

    The original definition of atypical antipsychotic drugs (APD) was drugs that are effective against positive symptoms in schizophrenia with no or little extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). However, atypical APD have been reported to be more effective for cognitive dysfunction and negative symptoms in schizophrenia than typical APD, which expands the definition of 'atypicality'. This article provides a critical review of the pharmacology of atypical APD, especially from the viewpoint of receptor binding profiles and neurotransmitter regulations as well as neuroprotection and neurogenesis. A variety of serotonin (5-HT) receptors, such as 5-HT2A / 2C , 5-HT1A , 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors, may contribute to the mechanisms of action of 'atypicality'. The dopaminergic modulations, including a low affinity for dopamine D2 receptors and a partial D2 receptor agonistic action, and glutamatergic regulations may also be involved in the pharmacological backgrounds of 'atypicality'. Atypical APD, but not typical APD, may facilitate cortical neuroprotection and hippocampal neurogenesis, which might be a part of the action mechanisms of atypical APD. The facilitation of cortical neuroprotection and hippocampal neurogenesis induced by atypical APD might be mediated by an increase in the Ser9 phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). The stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors and/or the blockade of 5-HT2 receptors, which is characteristic of atypical APD, might increase Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Moreover, atypical APD increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. BDNF increases Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β and has neuroprotective and neurogenic effects, as in the case of atypical APD. These findings suggest that GSK-3β might play a role in the action mechanisms of atypical APD, in both the 5-HT-dependent and BDNF-dependent mechanisms.

  5. Atypical antipsychotic drugs and pregnancy outcome: a prospective, cohort study.

    PubMed

    Habermann, Frank; Fritzsche, Juliane; Fuhlbrück, Frederike; Wacker, Evelin; Allignol, Arthur; Weber-Schoendorfer, Corinna; Meister, Reinhard; Schaefer, Christof

    2013-08-01

    Women of childbearing age are often affected with psychotic disorders, requiring the use of antipsychotic medication during pregnancy. In the present study, we prospectively followed the pregnancies of 561 women exposed to second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; study cohort) and compared these to 284 pregnant women exposed to first-generation antipsychotic agents (FGAs; comparison cohort I) and to 1122 pregnant women using drugs known as not harmful to the unborn (comparison cohort II). Subjects were enrolled through the Institute's consultation service. Major malformation rates of SGA exposed were higher compared to comparison cohort II (adjusted odds ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-3.91), possibly reflecting a detection bias concerning atrial and ventricular septal defects. Postnatal disorders occurred significantly more often in infants prenatally exposed to SGAs (15.6%) and FGAs (21.6%) compared to 4.2% of comparison cohort II. Cumulative incidences of elective terminations of pregnancy were significantly higher in both the study cohort (17%) and comparison cohort I (21%) compared to comparison cohort II (3%), whereas the rates of spontaneous abortions did not differ. The numbers of stillbirths and neonatal deaths were within the reference range. Preterm birth and low birth weight were more common in infants exposed to FGAs. To conclude, our findings did not reveal a major teratogenic risk for SGAs, making the better studied drugs of this group a treatment option during pregnancy. Because neonates exposed to SGAs or FGAs in the last gestational week are at higher risk of postnatal disorders, delivery should be planned in clinics with neonatal intensive care units.

  6. Evaluation of Paraoxonase, Arylesterase and Malondialdehyde Levels in Schizophrenia Patients Taking Typical, Atypical and Combined Antipsychotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Güneş, Mehmet; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Bulut, Mahmut; Demir, Süleyman; İbiloğlu, Aslıhan Okan; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Atlı, Abdullah; Kaplan, İbrahim; Sir, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human serum paraoxonase (PON1) prevents lipids from peroxidation and functions as an antioxidant mechanism. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) is the final product of lipid peroxidation and can be used as an indicator of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate PON1, MDA, and arylesterase (ARY) levels in schizophrenic patients who are taking typical, atypical, or combined (typical and atypical) antipsychotic drug treatment, with respect to those of healthy controls. Methods We evaluated 41 patients (11 taking typical antipsychotics, 19 taking atypical antipsychotics, 11 taking combined anti-psychotics) and 43 healthy controls. Results MDA levels were higher in schizophrenic patients taking typical antipsychotics compared with healthy controls (p=0.001). ARY levels were higher in patients taking atypical antipsychotics compared with healthy controls (p=0.005). PON1 activity was similar in all groups. Conclusion Our results indicate that treatment with typical antipsychotic drugs could be related to increased MDA levels; and antipsychotic medication may increase PON1 levels in schizophrenic patients. PMID:27776386

  7. Phenomenology and epidemiology of childhood psychiatric disorders that may necessitate treatment with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    DelBello, Melissa; Grcevich, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents commonly present to clinical settings with more severe psychopathology than previously recognized. Physicians evaluating children may be confronted with clinical manifestations of early-onset schizophrenia, including command hallucinations and delusional thinking, severe irritability and suicidality associated with juvenile-onset bipolar disorder, or the severe aggression of a child with a pervasive developmental disorder. In these as well as other clinical situations, the potential risks and benefits of treatment with atypical antipsychotics should be considered. In this article, we summarize the clinical manifestations of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents, with particular attention to the disorders for which the benefits of prescribing an atypical antipsychotic may outweigh the potential risks. We also describe the differences in the clinical presentation of these disorders between youth and adults.

  8. Diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia as a consequence of an atypical antipsychotic agent.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Kirsten; Brzozowska, Malgorzata Monika

    2016-08-09

    The atypical antipsychotic agent clozapine, although an effective treatment for schizophrenia, is linked with metabolic adverse effects. We report a case of diabetic ketoacidosis and very severe hypertriglyceridaemia associated with clozapine use, in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who was successfully treated with continuous insulin infusion and fluids. As clozapine proved to be the most efficacious in controlling the patient's psychotic symptoms, the patient has been continued on clozapine despite its known metabolic side effects. Importantly the patient has achieved satisfactory long-term lipid and glycaemic control. The current recommendations related to the metabolic care for patients treated with atypical antipsychotic agents as well as the mechanisms behind abnormal glucose and lipid regulation with clozapine therapy are discussed.

  9. [Guidelines on long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotics for first-episode schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Azorin, J-M

    2013-09-01

    The current review raises the question of the place of long-acting injectable (LAI) atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia in current and future guidelines. After exposing the different points of view adopted in the former, the author presents the clinical trials conducted with LAI atypicals in this indication, as well as the surveys related to psychiatrists'opinion regarding the use of these drugs in early schizophrenia. Pros and cons of this therapeutic option are discussed and suggestions are made for further guidelines.

  10. Psychopharmacology of chronic pain: a focus on antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is considered one of the most prevalent causes of costly and disabling medical conditions. This review will define chronic pain and its categories and then will summarize the effectiveness and side effects associated with the use of various antidepressants, including the tricyclics, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, other miscellaneous antidepressants and the atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of chronic pain.

  11. An exploratory study for bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Preeti; Gupta, Anupam; Reddi, V. Senthil Kumar; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is an exploratory study, which aimed to analyze urodynamic findings in patients who are on atypical antipsychotics and present with urinary incontinence (UI) in order to understand the mechanisms of antipsychotic-emergent UI. Patients and Methods: Eight patients (34 ± 7.6 years; five males and three females) diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, who were on risperidone, olanzapine, or clozapine monotherapy and having UI were recruited. Urodynamic study was performed in all patients. Results: Six out of eight (75%) patients had abnormal urodynamic findings. Three of them had detrusor overactivity (DO) without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD); two had DO with DSD; and one had hypoactive detrusor with nonrelaxing sphincter during void phase. The common urinary symptoms were urgency, enuresis, and straining to void urine. Significant postvoid residual urine was found in two patients. Conclusion: The evidence of bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent UI is similar to that present in patients with neurological disorders. Urinary complaints in patients on antipsychotics thus need to be evaluated and managed systematically using the protocol followed for neurological conditions. PMID:28197002

  12. Misuse of atypical antipsychotics in conjunction with alcohol and other drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Malekshahi, Tara; Tioleco, Nina; Ahmed, Nahima; Campbell, Aimee N C; Haller, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Non-medical use of atypical antipsychotics by substance abusers has been reported in the literature, although no detailed studies exist. Among 429 addiction treatment inpatients screened, 73 (17.0%) reported misuse of antipsychotics with alcohol, opioids, cocaine, methamphetamine and/or cannabis; 39 (9.1%) within the past year. Of past year misusers, 25 (64.1%) were interviewed. Most were male (76.0%), non-Caucasian (56.0%), and polysubstance abusers (84.0%). Quetiapine, the most abused drug (96.0%), was obtained primarily from doctors (52.0%) and family/friends (48.0%). Reasons for use included to "recover" from other substances (66.7%), "enhance" the effects of other substances (25.0%), and "experiment" (20.8%). The most frequently reported positive effect was "feeling mellow" (75.0%); negative effects were consistent with antipsychotic use (e.g., feeling thirsty, trouble concentrating). Compared to a normative sample of inpatient substance abusers, ASI composite scores were higher. Findings suggest that physicians should assess for use/misuse of atypical antipsychotics among patients with addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prolactin and macroprolactin levels in psychiatric patients receiving atypical antipsychotics: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Bun-Hee; Lee, Kyu Young; Lee, Kye-Seong; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Won

    2016-05-30

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether atypical antipsychotics can elevate serum levels of both macroprolactin and prolactin, and whether the macroprolactin levels differ according to the type of atypical antipsychotic being taken. In total, 245 subjects were enrolled consecutively in 6 hospitals. Serum prolactin and macroprolactin levels were measured at a single time point during maintenance antipsychotic monotherapy. The mean total serum prolactin levels including macroprolactin were 11.91, 20.73, 16.41, 50.83, 12.84, and 59.1ng/mL for patients taking aripiprazole, blonanserin, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, and risperidone, respectively, while those for macroprolactin were 1.71, 3.86, 3.73, 7.28, 2.77, and 8.0ng/mL. The total prolactin and macroprolactin levels were significantly higher among those taking paliperidone and risperidone than among those taking any of the other antipsychotics (p<0.01). Moreover, there was a strong positive correlation between serum levels of prolactin and macroprolactin. Sexual dysfunction was reported in 35.5% (87/245) of the total subjects. However, the total prolactin level did not differ significantly between subjects with and without sexual dysfunction except gynecomastia. These findings suggest that treatment with risperidone and paliperidone can induce hyperprolactinemia and macroprolactinemia in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential effects of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs on striosome and matrix compartments of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bubser, Michael; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2002-02-01

    Administration of typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) is often accompanied by extrapyramidal side-effects (EPS). Treatment with atypical APDs has a lower incidence of motor side-effects and atypical APDs are superior to typical APDs in treating the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Although typical APDs strongly induce the immediate-early gene c-fos in the striatum while atypical APDs do so only weakly, it is possible that the effects of atypical APDs are more pronounced within certain regions of the striatum. The striatum contains two histochemically defined compartments, the striosome (patch) and the matrix. These compartments have been well characterized anatomically but their functional attributes are unclear. We therefore examined the effects of typical and atypical APDs on Fos expression in the striosome and matrix of the rat. Typical and atypical APDs were distinguished by the pattern of striatal compartmental activation they induced: the striosome : matrix ratio of Fos-li neurons was greater in rats treated with atypical APDs. Pretreating animals with selective antagonists of receptors that atypical APDs target with high affinity did not increase the striosome : matrix Fos ratio of typical APD-treated rats and thus did not mimic the ratio seen in response to atypical APDs. However, pretreatment with the atypical APD clozapine did recapitulate the characteristic compartmental Fos pattern seen in response to typical APDs. These data suggest that some characteristics of atypical APDs, such as the lower EPS liability and greater reduction of negative symptoms, may be linked to the coordinate regulation of the striatal striosome and matrix.

  15. Trends in Scientific Literature on Atypical Antipsychotics in South Korea: A Bibliometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Winston W.; Pae, Chi-Un; Moreno, Raquel; Rubio, Gabriel; Molina, Juan D.; Noriega, Concha; Pérez-Nieto, Miguel A.; Huelves, Lorena; Álamo, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    Objective We have carried out a bibliometric study on the scientific publications in relation to atypical or second-generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) in South Korea. Methods With the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, we selected those publications made in South Korea whose title included the descriptors atypic* (atypical*) antipsychotic*, second-generation antipsychotic*, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, ziprasidone, quetiapine, sertindole, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride, zotepine, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone, perospirone and blonanserin. We applied some bibliometric indicators of paper production and dispersion with Price's law and Bradford's law, respectively. We also calculated the participation index (PI) of the different countries, and correlated the bibliometric data with some social and health data from Korea (such as total per capita expenditure on health and gross domestic expenditure on research and development). Results We collected 326 original papers published between 1993 and 2011. Our results state fulfilment of fulfilled Price's law, with scientific production on SGAs showing exponential growth (correlation coefficient r=0.8978, as against an r=0.8149 after linear adjustment). The most widely studied drugs were risperidone (91 papers), aripiprazole (77), olanzapine (53), and clozapine (43). Division into Bradford zones yielded a nucleus occupied by the Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry (36 articles). A total of 86 different journals were published, with 4 of the first 10 used journals having an impact factor being greater than 4. Conclusion The publications on SGAs in South Korea have undergone exponential growth over the studied period, without evidence of reaching a saturation point. PMID:23482954

  16. Atypical antipsychotics in primary generalized anxiety disorder or comorbid with mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Gao, Keming; Sheehan, David V; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2009-08-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic, highly prevalent and debilitating disorder that commonly co-occurrs with mood disorders. Current available agents for GAD are limited either by their slow onsets of actions, unsatisfactory anxiolytic effects or potential for abuse/dependence. Atypical antipsychotics have been studied as alternatives. Olanzapine, risperidone and quetiapine immediate release have been explored in the treatment of refractory GAD and risperidone in bipolar anxiety with randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, but the results were not consistent. By contrast, quetiapine extended release (quetiapine-XR) 150 mg/day monotherapy yielded consistent anxiolytic effects across three studies that were superior to placebo and as effective as paroxetine 20 mg/day and escitalopram 10 mg/day but with an earlier onset of action. In a 52-week treatment of GAD, quetiapine-XR was superior to placebo in the prevention of anxiety relapses. Overall, atypical antipsychotics were relatively well tolerated, with common side effects of somnolence and sedation. However, in contrast to antidepressants and benzodiazepines, the long-term risk and benefit of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of GAD is yet to be determined.

  17. Clozapine-like motor effects of the atypical antipsychotic risperidone in rats.

    PubMed

    Stanford, J A; Fowler, S C

    2000-05-19

    A behavioral preparation that affords concurrent measurement of forelimb force, lick rhythm, and forelimb tremor in rats was used to assess the effects of the atypical antipsychotic risperidone. Rats that were trained to press downward on an isometric force transducer while simultaneously licking water reinforcement were administered risperidone (0.08, 0.12, and 0.16 mg/kg). Risperidone suppressed task engagement and increased the duration of individual press-hold-release bouts, effects shared with both typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs in this task. Although risperidone did not significantly affect forelimb force output as clozapine does, it did significantly decrease tremor power in the high-frequency (10-25 Hz) band of the power spectrum. Risperidone dose-dependently decreased the dominant 6 Hz frequency of the power spectrum, a reflection of slowed lick rhythm which is an effect that is shared by other atypical antipsychotic drugs in this task. The results reported in the present study suggest that, although risperidone may not possess the exceptionally low extrapyramidal side-effect profile that clozapine does, its effects are more similar to clozapine than to the extrapyramidal side-effect-producing haloperidol in this task.

  18. Japan useful medication program for schizophrenia (JUMPs)-long-term study on discontinuation rate, resolution and remission, and improvement in social functioning rate associated with atypical antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is desirable to establish evidence for the selection of antipsychotics from the viewpoint of recovery of social activity in individual patient with schizophrenia receiving medication. From this perspective, awareness of the importance of studies about drug effectiveness on treatment discontinuation rate, remission rate, and improvement in QOL has grown recently. In Western countries, numerous reports are available in effectiveness studies, which are related to olanzapine and risperidone primarily, whereas evidence for other second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) is poor. In Japan, no effectiveness study has been reported: thus, it is desirable to collect data that will serve as evidence for selection of the 3 SGAs approved after olanzapine. Methods The present study was a long-term effectiveness study under healthcare setting in Japan. It was designed as an open-label, multicenter, randomized, comparative study involving 104-week oral treatment with 1 of the 3 drugs (aripiprazole, blonanserin, and paliperidone) in patients with schizophrenia aged 20 years or over who required antipsychotic medication or switching of the current medication to others for reasons such as lack of efficacy and intolerability. The primary endpoint is treatment discontinuation rate for any causes. The secondary endpoints include remission rate, improvement of social activity, alleviation, aggravation or recurrence of psychiatric symptoms, and safety. The target number of subjects was set at 300. Discussion Because this study is expected to yield evidence regarding the selection of antipsychotics for facilitating the recovery of social activity in patients with schizophrenia, it is considered highly valuable to perform this effectiveness study under ordinary healthcare setting in Japan. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry 000007942 PMID:24090047

  19. Atypical antipsychotic augmentation strategies in the context of guideline-based care for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Ashwin A; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that supports the use of atypical antipsychotics as augmentation agents for nonpsychotic unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Unfortunately, varying definitions of treatment-resistant depression, the limited evidence available for interventions after two or more treatment failures, and when and whether to use medications from nonantidepressant classes, remain a key gap in the knowledge base for clinicians. We identified and reviewed the following guidelines to discuss the status of augmentation therapy with atypical antipsychotic agents in MDD: American Psychiatric Association practice guidelines for treatment of patients with MDD; Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments clinical guidelines for the management of MDD in adults; National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for treatment and management of depression in adults; British Association of Psychopharmacology guidelines for treatment of depressive disorders; Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement healthcare guideline for MDD in adults in primary care; clinical practice recommendations for depression; international consensus statement on MDD; German Society of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Neurology guidelines for unipolar depression; and World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry guidelines for biological treatment of unipolar depressive disorders in primary care. Reflecting the cumulative evidence in the past decade, augmentation strategies including atypical antipsychotic augmentation are recommended in most guidelines for partial or nonresponders, at the same stage as switching or combination strategies. However, there are few direct comparisons of different augmentation strategies and little information about the optimal duration of augmentation strategies or use in special populations. Clinicians should note that guidelines are derived from an evolving database of evidence and cannot take into account the

  20. Atypical antipsychotics and hyperglycemic emergencies: multicentre, retrospective cohort study of administrative data.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Lorraine L; Austin, Peter C; Alessi-Severini, Silvia; Blackburn, David F; Blais, Lucie; Bresee, Lauren; Filion, Kristian B; Kawasumi, Yuko; Kurdyak, Paul; Platt, Robert W; Tamim, Hala; Paterson, J Michael

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the relationship between initiation of atypical antipsychotic agents and the risk of hyperglycemic emergencies. We conducted a multicentre retrospective cohort study using administrative health data from 7 Canadian provinces and the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Hospitalizations for hyperglycemic emergencies (hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state) were compared between new users of risperidone (reference), and new users of olanzapine, other atypical antipsychotics, and typical antipsychotics. We used propensity scores with inverse probability of treatment weighting and proportional hazard models to estimate the site-specific hazard ratios of hyperglycemic emergencies in the year following drug initiation separately for adults under and over age 66 years. Site-level results were pooled using meta-analytic methods. Among 725,489 patients, 55% were aged 66+years; 5% of younger and 19% of older patients had pre-existing diabetes. Hyperglycemic emergencies were rare (1-2 per 1000 person years), but more frequent in patients with pre-existing diabetes (6-12 per 1000 person years). We did not find a significant difference in risk of hyperglycemic emergencies with initiation of olanzapine versus risperidone; however heterogeneity existed between sites. The risk of an event was significantly lower with other atypical (99% quetiapine) compared to risperidone use in older patients [adjusted hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69, 0.53-0.90]. Risk for hyperglycemic emergencies is low after initiation of antipsychotics, but patients with pre-existing diabetes may be at greater risk. The risk appeared lower with the use of quetiapine in older patients, but the clinical significance of the findings requires further study. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatial working memory and problem solving in schizophrenia: the effect of symptom stabilization with atypical antipsychotic medication.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Peter J; Jackson, Colleen E; Piskulic, Danijela; Olver, James; Norman, Trevor; Maruff, Paul

    2008-09-30

    Reasoning and problem solving in the spatial domain are important aspects of executive function that are reliably impaired in schizophrenia, and the Groton Maze Learning Test(c) (GMLT) provides a valid measure of spatial working memory. In the current study, 34 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 20 matched controls were assessed for baseline spatial working memory abilities using this hidden maze learning test. Approximately one month after baseline assessment, allowing for symptoms to stabilize in response to treatment with therapeutic doses of atypical antipsychotic medications for individuals with schizophrenia, all participants were again assessed with the GMLT. Prior to pharmacologic intervention, patients with schizophrenia showed significant impairments in performance of all aspects of the GMLT, including measures of learning efficiency and error monitoring. One month of treatment was associated with a reliable improvement in these domains, although impairments in accuracy and error monitoring on this spatial working memory test persisted despite symptomatic improvement. These results indicate that impairments in spatial working memory are present at the earliest stages of the illness, and that such deficits in performance remain present, albeit ameliorated, after treatment with atypical antipsychotic medication.

  2. Metabolic status and resistin in chronic schizophrenia over a 2-year period with continuous atypical antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Kentaro; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Onuma, Hiroshi; Osawa, Haruhiko; Hosoda, Yoshiki; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Common adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic treatments for schizophrenia are weight gain and lipid metabolism abnormality. We aimed to identify the signs of metabolic problems with continuous atypical antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia over a 2-year period. Methods: The participants were 68 schizophrenic patients (29 males, 39 females; ages 53.4 ± 13.5 years old). Changes in carbohydrate metabolism and changes in physical characteristics were studied over a 2-year period. In addition, functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in the transcriptional regulatory region of the resistin gene were examined. Results: We found no changes in the mental state of the participants over a 2-year period. Patients did show a significant decrease in total cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c levels, although physical changes such as body mass index and abdominal girth, were not observed. The amount of resistin may not be associated with mental states and physical parameters. Conclusions: We could not find physical factors related to metabolic changes of antipsychotics in this 2-year study. However, several psychological factors, such as health-related thoughts and behaviors, should be studied in the future. PMID:26557983

  3. Anticholinergics in the era of atypical antipsychotics: short-term or long-term treatment?

    PubMed

    Desmarais, Julie Eve; Beauclair, Linda; Margolese, Howard C

    2012-09-01

    Anticholinergic agents are usually prescribed to prevent or treat antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Their long-term benefits are questionable and they carry diverse adverse effects, including cognitive impairment and worsening of tardive dyskinesia. This literature review explores the impact of anticholinergic medication discontinuation on movement disorders, cognition and psychopathology in patients receiving antipsychotics. Medline, Embase and PsycInfo were searched from 1950 to July 2011 using "cessation /withdrawal /discontinuation /stopping" with "anticholinergic*" or "antiparkinson*" and "neuroleptic*" or "antipsychotic*". Additional articles were obtained by searching the bibliographies of relevant references. Earlier studies of anticholinergic agent discontinuation in patients receiving first-generation antipsychotics reported relapse rates of extrapyramidal symptoms between 4% and 80%, reflecting the heterogeneity of the studies. Two recent studies of patients prescribed second-generation antipsychotics obtained relapse rates of 4% and 33%. Some studies suggest improvement in tardive dyskinesia with cessation of anticholinergics. Four studies examined the effects of anticholinergic agent discontinuation on cognition and all observed an improvement post-discontinuation. Changes in symptoms of schizophrenia with anticholinergic discontinuation are conflicting, with more recent studies suggesting an improvement. Given their questionable benefit with continued use, clinicians should consider a gradual withdrawal of anticholinergic agents in stable patients receiving antipsychotics.

  4. Atypical antipsychotic properties of blonanserin, a novel dopamine D2 and 5-HT2A antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Okano, Motoki; Imaki, Junta; Tatara, Ayaka; Okumura, Takahiro; Shimizu, Saki

    2010-08-01

    Blonanserin is a novel antipsychotic agent that preferentially interacts with dopamine D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors. To assess the atypical properties of blonanserin, we evaluated its propensity to induce extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) and to enhance forebrain Fos expression in mice. The actions of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin, in modulating haloperidol-induced EPS were also examined. Blonanserin (0.3-10mg/kg, p.o.) did not significantly alter the pole-descending behavior of mice in the pole test or increase the catalepsy time, while haloperidol (0.3-3mg/kg, p.o.) caused pronounced bradykinesia and catalepsy. Blonanserin and haloperidol at the above doses significantly enhanced Fos expression in the shell (AcS) region of the nucleus accumbens and dorsolateral striatum (dlST). The extent of blonanserin-induced Fos expression in the AcS was comparable to that induced by haloperidol. However, the striatal Fos expression by blonanserin was less prominent as compared to haloperidol. Furthermore, combined treatment of AD-6048 (0.1-3mg/kg, s.c.) with haloperidol (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated haloperidol-induced bradykinesia and catalepsy. The present results show that blonanserin behaves as an atypical antipsychotic both in inducing EPS and enhancing forebrain Fos expression. In addition, AD-6048 seems to contribute at least partly to the atypical properties of blonanserin. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identifying a predictive model for response to atypical antipsychotic monotherapy treatment in south Indian schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Meenal; Moily, Nagaraj S; Kaur, Harpreet; Jajodia, Ajay; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree

    2013-08-01

    Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) drugs are the preferred choice of treatment for schizophrenia patients. Patients who do not show favorable response to AAP monotherapy are subjected to random prolonged therapeutic treatment with AAP multitherapy, typical antipsychotics or a combination of both. Therefore, prior identification of patients' response to drugs can be an important step in providing efficacious and safe therapeutic treatment. We thus attempted to elucidate a genetic signature which could predict patients' response to AAP monotherapy. Our logistic regression analyses indicated the probability that 76% patients carrying combination of four SNPs will not show favorable response to AAP therapy. The robustness of this prediction model was assessed using repeated 10-fold cross validation method, and the results across n-fold cross-validations (mean accuracy=71.91%; 95%CI=71.47-72.35) suggest high accuracy and reliability of the prediction model. Further validations of these results in large sample sets are likely to establish their clinical applicability.

  6. Tardive dyskinesia occurring in a young woman after withdrawal of an atypical antipsychotic drug

    PubMed Central

    Alblowi, Mohammed A.; Alosaimi, Fahad D.

    2015-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is one of the most serious and disturbing side-effects of dopamine receptor antagonists. It affects 20-50% of patients on long-term antipsychotic therapy. The pathophysiology of TD remains poorly understood, and treatment is often challenging. Here, we present a 32-year-old woman presenting with a 9-month history of TD occurring after risperidone withdrawal, and characterized almost exclusively by tongue protrusion. After being seen by different specialties and undergoing multiple investigations, she was eventually correctly diagnosed with TD by a specialist team and successfully treated with amantadine. Vigilance and awareness of this condition and its risk factors are required to make the correct diagnosis, especially in cases with unusual presentations caused by atypical antipsychotics, and treatment can be challenging. PMID:26492119

  7. Attenuation of MK-801-induced behavioral perseveration by typical and atypical antipsychotic pretreatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Tuplin, Erin W; Stocco, Marlaina R; Holahan, Matthew R

    2015-08-01

    The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d] cyclohepten-5-10-imine maleate (MK-801) has been shown to increase the probability of operant responding during extinction and reduce infralimbic prefrontal cortical activation, possibly modeling the cognitive dysfunction symptomology, and underlying cause, in patients with schizophrenia. The present study sought to determine if typical and/or atypical antipsychotics would attenuate the MK-801-induced behavioral perseveration and whether this would be associated with concomitant changes in phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) labeling in the infralimbic cortex (IL). Male, Long Evans rats were pretreated with the typical antipsychotic, Flupenthixol (0, 0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 mg/kg) or the atypical antipsychotic, aripiprazole (0, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0 mg/kg), then given 0.1 mg/kg MK-801 followed by a 60-min appetitive operant extinction session. Flupenthixol produced a dose-dependent decrease in MK-801-induced bar pressing behavior and locomotor activity and a dose-dependent increase in IL pERK1/2 labeling. Aripiprazole produced a U-shaped dose-response curve on MK-801-induced bar pressing behavior, a dose-dependent decrease in locomotor activity but no changes in IL pERK1/2 labeling. The attenuation of the MK-801-induced behavioral (bar pressing, locomotion) profile by Flupenthixol indicates a clear dopaminergic contribution to this behavior. The behavioral effect of aripiprazole may be due to its a) binding to presynaptic dopamine receptors at the midrange dose decreasing dopamine output and b) binding to postsynaptic dopamine receptors at the higher dose increasing dopamine tone. While both classes of antipsychotics can normalize perseverative behavioral symptoms, the underlying prefrontal cortical dysregulation seems to persist.

  8. Effective treatment of coprophagia in a patient with schizophrenia with the novel atypical antipsychotic drug perospirone.

    PubMed

    Harada, K I; Yamamoto, K; Saito, T

    2006-05-01

    Here we report on a patient with schizophrenia who suffered from medication-refractory coprophagia. Although there were few cases in which psychotropic medication was effective against coprophagia, we encountered a patient with schizophrenia in whom coprophagia rapidly disappeared after treatment with perospirone, a novel atypical antipsychotic drug of the serotonin-dopamine antagonist (SDA) type. Perospirone has a uniquely high affinity for serotonin-1A receptors, and it could be speculated that perospirone, as a serotonin-1A receptor agonist combined with SDA, may have greater efficacy for treatment-refractory symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, perospirone is an agent with possible efficacy for medication-refractory schizophrenia.

  9. Use of atypical antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia in Maine Medicaid following a policy change.

    PubMed

    Soumerai, Stephen B; Zhang, Fang; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Ball, Daniel E; LeCates, Robert F; Law, Michael R; Hughes, Tom E; Chapman, Daniel; Adams, Alyce S

    2008-01-01

    More than one-third of Medicaid programs and Medicare Part D plans use prior authorization (PA) policies to control the use of atypical antipsychotics (AAs). We used Medicaid and Medicare claims data to investigate how Maine's PA policy affected AA use, treatment discontinuities, and spending among schizophrenia patients initiating AA therapy. Patients initiating AAs during Maine's policy experienced a 29 percent greater risk of treatment discontinuity than patients initiating AAs before the policy took effect; no change occurred in a comparison state. AA spending was slightly lower in both states. Observed increases in treatment discontinuities without cost savings suggest that AAs should be exempt from PA for patients with severe mental illnesses.

  10. Withdrawal symptoms and rebound syndromes associated with switching and discontinuing atypical antipsychotics: theoretical background and practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cerovecki, Anja; Musil, Richard; Klimke, Ansgar; Seemüller, Florian; Haen, Ekkehard; Schennach, Rebecca; Kühn, Kai-Uwe; Volz, Hans-Peter; Riedel, Michael

    2013-07-01

    With the widespread use of atypical or second-generation antipsychotics, switching treatment has become current practice and more complicated, as the pharmacological profiles of these agents differ substantially despite their similarity in being 'atypical'. All share the ability to block dopamine D₂ receptors, and most of them also block serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Apart from these common features, some atypical antipsychotics are also able to block or stimulate other dopamine or serotonin receptors, as well as histaminergic, muscarinergic or adrenergic receptors. As a result of the varying receptor affinities, in switching or discontinuing compounds several possible pitfalls have to be considered, including the occurrence of withdrawal and rebound syndromes. This article reviews the pharmacological background of functional blockade or stimulation of receptors of interest in regard to atypical antipsychotics and the implicated potential withdrawal and rebound phenomena. A MEDLINE search was carried out to identify information on withdrawal or rebound syndromes occurring after discontinuation of atypical antipsychotics. Using the resulting literature, we first discuss the theoretical background to the functional consequences of atypical antipsychotic-induced blockade or stimulation of neurotransmitter receptors and, secondly, we highlight the clinical consequences of this. We then review the available clinical literature on switching between atypical antipsychotics, with respect to the occurrence of withdrawal or rebound symptoms. Finally, we offer practical recommendations based on the reviewed findings. The systematic evaluation of withdrawal or rebound phenomena using randomized controlled trials is still understudied. Knowledge of pharmacological receptor-binding profiles may help clinicians in choosing adequate switching or discontinuation strategies for each agent. Results from large switching trials indicate that switching atypical antipsychotics can be

  11. Assessing the burden of treatment-emergent adverse events associated with atypical antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Lançon, Christophe; Hartry, Ann; Brown, T Michelle; DiBenedetti, Dana B; Kamat, Siddhesh A; François, Clément

    2017-02-13

    Treatment of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (MDD) with atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) show improved efficacy and reduced side effect burden compared with older antipsychotic medications. However, a risk of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) remains. TEAEs are hard to quantify and perspectives on the importance of TEAEs differ across patients and between patients and physicians. The current study is a qualitative assessment that investigates TEAEs of AAPs from both patient and physician perspectives to provide better understanding of the occurrence and burden of TEAEs associated with these medications. Focus groups comprised of patients with MDD and interviews with patients with schizophrenia were conducted at two qualitative research facilities, along with a physician focus group at one of the facilities. Information collected from patients included an exhaustive list of TEAEs experienced, and the frequency and level of bother of each TEAE; from psychiatrists, information included an exhaustive list of TEAEs based on personal observations and patient report, frequency of TEAEs, clinically important TEAEs, and levels of patient-perceived bother. Standard qualitative analysis methods were used to identify, quantify, characterize, and summarize patterns found in the data collected. A total of 42 patients (25 with MDD and 17 with schizophrenia) and 4 psychiatrists participated in the study. TEAEs reported as bothersome across both patients groups included cognitive issues, weight gain and/or increased appetite, low energy, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), and need to sleep/excessive sleep/excessive sleepiness. TEAEs considered more bothersome by patients with schizophrenia were weight gain, low energy, EPS, mental anxiety, and increased positive symptoms; those considered more bothersome by patients with MDD were cognitive issues, somnolence/sedation, and flat/restricted affect. TEAEs considered most clinically important by psychiatrists included

  12. Atypical antipsychotics as augmentation therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Marzola, Enrica; Desedime, Nadia; Giovannone, Cristina; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings.

  13. Atypical Antipsychotics as Augmentation Therapy in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Marzola, Enrica; Desedime, Nadia; Giovannone, Cristina; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings. PMID:25922939

  14. Brexpiprazole and cariprazine: distinguishing two new atypical antipsychotics from the original dopamine stabilizer aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Joshua S.; Schwartz, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brexpiprazole and cariprazine are the latest US Food and Drug Administration approved atypical antipsychotics available in the United States. Both function as partial agonists of the dopamine-2 receptor (D2R), a mechanism of action shared with aripiprazole. However, all three differ in their affinities for the D2R as well as for serotonin receptors (5-HTRs). This paper seeks to delineate these pharmacodynamic and clinical differences amongst the three dopamine partial agonist atypical antipsychotic drugs. Methods: PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov searches were used to generate preclinical and clinical evidence for review. Data derived from animal models and human subjects were used to provide insight on clinical mechanisms and adverse effect potentials. Clinical trial data were reviewed to compare clinical efficacy and adverse effects. Results: Efficacies among the three drugs are comparable for their shared indications. Side-effect profile and underlying pharmacodynamic mechanism of action for each drug may differ. Conclusion: Partial agonism of the D2R is a similarity of the three drugs reviewed. Each drug varies in affinity for both the D2R and a diverse group of 5-HTRs, generating a distinct profile of clinical indications and adverse effects for each. PMID:28101322

  15. Dopamine depletion of the prefrontal cortex induces dendritic spine loss: reversal by atypical antipsychotic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2008-05-01

    Dystrophic changes in dendrites of cortical neurons are present in several neuro-psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. The mechanisms that account for dendritic changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in schizophrenia are unclear. Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia have been linked to compromised cortical dopamine function, and the density of the PFC dopamine innervation is decreased in schizophrenia. We determined if 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the ventral tegmental area that disrupt the PFC dopamine innervation cause dystrophic changes in cortical neurons. Three weeks post-operatively we observed a marked decrease in basal dendritic length and spine density of layer V pyramidal cells in the prelimbic cortex; no change was seen in neurons of the motor cortex. We then examined rats in which the PFC dopamine innervation was lesioned and 3 weeks later were started on chronic treatment with an atypical (olanzapine) or typical (haloperidol) antipsychotic drug. Olanzapine but not haloperidol reversed lesion-induced changes in PFC pyramidal cell dendrites. These data suggest that dopamine regulates dendritic structure in PFC neurons. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a decrease in cortical dopaminergic tone contributing to the pathological changes in the cortex of schizophrenia, and suggest that the progressive cortical loss in schizophrenia may be slowed or reversed by treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs.

  16. Minimizing Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Shankar, Gollapudi S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:24649390

  17. Brexpiprazole and cariprazine: distinguishing two new atypical antipsychotics from the original dopamine stabilizer aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Joshua S; Schwartz, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    Brexpiprazole and cariprazine are the latest US Food and Drug Administration approved atypical antipsychotics available in the United States. Both function as partial agonists of the dopamine-2 receptor (D2R), a mechanism of action shared with aripiprazole. However, all three differ in their affinities for the D2R as well as for serotonin receptors (5-HTRs). This paper seeks to delineate these pharmacodynamic and clinical differences amongst the three dopamine partial agonist atypical antipsychotic drugs. PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov searches were used to generate preclinical and clinical evidence for review. Data derived from animal models and human subjects were used to provide insight on clinical mechanisms and adverse effect potentials. Clinical trial data were reviewed to compare clinical efficacy and adverse effects. Efficacies among the three drugs are comparable for their shared indications. Side-effect profile and underlying pharmacodynamic mechanism of action for each drug may differ. Partial agonism of the D2R is a similarity of the three drugs reviewed. Each drug varies in affinity for both the D2R and a diverse group of 5-HTRs, generating a distinct profile of clinical indications and adverse effects for each.

  18. Mortality of neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs: a propensity-matched analysis from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Miyata, Hiroaki; Shimada, Takafumi; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya

    2012-04-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by atypical antipsychotics presents atypical clinical manifestations with fewer symptoms compared with neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by typical antipsychotics. However, any differences in prognosis between these 2 types of drug-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome remain unknown. We examined neuroleptic malignant syndrome-related mortality in patients treated with typical or atypical antipsychotics by using a national administrative claims database. Data of patients with a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome between July and December in each of the 5 years from 2004 to 2008 were extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. Data included patient background, use of antipsychotics, and in-hospital mortality. Propensity score matching was performed to formulate a balanced 1:1 matched study and to compare in-hospital mortality between neuroleptic malignant syndrome patients taking typical antipsychotics and those taking atypical antipsychotics. We identified 423 neuroleptic malignant syndrome patients treated with typical antipsychotics and 215 neuroleptic malignant syndrome patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. Matching based on propensity scores produced 210 patients in each drug group. In-hospital mortality was substantially lower in the atypical antipsychotic group compared with the typical antipsychotic group, but the difference was not significant (3.3% vs 7.6%; OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.17-1.11; P = .084). The results show that neuroleptic malignant syndrome remains a life threatening disease among patients receiving antipsychotics. A tendency for lower mortality in the atypical antipsychotic group may reflect differences in the pathophysiology. However, to clarify whether there is a difference in neuroleptic malignant syndrome-related mortality with the 2 types of antipsychotics, further studies with larger samples are needed. © Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press

  19. Effect of novel atypical antipsychotic, blonanserin, on extracellular neurotransmitter level in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohoyama, Keiko; Yamamura, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Shiroyama, Takashi; Tanii, Hisashi; Okada, Motohiro

    2011-02-25

    To clarify the mechanisms of action of blonanserin, an atypical antipsychotic drug, we studied the effects of systemic administration of blonanserin and risperidone on extracellular levels of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex using microdialysis, and neuronal firing in the ventral tegmental area, locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe nucleus and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus using radiotelemetry. The binding affinities of blonanserin to D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the rat brain were confirmed and found to be similar. Blonanserin transiently increased neuronal firing in locus coeruleus and ventral tegmental area but not in dorsal raphe nucleus or mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, whereas risperidone increased the firing in locus coeruleus, ventral tegmental area and dorsal raphe nucleus but not in mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Blonanserin persistently increased frontal extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine but not serotonin, GABA or glutamate, whereas risperidone persistently increased those of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin but not GABA or glutamate. These results suggest a pharmacological correlation between the stimulatory effects of these antipsychotics on frontal monoamine release and neuronal activity in monoaminergic nuclei. Inhibition of the α(2) adrenoceptor increased extracellular monoamine levels and enhanced blonanserin-induced increase in extracellular serotonin level. These results indicated that the combination of antagonism of D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors contribute to the rise in extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine, and that α(2) adrenoceptors play important roles in frontal serotonin release. They also suggest that blonanserin-induced activation of monoaminergic transmission could be, at least partially, involved in atypical antipsychotic properties of blonanserin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lateral and medial hypofrontality in first-episode schizophrenia: functional activity in a medication-naive state and effects of short-term atypical antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Snitz, Beth E; MacDonald, Angus; Cohen, Jonathan D; Cho, Raymond Y; Becker, Theresa; Carter, Cameron S

    2005-12-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex are critical components of the brain circuitry underlying executive control. The objective of this study was to investigate control-related dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functioning and conflict-related anterior cingulate cortex functioning in a group of never medicated first-episode schizophrenia patients to determine whether both regions show dysfunction at illness onset. A second objective was to assess short-term effects of atypical antipsychotic medication on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex functioning. First-episode schizophrenia patients (N=23) and healthy comparison subjects (N=24) underwent event-related fMRI and performed a cognitive task designed to functionally dissociate the two regions. Four weeks after initiation of pharmacotherapy for patients, a subset of 11 patients and 16 comparison subjects underwent a repeat assessment. At baseline, patients exhibited hypoactivation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. After 4 weeks of antipsychotic treatment, the patients demonstrated improved functioning in the anterior cingulate cortex but not in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings confirm the presence of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex dysfunction early in the course of schizophrenia and suggest that anterior cingulate cortex functioning may be altered at illness onset as well. Results also suggest that anterior cingulate cortex functioning may be especially sensitive to remedial antipsychotic treatment effects. These findings are consistent with an emerging literature documenting short-term benefits of atypical antipsychotic medication for the neural circuitry underlying cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  1. Atypical antipsychotic use is an independent predictor for the increased mean platelet volume in patients with schizophrenia: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Semiz, Murat; Yücel, Hasan; Kavakçı, Önder; Yıldırım, Osman; Zorlu, Ali; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Canan, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases, cardiovascular risk factors, and mortality due to these situations are more frequently encountered in schizophrenic patients when compared with the general population. The mean platelet volume (MPV) is a surrogate biomarker of the platelet activity and an useful prognostic test in cardiometabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate what influenced MPV levels in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: We evaluated hospital records of 60 hospitalized schizophrenia patients. Thirty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were also included as a control group. Results: MPV levels were significantly higher in patients who were on atypical antipsychotic drugs than in patients who were not using any drug (9.2 ± 0.8 vs. 8.6 ± 0.8 fL, P = 0.016) and also higher than control group (9.2 ± 0.8 vs. 8.1 ± 0.9 fL, P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients who were not using antipsychotics had higher MPV than control group (8.6 ± 0.8 vs. 8.1 ± 0.9 fL, P = 0.036). Atypical antipsychotic use [Odds ratio (OR) =6.152, 95% confidence interval (CI,) P = 0.003)] and platelet distribution width (OR = 0.989, 95% CI, P = 0.032) were associated with high MPV levels in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression model, only atypical antipsychotics use (OR = 6.152, 95% CI, P = 0.003) was found to be independent predictor of high MPV levels after adjustment of other potential confounders (age, gender, presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and smoking). Conclusion: MPV seems to be influenced not only by schizophrenia itself but also by atypical antipsychotic drugs. It might be concluded that schizophrenic patients are under increased risk for cardiometabolic diseases and risk factors and this risk is higher in patients on atypical antipsychotic treatment. PMID:24516487

  2. Chronic atypical antipsychotics, but not haloperidol, increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Chikama, Koji; Yamada, Hidetaka; Tsukamoto, Tatsuo; Kajitani, Kosuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2017-09-09

    It is suggested that altered neuroplasticity contributes to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and antipsychotics may exhibit some of their therapeutic efficacies by improving neurogenesis and/or proliferation of neural progenitors. The aim of this study is to investigate whether chronic antipsychotics treatment affect neurogenesis in adult mouse hippocampus. Animals were administered olanzapine, quetiapine, clozapine, risperidone, aripiprazole, or haloperidol via the osmotic minipump for 21 days and then injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label mitotic cells. BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampus were quantified by stereology. Aripiprazole, quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzapine significantly increased density of BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampus. Interestingly, other antipsychotic drugs had tendency to increasing BrdU-positive cells, whereas haloperidol had propensity to decrease with a marginal significance. These results suggest that differences of neurogenesis among these drugs may, at least in part, account for their pharmacological profiles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Why Research on the Pharmacogenetics of Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleister, Heidi M.; Valdovinos, Maria Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Weight gain is an often-observed side effect of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and is particularly significant in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). The majority of individuals treated with AAPs will gain at least 10% of their initial body weight over the course of therapy (Umbricht & Kane, 1996). One's genetic constitution is an…

  4. Tardive Dyskinesia and Intellectual Disability: An Examination of Demographics and Topography in Adults with Dual Diagnosis and Atypical Antipsychotic Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodstad, Jill C.; Bamburg, Jay W.; Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A.; Neal, Daniene; Holloway, Jodie

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are commonly used in large-scale residential care facilities for adults with developmental disabilities. While the benefits of this class of psychotropics are noted, debate exists whether the side effect profile of these medications outweigh their therapeutic benefit, especially in those who use them long-term.…

  5. Why Research on the Pharmacogenetics of Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleister, Heidi M.; Valdovinos, Maria Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Weight gain is an often-observed side effect of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and is particularly significant in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). The majority of individuals treated with AAPs will gain at least 10% of their initial body weight over the course of therapy (Umbricht & Kane, 1996). One's genetic constitution is an…

  6. Tardive Dyskinesia and Intellectual Disability: An Examination of Demographics and Topography in Adults with Dual Diagnosis and Atypical Antipsychotic Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodstad, Jill C.; Bamburg, Jay W.; Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A.; Neal, Daniene; Holloway, Jodie

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are commonly used in large-scale residential care facilities for adults with developmental disabilities. While the benefits of this class of psychotropics are noted, debate exists whether the side effect profile of these medications outweigh their therapeutic benefit, especially in those who use them long-term.…

  7. Multi-receptor drug design: Haloperidol as a scaffold for the design and synthesis of atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Peprah, Kwakye; Zhu, Xue Y; Eyunni, Suresh V K; Setola, Vincent; Roth, Bryan L; Ablordeppey, Seth Y

    2012-02-01

    Using haloperidol as a scaffold, new agents were designed to investigate the structural contributions of various groups to binding at CNS receptors associated with atypical antipsychotic pharmacology. It is clear that each pharmacophoric group, the butyrophenone, the piperidine and the 4-chlorophenyl moieties contributes to changes in binding to the receptors of interest. This strategy has resulted in the identification of several new agents, compounds 16, 18, 19, 23, 24 and 25, with binding profiles which satisfy our stated criteria for agents to act as potential atypical antipsychotics. This research demonstrates that haloperidol can serve as a useful lead in the identification and design of new agents that target multiple receptors associated with antipsychotic pharmacology.

  8. Treatment of behavior disorders in mental retardation: report on transitioning to atypical antipsychotics, with an emphasis on risperidone.

    PubMed

    Aman, Michael G; Gharabawi, Georges M

    2004-09-01

    Mental illnesses are more common in people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities than in the general population. Due to the difficulty of making specific psychiatric diagnoses in these patients, the target of medication is often a behavioral symptom. For many symptoms, antipsychotic medications are effective, but the serious side effect profile of conventional antipsychotics renders their use problematic. Recent findings concerning the safety and efficacy of atypical antipsychotics for control of certain disruptive behaviors in adults and children led a Special Topic Advisory Panel to draw up guidelines for transitioning patients with specific symptoms from classical antipsychotics to risperidone and, by extrapolation, to other atypical agents. Participants were chosen by Janssen Pharmaceutica, based on individual achievements and lifetime experience. The Special Topic Advisory Panel on Transitioning to Risperidone Therapy in Patients With Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities comprised academic clinicians with at least 10 years' experience in the field of mental retardation and developmental disabilities. It included a clinical pharmacist, consultant pharmacists, a certified developmental disabilities nurse, psychiatrists, a family physician, and a psychologist. The Panel considered recent studies of the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone and other atypical antipsychotics in adults and children with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. MEDLINE searches were conducted using the name of each atypical antipsychotic and the following terms: mental retardation, developmental disabilities, and behavior disorders. Searches were conducted starting in July 2002 and done periodically through April 2004 to capture new additions to the literature. Searches were confined to English. GUIDELINES PROCESS: The Panel reviewed the available evidence, identified optimal doses and titration schedules, considered instruments and rating

  9. Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotic medications for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, George I; Shelton, Richard C; Smith, Juliana; Fava, Maurizio

    2007-06-01

    To examine the efficacy and overall tolerability of augmentation of standard antidepressants with atypical antipsychotic agents for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane database, and program syllabi from major psychiatric meetings held since 2000 as well as a number of online clinical trial results registries were searched. Makers of atypical anti-psychotic agents who do not maintain an online clinical study results registry were contacted directly. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials assessing adjunctive treatment of standard antidepressants with an atypical antipsychotic agent for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder were identified. Data were extracted with the use of a pre-coded form. Data from 10 clinical trial reports involving a total of 1500 outpatients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder were identified and combined using a random-effects model. Patients randomized to adjunctive treatment with an atypical antipsychotic agent were more likely to experience remission (risk ratio [RR] = 1.75, p < .0001) or clinical response (RR = 1.35, p = .001) than patients who received adjunctive placebo. Pooled remission and response rates for the 2 treatment groups were 47.4% vs. 22.3% and 57.2% vs. 35.4%, respectively. Although there was no difference in overall discontinuation rates (p = .929) or the rate of discontinuation due to inefficacy (p = .133) between the 2 treatment groups, the rate of discontinuation due to adverse events was lower among placebo-treated patients (RR = 3.38, p < .0001). These results support the utility of augmenting standard antidepressants with atypical antipsychotic agents for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder. An obvious limitation of this work is the absence of data focusing on the use of aripiprazole and ziprasidone. Future short- as well as long-term studies comparing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of this versus other

  10. A review of new atypical antipsychotic launches in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, Jeff; Kalali, Amir H; Citrome, Leslie

    2010-12-01

    In this article we investigate the post-launch retail prescription trends of asenapine (Saphris(®), Merck and Co.) and iloperidone (Fanapt(®), Vanda Pharmaceuticals Inc./Novartis), two new atypical antipsychotics to launch in the United States market in October 2009 and January 2010, respectively. In the first 12 months following the asenapine launch, and in the nine months since the iloperidone launch, asenapine and iloperidone have secured 0.22 and 0.10 percent of the total prescription market; however, both products nearly double those respective shares when total prescriptions are isolated to new patient prescriptions (0.44% for asenapine and 0.17% for iloperidone). Since launch, asenapine has shown stronger signs of growth, largely attributed to its approval in multiple indications as compared to iloperidone's single indication.

  11. Augmentation of standard antidepressants with atypical antipsychotic agents for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, George I

    2005-01-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is not uncommon; 29% to 46% of patients with depression who are treated with antidepressants fail to respond fully. Dr. Papakostas discusses various augmentation strategies, focusing particular on a possible role for the newer atypical antipsychotics. Their complex neuropharmacological actions suggest such efficacy. One chart review and a number of open-label studies have been encouraging, but 2 double-blind, placebo controlled-studies have offered contradictory results. Considering the side-effect profiles of these drugs, a careful risk/benefit assessment is always required. While routinely used for psychotic depression and panic reactions in depressive disorders, their value as augmenters in TRD awaits further study.

  12. Differences in prolactin elevation and related symptoms of atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Melkersson, Kristina

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the degree and frequency of prolactin (PRL) elevation and related symptoms in patients treated with 3 different atypical antipsychotics: clozapine, olanzapine, and risperidone. Twenty-eight patients receiving clozapine, 29 patients receiving olanzapine, and 18 patients receiving risperidone (all meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia, schizophreni-form disorder, or schizoaffective disorder) were studied. The median daily dose was 400 mg of clozapine, 10 mg of olanzapine, and 3 mg of risperidone. Fasting morning blood samples were analyzed for PRL, and the occurrence of hyper-prolactinemic symptoms in the patients was evaluated. Elevated PRL levels were found in 16 (89%) of the patients receiving risperidone and in 7 (24%) of the patients receiving olanzapine, but in none of the patients receiving clozapine. In addition, there was a significant difference in median PRL level among the treatment groups (p < .0001), in that the PRL level was higher both in the patients treated with risperidone and in the patients treated with olanzapine, compared to those treated with clozapine. Moreover, hyperpro-lactinemic symptoms-menstrual disturbances, galactorrhea, impotence, oligospermia, and decreased libido-were reported in 8 (44%) of the risperidone-treated patients and in 1 (3%) of the olanzapine-treated patients, but in none of the clozapine-treated patients. Treatment with risperidone was frequently associated with hyperprolactinemia and related symptoms, whereas the occurrence of PRL elevation and related symptoms was modest in patients receiving olanzapine and nonexistent in those receiving clozapine. Thus, atypical anti-psychotics in therapeutic doses differ with regard to effect on PRL secretion.

  13. [Study of the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in Málaga Prison].

    PubMed

    Salinas Rosillo, C; Ortega Basanta, L; Rubio Flores, A; Jiménez Sánchez, J A

    2007-06-01

    we studied the use of psychotropic drugs belonging to the group of atypical neuroleptics in Malaga State Prison (Centro Penitenciario de Málaga) from 2003 to 2004. We also compared the results of this study with references taken from the Primary Health Care District of Guadalhorce. A retrospective study was carried out on the use of antipsychotic drugs from 2003 to 2004 in Malaga State Prison. A comparison was then made with the use of this type of medication in the Primary Health Care District of Guadalhorce. Data on medication consumption was taken from medical orders received at the prison during this study. The ATC (Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical Classifying System) was used for classifying the active principles. The prison´s own data base (SANIT) was used for calculating the number of containers. For calculating the DDD, the ratio DDD/1000 inmates/day was utilised. The use of atypical antipsychotic medication in the prison increased. There is an increasing trend towards the use of quetiapine in small doses. The use of risperidone went down during the period of this study, although it is still the most commonly used drug in DDD and in consumed containers. The Primary Health care results indicate a trend in the opposite direction. The use of the group of drugs in this study has decreased in the Primary Health Care area, possibly because of special medical control measures such as the control stamp. In Malaga Prison use of these drugs has increased. The reasons for this difference are as yet unknown.

  14. Testing of bioactive-nanovesicles on hepatotoxicity of atypical antipsychotics via digital holography.

    PubMed

    Ozturk Kirbay, Fatma; Geyik, Caner; Guler, Emine; Yesiltepe, Ozan; Gumus, Zinar Pinar; Odaci Demirkol, Dilek; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna

    2017-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs induce hepatic toxicity. Thus, it is of importance to eliminate the side effects of these drugs. Herein we describe the preparation of nanoemulsions with a dietary supplement; wheat germ oil (WGO), to ameliorate the liver damage induced by clozapine and olanzapine. THLE-2 cell line was used as a model to investigate the effects of these nanoemulsions on cell viability as well as antioxidative efficiency after antipsychotic insult. In this context, a conventional cell culture method; MTT was used along with a novel cellular imaging technique called digital holography (DH) to evaluate cell viability. Obtained data confirmed that both clozapine and olanzapine induced the liver damage in in vitro model and WGO nanoemulsions were found to be effective on cells and eliminate the cytotoxic effects of these drugs. Briefly, this study has some outputs as follows; it showed that different dietary supplements can be used in such formulations instead of their pristine forms to increase bioavailability. Also, DH was successfully applied for the monitoring of cell viability and it could be a promising approach as the reactive-free cytotoxicity test.

  15. How frequently are atypical antipsychotics used to treat OCD in a British community mental health team?

    PubMed

    Agius, Mark; Birtwhistle, Michael; Servant, Donald; Zaman, Rashid

    2011-09-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a condition with a prevalence of around 1-2% (3-4% in some studies) with a recognised protocol for its treatment produced by the national institute for health and clinical excellence (NICE). NICE recommends that all patients with OCD are first offered treatment with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) concentrating on exposure and response prevention (ERP) before proceeding to selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Treatment may later be augmented with clomipramine and/or an antipsychotic. This study focuses on the biological treatment received after, or in parallel to, the psychological. We aimed to collate and evaluate the levels of biological treatment currently received by OCD outpatients in the Bedford East catchment area of SEPT. In particular we wished to establish how many of the patients were receiving an atypical antipsychotic as well as maximal SSRIs. Hence we have attempted to assess the types of treatment received by patients under our care, and the difficulties associated with the treatment of this illness.

  16. The atypical antipsychotic olanzapine disturbs depotentiation by modulating mAChRs and impairs reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo Seok; Cha, Jin Hee; Yoon, Sang Ho; Cho, Young Seon; Park, Kyeong-Yeol; Kim, Myoung-Hwan

    2017-03-01

    Antipsychotic medication is an essential component for treating schizophrenia, which is a serious mental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the global population. Olanzapine (Olz), one of the most frequently prescribed atypical antipsychotics, is generally considered a first-line drug for treating schizophrenia. In contrast to psychotic symptoms, the effects of Olz on cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia are still unclear. In addition, the mechanisms by which Olz affects the neural circuits associated with cognitive function are unknown. Here we show that Olz interrupts depotentiation (reversal of long-term potentiation) without disturbing de novo LTP (long-term potentiation) and LTD (long-term depression). At hippocampal SC-CA1 synapses, inhibition of NMDARs (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors), mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors), or mAChRs (muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) disrupted depotentiation. In addition, co-activation of NMDARs, mGluRs, and mAChRs reversed stably expressed LTP. Olz inhibits the activation of mAChRs, which amplifies glutamate signaling through enhanced NMDAR opening and Gq (Gq class of G protein)-mediated signal transduction. Behaviorally, Olz impairs spatial reversal learning of mice in the Morris water maze test. Our results uncover a novel mechanism underpinning the cognitive modulation of Olz and show that the anticholinergic property of Olz affects glutamate signaling and synaptic plasticity.

  17. Perceptions on efficacy and side effects of conventional depot antipsychotics (CDA) and atypical depot antipsychotics (ADA): Psychiatrists versus patients in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hector W H; Fong, Mandy W M; Fung, Kelvin M T; Chung, Raymond C K

    2010-03-01

    Abstract Objectives. We compared the satisfaction level of psychiatrists and psychiatric patients towards conventional (CDA) and atypical (ADA) depot antipsychotics on symptom management, role functioning, and side effects. Method. Patients from an out-patient clinic of a public hospital and psychiatrists from public hospitals participated in the survey in 2007-2008. A total of 153 patients were interviewed by a tailor-made questionnaire and 72 psychiatrists self-administered a similar questionnaire. Results. Both groups shared similar attitudes towards clinical effectiveness and treatment efficacy of ADA and CDA. More patients were ambivalent towards relapse prevention of CDA than psychiatrists (30.7 vs. 16.7%, P<0.044) and three quarters of psychiatrists believed that ADA are associated with less side effects. More than half of the patients showed negative attitudes towards the effectiveness of CDA on improving quality of life (52.40%), work (57.50%), and recreation (55.50%). Psychiatrists were more aware of the limitation of CDA and severity of side effects of CDA. They did not, however, seem to incorporate patients' opinions and research findings into their clinical practice. Conclusion. Evidence-based practice and shared decision-making model between clinicians and mental patients should be advocated. More investigations should be devoted to examine the efficacy of ADA as the alternative to CDA.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates atypical antipsychotic-induced metabolic side effects in rats: involvement of the INSIG/SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruili; Jiang, Pei; Cai, Hualin; Li, Huande; Guo, Ren; Wu, Yanqin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhu, Wenye; He, Xin; Liu, Yiping; Xu, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a major concern in psychotic patients receiving atypical antipsychotics. Recent evidence suggests that sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and insulin-induced genes (INSIGs) are implicated in the antipsychotic-induced metabolic side-effects. Vitamin D (VD) deficiency, a highly prevalent phenomenon among patients with psychosis, might also predispose individuals to metabolic syndrome Considering that VD has modulating effects on the INSIG/SREBP pathway, it is possible that VD may have a role in the antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances involving its effects on the INSIG/SREBP system. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of VD deficiency and VD supplementation on antipsychotic-induced metabolic changes in rats. After 4-week administration, clozapine (10mg/kg/d) and risperidone (1mg/kg/d) both caused glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in VD deficient rats, but not in rats with sufficient VD status. Antipsychotic treatments, especially clozapine, elevated serum lipid levels, which were most apparent in VD deficient rats, but alleviated in VD-supplemented rats. Additionally, antipsychotic treatments down-regulated INSIGs and up-regulated SREBPs expression in VD deficient rats, and these effects were attenuated when VD status was more sufficient. Collectively, this study disclose the novel findings that antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances is exacerbated by VD deficiency and can be alleviated by VD supplementation, providing new evidence for the promising role of VD in prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders caused by antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, our data also suggest the involvement of INSIG/SREBP pathway in the antipsychotic-induced hyperlipidemia and beneficial effects of VD on lipid profile.

  19. The use of atypical antipsychotics beyond psychoses: efficacy of quetiapine in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Emanuela; Cattaneo, Elisabetta; Zanoni, Silvia; Altamura, A Carlo

    2006-06-01

    Atypical antpsychotics have been sucessfully used in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), either as adjunctive or as monotherapy. Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic extensively used in the treatment of psychotic disorders. It has serotonergic and dopaminergic activity and it appears to be selective for the mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine system. The aim of this paper was to review the recent literature on the use of quetiapine in the treatment of BD. The literature databases currently available online were searched for papers on quetiapine and BD. Papers and reports published between January 1995 and June 2005 were selected and reviewed critically. Augmentative low dose quetiapine was found to be effective in BD partially responsive to conventional mood-stabilizers. Manic and mixed episodes have been the best studied, and quetiapine was found to be effective either as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy in both randomized clinical trials and open-label studies. Data on the use of quetiapine in bipolar depression showed a significant efficacy and high remission rates. Maintenance data suggested a role of quetiapine as a good alternative to classical mood stabilizers in reducing recurrence rates of BD. A few studies on the efficacy in rapid cycling BD have also been published. Quetiapine is an effective agent for the short- and long-term treatment of BD. The mechanism of action of quetiapine as a mood stabilizer is still unknown. Some preliminary data suggest the involvement of glutamate pathways but further studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  20. Costs and Resource Utilization Among Medicaid Patients with Schizophrenia Treated with Paliperidone Palmitate or Oral Atypical Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Pesa, Jacqueline A; Muser, Erik; Montejano, Leslie B; Smith, David M; Meyers, Oren I

    Non-adherence to antipsychotic therapy among patients with schizophrenia is a key driver of relapse, which can lead to costly inpatient stays. Long-acting injectables (LAIs) may improve adherence, thus reducing hospitalizations, but inpatient cost reductions need to be balanced against higher drug acquisition costs of LAIs. Real-world evidence is needed to help quantify the economic value of oral atypical antipsychotics compared with LAIs. The objective of this study was to compare healthcare costs and resource utilization between once-monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP) and oral antipsychotic therapy (OAT) in a population of Medicaid beneficiaries with schizophrenia. A retrospective, observational study was performed using Truven Health MarketScan Medicaid claims data from 2009 to 2012. Marginal structural modeling, a form of weighted repeated measures analysis to control for differences between cohorts and time-varying confounding, was used to estimate monthly costs of care in 2012 US dollars and resource utilization over a 12-month period for patients in each cohort. While per-month mental-health prescription costs were US$1019 higher in the PP cohort, approximately 55 % of this premium was offset by lower inpatient and outpatient care costs, producing a mean monthly total cost differential of US$434 (95 % CI 298-569, p < 0.0001) for all-cause costs and US$463 (95 % CI 374-552, p < 0.0001) for mental-health-related costs. Use of PP also resulted in a 0.44 and 0.47 reduction in the odds of all-cause and mental-health-related hospitalizations and a 0.09 reduction in the odds of all-cause emergency department visits (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0134, respectively) over the 12-month follow-up period. Treatment with long-acting injectable antipsychotics, such as PP, may reduce inpatient and outpatient healthcare services utilization and associated costs. These findings also suggest that patients with schizophrenia taking once-monthly PP may stand a

  1. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Muscarinic M1 Receptor Improves Efficacy of Antipsychotics in Mouse Glutamatergic Deficit Models of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Choy, Kwok H C; Shackleford, David M; Malone, Daniel T; Mistry, Shailesh N; Patil, Rahul T; Scammells, Peter J; Langmead, Christopher J; Pantelis, Christos; Sexton, Patrick M; Lane, Johnathan R; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    Current antipsychotics are effective in treating the positive symptoms associated with schizophrenia, but they remain suboptimal in targeting cognitive dysfunction. Recent studies have suggested that positive allosteric modulation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) may provide a novel means of improving cognition. However, very little is known about the potential of combination therapies in extending coverage across schizophrenic symptom domains. This study investigated the effect of the M1 mAChR positive allosteric modulator BQCA [1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid], alone or in combination with haloperidol (a first-generation antipsychotic), clozapine (a second-generation atypical antipsychotic), or aripiprazole (a third-generation atypical antipsychotic), in reversing deficits in sensorimotor gating and spatial memory induced by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine]. Sensorimotor gating and spatial memory induction are two models that represent aspects of schizophrenia modeled in rodents. In prepulse inhibition (an operational measure of sensorimotor gating), BQCA alone had minimal effects but exhibited different levels of efficacy in reversing MK-801-induced prepulse inhibition disruptions when combined with a subeffective dose of each of the three (currently prescribed) antipsychotics. Furthermore, the combined effect of BQCA and clozapine was absent in M1(-/-) mice. Interestingly, although BQCA alone had no effect in reversing MK-801-induced memory impairments in a Y-maze spatial test, we observed a reversal upon the combination of BQCA with atypical antipsychotics, but not with haloperidol. These findings provide proof of concept that a judicious combination of existing antipsychotics with a selective M1 mAChR positive allosteric modulator can extend antipsychotic efficacy in glutamatergic deficit models of behavior

  2. Correlation of serum ghrelin levels with body mass index and carbohydrate metabolism in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Palik, E; Birkás, K D; Faludi, G; Karádi, I; Cseh, K

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome is higher in patients with schizophrenia than in the normal population. Atypical antipsychotic drugs are used in psychiatry since the beginning of 1990. These drugs differ from the "typical" antipsychotics used previously, as they have less extrapyramidal side effects, and because of this they are tolerated better, but are associated with weight-gain and disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism. Ghrelin is an orexigen hormone partaking in body weight regulation. It is produced in the enteroendocrine P/D1 cells of the gastric mucosa and secreted to the circulation. The aim of our study was to determine ghrelin levels of atypical antipsychotic-treated patients in relationship with their body mass index (BMI) and carbohydrate metabolism. We measured the fasting serum ghrelin levels in 56 patients (male/female: 16/40, age mean+/-S.D.: 50.6+/-5.6 years) treated with atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidon and quetiapine), and in 75 healthy control subjects, age and gender matched (RIA Linco, USA) in relationship with their BMI and their fasting and 75 g OGTT 120 min blood glucose values. The serum ghrelin levels of the patient group were notably higher (1333+/-659 pg/ml) than in the control group (368+/-103, p<0.0001; Mann-Whitney). We found no difference among the four antipsychotics in weight-gain, diabetes prevalence and the serum ghrelin levels. The BMI of the patient group was significantly higher (29.3+/-7.2 kg/m2 versus 24.3+/-3.7 kg/m2, p<0.0001; Mann-Whitney); 32% of them had blood glucose abnormality (18/56). There was no difference between the ghrelin levels in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. We found a significant negative linear correlation between the serum ghrelin and BMI (r=-0.35, p=0.0078; Spearman), the ghrelin and fasting blood glucose (r=-0.32, p=0.015) and OGTT 75 g 120 min blood glucose levels (r=-0.27, p=0.036). The orexigen effect of elevated serum ghrelin levels can

  3. Quality of life in schizophrenia on conventional versus atypical antipsychotic medication: a comparative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Ann M; Al-Agib, Ahmed Omar Ahmed

    2007-03-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs, with superior tolerability and possibly superior efficacy, were expected to give schizophrenia patients better quality of life (QOL) than conventional treatment. Research findings are equivocal. We evaluated QOL using three subjective measures--Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI); Sickness Impact Profile (SIP); Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (SQLS)--in 126 routinely seen patients whose treatment was stable for six months, regardless of co-morbidity, current clinical status and concomitant medications. Severity of disorder was assessed with the Global Assessment Schedule (GAS). Fifty patients were on conventional treatment and 76 on atypical treatment. Atypical patients were more likely to be abusing substances (p = 0.02) and living independently (p = 0.00). Conventionally treated patients were older than atypically treated patients. Conventionally treated patients suffered schizophrenia almost twice as long as atypically treated patients. Atypically treated patients enjoyed substantially better quality of life than conventionally treated patients on all measures. The effects of confounding variables, i.e. age, duration, accommodation, co-morbid substance misuse and time spent in hospital, were evaluated with the General Linear Model. This confirmed the status of drug treatment as the primary predictor of all aspects of QOL. We conclude that quality of life is genuinely superior on atypical treatment even allowing for the confounding effects of differential prescribing habits: atypical treatment tends to be reserved for younger, less seriously ill patients. There is no scientific or clinical rationale to support this practice.

  4. Can Atypical Antipsychotic Augmentation Reduce Subsequent Treatment Failure More Effectively Among Depressed Patients with a Higher Degree of Treatment Resistance? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Ahn, Il Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atypical antipsychotic augmentation was demonstrated to be efficacious in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in previous meta-analyses. We investigate whether there are differences in the effect size of atypical antipsychotic augmentation in major depressive disorder according to the degree of treatment resistance. Methods: A comprehensive search of four databases identified 11 randomized controlled trials. The 11 trials, which included 3 341 participants, were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Atypical antipsychotic augmentation of antidepressant therapy showed superior efficacy compared to antidepressant monotherapy in TRD in terms of both response and remission rates (response, risk ratio [RR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25 to 1.53; remission, RR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.42 to 1.85). In addition, regarding response rates in the TRD trials, atypical antipsychotic augmentation exhibited significantly different effect sizes according to the degree of treatment resistance (TRD 1: RR = 1.24; TRD 2: RR = 1.37; TRD 2–4: RR = 1.58). In non-TRD trials, atypical antipsychotic augmentation failed to show superior efficacy over antidepressant monotherapy in terms of remission rates (RR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.69 to 1.14). Atypical antipsychotic augmentation of antidepressant therapy exhibits greater effect size in patients with a higher degree of treatment resistance. Conclusions: This finding strengthens the rationale for considering atypical antipsychotic augmentation among depressed patients with multiple previous treatment failures in clinical practice. The efficacy of atypical antipsychotic augmentation for non-TRD seems to be different from that for TRD and, thus, further studies of non-TRD populations are needed. PMID:25770098

  5. Can Atypical Antipsychotic Augmentation Reduce Subsequent Treatment Failure More Effectively Among Depressed Patients with a Higher Degree of Treatment Resistance? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Ahn, Il Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-03-13

    Atypical antipsychotic augmentation was demonstrated to be efficacious in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in previous meta-analyses. We investigate whether there are differences in the effect size of atypical antipsychotic augmentation in major depressive disorder according to the degree of treatment resistance. A comprehensive search of four databases identified 11 randomized controlled trials. The 11 trials, which included 3 341 participants, were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. Atypical antipsychotic augmentation of antidepressant therapy showed superior efficacy compared to antidepressant monotherapy in TRD in terms of both response and remission rates (response, risk ratio [RR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25 to 1.53; remission, RR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.42 to 1.85). In addition, regarding response rates in the TRD trials, atypical antipsychotic augmentation exhibited significantly different effect sizes according to the degree of treatment resistance (TRD 1: RR = 1.24; TRD 2: RR = 1.37; TRD 2-4: RR = 1.58). In non-TRD trials, atypical antipsychotic augmentation failed to show superior efficacy over antidepressant monotherapy in terms of remission rates (RR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.69 to 1.14). Atypical antipsychotic augmentation of antidepressant therapy exhibits greater effect size in patients with a higher degree of treatment resistance. This finding strengthens the rationale for considering atypical antipsychotic augmentation among depressed patients with multiple previous treatment failures in clinical practice. The efficacy of atypical antipsychotic augmentation for non-TRD seems to be different from that for TRD and, thus, further studies of non-TRD populations are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  6. Atypical antipsychotic paliperidone prevents behavioral deficits in mice prenatally challenged with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Umesh; Mohanty, Banalata

    2015-01-15

    Studies on animal models provide enough evidences that old age appearance of psychosis on exposures to various insults during critical period of brain development could be prevented by antipsychotic drug treatment. Presently, gestational intervention of the atypical antipsychotic paliperidone (PAL) is done along with the exposure of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide/LPS hypothesizing that the drug would counteract and/or prevent the immune activation-induced behavioral deficits in mice. Effect of the PAL (0.05 mg/kg; GD 15-PND 28) in preventing reflex, sensorimotor and anxiety deficits in prenatally LPS-challenged (800 µg/kg; GD 15 and GD 17) mice was assessed at three different life stages: neonatal (PND 4-PND 14), adolescence (PND 35) and at adulthood (PND 85). LPS-induced behavioral deficits were recognizable even at neonatal and adolescence stages, though more pronounced at adulthood. In only PAL-treated group few behavioral deficits though observed both at neonatal and adult stages but less prominent than LPS group were found. PAL co-treatment prevented the abnormalities in nest-seeking behavior in neonates, anxiety abnormalities at adolescence and adulthood but not the sensorimotor impairment. The drug might have maintained the stress homeostasis to counteract the behavioral abnormalities as LPS-induced hypercorticosteronemia was prevented on PAL co-treatment. In view of the in utero exposure, comparatively low drug dose was selected. Though efficacy has been predicted, the dose was not effective to prevent all psychopathological impairments. Considering the wider objectives, it was not possible to conduct multi dose study simultaneously. Our ongoing study with higher dose may predict the effective PAL dose in prevention of psychiatric illness.

  7. Blonanserin, a novel atypical antipsychotic agent not actively transported as substrate by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoko; Osada, Kenichi; Tagawa, Masaaki; Ogawa, Yuriko; Haga, Toshiaki; Sogame, Yoshihisa; Hashizume, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Taguchi, Atsushi; Katsumata, Takashi; Yabuki, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2012-10-01

    Although blonanserin, a novel atypical antipsychotic agent with dopamine D(2)/serotonin 5-HT(2A) antagonistic properties, displays good brain distribution, the mechanism of this distribution has not been clarified. P-glycoprotein [(P-gp) or multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1)] is an efflux transporter expressed in the brain and plays an important role in limiting drug entry into the central nervous system (CNS). In particular, P-gp can affect the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of antipsychotics, and exacerbate or soothe their adverse effects. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments to determine whether blonanserin is a P-gp substrate. Risperidone and its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone, both of which are P-gp substrates, were used as reference drugs. Affinity of blonanserin, risperidone, and 9-hydroxyrisperidone for P-gp was evaluated by in vitro transcellular transport across LLC-PK1, human MDR1 cDNA-transfected LLC-PK1 (LLC-MDR1), and mouse Mdr1a cDNA-transfected LLC-PK1 (LLC-Mdr1a). In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters in the brain and plasma (B/P ratio) of test compounds were measured in mdr1a/1b knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. The results of in vitro experiments revealed that P-gp does not actively transport blonanserin as a substrate in humans or mice. In addition, blonanserin displayed comparable B/P ratios in KO and WT mice, whereas B/P ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone differed markedly in these animals. Our results indicate that blonanserin is not a P-gp substrate and therefore its brain distribution is unlikely to be affected by this transporter. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Assessment of Weight Gain with Atypical Antipsychotics - Blonanserin vs Amisulpride.

    PubMed

    Deepak, T S; Raveesh, B N; Parashivamurthy, B M; Kumar, Ms Narendra; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna; Nagesh, H N

    2015-06-01

    Atypical antipsychotics appear to have the greatest potential to induce weight gain. Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is the one of main cause of non-compliance and discontinuation of treatment, often resulting in the relapse of psychosis. To compare the weight gain between amisulpride and blonanserin treatment, in persons with psychosis. Fifty six subjects with psychosis attending psychiatry department at KR Hospital, Mysore were randomized into two equal groups. After obtaining informed consent, subjects of group I received amisulpride tablets 200 mg BD, and group II received blonanserin tablets 4 mg BD, for eight weeks. Body weight, Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Hip Ratio (WHR) were measured at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks. The mean weight gain with amisulpride at 4 weeks was 2.73 kg (5.21%) and at 8 weeks was 4.34 kg (8.28%) from the baseline. The mean weight gain with blonanserin at 4 weeks was 1.77 kg (3.46%) and at 8 weeks was 3.46 kg (6.75%) from the baseline. The mean BMI increase at 8 weeks with amisulpride was 1.66 ± 0.56 and with blonanserin was 1.34 ± 0.77. The mean WHR increase at 8 weeks with amisulpride was 0.036 ± 0.026 and with blonanserin was 0.029 ± 0.020. There was statistically significant increase in weight, BMI and WHR associated with both blonanserin and amisulpride at 8 weeks. But there was no statistically significant difference in those parameters between blonanserin and amisulpride, at eight weeks. Even though there was no significant difference in the weight gain caused by blonanserin, in comparison with amisulpride, both these drugs individually caused significant weight gain at 8 weeks, which is in contrast with the earlier studies, which needs to be further evaluated.

  9. Clinical Assessment of Weight Gain with Atypical Antipsychotics - Blonanserin vs Amisulpride

    PubMed Central

    Raveesh, BN; Parashivamurthy, BM; Kumar, MS Narendra; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna; Nagesh, HN

    2015-01-01

    Background Atypical antipsychotics appear to have the greatest potential to induce weight gain. Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is the one of main cause of non-compliance and discontinuation of treatment, often resulting in the relapse of psychosis. Objective To compare the weight gain between amisulpride and blonanserin treatment, in persons with psychosis. Materials and Methods Fifty six subjects with psychosis attending psychiatry department at KR Hospital, Mysore were randomized into two equal groups. After obtaining informed consent, subjects of group I received amisulpride tablets 200 mg BD, and group II received blonanserin tablets 4 mg BD, for eight weeks. Body weight, Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Hip Ratio (WHR) were measured at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks. Results The mean weight gain with amisulpride at 4 weeks was 2.73 kg (5.21%) and at 8 weeks was 4.34 kg (8.28%) from the baseline. The mean weight gain with blonanserin at 4 weeks was 1.77 kg (3.46%) and at 8 weeks was 3.46 kg (6.75%) from the baseline. The mean BMI increase at 8 weeks with amisulpride was 1.66 ± 0.56 and with blonanserin was 1.34 ± 0.77. The mean WHR increase at 8 weeks with amisulpride was 0.036 ± 0.026 and with blonanserin was 0.029 ± 0.020. There was statistically significant increase in weight, BMI and WHR associated with both blonanserin and amisulpride at 8 weeks. But there was no statistically significant difference in those parameters between blonanserin and amisulpride, at eight weeks. Conclusion Even though there was no significant difference in the weight gain caused by blonanserin, in comparison with amisulpride, both these drugs individually caused significant weight gain at 8 weeks, which is in contrast with the earlier studies, which needs to be further evaluated. PMID:26266134

  10. Real-world adherence assessment of lurasidone and other oral atypical antipsychotics among patients with schizophrenia: an administrative claims analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Krithika; Wade, Sally; Meyer, Nicole; Loebel, Antony

    2017-05-01

    To compare adherence with lurasidone to other oral atypical antipsychotics among Medicaid and commercially insured patients with schizophrenia. Administrative claims of patients with schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics (lurasidone, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone) from October 2010 to September 2011 were identified from MarketScan Commercial and Medicaid Databases, and were classified by the first (index) antipsychotic. Patients were 18-64 years, had insurance coverage 12 months pre- and 6 months post-index, and no pre-index use of the index drug. Medication possession ratio (MPR), discontinuation rate, and mean time to discontinuation were assessed post-index. Pairwise comparisons (lurasidone versus each drug) were conducted using chi-square tests and Student's t-tests. There were 146 Medicaid (mean age 43.5 years, 47.9% female) and 63 commercial (mean age 40.0 years, 42.9% female) patients treated with lurasidone. In the Medicaid population, the MPR for patients treated with lurasidone was 0.60, versus 0.41-0.48 for patients treated with other antipsychotics (all p < .05). Patients treated with lurasidone exhibited a lower discontinuation rate compared to patients treated with all other antipsychotics (49.3% versus 62.3%-68.3%, all p < .05). The mean time to discontinuation with lurasidone was significantly longer than with ziprasidone (p < .05). In the commercial population, the MPR for patients treated with lurasidone (0.61) was higher compared to patients treated with quetiapine (0.44) and ziprasidone (0.43) (both p < .05). The discontinuation rate (44.4%) was lower for patients treated with lurasidone compared to patients treated with all other antipsychotics except risperidone (p < .05). The mean time to discontinuation was longer for lurasidone than with other antipsychotics. In Medicaid and commercial populations, patients treated with lurasidone demonstrated greater adherence compared to

  11. A naturalistic study of predictors and risks of atypical antipsychotic use in an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder clinic.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Margaret; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Giles, Lauren; Gibbins, Christopher; Kuzeljevic, Boris; Davidson, Jana; Harrison, Rebecca

    2009-10-01

    This was an exploratory study to examine the use of atypical antipsychotics in an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) clinic. A total of 194 patients was examined to compare those receiving atypical or second-generation antipsychotics (atypicals) from those who were not. A sample of 27 children on atypicals received laboratory investigation for indicators of possible metabolic effects. In all, 19.1% of the patients in the clinic were receiving atypicals with a mean duration of 313 days; 36 of 37 patients on atypicals had received risperidone, with a mean dose of 0.62 mg. Children receiving atypicals were statistically more likely to have a severe co-morbid disorder, a lower Children's Global Assessment Scale score, a greater total score on the teacher Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and greater difficulty with parent-rated symptoms of being touchy, worried, rages, and explosive outbursts. There were no differences found in measures of functioning, adaptive skills, quality of life, or ADHD symptoms. In the subset of children studied for potential metabolic effects, 68.0% had a waist circumference > or =90(th) percentile that was independent of weight gain, 18.5% had impaired fasting glucose, 12.5% had elevated blood pressure, 11.1% had elevated triglycerides, and 16.7% met full criteria for metabolic syndrome. Clinical implementation of the efficacy studies of risperidone for disruptive behavior disorders has led to a significant change in practice. Almost 1 in 5 patients are now receiving atypical neuroleptics, typically to treat severe co-morbid disorders and symptoms other than ADHD per se. Despite these children receiving low doses, concomitant stimulants, and low body mass index z-scores, a significant proportion of children demonstrated either one or more components or the full criteria for metabolic syndrome.

  12. Adverse Effects and Toxicity of the Atypical Antipsychotics: What is Important for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Rasimas, J.J.; Liebelt, Erica L.

    2012-01-01

    Medications are being used with greater frequency to address pediatric mental health problems, and in recent years atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescriptions have increased more than any other class. Acute care practitioners must be aware of the pharmacology of AAPs and the conditions, on- and off-label, for which they are prescribed. This involves identifying and managing side effects that manifest both mentally and physically. Although “atypicality” confers a lower risk of movement side effects compared to conventional agents, children are more sensitive than adults to extrapyramidal reactions. Like adults, they also may present with toxic sedation, confusion, cardiovascular dysfunction, and metabolic derangements. Evaluation and management of these toxicities requires an index of suspicion, a careful symptom and medication history, physical examination, and targeted interventions. This review is designed to orient the emergency practitioner to the challenging task of recognizing and treating adverse effects related to acute and chronic atypical antipsychotic exposure in children. PMID:23471213

  13. Synthesis, evaluation and computational studies on a series of acetophenone based 1-(aryloxypropyl)-4-(chloroaryl) piperazines as potential atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Bali, Alka; Sharma, Komal; Bhalla, Abhishek; Bala, Suman; Reddy, Dinesh; Singh, Anant; Kumar, Anil

    2010-06-01

    A series of 1-(aryloxypropyl)-4-(chloroaryl) piperazines have been synthesized and the target compounds evaluated for atypical antipsychotic activity in apomorphine induced mesh climbing and stereotypy assays in mice. The compounds 11 and 12 have emerged as important lead compounds showing potential atypical antipsychotic profile. The physicochemical similarity of the new analogs with respect to standard drugs clozapine, ketanserin, ziprasidone and risperidone was assessed by calculating from a set of 10 physicochemical properties using software programs. The test compounds demonstrated good similarity values with respect to the standard drugs. The potential of these compounds to penetrate the blood brain barrier (log BB) was computed through an online software program and the values obtained for the compounds suggest a good brain permeation.

  14. Tardive dyskinesia and intellectual disability: an examination of demographics and topography in adults with dual diagnosis and atypical antipsychotic use.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, Jill C; Bamburg, Jay W; Matson, Johnny L; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A; Neal, Daniene; Holloway, Jodie

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are commonly used in large-scale residential care facilities for adults with developmental disabilities. While the benefits of this class of psychotropics are noted, debate exists whether the side effect profile of these medications outweigh their therapeutic benefit, especially in those who use them long-term. Tardive Dyskinesia (TD) is a movement disorder often caused by a history of neuroleptic use which can cause deleterious effects. Due to the seriousness of TD and the impact on an individual's quality of life, it is necessary to identify predisposing factors for this condition in a population of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The current study seeks to expand the literature related to TD and atypical antipsychotic medication utilizing a measure of medication side effects, the Matson Evaluation of Drug Side Effects (MEDS). Results and implications for assessment and practice are discussed. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics in non-delusional unipolar depressed patients with non-response to antidepressant-monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Erbe, Sebastian; Gutwinski, Stefan; Bschor, Tom

    2012-03-01

    Objective Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics is used in depressive patients with non-response to antidepressants. We investigated the utility of this strategy.Methods Systematic computer-based search in the online library Pubmed for randomized placebo-controlled double-blind trials (RCT) from the years 1990 to 2011.Results We found 14 RCT about augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics in depressive patients with non-response to antidepressants. Trials examined olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine and aripiprazole.Conclusions Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics is an alternative to the augmentation with lithium in unipolar depressive patients with non-response to antidepressants. But treatment with atypical antipsychotics as opposed to placebo increases the risk of non-compliance due to side-effects of medication. Augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics in unipolar depression is an off-label therapy in Germany except for the augmentation with extended-release quetiapine. Knowledge about treatment strategies regarding augmentation of antidepressants with atypical antipsychotics can increase the chance of a successful treatment, but interactions and side-effects should be considered.

  16. Coverage of Atypical Antipsychotics Among Medicare Drug Plans in the State of Washington for Fiscal Year 2007

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Chuan; Kennedy, Jae; Cohen, Lawrence J.; Sclar, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine drug coverage and patient costs for 6 atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, clozapine, and risperidone) in Medicare Part D formularies using health plan data from the state of Washington. Method: Fiscal year 2007 coverage and cost-sharing characteristics for 57 prescription drug plans (PDPs) and 43 Medicare advantage prescription drug plans (MAPDs) were collected from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Plans were compared in terms of formulary restrictions, out-of-pocket costs, and premium charges. Medicare released plan information for fiscal year 2007 in October 2006. Data were collected for this study in February 2007. Results: Almost all plans covered the 6 atypical antipsychotics. The PDPs were more likely to restrict coverage than the MAPDs. Prior authorization requirements were enforced in 5% to 21% of plans, depending on plan type and medication. Monthly drug plan premiums were higher for PDPs than MAPDs, but the MAPDs had concurrent monthly health premiums. About 80% of MAPDs and 60% of PDPs also had no annual deductible for medications. The patient out-of-pocket cost for atypical antipsychotics varied depending on the stage of coverage—median monthly drug costs ranged from $5 to $50 during the initial period, but if costs exceeded the annual cap, patients were responsible for the full cost of the drug, which ranged from $292 to $665. Patients with low incomes and those who exceeded the annual spending limit ($3850 in fiscal year 2007) had a median monthly cost of $17 to $33. Conclusion: There is considerable variation across health plans in terms of patients' out-of-pocket drug costs. Given the significant needs and vulnerabilities of Medicare beneficiaries with mental illness, changes for atypical antipsychotic coverage should be monitored carefully, and the complexity of Medicare drug plans should be minimized. PMID:18787664

  17. The psychopharmacology of aggressive behavior: a translational approach: part 2: clinical studies using atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium.

    PubMed

    Comai, Stefano; Tau, Michael; Pavlovic, Zoran; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2012-04-01

    Patients experiencing mental disorders are at an elevated risk for developing aggressive behavior. In the past 10 years, the psychopharmacological treatment of aggression has changed dramatically owing to the introduction of atypical antipsychotics on the market and the increased use of anticonvulsants and lithium in the treatment of aggressive patients.This review (second of 2 parts) uses a translational medicine approach to examine the neurobiology of aggression, discussing the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in its pathogenesis (serotonin, glutamate, norepinephrine, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid) and the neuropharmacological rationale for using atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium in the therapeutics of aggressive behavior. A critical review of all clinical trials using atypical antipsychotics (aripiprazole, clozapine, loxapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, and amisulpride), anticonvulsants (topiramate, valproate, lamotrigine, and gabapentin), and lithium are presented. Given the complex, multifaceted nature of aggression, a multifunctional combined therapy, targeting different receptors, seems to be the best strategy for treating aggressive behavior. This therapeutic strategy is supported by translational studies and a few human studies, even if additional randomized, double-blind, clinical trials are needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of this framework.

  18. The use of atypical antipsychotics beyond psychoses: efficacy of quetiapine in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Emanuela; Cattaneo, Elisabetta; Zanoni, Silvia; Altamura, A Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Background and rationale Atypical antpsychotics have been sucessfully used in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), either as adjunctive or as monotherapy. Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic extensively used in the treatment of psychotic disorders. It has serotonergic and dopaminergic activity and it appears to be selective for the mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine system. The aim of this paper was to review the recent literature on the use of quetiapine in the treatment of BD. Methods The literature databases currently available online were searched for papers on quetiapine and BD. Papers and reports published between January 1995 and June 2005 were selected and reviewed critically. Results Augmentative low dose quetiapine was found to be effective in BD partially responsive to conventional mood-stabilizers. Manic and mixed episodes have been the best studied, and quetiapine was found to be effective either as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy in both randomized clinical trials and open-label studies. Data on the use of quetiapine in bipolar depression showed a significant efficacy and high remission rates. Maintenance data suggested a role of quetiapine as a good alternative to classical mood stabilizers in reducing recurrence rates of BD. A few studies on the efficacy in rapid cycling BD have also been published. Conclusions Quetiapine is an effective agent for the short- and long-term treatment of BD. The mechanism of action of quetiapine as a mood stabilizer is still unknown. Some preliminary data suggest the involvement of glutamate pathways but further studies are needed to clarify this issue. PMID:19412458

  19. Adjunctive effects of aripiprazole on metabolic profiles: comparison of patients treated with olanzapine to patients treated with other atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Ree, Shao-Chun; Huang, Yu-Shu; Hsiao, Cheng-Cheng; Chen, Chih-Ken

    2013-01-10

    Metabolic abnormalities are serious adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic treatment. This study aims to determine the effects of adjunctive aripiprazole on metabolic profiles among patients receiving treatment with atypical antipsychotics, and to examine whether these effects are different from that of pre-existing atypical antipsychotics. In the 8-week open-label trial, aripiprazole was added to patients who were receiving treatment with atypical antipsychotics and had experienced weight gain or dyslipidemia. The dosage of pre-existing atypical antipsychotics was fixed, while the dosage of aripiprazole ranged from 5 to 20 mg/day during the study period. Metabolic profiles, including body weight, body mass index (BMI), plasma levels of fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and adiponectin, were measured at baseline and week 8. As a result, 43 subjects (16 males and 27 females, mean age: 37.8±10.8 years) completed the study. The pre-existing antipsychotics were olanzapine (n=12), risperidone (n=19), quetiapine (n=6) and amisulpiride (n=6). The mean dosage of adjunctive aripiprazole was 9.9±3.2 mg/day. After the aripiprazole-augmented regimen for 8 weeks, patients treated with olanzapine had significant decreases in body weight, BMI and triglyceride levels, and had significant increases in adiponectin levels. For patients treated with other atypical antipsychotics, none of the metabolic parameters significantly changed after administering aripiprazole. In conclusion, aripiprazole-augmented treatment might be beneficial for the metabolic regulation of patients being treated with a stable dose of olanzapine, but not for those treated with other atypical antipsychotics. A long-term, randomized, double-blind controlled design is suggested to confirm these findings.

  20. Mapping the scientific research on atypical antipsychotic drugs in Spain: a bibliometric assessment.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Francisco; Rubio, Gabriel; Molina, Juan D; Shen, Winston W; Pérez-Nieto, Miguel A; Moreno, Raquel; Huelves, Lorena; Noriega, Concha; García-García, Pilar; Alamo, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a bibliometric study on the scientific publications in relation to atypical antipsychotic drugs (AADs) in Spain. We used the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases and we applied some bibliometric indicators of paper production and dispersion (Price's law and Bradford's law, respectively). We also calculated the participation index of the different countries and correlated the bibliometric data with some social and health data (total per capita expenditure on health and gross domestic expenditure on research and development). We collected 656 original papers published between 1988 and 2011. Our study results fulfilled Price's law with scientific production on AADs showing exponential growth (correlation coefficient r = 0.9693, vs. r = 0.9177 after linear adjustment). The most widely studied drugs were risperidone (181 papers), olanzapine (143), clozapine (94), and quetiapine (74). Division into Bradford zones yielded a nucleus occupied by the European Psychiatry and European Neuropsychopharmacology (70 articles). Totally 194 different journals were published, with 5 of the first 10 used journals having an impact factor being greater than 4. The publications on AADs in Spain have undergone exponential growth over the studied period, without evidence of reaching a saturation point.

  1. Atypical antipsychotics and the neural regulation of food intake and peripheral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Kim, Sangwon F

    2011-09-26

    The atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are associated with weight gain and an increased incidence of metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiological, cross-sectional and prospective studies suggest that two of the AAPs, olanzapine and clozapine, cause the most dramatic weight gain and metabolic impairments including increased fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Relative to the other AAPs, both olanzapine and clozapine exhibit a particularly high antagonistic affinity for histamine and muscarinic receptors which have been hypothesized as mediators of the reported increase in weight and glucose abnormalities. In this article, we review the current evidence for the AAP associated weight gain and abnormal glucose metabolism. We postulate that the effects of the AAPs on food intake and peripheral metabolism are initially independently regulated but with increasing body adiposity, the early AAP-induced impairments in peripheral metabolism will be exacerbated, thereby establishing a vicious cycle such that the effects of the AAP are magnified by the known pathophysiological consequences of obesity. Furthermore, we examine how inhibition of the histaminergic pathway may mediate increases in food intake and the potential role of the vagus nerve in the reported peripheral metabolic effects.

  2. Atypical antipsychotics and the neural regulation of food intake and peripheral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Karen L.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2011-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are associated with weight gain and an increased incidence of metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiological, cross-sectional and prospective studies suggest that two of the AAPs, olanzapine and clozapine, cause the most dramatic weight gain and metabolic impairments including increased fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Relative to the other AAPs, both olanzapine and clozapine exhibit a particularly high antagonistic affinity for histamine and muscarinic receptors which have been hypothesized as mediators of the reported increase in weight and glucose abnormalities. In this article, we review the current evidence for the AAP associated weight gain and abnormal glucose metabolism. We postulate that the effects of the AAPs on food intake and peripheral metabolism are initially independently regulated but with increasing body adiposity, the early AAP-induced impairments in peripheral metabolism will be exacerbated, thereby establishing a vicious cycle such that the effects of the AAP are magnified by the known pathophysiological consequences of obesity. Furthermore, we examine how inhibition of the histaminergic pathway may mediate increases in food intake and the potential role of the vagus nerve in the reported peripheral metabolic effects. PMID:21664918

  3. Effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs on intralipid intake and cocaine-induced hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Abegale W; Moore, Nicholas A; Clifton, Peter G

    2006-09-01

    Clozapine and olanzapine have been shown to acutely stimulate consumption of a fat emulsion (Intralipid) by male Lister hooded rats. We initially investigated the extent of any sex difference in Intralipid hyperphagia associated with olanzapine treatment. We then examined the degree of Intralipid hyperphagia produced by a range of atypical antipsychotic drugs having different associations with human weight gain, and also determined their effects on cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity as a measure of functional dopamine antagonism in vivo. Olanzapine (0.1-1 mg/kg) stimulated Intralipid intake to an equal extent in male and female rats. Quetiapine (10 mg/kg) also stimulated Intralipid intake whereas ziprasidone (0.3-10 mg/kg) or risperidone (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) did not have this effect. All of the compounds, except quetiapine, reduced cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity but the relationship to the degree of Intralipid hyperphagia was variable. Since there was a positive relationship between Intralipid hyperphagia and the reported extent of human body weight gain, we conclude that Intralipid hyperphagia may have predictive value for this drug-associated side effect and is not related to the dopamine antagonist properties of these agents.

  4. A systematic review of cardiovascular effects after atypical antipsychotic medication overdose.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hock Heng; Hoppe, Jason; Heard, Kennon

    2009-06-01

    As the use of atypical antipsychotic medications (AAPMs) increases, the number of overdoses continues to grow. Cardiovascular toxicity was common with older psychiatric medications but seems uncommon with AAPM. We conducted a systematic literature review to describe the cardiovascular effects reported after overdose of 5 common AAPM: aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone. We included case reports and case series describing overdose of these 5 medications identified in a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and abstracts from major toxicology meetings. We found 13 pediatric cases (age, <7 years), 22 adolescent cases (age, 7-16 years), and 185 adult cases. No pediatric case described a ventricular dysrhythmia or a cardiovascular death. In the adolescent and adult cases, we found numerous reports of prolonged corrected QT interval and hypotension, but there were only 3 cases of ventricular dysrhythmia and 3 deaths that may have been due to direct cardiovascular toxicity. The results from case series reports were similar to the single case report data. Our review suggests that overdose of AAPM is unlikely to cause significant cardiovascular toxicity.

  5. Discriminative stimulus properties of the atypical antipsychotic amisulpride: comparison to its isomers and to other benzamide derivatives, antipsychotic, antidepressant, and antianxiety drugs in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy J; Hillhouse, Todd M; Webster, Kevin A; Young, Richard; De Oliveira, Eliseu O; Porter, Joseph H

    2017-09-18

    Racemic (RS)-amisulpride (Solian(®)) is an atypical antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and dysthymia. Blockade of dopamine D2/D3 and/or serotonin 5-HT7 receptors is implicated in its pharmacological effects. While the (S)-amisulpride isomer possesses a robust discriminative cue, discriminative stimulus properties of (RS)-amisulpride have not been evaluated. The present study established (RS)-amisulpride as a discriminative stimulus and assessed amisulpride-like effects of amisulpride stereoisomers, other benzamide derivatives, and antipsychotic, antidepressant, and anxiolytic drugs. Adult, male C57BL/6 mice were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg (RS)-amisulpride from vehicle in a two-lever food-reinforced operant conditioning task. (RS)-Amisulpride's discriminative stimulus was dose-related, time-dependent, and stereoselective. (S)-Amisulpride (an effective dose of 50% (ED50) = 0.21 mg/kg) was three times more potent than (RS)-amisulpride (ED50 = 0.60 mg/kg) or (R)-amisulpride (ED50 = 0.68 mg/kg). (RS)-Amisulpride generalized fully to the structurally related atypical antipsychotic/antidysthymia drug sulpiride (Sulpor(®); ED50 = 7.29 mg/kg) and its (S)-enantiomer (ED50 = 9.12 mg/kg); moderate to high partial generalization [60-75% drug lever responding (%DLR)] occurred to the benzamide analogs tiapride (Tiapridal(®)) and raclopride, but less than 60% DLR to metoclopramide (Reglan(®)), nemonapride (Emilace(®)), and zacopride. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and antianxiety drugs from other chemical classes (chlorpromazine, quetiapine, risperidone, and mianserin) produced 35-55% amisulpride lever responding. Lastly, less than 35% DLR occurred for clozapine, olanzapine, aripiprazole imipramine, chlordiazepoxide, and bupropion. (RS)-Amisulpride generalized to some, but not all benzamide derivatives, and it failed to generalize to any other antipsychotic, antidepressant, or antianxiety drugs tested. Interestingly, the (R)-isomer shared

  6. Patterns of Adherence to Oral Atypical Antipsychotics Among Patients Diagnosed with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Joanna P; Forma, Felicia M; Shafrin, Jason; Hatch, Ainslie; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Poor medication adherence contributes to negative treatment response, symptom relapse, and hospitalizations in schizophrenia. Many health plans use claims-based measures like medication possession ratios or proportion of days covered (PDC) to measure patient adherence to antipsychotics. Classifying patients solely on the basis of a single average PDC measure, however, may mask clinically meaningful variations over time in how patients arrive at an average PDC level. To model patterns of medication adherence evolving over time for patients with schizophrenia who initiated treatment with an oral atypical antipsychotic and, based on these patterns, to identify groups of patients with different adherence behaviors. We analyzed health insurance claims for patients aged ≥ 18 years with schizophrenia and newly prescribed oral atypical antipsychotics in 2007-2013 from 3 U.S. insurance claims databases: Truven MarketScan (Medicaid and commercial) and Humana (Medicare). Group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) was used to stratify patients into groups with distinct trends in adherence and to estimate trends for each group. The response variable was the probability of adherence (defined as PDC ≥ 80%) in each 30-day period after the patient initiated antipsychotic therapy. GBTM proceeds from the premise that there are multiple distinct adherence groups. Patient demographics, health status characteristics, and health care resource use metrics were used to identify differences in patient populations across adherence trajectory groups. Among the 29,607 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 6 distinct adherence trajectory groups emerged from the data: adherent (33%); gradual discontinuation after 3 months (15%), 6 months (7%), and 9 months (5%); stop-start after 6 months (15%); and immediate discontinuation (25%). Compared to patients 18-24 years of age in the adherent group, patients displaying a stop-start pattern after 6 months had greater odds of having a history of drug

  7. Interventions to improve antipsychotic medication adherence: review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    Dolder, Christian R; Lacro, Jonathan P; Leckband, Susan; Jeste, Dilip V

    2003-08-01

    Antipsychotic nonadherence is an important barrier to the successful treatment of schizophrenia and can lead to clinical and economic burdens. Interventions capable of significantly improving medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia would be beneficial in maximizing treatment outcomes with antipsychotics. This article reviews recent literature reporting interventions designed to improve antipsychotic adherence in patients with schizophrenia. We searched the Medline, Healthstar, and PsycInfo electronic databases for articles published since 1980 on interventions to improve medication adherence in schizophrenia. Twenty-one studies met our selection criteria. In this review, educational, behavioral, affective, or a combination of these approaches to improve adherence were examined. A total of 23 interventions were tested, as 2 studies investigated more than 1 intervention. While study design and adherence measures varied across the trials reviewed, medication adherence was noted to moderately improve with 15 of the 23 interventions tested. Interventions of a purely educational nature were the least successful at improving antipsychotic adherence. The greatest improvement in adherence was seen with interventions employing combinations of educational, behavioral, and affective strategies with which improvements in adherence were noted in 8 out of 12 studies, with additional secondary gains such as: reduced relapse, decreased hospitalization, decreased psychopathology, improved social function, gains in medication knowledge, and improved insight into the need for treatment. Longer interventions and an alliance with therapists also appeared important for successful outcomes. The continuing development and study of successful interventions to improve medication adherence are necessary to maximize the usefulness of pharmacologic treatment of schizophrenia.

  8. Role of CYP pharmacogenetics and drug-drug interactions in the efficacy and safety of atypical and other antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Murray, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) drug oxidases play a pivotal role in the elimination of antipsychotic agents, and therefore influence the toxicity and efficacy of these drugs. Factors that affect CYP function and expression have a major impact on treatment outcomes with antipsychotic agents. In particular, aspects of CYP pharmacogenetics, and the processes of CYP induction and inhibition all influence in-vivo rates of drug elimination. Certain CYPs that mediate the oxidation of antipsychotic drugs exhibit genetic variants that may influence in-vivo activity. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP genes have been shown to encode enzymes that have decreased drug oxidation capacity. Additionally, psychopharmacotherapy has the potential for drug-drug inhibitory interactions involving CYPs, as well as drug-mediated CYP induction. Literature evidence supports a role for CYP1A2 in the clearance of the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine; CYP1A2 is inducible by certain drugs and environmental chemicals. Recent studies have suggested that specific CYP1A2 variants possessing individual SNPs, and possibly also SNP combinations (haplotypes), in the 5'-regulatory regions may respond differently to inducing chemicals. CYP2D6 is an important catalyst of the oxidation of chlorpromazine, thioridazine, risperidone and haloperidol. Certain CYP2D6 allelic variants that encode enzymes with decreased drug oxidation capacity are more common in particular ethnic groups, which may lead to adverse effects with standard doses of psychoactive drugs. Thus, genotyping may be useful for dose optimization with certain psychoactive drugs that are substrates for CYP2D6. However, genotyping for inducible CYPs is unlikely to be sufficient to direct therapy with all antipsychotic agents. In-vivo CYP phenotyping with cocktails of drug substrates may assist at the commencement of therapy, but this approach could be complicated by pharmacokinetic interactions if applied when an

  9. A novel insulin sensitizer drug candidate-BGP-15-can prevent metabolic side effects of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Tory, Kálmán; Literáti-Nagy, Botond; Kolonics, Attila; Vígh, László; Vígh, László; Mandl, József; Szilvássy, Zoltán

    2012-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPD) are widely used to treat severe psychiatric disorders, have well documented metabolic side effects such as disturbances in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance and weight gain. It has been shown that BGP-15, a hydroxylamine derivative with insulin sensitizing activity can prevent AAPD provoked fat accumulation in adipocyte cultures, and insulin resistance in animal experiments and in healthy volunteers. The aim of this study was to compare the preventive effect of BGP-15 with conventional oral antidiabetics on metabolic side effects of AAPDs. We found that BGP-15 that does not belong to either conventional insulin sensitizers or oral antidiabetics, is able to counteract insulin resistance and weight gain provoked by antipsychotic agents in rats while rosiglitazone and metformin were not effective in the applied doses. Our results confirm that BGP-15 is a promising new drug candidate to control the metabolic side effects of atypical antipsychotics. Data indicate that this rat model is suitable to analyze the metabolic side effects of AAPDs and the protective mechanism of BGP-15.

  10. The effect of metformin on anthropometrics and insulin resistance in patients receiving atypical antipsychotic agents: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Megan; Goethe, John; Lanosa, Michael; Coleman, Craig I

    2010-10-01

    In the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness, atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) were found to be associated with weight gain and impairment of glucose metabolism. While metformin has been shown to attenuate weight gain and insulin resistance, not all studies have shown a benefit in the reduction of antipsychotic-induced weight gain and insulin resistance. To characterize metformin's impact on anthropometrics and insulin resistance in patients taking AAPs. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was conducted from the earliest possible date through December 31, 2008. The search was performed using the following Medical Subject Headings and text keywords: metformin, biguanide(s), in combination with neuroleptic(s), neuroleptic drug(s), antipsychotic(s), dopamine antagonist(s), atypical antipsychotic(s), psychotropic(s), risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, sulpiride, clozapine, iloperidone, aripiprazole, paliperidone, melperone, bifeprunox, amisulpride, zotepine, and sertindole. Six of 62 identified studies (N = 336 participants) met our inclusion criteria: randomized, placebo-controlled trials of metformin in patients taking AAPs with data on weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, insulin resistance (determined using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and/or a diagnosis of diabetes. Data were independently abstracted by 2 investigators; disagreements were resolved through discussion or by a third investigator using a standardized data abstraction tool. For continuous endpoints, the weighted mean difference (WMD) of the change from baseline with 95% CI was calculated as the difference between the mean in the metformin and placebo groups. For categorical endpoints, the pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% CI was calculated. A random-effects model was used for all analyses. Compared to placebo, the metformin group had significantly reduced weight (WMD, 3.16 kg; P

  11. Metabolic Disturbances Independent of Body Mass in Patients with Schizophrenia Taking Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Il

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) treatment is associated with weight gain and metabolic disturbances such as dyslipidemia and dysglycemia. The metabolic disturbances are usually considered to develop secondary to weight gain. We performed the comparison of metabolic disturbances of three AAP group with different risk of metabolic side effect after adjusting for body mass to investigate whether any metabolic disturbances develop independently from body mass index (BMI). Methods This cross-sectional study included 174 subjects with schizophrenia who were on 1) monotherapy with clozapine (CL), olanzapine (OL), or quetiapine (QT) (n=61), 2) monotherapy with risperidone (RSP) (n=89), or 3) monotherapy with aripiprizole (ARP), or ziprasidone (ZPS) (n=24) more than 1 year. Association between the prevalence of metabolic disturbances and groups were analysed using logistic regression after adjusting confounding variables including BMI. Analysese of covariance were used to compare the AAP groups in terms of the levels of metabolic parameters. Results There were significant differences among groups in terms of the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia (p=0.015), low HDL-cholesterol (p=0.017), and hyperglycemia (p=0.022) after adjusting for BMI. Triglyceride level (p=0.014) and the ratio of triglyceride to HDL-cholesterol (p=0.004) were significantly different among groups after adjusting for BMI. Conclusion In conclusion, metabolic disturbances are significantly different in AAP groups even after adjusting BMI. AAPs may have direct effect on metabolic parameters. Blood lipid and glucose levels should be monitored regularly regardless of whether patients tend to gain weight. PMID:25866526

  12. Weight change in Parkinson and Alzheimer patients taking atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Sitburana, Oraporn; Rountree, Susan; Ondo, William G

    2008-09-15

    Atypical antipsychotics (AA) are generally associated with weight gain. We determined body mass index (BMI) change in Parkinson's disease (PD) before and after taking AA and compared against PD controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on AA. In 66 consecutive PD subjects started on AA who had accurate weights for more than 6 months before and after initiation of AA, we compared weight change before and after AA use, against a control group of sixty-one sex-matched PD subjects, and against twenty-eight AD subjects taking AA. A linear regression model was created to compare weight changes. Fifty-nine PD subjects had complete data, quetiapine (n=53) and clozapine (n=6). The mean BMI change in the period before starting AA was 0.00 kg/m(2)/month over 1.95+/-1.41 years. After starting AA, subjects lost 0.03 kg/m(2)/month (95% CI 0.62-1.21, P<0.0001), comparing PD before AA to the same PD patients after AA. In 61 PD controls, the mean BMI loss was 0.01 kg/m(2)/month (95% CI 0.15-0.94, P=0.007) comparing PD on AA vs. PD controls. The BMI for 28 AD subjects on AA increased 0.01 kg/m(2)/month (95% CI 0.26-0.83, P<0.0001), comparing PD on AA vs. AD on AA. The weight loss seen in the PD/AA group, compared to AD, suggest uniquely altered weight homeostasis in PD.

  13. Gene-Specific DNA Methylation may Mediate Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Kyle J.; Goodrich, Jacyln M.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Atypical Antipsychotics (AAPs) carry a significant risk of cardiometabolic side effects including insulin resistance. It is thought that the insulin resistance resulting from the use of AAP may be associated with changes in DNA methylation. We aimed to identify and validate a candidate gene associated with AAP-induced insulin resistance by using a multi-step approach that included an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) and validation with site-specific methylation and metabolomics data. Methods Bipolar subjects treated with AAPs or lithium monotherapy were recruited for a cross-sectional visit to analyze peripheral blood DNA methylation and insulin resistance. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation was analyzed in a discovery sample (n=48) using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Validation analyses of the epigenome-wide findings occurred in a separate sample (n=72) using site-specific methylation with pyrosequencing and untargeted metabolomics data. Regression analyses were conducted controlling for known confounders in all analyses and a mediation analysis was performed to investigate if AAP-induced insulin resistance occurs through changes in DNA methylation. Results A differentially methylated probe associated with insulin resistance was discovered and validated in the Fatty Acyl CoA Reductase 2 (FAR2) gene of Chromosome 12. Functional associations of this DNA methylation site on untargeted phospholipid-related metabolites were also detected. Our results identified a mediating effect of this FAR2 methylation site on AAP-induced insulin resistance. Conclusions Going forward, prospective, longitudinal studies assessing comprehensive changes in FAR2 DNA methylation, expression, and lipid metabolism before and after AAP treatment are required to assess its potential role in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:27542345

  14. Aripiprazole an atypical antipsychotic protects against ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats

    PubMed Central

    Asmari, Abdulrahman Al; Arshaduddin, Mohammed; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Kadasah, Saeed; Robayan, Abdulrahman Al; Asmary, Saeed Al

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken, to study the gastro-protective potential of aripiprazole (ARI) an atypical antipsychotic drug in ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats. ARI (10, 30, 100 mg/kg) was tested for gastric secretion and antiulcer activity in different groups of male Sprague Dawley rats. Gastric secretion and acidity studies were performed in pylorus ligated rats while indices of gastric ulcers were measured in ethanol (1 ml-100%) induced gastric ulcers. Histological changes and the levels of gastric wall mucus, malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and serotonin were used to assess ethanol induced gastric mucosal injuries. Exposure of rats to ethanol resulted in gastric mucosal injury and a high index of ulcer. Pretreatment with ARI significantly (P < 0.001), reduced the gastric lesions induced by ethanol and also resulted in a significant decrease in the gastric secretion, and total acidity in pylorus ligated rats. ARI also significantly attenuated the ethanol induced reduction in the levels of gastric wall mucus, and NP-SH (P < 0.001). The histological changes and the increased MDA and MPO activity were also significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited by ARI. Ethanol induced depletion in the levels of serotonin in the gastric tissue were also significantly restored by pretreatment with ARI (p < 0.001). ARI showed significant antiulcer and gastroprotective activity against ethanol induced gastric ulcers. The gastroprotective effects of ARI may be due to its anti-secretory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and also due to the restoration of the depleted gastric serotonin levels. PMID:25232384

  15. Atypical Antipsychotics and the Risk of Hyperlipidemia: A Sequence Symmetry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Ishiguro, Chieko; Uyama, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Although hyperlipidemia is a well known adverse event of atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medication, there are few studies that have quantitatively compared the risks of various AAPs. Our aim was to comparatively evaluate the risk of hyperlipidemia associated with the use of AAPs approved in Japan through a consecutive epidemiological study. We conducted a sequence symmetry analysis (SSA) using health insurance claims data to analyze the following nine AAPs approved for use in Japan: risperidone, paliperidone, perospirone hydrochloride hydrate, blonanserin, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine fumarate, aripiprazole, and zotepine. Exposed cases were identified from drug dispensing records as those who had been administered both AAPs and antihyperlipidemic drugs. The adjusted sequence ratio (ASR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for each individual AAP and for all AAPs were calculated while controlling for time trends in dispensing patterns. Olanzapine was significantly associated with increased hyperlipidemia occurrence (ASR 1.56; 95 % CI 1.25-1.95). The ASRs obtained for risperidone (1.01; 95 % CI 0.80-1.27), perospirone hydrochloride hydrate (0.93; 95 % CI 0.63-1.39), blonanserin (0.83; 95 % CI 0.52-1.33), quetiapine fumarate (0.93; 95 % CI 0.73-1.18), and aripiprazole (1.02; 95 % CI 0.82-1.26) were approximately 1.0. Unstable estimates (wide CIs) were obtained for paliperidone and zotepine due to the small sample sizes. Among the AAPs used in Japan, only olanzapine was found to have an elevated risk of hyperlipidemia. In contrast, risperidone, perospirone hydrochloride hydrate, blonanserin, quetiapine fumarate, and aripiprazole had relatively low risks.

  16. Trends in the Use of Typical and Atypical Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Nick C.; Crismon, M. Lynn; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Johnsrud, Michael T.; Rascati, Karen L.; Wilson, James P.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To estimate prevalence rates of antipsychotic use in children and adolescents from 1996 to 2001 in three state Medicaid programs (midwestern [MM], southern [SM], and western [WM]) and one private managed care organization (MCO). Method: Prescription claims were used to evaluate antipsychotic prevalence, defined as the number of children…

  17. Relationship between Dose, Drug Levels, and D2 Receptor Occupancy for the Atypical Antipsychotics Risperidone and Paliperidone

    PubMed Central

    Votaw, J. R.; Ritchie, J.; Howell, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    Blockade of D2 family dopamine receptors (D2Rs) is a fundamental property of antipsychotics, and the degree of striatal D2R occupancy has been related to antipsychotic and motor effects of these drugs. Recent studies suggest the D2R occupancy of antipsychotics may differ in extrastriatal regions compared with the dorsal striatum. We studied this issue in macaque monkeys by using a within-subjects design. [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography scans were obtained on four different doses of risperidone and paliperidone (the 9-OH metabolite of risperidone) and compared with multiple off-drug scans in each animal. The half-life of the two drugs in these monkeys was determined to be between 3 and 4 h, and drug was administered by a constant infusion through an intragastric catheter. The D2R occupancy of antipsychotic was determined in the caudate, putamen, ventral striatum, and four prefrontal and temporal cortical regions and was related to serum and cerebrospinal fluid drug levels. Repeated 2-week treatment with risperidone or paliperidone did not produce lasting changes in D2R binding potential in any region examined. As expected, D2R binding potential was highest in the caudate and putamen and was approximately one-third that level in the ventral striatum and 2% of that level in the cortical regions. We found dose-dependent D2R occupancy for both risperidone and paliperidone in both basal ganglia and cortical regions of interest. We could not find evidence of regional variation in D2R occupancy of either drug. Comparison of D2R occupancy and serum drug levels supports a target of 40 to 80 ng/ml active drug for these two atypical antipsychotics. PMID:22214649

  18. Comparative treatment patterns, resource utilization, and costs in stimulant-treated children with ADHD who require subsequent pharmacotherapy with atypical antipsychotics versus non-antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Sikirica, Vanja; Pliszka, Steven R; Betts, Keith A; Hodgkins, Paul; Samuelson, Tom; Xie, Jipan; Erder, Haim; Dammerman, Ryan; Robertson, Brigitte; Wu, Eric Q

    2012-01-01

    Although not indicated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are commonly prescribed for children with ADHD. The treatment patterns, resource utilization, and costs associated with AAPs relative to non-antipsychotic medications have not been evaluated for children with ADHD.  To compare treatment patterns, resource utilization, and costs to U.S. third party payers between stimulant-treated ADHD children who switch to or augment their stimulant treatment with AAPs (risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, olanzapine, ziprasidone, paliperidone, and clozapine) compared with non-antipsychotic medications (atomoxetine, clonidine immediate-release (IR), guanfacine IR, dexmethylphenidate, mixed amphetamine salts, methylphenidate, lisdexamfetamine, and dextroamphetamine). Patients with at least one ADHD diagnosis (ICD-9-CM codes 314.00 or 314.01) and at least one stimulant medication claim between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2009, were identified from a large U.S. commercial medical/pharmacy claims database. Patients were classified into the AAP cohort if they had a claim for an AAP following a stimulant fill or into the non-antipsychotic cohort if they had a claim for a non-antipsychotic medication after a stimulant fill and no AAP claims. The index date was defined as the date of the first fill of the AAP or a randomly selected eligible non-antipsychotic medication. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they were aged 6-12 as of the index date and had at least 18 months of continuous eligibility. Patients were excluded if they had a psychiatric diagnosis for which AAPs were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or commonly used. Patients in the non-antipsychotic group were matched 1:1 to patients in the AAP group using a propensity score generated from a logistic regression that included demographics, treatments, resource utilization, and comorbidities during the 6 months prior to the index date. All

  19. Medical Conditions and Demographic, Service and Clinical Factors Associated with Atypical Antipsychotic Medication Use Among Children with An Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lake, Johanna K; Denton, Danica; Lunsky, Yona; Shui, Amy M; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2017-02-16

    This study aimed to describe rates of antipsychotic medication use and the association between their use and demographics, clinical variables, and the use of behavioral/education services among children with ASD. For children with ASD ages 2-11 (n = 4749) and those 12-17 (n = 401), 5.4 and 17.7% were prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic medication respectively. In the multivariable model of young children, older age, use of multiple psychotropic medications, prior ASD diagnosis, non-white Hispanic race/ethnicity, and oppositional defiant problems were associated with antipsychotic use. Among older children, only older age was associated with antipsychotic use. In at least one age group, antipsychotic medication use was also related to behaviour, family and occupational therapy, public insurance, site region, externalizing problems, body mass index, and sleep and gastrointestinal problems.

  20. Atypical antipsychotics: recent research findings and applications to clinical practice: Proceedings of a symposium presented at the 29th Annual European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Congress, 19 September 2016, Vienna, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robin; Correll, Christoph U.; Reynolds, Gavin P.; Taylor, David

    2017-01-01

    Available evidence suggests that second-generation atypical antipsychotics are broadly similar to first-generation agents in terms of their efficacy, but may have a more favourable tolerability profile, primarily by being less likely to cause extrapyramidal symptoms. However, atypical antipsychotics are variably associated with disturbances in the cardiometabolic arena, including increased body weight and the development of metabolic syndrome, which may reflect differences in their receptor binding profiles. Effective management of schizophrenia must ensure that the physical health of patients is addressed together with their mental health. This should therefore involve consideration of the specific tolerability profiles of available agents and individualization of treatment to minimize the likelihood of adverse metabolic sequelae, thereby improving long-term adherence and optimizing overall treatment outcomes. Alongside this, modifiable risk factors (such as exercise, diet, obesity/body weight and smoking status) must be addressed, in order to optimize patients’ overall health and quality of life (QoL). In addition to antipsychotic-induced side effects, the clinical management of early nonresponders and psychopharmacological approaches for patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia remain important unmet needs. Evidence suggests that antipsychotic response starts early in the course of treatment and that early nonresponse accurately predicts nonresponse over the longer term. Early nonresponse therefore represents an important modifiable risk factor for poor efficacy and effectiveness outcomes, since switching or augmenting antipsychotic treatment in patients showing early nonresponse has been shown to improve the likelihood of subsequent treatment outcomes. Recent evidence has also demonstrated that patients showing early nonresponse to treatment with lurasidone at 2 weeks may benefit from an increase in dose at this timepoint without compromising

  1. Atypical antipsychotics: recent research findings and applications to clinical practice: Proceedings of a symposium presented at the 29th Annual European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Congress, 19 September 2016, Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Murray, Robin; Correll, Christoph U; Reynolds, Gavin P; Taylor, David

    2017-03-01

    Available evidence suggests that second-generation atypical antipsychotics are broadly similar to first-generation agents in terms of their efficacy, but may have a more favourable tolerability profile, primarily by being less likely to cause extrapyramidal symptoms. However, atypical antipsychotics are variably associated with disturbances in the cardiometabolic arena, including increased body weight and the development of metabolic syndrome, which may reflect differences in their receptor binding profiles. Effective management of schizophrenia must ensure that the physical health of patients is addressed together with their mental health. This should therefore involve consideration of the specific tolerability profiles of available agents and individualization of treatment to minimize the likelihood of adverse metabolic sequelae, thereby improving long-term adherence and optimizing overall treatment outcomes. Alongside this, modifiable risk factors (such as exercise, diet, obesity/body weight and smoking status) must be addressed, in order to optimize patients' overall health and quality of life (QoL). In addition to antipsychotic-induced side effects, the clinical management of early nonresponders and psychopharmacological approaches for patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia remain important unmet needs. Evidence suggests that antipsychotic response starts early in the course of treatment and that early nonresponse accurately predicts nonresponse over the longer term. Early nonresponse therefore represents an important modifiable risk factor for poor efficacy and effectiveness outcomes, since switching or augmenting antipsychotic treatment in patients showing early nonresponse has been shown to improve the likelihood of subsequent treatment outcomes. Recent evidence has also demonstrated that patients showing early nonresponse to treatment with lurasidone at 2 weeks may benefit from an increase in dose at this timepoint without compromising

  2. A review of genetic alterations in the serotonin pathway and their correlation with psychotic diseases and response to atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Baou, Maria; Boumba, Vassiliki A; Petrikis, Petros; Rallis, Georgios; Vougiouklakis, Theodore; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that plays a predominant role in mood regulation. The importance of the serotonin pathway in controlling behavior and mental status is well recognized. All the serotonin elements - serotonin receptors, serotonin transporter, tryptophan hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase proteins - can show alterations in terms of mRNA or protein levels and protein sequence, in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Additionally, when examining the genes sequences of all serotonin elements, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be more prevalent in schizophrenic or bipolar patients than in healthy individuals. Several of these alterations have been associated either with different phenotypes between patients and healthy individuals or with the response of psychiatric patients to the treatment with atypical antipsychotics. The complex pattern of genetic diversity within the serotonin pathway hampers efforts to identify the key variations contributing to an individual's susceptibility to the disease. In this review article, we summarize all genetic alterations found across the serotonin pathway, we provide information on whether and how they affect schizophrenia or bipolar disorder phenotypes, and, on the contribution of familial relationships on their detection frequencies. Furthermore, we provide evidence on whether and how specific gene polymorphisms affect the outcome of schizophrenic or bipolar patients of different ethnic groups, in response to treatment with atypical antipsychotics. All data are discussed thoroughly, providing prospective for future studies.

  3. The HSP co-inducer BGP-15 can prevent the metabolic side effects of the atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Literáti-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Tory, Kálmán; Literáti-Nagy, Botond; Kolonics, Attila; Török, Zsolt; Gombos, Imre; Balogh, Gábor; Vígh, László; Horváth, Ibolya; Mandl, József; Sümegi, Balázs; Hooper, Philip L; Vígh, László

    2012-07-01

    Weight gain and dysfunction of glucose and lipid metabolism are well-known side effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPD). Here, we address the question whether a heat-shock protein (HSP) co-inducer, insulin sensitizer drug candidate, BGP-15, can prevent AAPD-induced glucose, lipid, and weight changes. We also examined how an AAPD alters HSP expression and whether BGP-15 alters that expression. Four different experiments are reported on the AAPD BGP-15 interventions in a human trial of healthy men, a rodent animal model, and an in vitro adipocyte cell culture system. Olanzapine caused rapid insulin resistance in healthy volunteers and was associated with decreased level of HSP72 in peripheral mononuclear blood cells. Both changes were restored by the administration of BGP-15. In Wistar rats, weight gain and insulin resistance induced by clozapine were abolished by BGP-15. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, clozapine increased intracellular fat accumulation, and BGP-15 inhibited this process. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 inhibits multiple metabolic side effects of atypical antipsychotics, and this effect is likely to be related to its HSP co-inducing ability.

  4. Do Atypical Antipsychotics Have Antisuicidal Effects? A Hypothesis-Generating Overview.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Baldessarini, Ross J; Forte, Alberto; Erbuto, Denise; Serafini, Gianluca; Fiorillo, Andrea; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2016-10-11

    Modern antipsychotic drugs are employed increasingly in the treatment of mood disorders as well as psychoses, stimulating interest in their possible contributions to altering suicidal risk. Clozapine remains the only treatment with an FDA-recognized indication for reducing suicidal risk (in schizophrenia). We carried out a systematic, computerized search for reports of studies involving antipsychotic drug treatment and suicidal behaviors. A total of 19 reports provide data with preliminary support for potential suicide risk-reducing effects of olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and asenapine in addition to clozapine, and provide some support for antipsychotic drug treatment in general. These preliminary findings encourage further testing of antipsychotics for effects on suicidal behavior, making use of explicit, pre-planned assessments of suicidal behavior.

  5. Do Atypical Antipsychotics Have Antisuicidal Effects? A Hypothesis-Generating Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Forte, Alberto; Erbuto, Denise; Serafini, Gianluca; Fiorillo, Andrea; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Modern antipsychotic drugs are employed increasingly in the treatment of mood disorders as well as psychoses, stimulating interest in their possible contributions to altering suicidal risk. Clozapine remains the only treatment with an FDA-recognized indication for reducing suicidal risk (in schizophrenia). We carried out a systematic, computerized search for reports of studies involving antipsychotic drug treatment and suicidal behaviors. A total of 19 reports provide data with preliminary support for potential suicide risk-reducing effects of olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and asenapine in addition to clozapine, and provide some support for antipsychotic drug treatment in general. These preliminary findings encourage further testing of antipsychotics for effects on suicidal behavior, making use of explicit, pre-planned assessments of suicidal behavior. PMID:27727180

  6. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sárvári, Anitta K.; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P.; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  7. Lack of effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics in DARPP-32 and NCS-1 levels in PC12 cells overexpressing NCS-1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is the major psychiatry disorder, which the exact cause remains unknown. However, it is well known that dopamine-mediated neurotransmission imbalance is associated with this pathology and the main target of antipsychotics is the dopamine receptor D2. Recently, it was described alteration in levels of two dopamine signaling related proteins in schizophrenic prefrontal cortex (PFC): Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (NCS-1) and DARPP-32. NCS-1, which is upregulated in PFC of schizophrenics, inhibits D2 internalization. DARPP-32, which is decreased in PFC of schizophrenics, is a key downstream effector in transducing dopamine signaling. We previously demonstrated that antipsychotics do not change levels of both proteins in rat's brain. However, since NCS-1 and DARPP-32 levels are not altered in wild type rats, we treated wild type PC12 cells (PC12 WT) and PC12 cells stably overexpressing NCS-1 (PC12 Clone) with antipsychotics to investigate if NCS-1 upregulation modulates DARPP-32 expression in response to antipsychotics treatment. Results We chronically treated both PC12 WT and PC12 Clone cells with typical (Haloperidol) or atypical (Clozapine and Risperidone) antipsychotics for 14 days. Using western blot technique we observed that there is no change in NCS-1 and DARPP-32 protein levels in both PC12 WT and PC12 Clone cells after typical and atypical antipsychotic treatments. Conclusions Because we observed no alteration in NCS-1 and DARPP-32 levels in both PC12 WT and Clone cells treated with typical or atypical antipsychotics, we suggest that the alteration in levels of both proteins in schizophrenic's PFC is related to psychopathology but not with antipsychotic treatment. PMID:20565907

  8. -759C÷T polymorphism of the HTR2C gene is not correlated with atypical antipsychotics-induced weight gain, among Romanian psychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Grădinaru, Raluca Claudia; Andreescu, Nicoleta Ioana; Nussbaum, Laura Alexandra; Farcaş, Simona Sorina; Dumitraşcu, Victor; Suciu, Liana; Puiu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate whether the -759C÷T polymorphism in 5-HTR2C gene was associated with weight change and hyperinsulinemia in Romanian pediatric patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. The patients under investigation were enrolled between 2009 and 2014. A total of 81 schizophrenic and bipolar-disorder patients, aged between nine to 20 years (median age 15.74±4 years), who were following an atypical antipsychotic treatment (Risperidone, Aripiprazole, Olanzapine), were enrolled from University Hospital for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Neurology from Timisoara, Romania. The outcomes that we measured were the changes in Body Mass Index (BMI) from baseline to different time points: three months, six months, 12 months and 18 months, and the change in insulinemia over time, after atypical antipsychotic treatment. After carrying out the 5-HTR2C 759C÷T polymorphism identification, we found that 22 patients presented the -759C÷T polymorphism in 5-HTR2C gene. Between the patients exhibiting the 5-HTR2C -759C÷T polymorphism and the patients having the wild type alleles, there was no significant statistical difference in changes of BMI from baseline to endpoints that indicates the lack of the protective effect of the T allele against atypical antipsychotics-induced weight gain. Interestingly, we found a statistically significant association between insulinemia and T alleles' carriers, after 18 months of treatment with the above-mentioned antipsychotics. Taking into consideration that atypical antipsychotics have been associated with elevated insulin levels and insulin resistance, maybe in the future the -759C÷T polymorphism would find a role in the development of a more complex algorithm for prediction of diabetes mellitus risk, in patients taking atypical antipsychotics.

  9. Prolactin-related and metabolic adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Henderson, David C; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2008-01-01

    While there are many effective antipsychotics available to clinicians for treating schizophrenia or bipolar mania, the onset of antipsychotic-associated prolactin-related and metabolic adverse effects can diminish the effectiveness of treatment. Increased levels of prolactin (hyperprolactinemia) associated with some antipsychotics raises the risk of sexual side effects. The increased appetite and/or sedation (reduced activity levels) induced by other antipsychotics can lead to weight gain, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure and, if unchecked, ultimately to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Clinicians should take steps to help their patients avoid unnecessary risks associated with antipsychotic use. These steps include monitoring risk factors for developing these illnesses by taking careful patient histories and baseline measurements of patients' weight and blood chemistry. Patients should be made aware of potential metabolic and prolactin-related side effects, and periodic checks should also be made to watch for changes in weight, body mass index, waist size, blood pressure, fasting glucose, or lipid levels that could be harmful and may increase risk for cardiovascular disease.

  10. Health care resource utilization and direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia initiating treatment with atypical versus typical antipsychotics in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoning; Wu, Jing; Jiang, Yawen; Liu, Li; Ye, Wenyu; Xue, Haibo; Montgomery, William

    2015-04-09

    It is uncertain whether the extra acquisition costs of atypical antipsychotics over typical antipsychotics are offset by their other reduced resource use especially in hospital services in China. This study compared the psychiatric-related health care resource utilization and direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia initiating atypical or typical antipsychotics in Tianjin, China. Data were obtained from the Tianjin Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance database (2008-2010). Adult patients with schizophrenia with ≥1 prescription for antipsychotics after ≥90-day washout and 12-month continuous enrollment after first prescription was included. Psychiatric-related resource utilization and direct medical costs of the atypical and typical cohorts were estimated during the 12-month follow-up period. Logistic regressions, ordinary least square (OLS), and generalized linear models (GLM) were employed to estimate differences of resource utilization and costs between the two cohorts. One-to-one propensity score matching was conducted as a sensitivity analysis. 1131 patients initiating either atypical (N = 648) or typical antipsychotics (N = 483) were identified. Compared with the typical cohort, the atypical cohort had a lower likelihood of hospitalization (45.8% vs. 56.7%, P < 0.001; adjusted OR: 0.58, P < 0.001) over the follow-up period. Medication costs for the atypical cohort were higher than the typical cohort ($438 vs. $187, P < 0.001); however, their non-medication medical costs were significantly lower ($1223 vs. $1704, P < 0.001). The total direct medical costs were similar between the atypical and typical cohorts before ($1661 vs. $1892, P = 0.100) and after matching ($1711 vs. 1868, P = 0.341), consistent with the results from OLS and GLM models for matched cohorts. The atypical cohort had similar total direct medical costs compared to the typical cohort. Higher medication costs associated with atypical

  11. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sárvári, Anitta K; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-08-08

    Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin and adiponectin, suggesting that both glucose and fat metabolism may be affected by these drugs. These data further suggest that antipsychotic treatments in patients alter the gene expression patterns in adipocytes in a coordinated fashion and priming them for a low-level inflammatory state.

  12. Efficacy of Atypical Antipsychotic Medication in the Management of Behaviour Problems in Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Borderline Intelligence: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Gemma L.; Deb, Shoumitro

    2011-01-01

    The use of medications to manage problem behaviours is widespread. However, robust evidence to support their use seems to be lacking. The aim was to review research evidence into the efficacy of atypical antipsychotic medication in managing problem behaviour in children with intellectual disabilities and borderline intelligence. A systematic…

  13. Medical Conditions and Demographic, Service and Clinical Factors Associated with Atypical Antipsychotic Medication Use among Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Johanna K.; Denton, Danica; Lunsky, Yona; Shui, Amy M.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to describe rates of antipsychotic medication use and the association between their use and demographics, clinical variables, and the use of behavioral/education services among children with ASD. For children with ASD ages 2-11 (n = 4749) and those 12-17 (n = 401), 5.4 and 17.7% were prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic…

  14. Efficacy of Atypical Antipsychotic Medication in the Management of Behaviour Problems in Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Borderline Intelligence: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Gemma L.; Deb, Shoumitro

    2011-01-01

    The use of medications to manage problem behaviours is widespread. However, robust evidence to support their use seems to be lacking. The aim was to review research evidence into the efficacy of atypical antipsychotic medication in managing problem behaviour in children with intellectual disabilities and borderline intelligence. A systematic…

  15. Strategies for improving adherence to second-generation antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia by increasing ease of use.

    PubMed

    Burton, Simon C

    2005-11-01

    Despite the advances in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia that have occurred since the introduction of the second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agents, a leading cause of suboptimal outcome is poor patient adherence to oral medication. Partial adherence can be attributed to a number of factors, including lack of insight, cognitive dysfunction, a complicated treatment regimen, drug-related side effects, patient attitude, lack of patient education, and cultural factors. A number of strategies, including psychosocial interventions, cognitive-behavioral techniques, strategies that minimize side effects, and pharmacological approaches that increase ease of medication use, can be employed to support adherence and improve long-term outcomes. This article focuses on strategies for increasing ease of use of antipsychotics in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. These strategies include using monotherapy rather than polypharmacy, simplifying the medication regimen, and using a long-acting antipsychotic formulation. The goal of these strategies is to improve adherence and help prevent relapse by ensuring continuous antipsychotic coverage. Strategies that optimize ease of use of medication treatment for schizophrenia and thus improve adherence to treatment are likely to promote the attainment of new treatment goals and improved patient outcomes.

  16. Risk of Mortality (Including Sudden Cardiac Death) and Major Cardiovascular Events in Atypical and Typical Antipsychotic Users: A Study with the General Practice Research Database

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Thomas, Tarita; Jones, Meghan E.; Patel, Deven; Brunner, Elizabeth; Shatapathy, Chetan C.; Motsko, Stephen; Van Staa, Tjeerd P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Antipsychotics have been associated with increased cardiac events including mortality. This study assessed cardiac events including mortality among antipsychotic users relative to nonusers. Methods. The General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was used to identify antipsychotic users, matched general population controls, and psychiatric diseased nonusers. Outcomes included cardiac mortality, sudden cardiac death (SCD), all-cause mortality (excluding suicide), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ventricular arrhythmias (VA). Sensitivity analyses were conducted for age, dose, duration, antipsychotic type, and psychiatric disease. Results. 183,392 antipsychotic users (115,491 typical and 67,901 atypical), 544,726 general population controls, and 193,920 psychiatric nonusers were identified. Nonusers with schizophrenia, dementia, or bipolar disorder had increased risks of all-cause mortality compared to general population controls, while nonusers with major depression had comparable risks. Relative to psychiatric nonusers, the adjusted relative ratios (aRR) of all-cause mortality in antipsychotic users was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.64–1.87); cardiac mortality 1.72 (95% CI: 1.42–2.07); SCD primary definition 5.76 (95% CI: 2.90–11.45); SCD secondary definition 2.15 (95% CI: 1.64–2.81); CHD 1.16 (95% CI: 0.94–1.44); and VA 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.31). aRRs of the various outcomes were lower for atypical versus typical antipsychotics (all-cause mortality 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80–0.85); cardiac mortality 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82–0.97); and SCD secondary definition 0.76 (95% CI: 0.55–1.04). Conclusions. Antipsychotic users had an increased risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and SCD compared to a psychiatric nonuser cohort. PMID:24455199

  17. Stability of some atypical antipsychotics in human plasma, haemolysed whole blood, oral fluid, human serum and calf serum.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Danielle S; Partridge, Suzanne J; Handley, Simon A; Flanagan, Robert J

    2013-06-10

    Long-term stability data of atypical antipsychotics in different matrices are not widely available. The aim of this work was to assess the stability of amisulpride, aripiprazole and dehydroaripiprazole, clozapine and norclozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and sulpiride in human EDTA plasma, heparinised haemolysed human whole blood, oral fluid, human serum, and newborn calf serum stored in tightly capped plastic containers under a range of conditions. Measurements were performed by LC-MS/MS. Analyte instability was defined as a deviation of 15% or greater from the expected concentration. All analytes were stable following 3 freeze-thaw cycles in human plasma, and were stable in this matrix for at least 5 days at ambient temperature (olanzapine, 3 days); 4 weeks at 2-8°C (olanzapine, 2 weeks), and 2 years at -20°C (except for dehydroaripiprazole, olanzapine, and quetiapine, 1 year). In human serum, aripiprazole, dehydroaripiprazole, norclozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and sulpiride were unstable after 5 days at ambient temperature, 3 weeks at 2-8°C, and 9 months at -20°C. Olanzapine was unstable in whole blood and oral fluid under most conditions studied, although prior addition of ascorbic acid had a moderate stabilising effect. All other analytes were stable in whole blood and oral fluid for at least 2 days at ambient temperature, 1 week at 2-8°C, and 2 months at -20°C (clozapine and norclozapine, 1 month whole blood). These results confirm that plasma (EDTA anticoagulant) is the sample of choice for TDM of atypical antipsychotics. Delayed (more than 1 week) analysis of patient samples should be undertaken with caution, especially with serum and with haemolysed whole blood. With olanzapine, only plasma collected and stored appropriately is likely to give reliable quantitative results.

  18. A meta-analysis of profile and time-course of symptom change in acute schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Megan; Thornton, Allen E; Honer, William G

    2006-06-01

    The profile and time-course of symptom response in acute schizophrenia is unclear. For the present study, we hypothesized that the time-course would be nonlinear. A meta-analysis was performed using randomized, controlled clinical trials of five atypical antipsychotics reported in nine electronic databases. Studies were of subjects experiencing an acute exacerbation of illness, with multiple BPRS or PANSS data-points as outcome measures. A mixed factorial repeated-measures ANOVA was used. Twenty-one published clinical trials were identified. Reduction in total symptoms from baseline to 4 wk was associated with a linear decline in symptomatology (F=23.4, d.f.=1, 7, p=0.002) without attenuation of effect. In contrast, from baseline to 6 wk the linear symptom reduction (F=76.5, d.f.=1, 12, p<0.001) eventually flattened at the end of the trial (F=87.2, d.f.=1, 12, p<0.001). Secondary analyses showed a similar pattern for typical antipsychotics, and the same profile for risperidone and olanzapine as for atypical agents as a whole. Inclusion of LOCF data altered the results at 4 wk, but not 6 wk; completion rates had no effect on results. In conclusion, this meta-analysis confirms our hypothesis for 6-wk data. The profile of symptom change is one of linear symptom reduction until 4 wk, with a flattening of treatment effects by 6 wk. A curvilinear profile of schizophrenia symptom reduction has possible implications with respect to trial design and clinical decision-making.

  19. Atypical antipsychotic drugs directly impair insulin action in adipocytes: effects on glucose transport, lipogenesis, and antilipolysis.

    PubMed

    Vestri, Helliner S; Maianu, Lidia; Moellering, Douglas R; Garvey, W Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Treatment with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) has been associated with weight gain and the development of diabetes mellitus, although the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SGAs exert direct cellular effects on insulin action and substrate metabolism in adipocytes. We utilized two cultured cell models including 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary cultured rat adipocytes, and tested for effects of SGAs risperidone (RISP), clozapine (CLZ), olanzapine (OLZ), and quetiapine (QUE), together with conventional antipsychotic drugs butyrophenone (BUTY), and trifluoperazine (TFP), over a wide concentration range from 1 to 500 microM. The effects of antipsychotic drugs on basal and insulin-stimulated rates of glucose transport were studied at 3 h, 15 h, and 3 days. Both CLZ and OLZ (but not RISP) at doses as low as 5 microM were able to significantly decrease the maximal insulin-stimulated glucose transport rate by approximately 40% in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas CLZ and RISP reduced insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates in primary cultured rat adipocytes by approximately 50-70%. Conventional drugs (BUTY and TFP) did not affect glucose transport rates. Regarding intracellular glucose metabolism, both SGAs (OLZ, QUE, RISP) and conventional drugs (BUTY and TFP) increased basal and/or insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation rates, whereas rates of lipogenesis were increased by CLZ, OLZ, QUE, and BUTY. Finally, rates of lipolysis in response to isoproterenol were reduced by the SGAs (CLZ, OLZ, QUE, RISP), but not by BUTY or TFP. These experiments demonstrate that antipsychotic drugs can differentially affect insulin action and metabolism through direct cellular effects in adipocytes. However, only SGAs were able to impair the insulin-responsive glucose transport system and to impair lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, SGAs directly induce insulin resistance and alter lipogenesis and lipolysis in favor of progressive lipid accumulation and adipocyte enlargement. These

  20. Anti-atherogenic properties of high-density lipoproteins in psychiatric patients before and after two months of atypical anti-psychotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Osamah; Izikson, Lidia; Bathish, Yunis; Dabur, Enas; Hanna, Alaa; Zidan, Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Some of the medications used for the management of schizophrenia are associated with clinically significant increases in weight and adverse alterations in serum lipid levels. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of short-term (two months) treatment with atypical anti-psychotics on coronary heart disease risk factors, including the functional properties of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in psychiatric patients. Nineteen patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder and ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. In the present study blood was drawn at baseline and after two months of atypical anti-psychotic treatment. Wilcoxon non-parametric-test was used to examine differences in the psychotic group before and two months after treatment.Waist circumference and oxidative stress in psychiatric patients were higher compared with the control group. Serum-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity was lower in psychotic patients compared to controls. Two months of anti-psychotic therapy was associated with increased abdominal obesity, decreased paraoxonase lactonase activity, but with no further change in serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Psychotic patients have low serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages as a parameter of HDL functionality. Atypical anti-psychotic treatment for two months increased metabolic derangements in these patients but without further decrement in serum-mediated cholesterol efflux. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Adjunctive Atypical Antipsychotic Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Depression, Quality of Life, and Safety Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Spielmans, Glen I.; Berman, Margit I.; Linardatos, Eftihia; Rosenlicht, Nicholas Z.; Perry, Angela; Tsai, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Atypical antipsychotic medications are widely prescribed for the adjunctive treatment of depression, yet their total risk–benefit profile is not well understood. We thus conducted a systematic review of the efficacy and safety profiles of atypical antipsychotic medications used for the adjunctive treatment of depression. Methods and Findings We included randomized trials comparing adjunctive antipsychotic medication to placebo for treatment-resistant depression in adults. Our literature search (conducted in December 2011 and updated on December 14, 2012) identified 14 short-term trials of aripiprazole, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC), quetiapine, and risperidone. When possible, we supplemented published literature with data from manufacturers' clinical trial registries and US Food and Drug Administration New Drug Applications. Study duration ranged from 4 to 12 wk. All four drugs had statistically significant effects on remission, as follows: aripiprazole (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.48–2.73), OFC (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.01–2.0), quetiapine (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.33–2.42), and risperidone (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30). The number needed to treat (NNT) was 19 for OFC and nine for each other drug. All drugs with the exception of OFC also had statistically significant effects on response rates, as follows: aripiprazole (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.58–2.72; NNT, 7), OFC (OR, 1.30, 95% CI, 0.87–1.93), quetiapine (OR, 1.53, 95% CI, 1.17–2.0; NNT, 10), and risperidone (OR, 1.83, 95% CI, 1.16–2.88; NNT, 8). All four drugs showed statistically significant effects on clinician-rated depression severity measures (Hedges' g ranged from 0.26 to 0.48; mean difference of 2.69 points on the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale across drugs). On measures of functioning and quality of life, these medications produced either no benefit or a very small benefit, except for risperidone, which had a small-to-moderate effect on quality of life (g

  2. Adjunctive atypical antipsychotic treatment for major depressive disorder: a meta-analysis of depression, quality of life, and safety outcomes.

    PubMed

    Spielmans, Glen I; Berman, Margit I; Linardatos, Eftihia; Rosenlicht, Nicholas Z; Perry, Angela; Tsai, Alexander C

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are widely prescribed for the adjunctive treatment of depression, yet their total risk-benefit profile is not well understood. We thus conducted a systematic review of the efficacy and safety profiles of atypical antipsychotic medications used for the adjunctive treatment of depression. We included randomized trials comparing adjunctive antipsychotic medication to placebo for treatment-resistant depression in adults. Our literature search (conducted in December 2011 and updated on December 14, 2012) identified 14 short-term trials of aripiprazole, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC), quetiapine, and risperidone. When possible, we supplemented published literature with data from manufacturers' clinical trial registries and US Food and Drug Administration New Drug Applications. Study duration ranged from 4 to 12 wk. All four drugs had statistically significant effects on remission, as follows: aripiprazole (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.48-2.73), OFC (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.01-2.0), quetiapine (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.33-2.42), and risperidone (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.31-4.30). The number needed to treat (NNT) was 19 for OFC and nine for each other drug. All drugs with the exception of OFC also had statistically significant effects on response rates, as follows: aripiprazole (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.58-2.72; NNT, 7), OFC (OR, 1.30, 95% CI, 0.87-1.93), quetiapine (OR, 1.53, 95% CI, 1.17-2.0; NNT, 10), and risperidone (OR, 1.83, 95% CI, 1.16-2.88; NNT, 8). All four drugs showed statistically significant effects on clinician-rated depression severity measures (Hedges' g ranged from 0.26 to 0.48; mean difference of 2.69 points on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale across drugs). On measures of functioning and quality of life, these medications produced either no benefit or a very small benefit, except for risperidone, which had a small-to-moderate effect on quality of life (g = 0.49). Treatment was linked to several adverse

  3. Meta-analysis of drop-out rates in randomised clinical trials, comparing typical and atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martin, José Luis R; Pérez, Víctor; Sacristán, Montse; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Martínez, Cristóbal; Alvarez, Enric

    2006-01-01

    To assess antipsychotic medication in the treatment of schizophrenia, based on trial drop-out rates. The studies included were randomised controlled trials that compared any of the four clinically best-established atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, olanzapine, risperidone or clozapine) against either of two typical antipsychotics regarded as the gold standard (haloperidol or chlorpromazine). Meta-analysis indicated less risk of all-cause patient withdrawal from atypical medication trials where dosage was flexible, in both the short, relative risk (RR) 0.70 (95% CI 0.64-0.76), P<0.00001, and long term, RR 0.72 (0.65-0.80), P<0.00001. Similar results were observed for withdrawal due to adverse events, RR: 0.54 (0.41-0.72), P<0.0001. Nevertheless, the favourable effects of atypical medication disappeared in trials relying on fixed dosage. We detected a significant positive effect in terms of the outcome of treatment discontinuation for atypical versus typical medication, though only where the use of flexible rather than fixed doses (closer to an experimental control situation) was possible.

  4. Expression of 5-HT2A receptors in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons projecting to nucleus accumbens. Potential relevance for atypical antipsychotic action.

    PubMed

    Mocci, Giuseppe; Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Adell, Albert; Cortés, Roser; Artigas, Francesc

    2014-04-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in higher brain functions altered in schizophrenia. Classical antipsychotic drugs modulate information processing in cortico-limbic circuits via dopamine D2 receptor blockade in nucleus accumbens (NAc) whereas atypical antipsychotic drugs preferentially target cortical serotonin (5-HT) receptors. The brain networks involved in the therapeutic action of atypical drugs are not fully understood. Previous work indicated that medial PFC (mPFC) pyramidal neurons projecting to ventral tegmental area express 5-HT2A receptors suggesting that atypical antipsychotic drugs modulate dopaminergic activity distally, via 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2A-R) blockade in PFC. Since the mPFC also projects heavily to NAc, we examined whether NAc-projecting pyramidal neurons also express 5-HT2A-R. Using a combination of retrograde tracing experiments and in situ hybridization we report that a substantial proportion of mPFC-NAc pyramidal neurons in rat brain express 5-HT2A-R mRNA in a layer- and area-specific manner (up to 68% in layer V of contralateral cingulate). The functional relevance of 5-HT2A-R to modulate mPFC-NAc projections was examined in dual-probe microdialysis experiments. The application of the preferential 5-HT2A-R agonist DOI into mPFC enhanced glutamate release locally (+66 ± 18%) and in NAc (+74 ± 12%) indicating that cortical 5-HT2A-R activation augments glutamatergic transmission in NAc. Since NAc integrates glutamatergic and dopaminergic inputs, blockade of 5-HT2A-R by atypical drugs may reduce cortical excitatory inputs onto GABAergic neurons of NAc, adding to dopamine D2 receptor blockade. Together with previous observations, the present results suggest that atypical antipsychotic drugs may control the activity of the mesolimbic pathway at cell body and terminal level.

  5. Discontinuation of treatment of schizophrenic patients is driven by poor symptom response: a pooled post-hoc analysis of four atypical antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Adams, David H; Kinon, Bruce J

    2005-12-23

    Stopping antipsychotic treatment can interrupt improvement and exacerbate the illness. The reasons for discontinuing treatment during controlled clinical trials were analyzed to explore this phenomenon. A post-hoc, pooled analysis was made of 4 randomized, double-blind clinical trials, 24-28 weeks in duration, involving 1627 patients with schizophrenia or a related disorder. Analyses combined all the atypical antipsychotic treatment groups in the studies. The majority of patients (53%) stopped their treatment at an early stage. Poor psychiatric response along with worsening symptoms was the most frequently given reason for discontinuing the course (36%), which was substantially more common than discontinuation due to poor tolerability of the medication (12%). This phenomenon was corroborated by less improvement in patients who discontinued treatment compared with those who completed, based on the PANSS total scores. Discontinuation due to poor response was, apparently, more predominantly linked to patient perception than to physicians' conclusions alone (80% vs. 20%). Discontinuation due to patient perception of poor response appeared to occur particularly early in the course of treatment. Patients who discontinued due to poor toleration of the medication responded in a more comparable manner with completers. Discontinuing treatment may lead to exacerbation of symptoms, undermining therapeutic progress. In these studies, poor response to treatment and worsening of underlying psychiatric symptoms, and to a lesser extent, intolerability to medication were the primary contributors to treatment being discontinued. Our findings suggest that adherence may be enhanced by effective symptom control, as objectively measured and as subjectively perceived. Such strategies may improve patients' willingness to undertake long-term therapy and increase the likelihood of a better prognosis.

  6. Can melatonin prevent or improve metabolic side effects during antipsychotic treatments?

    PubMed Central

    Porfirio, Maria-Cristina; Gomes de Almeida, Juliana Paula; Stornelli, Maddalena; Giovinazzo, Silvia; Purper-Ouakil, Diane; Masi, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    In the last two decades, second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) were more frequently used than typical antipsychotics for treating both psychotic and nonpsychotic psychiatric disorders in both children and adolescents, because of their lower risk of adverse neurological effects, that is, extrapyramidal symptoms. Recent studies have pointed out their effect on weight gain and increased visceral adiposity as they induce metabolic syndrome. Patients receiving SGAs often need to be treated with other substances to counteract metabolic side effects. In this paper, we point out the possible protective effect of add-on melatonin treatment in preventing, mitigating, or even reversing SGAs metabolic effects, improving quality of life and providing safer long-term treatments in pediatric patients. Melatonin is an endogenous indolamine secreted during darkness by the pineal gland; it plays a key role in regulating the circadian rhythm, generated by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus, and has many other biological functions, including chronobiotic, antioxidant and neuroprotective properties, anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging effects, and diminishing oxidative injury and fat distribution. It has been hypothesized that SGAs cause adverse metabolic effects that may be restored by nightly administration of melatonin because of its influence on autonomic and hormonal outputs. Interestingly, atypical anti-psychotics (AAPs) can cause several sleep disorders, and circadian misalignment can influence hormones involved in the metabolic regulation, such as insulin, leptin, and ghrelin; furthermore, a relationship between obesity and sleep curtailment has been demonstrated, as well as sleep deprivation in rats has been associated with hyperphagia. Metabolic effects of melatonin, both central and peripheral, direct and indirect, target most metabolic disorders reported during and after SGA treatment in children, adolescents, and adults. Further systematic

  7. Effects of typical (haloperidol) and atypical (risperidone) antipsychotic agents on protein expression in rat neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Mohammed A; Ummehany, Rahnuma; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Mcgregor, Iain S; Matsumoto, Izuru

    2009-12-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) play a crucial role in the development and maturation of the central nervous system. Recently studies suggest that antipsychotic drugs regulate the activities of NSCs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying antipsychotic-induced changes of the activity of NSCs, particularly protein expression, are still unknown. We studied the growth and protein expression in haloperidol (HD) and risperidone (RS) treated rat NSCs. The treatment with RS (3microM) or HD (3microM) had no effect on morphology of NSCs after 24h, but significantly promotes or inhibits the differentiation of NSCs after a 96h of treatment. 2-DE based proteomics was performed at 24h, a stage before phenotypic expression of NSCs. Gel image analysis revealed that 30 protein spots in HD- and 60 spots in RS-treated groups were differentially regulated in their expression compared to control group (p<0.05; ANOVA). When these spots were compared between the two drug-treated groups, 23 spots overlapped leaving 7 HD-specific and 37 RS-specific spots. Of these 67 spots, 32 different proteins were identified. The majority of the differentially regulated proteins were classified into several functional groups, such as cytoskeletal, calcium regulating protein, metabolism, signal transduction and proteins related to oxidative stress. Our data shows that atypical RS expressed more proteins than typical HD, and these results might explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the different effects of both drugs on NSCs activities as described above. Identified proteins in this experiment may be useful in future studies of NSCs differentiation and/or understanding in molecular mechanisms of different neural diseases including schizophenia.

  8. The atypical antipsychotic blonanserin reverses (+)-PD-128907- and ketamine-induced deficit in executive function in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Manato; Enomoto, Takeshi; Murai, Takeshi; Nakako, Tomokazu; Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Kiyoshi, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Ikejiri, Masaru; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Ogi, Yuji; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2016-05-15

    Antagonism of the dopamine D3 receptor is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia. We have previously reported that the atypical antipsychotic blonanserin, a dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, highly occupies dopamine D3 receptors at its antipsychotic dose range in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of blonanserin on executive function in common marmosets using the object retrieval with detour (ORD) task. The dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist (+)-PD-128907 at 1mg/kg decreased success rate in the difficult trial, but not in the easy trial. Since the difference between the two trials is only cognitive demand, our findings indicate that excess activation of dopamine D3 receptors impairs executive function in common marmosets. Blonanserin at 0.1mg/kg reversed the decrease in success rate induced by (+)-PD-128907 in the difficult trial. This finding indicates that blonanserin has beneficial effect on executive function deficit induced by activation of the dopamine D3 receptor in common marmosets. Next, and based on the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia, the common marmosets were treated with the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. Ketamine at sub-anesthetic doses decreased success rate in the difficult trial, but not in the easy trial. Blonanserin at 0.1mg/kg reversed the decrease in success rate induced by ketamine in the difficult trial. The findings of this study suggest that blonanserin might have beneficial effect on executive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk of death associated with the use of conventional vs. atypical antipsychotic medications: evaluating the use of the Emilia-Romagna Region database for pharmacoepidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Sikirica, S; Marino, M; Gagne, J J; De Palma, R; Maio, V

    2014-02-01

    Since 2005, a mounting base of evidence has identified that conventional antipsychotic medications are associated with an increased risk of mortality among elderly patients when compared to atypical antipsychotics. This study sought to explore the feasibility of using the Emilia-Romagna Region (RER) database for comparative safety analyses by replicating and refining risk estimates of this well-known drug safety example through meta-analysis. We identified a cohort of 23 681 Italian RER patients (aged ≥65) who initiated treatment with a conventional or atypical antipsychotic between 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2011. We compared 180-day mortality using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for risk factors for death, use of other medications and measures of health services utilization intensity, all measured before antipsychotic initiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies with similar methods against which to compare our results. Among 14 462 and 9219 patients prescribed conventional and atypical antipsychotics, respectively, we observed 2402 (16·6%) and 821 (8·9%) deaths during follow-up. Conventional antipsychotic initiators were older and generally had higher prevalence of outcome risk factors and higher baseline health service use intensity. The crude hazard ratio (HR) was 1·95 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1·80-2·11], which decreased to 1·47 (95% CI, 1·35-1·60) after full adjustment. We identified seven published studies that examined this association using similar methods. The pooled HR from these studies was 1·34 (95% CI, 1·28-1·39). Including our study, the meta-analysis yielded a summary estimate of 1·35 (95% CI, 1·31-1·40) and did not introduce any heterogeneity (I(2)  = 0%; P = 0·455). Our results support the use of the RER database for pharmacoepidemiological studies and provide an up-to-date and pooled estimate of the magnitude of the association between mortality and conventional vs. atypical antipsychotics. © 2013 John

  10. Real-world adherence and economic outcomes associated with paliperidone palmitate versus oral atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients with substance-related disorders using Medicaid benefits.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kruti; Lafeuille, Marie-Hélène; Kamstra, Rhiannon; Tiggelaar, Sean; Lefebvre, Patrick; Kim, Edward; Yue, Yong; Tandon, Neeta

    2017-08-15

    Compare medication utilization, costs and healthcare resource use in schizophrenia patients with substance-related disorders initiated on once-monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP1M) or an oral atypical antipsychotic (OAA). Data from six Medicaid states (07/2009-03/2015) were used to compare outcomes between PP1M and OAA patients. PP1M patients had higher 12-month antipsychotic adherence and persistence than OAA patients. PP1M patients had lower medical (mean monthly cost difference [MMCD] = US$-191, p = 0.020), higher pharmacy (MMCD = US$250, p < 0.001) and similar total costs (MMCD = US$59, p = 0.517) during the overall follow-up. PP1M patients had lower rates of outpatient visits and inpatient days but higher rates of mental health-related utilization. PP1M was associated with higher antipsychotic adherence and persistence, and similar total costs versus OAA.

  11. Efficacy, quality of life, and acceptability outcomes of atypical antipsychotic augmentation treatment for treatment-resistant depression: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating and costly mental disorder. Although commercially available antidepressants have proliferated over the last 20 years, a substantial number of patients either do not respond adequately to these drugs or are unable to tolerate their adverse effects. One common approach has been to augment conventional antidepressants with an adjunctive agent, but the optimal selection of atypical antipsychotic agents for adjunctive treatment of treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains controversial. Methods/Design An electronic literature search of PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Web of Science, LiLACS, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for studies will be conducted with no restrictions on language, publication year, or publication type. Several clinical trial registry agencies, pharmaceutical company websites, and FDA reports will also be reviewed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with atypical antipsychotic augmentation treatment for treatment-resistant depression will be considered. Data will be independently extracted by two reviewers. Traditional pairwise meta-analyses will be performed for RCTs that directly compare different treatment arms. Then, Bayesian network meta-analyses will be performed to compare the relative efficacy and acceptability of different atypical antipsychotic agents (and doses). A sensitivity analysis will be performed by excluding studies classified as a small sample size, having a high placebo effect. Discussion This systematic review and network meta-analysis will comparatively analyze the efficacy, quality of life, and acceptability profiles of atypical antipsychotic medications used for the adjunctive treatment of TRD. The findings should provide clinically relevant implications for comprehensively understanding the risk–benefit profiles of these adjunctive treatments. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD 42014009666. PMID:25373601

  12. Quality of life and its association with insight, adverse effects of medication and use of atypical antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in remission.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Cheng, Chung-Ping; Huang, Chi-Fen; Yen, Ju-Yu; Ko, Chih-Hung; Chen, Cheng-Sheng

    2008-07-01

    The present study aimed: (i) to compare the level of quality of life (QOL) among subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia who were in remission and healthy control subjects and (ii) to examine the association of QOL with insight, adverse effects of medication and use of atypical antipsychotics among subjects with BD and schizophrenia who were in remission by controlling other confounding factors. The QOL on the four domains of the World Health Organization Questionnaire on Quality of Life: Short Form - Taiwan version (WHOQOL-BREF) were compared between 96 subjects with BD in remission, 96 subjects with schizophrenia in remission and 106 healthy control subjects. The association between the four QOL domains and subjects' insight, adverse effects of medication and use of atypical antipsychotics were examined using multiple regression analyses in the subjects with BD and schizophrenia in remission. The results demonstrated that the subjects with BD in remission had similarly poor levels of QOL in all four domains as those subjects with schizophrenia in remission, and both subjects with BD and schizophrenia had poorer QOL than those in the control group. For both subjects with BD and schizophrenia in remission, insight was negatively associated with QOL on the physical domain, and adverse effects of medication were negatively associated with QOL on the physical and environment domains. Use of atypical antipsychotics was not associated with QOL, but subjects with BD receiving olanzapine perceived better psychological QOL than those receiving risperidone and better psychological and social relationship QOL than those receiving no atypical antipsychotic. The results of the present study indicate that subjects with BD are dissatisfied with their QOL, even when they are in a remitted state. Clinicians must consider the negative influences of insight and adverse effects of medication on QOL of patients with BD and schizophrenia in remission.

  13. The role of histaminergic H1 and H3 receptors in food intake: a mechanism for atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain?

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Weston-Green, Katrina; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2010-02-01

    Atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine and clozapine are effective at treating the multiple domains of schizophrenia, with a low risk of extra-pyramidal side-effects. However a major downfall to their use is metabolic side-effects particularly weight gain/obesity, which occurs by unknown mechanisms. The present paper explores the potential candidature of histaminergic neurotransmission in the mechanisms of atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain, with a focus on the histaminergic H1 and H3 receptors. Olanzapine and clozapine have a high affinity for the H1 receptor, and meta-analyses show a strong correlation between risk of weight gain and H1 receptor affinity. In addition, olanzapine treatment decreases H1 receptor binding and mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus. Furthermore, a complex role is emerging for the histamine H3 receptor in the control of hunger. The H3 receptor is a pre-synaptic autoreceptor that inhibits the synthesis and release of histamine, and a heteroreceptor that inhibits other neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline (NA) and acetylcholine (ACh), which are also implicated in the regulation of food intake. Thus, the H3 receptor is in a prime position to regulate food intake, both through its control of histamine and its influence on other feeding pathways. We proposed that a mechanism for atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain may be partly through the H3 receptor, as a drug-induced decrease in H1 receptor activity may decrease histamine tone through the H3 autoreceptors, compounding the weight gain problem. In addition, atypical antipsychotics may affect food intake by influencing 5-HT, NA and ACh release via interactions with the H3 heteroreceptor.

  14. Differential Effects of Various Typical and Atypical Antipsychotics on Plasma Glucose and Insulin Levels in the Mouse: Evidence for the Involvement of Sympathetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Savoy, Yvette E.; Ashton, Michael A.; Miller, Matthew W.; Nedza, Frank M.; Spracklin, Douglas K.; Hawthorn, Mark H.; Rollema, Hans; Matos, F. Fatima; Hajos-Korcsok, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic treatment has been associated with serious metabolic adverse events, such as glucose dysregulation and development of type 2 diabetes. As part of our studies on possible underlying mechanisms, we investigated the acute effects of various typical and atypical antipsychotics on plasma glucose and insulin in FVB/N mice, a strain that showed a more pronounced hyperglycemic response to clozapine than C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. Acute administration of high doses of clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, perphenazine, or chlorpromazine significantly increased plasma glucose by 100%–140% above basal levels without significant effects on insulin levels. In contrast, risperidone reduced plasma glucose (−30%) and markedly enhanced plasma insulin levels. Doses of ziprasidone that gave 50-fold higher free plasma concentrations than therapeutic plasma levels, as well as high doses of aripiprazole and haloperidol, did not significantly alter either glucose or insulin levels. Clozapine- and olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia occurred at free plasma concentrations that were within, or one order of magnitude above, the range of therapeutic plasma levels. Pretreatment with either the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium, or the α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine, blocked the clozapine- and chlorpromazine-induced increase in glucose levels. Taken together, these results suggest that typical and atypical antipsychotics with known metabolic liability produce acute hyperglycemia in mice and that this effect is likely driven by activation of the sympathetic autonomic nervous system via a central mechanism. PMID:18703666

  15. The effect of a calorie-restricted diet on weight gain in short-term psychiatric inpatients receiving atypical antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Jacobowitz, William; Derbabian, Barbara; Saunders, Anne

    2014-07-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the effect of a calorie-restricted diet on weight change in short-term acute care psychiatric patients receiving atypical antipsychotic medication. A descriptive correlational design utilizing chart review and a convenience sample of 100 participants was used. Fifty charts of patients hospitalized prior to the implementation of the calorie-restricted diet for those receiving atypical antipsychotic agents were compared to 50 charts of patients who received the diet. Weight changes in the two groups were compared relative to age, gender, length of time taking the medication, and the type of medication. The Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman's rank-correlation coefficient, and the two-way analysis of variance were used to conduct the analyses. The calorie-restricted diet was not significantly associated with a reduction in weight gain in participants who received any of the atypical antipsychotic agents except for olanzapine; therefore, findings indicate that the calorie-restricted diet may only be effective for patients receiving olanzapine.

  16. A longitudinal study of alterations of hippocampal volumes and serum BDNF levels in association to atypical antipsychotics in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Emmanouil; Papathanasiou, Matilda A; Michalopoulou, Panagiota G; Laskos, Efstathios; Mazioti, Aggeliki; Kastania, Anastasia; Vasilopoulou, Konstantina; Nikolaidou, Paraskevi; Margaritis, Dimitrios; Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Liappas, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus, which have been suggested to play an important role in the formation and emergence of schizophrenia syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit significant bilateral hippocampal volume reduction and progressive hippocampal volume decrease in first-episode patients with schizophrenia has been shown in many neuroimaging studies. Dysfunction of the neurotrophic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The initiation of antipsychotic medication alters the levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels. However it is unclear whether treatment with antipsychotics is associated with alterations of hippocampal volume and BDNF levels. In the present longitudinal study we investigated the association between serum BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes in a sample of fourteen first-episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FEP). MRI scans, BDNF and clinical measurements were performed twice: at baseline before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment and 8 months later, while the patients were receiving monotherapy with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs). We found that left hippocampal volume was decreased (corrected left HV [t = 2.977, df = 13, p = .011] at follow-up; We also found that the higher the BDNF levels change the higher were the differences of corrected left hippocampus after 8 months of treatment with atypical antipsychotics (Pearson r = 0.597, p = 0.024). The association of BDNF with hippocampal volume alterations in schizophrenia merits further investigation and replication in larger longitudinal studies.

  17. Physico-chemical characterization of a novel group of dopamine D(3)/D(2) receptor ligands, potential atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Deák, Katalin; Takács-Novák, Krisztina; Kapás, Margit; Vastag, Mónika; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2008-11-04

    The fundamental physico-chemical properties such as ionization and lipophilicity of twelve alkyl-aryl-piperidine and aryl-piperazine derivatives have been determined. Compounds are members of a recently identified, new class of potent dopamine D(3)/D(2) receptor ligands as potential atypical antipsychotic agents and were used in the development of a promising drug candidate (RGH-188) being present currently in clinical phase II investigations. The ionization constant (pK(a)) and the partition coefficient in octanol/water (logP(oct)) and cyclohexane/water systems (logP(ch)) were measured by validated analytical methods. Based on the highly precise physico-chemical data the structure-property relationships (SPR) were studied. The effect of the polar and apolar heteroatoms as well as polar and apolar surface areas on the partition in the two solvent systems was investigated by linear regression and multivariate linear regression analyses. Brain/blood concentration ratios (BB values) as a function of time were determined by HPLC analyses on plasma and brain homogenates of Wistar rats. A linear relationship has been found between DeltalogP values (logP(oct)-logP(ch)) and experimental logBB values, verifying that physico-chemical data can predict pharmacokinetic behaviour.

  18. Level of serum thioredoxin and correlation with neurocognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia using clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Bas, Alper; Gultekin, Gozde; Incir, Said; Bas, Tuba Ocek; Emul, Murat; Duran, Alaatin

    2017-01-01

    Thioredoxin is a serum antioxidant that has been investigated in the etiology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study is investigating the relationship between serum thioredoxin levels and cognitive functions in acute psychotic episode and remission state patients with schizophrenia; and examining whether there were differences between patients using clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics; including risperidone, olanzapine and amisulpride. This research was performed in schizophrenia patients hospitalized with acute psychotic episode (n=57), reevaluated patients after the initiation of treatment (mean 16 weeks) (n=46), and healthy controls (n=41). Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinic Global Impressions Scale, Neuropsychologic test battery to assess cognitive performance, and serum thioredoxin levels measured by ELISA were used in this research. Serum thioredoxin levels were highest in acute psychotic episode, lower in the remission state and the lowest in healthy controls. Significant correlation has been established between serum thioredoxin levels and Trail Making Test-A performance in remission state patients. In conclusion, serum thioredoxin levels were increased in acute psychotic episode and decreased in remission state, and its relationship with attention is worth to consider in schizophrenia patients.

  19. Opposite regulation by typical and atypical anti-psychotics of ERK1/2, CREB and Elk-1 phosphorylation in mouse dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Laura; Håkansson, Kerstin; Usiello, Alessandro; Borgkvist, Anders; Lindskog, Maria; Greengard, Paul; Fisone, Gilberto

    2003-07-01

    The two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), are involved in the control of gene expression via phosphorylation and activation of the transcription factors cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and Elk-1. Here, we have examined the effect of haloperidol and clozapine, two anti-psychotic drugs, and eticlopride, a selective dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, on the state of phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CREB and Elk-1, in the mouse dorsal striatum. Administration of the typical anti-psychotic haloperidol stimulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CREB and Elk-1. Virtually identical results were obtained using eticlopride. In contrast, the atypical anti-psychotic clozapine reduced ERK1/2, CREB and Elk-1 phosphorylation. This opposite regulation was specifically exerted by haloperidol and clozapine on ERK, CREB, and Elk-1 phosphorylation, as both anti-psychotic drugs increased the phosphorylation of the dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) at the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) site. The activation of CREB and Elk-1 induced by haloperidol appeared to be achieved via different signalling pathways, as inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abolished the stimulation of Elk-1 phosphorylation without affecting CREB phosphorylation. This study shows that haloperidol and clozapine induce distinct patterns of phosphorylation in the dorsal striatum. The results provide a novel biochemical paradigm elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the distinct therapeutic actions of typical and atypical anti-psychotic agents.

  20. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine selectively inhibits interleukin 8 (IL-8)-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Capannolo, Marta; Fasciani, Irene; Romeo, Stefania; Aloisi, Gabriella; Rossi, Mario; Bellio, Pierangelo; Celenza, Giuseppe; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Scarselli, Marco; Maggio, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic to date, but its benefits are counterbalanced by the risk of severe hematological effects. In this study, we analyzed whether clozapine inhibits polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte chemotaxis. We found that clozapine, within the therapeutic concentration range, potently and selectively inhibits PMN chemotaxis induced by interleukin 8 (IL-8), a chemokine inducing neutrophil migration. The effect was not due to its action at dopamine, serotonin and muscarinic receptors, or to a direct antagonism to IL-8 receptors. Furthermore, clozapine did not inhibit PMN chemotaxis by its presumed toxic mechanism. In fact, after an overnight incubation in cell culture, the drug did not increase the physiological PMN apoptosis. An interference of clozapine with the autocrine release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a secondary chemoattractant secreted by neutrophils in response to the primary chemoattractant IL-8, was hypothesized. In agreement with this hypothesis, clozapine attenuated the IL-8-induced release of LTB4 in PMNs. A series of experiments with an antagonist of the LTB4 receptor, U75302, and an inhibitor of LTB4 synthesis, zileuton, provided support to this conjecture. Intriguingly MK-571, an inhibitor of the multi-drug resistance protein MRP4, playing a pivotal role in effluxing LTB4, completely blocked PMN chemotaxis induced by IL-8, but gave conflicting results when tested for its ability to reduce LTB4 release, increasing LTB4 efflux by itself but reducing the release when in combination with IL-8. The reduction of PMN chemotaxis due to clozapine could predispose patients to infections. Whether this effect is a prelude to clozapine agranulocytosis requires further investigation.

  1. Atypical antipsychotics as add-on treatment in late-life depression

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Sibel; Senkal, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Background Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) have been used in the augmentation of treatment-resistant depression. However, little is known about their effectiveness, tolerability, and adverse events in the treatment of late-life depression, which were the aim of this study. Methods The retrospective data of patients aged >65 years who had a major depressive episode with inadequate response to antidepressant treatment and had adjuvant SGA treatment were analyzed. The outcome measures were the number of the patients who continued to use SGAs in the fourth and twelfth weeks, adverse events, and changes in symptoms of depression. Results Thirty-five patients were screened: 21 (60%) had quetiapine, twelve (34.28%) had aripiprazole, and two (5.71%) had olanzapine adjuvant treatment. The mean age was 72.17±5.02 years, and 65.7% of the patients were women. The mean daily dose was 85.71±47.80 mg for quetiapine, 3.33±1.23 mg for aripiprazole, and 3.75±1.76 mg for olanzapine. The Geriatric Depression Scale scores of all patients were significantly decreased in the fourth week and were significant in the aripiprazole group (P=0.02). Of the 35 patients, 23 (65.7%) patients discontinued the study within 12 weeks. The frequency of adverse events was similar in all SGAs, and the most common were sedation, dizziness, constipation, and orthostatic hypotension with quetiapine, and akathisia and headache because of aripiprazole. Conclusion This study indicates that dropout ratio of patients with SGAs is high, and a subgroup of patients with late-life depression may benefit from SGAs. Effectiveness is significant in aripiprazole, and adverse events of SGAs were not serious but common in elderly patients. PMID:27672315

  2. LC-MS/MS of some atypical antipsychotics in human plasma, serum, oral fluid and haemolysed whole blood.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Danielle S; Partridge, Suzanne J; Handley, Simon A; Couchman, Lewis; Morgan, Phillip E; Flanagan, Robert J

    2013-06-10

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of atypical antipsychotics is common, but published methods often specify relatively complex sample preparation and analysis procedures. The aim of this work was to develop and validate a simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of amisulpride, aripiprazole and dehydroaripiprazole, clozapine and norclozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and sulpiride in small (200 μL) volumes of plasma or serum for TDM purposes. The applicability of the method as developed to haemolysed whole blood and to oral fluid was also investigated. Analytes and internal standards were extracted into butyl acetate:butanol (9+1, v/v) and a portion of the extract analysed by LC-MS/MS (100 mm × 2.1 mm i.d. Waters Spherisorb S5SCX; eluent: 50 mmol/L methanolic ammonium acetate, pH* 6.0; flow-rate 0.5 mL/min; positive ion APCI-SRM, two transitions per analyte). Assay calibration (human plasma, oral fluid, and haemolysed whole blood calibration solutions) was performed by plotting the ratio of the peak area of the analyte to that of the appropriate internal standard. Assay validation was as per FDA guidelines. Assay calibration was linear across the concentration ranges studied. Inter- and intra-assay precision and accuracy were within 10% for all analytes in human plasma. Similar results were obtained for oral fluid and haemolysed whole blood, except that aripiprazole and dehydroaripiprazole were within 15% accuracy at low concentration (15 μg/L) in oral fluid, and olanzapine inter-assay precision could not be assessed in these matrices due to day-by-day degradation of this analyte. Recoveries varied between 16% (sulpiride) and 107% (clozapine), and were reproducible as well as comparable between human plasma, human serum, calf serum and haemolysed whole blood. For oral fluid, recoveries were reproducible, but differed slightly from those in plasma suggesting the need for

  3. Number needed to treat to harm for discontinuation due to adverse events in the treatment of bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Keming; Kemp, David E; Fein, Elizabeth; Wang, Zuowei; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2011-08-01

    To estimate the number needed to treat to harm (NNTH) for discontinuation due to adverse events with atypical antipsychotics relative to placebo during the treatment of bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). English-language literature published and cited in MEDLINE from January 1966 to May 2009 was searched with the terms antipsychotic, atypical antipsychotic, generic and brand names of atypical antipsychotics, safety, tolerability, discontinuation due to adverse events, somnolence, sedation, weight gain, akathisia, or extrapyramidal side effect; and bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, or generalized anxiety disorder; and randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. This search was augmented with a manual search. Studies with a cumulative sample of ≥ 100 patients were included. The NNTHs for discontinuation due to adverse events, somnolence, sedation, ≥ 7% weight gain, and akathisia relative to placebo were estimated with 95% confidence intervals to reflect the magnitude of variance. Five studies in bipolar depression, 10 studies in MDD, and 4 studies in GAD were identified. Aripiprazole and olanzapine have been studied in bipolar depression and refractory MDD. Only quetiapine extended release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in 3 psychiatric conditions with different fixed dosing schedules. For aripiprazole, the mean NNTH for discontinuation due to adverse events was 14 in bipolar depression, but was not significantly different from placebo in MDD. For olanzapine, the mean NNTHs were 24 in bipolar depression and 9 in MDD. The risk for discontinuation due to adverse events during quetiapine-XR treatment appeared to be associated with dose. For quetiapine-XR 300 mg/d, the NNTHs for discontinuation due to adverse events were 9 for bipolar depression, 8 for refractory MDD, 9 for MDD, and 5 for GAD. At the same dose of quetiapine-XR, patients with GAD appeared to have a lower tolerability than

  4. Basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients before and after short-term treatment with either a typical or an atypical antipsychotic drug.

    PubMed

    Glenthoj, Andreas; Glenthoj, Birte Y; Mackeprang, Torben; Pagsberg, Anne K; Hemmingsen, Ralf P; Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William F C

    2007-04-15

    The present study examined basal ganglia volumes in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients before and after treatment with either a specific typical or atypical antipsychotic compound. Sixteen antipsychotic drug-naive and three minimally medicated first-episode schizophrenic patients and 19 matched controls participated. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either low doses of the typical antipsychotic drug, zuclopenthixol, or the atypical compound, risperidone. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained in patients before and after 12 weeks of exposure to medication and in controls at baseline. Caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and putamen volumes were measured. Compared with controls, absolute volumes of interest (VOIs) were smaller in patients at baseline and increased after treatment. However, with controls for age, gender and whole brain or intracranial volume, the only significant difference between patients and controls was a Hemisphere x Group interaction for the caudate nucleus at baseline, with controls having larger left than right caudate nuclei and patients having marginally larger right than left caudate volumes. Within patients, the two medication groups did not differ significantly with respect to volume changes after 3 months of low dose treatment in any of the VOIs. Nevertheless, when medication groups were examined separately, a significant volume increase in the putamen was evidenced in the risperidone group. The altered asymmetry in caudate volume in patients suggests intrinsic basal ganglia pathology in schizophrenia, most likely of neurodevelopmental origin.

  5. The atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine promote down-regulation and display functional selectivity at human 5-HT7 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Andressen, K W; Manfra, O; Brevik, C H; Ulsund, A H; Vanhoenacker, P; Levy, F O; Krobert, K A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Classically, ligands of GPCRs have been classified primarily upon their affinity and efficacy to activate a signal transduction pathway. Recent reports indicate that the efficacy of a particular ligand can vary depending on the receptor-mediated response measured (e.g. activating G proteins, other downstream responses, internalization). Previously, we reported that inverse agonists induce both homo- and heterologous desensitization, similar to agonist stimulation, at the Gs-coupled 5-HT7 receptor. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether different inverse agonists at the 5-HT7 receptor also induce internalization and/or degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Experimental Approach HEK293 cells expressing 5-HT7(a, b or d) receptors were pre-incubated with 5-HT, clozapine, olanzapine, mesulergine or SB269970 and their effects upon receptor density, AC activity, internalization, recruitment of β-arrestins and lysosomal trafficking were measured. Key Results The agonist 5-HT and three out of four inverse agonists tested increased internalization independently of β-arrestin recruitment. Among these, only the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine promoted lysosomal sorting and reduced 5-HT7 receptor density (∼60% reduction within 24 h). Inhibition of lysosomal degradation with chloroquine blocked the clozapine- and olanzapine-induced down-regulation of 5-HT7 receptors. Incubation with SB269970 decreased both 5-HT7(b) constitutive internalization and receptor density but increased 5-HT7(d) receptor density, indicating differential ligand regulation among the 5-HT7 splice variants. Conclusions and Implications Taken together, we found that various ligands differentially activate regulatory processes governing receptor internalization and degradation in addition to signal transduction. Thus, these data extend our understanding of functional selectivity at the 5-HT7 receptor. PMID:25884989

  6. National trends in off-label use of atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Minji; Moga, Daniela C.; Blumenschein, Karen; Talbert, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of the study were as follows: to examine the national trend of pediatric atypical antipsychotic (AAP) use in the United States; to identify primary mental disorders associated with AAPs; to estimate the strength of independent associations between patient/provider characteristics and AAP use. Data are from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. First, average AAP prescription rates among 4 and 18-year-old patients between 1993 and 2010 were estimated. Second, data from 2007 to 2010 were combined and analyzed to identify primary mental disorders related to AAP prescription. Third, a multivariate logistic regression model was developed having the presence of AAP prescription as the dependent variable and patient/provider characteristics as explanatory variables. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Outpatient visits including an AAP prescription among 4 to 18-year-old patients significantly increased between 1993 and 2010 in the United States, and over 65% of those visits did not have diagnoses for US Food and Drug Administration-approved AAP indications. During 2007 to 2010, the most common mental disorder was attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, accounting for 24% of total pediatric AAP visits. Among visits with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder diagnosis, those with Medicaid as payer (AOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.01–2.75), comorbid mental disorders (e.g., psychoses AOR 3.34, 95% CI 1.35–8.26), and multiple prescriptions (4 or more prescriptions AOR 4.48, 95% CI 2.08–9.64) were more likely to have an AAP prescription. The off-label use of AAPs in children and adolescents is prevalent in the United States. Our study raises questions about the potential misuse of AAPs in the population. PMID:27281081

  7. Up-regulation of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in rat brain by a putative atypical antipsychotic and sigma receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Zamanillo, D; Andreu, F; Ovalle, S; Pérez, M P; Romero, G; Farré, A J; Guitart, X

    2000-03-24

    Sigma(1) (sigma(1)) receptor mRNA expression was studied in the prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain by northern blot and in situ hybridization. The effects of a chronic treatment with antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol and clozapine), and with E-5842, a sigma(1) receptor ligand and putative atypical antipsychotic on sigma(1) receptor expression were examined. A significant increase in the levels of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and striatum after E-5842 administration was observed, while no apparent changes were seen with either haloperidol or clozapine. Our results suggest a long-term adaptation of the sigma(1) receptor at the level of mRNA expression in specific areas of the brain as a response to a sustained treatment with E-5842.

  8. Exploratory analysis of psychiatric-related utilization and costs associated with paliperidone ER compared with other oral atypical antipsychotics using pharmacy claims from an administrative database.

    PubMed

    Panish, J M; Dirani, R; Halpern, R; Cao, F

    2010-01-01

    To compare psychiatric-related healthcare resource utilization (inpatient facility admissions, emergency room visits and ambulatory visits) and costs (medical, pharmacy and total healthcare costs) in patients initiated on paliperidone extended release (ER), risperidone, aripiprazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone or quetiapine. This exploratory, retrospective administrative claims analysis database compared patients from a large US commercial health plan who were initiated on their index oral atypical antipsychotics between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2007. Cohorts were assigned by first antipsychotic claim and propensity score-matched by age, gender, US census division, race, household income, baseline antipsychotic use, co-morbid conditions and psychiatric-related utilization. Psychiatric-related healthcare resource utilization and costs were measured for 6 months post-initiation. Descriptive analyses compared paliperidone ER with the other cohorts. There were 562 patients in matched paliperidone ER (n = 95), risperidone (n = 94), aripiprazole (n = 94), olanzapine (n = 89), ziprasidone (n = 95) or quetiapine (n = 95) cohorts. The paliperidone ER cohort had fewer mean psychiatric-related ambulatory visits than the risperidone cohort (p = 0.05). The paliperidone ER cohort had significantly lower mean psychiatric-related medical costs than the olanzapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone cohorts (p < 0.05) and lower total costs than the ziprasidone and olanzapine cohorts (p = 0.02). No other outcomes were significantly different. Small sample sizes and short post-index observation times due to the launch of paliperidone ER in January 2007, coupled with the inherent lag time with medical claims data, limit the generalizability of the study findings. Patients treated with paliperidone ER may have psychiatric-related utilization costs that are comparable to those of patients who initiated treatment with other oral atypical antipsychotics.

  9. Antipsychotic medication-induced dysphoria: its meaning, association with typical vs. atypical medications and impact on adherence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanjing Emily; Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2015-06-01

    Antipsychotic medication-induced dysphoria is a relatively under-recognized and understudied effect of antipsychotic medication. Although the term is encountered in clinical practice and in the literature, there is no consensus regarding its exact meaning. This article is a narrative review of the literature on antipsychotic medication and dysphoria based on a pubmed database search. We found that antipsychotic medication-induced dysphoria is a term used to describe a negative and unpleasant affective state which seems to be more often associated with high potency first-generation antipsychotics and could potentially lead to medication non-adherence. Though it is plausible to expect antipsychotic medication-induced dysphoria to be related to extrapyramidal symptoms, most especially akathisia, the nature of the association remains unspecified. Furthermore, there is some evidence that dopamine blockade maybe involved in the pathogenesis of antipsychotic medication-induced dysphoria. However, the limited methods of the currently available studies make it impossible to conclusively address the question of which class of antipsychotic (first- or second-generation) has a higher prevalence and severity of the syndrome.

  10. Synthesis and preliminary screening of novel N-{2-[4-(substituted)piperazin-1-yl]-2-oxoethyl}acetamides as potential atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Chandra Sekhar, Kondapalli Venkata Gowri; Rao, Vajja Samabasiva; Krishna, Mutyala Murali

    2009-06-01

    A series of N-{2-[4-(substituted)piperazin-1-yl]-2-oxoethyl}acetamides were synthesized as prospective novel atypical antipsychotic agents. Microwave irradiation of acetyl glycine (I) with substituted piperazines in the presence of DCC in DMF for about 3-5 min gave the titled compounds (P:1-7). All the synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo pharmacological activity in Swiss albino mice. D(2) antagonism studies were performed using the climbing mouse assay model and 5-HT(2A) antagonism studies were performed using quipazine induced head twitches in mice. Among the synthesized compounds P4 was found to be the most active compound.

  11. A Longitudinal Study of Alterations of Hippocampal Volumes and Serum BDNF Levels in Association to Atypical Antipsychotics in a Sample of First-Episode Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Emmanouil; Papathanasiou, Matilda A.; Michalopoulou, Panagiota G.; Laskos, Efstathios; Mazioti, Aggeliki; Kastania, Anastasia; Vasilopoulou, Konstantina; Nikolaidou, Paraskevi; Margaritis, Dimitrios; Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Liappas, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus, which have been suggested to play an important role in the formation and emergence of schizophrenia syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit significant bilateral hippocampal volume reduction and progressive hippocampal volume decrease in first-episode patients with schizophrenia has been shown in many neuroimaging studies. Dysfunction of the neurotrophic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The initiation of antipsychotic medication alters the levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels. However it is unclear whether treatment with antipsychotics is associated with alterations of hippocampal volume and BDNF levels. Methods In the present longitudinal study we investigated the association between serum BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes in a sample of fourteen first-episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FEP). MRI scans, BDNF and clinical measurements were performed twice: at baseline before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment and 8 months later, while the patients were receiving monotherapy with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs). Results We found that left hippocampal volume was decreased (corrected left HV [t = 2.977, df = 13, p = .011] at follow-up; We also found that the higher the BDNF levels change the higher were the differences of corrected left hippocampus after 8 months of treatment with atypical antipsychotics (Pearson r = 0.597, p = 0.024). Conclusions The association of BDNF with hippocampal volume alterations in schizophrenia merits further investigation and replication in larger longitudinal studies. PMID:24551075

  12. Profile of atypical-antipsychotics use in patients affected by dementia in the University Hospital of Ferrara.

    PubMed

    Chiabrando, Giacomo; Bianchi, Stefano; Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Montanaro, Nicola; Scanavacca, Paola

    2010-07-01

    The use of off-label atypical antipsychotic drugs (AA) has been noted for the treatment of behavior disorders in older patients affected by Alzheimer's or by other forms of dementia, even though effectiveness data are limited and use seems to be associated with severe cerebrovascular risks. The data concerning such risks caused the Italian Ministry of Health to release a statement discouraging doctors from prescribing olanzapine and risperidone outside of the registered indications, in May 2004. This study aimed to analyze the prescriptive profile of AAs in patients with dementia, in terms of the choice of active substance and of the clinical characteristics of the patients. Patients with a diagnosis of dementia and in treatment with AA (risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine) were selected from three main Alzheimer Evaluation Centers (Geriatrics, Neurology, Internal Medicine) of the University Hospital in Ferrara, in the period 05/2003-04/2006. For each subject, the following information was collected: the frequency of prescriptions, the drug received, and the amount of AAs in the considered period. In the third year of observation, the intensity of treatment was evaluated (intense treatment: >300 tablets of any AA; weak treatment: <300 tablets of any AA or up to three packages of risperidone drops). Such data were analyzed in terms of the type of dementia, the behavioral disturbance, and the possible presence of psychomotor agitation. In addition, the adverse reactions that occurred during the treatment were gathered. Lastly, the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors among the selected subjects was described. Among the 392 subjects (63% female), Alzheimer's (49%) was the most frequent form of dementia, hallucinations were present in 50% of the cases and aggression in 53%.The statement by the Ministry of Health resulted in a foreseeable increase in the consumption of quetiapine and a parallel decrease in risperidone and olanzapine; subsequently, the distribution

  13. Antipsychotic prescribing in older people.

    PubMed

    Neil, Wendy; Curran, Stephen; Wattis, John

    2003-09-01

    Antipsychotic medications have made a significant contribution to the care of the mentally ill people over the past 50 years, with good evidence that both typical and atypical agents are effective in the treatment of schizophrenia and related conditions. In addition they are widely used to good effect in other disorders including psychotic depression, dementia and delirium. Both typical and atypical agents may cause severe side-effects and, in the elderly in particular, there is an increased propensity for drug interactions. If used with care, antipsychotics are usually well tolerated, especially the atypical drugs. Although antipsychotics are effective at reducing psychotic symptoms their limitations should be recognised. They do not 'cure' the underlying illness, and the management of psychotic and behavioural symptoms must take into consideration treatment of physical illness as well as psychosocial interventions. In addition, the antipsychotic effect may take one to two weeks to be evident so doses should not be increased too rapidly. Often small doses are effective in the elderly if they are given sufficient time to work. As our understanding of the mechanisms of psychosis improves it is hoped that new drugs will be developed with novel mechanisms of action with improved efficacy and reduced side-effects. There are several drugs in development, some sharing similarities to currently available agents whilst others have novel mechanisms of actions involving glutamate and nicotinic receptors. Pharmacogenetics is also likely to be increasingly important over the next few years. As the genetic basis of many psychiatric disorders becomes more clearly established it is likely that drugs specifically designed for particular sub-groups of receptors will be developed. Finally, although the pharmacological treatment of psychotic disorders in younger people has been given considerable attention, there is a paucity of good quality research on antipsychotic drug use in

  14. LLY-2707, a novel nonsteroidal glucocorticoid antagonist that reduces atypical antipsychotic-associated weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Dana K; Carson, Mathew W; Morin, Michelle; Shaw, Janice; Barr, Robert J; Need, Anne; Alexander-Chacko, Jesline; Coghlan, Michael; Gehlert, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    Weight gain and diabetes have been reported during treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs). Patients treated with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (GRA) and the progesterone receptor antagonist (PRA) mifepristone [estra-4,9-dien-3-one, 11-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-17-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-(11β,17β)-(9CI)] experienced significant reduction in the weight gain observed when patients were treated with olanzapine or risperidone. To understand the pharmacology responsible for this finding, we discovered LLY-2707 [N-(5-(tert-butyl)-3-(2-fluoro-5-methylpyridin-4-yl)-2-methyl-1H-indol-7-yl)methanesulfonamide], a novel and selective GRA, and evaluated its utility in preclinical models of AAPD-associated weight gain and diabetes. In vitro, LLY-2707 was a highly selective and potent GRA. GR occupancy in vivo was assessed using ex vivo binding where LLY-2707 inhibited [(3)H]dexamethasone binding to the liver. Modest but statistically significant decreases in brain ex vivo binding were observed with high doses of CORT-108297 [(R)-4α-(ethoxymethyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-6-((4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)sulfonyl)-4,4a,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-g]isoquinoline] and LLY-2707, but mifepristone inhibited at all doses. Central activity of the GRAs was confirmed by their ability to suppress amphetamine-induced increases in locomotor activity. The increases in the body weight of female rats treated with olanzapine (2 mg/kg PO) over 14 days were reduced in a dose-dependent manner by coadministration of LLY-2707. Similar decreases, although less robust, in body weight were seen with mifepristone and CORT-108297. In addition, sGRAs prevented the glucose excursion after intragastric olanzapine infusions consistent with a direct effect on the hyperglycemia observed during treatment with AAPDs. At doses effectively preventing weight gain, LLY-2707 did not substantially interfere with the dopamine D2 receptor occupancy by olanzapine. Therefore, GRA coadministration may

  15. The role of 5-HT7 receptor antagonism in the amelioration of MK-801-induced learning and memory deficits by the novel atypical antipsychotic drug lurasidone.

    PubMed

    Horisawa, Tomoko; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Toma, Satoko; Ikeda, Atsushi; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Ono, Michiko; Ishiyama, Takeo; Taiji, Mutsuo

    2013-05-01

    Lurasidone is a novel atypical antipsychotic with high affinity for dopamine D2, serotonin 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors. We previously reported that lurasidone and the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-656104-A improved learning and memory deficits induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, in the rat passive avoidance test. In this study, we first examined the role of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonistic activity of lurasidone in its pro-cognitive effect to ameliorate MK-801-induced deficits in the rat passive avoidance test. The 5-HT7 receptor agonist, AS19, (2S)-(+)-5-(1,3,5-trimethylpyrazol-4-yl)-2-(dimethylamino) tetralin, (3 mg/kg, s.c.) completely blocked the attenuating effects of lurasidone (3 mg/kg, p.o.), highlighting the importance of 5-HT7 receptor antagonism in the pro-cognitive effect of lurasidone. AS19 (3 mg/kg, s.c.) also blocked the ameliorating effect of SB-656104-A (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the same experimental paradigm. To further extend our observation, we next tested whether 5-HT7 receptor antagonism still led to the amelioration of MK-801-induced deficits when combined with D2 and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists, and found that SB-656104-A (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced deficits even in the presence of the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (1 mg/kg, s.c.). Taken together, these results suggest that the 5-HT7 receptor antagonistic activity of lurasidone plays an important role in its effectiveness against MK-801-induced deficits, and may contribute to its pharmacological actions in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Series of 2-Substituted-5-Thiopropylpiperazine (Piperidine)-1,3,4-Oxadiazoles Derivatives as Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin; Xu, Xiangqing; Liu, Xin; Yu, Minquan; Liu, Bi-Feng; Zhang, Guisen

    2012-01-01

    Background It is important to develop novel antipsychotics that can effectively treat schizophrenia with minor side-effects. The aim of our work is to develop novel antipsychotics that act on dopamine D2 and D3, serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors with low affinity for the serotonin 5-HT2C and H1 receptors, which can effectively cure positive symptoms, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment without the weight gain side-effect. Methodology/Principal Findings A series of 2-substituted-5-thiopropylpiperazine (piperidine) -1,3,4-oxadiazoles derivatives have been synthesized and the target compounds were evaluated for binding affinities to D2, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. Preliminary results indicated that compounds 14, 16 and 22 exhibited high affinities to D2, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors among these compounds. Further binding tests showed that compound 22 had high affinity for D3 receptor, and low affinity for serotonin 5-HT2C and H1 receptors. In addition, compound 22 inhibited apomorphine-induced climbing behavior and MK-801-induced hyperactivity with no extrapyramidal symptoms liability in mice. Moreover, compound 22 exhibited acceptable pharmacokinetic properties. Conclusions/Significance Compound 22 showed an atypical antipsychotic activity without liability for extrapyramidal symptoms. We anticipate compound 22 to be useful for developing a novel class of drug for the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:22558126

  17. Significant changes in antipsychotic drug use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Kate; Einarson, Adrienne; Levinson, Andrea; Gideon, Koren

    2004-02-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are less likely to cause hyperprolactinemia-related side effects, such as infertility; hence it is predicted that more women taking antipsychotic medications will be able to become pregnant as the use of atypical antipsychotics increases. To compare the use of conventional and atypical antipsychotics, we conducted a retrospective review of the Motherisk Program clinic schedule from 1989 to 2001 comparing the proportion of appointments made for conventional and atypical antipsychotics. In 1989, 2.7% of all appointments were about the use of antipsychotic medication. In 2001, 7.4% of appointments were regarding antipsychotic drug use. This 170% increase was due to an increase in appointments for atypical antipsychotics as the number of appointments for conventional antipsychotics remained relatively constant over the 12-y period. Since the introduction of atypical antipsychotics, more women requiring antipsychotic drug therapy have been planning or becoming pregnant. This increase may have substantial public health implications.

  18. Quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: the impact of socio-economic factors and adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics drugs.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; de Araújo Dantas, Diego; do Nascimento, Gemma Galgani; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Chaves, Katarina Melo; de Lima Silva, Vanessa; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2014-09-01

    This cross-sectional study compared the effects of treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs on quality of life (QoL) and side effects in 218 patients with schizophrenia attending the ambulatory services of psychiatric in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Socio-economic variables were compared. The five-dimension EuroQoL (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate QoL, and side effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale. Data were analysed using the χ (2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %. Average monthly household incomes in the medication groups were 1.1-2.1 minimum wages ($339-$678). UKU Scale scores showed significant differences in side effects, mainly, clozapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone (p < 0.05). EQ-5D scores showed that all drugs except olanzapine significantly impacted mobility (p < 0.05), and proportions of individuals reporting problems in other dimensions were high: 63.6 % of clozapine users reported mobility problems, 63.7 and 56.3 % of clozapine and ziprasidone users, respectively, had difficulties with usual activities, 68.8 and 54.5 % of ziprasidone and clozapine users, respectively, experienced pain and/or discomfort, and 72.8 % of clozapine users reported anxiety and/or depression. Psychiatric, neurological, and autonomous adverse effects, as well as other side effects, were prevalent in users of atypical antipsychotic drugs, especially clozapine and ziprasidone. Olanzapine had the least side effects. QoL was impacted by side effects and economic conditions in all groups. Thus, the effects of these antipsychotic agents appear to have been masked by aggravating social and economic situations.

  19. Preclinical characterization of the potential of the putative atypical antipsychotic MDL 100,907 as a potent 5-HT2A antagonist with a favorable CNS safety profile.

    PubMed

    Kehne, J H; Baron, B M; Carr, A A; Chaney, S F; Elands, J; Feldman, D J; Frank, R A; van Giersbergen, P L; McCloskey, T C; Johnson, M P; McCarty, D R; Poirot, M; Senyah, Y; Siegel, B W; Widmaier, C

    1996-05-01

    In preclinical studies, [R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)ethyl]-4- piperidinemethanol] [formula: see text] (MDL 100,907), a putative atypical antipsychotic, was characterized in vitro as a potent and selective ligand for the serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptor and was evaluated in vitro and in vivo as a potent 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Furthermore, MDL 100,907's potential CNS safety profile and selectivity as a potential antipsychotic agent were evaluated and compared with benchmark compounds. MDL 100,907 demonstrated low nanomolar or subnanomolar binding in vitro at the 5-HT2A receptor and showed a > 100-fold separation from all other receptors measured. MDL 100,907 had subnanomolar potency as a 5-HT2A antagonist in vitro in reversing 5-HT-stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the rat 5-HT2A receptor. In vivo, MDL 100,907 potently inhibited 5-methoxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine-induced head twitches in mice or 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced head twitches in rats. In vivo functional tests in mice revealed a > 500-fold separation between doses that produced 5-HT2A antagonism and doses that produced alpha 1-adrenergic or striatal D2 antagonism. Using inhibition of D-amphetamine-stimulated locomotion in mice as a measure of potential antipsychotic efficacy, MDL 100,907 showed a superior CNS safety index relative to the reference compounds, haloperidol, clozapine, risperidone, ritanserin, and amperozide, in each of five tests for side effect potential, including measures of ataxia, general depressant effects, alpha 1-adrenergic antagonism, striatal D2 receptor antagonism, and muscle relaxation. MDL 100,907 did not antagonize apomorphine-induced stereotypes in rats, suggesting that it potentially lacks extrapyramidal side effect liability. MDL 100,907 showed selectivity as a potential antipsychotic in that it lacked consistent activity in selected rodent models of anticonvulsant, antidepressant, analgesic, or anxiolytic

  20. Impact of atypical long-acting injectable versus oral antipsychotics on rehospitalization rates and emergency room visits among relapsed schizophrenia patients: a retrospective database analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among schizophrenia patients relapsed on an oral antipsychotic (AP), this study compared the impact of switching to atypical AP long-acting injectable therapy (LAT) versus continuing oral APs on hospitalization and emergency room (ER) visit recurrence. Methods Electronic records from the Premier Hospital Database (2006-2010) were analyzed. Adult patients receiving oral APs during a schizophrenia-related hospitalization were identified and, upon relapse (i.e., rehospitalization for schizophrenia), were stratified into (a) patients switching to atypical LAT and (b) patients continuing with oral APs. Atypical LAT relapse patients were matched 1:3 with oral AP relapse patients, using a propensity score model. Andersen-Gill Cox proportional hazards models assessed the impact of atypical LAT versus oral AP on time to multiple recurrences of all-cause hospitalizations and ER visits. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. Results Atypical LAT (N = 1032) and oral AP (N = 2796) patients were matched and well-balanced with respect to demographic (mean age: 42.1 vs 42.4 years, p = .5622; gender: 43.6% vs 44.6% female, p = .5345), clinical, and hospital characteristics. Over a mean 30-month follow-up period, atypical LATs were associated with significantly lower mean number of rehospitalizations (1.25 vs 1.61, p < .0001) and ER visits (2.33 vs 2.67, p = .0158) compared with oral APs, as well as fewer days in hospital (mean days: 13.46 vs. 15.69, p = .0081). Rehospitalization (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.87, p < .0001) and ER visit (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.87–0.93, p < .0001) rates were significantly lower for patients receiving atypical LAT versus oral APs. Conclusions This hospital database analysis found that in relapsed schizophrenia patients, atypical LATs were associated with lower rehospitalization and ER visit rates than oral APs. PMID:24016390

  1. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of novel N-(trans-4-(2-(4-(benzo[d]isothiazol-3-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)cyclohexyl)amides as potential multireceptor atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wen; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Fu, Lei; Li, Jian-Qi

    2016-11-10

    A series of novel benzisothiazolylpiperazine derivatives combining potent dopamine D2 and D3, and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor properties were synthesized and evaluated for their potential antipsychotic properties. The most-promising derivative was 9j. The unique pharmacological features of 9j were a high affinity for D2, D3, 5-HT1A, and 5-HT2A receptors, together with a 20-fold selectivity for the D3 versus D2 subtype, and a low affinity for muscarinic M1 (reducing the risk of anticholinergic side effects), and for hERG channels (reducing incidence of QT interval prolongation). In animal behavioral models, 9j inhibited the locomotor-stimulating effects of phencyclidine, blocked conditioned avoidance response, and improved the cognitive deficit in the novel object recognition tests in rats. 9j exhibited a low potential for catalepsy, consistent with results with risperidone. In addition, favorable brain penetration of 9j in rats was detected. These studies have demonstrated that 9j is a potential atypical antipsychotic candidate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis and preliminary pharmacological evaluation of N-2-(4-(4-(2-substitutedthiazol-4-yl) piperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl)acetamides as novel atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, K V G Chandra; Rao, V S; Vyas, D Ravi Kumar; Kumar, M Murali Krishna

    2008-12-01

    A series of N-2-(4-(4-(2-substitutedthiazol-4-yl) piperazin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl)acetamides were synthesized in an effort to prepare novel atypical antipsychotic agents. The compounds were synthesized by either microwave irradiation technique or by conventional synthesis and were characterized by spectral data (IR, (1)H NMR, and MS) and the purity was ascertained by microanalysis. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo pharmacological activity in Swiss albino mice. D(2) antagonism studies were performed using climbing mouse assay model and 5-HT(2A) antagonism studies were performed using quipazine induced head twitches in mice. It was observed that none of the new chemical entities exhibited catalepsy. AG 3 was found to be the most active compound.

  3. Acute administration of typical and atypical antipsychotics reduces EEG gamma power, but only the preclinical compound LY379268 reduces the ketamine-induced rise in gamma power

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nigel C.; Reddy, Maya; Anderson, Paul; Salzberg, Michael; O'Brien, Terence J.; Pinault, Didier

    2011-01-01

    A single non-anaesthetic dose of ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor (NMDAr) antagonist with hallucinogenic properties, induces cognitive impairment and psychosis, and aggravates schizophrenia symptoms in patients. In conscious rats an equivalent dose of ketamine induces key features of animal models of acute psychosis, including abnormal behaviour, hyperlocomotion, deficits in prepulse inhibition to an acoustic startle response and gating of auditory evoked potentials, and concomitantly increases the power of spontaneously occurring gamma oscillations in the neocortex. This study investigated whether NMDAr antagonist-induced aberrant gamma oscillations could be modulated by acute treatment with typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Adult male Wistar rats that has been implanted with extradural electrodes were placed in an arena for 30 minutes (baseline) and then subcutaneously administered either clozapine (1–5mg/kg, n=7), haloperidol (0.05 – 0.25mg/kg; n=8), LY379268 (a preclinical agonist at mGluR2/3 receptors: 0.3 – 3mg/kg; n=5) or their vehicles alone, and 30 minutes later received ketamine (5mg/kg sc). Quantitative measures of EEG gamma power and locomotor activity were assessed throughout the experiment. All three drugs significantly reduced the power of baseline EEG gamma oscillations by 30–50%, an effect most prominent after LY379268, and all inhibited ketamine-induced hyperlocomotor activity. However, only pretreatment with LY379268 attenuated trough-to-peak ketamine-induced gamma hyperactivity. These results demonstrate that typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs acutely reduce cortical gamma oscillations, an effect that may be related to their clinical efficacy. PMID:21733235

  4. A cost-effectiveness analysis of off-label atypical antipsychotic treatment in children and adolescents with ADHD who have failed stimulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Minji; Talbert, Jeffery; Moga, Daniela C; Blumenschein, Karen

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to estimate the expected health outcomes of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and other non-stimulant attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications and (2) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of AAPs compared to other non-stimulant ADHD medications. We used decision analysis to compare three alternatives for treating children and adolescents with ADHD who failed initial stimulant treatment: (1) AAPs, (2) a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (atomoxetine), and (3) selective α2-adrenergic agonists (clonidine and guanfacine). Probability estimates and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) weights were derived from a literature review. Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the expected health outcomes derived from the decision analysis and expected costs from the literature. The study was conducted from the third-party payer perspective, and the study period was 1 year. One-way deterministic sensitivity analysis and a Monte Carlo simulation were performed. Over the course of 1 year of ADHD pharmacotherapy, the highest QALY was for clonidine/guanfacine (expected QALY = 0.95) followed by atomoxetine (expected QALY = 0.94). Atypical antipsychotics yielded the lowest health outcome with an expected QALY of 0.84. In the cost-effectiveness analysis, the AAP strategy was dominated as it was less effective and more costly than other two strategies. Compared to clonidine/guanfacine, AAPs provided lower QALYs (0.11 QALY lost) at an additional cost of $2186 on average. Compared to atomoxetine, AAPs resulted in 0.10 QALYs lost at an additional cost of $2186. In this decision analysis model, AAPs provide lower expected health outcomes than other ADHD medications in children and adolescents who failed prior stimulant therapy. Furthermore, AAPs were not a cost-effective option.

  5. The metabolites N-desmethylclozapine and N-desmethylolanzapine produce cross-tolerance to the discriminative stimulus of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M; Webster, Kevin A; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Porter, Joseph H

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously shown that cross-tolerance to the discriminative stimulus properties of clozapine can be demonstrated with the drug discrimination paradigm. This study examined the ability of N-desmethylclozapine and N-desmethylolanzapine (metabolites of the atypical antipsychotic drugs clozapine and olanzapine, respectively) to induce cross-tolerance to the discriminative stimulus effects of clozapine. After C57BL/6 mice were trained to reliably discriminate 2.5 mg/kg clozapine from vehicle, a clozapine generalization curve was generated. Next, training was suspended and the mice received a maintenance dosing regimen in which they were injected twice daily with 10 mg/kg N-desmethylclozapine for 10 days. Then a second clozapine generalization curve was generated. This was followed by a 10-day washout period during which the mice did not receive drug injections or discrimination training. Finally, a third clozapine generalization curve was generated. These same procedures were followed for N-desmethylolanzapine (10 mg/kg twice daily during maintenance dosing). Both N-desmethylclozapine and N-desmethylolanzapine produced significant rightward shifts in the clozapine generalization curve indicating cross-tolerance between N-desmethylclozapine and clozapine and between N-desmethylolanzapine and clozapine. After a washout period with no training or drug administration this cross-tolerance effect was lost for both metabolites. This cross-tolerance drug discrimination procedure demonstrated in-vivo similarities between these two metabolites and clozapine and suggests that common underlying pharmacological mechanisms were responsible for the cross-tolerance that was observed. These findings also demonstrated that this procedure may be useful for identifying drugs with therapeutic efficacy similar to the atypical antipsychotic clozapine under repeated dosing conditions.

  6. Atypical antipsychotic clozapine reversed deficit on prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex produced by microinjection of DOI into the inferior colliculus in rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodolpho Pereira; Nagaishi, Karen Yuriko; Barbosa Silva, Regina Cláudia

    2017-05-15

    Dysfunctions of the serotonergic system have been suggested to be important in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit deficits in an operational measure of sensorimotor gating: prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. PPI is the normal reduction in the startle response caused by a low intensity non-startling stimulus (prepulse) which is presented shortly before the startle stimulus (pulse). The hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), a 5-hydroxytryptamine(HT)2 receptor agonist disrupted PPI in rats. The inferior colliculus (IC) is a critical nucleus of the auditory pathway mediating acoustic PPI. The activation of the IC by the acoustic prepulse reduces startle magnitude. The present study investigated the role of serotonergic transmission in the IC on the expression of acoustic PPI. For that we investigated whether 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade would affect this response. Unilateral microinjection of DOI (10μg/0.3μl) into the IC disrupted PPI, while microinjection of the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin (4μg/0.3μl), into this structure did not alter PPI. We also examined the ability of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (5.0mg/kg; I.P.) to reverse the disruption of PPI produced by unilateral microinjections of DOI into the IC of rats. Pretreatment with clozapine blocked DOI-induced disruption of PPI. Altogether, these results suggest that serotonin-mediated mechanisms of the IC are involved in the expression of PPI in rodents and that this response is sensitive to atypical antipsychotic clozapine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Informed Consent and the Approval by Ethics Committees of Studies Involving the Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in the Management of Delirium].

    PubMed

    Millán-González, Ricardo

    2012-03-01

    Delirium is an acute alteration of consciousness and cognition. Atypical antipsychotics (AA) have recently become a main part of its treatment. Studies in this population generate a series of ethical dilemmas concerning the voluntary participation of patients and their state of vulnerability since their mental faculties are, by definition, compromised. To assess whether studies with AA for the treatment of delirium obtained an approval by an ethics committee on human research (ECHR), if an informed consent (IC) was obtained, whether the IC was verbal or written, and who gave the approval to participate. Systematic review of Medline for studies of delirium where quetiapine and olanzapine were the main treatment, assessing the existence of an ECHR approval and implementation of an IC. 11 studies were identified (6 of quetiapine and 5 of olanzapine). 5 had an ECHR approval. Most studies examining the treatment of delirium with quetiapine or olanzapine were not subject to approval by an ECHR and most of them did not obtain an IC from the patient's legal guardian. It is essential that future studies of antipsychotics and other drugs for the treatment of delirium have the protocol approved by an ECHR and a written IC signed by the patient's legal representative, since by definition delirium is a condition that compromises superior mental processes. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. The atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, potentiates ghrelin-induced receptor signaling: An in vitro study with cells expressing cloned human growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keita; Kashiwase, Yohei; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Nishimura, Hitomi; Miyano, Kanako; Suzuki, Masami; Shiraishi, Seiji; Matoba, Motohiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) belongs to Gαq-coupled G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates growth hormone release, food intake, appetite, glucose metabolism and body composition. Ghrelin has been identified as an endogenous ligand for GHS-R, and it is the only orexigenic peptide found in the peripheral organs. Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent that binds to and inhibits the activation of GPCR for several neurotransmitters, has metabolic side effects such as excessive appetite and weight gain. Recently, studies have revealed that the orexigenic mechanism of olanzapine is mediated via GHS-R signaling, although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the effect of olanzapine on ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling by using an electrical impedance-based receptor biosensor assay system (CellKey™). Olanzapine at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L enhanced ghrelin-induced (10(-10)-10(-8)mol/L) GHS-R activation. A Ca(2+) imaging assay revealed that olanzapine (10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L) enhanced ghrelin (10(-7) M)-induced GHS-R activity. In contrast, haloperidol (an antipsychotic agent) failed to enhance this ghrelin-mediated GHS-R activation, as demonstrated by both the CellKey™ and Ca(2+) imaging assays. Together, these results suggest that olanzapine, but not haloperidol, promotes appetite by enhancing ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling.

  9. Atypical form of melorheostosis improved by pamidronate.

    PubMed

    Saadallaoui Ben Hamida, Kaouther; Ksontini, Imen; Rahali, Hajer; Mourali, Slim; Fejraoui, Nadia; Bouhaouala, Habib; Charfi, M Ridha; Dougui, M Hedi

    2009-03-01

    Melorheostosis is a rare chronic bone disease of unknown etiology that often affects a single limb. Report a new case of melorheostosis of the ribs improved by pamidronate infusions A 36-year-old man without any medical history was admitted for a history of one month painful tumefaction on the 7th left rib. The diagnosis of melorheostosis of the rib and the tibia was made. Patient was treated by pamidronate infusions with useful and satisfactory outcome.

  10. Monitoring unwanted effects of antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are licensed as treatment for schizophrenia and other mental health disorders but can cause a range of unwanted effects that require close monitoring by, and close collaboration between, healthcare professionals across a range of settings. This applies to both first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs; sometimes known as conventional and atypical antipsychotics, respectively). Here we discuss monitoring for unwanted effects of antipsychotics in adults, with a particular focus on SGAs.

  11. Predictors of concomitant use of antipsychotics and stimulants and its impact on stimulant persistence in pediatric attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Bali, Vishal; Kamble, Pravin Shivaji; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2015-06-01

    concomitant use of LAS and atypical antipsychotic agents. Bivariate analyses revealed that concomitant users had longer persistence (by 71 days) than the stimulant-alone users. Cox proportional hazards regression revealed that concomitant atypical antipsychotic was associated with improvement in LAS persistence by 15% (HR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.76-0.94) in comparison with the LAS recipients who did not use atypical antipsychotic concomitantly. Other factors such as age, region, season, coexisting mental health conditions, use of comedications, and general mental health status influenced the LAS treatment persistence among children and adolescents. Various predisposing, enabling, and need factors were associated with the concomitant stimulant and atypical antipsychotic use. Concomitant use of atypical antipsychotics was associated with improved LAS treatment persistence in children and adolescents with ADHD.

  12. Strategies for dosing and switching antipsychotics for optimal clinical management.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Peter F; Correll, Christoph U

    2008-01-01

    Optimal clinical management of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder can be achieved through careful antipsychotic dosing and, if necessary, switching to another well-chosen antipsychotic using suitable switching strategies. For severely ill patients treated in clinical practice, adequate dosing may not result from following the relatively low dosing levels and abrupt titration schedules typically used in clinical registration trials. Data from recent effectiveness trials, naturalistic studies, and the Roadmap Expert Consensus Survey provide evidence of specific dose levels and titration schedules for antipsychotic agents that may be appropriate in clinical practice. Discontinuation and frequent switching of medication are common among patients treated with antipsychotics, but data suggest that an adequate trial of the first antipsychotic medication should be undertaken before switching to another antipsychotic medication. Making a decision to switch from a typical to an atypical antipsychotic or between atypical antipsychotics should involve consideration of variables relating to the patient, illness, medication, and the patient's environment. Switching can improve efficacy and tolerability but may also result in predictable side effects or withdrawal symptoms, including weight gain and metabolic effects as well as effects associated with prolactin changes. Many side effects that occur during switching are attributable to receptor profiles and antimuscarinic or antihistaminic blockade. Individualized switching strategies that include careful choice of medication, dose, and titration and tapering schedules; management of symptoms; and patient psychoeducation can reduce or treat side effects, increasing the likelihood of a successful switch and greater adherence and efficacy.

  13. Improving metabolic parameters of antipsychotic child treatment (IMPACT) study: rationale, design, and methods.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gloria M; Keeton, Courtney; Correll, Christoph U; Johnson, Jacqueline L; Hamer, Robert M; Sikich, Linmarie; Hazzard, Lindsey; Alderman, Cheryl; Scheer, Abigail; Mabe, Micah; Kapoor, Sandeep; Sheridan, Eva; Borner, Irmgard; Bussell, Kristin; Pirmohamed, Sara; Bethea, Terrence C; Chekuri, Raja; Gottfried, Rhoda; Reinblatt, Shauna P; Santana, Erin; Riddle, Mark A

    2013-08-15

    Youth with serious mental illness may experience improved psychiatric stability with second generation antipsychotic (SGA) medication treatment, but unfortunately may also experience unhealthy weight gain adverse events. Research on weight loss strategies for youth who require ongoing antipsychotic treatment is quite limited. The purpose of this paper is to present the design, methods, and rationale of the Improving Metabolic Parameters in Antipsychotic Child Treatment (IMPACT) study, a federally funded, randomized trial comparing two pharmacologic strategies against a control condition to manage SGA-related weight gain. The design and methodology considerations of the IMPACT trial are described and embedded in a description of health risks associated with antipsychotic-related weight gain and the limitations of currently available research. The IMPACT study is a 4-site, six month, randomized, open-label, clinical trial of overweight/obese youth ages 8-19 years with pediatric schizophrenia-spectrum and bipolar-spectrum disorders, psychotic or non-psychotic major depressive disorder, or irritability associated with autistic disorder. Youth who have experienced clinically significant weight gain during antipsychotic treatment in the past 3 years are randomized to either (1) switch antipsychotic plus healthy lifestyle education (HLE); (2) add metformin plus HLE; or (3) HLE with no medication change. The primary aim is to compare weight change (body mass index z-scores) for each pharmacologic intervention with the control condition. Key secondary assessments include percentage body fat, insulin resistance, lipid profile, psychiatric symptom stability (monitored independently by the pharmacotherapist and a blinded evaluator), and all-cause and specific cause discontinuation. This study is ongoing, and the targeted sample size is 132 youth. Antipsychotic-related weight gain is an important public health issue for youth requiring ongoing antipsychotic treatment to

  14. Improving metabolic parameters of antipsychotic child treatment (IMPACT) study: rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Youth with serious mental illness may experience improved psychiatric stability with second generation antipsychotic (SGA) medication treatment, but unfortunately may also experience unhealthy weight gain adverse events. Research on weight loss strategies for youth who require ongoing antipsychotic treatment is quite limited. The purpose of this paper is to present the design, methods, and rationale of the Improving Metabolic Parameters in Antipsychotic Child Treatment (IMPACT) study, a federally funded, randomized trial comparing two pharmacologic strategies against a control condition to manage SGA-related weight gain. Methods The design and methodology considerations of the IMPACT trial are described and embedded in a description of health risks associated with antipsychotic-related weight gain and the limitations of currently available research. Results The IMPACT study is a 4-site, six month, randomized, open-label, clinical trial of overweight/obese youth ages 8–19 years with pediatric schizophrenia-spectrum and bipolar-spectrum disorders, psychotic or non-psychotic major depressive disorder, or irritability associated with autistic disorder. Youth who have experienced clinically significant weight gain during antipsychotic treatment in the past 3 years are randomized to either (1) switch antipsychotic plus healthy lifestyle education (HLE); (2) add metformin plus HLE; or (3) HLE with no medication change. The primary aim is to compare weight change (body mass index z-scores) for each pharmacologic intervention with the control condition. Key secondary assessments include percentage body fat, insulin resistance, lipid profile, psychiatric symptom stability (monitored independently by the pharmacotherapist and a blinded evaluator), and all-cause and specific cause discontinuation. This study is ongoing, and the targeted sample size is 132 youth. Conclusion Antipsychotic-related weight gain is an important public health issue for youth requiring

  15. The effectiveness of guideline implementation strategies on improving antipsychotic medication management for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Richard R; Hudson, Teresa; Thrush, Carol; Thapa, Purushottam; Armitage, Tracey; Landes, Reid D

    2008-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a conceptually-based, multicomponent "enhanced" strategy with a "basic" strategy for implementing antipsychotic management recommendations of VA schizophrenia guidelines. Two VA medical centers in each of 3 Veterans Integrated Service Networks were randomized to either a basic educational implementation strategy or the enhanced strategy, in which a trained nurse promoted provider guideline adherence and patient compliance. Patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia were enrolled and assessed at baseline and 6 months and their medical records were abstracted; 291 participants were included in analyses. Logistic regression models were developed for rates of: (1) switching patients from first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) to second-generation antipsychotics (SGA), and (2) guideline-concordant antipsychotic dose. Of participants prescribed FGAs at baseline, those at enhanced sites were significantly more likely than participants at basic sites to have an SGA added to the FGA during the study (29% vs. 8%; adjusted OR = 7.7; 95% CI: 2.0-30.1), but were not significantly more likely to be switched to monotherapy with an SGA (29% vs. 23%). Guideline-concordant antipsychotic dosing was not significantly affected by the intervention. The enhanced guideline implementation strategy increased addition of SGAs to FGA therapy, but did not significantly increase guideline-recommended switching from FGA to SGA monotherapy. Antipsychotic dosing was not significantly altered. The study illustrates the challenges of changing clinical behavior. Strategies to improve medication management for schizophrenia are needed, and must incorporate recommendations likely to emerge from recent research suggesting comparable effectiveness of SGAs and FGAs.

  16. Cost-effectiveness simulation analysis of schizophrenia at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: Assessment of typical and atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Mould-Quevedo, Joaquín; Contreras-Hernández, Iris; Verduzco, Wáscar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan

    2009-07-01

    Estimation of the economic costs of schizophrenia is a fundamental tool for a better understanding of the magnitude of this health problem. The aim of this study was to estimate the costs and effectiveness of five antipsychotic treatments (ziprasidone, olanzapine, risperidone, haloperidol and clozapine), which are included in the national formulary at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, through a simulation model. Type of economic evaluation: complete economic evaluation of cost-effectiveness. direct medical costs. 1 year. Effectiveness measure: number of months free of psychotic symptoms. to estimate cost-effectiveness, a Markov model was constructed and a Monte Carlo simulation was carried out. Effectiveness: the results of the Markov model showed that the antipsychotic with the highest number months free of psychotic symptoms was ziprasidone (mean 9.2 months). The median annual costs for patients using ziprasidone included in the hypothetical cohort was 194,766.6 Mexican pesos (MXP) (95% CI, 26,515.6-363,017.6 MXP), with an exchange rate of 1 € = 17.36 MXP. The highest costs in the probabilistic analysis were estimated for clozapine treatment (260,236.9 MXP). Through a probabilistic analysis, ziprasidone showed the lowest costs and the highest number of months free of psychotic symptoms and was also the most costeffective antipsychotic observed in acceptability curves and net monetary benefits. Copyright © 2009 Sociedad Española de Psiquiatría and Sociedad Española de Psiquiatría Biológica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Healthcare utilization and costs of Veterans Health Administration patients with schizophrenia treated with paliperidone palmitate long-acting injection or oral atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Baser, Onur; Xie, Lin; Pesa, Jacqueline; Durkin, Mike

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to compare real world healthcare costs and resource utilization between patients with schizophrenia treated with paliperidone palmitate long-acting injection (PP) and oral atypical antipsychotics (OAT). Patients (18-64 years) were selected from the Veterans Health Administration dataset (1 July 2007-31 May 2012). Patients with 2+ claims for PP or 2+ claims for the same OAT comprised the two study cohorts with the first prescription date designated as the index date. Participation in the VA healthcare system for 24 months pre- and 12 months post-index, schizophrenia diagnosis (International Classification of Disease 9th Revision Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 295.1x-6x, 295.8x-9x) and ≥1 claim for an antipsychotic medication during the baseline period were required. Propensity scores and Mahalanobis metric distances with calipers were used to create two matched cohorts. All-cause healthcare utilization and costs for the 12-month follow-up period were compared between matched cohorts. The matching process produced two cohorts of 335 patients with similar baseline characteristics. During the 12-month follow-up period, patients in the PP cohort had lower mean inpatient costs (18,560 vs $31,505, p = 0.002), lower frequency of hospitalization (34% vs 53%, p < 0.001) and fewer average inpatient days (13.24 vs 24.18, p = 0.002) vs matched OAT patients. While mean pharmacy costs were higher for the PP cohort ($10,063 vs $4167, p < 0.001), mean total healthcare costs were not significantly different ($45,529 vs $52,569, p = 0.128). VA patients, diagnosed with schizophrenia and treated with PP, had lower inpatient costs and admission rates compared to a matched cohort of OAT patients. Total healthcare costs were not significantly different.

  18. Downregulation of 5-HT7 Serotonin Receptors by the Atypical Antipsychotics Clozapine and Olanzapine. Role of Motifs in the C-Terminal Domain and Interaction with GASP-1.

    PubMed

    Manfra, Ornella; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Skieterska, Kamila; Frimurer, Thomas; Schwartz, Thue W; Levy, Finn Olav; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel

    2015-07-15

    The human 5-HT7 serotonin receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), activates adenylyl cyclase constitutively and upon agonist activation. Biased ligands differentially activate 5-HT7 serotonin receptor desensitization, internalization and degradation in addition to G protein activation. We have previously found that the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine inhibited G protein activation and, surprisingly, induced both internalization and lysosomal degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Here, we aimed to determine the mechanism of clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. In the C-terminus of the 5-HT7 receptor, we identified two YXXΦ motifs, LR residues, and a palmitoylated cysteine anchor as potential sites involved in receptor trafficking to lysosomes followed by receptor degradation. Mutating either of these sites inhibited clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5-HT7 receptors and also interfered with G protein activation. In addition, we tested whether receptor degradation was mediated by the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We show that GASP-1 binds the 5-HT7 receptor and regulates the clozapine-mediated degradation. Mutations of the identified motifs and residues, located in or close to Helix-VIII of the 5-HT7 receptor, modified antipsychotic-stimulated binding of proteins (such as GASP-1), possibly by altering the flexibility of Helix-VIII, and also interfered with G protein activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that binding of clozapine or olanzapine to the 5-HT7 receptor leads to antagonist-mediated lysosomal degradation by exposing key residues in the C-terminal tail that interact with GASP-1.

  19. Discovery of a new class of potential multifunctional atypical antipsychotic agents targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors: design, synthesis, and effects on behavior.

    PubMed

    Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Campiani, Giuseppe; Franceschini, Silvia; Trotta, Francesco; Borriello, Marianna; Ceres, Nicoletta; Ros, Sindu; Coccone, Salvatore Sanna; Bernetti, Matteo; De Angelis, Meri; Brindisi, Margherita; Nacci, Vito; Fiorini, Isabella; Novellino, Ettore; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mennini, Tiziana; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Scheel-Kruger, Jorgen; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Fattorusso, Caterina

    2009-01-08

    Dopamine D(3) antagonism combined with serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor occupancy may represent a novel paradigm for developing innovative antipsychotics. The unique pharmacological features of 5i are a high affinity for dopamine D(3), serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, together with a low affinity for dopamine D(2) receptors (to minimize extrapyramidal side effects), serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptors (to reduce the risk of obesity under chronic treatment), and for hERG channels (to reduce incidence of torsade des pointes). Pharmacological and biochemical data, including specific c-fos expression in mesocorticolimbic areas, confirmed an atypical antipsychotic profile of 5i in vivo, characterized by the absence of catalepsy at antipsychotic dose.

  20. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in elderly demented subjects: is the long lasting use of atypical antipsychotic drugs useful and safe?

    PubMed

    Angelini, A; Bendini, C; Neviani, F; Neri, M

    2007-01-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotics (AA) is suggested in the treatment of BPSD, although controversial data are available on their safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of AA and whether this therapy could modify cognitive and functional domains in parallel with BPSD modifications. Out of 1,100 patients followed by the psychogeriatric ambulatory of our hospital, 69 patients (6.2%) were in therapy with AA and only 32 of them fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this study. Namely, the availability was required of a complete geriatric assessment, including the evaluation of cognitive (mini mental state examination=MMSE), emotional (the Italian "scala di valutazione del benessere emotivo nell'anziano"=SVEBA), functional (basic and instrumental activities of daily living=ADL and IADL), as well as behavioral (neuropsychological inventory=NPI) status, at the beginning (T(0)) and after a 6 month therapy (T(1)). The AA prescribed were risperidone (42.8%), olanzapine (31.3%), quetiapine (25.9%). The mean age was 80.1 years; 34.4% male; 65.6% female. Educational level was elementary in 90.6% of cases. Only 21.9% were institutionalized. 15.6% had 1 cardiovascular risk factor (CVRF), 50% more than 1, and the remaining with no CVRF. More than the half of them were diagnosed with degenerative dementia (D) (40.6% Alzheimer D=AD; 15.6% fronto-temporal dementia (FTD); 34.4% with vascular dementia (VD) (9.4%) or combined D (25%); 3,1 % with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), classified as F06.7 by the ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases) and 6.2% with psychiatric disturbances. The most common BPSD were hallucinations, delusions, agitation, verbal and physical aggression. A paired t-test was applied to analyze data. There was a significant improvement with all 3 AA on NPI (mean NPI T(0)=27.50 vs. T(1)=12.13; t=7.49). An improvement was also observed on SVEBA (t=1.97), close to significance. Most people did not have any adverse

  1. Improving blood and ECG monitoring among patients prescribed regular antipsychotic medications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims and methods It is now well established that antipsychotic medications are associated with adverse effects such as metabolic dysfunction, hyperprolactinaemia and cardiac arrhythmias. We completed an audit cycle between 2008 and 2010 to assess whether the implementation of a high-visibility prompt and an educational programme would improve monitoring rates among patients prescribed regular antipsychotics admitted to a 59-bedded psychiatric hospital in West Sussex. Results There was an improvement in monitoring rates for most audit standards. The greatest improvement was seen in measurement of random plasma glucose and cholesterol levels. Rates improved irrespective of the risk of metabolic dysfunction. However, prolactin measurement remained static and the ECG recording deteriorated. Clinical implications There appears to be a growing awareness of the need to screen for metabolic dysfunction among patients prescribed regular antipsychotic medication. A high-visibility prompt and educational programme helps to increase monitoring rates. However, more needs to be done to improve the mortality and morbidity rates among this patient subpopulation. PMID:24381652

  2. Gene-gene interactions of the INSIG1 and INSIG2 in metabolic syndrome in schizophrenic patients treated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Liou, Y-J; Bai, Y M; Lin, E; Chen, J-Y; Chen, T-T; Hong, C-J; Tsai, S-J

    2012-02-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) is associated with increasing the risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Two insulin-induced gene (INSIG) isoforms, designated INSIG-1 and INSIG-2 encode two proteins that mediate feedback control of lipid metabolism. In this genetic case-control study, we investigated whether the common variants in INSIG1 and INSIG2 genes were associated with MetS in schizophrenic patients treated with atypical antipsychctics. The study included 456 schizophrenia patients treated with clozapine (n=171), olanzapine (n=91) and risperidone (n=194), for an average of 45.5±27.6 months. The prevalence of MetS among all subjects was 22.8% (104/456). Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the INSIG1 gene and seven SNPs of the INSIG2 gene were chosen as haplotype-tagging SNPs. In single-marker-based analysis, the INSIG2 rs11123469-C homozygous genotype was found to be more frequent in the patients with MetS than those without MetS (P=0.001). In addition, haplotype analysis showed that the C-C-C haplotype of rs11123469-rs10185316- rs1559509 of the INSIG2 gene significantly increased the risk of MetS (P=0.0023). No significant associations were found between polymorphisms of INSIG1 gene and MetS, however, INSIG1 and INSIG2 interactions were found in the significant 3-locus and 4-locus gene-gene interaction models (P=0.003 and 0.012, respectively). The results suggest that the INSIG2 gene may be associated with MetS in patients treated with AAPs independently or in an interactive manner with INSIG1.

  3. Treatment Patterns, Health Care Resource Utilization, and Spending in Medicaid Beneficiaries Initiating Second-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Agents Versus Oral Atypical Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Dominic; Tandon, Neeta; Lafeuille, Marie-Hélène; Kamstra, Rhiannon; Emond, Bruno; Lefebvre, Patrick; Joshi, Kruti

    2017-09-14

    Second-generation long-acting injectable therapies (SGA-LAIs) may reduce health care resource utilization (HRU) and health care costs compared with daily oral atypical antipsychotics (OAAs) in patients with schizophrenia due to reduced dosing frequency, delivery/monitoring by a health care provider, and improved adherence. The aim of the present study was to compare treatment patterns, HRU, and Medicaid spending in patients with schizophrenia initiated on SGA-LAIs (overall and according to agent) versus OAAs. Medicaid claims data (2010-2015) from 6 states were used to identify adult schizophrenia patients initiated on SGA-LAIs or OAAs. Treatment patterns (proportion of days covered [PDC] ≥80% and persistence [no gap ≥30, 60, or 90 days] to index treatment), HRU, and costs were evaluated over 12 months and compared by using multivariable logistic, Poisson, and ordinary least squares regression models, respectively. P values for HRU and cost outcomes were obtained from a nonparametric bootstrap procedure. Costs (2015 US dollars) reflect the Medicaid payer's perspective before any rebate. Overall, 3307 and 21,355 patients initiated SGA-LAIs and OAAs, respectively (paliperidone palmitate LAI [PP-LAI; n = 2182], risperidone LAI [n = 968], aripiprazole LAI [n = 108], and olanzapine LAI [n = 49]). During follow-up and compared with OAA patients, SGA-LAI patients were more likely to reach PDC ≥80% (odds ratio [OR], 1.28; P < 0.001) and be persistent (eg, no gap ≥60 days; OR, 1.45; P < 0.001) to the index treatment. Relative to OAA patients, SGA-LAI patients had fewer long-term care days (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.75; P < 0.001) and home care visits (IRR, 0.75; P < 0.001) but more mental health institute (IRR, 1.16; P < 0.001) and 1-day mental health institute (IRR, 1.16; P < 0.001) admissions. Moreover, PP-LAI patients had fewer inpatient days (IRR, 0.78; P = 0.004) versus OAA patients. SGA-LAI patients had lower medical costs (mean monthly cost difference

  4. Antipsychotic adjunctive therapy to mood stabilizers and 1-year rehospitalization rates in bipolar disorder: A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Eldar; Krivoy, Amir; Schaffer, Ayal; Weizman, Abraham; Valevski, Avi

    2016-12-01

    Antipsychotic adjunctive therapy to mood stabilizers (MSs) may improve relapse prevention; however, only a few naturalistic studies, reflecting more generalizable bipolar disorder (BD) samples, support this notion. We compared the 1-year rehospitalization rates of manic patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who were discharged with MS (lithium or valproate) monotherapy or with adjunctive atypical or typical antipsychotic therapy. A total of 201 patients with BD-I who were hospitalized with manic episodes between 2005 and 2013 were retrospectively followed for 1-year rehospitalization rates according to treatment at discharge: MS monotherapy, MS with atypical antipsychotics, and MS with typical antipsychotics. Additionally, time to rehospitalization during the 1-year period after discharge was compared between treatment groups. Multivariable survival analyses adjusted for covariates known to influence rehospitalization were conducted. Rehospitalization rates within 1 year were significantly lower in the MS with atypical antipsychotics group (6.3%) compared to the MS monotherapy group (24.3%, P=.008) and to the MS with typical antipsychotics group (20.6%, P=.02). Time to rehospitalization was significantly longer for the MS with atypical antipsychotics group (345.5 days) compared to the MS monotherapy group (315.1 days, P=.006) and to the MS with typical antipsychotics group (334.1 days, P=.02). The MS with atypical antipsychotics group had a significantly reduced adjusted risk of rehospitalization (hazard ratio=0.17, 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.61, P=.007) compared to the MS monotherapy group. Atypical antipsychotic adjunctive therapy to MSs may be more effective than MS monotherapy in preventing rehospitalization during the 1-year period after a BD manic episode. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Relationship between the rs1414334 C/G polymorphism in the HTR2C gene and smoking in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Rico-Gomis, José María; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Triano-García, Irene; Mahecha-García, Luis Fabián; García-Monsalve, Ana; Navarro-Ruiz, Andrés; Villagordo-Peñalver, Berta; Martínez-Hortelano, Alicia; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2017-07-14

    An association has been found between the C allele of the rs1414334 polymorphism in the HTR2C gene and the metabolic syndrome in psychiatric patients. However, no study has yet evaluated whether this allele is associated with smoking. To assess this issue, therefore, we performed a cross-sectional study with a sample of 166 adult patients treated with atypical antipsychotics in 2012-2013 in a region of Spain. The primary variable was the presence of the C allele of the rs1414334 polymorphism in the HTR2C gene. Secondary variables were the number of pack-years (number of cigarettes per day x number of smoking years ÷ 20), age, gender, schizophrenia, years since diagnosis, metabolic syndrome criteria and SCORE. A stepwise binary logistic regression model was constructed to determine associations between primary and secondary variables and their area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated. Of the total sample, 33 patients (19.9%) had the C allele of the polymorphism analyzed. Mean cigarette consumption was 11.6 pack-years. The multivariate analysis showed the following factors as associated with the polymorphism: higher cigarette consumption, being a woman, and not having abdominal obesity. The AUC was 0.706. An association was found between increased cigarette consumption over the years and the presence of the C allele of the rs1414334 polymorphism in the HTR2C gene.

  6. Blonanserin Augmentation of Atypical Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia-Who Benefits from Blonanserin Augmentation?: An Open-Label, Prospective, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Young Sup; Park, Joo Eon; Kim, Do-Hoon; Sohn, Inki; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Park, Young-Min; Jon, Duk-In; Jeong, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) with augmentation by blonanserin in schizophrenic patients. Methods aA total of 100 patients with schizophrenia who were partially or completely unresponsive to treatment with an AAP were recruited in this 12-week, open-label, non-comparative, multicenter study. Blonanserin was added to their existing AAP regimen, which was maintained during the study period. Efficacy was primarily evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12. Predictors for PANSS response (≥20% reduction) were investigated. Results The PANSS total score was significantly decreased at 12 weeks of blonanserin augmentation (-21.0±18.1, F=105.849, p<0.001). Moreover, 51.0% of participants experienced a response at week 12. Premature discontinuation of blonanserin occurred in 17 patients (17.0%); 4 of these patients dropped out due to adverse events. The patients who benefited the most from blonanserin were those with severe symptoms despite a treatment with a higher dose of AAP. Conclusion Blonanserin augmentation could be an effective strategy for patients with schizophrenia who were partially or completely unresponsive to treatment with an AAP. PMID:27482249

  7. Blonanserin Augmentation of Atypical Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia-Who Benefits from Blonanserin Augmentation?: An Open-Label, Prospective, Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Woo, Young Sup; Park, Joo Eon; Kim, Do-Hoon; Sohn, Inki; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Park, Young-Min; Jon, Duk-In; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) with augmentation by blonanserin in schizophrenic patients. aA total of 100 patients with schizophrenia who were partially or completely unresponsive to treatment with an AAP were recruited in this 12-week, open-label, non-comparative, multicenter study. Blonanserin was added to their existing AAP regimen, which was maintained during the study period. Efficacy was primarily evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12. Predictors for PANSS response (≥20% reduction) were investigated. The PANSS total score was significantly decreased at 12 weeks of blonanserin augmentation (-21.0±18.1, F=105.849, p<0.001). Moreover, 51.0% of participants experienced a response at week 12. Premature discontinuation of blonanserin occurred in 17 patients (17.0%); 4 of these patients dropped out due to adverse events. The patients who benefited the most from blonanserin were those with severe symptoms despite a treatment with a higher dose of AAP. Blonanserin augmentation could be an effective strategy for patients with schizophrenia who were partially or completely unresponsive to treatment with an AAP.

  8. Development and validation of a stability-indicating gas chromatographic method for quality control of residual solvents in blonanserin: a novel atypical antipsychotic agent.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ming; Liu, Jin; Lu, Dan; Yang, Yong-Jian

    2012-09-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic agent for the treatment of schizophrenia. Ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and toluene are utilized in the synthesis route of this bulk drug. A new validated gas chromatographic (GC) method for the simultaneous determination of residual solvents in blonanserin is described in this paper. Blonanserin was dissolved in N, N-dimethylformamide to make a sample solution that was directly injected into a DB-624 column. A postrun oven temperature at 240°C for approximately 2 h after the analysis cycle was performed to wash out blonanserin residue in the GC column. Quantitation was performed by external standard analyses and the validation was carried out according to International Conference on Harmonization validation guidelines Q2A and Q2B. The method was shown to be specific (no interference in the blank solution), linear (correlation coefficients ≥0.99998, n = 10), accurate (average recoveries between 94.1 and 101.7%), precise (intra-day and inter-day precision ≤2.6%), sensitive (limit of detection ≤0.2 ng, and limit of quantitation ≤0.7 ng), robust (small variations of carrier gas flow, initial oven temperature, temperature ramping rate, injector and detector temperatures did not significantly affect the system suitability test parameters and peak areas) and stable (reference standard and sample solutions were stable over 48 h). This extensively validated method is ready to be used for the quality control of blonanserin.

  9. Improving physical health for people taking antipsychotic medication in the Community Learning Disabilities Service

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ian; Shah, Amar; Thomson, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Adherence with antipsychotic monitoring guidelines is notoriously low nationally. Without active monitoring and measures to improve metabolic abnormalities, more patients may develop related morbidity and mortality. An audit highlighted antipsychotic monitoring in this learning disability service in London did not match guideline recommendations. People with intellectual disability also experience health inequalities. Psychiatrists are well placed to provide advice and assistance that is suitable for those with complex communication, behaviour, and social needs. The QI team tested ideas to increase rates of antipsychotic reviews. The focus was the follow up monitoring of all universal measures recommended by NICE 2014, collected at 2-weekly intervals. We trialled interventions in four broad categories; Intervention 1: to make monitoring more structured and planned; Intervention 2: to increase staff and patient awareness of healthy eating and exercise programs; Intervention 3: to increase the collection of diet and exercise histories from patients; Intervention 4: to improve the uptake of blood tests. The interventions created an improvement in monitoring. There are lessons in the methodology for others carrying out similar projects. PMID:27335645

  10. Protein Kinase C β: a New Target Therapy to Prevent the Long-Term Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Pavan, Chiara; Ioannidi, Elli; Nigro, Federica; Morganti, Claudia; Brugnoli, Alberto; Longo, Francesco; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Morari, Michele; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Zavan, Barbara; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-02-15

    Antipsychotic drugs are currently used in clinical practice for a variety of mental disorders. Among them, clozapine is the most effective medication for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and is most helpful in controlling aggression and the suicidal behavior in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Although clozapine is associated with a low likelihood of extrapyramidal symptoms and other neurological side effects, it is well known for the weight gain and metabolic side effects, which expose the patient to a greater risk of cardiovascular disorders and premature death, as well as psychosocial issues, leading to non-adherence to therapy. The mechanisms underlying these iatrogenic metabolic disorders are still controversial. We have therefore investigated the in vivo effects of the selective PKCβ inhibitor, ruboxistaurin (LY-333531), in a preclinical model of long-term clozapine-induced weight gain. Cell biology, biochemistry, and behavioral tests have been performed in wild-type and PKCβ knockout mice to investigate the contribution of endogenous PKCβ and its pharmacological inhibition to the psychomotor effects of clozapine. Finally, we also shed light on a novel aspect of the mechanism underlying the clozapine-induced weight gain, demonstrating that the clozapine-dependent PKCβ activation promotes the inhibition of the lipid droplet-selective autophagy process. This paves the way to new therapeutic approaches to this serious complication of clozapine therapy.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 15 February 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.20.

  11. [Possible connection between ghrelin, resistin and TNF-alpha levels and the metabolic syndrome caused by atypical antipsychotics].

    PubMed

    Birkás Kováts, Dezso; Palik, Eva; Faludi, Gábor; Cseh, Károly

    2005-09-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGA) are obesitogenic and diabetogenic. Role of ghrelin (RIA), resistin and TNF-alpha (ELISA) in weight gain and insulin resistance (fasting plasma insulin, HOMA, ELISA) was studied in Hungarian psychiatryic patients (n=60) treated with SGA (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, 15 each). After 1 year, 80% of patients became overweight/obese (BMI > 27/30) and 35% (n= 21/60) presented impaired glucose tolerance (13/60) or diabetes (8/60). Ghrelin (1.3 +/- 0.6 ng/ml), resistin (9.8 +/- 3.7 ng/ml), TNF-alpha (5.8 +/- 1.7 pg/ml), insulin (10.4 +/- 7.6 U/ml, HOMA A: 2.5 +/- 1.8, HOMA B: 133 +/- 62.5) were significantly higher in patients than in healthy matched controls. Resistin and TNF-alpha positively correlated with each other, insulin, HOMA, and negatively with ghrelin. Ghrelin contributes to weight gain, resistin and TNF-alpha to insulin resistance. A negative feedback regulation may exist between adipocytokines and ghrelin production. SGA drugs enhance ghrelin production despite the suppressive effect of adipocytokines. All four SGA drugs are equally obesitogenic and diabetogenic.

  12. In utero exposure to atypical antipsychotic drug, risperidone: Effects on fetal neurotoxicity in hippocampal region and cognitive impairment in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Singh, K P; Singh, Manoj Kr

    2017-04-03

    Clinical studies indicate that about one-third of pregnant women with psychotic symptoms are exposed to either typical or atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs). Reports on prenatal subject/model are lacking hence, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of prenatal exposure to risperidone (RIS) on the fetal hippocampus, and their related functional changes in young rat offspring. In this study, pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to equivalent therapeutic doses of RIS at 0.8mg/kg, 1.0mg/kg, and 2.0mg/kg BW from gestation days (GD) 6 to 20. On GD 21, about half of the pregnant subjects of each group were euthanized, their fetuses were collected, fetal brains dissected, and processed for neurohistopathological evaluation. Remaining pregnant dams were allowed to deliver naturally and reared up to 8weeks of age for neurobehavioral study under selected paradigms of cognition. Our results indicate that there was a significant decrease in the thickness of fetal hippocampus with the disturbed cytoarchitectural pattern, and volume of striatum and choroid plexus was also reduced. Furthermore, RIS treated young rat offspring displayed memory impairment on different mazes of learning and memory. The current study concludes that maternal exposure to clinically relevant doses of RIS may induce neurostructural changes in developing hippocampus and striatum, and cognitive sequelae in young offspring, respectively. Therefore, caution must be taken before prescribing this drug to pregnant subjects, especially during the sensitive phase of brain development. Hence, clinical correlation of animal data is urgently warranted.

  13. Treatment patterns, resource use, and economic outcomes associated with atypical antipsychotic prescriptions in children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in quebec.

    PubMed

    Lachaine, Jean; De, Gourab; Sikirica, Vanja; Van Stralen, Judy; Hodgkins, Paul; Yang, Hongbo; Heroux, Julie; Ben Amor, Leila

    2014-11-01

    To assess treatment patterns, health care resource utilization (HRU), and costs among previously stimulant-treated children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receiving atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescriptions in Quebec. Health care claims data extracted from Quebec's provincial health plan database between March 2007 and February 2012 were analyzed. Children and adolescents (6 to 17 years) with ADHD who were taking a stimulant and either switched to, or augmented with, an AAP (with the first AAP defined as the index AAP) without a documented diagnosis for which AAPs are Health Canada-approved were included. Discontinuation, augmentation, and switching of the index AAP during the 12-month, follow-up period were estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. HRU and costs for the 6 months before (baseline period) and after initiation of the index AAP were compared. A total of 453 children and adolescents with ADHD, mostly male (74.6%) and aged 6 to 12 years (73.7%), met the inclusion criteria. The 12-month discontinuation, augmentation, and switching rates were 45.5%, 68.2%, and 80.7%, respectively. Patients had, on average, more all-cause prescription fills (22.2, compared with 13.3) and incurred more all-cause pharmacy ($889, compared with $710), total medical ($1096, compared with $644), and total health care ($1985, compared with $1354) costs during the 6-month study period than during the 6-month baseline period (all P < 0.05). Similarly, ADHD-related total health care costs were higher during the study period ($1269, compared with $835; P < 0.05); all-cause and ADHD-related total health care costs increased by 46.6% and 52.0%, respectively. Use of an AAP among stimulant-treated children and adolescents with ADHD in Quebec was associated with high rates of therapy changes and increased HRU and costs.

  14. Treatment Patterns, Resource Use, and Economic Outcomes Associated With Atypical Antipsychotic Prescriptions in Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Lachaine, Jean; De, Gourab; Sikirica, Vanja; van Stralen, Judy; Hodgkins, Paul; Yang, Hongbo; Heroux, Julie; Ben Amor, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess treatment patterns, health care resource utilization (HRU), and costs among previously stimulant-treated children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receiving atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescriptions in Quebec. Methods: Health care claims data extracted from Quebec’s provincial health plan database between March 2007 and February 2012 were analyzed. Children and adolescents (6 to 17 years) with ADHD who were taking a stimulant and either switched to, or augmented with, an AAP (with the first AAP defined as the index AAP) without a documented diagnosis for which AAPs are Health Canada–approved were included. Discontinuation, augmentation, and switching of the index AAP during the 12-month, follow-up period were estimated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis. HRU and costs for the 6 months before (baseline period) and after initiation of the index AAP were compared. Results: A total of 453 children and adolescents with ADHD, mostly male (74.6%) and aged 6 to 12 years (73.7%), met the inclusion criteria. The 12-month discontinuation, augmentation, and switching rates were 45.5%, 68.2%, and 80.7%, respectively. Patients had, on average, more all-cause prescription fills (22.2, compared with 13.3) and incurred more all-cause pharmacy ($889, compared with $710), total medical ($1096, compared with $644), and total health care ($1985, compared with $1354) costs during the 6-month study period than during the 6-month baseline period (all P < 0.05). Similarly, ADHD-related total health care costs were higher during the study period ($1269, compared with $835; P < 0.05); all-cause and ADHD-related total health care costs increased by 46.6% and 52.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Use of an AAP among stimulant-treated children and adolescents with ADHD in Quebec was associated with high rates of therapy changes and increased HRU and costs. PMID:25565476

  15. [Functional status and quality of life in Latin American outpatients with schizophrenia treated with atypical or typical antipsychotics: outcomes of the 12 months schizophrenia outpatient health outcomes (IC-SOHO) Study].

    PubMed

    Rovner, Jorge; Assunção, Sheila; Gargoloff, Pedro; Ibarra, Hernan Silva; Gasca, Jaime Aguilar; Fournais, Erick Landa; Adan, Pablo; Andrades, Nestor J; Dyachkova, Yulia

    2005-01-01

    Functional status and quality of life outcomes in Latin American outpatients with schizophrenia were compared after 12 months of monotherapy treatment with olanzapine, risperidone or typical antipsychotics. Both outcomes were assessed as part of a prospective, large (N= 7658), international (27 countries), observational study. from the Latin American subpopulation (N= 2671; 11 countries) are presented. Compared to typical antipsychotics, olanzapine and risperidone were associated with significantly (p < 0.05) greater odds of employment and social activity, and significantly greater improvements in quality of life. Olanzapine was also associated with significantly greater odds of living independently, compared to typical antipsychotics. This study indicates that functional status and quality of life outcomes are likely to be more favorable when Latin American outpatients with schizophrenia are treated with olanzapine or risperidone monotherapy, rather than typical antipsychotics.

  16. Atypical antipsychotic drug treatment for 6 months restores N-acetylaspartate in left prefrontal cortex and left thalamus of first-episode patients with early onset schizophrenia: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jing-Li; Cheng, Zheng-Xiang; Duan, Hui-Feng; Yang, Jia-Ming; Zhu, Xi-Quan; Gao, Cun-You

    2014-07-30

    Early onset schizophrenia (EOS) is often associated with poorer outcomes, including lack of school education, higher risk of mental disability and resistance to treatment. But the knowledge of the neurobiological mechanism of EOS is limited. Here, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we investigated the possible neurochemical abnormalities in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and thalamus of first-episode drug-naïve patients with EOS, and followed up the effects of atypical antipsychotic treatment for 6 months on neurochemical metabolites and clinical symptoms. We measured the ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) to creatine (Cr) in 41 adolescents with first episode of EOS and in 28 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and years of education. The EOS patients presented with abnormally low NAA/Cr values in the left PFC and left thalamus with a reduced tendency in the right PFC compared with healthy controls. No significant differences were detected between groups for Cho/Cr in PFC and thalamus in any hemisphere. After atypical antipsychotic treatment for 6 months, the reduced NAA/Cr in the left PFC and left thalamus in EOS patients was elevated to the normal level in healthy controls, without any alteration in Cho/Cr. We also found that there was no significant correlation between the neurochemical metabolite ratios in the PFC and thalamus in patients with EOS, and clinical characteristics. Our results suggest that there was neurochemical metabolite abnormalities in PFC and thalamus in EOS patients, atypical antipsychotic treatment can effectively relieve the symptoms and restore the reduced NAA in PFC and thalamus.

  17. Improving physical health monitoring for patients with chronic mental health problems who receive antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Nihad; Conn, Rory; Latif Marini, Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Physical health monitoring is an integral part of caring for patients with mental health problems. It is proven that serious physical health problems are more common among patients with severe mental health illness (SMI), this monitoring can be challenging and there is a need for improvement. The project aimed at improving the physical health monitoring among patients with SMI who are receiving antipsychotic medications. The improvement process focused on ensuring there is a good communication with general practitioners (GPs) as well as patient's education and education of care home staff. GP letters requesting physical health monitoring were updated; care home staff and patients were given more information about the value of regular physical health monitoring. There was an improvement in patients' engagement with the monitoring and the monitoring done by GPs was more adherent to local and national guidelines and was communicated with the mental health service.

  18. A long-term, phase 2, multicenter, randomized, open-label, comparative safety study of pomaglumetad methionil (LY2140023 monohydrate) versus atypical antipsychotic standard of care in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    significantly greater in the SOC group at 24-week endpoint (P = .004). LY2140023 and SOC groups had comparable negative symptom improvement at 24-week endpoint (P = .444). Conclusion These data provide further evidence that the potential antipsychotic LY2140023 monohydrate, with a glutamatergic mechanism of action, may have a unique tolerability profile characterized by a low association with some adverse events such as extrapyramidal symptoms and weight gain that may characterize currently available dopaminergic antipsychotics. Trials registration A Long-term, Phase 2, Multicenter, Randomized, Open-label, Comparative Safety Study of LY2140023 Versus Atypical Antipsychotic Standard of Care in Patients with DSM-IV-TR Schizophrenia ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00845026. PMID:23694720

  19. Health care resource utilization and costs of California Medicaid patients with schizophrenia treated with paliperidone palmitate once monthly or atypical oral antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Pesa, Jacqueline A; Doshi, Dilesh; Wang, Li; Yuce, Huseyin; Baser, Onur

    2017-04-01

    To compare all-cause health care utilization and costs between patients with schizophrenia treated with once monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP1M; Invega Sustenna (1) ) and atypical oral antipsychotic therapy (OAT). This was a retrospective claims-based analysis among adult California Medicaid (Medi-Cal) patients with schizophrenia having ≥2 claims for PP1M or OAT from 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2013 and continuous health plan enrollment for ≥1 year pre- and post-index date (PP1M or OAT initiation date). Baseline characteristics were reported descriptively. Propensity score matching with a 1:1 greedy match method was used to create two matched cohorts. Treatment patterns, all-cause health care utilization, and costs for the 12 month follow-up period were compared between the two matched cohorts. Two well matched cohorts of 722 patients were produced with similar baseline characteristics. During the 12 month follow-up period, PP1M patients were significantly less likely to discontinue treatment (30.6% vs. 39.5%, p < .001) or switch to a new therapy (21.6% vs. 27.7%, p = .007). PP1M patients had fewer inpatient visits (5.0 vs. 7.9, p < .001), lower mean hospitalization days (15.0 vs. 27.7 days, p < .001) and inpatient costs ($5060 vs. $10,880, p < .001). While pharmacy costs were significantly higher in the PP1M cohort ($16,347 vs. $9115, p < .001), total costs were not significantly different between the matched cohorts ($25,546 vs. $25,307, p = 0.853). Patients with schizophrenia treated with PP1M had significantly fewer inpatient hospitalizations and associated costs with no significant difference in the total costs between the two cohorts. This study is subject to limitations associated with claims data such as miscoding, inability to examine clinical severity, etc.

  20. Effectiveness of financial incentives to improve adherence to maintenance treatment with antipsychotics: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeeles, Ksenija; Bremner, Stephen; Lauber, Christoph; Eldridge, Sandra; Ashby, Deborah; David, Anthony S; O’Connell, Nicola; Forrest, Alexandra; Burns, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test whether offering financial incentives to patients with psychotic disorders is effective in improving adherence to maintenance treatment with antipsychotics. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Community mental health teams in secondary psychiatric care in the United Kingdom. Participants Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder, who were prescribed long acting antipsychotic (depot) injections but had received 75% or less of the prescribed injections. We randomly allocated 73 teams with a total of 141 patients. Primary outcome data were available for 35 intervention teams with 75 patients (96% of randomised) and for 31 control teams with 56 patients (89% of randomised). Interventions Participants in the intervention group were offered £15 (€17; $22) for each depot injection over a 12 month period. Participants in the control condition received treatment as usual. Main outcome measure The primary outcome was the percentage of prescribed depot injections given during the 12 month intervention period. Results 73 teams with 141 consenting patients were randomised, and outcomes were assessed for 131 patients (93%). Average baseline adherence was 69% in the intervention group and 67% in the control group. During the 12 month trial period adherence was 85% in the intervention group and 71% in the control group. The adjusted effect estimate was 11.5% (95% confidence interval 3.9% to 19.0%, P=0.003). A secondary outcome was an adherence of ≥95%, which was achieved in 28% of the intervention group and 5% of the control group (adjusted odds ratio 8.21, 95% confidence interval 2.00 to 33.67, P=0.003). Although differences in clinician rated clinical improvement between the groups failed to reach statistical significance, patients in the intervention group had more favourable subjective quality of life ratings (β=0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.26 to 1.15, P=0.002). The number of admissions

  1. Fractal Analysis May Improve the Preoperative Identification of Atypical Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Marcin; Radwan, Hesham; Li, Jian Y; Filippi, Christopher G; Tykocki, Tomasz; Schulder, Michael

    2017-02-01

    There is no objective and readily accessible method for the preoperative determination of atypical characteristics of a meningioma grade. To evaluate the feasibility of using fractal analysis as an adjunctive tool to conventional radiological techniques in visualizing histopathological features of meningiomas. A group of 27 patients diagnosed with atypical (WHO grade II) meningioma and a second group of 27 patients with benign (WHO grade I) meningioma were enrolled in the study. Preoperative brain magnetic resonance (MR) studies (T1-wieghted, post-gadolinium) were processed and analyzed to determine the average fractal dimension (FDa) and maximum fractal dimension (FDm) of the contrast-enhancing region of the tumor using box-count method. FDa and FDm as well as particular radiological features were included in the logistic regression model as possible predictors of malignancy. The cohort consisted of 34 women and 20 men, mean age of 62 ± 15 yr. Fractal analysis showed good interobserver reproducibility (Kappa >0.70). Both FDa and FDm were significantly higher in the atypical compared to the benign meningioma group (P < .0001). Multivariate logistic regression model reached statistical significance with P = .0001 and AUC = 0.87. The FDm, which was greater than 1.31 (odds ratio [OR], 12.30; P = .039), and nonskull base localization (OR, .052; P = .015) were confirmed to be statistically significant predictors of the atypical phenotype. Fractal analysis of preoperative MR images appears to be a feasible adjunctive diagnostic tool in identifying meningiomas with potentially aggressive clinical behavior.

  2. Combined serotonin (5-HT)1A agonism, 5-HT(2A) and dopamine D₂ receptor antagonism reproduces atypical antipsychotic drug effects on phencyclidine-impaired novel object recognition in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-05-15

    Subchronic administration of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, e.g. phencyclidine (PCP), produces prolonged impairment of novel object recognition (NOR), suggesting they constitute a hypoglutamate-based model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (CIS). Acute administration of atypical, e.g. lurasidone, but not typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g. haloperidol, are able to restore NOR following PCP (acute reversal model). Furthermore, atypical APDs, when co-administered with PCP, have been shown to prevent development of NOR deficits (prevention model). Most atypical, but not typical APDs, are more potent 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonists than dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists, and have been shown to enhance cortical and hippocampal efflux and to be direct or indirect 5-HT(1A) agonists in vivo. To further clarify the importance of these actions to the restoration of NOR by atypical APDs, sub-effective or non-effective doses of combinations of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist (tandospirone), the 5-HT(2A) inverse agonist (pimavanserin), or the D2 antagonist (haloperidol), as well as the combination of all three agents, were studied in the acute reversal and prevention PCP models of CIS. Only the combination of all three agents restored NOR and prevented the development of PCP-induced deficit. Thus, this triple combination of 5-HT(1A) agonism, 5-HT(2A) antagonism/inverse agonism, and D2 antagonism is able to mimic the ability of atypical APDs to prevent or ameliorate the PCP-induced NOR deficit, possibly by stimulating signaling cascades from D1 and 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation, modulated by D2 and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism.

  3. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Stubbs, Brendon; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Valchera, Alessandro; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Ganança, Licínia

    2016-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs) associated with bipolar disorder (BD) is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo-) controlled trials (RCTs) or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports) representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-)manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) (SMD −0.74, 95% CI −1.20 to −0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652). Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979) experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores (SMD −1.08, 95% CI −1.35 to −0.81, p < 0.001) vs. placebo (n = 678). Publication and measurement biases and relative paucity of studies. Overall, SGAs appear to offer favorable improvements in MADRS and YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable and

  4. [Antipsychotics in geriatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The present paper approaches the use of antipsychotics in elder people in general, and particularly in geriatric institutions. During the last few years, prescription of antipsychotics in geriatric institutions increased, especially because of the availability of the atypicals, and their use was extended beyond the indications these drugs had been approved for. In dementia they are suggested for treatment of behavioral symptoms, despite having been approved only for cases of aggressiveness and risk of damage. There is a common tendency of perpetuating antipsychotic medication in elder people, with its consequent collateral effects as well. Few years ago, the increase of both risk of cerebrovascular events and of mortality in dementia patients treated with atypical agents was noticed. This generated controversy regarding their use in those kind of patients. Diverse factors associated to caregivers affect the decision of prescribing an antipsychotic in elder people. Non-pharmacological interventions are the first choice when treating behavioral symptoms; pharmacological interventions must take place with the lowest doses possible, with limited durations.

  5. Antipsychotics and amotivation.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Lee, Jimmy; Foussias, George; Fletcher, Paul J; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-05-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are thought to produce secondary negative symptoms, which can also exacerbate primary negative symptoms. In the present study, we examined whether motivational deficits in particular were related to antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia in a dose-dependent manner. Five hundred and twenty individuals with schizophrenia who were receiving antipsychotic monotherapy for at least 6 months and followed prospectively were included in the present study. Participants were receiving one of five antipsychotic medications (olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone), and analyses were conducted for patients receiving each drug separately. Analysis of covariance models were constructed to examine the effect of antipsychotic dose on level of motivational impairment, controlling for selected demographic and clinical variables (eg, positive symptoms). Level of motivation, or deficits therein, were evaluated using a derived measure from the Quality of Life Scale, and in addition with scores derived from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Antipsychotic dose was not related to the level of amotivation for any of the medications examined. Moreover, severity of sedation was not significantly related to the degree of amotivation. One hundred and twenty-one individuals were identified as antipsychotic-free at baseline, and after 6 months of antipsychotic treatment, no change in motivation was found. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics does not necessarily impede or enhance goal-directed motivation in patients with schizophrenia. It is possible that the negative impact of antipsychotics in this regard is overstated; conversely, the present results also indicate that we must look beyond antipsychotics in our efforts to improve motivation.

  6. Antipsychotics and Amotivation

    PubMed Central

    Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Lee, Jimmy; Foussias, George; Fletcher, Paul J; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are thought to produce secondary negative symptoms, which can also exacerbate primary negative symptoms. In the present study, we examined whether motivational deficits in particular were related to antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia in a dose-dependent manner. Five hundred and twenty individuals with schizophrenia who were receiving antipsychotic monotherapy for at least 6 months and followed prospectively were included in the present study. Participants were receiving one of five antipsychotic medications (olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone), and analyses were conducted for patients receiving each drug separately. Analysis of covariance models were constructed to examine the effect of antipsychotic dose on level of motivational impairment, controlling for selected demographic and clinical variables (eg, positive symptoms). Level of motivation, or deficits therein, were evaluated using a derived measure from the Quality of Life Scale, and in addition with scores derived from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Antipsychotic dose was not related to the level of amotivation for any of the medications examined. Moreover, severity of sedation was not significantly related to the degree of amotivation. One hundred and twenty-one individuals were identified as antipsychotic-free at baseline, and after 6 months of antipsychotic treatment, no change in motivation was found. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics does not necessarily impede or enhance goal-directed motivation in patients with schizophrenia. It is possible that the negative impact of antipsychotics in this regard is overstated; conversely, the present results also indicate that we must look beyond antipsychotics in our efforts to improve motivation. PMID:25567425

  7. Analysis of clinical characteristics and antipsychotic medication prescribing practices of first-episode schizophrenia in Israel: a naturalistic prospective study.

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael D; Bar, Faina; Keret, Noa; Lapidus, Raya; Kosov, Nikolai; Chelben, Joseph; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of the clinical presentation and treatment of first-episode psychosis is important in order to exclude effects of age, chronic illness, long-term treatment and institutionalization. The aim of this descriptive study was to investigate the management practices of first-episode schizophrenia in a cohort of patients in Israel and to document use of the various "typical" or "atypical" antipsychotic agents. Fifty-one consecutive patients (26 M, 25 F) with first-episode psychosis were recruited for study participation and were administered either typical or atypical antipsychotic medications in a naturalistic manner. While an approximately equal number of subjects received typical and atypical medications at illness onset, a prominent shift to atypical antipsychotic treatment occurred over the study course; 18 subjects had medication class shifts: 17 from typical to atypical, and one from atypical to typical. Negative symptoms did not affect length of hospitalization, but were associated with aggression. Higher depression rates were noted in patients with long hospitalizations who received typical antipsychotic medications. Immigrants were admitted at an age approximately four years older than native-born Israelis. The prominent shift from "typical" to "atypical" antipsychotic medications may indicate sensitivity of first-episode psychotic patients to side-effects of "typical" medications and prominence of use of atypical medications in this patient subpopulation be it due to improved efficacy over time or successful marketing. Unique cultural and population characteristics may contribute to the manifestation of first-episode psychosis and suggest the importance of more effective outreach to the immigrant population in order to manage an apparent treatment delay.

  8. Improvement of Neuropsychiatric Lupus with Addition of SSRI Antidepressant/Antipsychotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lesser, R S; Walters, J L; Khan, R; Pebenito, R; Klee, S

    1997-10-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (NPLE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We report a case involving an adolescent female who developed acute NPLE, manifesting as acute delusional depression with suicidal ideation. Despite high-dose corticosteroid therapy, these symptoms persisted. Within 7 to 10 days of initiation of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and fluphenazine, an antipsychotic agent, the patient's neurovegetative symptoms of depression improved and suicidality remitted. Psychosis resolved with longer treatment. Undoubtedly these drugs were treating a psychiatric complication of the underlying disease. Our case supports the notion that some severe neuropsychiatric symptoms can be reversed without reliance upon immunosuppressants. It is premature to advocate unconditional acceptance of this approach, vet the findings in our case suggest that early adjunctive treatment with paroxetine and fluphenazine for steroid-resistant NPLE might spare a subset of patients the toxic effects and complications of immunosuppressants. This is the first report to describe a novel adjunctive treatment with the SSRI antidepressant, paroxetine. Our findings merit further investigation with larger numbers of patients.

  9. Antipsychotic drugs reverse MK-801-induced cognitive and social interaction deficits in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kelly Juliana; Piato, Angelo Luis; da Luz Oliveira, Renata; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Vianna, Monica Ryff; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2011-10-10

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness characterized by positive and negative symptoms and cognitive deficits. Reduction of glutamatergic neurotransmission by NMDA receptor antagonists mimics symptoms of schizophrenia. Modeling social interaction and cognitive impairment in animals can be of great benefit in the effort to develop novel treatments for negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Studies have demonstrated that these behavioral changes are, in some cases, sensitive to remediation by antipsychotic drugs. The zebrafish has been proposed as a candidate to study the in vivo effects of several drugs and to discover new pharmacological targets. In the current study we investigated the ability of antipsychotic drugs to reverse schizophrenia-like symptoms produced by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. Results showed that MK-801 (5μM) given pre-training hindered memory formation while both atypical antipsychotics sulpiride (250μM) and olanzapine (50μM) improved MK-801-induced amnesia. The same change was observed in the social interaction task, where atypical antipsychotics reversed the MK-801-induced social interaction deficit whereas the typical antipsychotic haloperidol (9μM) was ineffective to reverse those behavioral deficits. Therefore, MK-801-treated zebrafish showed some behavioral features observed in schizophrenia, such as cognitive and social interaction deficits, which were reverted by current available atypical drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antipsychotics activate the TGFβ pathway effector SMAD3

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, T.; Sundaresh, S.; Levine, F.

    2014-01-01

    Although effective in treating an array of neurological disorders, antipsychotics are associated with deleterious metabolic side effects. Through high-throughput screening, we previously identified phenothiazine antipsychotics as modulators of the human insulin promoter. Here, we extended our initial finding to structurally diverse typical and atypical antipsychotics. We then identified the TGFβ pathway as being involved in the effect of antipsychotics on the insulin promoter, finding that antipsychotics activated SMAD3, a downstream effector of the TGFβ pathway, through a receptor distinct from the TGFβ receptor family and known neurotransmitter receptor targets of antipsychotics. Of note, antipsychotics that do not cause metabolic side effects did not activate SMAD3. In vivo relevance was demonstrated by reanalysis of gene expression data from human brains treated with antipsychotics, which showed altered expression of SMAD3 responsive genes. This work raises the possibility that antipsychotics could be designed that retain beneficial CNS activity while lacking deleterious metabolic side effects. PMID:22290122

  11. Survey on schizophrenia treatment in Mexico: perception and antipsychotic prescription patterns

    PubMed Central

    Apiquian, Rogelio; Fresán, Ana; de la Fuente-Sandoval, Camilo; Ulloa, Rosa-Elena; Nicolini, Humberto

    2004-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of antipsychotics, especially the so called atypicals, the treatment of schizophrenia has shown important improvements. At the present time, it is preferred to label clozapine and other antipsychotics sharing similar profiles as second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs). These medications have been proposed by some experts as a first line treatment for schizophrenia. It is critical to have reliable data about antipsychotic prescription in Mexico and to create management guidelines based on expert meetings and not only on studies carried out by the pharmaceutical industry. Only this approach will help to make the right decisions for the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods A translated version of Rabinowitz's survey was used to evaluate antipsychotic prescription preferences and patterns in Mexican psychiatrists. The survey questionnaire was sent by mail to 200 psychiatrists from public institutions and private practice in Mexico City and Guadalajara, Mexico. Results Recommendations for antipsychotics daily doses at different stages of the treatment of schizophrenia varied widely. Haloperidol was considered as the first choice for the treatment of positive symptoms. On the contrary, risperidone was the first option for negative symptoms. For a patient with a high susceptibility for developing extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), risperidone was the first choice. It was also considered that SGAs had advantages over typical antipsychotics in the management of negative symptoms, cognitive impairment and fewer EPS. Besides, there was a clear tendency for prescribing typical antipsychotics at higher doses than recommended and inadequate doses for the atypical ones. Conclusions Some of the obstacles for the prescription of SGAs include their high cost, deficient knowledge about their indications and dosage, the perception of their being less efficient for the treatment of positive symptoms and the resistance of some Mexican physicians to change

  12. The metabolic syndrome and its constituting variables in atypical antipsychotic-treated subjects: comparison with other drug treatments, drug-free psychiatric patients, first-degree relatives and the general population in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Serrano, Ana; Uzcátegui, Euderruh; ElFakih, Yamily; Rangel, Nairy; Carrizo, Edgardo; Fernández, Virginia; Connell, Lisette; de Baptista, Enma Araujo; Quiroz, Segundo; Uzcátegui, Marycelvia; Rondón, Juana; Matos, Yimber; Uzcátegui, Lilia; Gómez, Roald; Valery, Lenin; Novoa-Montero, Darío

    2011-03-01

    Few studies on the association between atypical antipsychotic drug (AAP) administration and metabolic dysfunction have concurrently evaluated the general population (GP), other psychotropic drug treatments and drug-free psychiatric patients. We assessed the frequency of the metabolic syndrome (MS) according to the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria (NCEP) and its constituting variables in a GP sample (n=271) and in patients receiving, for at least three consecutive months, antiepileptic drugs (n=93), olanzapine (n=162), clozapine (n=105), typical antipsychotics (n=117), other AAP (n=58), other psychotropic drugs (n=185), and drug-free individuals (n=636). Subjects were clinically classified as schizophrenia, bipolar or other axis I disorders (DSM-IV-RT), and as first-degree relatives of each diagnostic group. The MS was detected in 26.6% of the GP (95% confidence interval: 21.5-31.8). No diagnostic or treatment group had a significantly higher age-adjusted frequency than the GP (p>0.05). Treatment duration did not significantly affect the results. However, significant differences were observed in the frequency of abnormal MS constituting variables in comparison to the GP. For example, schizophrenia patients and their relatives, bipolar subjects and olanzapine- and clozapine-treated patients had higher abnormal waist circumference values. In addition, bipolar patients and their relatives and subjects treated with olanzapine and other AAPs had higher frequencies of abnormal glucose levels. Neither schizophrenia nor bipolar patients in the diagnostic categories nor the olanzapine or the clozapine groups displayed higher proportions of abnormal triglycerides, high density cholesterol or blood pressure levels than the GP. While we did not demonstrate an increased frequency of the MS in AAP-treated subjects, our results confirm that specific metabolic variables must be monitored in psychiatric patients. Besides they stress the importance, in epidemiological

  13. Atypical Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Use of Clozapine.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, Quevedo-Florez; Juliana, Granada-Romero; Fernando, Camargo-Arenas Juan

    2017-01-01

    The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) is a medical emergency of infrequent presentation in the emergency department, which is associated with the use of psychiatric drugs, such as typical and atypical antipsychotics. Our case addresses a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia for 10 years, who had been receiving clozapine and clonazepam as part of their treatment. This patient presents the symptoms of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome without fever, which improves with treatment especially with the withdrawal of clozapine. In the absence of fever and clinical improvement, the patient is considered to have an atypical presentation of this disease.

  14. Atypical Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Use of Clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Juliana, Granada-Romero; Fernando, Camargo-Arenas Juan

    2017-01-01

    The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) is a medical emergency of infrequent presentation in the emergency department, which is associated with the use of psychiatric drugs, such as typical and atypical antipsychotics. Our case addresses a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia for 10 years, who had been receiving clozapine and clonazepam as part of their treatment. This patient presents the symptoms of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome without fever, which improves with treatment especially with the withdrawal of clozapine. In the absence of fever and clinical improvement, the patient is considered to have an atypical presentation of this disease. PMID:28303200

  15. Coagulation and inflammation markers during atypical or typical antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia patients and drug-free first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Edgardo; Fernández, Virginia; Quintero, Jesús; Connell, Lissette; Rodríguez, Zulay; Mosquera, Mônica; Acosta, Arnaldo; Baptista, Trino

    2008-08-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the second generation antipsychotics (APs) clozapine and olanzapine and to a lesser extent the typical antipsychotics may be associated with a procoagulant and proinflammatory state that promotes venous thromboembolism. We evaluated here several blood factors associated with coagulation and inflammation in AP-treated schizophrenia patients and their first-degree relatives. Procoagulant factors (fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI-1]), the anticoagulant factor antithrombin III [AT-III], and inflammation-related factors (C-reactive protein [CRP] and leptin) were assessed in patients chronically treated with clozapine (n=29), olanzapine (n=29), typical APs (n=30) and first degree relatives of clozapine (n=23) and olanzapine subjects (n=11). The typical AP group had the highest CRP level (p=0.013) in spite of having the lowest body mass index (BMI). Patients as a single group had higher CRP levels than relatives (p=0.003). The typical AP group also had the highest AT-III levels (p=0.021). Fibrinogen levels did not differ between the groups (p=0.13). Olanzapine patients displayed the highest PAI-1 and leptin levels among the drug-treated subjects, but values were similar to those observed in their relatives, and were significantly correlated with the BMI. A homogeneous negative profile of high inflammation and procoagulant factors along with low levels of anticoagulants was not detected in any group. While preliminary, our results suggest that the observed abnormalities were not related to a direct drug effect, but to elevated BMI (high PAI-1 and leptin in olanzapine-treated patients). We speculate that the high CRP in the typical AP group might be related to poor lifestyle habits, but this must we confirmed in future studies.

  16. Assessing need for pharmacist involvement to improve care coordination for patients on LAI antipsychotics transitioning from hospital to home: A work system approach.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Olufunmilola; Myers, Michelle N; Brothers, Amanda L; Montgomery, Jamie; Norman, Bryan A; Fabian, Tanya

    The use of Long-Acting Injectable (LAI) antipsychotic medications has increased for patients with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). Care coordination for this population is complex, and pharmacist involvement may improve and support long-term medication adherence and patient outcomes. (1) Examine pharmacists' role in addressing care coordination and adherence challenges for patients taking Long-Acting Injectable (LAI) antipsychotics; and (2) explore patients' medication use experiences with LAI antipsychotics and educational needs. This project utilized a holistic work systems approach to assess the usefulness of implementing a pharmacist-led intervention to improve care coordination for patients taking LAI antipsychotics. Data collection and analyses were guided by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model. Data were collected using interviews with healthcare team members and patients taking LAI antipsychotics and retrospective chart reviews at a psychiatric hospital in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Data collection elicited information about LAI care coordination, the pharmacist's role, and patients' experiences. Content and thematic analyses were conducted to identify opportunities to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. Sixteen healthcare team members and six patients were interviewed. Twenty patient charts were reviewed to examine the care coordination process. Four themes of the workflow process emerged: pharmacist consultation, in-hospital LAI administration, discharge planning, and outpatient treatment. Key challenges identified included inadequate communication, limited knowledge, and the need for standardized roles. Most patients did not know the name of their LAI antipsychotic and did not recall receiving medication counseling, but were interested in discussing medication concerns with pharmacists. There is a need for improved communication during LAI care coordination, targeted education for healthcare team members, and

  17. [Extrapyramidal effects of antipsychotic drugs].

    PubMed

    Kulisevsky, J; Otermin, P

    2003-06-01

    Conventional antipsychotics have been used for many years to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders. Nevertheless, their effectiveness is often associated with a high incidence of side effects, especially extrapyramidal ones (EPS). With the entrance of the socalled atypical neuroleptics, this risk has been considerably, although not completely, reduced. Thus, clinicians should have good knowledge about the pharmacological characteristics of the newer anti-psychotics and their associated risk of worsening or developing motor disturbances. This article reviews these drugs, their pharmacological characteristics as well as the phenomenology of the extrapyramidal syndromes ans treatment of the EPS recommended.

  18. Design, synthesis, and preliminary in vitro and in vivo pharmacological evaluation of 2-{4-[4-(2,5-disubstituted thiazol-4-yl)phenylethyl]piperazin-1-yl}-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitriles as atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Gowri Chandra Sekhar, Kondapalli Venkata; Rao, Vajja Samabasiva; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Reddy, Aravalli Satish; Brust, Peter; Krishna Kumar, Mutyala Murali

    2011-08-01

    A series of 2-{4-[4-(2,5-disubstituted thiazolyl)phenylethyl] piperazin-1-yl}-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitriles were synthesized in an effort to prepare novel atypical antipsychotic agents. The compounds were synthesized either by microwave irradiation technique or by conventional synthesis and were characterized by spectral data (IR, (1)H NMR, and MS) and the purity was ascertained by microanalysis. The D(2) and 5-HT(2A) affinity of the synthesized compounds was screened in vitro by radioligand displacement assays on membrane homogenates isolated from rat striatum and rat cortex, respectively. Furthermore, all the synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo pharmacological activity in Swiss albino mice. The D(2) antagonism studies were performed using climbing mouse assay model and 5-HT(2A) antagonism studies were performed using quipazine-induced head twitches in mice. It was observed that none of the new chemical entities exhibited catalepsy and 10f is the most active among the synthesized compounds with 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratio of 1.1286 although the standard drug risperidone exhibited 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratio of 1.0989.

  19. Novel endocrine disrupter effects of classic and atypical antipsychotic agents and divalproex: induction of adrenal hyperandrogenism, reversible with metformin or rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Bahtiyar, Gül; Weiss, Karolina; Sacerdote, Alan S

    2007-10-01

    To ascertain an association between the a priori known insulin resistance caused by antipsychotic agents and divalproex and adrenal hyperandrogenism and to determine whether the associated hyperandrogenism is reversible with insulin sensitizers. We studied 26 consecutive psychiatric inpatients (22 women and 4 men) receiving the aforementioned medications, who were referred to us for a consultation. They ranged in age from 19 to 79 years and had a mean body mass index (SEM) of 32.35 +/- 1.26 kg/m2. Between 8 AM and 9 AM, blood samples were collected for 17-hydroxyprogesterone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, 11-deoxycortisol, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (in reproductive age women), estrone, estradiol (in reproductive age women), free testosterone (in women), deoxycorticosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which were measured by radioimmunoassay, after chromatography if necessary. For intact, premenopausal women, measurement of the abnormal steroid metabolite or SHBG level was repeated during prednisone therapy (5 mg at bedtime) to document the likely adrenal origin of the abnormality. Men, women who had undergone bilateral oophorectomy, and postmenopausal women had hyperandrogenism of adrenal origin by default. Clinical features included central obesity, acanthosis, hirsutism, alopecia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and oligomenorrhea. We found reversed estrone/estradiol ratios in 4 patients, decreased SHBG in 4, increased 17-hydroxy-pregnenolone in 8, increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone in 2, increased deoxycorticosterone in 2, increased DHEA sulfate in 1, increased 11-deoxycortisol in 4, increased androstenedione in 1, and reversed ratios of luteinizin hormone to follicle-stimulating hormone in 2. The bio-chemical abnormalities were corrected in 8 of 8 patients receiving metformin and in 2 of 2 patients receiving rosiglitazone. Insulin resistance caused by antipsychotic agents

  20. AVE1625, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, as a co-treatment with antipsychotics for schizophrenia: improvement in cognitive function and reduction of antipsychotic-side effects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Black, Mark D; Stevens, Rachel J; Rogacki, Nancy; Featherstone, Robert E; Senyah, Yaw; Giardino, Odessa; Borowsky, Beth; Stemmelin, Jeanne; Cohen, Caroline; Pichat, Philippe; Arad, Michal; Barak, Segev; De Levie, Amaya; Weiner, Ina; Griebel, Guy; Varty, Geoffrey B

    2011-05-01

    The psychotomimetic effects of cannabis are believed to be mediated via cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Furthermore, studies have implicated CB1 receptors in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. These studies investigated the effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist, AVE1625, in acute pharmacological and neurodevelopmental models of schizophrenia. AVE1625 was administered to rodents alone or as a co-treatment with clinically used antipsychotic drugs (APDs). The antipsychotic potential of AVE1625 was tested using psychotomimetic-induced hyperactivity and latent inhibition (LI) deficit models. The procognitive profile was assessed using hole board, novel object recognition, auditory evoked potential, and LI techniques. In addition, the side-effect profile was established by measuring catalepsy, antipsychotic-induced weight gain, plasma levels of prolactin, and anxiogenic potential. AVE1625 (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg ip), reversed abnormally persistent LI induced by MK-801 or neonatal nitric oxide synthase inhibition in rodents, and improved both working and episodic memory. AVE1625 was not active in positive symptom models but importantly, it did not diminish the efficacy of APDs. It also decreased catalepsy and weight gain induced by APDs, suggesting that it may decrease APD-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) and compliance. Unlike other CB1 antagonists, AVE1625 did not produce anxiogenic-like effects. These preclinical data suggest that AVE1625 may be useful to treat the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and as a co-treatment with currently available antipsychotics. In addition, an improved side-effect profile was seen, with potential to ameliorate the EPS and weight gain issues with currently available treatments.

  1. Antipsychotic combinations for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Orendain, Javier; Castiello-de Obeso, Santiago; Colunga-Lozano, Luis Enrique; Hu, Yue; Maayan, Nicola; Adams, Clive E

    2017-06-28

    Many people with schizophrenia do not achieve a satisfactory treatment response with their initial antipsychotic drug treatment. Sometimes a second antipsychotic, in combination with the first, is used in these situations. To examine whether:1. treatment with antipsychotic combinations is effective for schizophrenia; and2. treatment with antipsychotic combinations is safe for the same illness. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's register which is based on regular searches of CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, Embase, PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials. There are no language, time, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in the register. We ran searches in September 2010, August 2012 and January 2016. We checked for additional trials in the reference lists of included trials. We included all randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing antipsychotic combinations with antipsychotic monotherapy for the treatment of schizophrenia and/or schizophrenia-like psychoses. We independently extracted data from the included studies. We analysed dichotomous data using risk ratios (RR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI). We analysed continuous data using mean difference (MD) with a 95% CIs. For the meta-analysis we used a random-effects model. We used GRADE to complete a 'Summary of findings' table and assessed risk of bias for included studies. Sixty-two studies are included in the review, 31 of these compared clozapine monotherapy with clozapine combination. We considered the risk of bias in the included studies to be moderate to high. The majority of trials had unclear allocation concealment, method of randomisation and blinding, and were not free of selective reporting.There is some limited evidence that combination therapy is superior to monotherapy in improving clinical response (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85; participants = 2364; studies = 29, very low-quality evidence), although subgroup analyses

  2. Improvement of patient compliance after switching from conventional neuroleptics to the atypical neuroleptic amisulpride.

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael; Scheel, Tabea; Eich, Franz-Xaver

    2006-11-01

    Medication noncompliance of schizophrenic outpatients is an important problem in clinical practice, causing relapse and illness deterioration. Because atypical neuroleptics have, in controlled clinical studies, been shown to be better tolerated and accepted by patients, the question is whether switching from conventional to atypical neuroleptics such as amisulpride can increase patient compliance also under conditions of routine care. In a drug utilization observation study 570 schizophrenic outpatients, who had been pretreated with conventional neuroleptics and then been switched for individual clinical reasons to amisulpride, were observed for 3 months. Sociodemographic, illness and treatment related variables (e.g. Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, side effects), patients' subjective attitudes, and premedication and treatment compliance were assessed using standardized instruments. A total of 43.7% were rated as being noncompliant with the premedication, while 85.8% were rated as compliant after being switched to amisulpride, including 82.7% of the former noncompliant patients. Patients who had become compliant showed a signicantly better psychopathological status after 3 months as compared to still noncompliant patients, including a lower rate of inpatient stays. Switching noncompliant patients from conventional to atypical neuroleptics like amisulpride can improve patient compliance and psychopathology under conditions of routine treatment.

  3. Quality of life and subjective well-being during treatment with antipsychotics in out-patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wehmeier, Peter M; Kluge, Michael; Schneider, Edith; Schacht, Alexander; Wagner, Thomas; Schreiber, Wolfgang

    2007-04-13

    To assess the Quality of Life (QOL) in outpatients with schizophrenia under antipsychotics from two perspectives: a "subjective" perspective as rated by the patient and an "objective" perspective as rated by the physician. EASE (External Assessment of Quality of Life in Out-patients with Schizophrenia) is a 12-month, prospective, naturalistic study of the QOL in patients on antipsychotic treatment for schizophrenia in an out-patient setting in Germany. The study included 1462 patients who were initiated on a new antipsychotic or switched to another antipsychotic. The Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptics scale (SWN) and the Quality of Life Scale (QLS) were used to assess the QOL in these patients. The Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale was used to assess overall symptom severity. Four cohorts were identified and evaluated: (a) patients treated with olanzapine monotherapy (N=1007), (b) another atypical antipsychotic as monotherapy (N=335), (c) a typical antipsychotic as monotherapy (N=32) and (d) combination therapy with more than one antipsychotic (N=88). QOL as assessed by both SWN and QLS improved in all treatment cohorts. SWN responses in the respective cohorts were (a) 52.3%, (b) 38.8%, (c) 31.3% and (d) 44.3%, whilst the QLS responses were (a) 58.2%, (b) 45.1%, (c) 59.4% and (c) 40.9%. Symptom severity as assessed by the CGI also improved over time regardless of the type of antipsychotic. An increase of one point on the CGI corresponded to a change in SWN total score of -9.67 points and a change in QLS total score of -13.36 points. Both QOL and symptom severity improved over the 12-month study period, regardless of the type of antipsychotic taken. QOL improvement as perceived both from a "subjective" and an "objective" perspective was greatest in the cohort on olanzapine monotherapy.

  4. Do depressed patients on adjunctive atypical antipsychotics demonstrate a better quality of life compared to those on antidepressants only? A comparative cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of the US population.

    PubMed

    Al-Ruthia, Yazed Sulaiman; Hong, Song Hee; Solomon, David

    2015-01-01

    The adjunctive use of some atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) has been popular for patients with treatment-resistant depression. However, little is known about the impact of these agents on patients' Health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The objective of this study is to examine the impact of the adjunctive AAPs use on HRQoL among users of antidepressants with self-reported depression. Patients with depression (ICD-9-CM: 296, 300, and 311), and to have used the given AAPs and/or antidepressants for at least a year, were identified in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey of 2008-2011. The patients were classified into users of adjunctive AAPs (i.e., antidepressants plus AAPs) and users of antidepressants only. Adjusted multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between the utilization of AAPs and HRQoL measure.(c) A total of 3638 participants who met the inclusion criteria were identified (306 on AAPs vs. 3332 on antidepressants only). The study subjects were ≥18 years, predominately White (91.9%) and female (71%). The AAPs utilization was not associated with higher scores in the Physical Component Summary (PCS-12) of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12v2) (β = 1.542, 95% CI = -0.0142 to 3.0977, P = 0.0521). Rather, it was negatively associated with the Mental Component Summary (MCS-12) scores of the SF-12v2 (β = -1.5537, 95% CI = -3.0247 to -0.0827, P = 0.0385). The utilization of AAPs was not associated with higher scores of HRQoL. The findings of this study should underscore the need to consider other treatment options as add-on therapy for depression before resorting to AAPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel antipsychotics and severe hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M

    2001-08-01

    Newer atypical antipsychotics demonstrate superior effectiveness, with a diminished incidence of extrapyramidal side effects compared with older typical antipsychotics, but they have been associated with the development of obesity and new-onset diabetes. A small number of reports documenting modest hypertriglyceridemia related to newer antipsychotics have implicated fluperlapine, clozapine, and, most recently, olanzapine. This study summarizes the results of 14 cases of severe hypertriglyceridemia (>600 mg/dL) associated with olanzapine and quetiapine therapy occurring among inpatients at Oregon State Hospital, including 7 patients whose serum triglyceride levels exceeded 1,000 mg/ dL. Four of these patients also developed new-onset diabetes. Nine cases occurred during the first 8 months of treatment, with three cases identified within 3 months of commencing olanzapine or quetiapine therapy. Weight gain in olanzapine and quetiapine groups was modest (12.3 lb and 8.5 lb, respectively) and did not correlate with the severity of hypertriglyceridemia. Biochemical causes for severe hypertriglyceridemia associated with novel antipsychotics are unclear, but clinical monitoring of serum lipids must be added to the concerns about the metabolic consequences of therapy with certain newer antipsychotic agents.

  6. Testing for diabetes in hospitalised patients prescribed antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David; Young, Corina; Esop, Raadiyya; Paton, Carol; Walwyn, Rebecca

    2004-08-01

    Studies using computer databases suggest that atypical antipsychotic agents are more likely to be associated with diabetes than are conventional drugs. To discover the extent of testing for diabetes mellitus in hospital in-patients prescribed antipsychotics. Prescription charts were screened to identify patients prescribed antipsychotics. Case notes were then searched for evidence of testing for diabetes. In all, 606 patients were prescribed antipsychotics, of whom 250 (41.3%) had evidence of prior testing for diabetes. Patients prescribed atypicals were 40% more likely to have been tested than those prescribed conventional drugs (RR =1.4,95% CI1.1-1.9). Adjusted odds ratios v. conventional antipsychotics for conventional antipsychotics for testing were significantly higher for clozapine (OR=4.64,95% CI 2.42-8.90), olanzapine (OR=1.85,95% CI1.04-3.30) and antipsychotic polypharmacy (OR=2.96,95% CI1.59-5.52). Testing for diabetes was undertaken in less than half of the patients studied. Testing was more common in those receiving atypical antipsychotics. Apparent differences in claimed causal association of the use of some antipsychotics with diabetes may in part reflect different rates of testing.

  7. Discontinuation of antipsychotic medication in pregnancy: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Irene; McCrea, Rachel L; Osborn, David J P; Evans, Stephen; Pinfold, Vanessa; Cowen, Phil J; Gilbert, Ruth; Nazareth, Irwin

    2014-10-01

    Women prescribed antipsychotics face the dilemma on whether to continue medication in pregnancy in terms of balancing risks and benefits. Previous research on other psychotropic medications suggests that many women discontinue treatment in early pregnancy. However, very limited evidence exists on discontinuation of antipsychotic medication. We identified 495,953 pregnant women from THIN primary care database. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to examine time to last antipsychotic prescription. Poisson regression was used to examine characteristics of those who stopped treatment during pregnancy. There has been an overall increase in prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing since 2007. However, antipsychotics were more likely to be stopped in pregnant than non-pregnant women. Only 107/279 (38%) of women on atypical antipsychotics and 39/207 (19%) of women on typical antipsychotics before pregnancy still received treatment at the start of third trimester. Older women were more likely to continue typical antipsychotic treatment in pregnancy (35+ versus <25 years risk ratio: 3.09 [95% CI 1.76, 5.44]). Likewise, those who received typical antipsychotics for longer periods before were most likely to continue treatment in pregnancy (12+ versus <6 months: RR: 3.12 [95% CI 1.97, 4.95]). For atypical antipsychotics length and dose of prior prescribing were also associated with continuation in pregnancy. Pregnancy was a major determinant of cessation of antipsychotics. Only 38% of women on atypical and 19% on typical antipsychotics were still prescribed the drug in the third trimester. Duration of prior treatment, maternal age as well as dose was significantly associated with continued treatment of antipsychotics in pregnancy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Correlation between changes in quality of life and symptomatic improvement in Chinese patients switched from typical antipsychotics to olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, William; Kadziola, Zbigniew; Ye, Wenye; Xue, Hai Bo; Liu, Li; Treuer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between changes in symptoms and changes in self-reported quality of life among Chinese patients with schizophrenia who were switched from a typical antipsychotic to olanzapine during usual outpatient care. Patients and methods This post hoc analysis was conducted using data from the Chinese subgroup (n=475) of a multicountry, 12-month, prospective, noninterventional, observational study. The primary publication previously reported the efficacy, safety, and quality of life among patients who switched from a typical antipsychotic to olanzapine. Patients with schizophrenia were included if their symptoms were inadequately controlled with a typical antipsychotic and they were switched to olanzapine. Symptom severity was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity scale (CGI-S). Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality of Life–Abbreviated (WHOQOL-BREF). Paired t-tests were performed to assess changes from baseline to endpoint. Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) were used to assess the correlations between change in symptoms (BPRS and CGI-S scores) and change in HRQOL (WHOQOL-BREF scores). Results Symptoms and HRQOL both improved significantly over the 12 months of treatment (P<0.001). Significant correlations were observed between changes from baseline to end of study on the BPRS and the CGI-S and each of the WHOQOL-BREF four domain scores and two overall quality-of-life questions. The correlation coefficients ranged from r=−0.45 to r=−0.53 for the BPRS and WHOQOL-BREF. The correlation coefficients were slightly smaller between the CGI-S and WHOQOL-BREF, ranging from r=−0.33 to r=−0.40. Conclusion For patients with schizophrenia, assessing quality of life has the potential to add valuable information to the clinical assessment that takes into account the patient’s own

  9. Antipsychotic Drugs on Maternal Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Rat maternal behavior is a complex social behavior. Many clinically used antipsychotic drugs, including the typical drug haloperidol and atypical drugs clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and amisulpride, all disrupt active maternal responses (e.g. pup retrieval, pup licking and nest building) to various extents. In this review, I present a summary of recent studies on the behavioral effects and neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic action on maternal behavior in rats. I argue that antipsychotic drugs at the clinical relevant doses disrupt active maternal responses primarily by suppressing maternal motivation. Atypical drug-induced sedation also contributes to their disruptive effects, especially that on pup nursing. Among many potential receptor mechanisms, dopamine D2 receptors and serotonin 5-HT2A/2C receptors are shown to be critically involved in the mediation of the maternal disruptive effects of antipsychotic drugs, with D2 receptors contributing more to typical antipsychotic-induced disruptions, while 5-HT2A/2C receptors contributing more to atypical drug-induced disruption. The nucleus accumbens shell-related reward circuitry is an essential neural network in the mediation of the behavioral effects of antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior. This research not only helps to understand the extent and mechanisms of impacts of antipsychotic medications on human maternal care, but also is important for enhancing our understanding of the neurochemical basis of maternal behavior. It is also valuable for understanding the complete spectrum of therapeutic and side-effects of antipsychotic treatment. This knowledge may facilitate the development of effective intervening strategies to help patients coping with such undesirable effects. PMID:26221833

  10. Facial affect processing deficits in schizophrenia: A meta-analysis of antipsychotic treatment effects

    PubMed Central

    Kempton, Matthew J; Mehta, Mitul A

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition, including emotion processing, is a recognised deficit observed in patients with schizophrenia. It is one cognitive domain which has been emphasised as requiring further investigation, with the efficacy of antipsychotic treatment on this deficit remaining unclear. Nine studies met our criteria for entry into a meta-analysis of the effects of medication on facial affect processing, including data from 1162 patients and six antipsychotics. Overall we found a small, positive effect (Hedge’s g = 0.13, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.21, p = 0.002). In a subgroup analysis this was statistically significant for atypical, but not typical, antipsychotics. It should be noted that the pooled sample size of the typical subgroup was significantly lower than the atypical. Meta-regression analyses revealed that age, gender and changes in symptom severity were not moderating factors. For the small, positive effect on facial affect processing, the clinical significance is questionable in terms of treating deficits in emotion identification in schizophrenia. We show that antipsychotic medications are poor at improving facial affect processing compared to reducing symptoms. This highlights the need for further investigation into the neuropharmacological mechanisms associated with accurate emotion processing, to inform treatment options for these deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:25492885

  11. Blonanserin, a novel antipsychotic, is suitable for treating schizophrenia associated with hyperprolactinemia: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Fumie; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, atypical antipsychotic agents have primarily been used in pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia because of the fewer associated adverse effects. Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic recently introduced to treat patients with schizophrenia in Japan and South Korea. In this study, we examined the efficacy of switching antipsychotic medications to blonanserin monotherapy in patients with chronic schizophrenia with associated hyperprolactinemia. Ten schizophrenic patients (5 males and 5 females) with hyperprolactinemia were recruited. Clinical data before (baseline) and 12 weeks after (end point) switching to blonanserin monotherapy were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale score, Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale, and serum prolactin levels. The mean (SD) blonanserin dosage was 14.8 (3.8) mg/d. After switching to blonanserin, there were significant improvements in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale in the patients from both sexes. Moreover, serum prolactin levels in the female patients significantly decreased to within reference range. There were no additional adverse effects observed with the blonanserin treatment. Switching to blonanserin can reverse medication-induced prolactin elevations found in female patients- and blonanserin is a suitable antipsychotic for schizophrenic patients.

  12. Nanoencapsulation Improves Relative Bioavailability and Antipsychotic Effect of Olanzapine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dimer, Frantiescoli A; Pigatto, Maiara C; Boque, Camila A; Pase, Camila S; Roversi, Katiane; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Burger, Marilise E; Rates, M K; Dalla Costa, Teresa; Guterres, Silvia S

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and antipsychotic activity of olanzapine administered as free drug (OLA-FREE) or loaded into lipid-core nanocapsules (OLA-LNC). OLA-LNC were successfully developed with a particle size of 142 ± 4 nm and a zeta potential of -19.6 ± 0.6 mV. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution studies were carried out after the administration of free and nanoencapsulated olanzapine (10 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal route to male Wistar rats. Higher olanzapine concentrations and AUC(0-12 h) were found in plasma and tissues evaluated after the administration of OLA-LNC compared to the drug in the free form, resulting in a relative bioavailability of 226.7% in the plasma. As a result olanzapine loaded lipid-core nanocapsules presented pronounced and long-lasting effects on central nervous system. These nanocapsules (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly diminished the stereotyped behavior induced by D,L-amphetamine up to 12 hours whereas olanzapine free-form (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was effective during 03 hours only. Moreover, olanzapine loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) have shown a marked sedative effect and also prevented the prepulse inhibition disruption induced by apomorphine at lower dose than olanzapine in free-form (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Herewith, we point to the nanoencapsulation as a strategy for reducing the concentration of olanzapine in pharmaceutical formulations.

  13. Biomarkers for antipsychotic therapies.

    PubMed

    Pich, Emilio Merlo; Vargas, Gabriel; Domenici, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers for antipsychotic treatments have been conceptually linked to the measurements of dopamine functions, mostly D(2) receptor occupancy, either by imaging using selective PET/SPECT radioactive tracers or by assessing plasma prolactin levels. A quest for novel biomarkers was recently proposed by various academic, health service, and industrial institutions driven by the need for better treatments of psychoses. In this review we conceptualize biomarkers within the Translational Medicine paradigm whose goal was to provide support to critical decision-making in drug discovery. At first we focused on biomarkers as outcome measure of clinical studies by searching into the database clinicaltrial.gov. The results were somewhat disappointing, showing that out of 1,659 antipsychotic trials only 18 used a biomarker as an outcome measure. Several of these trials targeted plasma lipids as sentinel marker for metabolic adverse effects associated with the use of atypical antipsychotics, while only few studies were aimed to new disease specific biological markers. As an example of a mechanistic biomarker, we described the work done to progress the novel class of glycine transporter inhibitors as putative treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We also review how large-scale multiplex biological assays were applied to samples from tissues of psychiatric patients, so to learn from changes of numerous analytes (metabolic products, lipids, proteins, RNA transcripts) about the substrates involved in the disease. We concluded that a stringent implementation of these techniques could contribute to the endophenotypic characterization of patients, helping in the identification of key biomarkers to drive personalized medicine and new treatment development.

  14. Anxiolytic properties of the antipsychotic alkaloid alstonine.

    PubMed

    Costa-Campos, L; Dassoler, S C; Rigo, A P; Iwu, M; Elisabetsky, E

    2004-03-01

    Anxiolytic properties may be a crucial feature of newer antipsychotics associated with the improvement of negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients. The indole alkaloid alstonine acts as an atypical antipsychotic in behavioral models, but differs in its dopamine and serotonin binding profile. The purpose of this study was to verify if alstonine possesses anxiolytic properties in mice. The hole-board and light/dark models were used; moreover, the participation of D(1), 5-HT(2), NMDA and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors was likewise investigated. Alstonine clearly behaves as anxiolytic in both hole-board and light/dark situations. Pretreatment with the 5-HT(2A/2C) serotonin receptor antagonist ritanserin reverted the effects of alstonine in both the hole-board and light/dark models, suggesting the involvement of these receptors in the alstonine mechanism of action. The involvement of glutamate NMDA receptors should also be considered, given that alstonine partially reversed the increase in locomotion induced by MK-801 in the hole board, as well as MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion in motor activity apparatus.

  15. Effect of antipsychotic medications on glucose and lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Chaggar, Parminder S; Shaw, Steven M; Williams, Simon G

    2011-05-01

    Severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, are associated with excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cardiovascular risk in psychiatric disorders is partly related to antipsychotic therapy, especially second-generation or atypical antipsychotics. Some antipsychotic medications are associated with proatherogenic conditions including insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. In particular, olanzapine and clozapine have been consistently demonstrated to promote insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Ziprasidone and amisulpiride may be associated with more favorable metabolic effects. Many of the published data relating to metabolic effects of anti-psychotics originate from retrospective studies. However, prospective randomized-controlled data are emerging, and the latest evidence is described here.

  16. Synergistic interactions between ampakines and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Luu, N T; Herbst, T A; Knapp, R; Lutz, D; Arai, A; Rogers, G A; Lynch, G

    1999-04-01

    Tests were made for interactions between antipsychotic drugs and compounds that enhance synaptic currents mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptors ("ampakines"). Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs decreased methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats; the effects of near or even subthreshold doses of the antipsychotics were greatly enhanced by the ampakines. Interactions between the ampakine CX516 and low doses of different antipsychotics were generally additive and often synergistic. The ampakine did not exacerbate neuroleptic-induced catalepsy, indicating that the interaction between the different pharmacological classes was selective. These results suggest that positive modulators of cortical glutamatergic systems may be useful adjuncts in treating schizophrenia.

  17. Antipsychotic agents and QT changes.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, R; Chue, P

    2000-01-01

    Recently, antipsychotic medications of the novel or atypical classes have received increased attention because of concerns with respect to potential lengthening of the QT interval, yet the currently available and commonly prescribed conventional antipsychotics are significantly more cardiotoxic, particularly agents in the butyrophenone and phenothiazine classes. Lengthening of the QT interval can be associated with a fatal paroxysmal ventricular arrhythmia known as torsades de pointes. The specific duration of the QT interval at which the risk of an adverse cardiac event is greatest, is not established. There is not only significant variation in the applied definition of an abnormal interval, but the maximal QT interval in healthy volunteers is greater than the currently accepted standards. The QT interval is influenced by normal physiological and pathologic factors, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Using recombinant technology, haloperidol and sertindole have been demonstrated to be high-affinity antagonists of a human cardiac potassium channel encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene. Pimozide, however, has been shown to act principally through calcium channel antagonism, and chlorpromazine may affect sodium channels. Nevertheless, it is possible that these effects are significant only in the presence of predisposing factors, either genetic or acquired. Despite proven efficacy in clinical trials and subsequent supervised use in Europe, a number of recently developed antipsychotic medications are not available to patients in North America. Yet, conventional antipsychotic medications that would not be approved by current safety standards continue to be widely used. PMID:10740988

  18. Second-generation long-acting injectable antipsychotic agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    For over 40 years, antipsychotic drugs have been used as long-term maintenance treatment to control symptoms and reduce relapse rates in patients with schizophrenia. 'First-generation' oral agents such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine are associated with high levels of unwanted neurological effects and poor rates of patient adherence.1,2 Long-acting ('depot') injections of antipsychotics were developed to try to improve adherence. 'Second-generation' antipsychotic agents (also known as atypical antipsychotics) were introduced into clinical practice over 16 years ago. Although these agents have a lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal side effects, they are associated with a range of other unwanted effects (e.g. weight gain and its sequelae).1,3,4 Initially, second-generation agents were only available as orally administered medicines. Three long-acting injectable formulations of second-generation antipsychotics are now available in the UK: olanzapine embonate injection (ZypAdhera), paliperidone injection (Xeplion) and risperidone injection (Risperdal Consta). In this article we review the evidence for these agents and discuss the practical implications of their use.

  19. Long-acting injectable formulations of antipsychotic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Ji; Amatya, Sarmila; Kim, Myung Sun; Park, Jong Hoon; Seol, Eunyoung; Lee, Heeyong; Shin, Young-Hee; Na, Dong Hee

    2013-06-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been used to treat patients with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Long-acting injectable antipsychotic drugs are useful for improving medication compliance with a better therapeutic option to treat patients who lack insight or adhere poorly to oral medication. Several long-acting injectable antipsychotic drugs are clinically available. Haloperidol decanoate and fluphenazine decanoate are first-generation depot drugs, but the use of these medicines has declined since the advent of second-generation depot agents, such as long-acting risperidone, paliperidone palmitate, and olanzapine pamoate. The second-generation depot drugs are better tolerated and have fewer adverse neurological side effects. Long-acting injectable risperidone, the first depot formulation of an atypical antipsychotic drug, was prepared by encapsulating risperidone into biodegradable microspheres. Paliperidone palmitate is an aqueous suspension of nanocrystal molecules, and olanzapine pamoate is a microcrystalline salt of olanzapine and pamoic acid suspended in aqueous solution. This review summarizes the characteristics and recent research of formulations of each long-acting injectable antipsychotic drug.

  20. Patients' understanding and participation in a trial designed to improve the management of anti-psychotic medication: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Anne; Day, Jenny; Randall, Fiona; Bentall, Richard P

    2003-12-01

    Combining qualitative methods alongside randomised controlled trials in the health field has been advocated but has only been used rarely in mental health services research. The aim of this study was to illuminate patients' understanding of the nature and purpose and outcomes of a trial designed to improve the management of neuroleptic medication. Qualitative interviews were carried out with a group of patients participating in a trial comparing a psycho-educational and therapeutic alliance intervention in managing anti-psychotic medication. Our findings highlighted aspects of the experience, process and outcome of the trial, which remain latent in the quantitative assessment. The issue of enlarged selfefficacy emerging when patients were involved in communications with professionals in the trial was important. Whilst the participants provided positive feedback about their involvement in the trial, they struggled to recall the details of the intervention to which they had been exposed. Patients did not readily identify the content and concepts characterising each condition; rather they prioritised the opportunity for communication and contact with the researchers. Qualitative research accompanying trials illuminates and adds to the quantitative outcomes. The key to interpreting participants' accounts of the process and outcomes of this trial suggests the need to give greater emphasis to participants' past and current experience of service contact.

  1. Financial incentives to improve adherence to anti-psychotic maintenance medication in non-adherent patients - a cluster randomised controlled trial (FIAT)

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Stefan; Burton, Alexandra; Ashby, Deborah; Ashcroft, Richard; Burns, Tom; David, Anthony; Eldridge, Sandra; Firn, Mike; Knapp, Martin; McCabe, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Background Various interventions have been tested to achieve adherence to anti-psychotic maintenance medication in non-adherent patients with psychotic disorders, and there is no consistent evidence for the effectiveness of any established intervention. The effectiveness of financial incentives in improving adherence to a range of treatments has been demonstrated; no randomised controlled trial however has tested the use of financial incentives to achieve medication adherence for patients with psychotic disorders living in the community. Methods/Design In a cluster randomised controlled trial, 34 mental health teams caring for difficult to engage patients in the community will be randomly allocated to either the intervention group, where patients will be offered a financial incentive for each anti-psychotic depot medication they receive over a 12 month period, or the control group, where all patients will receive treatment as usual. We will recruit 136 patients with psychotic disorders who use these services and who have problems adhering to antipsychotic depot medication, although all conventional methods to achieve adherence have been tried. The primary outcome will be adherence levels, and secondary outcomes are global clinical improvement, number of voluntary and involuntary hospital admissions, number of attempted and completed suicides, incidents of physical violence, number of police arrests, number of days spent in work/training/education, subjective quality of life and satisfaction with medication. We will also establish the cost effectiveness of offering financial incentives. Discussion The study aims to provide new evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of offering financial incentives to patients with psychotic disorders to adhere to antipsychotic maintenance medication. If financial incentives improve adherence and lead to better health and social outcomes, they may be recommended as one option to improve the treatment of non

  2. Quinoline- and isoquinoline-sulfonamide analogs of aripiprazole: novel antipsychotic agents?

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Pawel; Partyka, Anna; Marciniec, Krzysztof; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Pawlowski, Maciej; Wesolowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of typical antipsychotics over six decades ago signaled an important milestone in psychiatry. However, second-generation antipsychotics ameliorated the positive symptoms of schizophrenia but displayed limited effectiveness for the negative and cognitive symptoms. In addition, while the newer antipsychotics produced fewer motor side effects, the atypical antipsychotics still induced weight gain and endocrinopathies. In recent years, a third generation of antipsychotics was identified. Aripiprazole was the first approved drug acting as a D2 partial agonist/functionally selective ligand. This review presents the state of the development of novel antipsychotic dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic agents, supported by an overview of the compounds evaluated under advanced preclinical and clinical development (e.g., cariprazine and brexpiprazole). In line with the recent trends in the development of modern atypical antipsychotics, we present our strategic development of long-chain arylpiperazine-derived quinoline- and isoquinoline-sulfonamide displaying a multireceptor binding profile and partial D2 receptor agonism.

  3. Effect of Second Generation Antipsychotics on Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Kaczyinski, Richard; Sultzer, David; Schneider, Lon S.

    2014-01-01

    Context Alzheimer disease (AD) imposes a severe burden upon patients and their caregivers. Severity of psychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances are important determinants of caregivers’ experience of burden. These symptoms may be improved with atypical antipsychotic treatment. Objective In this study we use data from the CATIE-AD trial to evaluate the effect of atypical antipsychotics as compared to placebo on the experiences of caregivers of outpatients with Alzheimer disease. Design We compared the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs (olanzapine, risperidone or quetiapine) considered together as a group, to placebo, on experiences of caregivers of AD outpatients. We also evaluated whether improvement in patients’ psychiatric and behavioral symptoms mediated the relationship between drug treatment and caregiver burden. Setting CATIE-AD included outpatients in usual care settings, and assessed treatment effectiveness over a nine-month period. Participants Data from CATIE-AD participants who had at least one post-baseline outcome assessment, and from their caregivers, were examined in an intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) (N=361), and then in a phase 1 only analysis including only observations while on the initially randomized drug (N=153). Measures The Burden Interview, Beck Depression Inventory, and the NPI Caregiver Distress Scale were used to evaluate caregiver burden. Results In both ITT and phase 1-only analyses, caregivers of patients treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) scored significantly lower than those on placebo on both the Burden Interview (p = 0.009) and the NPI Caregiver Distress Scale’s scores (p = 0.0209). These differences appeared to have been mediated by lower levels of agitation, hostility, and psychotic distortions. Conclusion In AD patients with symptoms of psychosis, agitation or aggressive behavior, medications can have a small but significant impact on caregiver burden. PMID:21939611

  4. [Schizophrenia, diabetes mellitus and antipsychotics].

    PubMed

    Gury, C

    2004-01-01

    and subjected to many flaws: concomitant diseases not taken into account, diabetes status evaluated by drug consumption, unknown diabetes status before antipsychotic treatment, etc. In the few prospective studies performed, no significant differences between the atypical versus typical antipsychotics were evidenced for new cases of diabetes. Moreover, in general population, the glucose tolerance impairment is underdiagnosed and it is estimated that people with a glucose tolerance impairment have a 5-10% annual risk of type II diabetes. Thus, this concern has to be replaced among the world epidemic increase of diabetes and in a population of patients whose the disease itself and life style are risk factors for diabetes. Some studies have explored the pathophysiological mechanisms that could support a diabetogenic effect of antipsychotics. Although it does not seem to be a direct effect of antipsychotics on insulin secretion by pancreatic cells, body weight increase has been evidence for both typical and atypical antipsychotics. However, it remains unclear whether this weight increase is responsible for a visceral adiposity, which is a risk factor better fitted to the cardiovascular mortality tha the body weight itself. Other hypotheses involving an effect on the leptin, which regulates the appetite, have been proposed. In waiting of new prospective controlled studies, and without denying the impact of antipsychotics on the glucose and lipid metabolisms (on the weight increase, for example), it should be recognized that the benefit/risk ratio remains largely in favour of the treatment, particularly for the atypical antipsychotics, more effective and better tolerated at the neurological level than the conventional antipsychotics. One of the benefits of the mainly articles in professional media about this concern is to draw attention on the metabolism disorders in schizophrenic patients, which are important risk factor of their frequent cardiovascular surmortality

  5. A new framework for investigating antipsychotic action in humans: lessons from PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Kapur, S

    1998-03-01

    With a decade of neuroreceptor imaging of antipsychotics behind us, this article attempts to synthesise what has been learnt about the mechanism of action of antipsychotics using these techniques. The data show that: (i) the 'typical' antipsychotics bind mainly to the dopamine D2 receptor, and that 60-80% D2 occupancy may provide optimal antipsychotic response with little extrapyramidal side effects; (ii) all the clinically available 'atypical' antipsychotics show a higher occupancy of the 5-HT2 than D2 receptors; (iii) however, these 'atypical' antipsychotics differ in their D2 occupancy. The D2 occupancy of risperidone is within the typical range (i.e. > 60%) while that of clozapine is clearly lower (< 60%); (iv) antipsychotics with combined 5-HT2/D2 antagonism lose some of their 'atypical' properties if used in doses where their D2 occupancy is too high (> 80%). Based on these data a framework is suggested wherein antipsychotics may be classified on the basis of their D2 and 5-HT2 occupancy in patients at steady state while taking clinically relevant doses. Within this framework typical antipsychotics are classified as 'high-D2', resperidone as 'high-D2 high-5HT2' and clozapine as a 'low-D2 high-5HT2' antipsychotic. The justification, limitations and the value of this framework in understanding and investigating newer antipsychotics is discussed.

  6. [Atypical depression: Clinical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Lutz, M; Morali, A; Lang, J-P

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines whether atypical depression is still a valid entity as a diagnosis subtype in the light of publications with most recent antidepressants. First, we present the origins of the diagnosis sub-specification of atypical depression, which is based on a different drug response to tricyclic antidepressants and mono amino oxydase inhibitors. Secondly, we discuss the different definitions that can be found for the terms of atypical depression. We present more specifically the definition of atypical depression as it is described in the DSM-IV, with its most important criterion: mood reactivity. Then we present a review of scientific publications questioning atypical depression validity as a clinical syndrome (based on medline researches). We will see whether this diagnosis is still relevant with the latest drugs used to treat mood disorders. A special focus is made on the link between atypical depression and bipolar disorder, based on Benazzi's work. Most of publications confirm that atypical depression is a valid syndrome regarding first antidepressants clinical trials. Nevertheless, more studies with the latest antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics are needed to confirm this hypothesis. The link between atypical depression and bipolar disorders seems to be quite strong although it requires further investigations. There are very few double-blind drug trials focusing on atypical depressions and results need to be confirmed by trials with new drugs. Moreover, we regret that there are no studies including cerebral imagery. More studies are also needed on neurobiology and psychotherapy specificity. Atypical depression is still a useful concept, because of its specific clinical presentation, evolution and treatments, even if more studies should be done. Atypical depression could also be useful to diagnose more easily some bipolar disorders and should help clinicians to focus more on suicidal risks and addiction evaluation for these patients, considering

  7. Olanzapine treatment in patients with typical and atypical neuroleptic-associated agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Finkel, B; Lerner, A; Oyffe, I; Rudinski, D; Sigal, M; Weizman, A

    1998-05-01

    Two cases are reported of patients who developed agranulocytosis after treatment with typical and atypical antipsychotics. The patients were successfully treated with olanzapine. We suggest the consideration of olanzapine as a safer treatment in patients who require immediate continuation of antipsychotic medication and have a prior history of classic and atypical neuroleptic-induced agranulocytosis.

  8. A new perspective for schizophrenia: TAAR1 agonists reveal antipsychotic- and antidepressant-like activity, improve cognition and control body weight.

    PubMed

    Revel, F G; Moreau, J-L; Pouzet, B; Mory, R; Bradaia, A; Buchy, D; Metzler, V; Chaboz, S; Groebke Zbinden, K; Galley, G; Norcross, R D; Tuerck, D; Bruns, A; Morairty, S R; Kilduff, T S; Wallace, T L; Risterucci, C; Wettstein, J G; Hoener, M C

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe and highly complex mental illness. Current treatments manage the positive symptoms, yet have minimal effects on the negative and cognitive symptoms, two prominent features of the disease with critical impact on the long-term morbidity. In addition, antipsychotic treatments trigger serious side effects that precipitate treatment discontinuation. Here, we show that activation of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a modulator of monoaminergic neurotransmission, represents a novel therapeutic option. In rodents, activation of TAAR1 by two novel and pharmacologically distinct compounds, the full agonist RO5256390 and the partial agonist RO5263397, blocks psychostimulant-induced hyperactivity and produces a brain activation pattern reminiscent of the antipsychotic drug olanzapine, suggesting antipsychotic-like properties. TAAR1 agonists do not induce catalepsy or weight gain; RO5263397 even reduced haloperidol-induced catalepsy and prevented olanzapine from increasing body weight and fat accumulation. Finally, TAAR1 activation promotes vigilance in rats and shows pro-cognitive and antidepressant-like properties in rodent and primate models. These data suggest that TAAR1 agonists may provide a novel and differentiated treatment of schizophrenia as compared with current medication standards: TAAR1 agonists may improve not only the positive symptoms but also the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits, without causing adverse effects such as motor impairments or weight gain.

  9. Intranasal delivery of antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Katare, Yogesh K; Piazza, Justin E; Bhandari, Jayant; Daya, Ritesh P; Akilan, Kosalan; Simpson, Madeline J; Hoare, Todd; Mishra, Ram K

    2016-11-29

    Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat psychotic disorders that afflict millions globally and cause tremendous emotional, economic and healthcare burdens. However, the potential of intranasal delivery to improve brain-specific targeting remains unrealized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and methods used for brain targeting via the intranasal (IN) route as well as the potential advantages of improving this type of delivery. We extensively review experimental studies relevant to intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of psychosis and mental illnesses. We also review clinical studies in which intranasal delivery of peptides, like oxytocin (7 studies) and desmopressin (1), were used as an adjuvant to antipsychotic treatment with promising results. Experimental animal studies (17) investigating intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs have revealed successful targeting to the brain as suggested by pharmacokinetic parameters and behavioral effects. To improve delivery to the brain, nanotechnology-based carriers like nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been used in several studies. However, human studies assessing intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs are lacking, and the potential toxicity of nanoformulations used in animal studies has not been explored. A brief discussion of future directions anticipates that if limitations of low aqueous solubility of antipsychotic drugs can be overcome and non-toxic formulations used, IN delivery (particularly targeting specific tissues within the brain) will gain more importance moving forward given the inherent benefits of IN delivery in comparison to other methods.

  10. Improving the appropriateness of antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes: a mixed-methods process evaluation of an academic detailing intervention.

    PubMed

    Desveaux, L; Saragosa, M; Rogers, J; Bevan, L; Loshak, H; Moser, A; Feldman, S; Regier, L; Jeffs, L; Ivers, N M

    2017-05-26

    In 2014, nursing home administration and government officials were facing increasing public and media scrutiny around the variation of antipsychotic medication (APM) prescribing across Ontario nursing homes. In response, policy makers partnered to test an academic detailing (AD) intervention to address appropriate prescribing of APM in nursing homes in a cluster-randomized trial. This mixed-methods study aimed to explore how and why the AD intervention may have resulted in changes in the nursing home context. The objectives were to understand how the intervention was implemented, explore contextual factors associated with implementation, and examine impact of the intervention on prescribing. Administrative data for the primary outcome of the full randomized trial will not be available for a minimum of 1 year. Therefore, this paper reports the findings of a planned, quantitative interim trial analysis assessed mean APM dose and prescribing prevalence at baseline and 3 and 6 months across 40 nursing homes (18 intervention, 22 control). Patient-level administrative data regarding prescribing were analyzed using generalized linear mixed effects regression. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nursing home staff from the intervention group to explore opinions and experiences of the AD intervention. Interviews were analyzed using the framework method, with constructs from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) applied as pre-defined deductive codes. Open coding was applied when emerging themes did not align with CFIR constructs. Qualitative and quantitative findings were triangulated to examine points of divergence to understand how the intervention may work and to identify areas for future opportunities and areas for improvement. No significant differences were observed in prescribing outcomes. A total of 22 interviews were conducted, including four academic detailers and 18 nursing home staff. Constructs within the CFIR domains of

  11. International trends in antipsychotic use: A study in 16 countries, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Hálfdánarson, Óskar; Zoëga, Helga; Aagaard, Lise; Bernardo, Miquel; Brandt, Lena; Fusté, Anna Coma; Furu, Kari; Garuoliené, Kristina; Hoffmann, Falk; Huybrechts, Krista F; Kalverdijk, Luuk J; Kawakami, Koji; Kieler, Helle; Kinoshita, Takuya; Litchfield, Melisa; López, Soffy C; Machado-Alba, Jorge E; Machado-Duque, Manuel E; Mahesri, Mufaddal; Nishtala, Prasad S; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Reutfors, Johan; Saastamoinen, Leena K; Sato, Izumi; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C M; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Verdoux, Hélène; Wang, Liang-Jen; Yahni, Corinne Zara; Bachmann, Christian J

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess international trends in antipsychotic use, using a standardised methodology. A repeated cross-sectional design was applied to data extracts from the years 2005 to 2014 from 16 countries worldwide. During the study period, the overall prevalence of antipsychotic use increased in 10 of the 16 studied countries. In 2014, the overall prevalence of antipsychotic use was highest in Taiwan (78.2/1000 persons), and lowest in Colombia (3.2/1000). In children and adolescents (0-19 years), antipsychotic use ranged from 0.5/1000 (Lithuania) to 30.8/1000 (Taiwan). In adults (20-64 years), the range was 2.8/1000 (Colombia) to 78.9/1000 (publicly insured US population), and in older adults (65+ years), antipsychotic use ranged from 19.0/1000 (Colombia) to 149.0/1000 (Taiwan). Atypical antipsychotic use increased in all populations (range of atypical/typical ratio: 0.7 (Taiwan) to 6.1 (New Zealand, Australia)). Quetiapine, risperidone, and olanzapine were most frequently prescribed. Prevalence and patterns of antipsychotic use varied markedly between countries. In the majority of populations, antipsychotic utilisation and especially the use of atypical antipsychotics increased over time. The high rates of antipsychotic prescriptions in older adults and in youths in some countries merit further investigation and systematic pharmacoepidemiologic monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Good medical practice in antipsychotic pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peuskens, J

    1998-03-01

    Schizophrenia requires a comprehensive treatment programme that augments pharmacotherapy, such as antipsychotic drugs, with psychological (education) and social (rehabilitation) therapies. Antipsychotic drugs, however, are still fundamental in the treatment of schizophrenia. When administered correctly, these drugs not only reduce psychotic symptoms but can also prevent relapse, which prevents hospitalization and facilitates psychosocial re-integration. Unfortunately, the type of drug and dosing schedule used are often inappropriate. The antipsychotic drug prescribed should be decided on an individual patient basis according to the experiences the patient has had with previous treatments. Choosing the right drug is a key to improving compliance and treatment outcome. Additionally, antipsychotic drugs should be prescribed at an early stage, in order to increase the likelihood of a favourable treatment outcome, and for long enough to reduce the risk of relapse. The efficacy and tolerability of antipsychotic drugs have been studied extensively, and treatment guidelines have now been developed, in particular from the Bruges Consensus Conference and the American Psychiatric Association, to optimize the diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia. The use of novel antipsychotics, which have better therapeutic and safety profiles than traditional antipsychotics, together with educational programmes should improve compliance with antipsychotic drugs and thus improve treatment outcomes for schizophrenic patients. Treatment strategies to be used at the various stages of schizophrenia have been recommended, together with preferred options for managing lack of response or side effects.

  13. Financial incentives to improve adherence to antipsychotic maintenance medication in non-adherent patients: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Stefan; Bremner, Stephen A; Lauber, Christoph; Henderson, Catherine; Burns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to long-term antipsychotic injectable (LAI) medication in patients with psychotic disorders is associated with a range of negative outcomes. No psychosocial intervention has been found to be consistently effective in improving adherence. OBJECTIVES: To test whether or not offering financial incentives is effective and cost-effective in improving adherence and to explore patient and clinician experiences with such incentives. DESIGN: A cluster randomised controlled trial with economic and nested qualitative evaluation. The intervention period lasted for 12 months with 24 months' follow-up. The unit of randomisation was mental health teams in the community. SETTING: Community teams in secondary mental health care. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis or bipolar illness, receiving ≤ 75% of their prescribed LAI medication. In total, 73 teams with 141 patients (intervention n = 78 and control n = 63) were included. INTERVENTIONS: Participants in the intervention group received £15 for each LAI medication. Patients in the control group received treatment as usual. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: PRIMARY OUTCOME: adherence to LAI medication (the percentage of received out of those prescribed). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: percentage of patients with at least 95% adherence; clinical global improvement; subjective quality of life; satisfaction with medication; hospitalisation; adverse events; and costs. Qualitative evaluation: semistructured interviews with patients in the intervention group and their clinicians. RESULTS: PRIMARY OUTCOME: outcome data were available for 131 patients. Baseline adherence was 69% in the intervention group and 67% in the control group. During the intervention period, adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (85% vs. 71%) [adjusted mean difference 11.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.9% to 19.0%; p = 0.003]. Secondary outcome

  14. Financial incentives to improve adherence to antipsychotic maintenance medication in non-adherent patients: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Priebe, Stefan; Bremner, Stephen A; Lauber, Christoph; Henderson, Catherine; Burns, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Poor adherence to long-term antipsychotic injectable (LAI) medication in patients with psychotic disorders is associated with a range of negative outcomes. No psychosocial intervention has been found to be consistently effective in improving adherence. To test whether or not offering financial incentives is effective and cost-effective in improving adherence and to explore patient and clinician experiences with such incentives. A cluster randomised controlled trial with economic and nested qualitative evaluation. The intervention period lasted for 12 months with 24 months' follow-up. The unit of randomisation was mental health teams in the community. Community teams in secondary mental health care. Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis or bipolar illness, receiving ≤ 75% of their prescribed LAI medication. In total, 73 teams with 141 patients (intervention n = 78 and control n = 63) were included. Participants in the intervention group received £15 for each LAI medication. Patients in the control group received treatment as usual. adherence to LAI medication (the percentage of received out of those prescribed). percentage of patients with at least 95% adherence; clinical global improvement; subjective quality of life; satisfaction with medication; hospitalisation; adverse events; and costs. Qualitative evaluation: semistructured interviews with patients in the intervention group and their clinicians. outcome data were available for 131 patients. Baseline adherence was 69% in the intervention group and 67% in the control group. During the intervention period, adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (85% vs. 71%) [adjusted mean difference 11.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.9% to 19.0%; p = 0.003]. Secondary outcome: patients in the intervention group showed statistically significant improvement in adherence of at least 95% (adjusted odds ratio 8.21, 95% CI 2.00 to 33

  15. A preliminary analysis of association between the down-regulation of microRNA-181b expression and symptomatology improvement in schizophrenia patients before and after antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong-tao; Sun, Xin-yang; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Lin; Guo, Zhong-min; Fan, Hui-min; Zhong, Ai-fang; Niu, Wei; Dai, Yun-hua; Zhang, Li-yi; Shi, Zheng; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Jim

    2014-07-01

    Despite the growing evidences on the relation of altered expression of miRNAs and schizophrenia, most schizophrenia subjects have an extensive antipsychotic treatment history and the pharmacological effects on miRNA expression are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the change of plasma microRNA-181b level and improvement of symptomatology before and after six-week antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia patients, and explore their association. A total of 20 schizophrenia patients absent of antipsychotics and 20 age-and gender-matched normal controls were enrolled, and tested for 9 schizophrenia-associated microRNA (miR-30e, miR-34a, miR-181b, miR-195, miR-346, miR-432, miR-7, miR-132 and miR-212) expression levels in plasma using quantitative RT-PCR and for symptomatology improvement using Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) before and after treatment (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone and risperidone) for the patients only. Compared with the normal control group, the expression levels of miRNA-181b, miRNA-30e, miRNA-34a and miRNA-7 of the patients group were significantly higher (p < 0.05). Compared with those before treatment in the patient group, the symptomatology scores were significantly lower (p < 0.001), and the expression level of microRNA-181b was significantly down-regulated after treatment (p < 0.05). The change of miRNA-181b expression was positively correlated with the improvement of negative symptoms and lack of response symptoms (r = 0.502 and 0.557, P < 0.05, accounting for 20.2% and 26.4% respectively), and their therapeutic effects with OR being 11.283 and 5.119 respectively. We conclude that miRNA-181b, miRNA-30e, miRNA-34a and miRNA-7 are probably involved in pathogenesis of SZ, and the significant down-regulation of miRNA-181b expression predicts improvement of negative symptoms to treatment, and thus can serve as a potential plasmamolecular marker for antipsychotic responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Antipsychotic drugs and seizures.

    PubMed

    Remick, R A; Fine, S H

    1979-02-01

    The authors examine the clinical problem of which antipsychotic drug to use when antipsychotics are indicated in patients with a seizuire disorder or who are susceptible to seizures. While definitive answers to this problem are still unknown, guidelines are offered for antipsychotic drug use in this situation, based on the author's understanding of psychotropics and epilepsy.

  17. Patient outcomes within schizophrenia treatment: a look at the role of long-acting injectable antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Bera, Rimal B

    2014-01-01

    Compliance is a critical issue across all chronic conditions, including schizophrenia. Compliance is not an all-or-nothing phenomenon, with a continuum from taking all medications as prescribed to partial compliance to complete noncompliance. Partial compliance is a serious problem that may result in abrupt dose changes leading to unanticipated adverse effects and can demoralize the patient. Further, there is a nearly 5-fold increase in the risk of relapse in first-episode patients when antipsychotic drug treatment is discontinued. Taken together, these data indicate that it is critical to ensure continuous delivery of antipsychotic treatment. Atypical antipsychotic medications were expected to result in better adherence, primarily because of the anticipated improved efficacy and safety profile. However, atypical agents have poor adherence, irrespective of the type of atypical medication, making it difficult to predict which patients are taking their oral medications. Long-acting injectable (LAI) agents may minimize the fluctuations in peak and overall plasma levels compared with oral agents, indicating they may allow more consistent and predictable administration. Based on clinical experience in my practice, several important observations regarding LAI use in patients with schizophrenia have been identified. First, there are potential advantages to using LAIs, including assistance in understanding reasons for poor response, the possibility of eliminating daily pill ingestion, and the elimination of the abrupt loss of medication coverage. There are also several potential obstacles to the use of LAIs, including a lack of infrastructure for the delivery and disposal of syringes and the ease of use with the oral agents. Several strategies can be used to increase patient willingness to initiate and continue LAI therapy. Strategies to improve acceptance involve presenting the option with enthusiasm, ensuring proper goal setting, educating the patient that this treatment

  18. Differential add-on effects of aripiprazole in resolving hyperprolactinemia induced by risperidone in comparison to benzamide antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ken; Huang, Yu-Shu; Ree, Shao-Chun; Hsiao, Cheng-Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is associated with typical antipsychotic agents and atypical antipsychotics such as risperidone and amisulpride. This study investigates the effects of 8-week adjunctive treatment with aripiprazole in patients with hyperprolactinemia induced by risperidone in comparison to benzamide antipsychotics (amisulpride and sulpiride). Aripiprazole was administered to 24 patients with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. The doses of pre-existing antipsychotics were fixed, while the aripiprazole dose was 5-20 mg/day during the 8-week study period. Serum prolactin levels were measured at weeks 4 and 8. Symptoms and side effects were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale, Simpson-Angus Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale, and metabolic measures at weeks 2, 4 and 8. Mean (standard error) prolactin levels decreased from 77.0±13.3 ng/mL to 18.3±2.1 ng/mL (p<0.001 vs. baseline), from 144.9±24.4 ng/mL to 127.5±21.7 ng/mL (p=0.099 vs. baseline) and 71.4±24.6 ng/mL to 43.3±14.7 ng/mL (p=0.106 vs. baseline) for those taking risperidone, amisulpride, and sulpiride, respectively. For those who took risperidone before the study started, 14 of 15 (93.3%) patients had normalized prolactin levels, while only 1 of 10 (10%) taking benzamide antipsychotics had normalized prolactin levels. The PANSS score improved significantly, and aripiprazole had no significant influence on metabolic measures or scales of movement side effects. Adjunctive aripiprazole treatment reversed effectively hyperprolactinemia induced by risperidone, but was less effective for that induced by benzamide antipsychotics. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00541554. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia: mechanisms, clinical features and management.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Peter M; Wieck, Angelika

    2004-01-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is an important but neglected adverse effect of antipsychotic medication. It occurs frequently with conventional antipsychotics and some atypical antipsychotics (risperidone and amisulpride) but is rare with other atypical antipsychotics (aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone). For this reason the terms 'prolactin-sparing' and 'prolactin-raising' are more useful than 'atypical' and 'conventional' when considering the effect of antipsychotic drugs on serum prolactin. During antipsychotic treatment prolactin levels can rise 10-fold or more above pretreatment values. In a recent study approximately 60% of women and 40% of men treated with a prolactin-raising antipsychotic had a prolactin level above the upper limit of the normal range. The distinction between asymptomatic and symptomatic hyperprolactinaemia is important but is often not made in the literature. Some symptoms of hyperprolactinaemia result from a direct effect of prolactin on target tissues but others result from hypogonadism caused by prolactin disrupting the normal functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Symptoms of hyperprolactinaemia include gynaecomastia, galactorrhoea, sexual dysfunction, infertility, oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea. These symptoms are little researched in psychiatric patients. Existing data suggest that they are common but that clinicians underestimate their prevalence. For example, well conducted studies of women treated with conventional antipsychotics have reported prevalence rates of approximately 45% for oligomenorrhoea/amenorrhoea and 19% for galactorrhoea. An illness-related under-function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female patients with schizophrenia may also contribute to menstrual irregularities. Long-term consequences of antipsychotic-related hypogonadism require further research but are likely and include premature bone loss in men and women. There are conflicting data on whether

  20. Serum Glutathione in Patients with Schizophrenia in Dynamics of Antipsychotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, S A; Smirnova, L P; Shchigoreva, Yu G; Semke, A V; Bokhan, N A

    2015-12-01

    Serum concentrations of oxidized and reduced glutathione were measured in 73 patients with schizophrenia at admission and in dynamics of therapy with traditional and atypical antipsychotic drugs. The level of reduced glutathione in patients with schizophrenia with manifest clinical symptoms was lower than in normal subjects. Atypical neuroleptics produced virtually no effects on the glutathione system, while therapy with typical antipsychotics led to further decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, thus aggravating the imbalance of metabolic processes typical of schizophrenia.

  1. Histamine H3-receptor inverse agonists as novel antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chihiro

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) that is resistant to treatment with dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists may involve changes other than those in the dopaminergic system. Recently, histamine (HA), which regulates arousal and cognitive functions, has been suggested to act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Four HA receptors-H1, H2, H3, and H4-have been identified. Our recent basic and clinical studies revealed that brain HA improved the symptoms of SZ. The H3 receptor is primarily localized in the central nervous system, and it acts not only as a presynaptic autoreceptor that modulates the HA release but also as a presynaptic heteroreceptor that regulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as monoamines and amino acids. H3-receptor inverse agonists have been considered to improve cognitive functions. Many atypical antipsychotics are H3-receptor antagonists. Imidazole-containing H3-receptor inverse agonists inhibit not only cytochrome P450 but also hERG potassium channels (encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene). Several imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists also have high affinity for H4 receptors, which are expressed at high levels in mast cells and leukocytes. Clozapine is an H4-receptor agonist; this agonist activity may be related to the serious side effect of agranulocytosis caused by clozapine. Therefore, selective non-imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists can be considered as novel antipsychotics that may improve refractory SZ.

  2. Newer antipsychotics and upcoming molecules for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    George, Melvin; Amrutheshwar, Radhika; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip; Kattimani, Shivanand; Dkhar, Steven Aibor

    2013-08-01

    The management of schizophrenia has seen significant strides over the last few decades, due to the increasing availability of a number of antipsychotics. Yet, the diminished efficacy in relation to the negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, and the disturbing adverse reactions associated with the current antipsychotics, reflect the need for better molecules targeting unexplored pathways. To review the salient features of the recently approved antipsychotics; namely, iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and blonanserin. We discuss the advantages, limitations and place in modern pharmacotherapy of each of these drugs. In addition, we briefly highlight the new targets that are being explored. Promising strategies include modulation of the glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways, as well as cholinergic systems. Although regulatory bodies have approved only a handful of antipsychotics in recent years, the wide spectrum of targets that are being explored could eventually bring out antipsychotics with improved efficacy and acceptability, as well as the potential to revolutionize psychiatric practice.

  3. Resting-state functional connectivity changes within the default mode network and the salience network after antipsychotic treatment in early-phase schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingchan; Tang, Weijun; Fan, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Jianye; Geng, Daoying; Jiang, Kaida; Zhu, Dianming; Song, Zhenhua; Xiao, Zeping; Liu, Dengtang

    2017-01-01

    Objective Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity (FC), particularly in the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN), has been reported in schizophrenia, but little is known about the effects of antipsychotics on these networks. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of atypical antipsychotics on DMN and SN and the relationship between these effects and symptom improvement in patients with schizophrenia. Methods This was a prospective study of 33 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and treated with antipsychotics at Shanghai Mental Health Center. Thirty-three healthy controls matched for age and gender were recruited. All subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Healthy controls were scanned only once; patients were scanned before and after 6–8 weeks of treatment. Results In the DMN, the patients exhibited increased FC after treatment in the right superior temporal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, and left superior frontal gyrus and decreased FC in the right posterior cingulate/precuneus (P<0.005). In the SN, the patients exhibited decreased FC in the right cerebellum anterior lobe and left insula (P<0.005). The FC in the right posterior cingulate/precuneus in the DMN negatively correlated with the difference between the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) score pre/post-treatment (r=−0.564, P=0.023) and negative trends with the difference in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score pre/post-treatment (r=−0.475, P=0.063) and the difference in PANSS-positive symptom scores (r=−0.481, P=0.060). Conclusion These findings suggest that atypical antipsychotics could regulate the FC of certain key brain regions within the DMN in early-phase schizophrenia, which might be related to symptom improvement. However, the effects of atypical antipsychotics on SN are less clear. PMID:28223812

  4. Pneumonia following antipsychotic prescriptions in electronic health records: a patient safety concern?

    PubMed

    Star, Kristina; Bate, Andrew; Meyboom, Ronald Hb; Edwards, I Ralph

    2010-10-01

    In screening the Intercontinental Medical Statistics (IMS) Health Disease Analyzer database of GP records from the UK, an increased registration of pneumonia subsequent to the prescription of some antipsychotic medicines was identified. To investigate the temporal pattern between antipsychotic prescriptions and pneumonia with respect to age, type of pneumonia and other chest infections, and antipsychotic class. Self-controlled cohort analysis. Electronic health records from the UK IMS Health Disease Analyzer database. Three groups of pneumonia-related International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 terms and prescriptions of atypical and conventional antipsychotic medicines were studied. Separate analyses were carried out for patients aged 65 years. The observed rate of pneumonia terms registered in different time periods in connection to antipsychotic prescriptions was contrasted to the overall rate of pneumonia terms relative to prescriptions of other drugs in the same dataset. In patients aged ≥ 65 years, an increased registration of a group of terms defined as 'acute chest infections', after atypical antipsychotic prescriptions, was identified. The corresponding increase after conventional antipsychotic prescriptions was much smaller. Bronchopneumonia had a striking increase after both atypical and conventional antipsychotic prescriptions, and was commonly recorded with fatal outcome. Few registrations of hypostatic pneumonia were noted. Patients aged <65 years did not have a higher rate of acute chest infections after receiving antipsychotic prescriptions. The consistent pattern of an increased rate of chest infections after atypical antipsychotic prescriptions in older people seen in this outpatient study, together with the higher risk shown in a previous study on hospitalised patients, suggests a causal relationship. This is of importance since bronchopneumonia seems highly linked to fatal outcome. In the absence of a mechanism, further investigation of

  5. Pneumonia following antipsychotic prescriptions in electronic health records: a patient safety concern?

    PubMed Central

    Star, Kristina; Bate, Andrew; Meyboom, Ronald HB; Edwards, I Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Background In screening the Intercontinental Medical Statistics (IMS) Health Disease Analyzer database of GP records from the UK, an increased registration of pneumonia subsequent to the prescription of some antipsychotic medicines was identified. Aim To investigate the temporal pattern between antipsychotic prescriptions and pneumonia with respect to age, type of pneumonia and other chest infections, and antipsychotic class. Design of study Self-controlled cohort analysis. Setting Electronic health records from the UK IMS Health Disease Analyzer database. Method Three groups of pneumonia-related International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 terms and prescriptions of atypical and conventional antipsychotic medicines were studied. Separate analyses were carried out for patients aged a65 years. The observed rate of pneumonia terms registered in different time periods in connection to antipsychotic prescriptions was contrasted to the overall rate of pneumonia terms relative to prescriptions of other drugs in the same dataset. Results In patients aged ≥65 years, an increased registration of a group of terms defined as ‘acute chest infections’, after atypical antipsychotic prescriptions, was identified. The corresponding increase after conventional antipsychotic prescriptions was much smaler. Bronchopneumonia had a striking increase after both atypical and conventional antipsychotic prescriptions, and was commonly recorded with fatal outcome. Few registrations of hypostatic pneumonia were noted. Patients aged <65 years did not have a higher rate of acute chest infections after receiving antipsychotic prescriptions. Conclusion The consistent pattern of an increased rate of chest infections after atypical antipsychotic prescriptions in older people seen in this outpatient study, together with the higher risk shown in a previous study on hospitalised patients, suggests a causal relationship. This is of importance since bronchopneumonia seems highly linked to

  6. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with antipsychotic drugs: case reports and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vuk, Antonia; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Baretic, Maja; Osvatic, Martina Matovinovic

    2017-06-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are associated with metabolic disturbances. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare, but potentially fatal sign of acute glucose metabolism dysregulation linked to the use of SGAs. The aims of this article are to present patients with a history of psychotic disorders and of severe metabolic diabetic ketoacidosis, possibly associated with the use of antipsychotics, and to review the current literature on the topic of antipsychotic-induced DKA. PubMed/Medline and EBSCO databases were searched using the keywords: diabetic ketoacidosis, antipsychotics, atypical antipsychotics, second generation antipsychotics, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride and haloperidol. Case reports, case series and reviews of case series were included in the review. The majority of patients who developed DKA following treatment with antipsychotics were treated with olanzapine and clozapine in monotherapy or in combination with other antipsychotics. DKA mostly occurred in the first six months of antipsychotic treatment. Other risk factors included insulin resistance prior to antipsychotic treatment, male gender and middle age. Clinicians should consider the risk of DKA when starting treatment with SGAs. Preventive measures for patients with psychotic disorders using antipsychotics should include regular assessment of risk factors and screening for diabetes before and after administering antipsychotics, especially in the first months of treatment. Whenever possible, polypharmacy should be avoided.

  7. Evaluation of the Expression Profile of Extrapyramidal Symptoms Due to Antipsychotics by Data Mining of Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

    PubMed

    Kose, Eiji; Uno, Kana; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

     Typical antipsychotics are easily expressed as adverse events such as extrapyramidal symptom (EPS). On the other hand, incidence of adverse events due to atypical antipsychotics is low. Therefore, currently, atypical antipsychotics are widely used to treat schizophrenia. However, it has been reported that there is no difference in the frequency of EPS in atypical and typical antipsychotics. This study aimed to evaluate the expression profile of EPS in atypical and typical antipsychotics treatment using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. We analyzed reports of EPS in the JADER database and calculated the reporting odds ratio (ROR) of antipsychotics potentially associated with EPS. We applied the Weibull shape parameter to time-to-event data in the JADER database. Consequently, there was little information to distinguish between the ROR of atypical and typical antipsychotics. A significant difference related to the time of onset of EPS in both antipsychotics was not recognized. However, when comparing each drug, Paliperidone, Perospirone, Blonanserin, and Aripiprazole were relatively developed as EPS in the early stage. On the other hand, Risperidone, Clozapine, Olanzapine, and Quetiapine were developed as EPS not only at an early stage but also after long-term use. In addition, this finding was suggested from the result of the cumulative incidence of EPS in each drug and of the time-to-onset analysis using Weibull distribution. These findings may contribute to future clinical practice because we revealed the expression profile of EPS in treatment with atypical and typical antipsychotics.

  8. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug.

    PubMed

    Zuardi, A W; Crippa, J A S; Hallak, J E C; Moreira, F A; Guimarães, F S

    2006-04-01

    A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis) component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. The antipsychotic-like properties of CBD have been investigated in animal models using behavioral and neurochemical techniques which suggested that CBD has a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The results of two studies on healthy volunteers using perception of binocular depth inversion and ketamine-induced psychotic symptoms supported the proposal of the antipsychotic-like properties of CBD. In addition, open case reports of schizophrenic patients treated with CBD and a preliminary report of a controlled clinical trial comparing CBD with an atypical antipsychotic drug have confirmed that this cannabinoid can be a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Future studies of CBD in other psychotic conditions such as bipolar disorder and comparative studies of its antipsychotic effects with those produced by clozapine in schizophrenic patients are clearly indicated.

  9. Cataract occurrence in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Souza, Valéria Barreto Novais e; Moura Filho, Francisco José Rodrigues de; Souza, Fábio Gomes de Matos e; Rocha, Camila Farias; Furtado, Fernando Antônio Mendes Lopes; Gonçalves, Tiago Bessa Almeida; Vasconcelos, Karla Feitosa Ximenes

    2008-09-01

    Typical antipsychotic drugs, mainly phenothiazines, have been associated with cataract formation for over forty years. Recently, there has been a concern about atypical antipsychotic drugs' potential for inducing this lenticular pathology. Accordingly, we sought to determine the cataract rate and other ocular side effects in patients on long-term therapy with antipsychotic drugs. Eighty outpatients with DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia from two settings who met pre determined inclusion criteria were submitted to an ophthalmological evaluation for ocular abnormalities with emphasis in the lens and cornea. They were divided into two groups: group 1 (n = 52) comprised patients who had been predominantly on typical antipsychotics for at least two years and group 2 (n = 28) patients who had been predominantly on atypical antipsychotics for at least two years. Cataract was found in 26 patients (33%) with predominance of anterior capsular cataract. The cataract rate among patients from group 1 (40%) was higher than among those from group 2 (18%). Visual acuity was reduced in 21 patients (26%). No changes were observed neither in the cornea nor in the retina. Patients using antipsychotic drugs should be submitted to a periodic ophthalmological evaluation.

  10. Antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia, hypogonadism and osteoporosis in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    O'Keane, Veronica

    2008-03-01

    Treatment of schizophrenic illness usually involves the long-term administration of antipsychotic drugs. Most antipsychotic agents antagonise the actions of endogenous dopamine (DA) at DA-2 receptors in the brain. The relative affinity for, and binding time to, DA-2 receptors was considered to be one of the key determinants of the antipsychotic potency of classical antipsychotic drugs. Some newer atypical antipsychotics, of which clozapine is the prototype, have a relatively poor affinity for DA-2 receptors; whereas other atypical antipsychotics are potent DA-2 antagonists. The propensity of antipsychotic agents to cause hyperprolactinaemia is related to their potency in antagonising DA-2 receptors on the anterior pituitary. In our studies, bone loss was consistently related to DA-2 antagonist potency of antipsychotic drugs, rather than their classification using conventional 'typical' versus 'atypical' systems. It is established that hyperprolactinaemia causes suppression of the reproductive endocrine axis and consequent bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Results from our group and others have demonstrated that a similar pathophysiological process is occurring in individuals with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia. We found high rates of osteoporosis and osteopenia in those taking long-term antipsychotic drugs, and this was related to the dose and duration of treatment. Bone loss was associated with hypogonadism in male and female groups. Young Caucasian women appear to be particularly vulnerable to developing hyperprolactinaemia and the associated hypogonadism and bone loss. The occurrence of menstrual dysfunction should alert clinical suspicions of hyperprolactinaemia and bone de-mineralisation. Lastly, there are no published trials examining the effects of hormone replacement on BMD in those taking long-term antipsychotic drugs, but preliminary findings from our studies suggest that active management of bone loss in those with antipsychotic-associated bone

  11. [Negative symptoms: which antipsychotics?].

    PubMed

    Maurel, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia is a major issue and a challenge for the functional and social prognosis of the disease, to which they are closely linked. First- and second-generation antipsychotics allow a reduction of all negative symptoms. The hope of acting directly on primary negative symptoms with any antipsychotic is not supported by the literature. However, the effectiveness of first- and second-generation antipsychotics is demonstrated on secondary negative symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypothermia following antipsychotic drug use

    PubMed Central

    Wegewijs, Michelle A.; Loonen, Anton J. M.; Beers, Erna

    2007-01-01

    Objective Hypothermia is an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of antipsychotic drug (APD) use. Risk factors for hypothermia in ADP users are unknown. We studied which risk factors for hypothermia can be identified based on case reports. Method Case reports of hypothermia in APD-users found in PUBMED or EMBASE were searched for risk factors. The WHO international database for Adverse Drug Reactions was searched for reports of hypothermia and APD use. Results The literature search resulted in 32 articles containing 43 case reports. In the WHO database, 480 reports were registered of patients developing hypothermia during the use of APDs which almost equals the number of reports for hyperthermia associated with APD use (n = 524). Hypothermia risk seems to be increased in the first days following start or dose increase of APs. APs with strong 5-HT2 antagonism seem to be more involved in hypothermia; 55% of hypothermia reports are for atypical antipsychotics. Schizophrenia was the most prevalent diagnosis in the case reports. Conclusion Especially in admitted patients who are not able to control their own environment or physical status, frequent measurements of body temperature (with a thermometer that can measure low body temperatures) must be performed in order to detect developing hypothermia. PMID:17401555

  13. Antipsychotics-induced metabolic alterations: focus on adipose tissue and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Araújo, João Ricardo; Martel, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic drugs for the treatment of mood disorders and psychosis has increased dramatically over the last decade. Despite its consumption being associated with beneficial neuropsychiatric effects in patients, atypical antipsychotics (which are the most frequently prescribed antipsychotics) use is accompanied by some secondary adverse metabolic effects such as weight gain, dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adverse effects are not fully understood but have been suggested to involve a dysregulation of adipose tissue homeostasis. As such, the aim of this paper is to review and discuss the role of adipose tissue in the development of secondary adverse metabolic effects induced by atypical antipsychotics. Data analyzed in this article suggest that atypical antipsychotics may increase adipose tissue (particularly visceral adipose tissue) lipogenesis, differentiation/hyperplasia, pro-inflammatory mediator secretion and insulin resistance and decrease adipose tissue lipolysis. Consequently, patients receiving antipsychotic medication could be at risk of developing obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A better knowledge of the impact of these drugs on adipose tissue homeostasis may unveil strategies to develop novel antipsychotic drugs with less adverse metabolic effects and to develop adjuvant therapies (e.g. behavioral and nutritional therapies) to neuropsychiatric patients receiving antipsychotic medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Antipsychotics for fibromyalgia in adults.

    PubMed

    Walitt, Brian; Klose, Petra; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Phillips, Tudor; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-06-02

    quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. We included a total of four studies with 296 participants.Three studies with 206 participants compared quetiapine, an atypical (second-generation) antipsychotic, with placebo. One study used a cross-over design and two studies a parallel-group design. Study duration was eight or 12 weeks. Quetiapine was used in all studies with a bedtime dosage between 50 and 300 mg/day. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias and we judged them to be at moderate risk of bias overall. The primary outcomes in this review were participant-reported pain relief of 50% or greater, Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) much or very much improved, withdrawal due to adverse events (tolerability) and serious adverse events (safety).Second tier evidence indicated that quetiapine was not statistically superior to placebo in the number of participants with a 50% or more pain reduction (very low quality evidence). No study reported data on PGIC. A greater proportion of participants on quetiapine reported a 30% or more pain reduction (risk difference (RD) 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00 to 0.23; number needed to treat for an additional benefit (NNTB) 8, 95% CI 5 to 100) (very low quality evidence). A greater proportion of participants on quetiapine reported a clinically relevant improvement of health-related quality of life compared to placebo ( RD 0.18, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.31; NNTB 5, 95% CI 3 to 20) (very low quality evidence). Quetiapine was statistically superior to placebo in reducing sleep problems (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.67, 95% CI -1.10 to -0.23), depression (SMD -0.39, 95% CI -0.74 to -0.04) and anxiety (SMD -0.40, 95% CI -0.69 to -0.11) (very low quality evidence). Quetiapine was statistically superior to placebo in reducing the risk of withdrawing from the study due to a lack of efficacy (RD -0.14, 95% CI -0.23 to -0.05) (very low

  15. [Subjective well-being under antipsychotic treatment and its meaning for compliance and course of disease].

    PubMed

    Naber, Dieter; Lambert, Martin; Karow, Anne

    2004-11-01

    Since the introduction of atypical antipsychotics success criteria of an effective antipsychotic treatment are more comprehensive. For instance these criteria include negative symptoms as well as cognitive deficits which are both important for the long-term prognosis of schizophrenia. However, the most fundamental change was the inclusion of the patients' perspective with respect to the treatment. Quality of life assessments as well as evaluation of subjective well-being are of increasing scientific interest and have been assessed in numerous studies. Accordingly there has been ascertained that schizophrenic patients are indeed able to fill out self reports consistently and reliably and it has been shown that patients' perspective differs enormously from the evaluation of psychiatrists with regard to antipsychotic treatment. In consideration of the variety of atypical antipsychotics and different resulting effects for compliance and prognosis of schizophrenia it seems needful to strengthen patients' perspective as an important success criterion of antipsychotic treatment.

  16. A review of the association between antipsychotic use and hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Bushe, Chris; Shaw, Michael; Peveler, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidence linking hyperprolactinaemia to longer-term clinical sequelae, including osteoporosis, hip fractures and possibly breast cancer, is increasing clinical awareness of the relevance of hyperprolactinaemia. A review of the literature finds clinical trials reporting some degree of comparative prolactin data among antipsychotics. Many of the randomised clinical trials (RCTs) do not report categorical rates of hyperprolactinaemia in contrast with the naturalistic studies, making it complex for clinicians to evaluate the extent and severity of hyperprolactinaemia. Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the commonest adverse events reported in clinical trials and can be found in association with all antipsychotics. The highest rates of hyperprolactinaemia are reported in association with risperidone and amisulpride, often as high as 80-90% of all female subjects and consistently greater than with the typical antipsychotics. Significant rates of hyperprolactinaemia of lesser severity and more transience have also been reported in association with other atypical antipsychotics.

  17. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Víctor; Rico, Guillem; Labad, Javier; de Pablo, Joan; Vilella, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain). Methods A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized database of 1,765 patients with schizophrenia treated between 2011 and 2013. Results The most used antipsychotic was risperidone, identified in 463 (26.3%) patients, followed by olanzapine in 249 (14.1%), paliperidone in 225 (12.7%), zuclopenthixol in 201 (11.4%), quetiapine in 141 (8%), aripiprazole in 100 (5.7%), and clozapine in 100 (5.7%). Almost 8 out of 10 patients (79.3%) were treated with atypical or second-generation antipsychotics. Long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations were used in 44.8% of patients. Antipsychotics were generally prescribed in their recommended doses, with clozapine, ziprasidone, LAI paliperidone, and LAI risperidone being prescribed at the higher end of their therapeutic ranges. Almost 7 out of 10 patients (69.6%) were on antipsychotic polypharmacy, and 81.4% were on psychiatric medications aside from antipsychotics. Being prescribed quetiapine (OR 14.24, 95% CI 4.94–40.97), LAI (OR 9.99, 95% CI 6.45–15.45), psychiatric co-medications (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.72–6.64), and paliperidone (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.23–7.92) were all associated with an increased likelihood of polypharmacy. Being prescribed risperidone (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.35–0.83) and older age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97–0.99) were related to a low polypharmacy probability. Conclusions Polypharmacy is the most common pattern of antipsychotic use in this region of Spain. Use of atypical antipsychotics is extensive. Most patients receive psychiatric co-medications such as anxiolytics or

  18. Antipsychotic Use in Nursing Homes Varies by Psychiatric Consultant

    PubMed Central

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Lemay, Celeste; Mazor, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Kanaan, Abir; Donovan, Jennifer; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Briesacher, Becky

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between psychiatric consultation and antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes (NH) is unknown. Objective To identify the association between psychiatric consultant groups and NH-level antipsychotic prescribing after adjustment for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Research Design & Subjects Nested cross-sectional study of 60 NHs in a cluster randomized trial. We linked facility leadership surveys to October 2009-September 2010 Minimum Data Set, Nursing Home Compare, U.S. Census and pharmacy dispensing data. Measures The main exposure is the psychiatric consultant group and the main outcome is NH-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use. We calculated annual means and interquartile ranges of NH-level antipsychotic use for each consultant group and arrayed consultant groups from lowest to highest prevalence. Generalized linear models were used to predict antipsychotic prescribing adjusting for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Observed versus predicted antipsychotic prescribing levels were compared for each consultant group. Results Seven (7) psychiatric consultant groups served a range of 3 to 27 study facilities. Overall mean facility-level antipsychotic prescribing was 19.2%. Mean prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing ranged from 12.2% (SD 5.8) in the lowest consultant group to 26.4% (SD 3.6) in the highest group. All facilities served by the highest-ranked consultant group had observed antipsychotic levels exceeding the overall study mean with half exceeding predictions for on-label indications, while most facilities served by the lowest-ranked consultant group had observed levels below the overall study and predicted means. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that psychiatric consultant groups affect NH antipsychotic prescribing independent of resident case-mix and facility characteristics. PMID:24374410

  19. Antipsychotic use in nursing homes varies by psychiatric consultant.

    PubMed

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Lemay, Celeste; Mazor, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Kanaan, Abir; Donovan, Jennifer; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Briesacher, Becky

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between psychiatric consultation and antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes (NH) is unknown. To identify the association between psychiatric consultant groups and NH-level antipsychotic prescribing after adjustment for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Nested cross-sectional study of 60 NHs in a cluster randomized trial. We linked facility leadership surveys to October 2009-September 2010 Minimum Data Set, Nursing Home Compare, the US Census, and pharmacy dispensing data. The main exposure is the psychiatric consultant group and the main outcome is NH-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use. We calculated annual means and interquartile ranges of NH-level antipsychotic use for each consultant group and arrayed consultant groups from lowest to highest prevalence. Generalized linear models were used to predict antipsychotic prescribing adjusting for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Observed versus predicted antipsychotic prescribing levels were compared for each consultant group. Seven psychiatric consultant groups served a range of 3-27 study facilities. Overall mean facility-level antipsychotic prescribing was 19.2%. Mean prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing ranged from 12.2% (SD, 5.8) in the lowest consultant group to 26.4% (SD, 3.6) in the highest group. All facilities served by the highest-ranked consultant group had observed antipsychotic levels exceeding the overall study mean with half exceeding predictions for on-label indications, whereas most facilities served by the lowest-ranked consultant group had observed levels below the overall study and predicted means. Preliminary evidence suggests that psychiatric consultant groups affect NH antipsychotic prescribing independent of resident case-mix and facility characteristics.

  20. Association between the use of anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs and safety and receptor drug-binding profiles of antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Gjerden, Pål; Slørdal, Lars; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2009-12-01

    The use of anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs is almost exclusively confined to treating antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). We investigated the prevalence of concomitant prescription of anticholinergics as a proxy for antipsychotic-induced EPS and compared variance in prevalence with differences in the assumed mechanisms of action of antipsychotics on central nervous system (CNS) transmitter systems (i.e., receptor drug-binding profiles). We paid special attention to potential differences between typical and atypical antipsychotics. Data were drawn from the Norwegian Prescription Database on sales of antipsychotic and anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs to a total of 57,130 outpatients in 2004. We assessed concomitant dispensations of antipsychotic and anticholinergic drugs and correlated the prevalence of concomitantly prescribed anticholinergics to previously assessed receptor-binding profiles of antipsychotics. The concurrent use of anticholinergics varied between 0.4% and 26.0% for patients using a single antipsychotic agent. The prevalence of anticholinergic comedication was more than twice as high in patients using two or more antipsychotic drugs. Four typical antipsychotics (fluphenazine, zuclopenthixol, haloperidol, and perphenazine) were associated with higher concomitant use of anticholinergics than the rest. For the remaining 14 antipsychotic agents, the difference between typical and atypical antipsychotics was neither pronounced nor systematic. A high degree of D2-receptor antagonism and a high 5-HT2A/D2-receptor-affinity ratio coincided with the use of anticholinergics. The liability of antipsychotic drugs to cause EPS seemed to vary considerably and largely independently of the distinction between typical and atypical antipsychotics.

  1. Network-assisted investigation of antipsychotic drugs and their targets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-05-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are tranquilizing psychiatric medications primarily used in the treatment of schizophrenia and similar severe mental disorders. So far, most of these drugs have been discovered without knowing much on the molecular mechanisms of their actions. The available large amount of pharmacogenetics, pharmacometabolomics, and pharmacoproteomics data for many drugs makes it possible to systematically explore the molecular mechanisms underlying drug actions. In this study, we applied a unique network-based approach to investigate antipsychotic drugs and their targets. We first retrieved 43 antipsychotic drugs, 42 unique target genes, and 46 adverse drug interactions from the DrugBank database and then generated a drug-gene network and a drug-drug interaction network. Through drug-gene network analysis, we found that seven atypical antipsychotic drugs tended to form two clusters that could be defined by drugs with different target receptor profiles. In the drug-drug interaction network, we found that three drugs (zuclopenthixol, ziprasidone, and thiothixene) tended to have more adverse drug interactions than others, while clozapine had fewer adverse drug interactions. This investigation indicated that these antipsychotics might have different molecular mechanisms underlying the drug actions. This pilot network-assisted investigation of antipsychotics demonstrates that network-based analysis is useful for uncovering the molecular actions of antipsychotics.

  2. Antipsychotic-induced akathisia in delirium: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Forcen, Fernando Espi; Matsoukas, Konstantina; Alici, Yesne

    2016-02-01

    Akathisia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by subjective and objective restlessness. It is a common side effect in patients taking antipsychotics and other psychotropics. Patients with delirium are frequently treated with antipsychotic medications that are well known to induce akathisia as a side effect. However, the prevalence, phenomenology, and management of akathisia in patients with delirium remain largely unknown. The purpose of this review was to examine the medical literature in order to establish the current state of knowledge regarding the prevalence of antipsychotic-induced akathisia in patients with delirium. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Ten studies addressing the incidence of akathisia in patients taking antipsychotic medication for delirium were identified and included in our review. The included studies reported a variable prevalence of antipsychotic-induced akathisia. A higher prevalence was found in patients taking haloperidol. Among atypical antipsychotics, paliperidone and ziprasidone were associated with a higher risk of akathisia. The risk for akathisia appeared to be a dose-related phenomenon. Studies using specific scales for evaluation of akathisia in delirium are lacking. Some populations, such as patients with cancer or terminally ill patients in palliative care settings taking antipsychotics for the treatment of delirium, could be at higher risk for development of akathisia as a side effect.

  3. Antipsychotic-induced akathisia in delirium: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    FORCEN, FERNANDO ESPI; MATSOUKAS, KONSTANTINA; ALICI, YESNE

    2017-01-01

    Objective Akathisia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by subjective and objective restlessness. It is a common side effect in patients taking antipsychotics and other psychotropics. Patients with delirium are frequently treated with antipsychotic medications that are well known to induce akathisia as a side effect. However, the prevalence, phenomenology, and management of akathisia in patients with delirium remain largely unknown. The purpose of this review was to examine the medical literature in order to establish the current state of knowledge regarding the prevalence of antipsychotic-induced akathisia in patients with delirium. Method A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Some 10 studies addressing the incidence of akathisia in patients taking antipsychotic medication for delirium were identified and included in our review. Results The included studies reported a variable prevalence of antipsychotic-induced akathisia. A higher prevalence was found in patients taking haloperidol. Among atypical antipsychotics, paliperidone and ziprasidone were associated with a higher risk of akathisia. The risk for akathisia appeared to be a dose-related phenomenon. Significance of results Studies using specific scales for evaluation of akathisia in delirium are lacking. Some populations, such as patients with cancer or terminally ill patients in palliative care settings taking antipsychotics for the treatment of delirium, could be at higher risk for development of akathisia as a side effect. PMID:26087817

  4. Second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Divac, Nevena; Prostran, Milica; Jakovcevski, Igor; Cerovac, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest), high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability.

  5. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Extrapyramidal Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jakovcevski, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest), high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability. PMID:24995318

  6. Antipsychotic drugs and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Christoph U.; Lencz, Todd; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying antipsychotic cardiometabolic adverse effects are incompletely understood. This hampers the identification of high-risk patients, low-risk antipsychotics and preventive/ameliorative treatments. Recent clinical, molecular, and genetic data suggest that i) antipsychotic-naïve samples provide the greatest power for mechanistic studies; ii) weight and metabolic effects can be discordant, pointing to overlapping and distinct mechanisms; iii) antipsychotics affect satiety and energy homeostasis signaling; iv) the specific peptides mediating these effects are unknown but likely overlap with those involved in idiopathic obesity; and v) single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding known neurotransmitter receptors and metabolic proteins are promising pharmacogenomic targets for countering adverse affects. However, sophisticated molecular studies and genome-wide association studies, ideally in antipsychotic-naïve/first episode samples, are needed to further advance the field. PMID:21185230

  7. Antipsychotics and hyperprolactinaemia: mechanisms, consequences and management.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard I G; Peveler, Robert C

    2011-02-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia is a common side effect in people receiving antipsychotics. The propensity to cause hyperprolactinaemia differs markedly between antipsychotics as a result of differential dopamine D(2) receptor-binding affinity and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Sexual dysfunction is common and under-recognized in people with severe mental illness and is in part caused by hyperprolactinaemia. There are a number of long-term consequences of hyperprolactinaemia, including osteoporosis. Regular monitoring before and during treatment will help identify those developing antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia. The treatment includes dose reduction and change in antipsychotic. Where this is not possible because of the risk of relapse of the mental illness, sex steroid replacement may be helpful in improving symptoms secondary to hypogonadism and reducing the risk of osteoporosis. Tertiary prevention of complications should also be considered.

  8. After six months of anti-psychotic treatment: Is the improvement in mental health at the expense of physical health?

    PubMed

    Martín Otaño, Leire; Barbadillo Izquierdo, Laura; Galdeano Mondragón, Ander; Alonso Pinedo, Marta; Querejeta Ayerdi, Imanol

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular causes in patients with schizophrenia is higher than in the general population, a fact that has been observed more since second generation anti-psychotics came into general use. To determine the incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with a previously untreated first psychotic episode, as well as the prospective changes in the parameters that define the criteria of metabolic syndrome. An observational study with a prospective cohort design including patients who were admitted to the Acute Unit of Donostia Hospital. A total of 21 patients were included in the study, of which 19 completed it. Just over one-quarter (26.3%) of the patients developed a metabolic syndrome at six months. Statistically significant differences were observed in the following parameters: 1) abdominal perimeter measurement with an increase of 14.6 cm at six months (P=.001); 2) triglyceride levels with a mean increase over the initial measurement of 48.99 mg/dl (P=.039); and 3) fasting blood glucose levels with a mean increase of 10.72 mg/dl (P=.001). Significant changes were observed in metabolic parameters in a short period with the subsequent risk of associated cardiovascular events in a group of young patients. Actions are required directed at ensuring appropriate monitoring of these patients in order to measures to minimise the risks. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors for developing effective antipsychotics: synthesis, biological characterization, and behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Brindisi, Margherita; Butini, Stefania; Franceschini, Silvia; Brogi, Simone; Trotta, Francesco; Ros, Sindu; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Salmona, Mario; Casagni, Alice; Andreassi, Marco; Saponara, Simona; Gorelli, Beatrice; Weikop, Pia; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Scheel-Kruger, Jorgen; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2014-11-26

    Combination of dopamine D3 antagonism, serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonism, and antagonism at 5-HT2A leads to a novel approach to potent atypical antipsychotics. Exploitation of the original structure-activity relationships resulted in the identification of safe and effective antipsychotics devoid of extrapyramidal symptoms liability, sedation, and catalepsy. The potential atypical antipsychotic 5bb was selected for further pharmacological investigation. The distribution of c-fos positive cells in the ventral striatum confirmed the atypical antipsychotic profile of 5bb in agreement with behavioral rodent studies. 5bb administered orally demonstrated a biphasic effect on the MK801-induced hyperactivity at dose levels not able to induce sedation, catalepsy, or learning impairment in passive avoidance. In microdialysis studies, 5bb increased the dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, 5bb represents a valuable lead for the development of atypical antipsychotics endowed with a unique pharmacological profile for addressing negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  10. Can transcranial electrical stimulation improve learning difficulties in atypical brain development? A future possibility for cognitive training.

    PubMed

    Krause, Beatrix; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2013-10-01

    Learning difficulties in atypical brain development represent serious obstacles to an individual's future achievements and can have broad societal consequences. Cognitive training can improve learning impairments only to a certain degree. Recent evidence from normal and clinical adult populations suggests that transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), a portable, painless, inexpensive, and relatively safe neuroenhancement tool, applied in conjunction with cognitive training can enhance cognitive intervention outcomes. This includes, for instance, numerical processing, language skills and response inhibition deficits commonly associated with profound learning difficulties and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The current review introduces the functional principles, current applications and promising results, and potential pitfalls of TES. Unfortunately, research in child populations is limited at present. We suggest that TES has considerable promise as a tool for increasing neuroplasticity in atypically developing children and may be an effective adjunct to cognitive training in clinical settings if it proves safe. The efficacy and both short- and long-term effects of TES on the developing brain need to be critically assessed before it can be recommended for clinical settings. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Can transcranial electrical stimulation improve learning difficulties in atypical brain development? A future possibility for cognitive training☆

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Beatrix; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2013-01-01

    Learning difficulties in atypical brain development represent serious obstacles to an individual's future achievements and can have broad societal consequences. Cognitive training can improve learning impairments only to a certain degree. Recent evidence from normal and clinical adult populations suggests that transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), a portable, painless, inexpensive, and relatively safe neuroenhancement tool, applied in conjunction with cognitive training can enhance cognitive intervention outcomes. This includes, for instance, numerical processing, language skills and response inhibition deficits commonly associated with profound learning difficulties and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The current review introduces the functional principles, current applications and promising results, and potential pitfalls of TES. Unfortunately, research in child populations is limited at present. We suggest that TES has considerable promise as a tool for increasing neuroplasticity in atypically developing children and may be an effective adjunct to cognitive training in clinical settings if it proves safe. The efficacy and both short- and long-term effects of TES on the developing brain need to be critically assessed before it can be recommended for clinical settings. PMID:23770059

  12. Antipsychotics promote neural differentiation of human iPS cell-derived neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Asada, Minoru; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-11-25

    We investigated the effects of antipsychotics on human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. Induction of NSCs from hiPSCs was performed using PSC neural induction medium. Induced NSCs were subsequently cultured in neural differentiation medium containing antipsychotics. Cultured cells were subjected to neural differentiation marker analysis. As previously shown in rodent cells, antipsychotics promoted neural differentiation compared with vehicle treatment. Atypical antipsychotics appear to possess more differentiation induction potential than typical ones. Most NSCs do not express dopamine D2 receptor; however, our in vitro study indicates the clinical potential of antipsychotics could include effects independent of monoamine receptor expression in NSCs. Our study shows NSCs derived from hiPSCs provide opportunity to investigate the underlying direct effect of antipsychotics treatment on NSCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Prescribing patterns of antipsychotics in 13 French psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Bret, P; Bret, M-C; Queuille, E

    2009-04-01

    The commercial introduction of atypical antipsychotics, called second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), a few years ago, has led to a world-wide reappraisal of the established treatment strategies for people with psychotic or bipolar disorders. They permitted improvements in the pharmacologic management of psychiatric diseases. As compared to conventional neuroleptics or first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs), they promised better efficacy especially on negative symptoms and cognitive impairments of psychiatric diseases and, at the same time, better tolerance on neurological side effects. Now, they have shown other side effects and they have a higher acquisition cost than FGAs. The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the prescribing practices of antipsychotic drugs in French psychiatric hospitals for adult inpatients and to compare them with other surveys and guidelines. In June 2004, we conducted a one-day, cross-sectional, observational and naturalistic study in 13 hospitals, members of the PIC network. Two thousand one hundred and ninety-two prescriptions with antipsychotic treatment were collected. One thousand one hundred and fifty-four prescriptions (52.6%) included a SGA, but the FGAs were the most prescribed (65.8%; n=2259), principally cyamemazine (24.7%). There was one antipsychotic in 50.7% of prescriptions, two antipsychotics in 42.2%, but the second neuroleptic used was a sedative (82.6%), principally cyamemazine. Multiple antipsychotics were present in 1081 prescriptions (49.3%), with an average number of 1.57 antipsychotics. A mood stabiliser, an antidepressant, an anxiolytic and a hypnotic were coprescribed in respectively 37, 30.5, 65.1 and 41.6%. There were 2.48 psychotropic drugs associated with the principal antipsychotic; in total, with correctors of side-effects of the antipsychotics, there were 3.38 drugs per prescription. The SGAs aimed more often for psychotic (F20-F29) patients (61.9% versus 43.3% with FGAs), who were males (61

  14. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in rat hippocampus after treatment with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ou; Chlan-Fourney, Jennifer; Bowen, Rudy; Keegan, David; Li, Xin-Min

    2003-01-01

    Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs, though both effective, act on different neurotransmitter receptors and are dissimilar in some clinical effects and side effects. The typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol has been shown to cause a decrease in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays an important role in neuronal cell survival, differentiation, and neuronal connectivity. However, it is still unknown whether atypical antipsychotic drugs similarly regulate BDNF expression. We examined the effects of chronic (28 days) administration of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs on BDNF mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus using in situ hybridization. Quantitative analysis revealed that the typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol (1 mg/kg) down-regulated BDNF mRNA expression in both CA1 (P < 0.05) and dentate gyrus (P < 0.01) regions compared with vehicle control. In contrast, the atypical antipsychotic agents clozapine (10 mg/kg) and olanzapine (2.7 mg/kg) up-regulated BDNF mRNA expression in CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus regions of the rat hippocampus compared with their respective controls (P < 0.01). These findings demonstrate that the typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs differentially regulate BDNF mRNA expression in rat hippocampus.

  15. Effects of antipsychotic medications on quality of life and psychosocial functioning in patients with early-stage schizophrenia: 1-year follow-up naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhanchou; Zhai, Jinguo; Fang, Maosheng; Hu, Maorong; Wu, Renrong; Liu, Zhening; Zhao, Jingping

    2012-10-01

    The relative effects of the atypical antipsychotic drugs and conventional agent on quality of life and psychosocial functioning in patients with early-stage schizophrenia is still uncertain because of an insufficient number of studies examining this issue. In a 12 months open-label, prospective observational, multicenter study, 1029 subjects with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder within 5 years of onset were monotherapy with chlorpromazine, sulpiride, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or aripiprazole. The health-related quality of life and psychosocial functioning were assessed using Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Global Assessment Scale (GAS) and the Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADL), respectively. At 12 months, treatment resulted in significant improvements in all 8 domain scores of SF-36, GAS and ADL score (all P-values< .001). However, only olanzapine and quetiapine groups demonstrated greater improvement in the role-psychical score of SF-36 and GAS score than did the chlorpromazine group (all P-values ≤ .002). All antipsychotics may improve quality of life and social function in patients with early-stage schizophrenia, but further studies are needed to determine whether atypical antipsychotics are superior to conventional agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antipsychotics in the treatment of autism

    PubMed Central

    Posey, David J.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Erickson, Craig A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have become indispensable in the treatment of a variety of symptoms in autism. They are frequently used to treat irritability and associated behaviors including aggression and self injury. They may also be efficacious for hyperactivity and stereotyped behavior. This review presents the rationale for the use of this drug class in autism and reviews the most important studies published on this topic to date. Significant adverse effects, including weight gain and the possibility of tardive dyskinesia, are reviewed. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:18172517

  17. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Goodship, Timothy H J; Cook, H Terence; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Kavanagh, David; Nester, Carla M; Noris, Marina; Pickering, Matthew C; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Roumenina, Lubka T; Sethi, Sanjeev; Smith, Richard J H

    2017-03-01

    In both atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) complement plays a primary role in disease pathogenesis. Herein we report the outcome of a 2015 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference where key issues in the management of these 2 diseases were considered by a global panel of experts. Areas addressed included renal pathology, clinical phenotype and assessment, genetic drivers of disease, acquired drivers of disease, and treatment strategies. In order to help guide clinicians who are caring for such patients, recommendations for best treatment strategies were discussed at length, providing the evidence base underpinning current treatment options. Knowledge gaps were identified and a prioritized research agenda was proposed to resolve outstanding controversial issues.

  18. Effectiveness of long-acting injectable antipsychotics in delusional disorders with nonprominent hallucinations and without hallucinations.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Penadés, Rafael; Bernardo, Miquel; Catalán, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    The presence of nonprominent hallucinations in delusional disorder (DD) has been accepted by the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. A recent meta-analysis revealed that patients with schizophrenia treated with long-acting atypical antipsychotics showed a significant improvement in psychotic symptoms. However, little research has been conducted on DD. Our goal was to investigate demographic and clinical differences between two subgroups of DD patients, those with nonprominent hallucinations and those without hallucinations, and to determine treatment effectiveness of long-acting antipsychotics in these patients. We conducted a longitudinal observational study with a 6-month follow-up period in a clinical group of 45 DD outpatients. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Personal and Social Performance Scale, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-17 (HRSD-17) were used for assessment. Age at onset of DD, scores in baseline assessment scales, and drug compliance were included in the analysis as potential confounders. When uncorrected for influencing factors, patients treated with long-acting antipsychotics showed lower scores in PANSS positive and negative subscales. There were no statistically significant clinical subgroup×treatment group interactions for any of the scores in assessment scales at 6 months. After adjustment, patients treated with long-acting antipsychotics showed lower scores in the PANSS negative subscale and a tendency toward improvement in scores in the PANSS positive subscale. Our study suggests that risperidone long-acting injection and paliperidone palmitate long-acting injection may be useful in the treatment of DD patients, specifically those with nonprominent hallucinations.

  19. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Polymorphism and Clinical Response to Antipsychotic Treatment in Schizophrenia and Schizo-Affective Disorder Patients: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Zai, Clement C.; Lisoway, Amanda; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Felsky, Daniel; Tiwari, Arun K.; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Ikeda, Masashi; Molero, Patricio; Ortuno, Felipe; Porcelli, Stefano; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Gao, Shugui; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Pelayo-Terán, José M; Kaur, Harpreet; Kukreti, Ritushree; Meltzer, Herbert Y.; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Potkin, Steven G.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme plays a crucial role in dopamine degradation, and the COMT Val158Met polymorphism (rs4680) is associated with significant differences in enzymatic activity and consequently dopamine concentrations in the prefrontal cortex. Multiple studies have analyzed the COMT Val158Met variant in relation to antipsychotic response. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between COMT Val158Met and antipsychotic response. Methods: Searches using PubMed, Web of Science, and PsycInfo databases (03/01/2015) yielded 23 studies investigating COMT Val158Met variation and antipsychotic response in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder. Responders/nonresponders were defined using each study’s original criteria. If no binary response definition was used, authors were asked to define response according to at least 30% Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score reduction (or equivalent in other scales). Analysis was conducted under a fixed-effects model. Results: Ten studies met inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. Five additional antipsychotic-treated samples were analyzed for Val158Met and response and included in the meta-analysis (ntotal=1416). Met/Met individuals were significantly more likely to respond than Val-carriers (P=.039, ORMet/Met=1.37, 95% CI: 1.02–1.85). Met/Met patients also experienced significantly greater improvement in positive symptoms relative to Val-carriers (P=.030, SMD=0.24, 95% CI: 0.024–0.46). Posthoc analyses on patients treated with atypical antipsychotics (n=1207) showed that Met/Met patients were significantly more likely to respond relative to Val-carriers (P=.0098, ORMet/Met=1.54, 95% CI: 1.11–2.14), while no difference was observed for typical-antipsychotic-treated patients (n=155) (P=.65). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism is associated with response to antipsychotics in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder

  20. Proteome effects of antipsychotic drugs: Learning from preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Lucia; Domenici, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Proteome-wide expression analyses are performed in the brain of schizophrenia patients to understand the biological basis of the disease and discover molecular paths for new clinical interventions. A major issue with postmortem analysis is the lack of tools to discern molecular modulation related to the disease from dysregulation due to medications. We review available proteome-wide analysis of antipsychotic treatment in rodents, highlighting shared dysregulated pathways that may contribute to a