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Sample records for au ag-polymetallic mineralization

  1. Au-Ag polymetallic mineralization within tectonically weak zones along the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Silberman, M.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The Music Mountain mining district lies at the base of the Grand Wash Cliffs, a major fault-line scarp along the Grand Wash fault, which marks the SW margin of the Colorado Plateau. Nearly vertical Au-Ag polymetallic quartz veins parallel, and are in contact with, altered diabase and granite porphyry dikes that cut Proterozoic granite, schist, and gneiss. The gold-bearing veins range in thickness from an inch to several feet and contain significant amounts of sulfide minerals. Diabase dikes and quartz veins in the district and to the north consistently strike N42[degree]W to N57[degree]W, which is one of the most prevalent fracture orientation throughout NW Arizona. In the Gold Basin-Lost Basin districts to the north, the Au occurs in such pegmatite-quartz veins that strike NE. Thirty miles east along Diamond Creek, quartz veins and diabase dikes strike N45[degree]E and are associated with Au and Ag anomalies in stream-sediments and panned concentrates. To the west major Au-Ag polymetallic quartz veins of the Wallapai mining district show consistent strikes from N30[degree] to 60[degree]W. K-Ar ages of hydrothermal alterations of 4 NW oriented diabase dikes that have quartz veins along them, range from 935 [+-] 35 to 755 [+-] 21 Ma. Sericite from altered granite porphyry, adjacent to a mineralized vein, gave a K-Ar age of 72 [+-]2 Ma. All geochemical sites (within a 1,000 mi[sup 2] area) determined to be anomalous in Au lie within 2 mi of either the Grand Wash or Hurricane faults. The Hurricane and Grand Wash faults, major Precambrian fault zones that were reactivated in the Phanerozoic, appear to be good exploration targets for Au-rich quartz veins associated with pegmatite or diabase dikes, many of which may be buried beneath the thick alluvium of Hualapai Valley.

  2. Nitrogen mineralization from 'AU Golden' sunn hemp residue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) cultivar ‘AU Golden’ has the potential to provide substantial amounts of nitrogen (N) to subsequent crops that could reduce recommended application rates of synthetic N fertilizers. Nitrogen fertilization problems via legumes are often due to asynch...

  3. Ozone-driven photocatalyzed degradation and mineralization of pesticide, Triclopyr by Au/TiO2.

    PubMed

    Maddila, Suresh; Rana, Surjakanta; Pagadala, Ramakanth; Maddila, Surya N; Vasam, Chandrasekhar; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2015-01-01

    Triclopyr is a widely used pesticide which is non-biodegradable and enters aquatic systems. The ozone facilitated photocatalyzed degradation and mineralization of Triclopyr using Au-loaded titania as heterogeneous catalyst is reported. The oxidative degradation activity of the hazardous pesticide was investigated at pH 7.8 under varied reaction conditions, including in presence and absence of ozone, titania alone, in presence and absence of light and with different loadings of Au on support. Photocatalysis with 2% Au/TiO2 in the presence of ozone yielded 100% degradation of Triclopyr in 2 h. The extent of degradation of pesticide and its mineralization were confirmed by GC-MS. For 10 mg/L of Triclopyr, 0.1 g/L of catalyst was found to be the optimum for mineralization. Results show that photocatalyzed ozonation with Au/TiO2 as catalyst is a very effective for its removal. No leaching of Au was observed in triplicate runs. Catalyst was fully recoverable and reusable with no loss of activity.

  4. Evidence for rapid epithermal mineralization and coeval bimodal volcanism, Bruner Au-Ag property, NV USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Dylan

    The character of Au-Ag mineralization and volcanic/hydrothermal relationships at the underexplored Miocene-age Bruner low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposit are elucidated using field and laboratory studies. Bruner is located in central Nevada within the Great Basin extensional province, near several major volcanic trends (Western Andesite, Northern Nevada Rift) associated with world-class Miocene-age epithermal Au-Ag provinces. Despite its proximity to several >1 Moz Au deposits, and newly discovered high-grade drill intercepts (to 117 ppm Au/1.5m), there is no published research on the deposit, the style of mineralization has not been systematically characterized, and vectors to mineralization remain elusive. By investigating the nature of mineralization and time-space relationships between volcanic/hydrothermal activity, the deposit has been integrated into a regional framework, and exploration targeting improved. Mineralization occurs within narrow quartz + adularia +/- pyrite veins that manifest as sheeted/stockwork zones, vein swarms, and rare 0.3-2 m wide veins hosted by two generations of Miocene high-K, high-silica rhyolite flow dome complexes overlying an andesite flow unit. The most prominent structural controls on veining are N­striking faults and syn-mineral basalt/rhyolite dikes. Productive veins have robust boiling indicators (high adularia content, bladed quartz after calcite, recrystallized colloform quartz bands), lack rhythmic banding, and contain only 1-2 stages; these veins overprint, or occur separately from another population of barren to weakly mineralized rhythmically banded quartz-only veins. Ore minerals consist of coarse Au0.5Ag 0.5 electrum, fine Au0.7Ag0.3 electrum, acanthite, uytenbogaardtite (Ag3AuS2) and minor embolite Ag(Br,Cl). Now deeply oxidized, veins typically contain <1% pyrite/goethite + Au-Ag minerals, with trace marcasite and microscopic Fe-poor sphalerite. Property-scale K-feldspar alteration related to a pre

  5. Porphyry Cu-Au mineralization in the Mirkuh Ali Mirza magmatic complex, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, A.; Yazdi, M.; Mehrpartou, M.; Vosoughi, M.; Younesi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Mirkuh Ali Mirza Cu-Au porphyry system in East Azerbaijan Province is located on the western part of the Cenozoic Alborz-Azerbaijan volcanic belt. The belt is also an important Cu-Mo-Au metallogenic province in northwestern Iran. The exposed rocks in the study area consist of a volcaniclastic sequence, subvolcanic rocks and intermediate to mafic lava flows of Neogene age. The volcanic rocks show a typical subduction-related magmatic arc geological and geochemical signature, with low concentration of Nb, Ta, and Ti. Mineralization is hosted by Neogene dacitic tuff and porphyritic dacite situated at the intersections of northeast and northwest faults. Field observations, alteration zonation, geochemical haloes and isotopic data of the Mirkuh Ali Mirza magmatic complex show similarities with typical convergent margin Cu-Au porphyry type deposits. The following features confirm the classic model for Cu-Au porphyry systems: (a) close spatial association with high-K calcalkaline to shoshonitic rock related to post-collision extensional setting (b) low grade Cu (0.57%) (c) stockworks as well as disseminated sulfides (c) zonality of the alteration patterns from intense phyllic at the center to outward weak-phyllic, argillic, and propylitic (d) the presence of a pyritic halo (e) accompanied by sheeted veins and low-sulfidation epithermal gold (f) mineralization spatially associated with intersection of structures, (g) genetically related to diorite porphyry stocks at depth (h) geochemical zonation of (Cu ± Au ± Ag ± Bi) → (Cu + Mo ± Bi ± Au ± Pb ± Zn ± As) → (Au + Mo ± Pb ± Zn) → (As + Ag + Sb + Mn + Ba + Pb + Zn + Hg) → Hg from center to outwards (i) The range of sulfur isotopic values is approximately zero (interpreted to have magmatic source) and similar to other subduction-related porphyry Cu deposits.

  6. Geological, fluid inclusion and isotopic studies of the Baiyangping Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag polymetallic deposit, Lanping basin, Yunnan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Song, Yu-Cai; Zhang, Hong-Rui

    2015-11-01

    Baiyangping Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag deposit is located in Lanping basin, northwestern Yunnan province. The deposit is composed of a few ore veins and can be divided into several ore blocks. The ore bodies are primarily hosted in Mesozoic carbonate, sandstone and siltstone along the north-south-striking, NWW-striking and NE-SW-striking fault zones. There are breccia, massive, vein like and disseminated ores. The main ore minerals are sphalerite, galena, gratonite, jordanite, tetrahedrite series minerals, chalcocite, chalcopyrite, realgar, orpiment, bournonite, cobalt-bearing arsenopyrite, argentite, kongsbergite, cobaltine, siegenite. The sizes of fluid inclusions in Baiyangping deposit are generally less than 10 μm and have the shape of round, oval, irregular, etc. The ore-forming fluid system is Ca2+-Na+-K+-Mg2+-Cl--F--NO3- brine system. The freezing temperature of fluid inclusions in mineral deposits ranges from -26.4 to -0.2 °C, average -14.6 °C; the homogenization temperature is concentrated in 120-180 °C, and the salinity is between 0.35 and 24.73 wt% (NaCleq), average 16.9 wt% (NaCleq). δ13CPDB and δ18OSMOW values of hydrothermal calcite range from -4.16‰ to 3‰ and -2.5‰ to 20.4‰, respectively. δ34S values of sulfide minerals range from -10.2‰ to 11.2‰, average 5.6‰. The sulfide samples yield 206Pb/204Pb values of 18.609-18.818, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.548-15.842 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.514-39.556. C-O-S-Pb isotope compositions of the Baiyangping deposit indicate a homogeneous carbon source, and the carbon in hydrothermal calcite is derived from the dissolution of carbonate rock strata, the ore-forming fluid belongs to basin brine fluid system, which is mixed with the precipitate water, sulfur in sulfides and sulfosalts is derived from thermal chemical sulfate reduction, and the thermal decomposition of sulfur-bearing organic matter. The metal mineralization material is from sedimentary strata and basement. The late Pb-Zn polymetallic mineralization event

  7. Tectono-metallogenic settings of the formation and convergence of disseminated Au-sulfide mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Sidorov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Large Au-sulfide deposits (GSDs) of disseminated ores occur worldwide in metallogenic provinces of various ages (from Precambrian to Pliocene). The studies performed showed that the great genetic diversity of GSD is determined by the similar oregenesis conditions that appear in different tectono-metallogenic settings (TMSs). A GSD is included in a certain TMS by the respective changes in the mineral and geochemical assemblages of ores. However, in the majority of cases, the GSDs of different TMSs are convergent (quasi-identical) in the texture, structure, and mineral composition of ores. All types of the above TMSs are found in Russia, which allows forecasting the discovery of new GSDs in each setting.

  8. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-06

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world's best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ(13)C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 10(9) moles of reduced sulphur and 10(10) moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  9. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F.; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world’s best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ13C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 109 moles of reduced sulphur and 1010 moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  10. Sulfide mineral paragenesis at the Hugo Dummett porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Oyu Tolgoi, South Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjaa, M.; Fujimaki, H.

    2008-12-01

    Mineralogical studies of ore minerals have been conducted for the Hugo Dummett porphyry copper deposit. The Hugo Dummett porphyry copper gold deposit is located in the South Gobi region, Mongolia and currently being explored. This deposit divided into the Cu-rich South Hugo Dummett and the Cu-Au-rich North Hugo Dummett deposits. The Hugo Dummett deposits contain 1.08% copper (1.16 billion tonnes in total) and 0.23 g/t gold. Copper-gold mineralizations at this deposit are centered on a high-grade copper (typically > 2.5%) and gold (0.5-2 g/t) zone of intense quartz stockwork veining. The high grade copper and gold zone is mainly within the Late Devonian quartz monzodiorite intrusions and augite basalt, also locally occurs in dacitic rocks. Intense quartz veining forms a lens up to 100 m wide hosted by augite basalt and partly by quartz monzodiorite. Although many explorations have been carried out, but only a few scientific works were done in the Oyu Tolgoi mining area. Therefore the nature of copper-gold mineralization and orgin of the deposit is not fully understood. North Hugo Dummett and South Hugo Dummett porphyry copper-gold deposits are characterized by three mineralized stages based on our study: (1) early stage (2) middle stage and (3) late stage. The main copper- gold mineralization occurs in the early and middle stages, which is related to the quartz monzodiorite and dacitic rocks. Pyrite, chalcopyrite and bornite were continuously crystallized from early to late stage. The early stage of pyrite, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite and sphalerite were replaced by middle stage of minerals. The middle stage minerals are sphalerite, tennantite, tetrahedrite, chalcocite, covellite, eugenite, galena, electrum, and gold, those are dominantly occur in the quartz monzodiorite. Additional pyrite, bornite and chalcopyrite were also deposited during this stage. In the late stage, pyrite, chalcopyrite and bornite are dominantly occurs as veins, veinlets and fracture

  11. Evidence for throttling as a control over localized late-stage Au/Ag mineralization in the Mineral Hill breccia pipe, Golden Sunlight mine, Jefferson County, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, W.W.; Porter, E.

    1985-01-01

    A restricted zone of anomalous gold and silver mineralization, coupled with localized intense alteration and textural variations, documents the existence of a natural throttle which controlled Au/Ag emplacement during late-stage mineralization of the Mineral Hill breccia pipe. The zone is roughly funnel-shaped with a maximum width of 10m and a length of 30m. Mineralization and alteration are developed along the trend of a steep-dipping to vertical fracture zone and apparently pinch out at depth. Small displacement post-mineralization cross-faults offset contacts and influence grade distribution within the feature. Breccia texture, nature and intensity of alteration, and ore grade very systematically from the margin to the interior of the zone. The breccia becomes rubbly and friable, with frothy, cellular quartz comprising the matrix and as much as 50 percent of the rock in some locations. Au/Ag grades vary directly with the development of the cellular quartz and are highest in the interior, grading to local background levels in the wallrock. Barite and minor white opaline quartz occur in the matrix adjacent to contacts, diminishing in volume toward the interior. Minor primary hematite occurs in some clasts in the interior. Iron-oxides after sulfides are common throughout the zone. The feature is interpreted as late-stage localized zone of venting and pressure-release developed above a constriction in the Mineral Hill hydrothermal mineralizing system.

  12. The enhancing of Au-Ag-Te content in tellurium-bearing ore mineral by bio-oxidation-leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, PyeongMan; Kim, HyunSoo; Myung, EunJi; Kim, YoonJung; Lee, YongBum; Park*, CheonYoung

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to enhance the content of valuable metals such as Au-Ag-Te in tellurium-bearing minerals by bio-oxidation-leaching. It was confirmed that pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena were produced together with tellurium-bearing minerals including hessite, sylvanite and tellurobismuthite from ore minerals and concentrates through microscopic observation and SEM/EDS analysis. In a bio-oxidation-leaching experiment, with regard to Au, Ag, Te, Cu and Fe, the changes in the amount of leaching and the content of leaching residues were compared and analyzed with each other depending on the adaptation of an indigenous microbe identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. As a result of the experiment, the Au-Ag-Te content in tellurium-bearing ore mineral was enhanced in the order of physical oxidation leaching, physical/non-adaptive bio-oxidation-leaching and physical/adaptive biological leaching. It suggests that the bio-oxidation-leaching using microbes adapted in tellurium-bearing ore mineral can be used as a pre-treatment and a main process in a recovery process of valuable metals. "This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2013R1A1A2004898)"

  13. Induced polarization imaging applied to exploration for low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposits, Seongsan mineralized district, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Man-Ho; Shin, Seung Wook; Park, Samgyu; Cho, Seong-Jun; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2016-10-01

    The determination of mineralization boundaries during mineral exploration for undiscovered low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposits is a significant challenge because of the extensive survey areas required. Induced polarization (IP) imaging is an effective geophysical technique for the detection of sulfides or clay. Thus, this method is considered useful to determine the boundaries of subsurface mineralization and hydrothermal alteration associated with epithermal deposits. We used 2D and 3D IP imaging to define the silicification and mineralization boundaries of the Moisan deposit in the Seongsan mineralized district, which is geologically well-known. The boundaries of the silicification zone were defined by high resistivity values of 600 Ω-m, and those of the mineralization zone were defined by high global chargeability values of 3 mV V-1. The continuity of the high resistivity anomaly corresponded well to the silicification (quartz veins) exposed in outcrop. In addition, it is geologically reasonable that the chargeability anomaly, ⩾3 mV V-1, associated with the mineralization/hydrothermal alteration zone was concentrated at near-surface depths, and extensively surrounding the resistivity anomaly, ⩾600 Ω-m, associated with the silicification zone.

  14. Pt, Au, Pd and Ru Partitioning Between Mineral and Silicate Melts: The Role of Metal Nanonuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Agranier, A.; Campbell, A.

    2012-01-01

    The partition coefficients of Pt and other Pt Group Elements (PGE) between metal and silicate D(sub Metal-Silicate) and also between silicate minerals and silicate melts D(sub Metal-Silicate) are among the most challenging coefficients to obtain precisely. The PGE are highly siderophile elements (HSE) with D(sub Metal-Silicate) >10(exp 3) due to the fact that their concentrations in silicates are very low (ppb to ppt range). Therefore, the analytical difficulty is increased by the possible presence of HSE-rich-nuggets in reduced silicate melts during experiments). These tiny HSE nuggets complicate the interpretation of measured HSE concentrations. If the HSE micro-nuggets are just sample artifacts, then their contributions should be removed before calculations of the final concentration. On the other hand, if they are produced during the quench, then they should be included in the analysis. We still don't understand the mechanism of nugget formation well. Are they formed during the quench by precipitation from precursor species dissolved homogeneously in the melts, or are they precipitated in situ at high temperature due to oversaturation? As these elements are important tracers of early planetary processes such as core formation, it is important to take up this analytical and experimental challenge. In the case of the Earth for example, chondritic relative abundances of the HSE in some mantle xenoliths have led to the concept of the "late veneer" as a source of volatiles (such as water) and siderophiles in the silicate Earth. Silicate crystal/liquid fractionation is responsible for most, if not all, the HSE variation in the martian meteorite suites (SNC) and Pt is the element least affected by these fractionations. Therefore, in terms of reconstructing mantle HSE abundances for Mars, Pt becomes a very important player. In the present study, we have performed high temperature experiments under various redox conditions in order to determine the abundances of Pt, Au

  15. Orogenic Au-mineralization during Proterozoic transpression in SW Tanzania: insights from three-dimensional frictional reactivation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawley, Christopher; Imber, Jonathan; Selby, David

    2013-04-01

    Au-mineralization in the western Lupa goldfield, SW Tanzania was associated with transpression and reverse sinistral slip along a network of steeply south-dipping shear zones with non-Andersonian geometries. Slip, synchronous with greenschist facies retrogression, was accommodated by frictional failure and sliding during emplacement of quartz ± Au-bearing veins, and by crystal plasticity and fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer. The Kenge ore body is situated along a NW-SE trending shear zone and is characterized by < 10 m thick, Au-bearing fault-fill veins hosted by well-developed phyllosilicate-rich mylonites. The contemporaneous Porcupine ore body is situated along an ENE-WSW to E-W trending shear zone, which is characterized by narrow, discontinuous mylonites within a silicified and non-foliated granitoid protolith. Au-mineralization at Porcupine occurs within steeply-dipping fault-fill and sub-horizontal extension/oblique-extension veins. Three-dimensional frictional reactivation theory explains the different vein styles at Kenge and Porcupine, and extends the classic fault valve model to the general case of oblique slip along multiple, arbitrarily-oriented shear zones. Frictional reactivation of the Kenge shear zone is predicted to have occurred at supra-hydrostatic, but sub-lithostatic pore fluid pressures, whilst frictional reactivation of the shear zone hosting the Porcupine deposit took place at near-lithostatic fluid pressures. Furthermore, analysis of the differential stress required for frictional reactivation suggests that the Kenge shear zone was intrinsically weaker than that hosting the Porcupine ore body, a prediction consistent with the lack of well-developed phyllosilicate-rich shear zones at Porcupine. We hypothesize that near-lithostatic pore fluid pressures at the Porcupine ore body relieved effective normal stresses at grain-grain contacts, helping to preserve intra-granular and fracture porosity associated with partially-altered feldspar

  16. Geology, mineralization, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion characteristics of the Novogodnee-Monto oxidized Au-(Cu) skarn and porphyry deposit, Polar Ural, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Serguei G.; Kryazhev, Sergey G.; Dvurechenskaya, Svetlana S.

    2013-06-01

    The Novogodnee-Monto oxidized Au-(Cu) skarn and porphyry deposit is situated in the large metallogenic belt of magnetite skarn and Cu-Au porphyry deposits formed along the Devonian-Carboniferous Urals orogen. The deposit area incorporates nearly contemporaneous Middle-Late Devonian to Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous calc-alkaline (gabbro to diorite) and potassic (monzogabbro, monzodiorite- to monzonite-porphyry, also lamprophyres) intrusive suites. The deposit is represented by magnetite skarn overprinted by amphibole-chlorite-epidote-quartz-albite and then sericite-quartz-carbonate assemblages bearing Au-sulfide mineralization. This mineralization includes early high-fineness (900-990 ‰) native Au associated mostly with cobaltite as well as with chalcopyrite and Co-pyrite, intermediate-stage native Au (fineness 830-860 ‰) associated mostly with galena, and late native Au (760-830 ‰) associated with Te minerals. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope data indicate an involvement of magmatic-hydrothermal high-salinity (>20 wt.% NaCl-equiv.) chloride fluids. The potassic igneous suite may have directly sourced fluids, metals, and/or sulfur. The abundance of Au mineralization is consistent with the oxidized character of the system, and its association with Co-sulfides suggests elevated sulfur fugacity.

  17. Descriptive and geoenvironmental model for Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks: Chapter G in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.; Johnson, Craig A.; Causey, J. Douglas; Lund, Karen; Schulz, Klaus J.; Gray, John E.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Slack, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Additional geologically and compositionally similar deposits are known, but have average Co grades less than 0.1 percent. Most of these deposits contain cobalt-rich pyrite and lack appreciable amounts of distinct Co sulfide and (or) sulfarsenide minerals. Such deposits are not discussed in detail in the following sections, but these deposits may be revelant to the descriptive and genetic models presented below. Examples include the Scadding Au-Co-Cu deposit in Ontario, Canada; the Vähäjoki Co-Cu-Au deposit in Finland; the Tuolugou Co-Au deposit in Qinghai Province, China; the Lala Co-Cu-UREE deposit in Sichuan Province, China; the Guelb Moghrein Cu-Au-Co deposit in Mauritania; and the Great Australia Co-Cu, Greenmount Cu-Au-Co, and Monakoff Cu-Au-Co-UAg deposits in Queensland, Australia. Detailed information on these deposits is presented in appendix 2.

  18. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including building bones, making ... regulating your heartbeat. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your ...

  19. The Woxi W-Sb-Au deposit in Hunan, South China: An example of Late Proterozoic sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, X. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Schulz, O.; Vavtar, F.; Liu, J. M.; Zheng, M. H.; Zheng, L.

    2012-09-01

    The Woxi W-Sb-Au deposit in Hunan, South China is hosted by Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks, a turbiditic sequence of graywacke, siltstone, sandy slate and slate. The deposit has two principal styles of mineralization: stratiform and stockwork. The stratiform ores, which account for about 75% of the total proven ore reserves, are composed predominantly of interbedded, massive to laminated Au-bearing quartz, stibnite, scheelite, pyrite, and silty clays. Fine layering, at the macro- to microscale, is the most striking feature of the ores, with individual mm- to cm-scale bands traceable over distances of several meters to a few hundred meters along strike. Structures indicative of soft-sediment deformation due to slumping and synsedimentary sliding are commonly observed in the banded ores and the barren quartz-carbonate beds in the adjacent host rocks. The stockwork mineralization accounts for about 25% of the total ore reserves and is restricted to a 3-10 m-thick zone immediately beneath the stratiform ores. It is characterized by numerous quartz + pyrite ± scheelite stringer veins that are either subparallel or near perpendicular to the overlying stratiform ore layers. Alteration at Woxi occurs as semiconformable, tabular blankets asymmetrically enveloping the orebodies along their entire length, and, is dominated by a quartz + sericite + chlorite ± carbonate assemblage. The footwall alteration is generally more intense and somewhat thicker than the hanging-wall alteration. Geochemical data show that, with distance above and below the mineralized horizons, contents of W, Au, As, and Sb systematically decrease, whereas concentrations of other trace elements such as Hf, Sc, Th, Ta, Y, Zr, Nb and REEs gradually increase. This may reflect a decreasing hydrothermal input in the sediments and an increasing dominance of detrital and seawater-derived components. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns of both bulk ores and individual minerals are comparable to those of

  20. Covellite CuS as a matrix for "invisible" gold: X-ray spectroscopic study of the chemical state of Cu and Au in synthetic minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagirov, Boris R.; Trigub, Alexander L.; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Shiryaev, Andrey A.; Chareev, Dmitriy A.; Nickolsky, Maximilian S.; Abramova, Vera D.; Kovalchuk, Elena V.

    2016-10-01

    Geological processes leading to formation of sulfide ores often result in precipitation of gold-bearing sulfides which can contain high concentrations of this metal in "invisible" (or "refractory") state. Covellite (CuS) is ubiquitous mineral in many types of the ore deposits, and numerous studies of the natural ores show that covellite can contain high concentrations of Au. At the same time, Au-bearing covellite withstands cooling in contrast to other minerals of the Cu-Fe-S system (chalcocite, bornite, chalcopyrite), where Au exsolves at low temperatures. This makes covellite a convenient model system for investigation of the chemical state (local environment and valence) of the "invisible" Au in copper-sulfide ores (copper-porphyry, epithermal, volcanogenic massive sulfide, SEDEX deposits). Therefore, it is necessary to determine the location of Au in the covellite matrix as it will have important implications for the methods employed by mineral processing industry to extract Au from sulfide ores. Here we investigate the chemical state of Cu and Au in synthetic covellite containing up to 0.3 wt.% of Au in the "invisible" state. The covellite crystals were synthesized by hydrothermal and salt flux methods. Formation of the chemically bound Au is indicated by strong dependence of the concentration of Au in covellite on the sulfur fugacity in the experimental system (d(log C(Au))/d(log f(S2)) ∼ 0.65). The Au concentration of covellite grows with increasing temperature from 400 to 450 °C, whereas further temperature increase to 500 °C has only minor effect. The synthesized minerals were studied using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in high energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) mode. Ab initio simulations of Cu K edge XANES spectra show that the Cu oxidation state in two structural positions in covellite (tetrahedral and triangular coordination with S atoms) is identical: the total loss of electronic charge for the 3d shell is ∼0

  1. Conditions of formation of the Mavrokoryfi high-sulfidation epithermal Cu-Ag-Au-Te mineralization (Petrota Graben, NE Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudouris, Panagiotis Christos

    2011-01-01

    The Mavrokoryfi Cu-Ag-Au-Te prospect, northeastern Greece, consists of atypical, high-sulfidation mineralization where precious metals were introduced contemporaneously with advanced argillic alteration from magmatic vapors. It occurs as veins of massive sulfides in zones of silicic and advanced argillic alteration spatially associated with an andesitic lava dome and hyaloclastites. Mineralogical data demonstrate an unusual ore and gangue mineralogy that is compatible with formation under very oxidizing conditions (log fO2 values of >-31.8) at temperatures of 200°C to 250°C. Oxidizing conditions favored the formation of hypogene lead sulfates (anglesite and barian celestite) instead of galena. Selenian acanthite, cadmian freibergite, and argentian goldfieldite are the main carriers of silver in the deposit and are reported in Greece for the first time. They were deposited at log fS2 of -9 to -7 and log fTe2 values of -9 to -12.5 (250°C). Ag-poor goldfieldite at Mavrokoryfi has up to 3.7 apfu Te and is the most Te-rich goldfieldite yet reported. The mineralization is accompanied by aluminum-phosphate-sulfate minerals of magmatic-hydrothermal origin and an unusual Pb-enrichment. Ore-forming components were likely derived from andesite porphyries.

  2. Tethyan mantle metasomatism creates subduction geochemical signatures in non-arc Cu-Au-Te mineralizing magmas, Apuseni Mountains (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Caroline R.; Pettke, T.; Heinrich, C. A.; Rosu, E.; Woodland, S.; Fry, B.

    2013-03-01

    The history of processes that have affected the lithospheric mantle can be reflected in the chemical characteristics of magmas that are emplaced millions of years later during crustal extension. As a result, ore deposits normally associated with subduction can form in environments where they are not conventionally expected. Calc-alkaline magmatism in the Apuseni Mountains, Romania, occurred in response to Miocene extension and formed rich Au-Ag-Te epithermal and Cu-Au porphyry deposits. We present major, trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data from a comprehensive suite of unaltered Apuseni samples. This dataset indicates that the Apuseni magmas were derived from partial melting of a lithospheric mantle source enriched in volatiles and incompatible elements. Mantle-like Sr and Nd isotopic signatures, combined with large ion lithophile element enrichments, Nb-Ta depletions, and Pb enrichments, are best explained by mantle refertilization during subduction. Subduction metasomatism of the Apuseni source region occurred at least 50 Ma prior to extensional magma generation in the Miocene, most likely during NE-dipping subduction associated with closure of the Neotethys Ocean in the Mesozoic. We suggest that the different types of mineralization in the region are generally related to the degree of Miocene extension and consequent partial melting of the mantle source. Initial extension is correlated with the largest Au deposits in the Apuseni Mountains. The magmatic rocks associated with these deposits contain the most isotopically enriched Pb-Sr-Nd ratios, higher SiO2 and lower Mg-number, consistent with significant lower crustal influence during the initiation of extension and associated crustal anatexis. As extension progressed, increased mantle input resulted in magmas with more isotopically depleted Pb-Sr-Nd ratios, lower SiO2 and higher Mg-numbers. Uniquely rich Te-rich Au-Ag epithermal deposits are associated with these magmas, and are followed by porphyry Cu-Au

  3. Using the concentration-volume (C-V) fractal model in the delineation of gold mineralized zones within the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au, Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Abdelnasser, Amr; Karaman, Muhittin; Budakoglu, Murat

    2016-04-01

    The Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au mineralization that located at the Biga peninsula (W Turkey) developed around the Eybek pluton concentrated at its southern contact. This mineralization that hosted in the hornfels rocks of Karakaya Complex is associated with three main alteration zones; potassic, phyllic and propylitic alterations along the fault controlled margins of the Eybek pluton and quartz stockwork veining as well as brecciation zones. As well as two mineralized zones were occurred in the mine area; hypogene and oxidation/supergene zone. The hypogene zone has differentiated alteration types; high potassic and low phyllic alteration, while the oxidation/supergene zone has high phyllic and propylitic alterations. This work deals with the delineation of gold mineralized zone within this porphyry deposit using the concentration-volume (C-V) fractal model. Five zones of gold were calculated using its power-law C-V relationship that revealed that the main phase of gold mineralization stated at 5.3083 ppm Au concentration. In addition, the C-V log-log plot shows that the highly and moderately Au mineralization zone developed in western part of deposit correlated with oxidation zone related to propylitic alteration. On the other hand, its weakly mineralization zone has a widespread in the hypogene zone related to potassic alteration. This refers to the enrichment of gold and depletion of copper at the oxidation/supergene zone is due to the oxidation/supergene alteration processes that enrich the deposits by the meteoric water. Keywords: Concentration-volume (C-V) fractal model; gold mineralized zone; Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au; Balikesir; NW Turkey.

  4. Origin of epithermal Ag-Au-Cu-Pb-Zn mineralization in Guanajuato, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Helen; Arehart, Greg; Oreskes, Naomi; Zantop, Half

    2014-01-01

    The Guanajuato epithermal district is one of the largest silver producers in Mexico. Mineralization occurs along three main vein systems trending dominantly northwest-southeast: the central Veta Madre, the La Luz system to the northwest, and the Sierra system to the east. Mineralization consists dominantly of silver sulfides and sulfosalts, base metal sulfides (mostly chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, and pyrite), and electrum. There is a broad zonation of metal distribution, with up to 10 % Cu+Pb+Zn in the deeper mines along the northern and central portions of the Veta Madre. Ore occurs in banded veins and breccias and as stockworks, with gangue composed dominantly of quartz and calcite. Host rocks are Mesozoic sedimentary and intrusive igneous rocks and Tertiary volcanic rocks. Most fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures are between 200 and 300 °C, with salinities below 4 wt.% NaCl equivalent. Fluid temperature and salinity decreased with time, from 290 to 240 °C and from 2.5 to 1.1 wt.% NaCl equivalent. Relatively constant fluid inclusion liquid-to-vapor ratios and a trend of decreasing salinity with decreasing temperature and with increasing time suggest dilution of the hydrothermal solutions. However, evidence of boiling (such as quartz and calcite textures and the presence of adularia) is noted along the Veta Madre, particularly at higher elevations. Fluid inclusion and mineralogical evidence for boiling of metal-bearing solutions is found in gold-rich portions of the eastern Sierra system; this part of the system is interpreted as the least eroded part of the district. Oxygen, carbon, and sulfur isotope analysis of host rocks, ore, and gangue minerals and fluid inclusion contents indicate a hydrothermal fluid, with an initial magmatic component that mixed over time with infiltrating meteoric water and underwent exchange with host rocks. Mineral deposition was a result of decreasing activities of sulfur and oxygen, decreasing temperature, increasing p

  5. Cu-Mo-Au Partitioning and Ore Mineral Solubility: Constraints on the Role of Temperature, Pressure, and Volatile Fugacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, Brian; Blundy, Jon

    2014-05-01

    The complex conditions under which volatile phases are exsolved from arc magmas play a key role in the formation of Porphyry Copper Deposits (PCD). Specifically, the efficiency by which ore metals are removed from melts by these 'proto-ore fluids', metal ratios in the fluid(s), the mass of metals available for transport, and ultimately deposit grades are affected by several key intensive variables and volatile fugacitites. Previous experiments have shown that fluid salinity [1] as well as sulfur content [2] can strongly affect the ore metal partitioning. In addition, more subtle parameters such as cation ratios (e.g Na/K/H - [3]) along with melt ASI and fH2S/fSO2, may influence both Cu and Au. We present experiments designed to constrain the role of key variables (T, P, fO2, fH2S, fSO2, δΣ Clv) in influencing metal partitioning on a suite of ore metals in equilibrium. In order to simulate complex, natural proto-ore fluids, we have performed CuFeS2-MoS2 saturated, Cu-Au-Mo-Re partitioning experiments using pumice from the Cardones Ignimbrite in northern Chile. These experiments examine fluid-melt-crystal partitioning and ore mineral solubility for a magmatic system similar to those found in major PCD. Experiments were performed at 100 & 200 MPa and super-solidus conditions (810 oC) in oxidized (NNO + 2) and reduced (NNO + 0.75) environments with respect to sulphur, as well as at near-solidus conditions (740 oC and NNO + 0.75). Observed Cu concentrations are consistent with Cl-dependent partitioning, modified by the presence of sulfur. The vapour/melt partitioning of Cu is enhanced by increased fH2S at reduced conditions at 810 oC, but returns to Cl-dependence for high fSO2 at oxidized conditions (DCuv/m decreases from 40 ± 20 to 10 ± 5). In contrast, molybdenum partitioning remains constant with changing fO2 (DMov/m = 3 ± 1 and 4 ± 2 respectively). This corresponds to a change in the vapour Cu/Mo ratio from ~40:1 down to ~1:1. The decrease in DCuv/m is likely

  6. Evaporatic-source model for igneous-related Fe oxide (REE-Cu-Au-U) mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    We propose that many igneous-related Fe oxide-rich (REE-Cu-Au-U-bearing) deposits form by hydrothermal processes involving evaporitic ligand sources, either coeval salars or older evaporites. These deposits are abundant in both Phanerozoic and Proterozoic extensional continental and continent-margin settings. They commonly form in global arid zones, but they also occur where magmatism is superimposed upon older evaporites. Magmatic compositions exert only second-order control, mainly on alteration mineralogy and on element abundances. Hot S-poor brines generated by interaction with evaporitic materials are consistent with geologic settings and help rationalize the distinctive element enrichments (siderophile, lithophile) and hydrothermal alteration (sodic, locally alkaline) found in these systems. This model contrasts with immiscible oxide melt and magmatic-hydrothermal origins commonly proposed for these deposits, although all three mechanisms can occur. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Magmatic and structural controls on porphyry-style Cu-Au-Mo mineralization at Kemess South, Toodoggone District of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duuring, Paul; Rowins, Stephen M.; McKinley, Bradley S. M.; Dickinson, Jenni M.; Diakow, Larry J.; Kim, Young-Seog; Creaser, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Kemess South is the only Cu-Au-Mo mine in the Toodoggone district and a major Cu and Au producer in British Columbia. Porphyry-style Cu-Au-Mo mineralization is mainly hosted by the tabular, SW-plunging, 199.6 ± 0.6-Ma Maple Leaf granodiorite, which intrudes tightly folded, SW-dipping, Permian Asitka Group siltstone and limestone and homogeneous Triassic Takla Group basalt. Southwest-dipping 194.0 ± 0.4-Ma Toodoggone Formation conglomerate, volcaniclastic, and epiclastic rocks overlie the granodiorite and Asitka Group rocks. Minor Cu-Au-Mo mineralization is hosted by the immediate Takla Group basalt country rock, whereas low-tonnage high-grade Cu zones occur beneath a 30-m-thick leached capping in supergene-altered granodiorite and in exotic positions in overlying Toodoggone Formation conglomerate. Granodiorite has an intrusive contact with mineralized and altered Takla Group basalt but displays a sheared contact with unmineralized and less altered Asitka Group siltstone. The North Block fault is a deposit-scale, E-striking, steeply S-dipping normal fault that juxtaposes the granodiorite/basalt ore body against unmineralized Asitka Group rocks. Younger NW- and NE-striking normal-dextral faults cut all rock types, orebodies, and the North Block fault with displacements of up to 100 m and result in the graben-and-horst-style block faulting of the stratigraphy and ore body. Both basalt and granodiorite host comparable vein sequence and alteration histories, with minor variations in hydrothermal mineral assemblages caused by differing protolith chemistry. Early potassic alteration (and associated early-stage Cu ± Au ± Mo mineralization) is partly replaced by phyllic and intermediate argillic alteration associated with main-stage Cu-Au-Mo mineralization. Two main-stage veins have Re-Os molybdenite ages of 201.3 ± 1.2 and 201.1 ± 1.2 Ma. These mineralization ages overlap the 199.6 ± 0.6-Ma U-Pb zircon crystallization age for the Maple Leaf granodiorite. Late

  8. Geophysical and geochemical data from the area of the Pebble Cu-Au-Mo porphyry deposit, southwestern Alaska: Contributions to assessment techniques for concealed mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, E.D.; Smith, S.M.; Giles, S.A.; Granitto, Matthew; Eppinger, R.G.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Shah, A.K.; Kelley, K.D.; Fey, D.L.; Minsley, B.J.; Brown, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey began a multidisciplinary study in southwest Alaska to investigate the setting and detectability of mineral deposits in concealed volcanic and glacial terranes. The study area hosts the world-class Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, and through collaboration with the Pebble Limited Partnership, a range of geophysical and geochemical investigations was carried out in proximity to the deposit. The deposit is almost entirely concealed by tundra, glacial deposits, and post-mineralization volcanic rocks. The discovery of mineral resources beneath cover is becoming more important because most of the mineral resources at the surface have already been discovered. Research is needed to identify ways in which to assess for concealed mineral resources. This report presents the uninterpreted geophysical measurements and geochemical and mineralogical analytical data from samples collected during the summer field seasons from 2007 to 2010, and makes the data available in a single Geographic Information System (GIS) database.

  9. Gold deposition on pyrite and the common sulfide minerals: An STM/STS and SR-XPS study of surface reactions and Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, Yuri L.; Romanchenko, Alexander S.

    2007-12-01

    Gold species spontaneously deposited on pyrite and chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, sphalerite from HAuCl 4 solutions at room temperature, as well as the state of the reacted mineral surfaces have been characterized using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), scanning tunneling microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy (STM/STS). The deposition of silver from 10 -4 M AgNO 3 has been examined for comparison. Gold precipitates as metallic nanoparticles (NPs) from about 3 nm to 30 nm in diameter, which tends to aggregate forming larger particles, especially on pyrite. The Au 4f binding energies increase up to 1 eV with decreasing size of individual Au 0 NPs, probably due to the temporal charging in the final state. Concurrently, a positive correlation between the tunneling current and the particle size was found in STS. Both these size effects were observed for unusually large, up to 20 nm Au particles. In contrast, silver deposited on the minerals as nanoparticles of semiconducting sulfide showed no shifts of photoelectron lines and different tunneling spectra. The quantity of gold deposited on pyrite and other minerals increased with time; it was lower for fracture surfaces and it grew if minerals were moderately pre-oxidized, while the preliminary leaching in Fe(III)-bearing media inhibited the following Au deposition. After the contact of polished minerals with 10 -4 M AuCl4- solution (pH 1.5) for 10 min, the gold uptake changed in the order CuFeS 2 > ZnS > PbS > FeAsS > FeS 2 > Fe 7S 8. It was noticed that the open circuit (mixed) potentials of the minerals varied in approximately the same order, excepting chalcopyrite. We concluded that the potentials of minerals were largely determined by Fe(II)/Fe(III) couple, whereas the reduction of gold complexes had a minor effect. As a result, the deposition of gold, although it proceeded via the electrochemical mechanism, increased with decreasing potential. This suggests, in particular, that the

  10. Composition and source of salinity of ore-bearing fluids in Cu-Au systems of the Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xavier, Roberto; Rusk, Brian; Emsbo, Poul; Monteiro, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The composition and Cl/Br – NaCl ratios of highly saline aqueous inclusions from large tonnage (> 100 t) IOCG deposits (Sossego, Alvo 118, and Igarapé Bahia) and a Paleoproterozoic intrusion-related Cu-Au-(Mo-W-Bi-Sn) deposit (Breves; < 50 Mt)) in the Carajás Mineral Province have been analysed by LA-ICP-MS and ion chromatography. In both Cu-Au systems, brine inclusions are Ca-dominated (5 to 10 times more than in porphyry Cu-Au fluids), and contain percent level concentrations of Na and K. IOCG inclusion fluids, however, contain higher Sr, Ba, Pb, and Zn concentrations, but significantly less Bi, than the intrusion-related Breves inclusion fluids. Cu is consistently below detection limits in brine inclusions from the IOCG and intrusion-related systems and Fe was not detected in the latter. Cl/Br and Na/Cl ratios of the IOCG inclusion fluids range from entirely evaporative brines (bittern fluids; e.g. Igarapé Bahia and Alvo 118) to values that indicate mixing with magma-derived brines. Cl/Br and Na/Cl ratios of the Breves inclusion fluids strongly suggest the involvement of magmatic brines, but that possibly also incorporated bittern fluids. Collectively, these data demonstrate that residual evaporative and magmatic brines were important components of the fluid regime involved in the formation of Cu-Au systems in the Carajás Mineral Province.

  11. Fluid processes in the Tesbihdere base-metal-Au deposit: Implications for epithermal mineralization in the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Gulcan; Banks, David A.; Ozbas, Fatih; Wallington, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Tesbihdere is one of a number of spatially close epithermal Cu-Pb-Zn-Ag-Au deposits hosted by andesites and rhyolites, typical of deposits in the Biga peninsula. Microthermometry of fluid inclusions shows a wide range of temperatures, ˜360-170°C, and salinities, ˜10-0.5 wt.% NaCl, in the different deposits studied. Dilution of a moderately saline magmatic? fluid with meteoric water occurred at constant temperature indicating, the temperature of both fluids was controlled by the geological environment. Boiling was not a major factor, but did occur in very minor amounts. The large range of temperatures within individual samples can only reasonably be explained by variations from near lithostatic to hydrostatic pressure during vein and fracture opening. That this pressure decrease did not produce extensive boiling suggests that vein opening was gradual rather than aggressive, allowing the pressure and temperature decrease to follow a path close to the L-V boiling curve. P-T reconstruction places emplacement of these ore veins at between 300-500 m beneath the surface. Similarities of LA-ICPMS of fluid inclusions from Tesbihdere, Azitepe and Basmakci, supports the conclusion that they were part of the same contemporaneous mineralizing system. The fluids are dominated by Na, with the concentrations of K>Ca>Mg combined equivalent to the concentration of Na. The range of K/Na ratios is not consistent with the fluid inclusion temperatures as the calculated temperatures are significantly higher indicating the fluids were not close to equilibrium with the enclosing rocks. Elevated K concentrations are consistent with acid-sulphate waters in shallow epithermal systems. Ore metals Cu, Zn and Pb are present in significant concentrations ˜500, 300 and 200 ppm respectively and the low Fe/Mn ratios are indicative of a relatively oxidising fluid. The negative δ 34S values of sulphides are consistent with boiling and oxidising redox conditions.

  12. Carbonate-replacement Pb-Zn-Ag ± Au mineralization in the Kamariza area, Lavrion, Greece: Mineralogy and thermochemical conditions of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudouris, P.; Melfos, V.; Spry, P. G.; Bonsall, T. A.; Tarkian, M.; Solomos, Ch.

    2008-09-01

    Carbonate-replacement Pb-Zn-Ag ± Au deposits in the Kamariza area, Lavrion district, Attica, Greece, are genetically related to the emplacement of Miocene andesitic dikes within a rapidly extending continental back-arc basin, which formed during exhumation of the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Belt. Replacement veins as well as chimneys and mantos of massive sulfides are the major orebody types with mantos grading into chimneys and veins. Ore minerals are similar among the various types of orebodies in the Kamariza area and consist of sulfides and sulfarsenides (pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, gersdorffite, marcasite), native metals (Au and Bi), Sn-bearing phases (petrukite), sulfosalts and sulfbismuthites of Ag, Bi, Cu, Pb, As, Sb (tetrahedrite-group minerals, bournonite, boulangerite, stephanite, pyrargyrite, semseyite, enargite, bismuthinite, lillianite homologues, Cu-matildite, aikinite, Ag-aikinite, mummeite, emplectite, wittichenite). The elemental association of Bi, Au, and Ag is common. The assemblages gersdorffite-bismuthinite-native gold and native gold-native bismuth are evidence for a contribution of magmatic components to the hydrothermal system. A fluctuation in the sulfidation states of the ore fluid during the evolution of the Kamariza system is evident from the deposition of early arsenopyrite, as well as of enargite-luzonite and both low-Fe and Fe-rich sphalerite in the same samples. Microthermometry of fluid inclusion assemblages show that carbonate replacement mineralization was deposited from a warm to hot (100°C to 400°C), low to moderately saline (1.8 to 17.3 wt% NaCl equiv) fluid. Eutectic temperatures of fluid inclusions as low as -55°C suggest the presence of CaCl2 in addition to NaCl, in the ore fluid. The Kamariza deposit occurs distal to the Plaka granodiorite intrusion and the associated porphyry-Mo mineralization, but is likely to be genetically related to a granitoid buried at depth.

  13. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopes in surficial materials at the Pebble Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposit, Southwestern Alaska: can the mineralizing fingerprint be detected through cover?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Forni, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit is covered by tundra and glacigenic sediments. Pb-Sr-Nd measurements were done on sediments and soils to establish baseline conditions prior to the onset of mining operations and contribute to the development of exploration methods for concealed base metal deposits of this type. Pebble rocks have a moderate range for 206Pb/204Pb = 18.574 to 18.874, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.484 to 15.526, and 208,Pb/204Pb = 38.053 to 38.266. Mineralized granodiorite shows a modest spread in 87Sr/86Sr (0.704354–0.707621) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512639–0.512750). Age-corrected (89 Ma) values for the granodiorite yield relatively unradiogenic Pb (e.g., 207Pb/204Pb 87Sr/86Sr, and positive values of ɛNd (1.00–4.52) that attest to a major contribution of mantle-derived source rocks. Pond sediments and soils have similar Pb isotope signatures and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values that resemble the mineralized granodiorites. Glacial events have obscured the recognition of isotope signatures of mineralized rocks in the sediments and soils. Baseline radiogenic isotope compositions, prior to the onset of mining operations, reflect natural erosion, transport and deposition of heterogeneous till sheets that included debris from barren rocks, mineralized granodiorite and sulfides from the Pebble deposit, and other country rocks that pre- and postdate the mineralization events. Isotopic variations suggest that natural weathering of the deposit is generally reflected in these surficial materials. The isotope data provide geochemical constraints to glimpse through the extensive cover and together with other geochemical observations provide a vector to concealed mineralized rocks genetically linked with the Pebble deposit.

  14. A monoclinic, pseudo-orthorhombic Au-Hg mineral of potential economic significance in Pleistocene Snake River alluvial deposits of southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, G.A.; Foord, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    A mineral with the approximate composition of Au94Hg6 - Au88Hg12 (atomic %) has been identified in Pleistocene Snake River alluvial deposits. The gold-mercury mineral occurs as very small grains or as polycrystalline masses composed of subhedral to nearly euhedral attached crystals. Vibratory cold-polishing techniques with 0.05-??m alumina abrasive for polished sections revealed a porous internal texture for most subhedral crystals after 48-72 hours of treatment. Thus, optical character (isotropic or anisotropic) could not be determined by reflected-light microscopy, and pore-free areas were too small for measurement of reflectance. X-ray-diffraction lines rather than individual reflections (spots), on powder camera X-ray films of unrotated spindles of single grains that morphologically appear to be single crystals, indicate that individual subhedral or euhedral crystals are composed of domains in random orientation. Thus, no material was found suitable for single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. -from Authors

  15. Mineralogy, textures, and whole-rock geochemistry of advanced argillic alteration: Hugo Dummett porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Oyu Tolgoi mineral district, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashgerel, Bat-Erdene; Kavalieris, Imants; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro

    2008-11-01

    Advanced argillic (AA) alteration is developed over a vertical interval of 500 m, above (and enclosing) Late Devonian quartz monzodiorite intrusions that accompany porphyry-style Cu-Au mineralization at the Hugo Dummett deposit. The AA alteration is mainly in basaltic rocks and locally extends into the overlying dacitic ash-flow tuff for about 100 m. The AA zone overprints porphyry-style quartz veins associated with quartz monzodiorite intrusions, but at least partly precedes high-grade porphyry-style bornite mineralization. Mineralogically, it consists of andalusite, corundum, residual quartz, titanium oxides, diaspore, alunite, aluminum phosphate-sulfate (APS) minerals, zunyite, pyrophyllite, topaz, kaolinite, and dickite, as well as anhydrite and gypsum, but is dominated by residual quartz and pyrophyllite. Alteration zonation is not apparent, except for an alunite-bearing zone that occurs approximately at the limit of strong quartz veining. Whole-rock geochemistry shows that the AA alteration removes most major elements except Si, Al, Ti, and P, and removes the trace elements Sc, Cs, and Rb. V, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, U, and Th are relatively immobile, whilst light REEs (La to Nd), Sr, Ba, and Ga can be enriched. Middle REEs (Sm to Gd) are moderately depleted; Y and heavy REEs (Tb to Lu) are strongly depleted except in two unusual samples where middle to heavy REEs are enriched.

  16. Porphyry Cu indicator minerals in till as an exploration tool: Example from the giant pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Lang, J.; Smith, Steven M.; Fey, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Porphyry Cu indicator minerals are mineral species in clastic sediments that indicate the presence of mineralization and hydrothermal alteration associated with porphyry Cu and associated skarn deposits. Porphyry Cu indicator minerals recovered from shallow till samples near the giant Pebble Cu-Au-Mo porphyry deposit in SW Alaska, USA, include apatite, andradite garnet, Mn-epidote, visible gold, jarosite, pyrite, and cinnabar. Sulphide minerals other than pyrite are absent from till, most likely due to the oxidation of the till. The distribution of till samples with abundant apatite and cinnabar suggest sources other than the Pebble deposit. With three exceptions, all till samples up-ice of the Pebble deposit contain 40grains/10kg) are in close proximity to smaller porphyry and skarn occurrences in the region. The distribution of Mn-epidote closely mimics the distribution of garnet in the till samples and further supports the interpretation that these minerals most likely reflect skarns associated with the porphyry deposits. All but two till samples, including those up-ice from the deposit, contain some gold grains. However, tills immediately west and down-ice of Pebble contain more abundant gold grains, and the overall number of grains decreases in the down-ice direction. Furthermore, all samples in the immediate vicinity of Pebble contain more than 65% pristine and modified grains compared to mostly re-shaped grains in distal samples. The pristine gold in till reflects short transport distances and/or liberation of gold during in-situ weathering of transported chalcopyrite grains. Jarosite is also abundant (1-2 500 grains/10kg) in samples adjacent to and up to 7 km down-ice from the deposit. Most jarosite grains are rounded and preliminary Ar/Ar dates suggest the jarosite formed prior to glaciation and it implies that a supergene cap existed over Pebble West. Assuming this interpretation is accurate, it suggests a shallow level of erosion of the Pebble deposit by

  17. Biomimetic layer-by-layer Co-mineralization approach towards TiO2/Au nanosheets with high rate performance for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bo; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xiaobo; Chen, Ge

    2013-10-01

    We fabricated a sandwich-like branched-polyethyleneimine (b-PEI)/TiO2/Au/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite through a biomimetic layer-by-layer co-mineralization approach, and the polymer b-PEI was believed to act as both an inducing agent for the hydrolysis of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)-dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH) and a reducing agent for the reduction of HAuCl4 in the synthetic procedure. Upon organic pyrolysis in air at 500 °C, a TiO2/Au nanosheet was formed; and gold nanocrystals were observed uniformly dispersed on TiO2 nanosheet. Moreover, the obtained TiO2/Au nanosheets demonstrated an enhanced lithium storage performance when they are used as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), particularly, a high capacity of 205 mA h g-1 and 189 mA h g-1 was obtained at 5 C and 10 C rate, respectively, indicating the high rate capability of the material. The greatly improved rate performance might be attributed from both the sheet-like nanostructure and the existence of uniformly dispersed gold nanocrystals, which facilitate electron transfer and lithium ions diffusion in the material. The result suggests that the TiO2 electrode performance can be improved through a design of sheet-like nanocomposites using a bio-inspired route, which is desirable for both ``green synthesis'' and application for high power LIBs, moreover, such a benign bio-inspired route can be developed into a general pathway to synthesize many other TiO2 based nanocomposites for broad applications in the fields of batteries, photoelectrochemistry, photocatalysis and dye-sensitized solar cells.We fabricated a sandwich-like branched-polyethyleneimine (b-PEI)/TiO2/Au/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite through a biomimetic layer-by-layer co-mineralization approach, and the polymer b-PEI was believed to act as both an inducing agent for the hydrolysis of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)-dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH) and a reducing agent for the reduction of HAuCl4 in the synthetic procedure. Upon organic

  18. Biomimetic layer-by-layer Co-mineralization approach towards TiO2/Au nanosheets with high rate performance for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Hao, Bo; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xiaobo; Chen, Ge

    2013-11-01

    We fabricated a sandwich-like branched-polyethyleneimine (b-PEI)/TiO2/Au/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite through a biomimetic layer-by-layer co-mineralization approach, and the polymer b-PEI was believed to act as both an inducing agent for the hydrolysis of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)-dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH) and a reducing agent for the reduction of HAuCl4 in the synthetic procedure. Upon organic pyrolysis in air at 500 °C, a TiO2/Au nanosheet was formed; and gold nanocrystals were observed uniformly dispersed on TiO2 nanosheet. Moreover, the obtained TiO2/Au nanosheets demonstrated an enhanced lithium storage performance when they are used as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), particularly, a high capacity of 205 mA h g(-1) and 189 mA h g(-1) was obtained at 5 C and 10 C rate, respectively, indicating the high rate capability of the material. The greatly improved rate performance might be attributed from both the sheet-like nanostructure and the existence of uniformly dispersed gold nanocrystals, which facilitate electron transfer and lithium ions diffusion in the material. The result suggests that the TiO2 electrode performance can be improved through a design of sheet-like nanocomposites using a bio-inspired route, which is desirable for both "green synthesis" and application for high power LIBs, moreover, such a benign bio-inspired route can be developed into a general pathway to synthesize many other TiO2 based nanocomposites for broad applications in the fields of batteries, photoelectrochemistry, photocatalysis and dye-sensitized solar cells.

  19. Stable isotope systematics and fluid inclusion studies in the Cu-Au Visconde deposit, Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil: implications for fluid source generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa Silva, Antonia Railine; Villas, Raimundo Netuno Nobre; Lafon, Jean-Michel; Craveiro, Gustavo Souza; Ferreira, Valderez Pinto

    2015-06-01

    The Cu-Au Visconde deposit is located in the Carajás Mineral Province (CMP), northern Brazil, near the contact between the ca. 2.76 Ga metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Itacaiunas Supergroup rocks and the ~3.0 Ga granitic-gneissic basement. It is hosted by mylonitized Archean rocks, mainly metadacites, the Serra Dourada granite, and gabbros/diorites, which have been successively altered by sodic, sodic-calcic-magnesian, potassic, and calcic-magnesian hydrothermal processes, producing diverse mineralogical associations (albite-scapolite; albite-actinolite-scapolite-epidote; K-feldspar-biotite; chlorite-actinolite-epidote-calcite, etc.). Chalcopyrite is the dominant ore mineral and occurs principally in breccias and veins/veinlets. The aqueous fluids responsible for the alteration/mineralization were initially hot (>460 °C) and very saline (up to 58 wt.% equivalent (equiv.) NaCl), but as the system evolved, they experienced successive dilution processes. Mineral oxygen and hydrogen isotope data show that 18O-rich ( to +9.4 ‰) fluids prevailed in the earlier alteration (including magnetitites) and reached temperatures as high as 410-355 °C. Metamorphic/formation waters, most likely derived from the Carajás Basin rocks, appear to have contributed a major component to the fluid composition, although some magmatic input cannot be discounted. In turn, the later alterations and the mineralization involved cooler (<230 °C), 18O-depleted ( to +3.7 ‰) and less saline (7-30 wt.% equiv. NaCl) fluids, indicating the influx of meteoric water. Fluid dilution and cooling might have caused abundant precipitation of sulfides, especially as breccia cement. Ore δ 34 S values (+0.5 to +3.4 ‰) suggest a magmatic source for sulfur (from sulfide dissolution in pre-existing igneous rocks). The chalcopyrite Pb-Pb ages (2.73 ± 0.15 and 2.74 ± 0.10 Ga) indicate that the Visconde mineralization is Neoarchean, rather than Paleoproterozoic as previously considered. If so, the

  20. Involvement of magmatic fluids at the Laloki and Federal Flag massive sulfide Cu-Zn-Au-Ag deposits, Astrolabe mineral district, Papua New Guinea: sulfur isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noku, Shadrach K.; Espi, Joseph O.; Matsueda, Hiroharu

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sulfur (S) isotope data of sulfides, sulfates, pyrite in host mudstone, and bulk sulfur of gabbroic rocks from the Laloki and Federal Flag massive Cu-Zn-Au-Ag deposits in the Astrolabe mineral district, Papua New Guinea. Early-stage pyrite-marcasite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite from Laloki display wide range of δ34S values from -4.5 to +7.0 ‰ ( n = 16). Late-stage pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite have restricted δ34S values of -1.9 to +4.7 ‰ ( n = 16). The mineralizing stage these correspond to had moderately saline (5.9-8.4 NaCl eq. wt%) mineralizing fluids of possible magmatic origin. A single analysis of late-stage barite has a value of δ34S +17.9 ‰, which is likely similar to coexisting seawater sulfate. Pyrite from the foot-wall mudstone at Laloki has very light δ34S values of -36.1 to -33.8 ‰ ( n = 2), which suggest an organic source for S. Pyrite-marcasite and chalcopyrite from Federal Flag show δ34S values of -2.4 to -1.9 ‰ ( n = 2), consistent with a magmatic origin, either leached from intrusive magmatic rocks or derived from magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. The very narrow range and near-zero δ34S values (-1.0 to +0.6 ‰) of bulk gabbroic samples is consistent with mantle-derived magmatic S. Sulfur isotope characteristics of sulfides and sulfates are, however, very similar to base metal sulfide accumulations associated with modern volcanic arcs and sedimented mid-ocean ridges. The most reasonable interpretation is that the range of the sulfide and sulfate δ34S values from both Laloki and Federal Flag massive sulfide deposits is indicative of the complex interaction of magmatic fluids, seawater, gabbroic rocks, and mudstone.

  1. Exploration case study using indicator minerals in till at the giant Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, southwest Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Kelley, Karen D.; Fey, David L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Smith, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    The Pebble deposit in southwest Alaska (Fig. 1) contains one of the largest resources of copper and gold in the world. It includes a measured and indicated resource of 5,942 million tonnes (Mt) at 0.42% Cu, 0.35 g/t Au, and 250 ppm Mo (0.30% copper equivalent, CuEQ, cut off) and contains significant concentrations of Ag, Pd, and Re (Northern Dynasty Minerals 2011). The deposit remains open at depth. The Pebble West zone was discovered in 1989 by Cominco American. In 2005, Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd. (NDM) discovered Pebble East, and in July 2007, NDM partnered with Anglo American to form the Pebble Limited Partnership (PLP). The U.S. Geological Survey began collaborative investigations with PLP in 2007 to identify techniques that will improve mineral exploration in covered terranes. The Pebble deposit is an ideal location for such a study because the deposit is undisturbed (except for drilling), is almost entirely concealed by post-mineral volcanic rocks and glacial deposits, and because its distribution is well constrained in the subsurface by PLP’s drill-hole geology and geochemistry. An exploration method developed by Averill (2007) that utilizes porphyry copper indicator minerals (PCIMR) in glacial till samples was applied at Pebble; samples were collected up- and down-ice (of former glaciers) from the deposit. The distribution of several PCIMs identifies the deposit, which suggests that PCIMs may be useful in exploration for other concealed porphyry deposits in the region. In this study, we compare the efficacy of PCIMs relative to that of pond and stream sediments also collected in the deposit area. The Pebble deposit is located 380 km southwest of Anchorage, in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska. There is no road network and access to the study area is by helicopter. The deposit is situated in a broad glacially sculpted topographic low at the head of three drainages, Talarik Creek, North Fork Koktuli River, and the South Fork Koktuli River (Fig

  2. Petrogenesis of the Middle Jurassic Yinshan volcanic-intrusive complex, SE China: Implications for tectonic evolution and Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Guang; Ni, Pei; Zhao, Kui-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Ji-Qiang; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Chen, Hui

    2012-10-01

    Plate during the early stage of the paleo-Pacific plate subduction. Regarding the Cu-Au mineralization, we infer that Cu-Au were released from subducted oceanic slab and reserved in the juvenile crust during Neoproterozoic subduction along the eastern Jiangnan Orogen. Partial melting of Cu-Au rich Neoproterozoic juvenile crust during the Middle Jurassic time in the Yinshan area caused the formation of adakitic rocks and large-scale Cu-Au deposits. Our model provides a new insight into genesis of adakitic rocks and related Cu-Au deposits in a non-arc setting.

  3. Epithermal mineralization and ore controls of the Shasta Au-Ag deposit, Toodoggone District, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiersch, P. C.; Williams-Jones, A. E.; Clark, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The Shasta gold-silver deposit, British Columbia, Canada, is an adularia-sericite-type epithermal deposit in which deposition of precious metals coincided with the transition of quartz- to calcite-dominant gangue. Mineralization is associated with stockwork-breccia zones in potassically altered dacitic lapilli tuffs and flows, and consists of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, acanthite, electrum and native silver. Pre- and post-ore veins consist solely of quartz and calcite, respectively. Fluid inclusion microthermometry indicates that ore minerals were deposited between 280 ° and 225 °C, from a relatively dilute hydrothermal fluid (˜1.5 wt.% NaCl equivalent). Abundant vapor-rich inclusions in ore-stage calcite are consistent with boiling. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic data (δ18Ofluid = -1.5 to -4.1‰; δDfluid = -148 to -171‰) suggest that the fluid had a meteoric origin, but was 18O-enriched by interaction with volcanic wallrocks. Initial (˜280 °C) fluid pH and log f O2 conditions are estimated at 5.3 to 6.0, and -32.5 to -33 bar, respectively; during ore deposition, the fluid became more alkaline and oxidizing. Ore deposition at Shasta is attributed to localization of meteoric hydrothermal fluids by extensional faults; mineralization was controlled by boiling in response to hydraulic brecciation. Calcite and base metal sulfides precipitated due to the increase in pH that accompanied boiling, and the associated decrease in H2S concentration led to precipitation of gold and silver.

  4. Mineralogical, stable isotope, and fluid inclusion studies of spatially related porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te mineralization, Fakos Peninsula, Limnos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch.; Spry, Paul G.; Melfos, Vasilios

    2012-05-01

    The Fakos porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te deposit, Limnos Island, Greece, is hosted in a ~20 Ma quartz monzonite and shoshonitic subvolcanic rocks that intruded middle Eocene to lower Miocene sedimentary basement rocks. Metallic mineralization formed in three stages in quartz and quartz-calcite veins. Early porphyry-style (Stage 1) metallic minerals consist of pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, bornite, sphalerite, molybdenite, and iron oxides, which are surrounded by halos of potassic and propylitic alteration. Stage 2 mineralization is composed mostly of quartz-tourmaline veins associated with sericitic alteration and disseminated pyrite and molybdenite, whereas Stage 3, epithermal-style mineralization is characterized by polymetallic veins containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, enargite, bournonite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, hessite, petzite, altaite, an unknown cervelleite-like Ag-telluride, native Au, and Au-Ag alloy. Stage 3 veins are spatially associated with sericitic and argillic alteration. Fluid inclusions in quartz from Stage 1 (porphyry-style) mineralization contain five types of inclusions. Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions, which homogenize at temperatures ranging from 189.5°C to 403.3°C have salinities of 14.8 to 19.9 wt. % NaCl equiv. Type II, liquid-vapor-NaCl, Type III liquid-vapor-NaCl-XCl2 (where XCl is an unknown chloride phase, likely CaCl2), and Type IV, liquid-vapor-hematite ± NaCl homogenize to the liquid phase by liquid-vapor homogenization or by daughter crystal dissolution at temperatures of 209.3 to 740.5 °C, 267.6 to 780.8 °C, and 357.9 to 684.2 °C, respectively, and, Type V, vapor-rich inclusions. Stage 2 veins are devoid of interpretable fluid inclusions. Quartz from Stage 3 (epithermal-style) veins contains two types of fluid inclusions, Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions that homogenize to the liquid phase (191.6 to 310.0 °C) with salinities of 1.40 to 9.73 wt. % NaCl equiv., and Type II, vapor-rich inclusions. Mixing

  5. Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in Qarachilar area, Qaradagh batholith (NW Iran): Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies and Re-Os dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, Vartan; Moazzen, Mohssen

    2015-04-01

    The Qaradagh batholith is located in NW Iran, neighboring the Meghri-Ordubad granitoid in southern Armenia. This magmatic complex is emplaced in the northwestern part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, which formed through north-eastward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the central Iranian domain in the late-Mesozoic and early-Cenozoic and hosts most of the porphyry copper deposits and prospects in Iran, such as Sarcheshmeh and Sungun. The Qaradagh batholith is comprised of Eocene-Oligocene intrusive rocks occurring as multi-episode stocks, where the dominant rock type is granodiorite. Hydrothermal alterations have also occurred in these rocks including potassic, phyllic-sericitic, argillic and propylitic alterations and silicification. These alterations are accompanied by vein-type and disseminated Cu, Mo and Au mineralization. The Qarachilar area is located in the central part of the Qaradagh batholith, which hosts mono-mineralic and quartz-sulfide veins and veinlets (several mm to <1 m thick and 50-700 m long) and silicic zones containing Cu-Mo-Au-Ag ore minerals (mainly pyrite, chalcopyrite and molybdenite). Microthermometric studies on the fluid inclusions of quartz-sulfide veins-veinlets show that the salinity ranges between 15-70 wt% NaCl, with the highest peak between 35-40 wt% NaCl. The homogenization temperature for primary 2-phase and multi-phase inclusions ranges between 220 and 540 °C. Two-phase inclusions homogenizing by vapor disappearance have TH values between 280 and 440 °C (mainly between 300 and 360 °C). A few of them homogenize into vapor state with TH values of 440-540 °C. Multi-phase inclusions show 3 types of homogenization. Most of them homogenize by simultaneous disappearance of vapor bubble and dissolution of halite daughter crystal, for which the TH value is 240-420 °C (mostly between 260 and 340 °C). Those homogenizing by halite dissolution show TH values about 220-360 °C and a few homogenizing by vapor

  6. Zircon geochronology and Hf isotopic composition of Mesozoic magmatic rocks from Chizhou, the Lower Yangtze Region: Constraints on their relationship with Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Hong-Fu

    2012-10-01

    Zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of Mesozoic magmatic rocks from the Chizhou Area are systematically investigated to reveal the tectonic setting of magmatism and their relationship with Cu-Au mineralization in the Lower Yangtze River Belt, southeastern China. The samples cover nearly all types of magmatic rocks in a 30 × 50 km2 region, including 6 granite porphyries, 6 dacites and 4 granites. The zircon U-Pb geochronology yields a range of 151-124 Ma, with granite porphyries ranging from 151 to 146 Ma, dacites from 132 to 127 Ma and granites from 127 to 124 Ma, indicating two magmatic episodes of the late Jurassic and the early Cretaceous. The earlier episode mainly formed small granite porphyries (generally < 5 km) and is always associated with porphyry Cu-Au deposits. The later episode began with dacites and was then dominated by large granite intrusions (generally > 10 km), which are barren in mineralization. The ore-barren dacites and the granites (131-124 Ma) are poor in inherited zircons. Zircons in these rocks yield a very large ɛHf(t) variation of - 20.8-0.4, suggesting a mixing between mantle-derived and crustal-derived magmas. By contrast, the ore-bearing porphyries (151-146 Ma) are rich in inherited zircons. The magmatic zircons have ɛHf(t) values of - 8.8-0.9, and the inherited ones yield U-Pb ages of 1156-811 Ma with ɛHf(t) values of 2.5-11.5. The existence of quantitative inherited zircons indicates that the crustal rocks of 1156-811 Ma significantly contribute to the formation of the ore-bearing porphyries, either being source or contamination. Since these inherited zircons are igneous as indicated by their oscillatory zonings, they may derive from components of the Grenvillian oceanic crust (ca. 1100-1000 Ma), i.e. the Neoproterozoic magmatic rocks related to arc (970-890 Ma) and Nanhua rift (ca. 825 Ma). Recent studies reveal that the ore-baring porphyries of the Lower Yangtze River Belt have slab melt features and conclude that

  7. Dating and isotopic characteristics (Pb and S) of the Fe oxide Cu Au U REE Igarapé Bahia ore deposit, Carajás mineral province, Pará state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarza, Marco Antonio; Macambira, Moacir José B.; Villas, Raimundo Netuno

    2008-05-01

    The Igarapé Bahia ore deposit is located in the Carajás mineral province, southeast of the Amazonian Craton in northern Brazil. The deposit is hosted by the Archean Igarapé Bahia Group, which consists of mafic metavolcanic, metapyroclastic, and metasedimentary rocks, in addition to banded iron-formations and hydrothermal breccias. Mafic dikes cut these lithological varieties. The Cu-Au mineralization is best developed in breccias that lie between the mafic metavolcanic and metapyroclastic/metasedimentary units. Chalcopyrite, pyrite, bornite, and chalcocite are the main sulfides and are associated with Fe-rich chlorite, magnetite, siderite, and subordinate amounts of tourmaline, fluorite, REE-bearing minerals, and calcite. Dating of chalcopyrite from the hydrothermal breccias and metavolcanic, metapyroclastic, and dike rocks by the Pb-Pb method yields ages of 2772 ± 46, 2756 ± 24, 2754 ± 36, and 2777 ± 22 Ma, respectively. A similar age of 2744 ± 12 Ma of gold from the hydrothermal breccia, mafic metavolcanic rocks, and gossan is also obtained and considered the age of the mineralization, contemporaneous with the formation of the volcanosedimentary sequences of the Igarapé Bahia Group (2745-2747 Ma). These geochronological data support a genetic link between the volcanic processes and the Igarapé Bahia Cu-Au mineralization. Pb-Pb analyses of chalcopyrite leachates from the hydrothermal breccias reveal ages of 2385 ± 122 and 2417 ± 120 Ma, which suggest remobilization, likely due to regional tectonic reactivations related to the development of the Carajás and Cinzento strike-slip fault systems. Pb isotopic analyses show highly radiogenic samples that indicate magmas derived from sources in the upper crust enriched in U and Th. δ34S values (-2.1 to +4.2) are consistent with the derivation of sulfides from magmatic fluids, but a submarine environment similar to that of Archean VMS mineralization in which evaporites have been deposited cannot be ruled out.

  8. Selective copper diffusion into quartz-hosted vapor inclusions: Evidence from other host minerals, driving forces, and consequences for Cu-Au ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hun; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    Recent experimental studies have raised concerns that Cu concentrations in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits do not represent pristine concentrations in the trapped fluids, but are modified by post-entrapment diffusional exchange through the host quartz. New microanalyses of fluid inclusions hosted in topaz show significantly lower Cu concentrations in vapor inclusions, compared to otherwise identical inclusions hosted by coexisting quartz, whereas coeval brine (hypersaline liquid) inclusions are very similar independent of host mineral in one sample. Sulfur is present as a major component in all vapor inclusions, as in most porphyry-related vapor inclusions, and Cu never exceeds S, but commonly matches the S content at a molar ratio of Cu:S ⩽ 2 in vapor inclusions hosted by quartz. Univalent ions with a radius smaller than ˜1 Å are known to diffuse rapidly through the channels of the quartz structure, parallel to its crystallographic c axis. Since only Cu concentrations differ between topaz- and quartz-hosted inclusions, we hypothesize that Cu+ and H+ re-equilibrate by diffusional ion exchange through these channels, while all other element concentrations remain essentially unchanged. A thermodynamic model considering charge-balanced Cu+H+ exchange and diffusive H2 re-equilibration of an initially Cu-poor but S-rich vapor inclusion with a typical rock-buffered fluid environment outside the host crystal demonstrates a strong chemical driving force for Cu+ to migrate from the surrounding rock into the fluid inclusion during cooling of the system. The driving force for Cu diffusion, against the gradient in total Cu concentration, is the abundant H+ liberated inside the inclusion by dissociation of HCl and particularly by the precipitation of CuFeS2 by reaction with the initially trapped H2S and/or SO2. Gold is not only a much larger ion, but is subject to an opposing driving force, suggesting that high concentrations of this

  9. Cenozoic high-K alkaline magmatism and associated Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in the Jinping-Fan Si Pan region, southeastern Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, southwestern China-northwestern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, My Dung; Liu, Junlai; Nguyen, Quang Luat; Chen, Yue; Tang, Yuan; Song, Zhijie; Zhang, Zhaochong; Zhao, Zhidan

    2014-01-01

    The Jinping-Fan Si Pan (JFP) Cenozoic magmatic and Cu-Mo-Au metallogenic belt in the southeastern part of the Ailao Shan shear zone host the Tongchang, Chang‧an, Habo, and Chinh Sang Cu-Mo-Au deposits. These deposits form an integrated epithermal-porphyry regional mineralization system associated with 40-32 Ma high-K alkaline magmatism. The magmatic rocks in the belt have relatively low TiO2 (<0.73 wt%), P2O5 (<0.29 wt%), and FeO* (<4.99 wt%), and high Na2O (2.86-4.75 wt%) and K2O (4.01-7.98 wt%). They also have high contents of incompatible trace elements, and are enriched in LILE (Rb, Ba, K, Sr) and LREE. They have marked Nb, Ta, Ti and P depletion in primitive mantle-normalized spidergrams, and plot close to the EMII mantle field in the Sr-Nd isotopic diagram. These characteristics are similar to those of the Eocene high-K alkaline rocks along the northern Ailao Shan belt, eastern Tibet plateau. The sulfur and lead isotope analyses of sulfide minerals from both the ores and related magmatic rocks confirm the involvement of a magmatic ore fluid. The Cenozoic alkaline intrusions and Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in the JFP were formed prior to the initiation of left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan shear zone. The magmas appear to have been derived from enriched mantle, possibly with mixing of materials from the buried Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, and/or crust.

  10. Genesis of the Au-Bi-Cu-As, Cu-Mo ± W, and base-metal Au-Ag mineralization at the Mountain Freegold (Yukon, Canada): constraints from Ar-Ar and Re-Os geochronology and Pb and stable isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bineli Betsi, Thierry; Lentz, David; Chiaradia, Massimo; Kyser, Kurt; Creaser, Robert A.

    2013-12-01

    The genesis of mineralized systems across the Mountain Freegold area, in the Dawson Range Cu-Au ± Mo Belt of the Tintina Au province was constrained using Pb and stable isotope compositions and Ar-Ar and Re-Os geochronology. Pb isotope compositions of sulfides span a wide compositional range (206Pb/204Pb, 18.669-19.861; 208Pb/204Pb, 38.400-39.238) that overlaps the compositions of the spatially associated igneous rocks, thus indicating a magmatic origin for Pb and probably the other metals. Sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfide minerals are broadly similar and their δ34S (Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT)) values range from -1.4 to 3.6 ‰ consistent with the magmatic range, with the exception of stibnite from a Au-Sb-quartz vein, which has δ34S values between -8.1 and -3.1 ‰. The δ34S values of sulfates coexisting with sulfide are between 11.2 and 14.2 ‰; whereas, those from the weathering zone range from 3.7 to 4.3 ‰, indicating supergene sulfates derived from oxidation of hypogene sulfides. The δ13C (Vienna Peedee Belemnite (VPDB)) values of carbonate range from -4.9 to 1.1 ‰ and are higher than magmatic values. The δ18O (V-SMOW) values of magmatic quartz phenocrysts and magmatic least-altered rocks vary between 6.2 and 10.1 ‰ and between 5.0 and 10.1 ‰, respectively, whereas altered magmatic rocks and hydrothermal minerals (quartz and magnetite) are relatively 18O-depleted (4.2 to 7.9 ‰ and -6.3 to 1.5 ‰, respectively). Hydrogen isotope compositions of both least-altered and altered igneous rock samples are D-depleted (from -133 to -161 ‰ Vienna-Standard Mean Ocean Water (V-SMOW)), consistent with differential magma degassing and/or post-crystallization exchange between the rocks and meteoric ground water. Zircon from a chlorite-altered dike has a U-Pb crystallization age of 108.7 ± 0.4 Ma; whereas, the same sample yielded a whole-rock Ar-Ar plateau age of 76.25 ± 0.53 Ma. Likewise, molybdenite Re-Os model ages range from 75.8 to

  11. Origin of REE mineralization in the Bastnäs-type Fe-REE-(Cu-Mo-Bi-Au) deposits, Bergslagen, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtstam, Dan; Andersson, Ulf B.; Broman, Curt; Mansfeld, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    The Bastnäs-type deposits, with mineral assemblages of Fe oxides, Ca-Mg silicates, rare earth element (REE) silicates, REE fluorocarbonates, and Cu-Fe-Mo-Bi sulfides, are associated with marble horizons in a strongly Na, K, and/or Mg altered, metavolcanic succession, over a distance of at least 80 km in a SW-NE trending zone in western Bergslagen. Two subtypes occur: (1) enriched (relative to the other type) in light REE (LREE) and Fe, exemplified by the Bastnäs and Rödbergsgruvan deposits, and (2) enriched in heavy REE (HREE), Y, Mg, Ca, and F, represented by deposits in the Norberg district. Bastnäsite hosts primary fluid H2O-CO2 inclusions with salinities of 6-29 eq. wt% CaCl2 and with total homogenization temperatures ( Th tot) of ca. 300-400 °C. Subtype 2 has late-stage fluorite with fluid inclusions that show 1-16 eq. wt% NaCl and Th tot of ca. 90-150 °C. Molybdenite Re-Os ages obtained from three deposits are 1,904 ± 6, 1,863 ± 4, and 1,842 ± 4 Ma. Nd isotopic data from five different REE minerals yielded no defined isochron, but a range in ɛNd (1.88 Ga) of +0.2 to +1.6. The oxygen isotope values (δ18OSMOW) of dolomite and calcite from the associated REE-mineralized skarn and recrystallized carbonate assemblages lie in the range 6.1-8.6 ‰, overlapping with those of the host marbles. Carbon isotope values (δ13CPDB) show typical magmatic signatures of -6.7 to -4.4 ‰, while the host marbles group around ca. -2.4 ‰. The sulfur isotope (δ34SCDT) values of associated sulfides range between -10.8 and +0.2 ‰. The combined evidence suggests REE mineralization, beginning at 1.9 Ga, from mainly Svecofennian, juvenile magmatic (>400 °C) fluids carrying Si, F, Cl, S, CO2, and the REE in addition to other metals; mineralization occurred through reactions with dolomitic layers in the supracrustal units coevally with regional metasomatic alteration associated with fluid circulation through an extensive active volcano-plutonic complex.

  12. Fluid inclusion and H-O isotope evidence for immiscibility during mineralization of the Yinan Au-Cu-Fe deposit, Shandong, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Gu, X. X.; Liu, L.; Dong, S. Y.; Li, K.; Li, B. H.; Lv, P. R.

    2011-07-01

    The fluid inclusion and H-O isotope studies have provided the evidences for the source of ore-forming fluids, and helped to recognize two types of immiscibility and their relationships with mineralization. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic geochemistry shows that the earlier ore-forming fluids during the anhydrous skarn stage (I) and the hydrous skarn-magnetite stage (II) were mainly derived from magmatic water, while the later fluids during the quartz-sulfide stage (III) and the carbonate stage (IV) were mainly from magmatic water mixed with small amounts of meteoric water. Various types of fluid inclusions, including abundant vapor- or liquid-rich two-phase aqueous inclusions, daughter minerals-bearing multiphase inclusions, CO 2-H 2O inclusions, and less abundant liquid inclusions, vapor inclusions and melt inclusions, are present in hydrothermal minerals of different stages. The liquid-vapor fluid inclusions are mainly composed of H 2O, with significant amounts of CO 2 and a small amount of CH 4. In the opaque-bearing fluid inclusions, the hematite and fahlore (tetrahedrite) were identified. The homogenization temperature of the aqueous fluid inclusions decreases from Stage I (520-410 °C), through Stage II (430-340 °C) and III (250-190 °C), to Stage IV (190-130 °C). The coexistence of melt inclusions with simultaneously trapped vapor- or liquid-rich two-phase aqueous inclusions and daughter minerals-bearing multiphase inclusions in garnet, diopside and epidote of Stages I and II suggests an immiscibility between silicate melt and hydrothermal fluid. It is an effective mechanism on scavenging and transporting ore-forming components from magmas. The aqueous fluid inclusions with various vapor/liquid ratios (from <10% to >65%) commonly coexist with simultaneously trapped liquid inclusions, vapor inclusions, daughter minerals-bearing multiphase inclusions and CO 2-H 2O inclusions in the quartz of Stage III, and the different kinds of the fluid inclusions have

  13. Geology of the Ivanhoe Hg-Au district, northern Nevada: Influence of Miocene volcanism, lakes, and active faulting on epithermal mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The mercury-gold deposits of the Ivanhoe mining district in northern Nevada formed when middle Miocene rhyolitic volcanism and high-angle faulting disrupted a shallow lacustrine environment. Sinter and replacement mercury deposits formed at and near the paleosurface, and disseminated gold deposits and high-grade gold-silver veins formed beneath the hot spring deposits. The lacustrine environment provided abundant meteoric water; the rhyolites heated the water; and the faults, flow units, and lakebeds provided fluid pathways for the hydrothermal fluids. A shallow lake began to develop in the Ivanhoe area about 16.5 Ma. The lake progressively expanded and covered the entire area with fine-grained lacustrine sediments. Lacustrine sedimentation continued to at least 14.4 Ma, and periodic fluctuations in the size and extent of the lake may have been responses to both climate and nearby volcanism. The eruption of rhyolite and andesite flows and domes periodically disrupted the lacustrine environment and produced interfingered flows and lake sediments. The major pulse of rhyolitic volcanism took place between 15.16 ?? 0.05 and 14.92 ?? 0.05 Ma. High-angle faulting began in the basement about 15.2 Ma, penetrated to and disrupted the paleosurface after 15.10 ?? 0.06 Ma, and largely ceased by 14.92 ?? 0.05 Ma. Ground motion related to both faulting and volcanism created debris flows and soft-sediment deformation in the lakebeds. Mercury-gold mineralization was coeval with rhyolite volcanism and high-angle faulting, and it took place about 15.2 to 14.9 Ma. At and near the paleosurface, hydrothermal fluids migrated through tuffaceous sediments above relatively impermeable volcanic and Paleozoic units, creating chalcedonic, cinnabar-bearing replacement bodies and sinters. Disseminated gold was deposited in sedimentary and volcanic rocks beneath the mercury deposits, although the hydrologic path between the two ore types is unclear. Higher-grade gold-silver deposits formed in

  14. Geochronology and Nd isotope geochemistry of the Gameleira Cu-Au deposit, Serra dos Carajás, Brazil: 1.8-1.7 Ga hydrothermal alteration and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Márcio M.; Lindenmayer, Zara G.; Laux, Jorge H.; Armstrong, Richard; de Araújo, Janice Caldas

    2003-01-01

    The Gameleira deposit is one of several important Cu-Au deposits associated with the late Archean (ca. 2.7 Ga) volcanic rocks of the Itacaiúnas supergroup in the Carajás mineral province, southeastern Pará. It comprises mainly biotite- and sulphide-rich veins and quartz-grunerite-biotite-gold hydrothermal veins that cut andesitic rocks. It is interpreted as representative of the Fe oxide Cu-Au class of deposit. Sm-Nd isotopic data indicate an age of 2719±80 Ma (MSWD=3.0) and ɛNd( T) of -1.4 for the host meta-andesites. Metavolcanic rocks and cogenetic gabbros give an age of 2757±81 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -0.8. This is considered the best estimate for the crystallization age of the Gameleira volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. Negative ɛNd( T) and Archean TDM model ages (mostly between 2.8 and 3.1 Ga) suggest some contamination with older crustal material. The andesitic/gabbroic rocks are cut by two generations of granite dykes. The older has striking petrographic and geochemical similarities to the ca. 1.87 Ga alkali-rich Pojuca granite, which is exposed a few kilometers to the northwest of the deposit. The younger is a leucogranite with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 1583+9/-7 Ma. Neodymium isotopic analyses of the two generations of granites indicate a strong crustal affinity and possible derivation from reworking of the Archean crust. The quartz-grunerite-gold hydrothermal vein yields a Sm-Nd isochron (MSWD=.83) age of 1839±15 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -9.2. Pervasive potassic alteration, represented by the widespread formation of biotite in the country rocks, is dated by Ar-Ar at 1734±8 Ma, and a similar age of 1700±31 Ma (1 σ) is indicated by the Sm-Nd isochron for the biotite-sulphide veins. Similar to that for the quartz-grunerite vein, the ɛNd( T) value for the sulphide-rich veins is strongly negative (-8.2), thereby suggesting that the original fluids percolated through, leached, or were derived from igneous rocks with an Archaean Nd isotopic signature

  15. Contrasting zircon Hf-O isotopes and trace elements between ore-bearing and ore-barren adakitic rocks in central-eastern China: Implications for genetic relation to Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangyue; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Li, Shuguang; He, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The petrogenesis of Early Cretaceous adakitic intrusions in the Lower Yangtze River belt (LYRB), central-eastern China, and their genetic association with Cu-Au mineralization have recently been debated. This study presented integrated in-situ zircon U-Pb-Hf-O isotopic and trace elemental data for the LYRB adakites, and a comparison with ore-barren adakites from the south Tan-Lu fault (STLF) adjacent to the LYRB. Magmatic zircons from these two series of intrusions have U-Pb ages of 145-132 Ma and 136-132 Ma respectively. The STLF zircons have δ18O ranging from 5.6 to 6.7‰ and ɛHf(t) from - 28.8 to - 16.4, plotted within the range of global lower crustal metabasaltic xenoliths, consistent with low-radiogenic Pb of the host adakitic rocks. In contrast, both Hf and O isotopic compositions of zircons from the LYRB are greatly variable with heavier δ18O (4.7 to 9.6‰) and higher ɛHf(t) values (- 25.5 to + 2.0) compared with the STLF series. The co-variations of Hf-O isotopes in the LYRB series reflect source heterogeneity as a result of mixing of basaltic oceanic crust with sediments (10-20%), consistent with high-radiogenic Pb and enriched Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the host adakites. The high La, U and low Ti concentrations in the LYRB zircons also imply a volatile (perhaps, CO32 --rich, carbonatite-like) source. Combined with whole-rock geochemical data, the new results further suggest contrasting origins of the LYRB and STLF adakites from subducted oceanic crust and foundering lower continental crust, respectively. The LYRB zircons have much higher ratios of Ce4 +/Ce3 + (avg.417) and Eu/Eu* (avg. 0.67) than the STLF zircons (avg. 84 and 0.44). This difference confirms that the ore-bearing adakitic magmas are more oxidized relative to the ore-barren ones. There is roughly a positive correlation between zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + and δ18O in the LYRB series, probably indicating that the elevated fO2 was related to components enriched in heavy oxygen isotopes. A

  16. Constraints on the timing of Co-Cu ± Au mineralization in the Blackbird district, Idaho, using SHRIMP U-Pb ages of monazite and xenotime plus zircon ages of related Mesoproterozoic orthogneisses and metasedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.; Lund, Karen; Evans, Karl V.; Fanning, C. Mark; Mazdab, Frank K.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Pillers, Renee M.

    2012-01-01

    The Blackbird district, east-central Idaho, contains the largest known Co reserves in the United States. The origin of strata-hosted Co-Cu ± Au mineralization at Blackbird has been a matter of controversy for decades. In order to differentiate among possible genetic models for the deposits, including various combinations of volcanic, sedimentary, magmatic, and metamorphic processes, we used U-Pb geochronology of xenotime, monazite, and zircon to establish time constraints for ore formation. New age data reported here were obtained using sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) microanalysis of (1) detrital zircons from a sample of Mesoproterozoic siliciclastic metasedimentary country rock in the Blackbird district, (2) igneous zircons from Mesoproterozoic intrusions, and (3) xenotime and monazite from the Merle and Sunshine prospects at Blackbird. Detrital zircon from metasandstone of the biotite phyllite-schist unit has ages mostly in the range of 1900 to 1600 Ma, plus a few Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic grains. Age data for the six youngest grains form a coherent group at 1409 ± 10 Ma, regarded as the maximum age of deposition of metasedimentary country rocks of the central structural domain. Igneous zircons from nine samples of megacrystic granite, granite augen gneiss, and granodiorite augen gneiss that crop out north and east of the Blackbird district yield ages between 1383 ± 4 and 1359 ± 7 Ma. Emplacement of the Big Deer Creek megacrystic granite (1377 ± 4 Ma), structurally juxtaposed with host rocks in the Late Cretaceous ca. 5 km north of Blackbird, may have been involved in initial deposition of rare earth elements (REE) minerals and, possibly, sulfides. In situ SHRIMP ages of xenotime and monazite in Co-rich samples from the Merle and Sunshine prospects, plus backscattered electron imagery and SHRIMP analyses of trace elements, indicate a complex sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Cretaceous events. On the basis of textural relationships

  17. DSPRU Project at NSU: Evolution of Basic, Mantle-crust Granitoid Ore-magmatic Systems Resulting in Pt-Cu-Ni, Cu-Mo-porphiric and Epithermal Au-Ag Ore-bearing Mineralization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmenkulova, I.; Sharapov, V.; Zhitova, L.

    2006-05-01

    Education and Human Resources are one of the most important priorities of the Russian Government policy nowadays. This work covers the principally new Project of the Ministry for Russian Science and Education: 'Development of Scientific Potential for Russian Universities' (DSPRU). The purposes of the Project are: 1) to involve university students to research in most urgent problems of fundamental science; 2) to enhance the professional development of Russian educators; 3) to interest the most perspective researches in education process at Russian universities; 4) to broaden the educational process involving to the Project foreign students, educators and researchers. All the State Universities in Russia could participate in the Project (with the exception of Moscow State University, whose employees were the Project experts). At Novosibirsk State University (NSU) research teams of 13 Departments applied for the Project. Only 5 Projects turned out to be successful. From the Department of Geology and Geophysics 9 Projects were applied and the only one won: 'Evolution of Basic, Mantle-crust Granitoid Ore-magmatic Systems Resulting in Pt-Cu-Ni, Cu-Mo-porphiric and Epithermal Au-Ag Ore-bearing Mineralization'. The team of the above-mentioned Project includes: - nine university educators - five researchers from the Institutes of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences - four PhD students - eight undergraduate students. The expecting results of the Project are: 1) obtaining new data for natural objects covered by the Project (Siberia, Mongolia, China, South Africa, Morocco); 2) creation of mathematical models of evolution for fluid ore-magmatic systems of various geochemical character and productivity; 3) improving the education process at the Department of Geology and Geophysics of NSU (creation of new courses and publications, professional development of the educators, participation of students and young researchers in scientific conferences). The work was

  18. Virus-templated Au and Au/Pt Core/shell Nanowires and Their Electrocatalytic Activitives for Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOUJIN; KIM, JUNHYUNG; YUN, DONG SOO; NAM, YOON SUNG; SHAO-HORN, YANG; BELCHER, ANGELA M.

    2014-01-01

    A facile synthetic route was developed to make Au nanowires (NWs) from surfactant-mediated bio-mineralization of a genetically engineered M13 phage with specific Au binding peptides. From the selective interaction between Au binding M13 phage and Au ions in aqueous solution, Au NWs with uniform diameter were synthesized at room temperature with yields greater than 98 % without the need for size selection. The diameters of Au NWs were controlled from 10 nm to 50 nm. The Au NWs were found to be active for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO molecules for all sizes, where the activity was highly dependent on the surface facets of Au NWs. This low-temperature high yield method of preparing Au NWs was further extended to the synthesis of Au/Pt core/shell NWs with controlled coverage of Pt shell layers. Electro-catalytic studies of ethanol oxidation with different Pt loading showed enhanced activity relative to a commercial supported Pt catalyst, indicative of the dual functionality of Pt for the ethanol oxidation and Au for the anti-poisoning component of Pt. These new one-dimensional noble metal NWs with controlled compositions could facilitate the design of new alloy materials with tunable properties. PMID:24910712

  19. Mineral Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Mineral Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Mineral Chart Print A A A Text Size en ... sources of calcium. You'll also find this mineral in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables. Soy ...

  20. Collective flow in Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

  1. Industrial Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in and factors related to the production of industrial minerals during 1982, indicating that, as 1981 marked a downturn in production of industrial minerals, 1982 continued the trend with temporary and permanent cutbacks in mine and plant production. Includes highlights of several conferences/conference papers in this field.…

  2. Mineral Quantification.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb. PMID:26939263

  3. Mineral Quantification.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb.

  4. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  5. Descriptive and Grade-Tonnage Models and Database for Iron Oxide Cu-Au Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Dennis P.; Singer, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Iron oxide Cu-Au deposits are veins and breccia-hosted bodies of hematite and/or magnetite with disseminated Cu + Au ? Ag ? Pd ? Pt ? Ni ? U ? LREE minerals formed in sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary basins intruded by igneous rocks. Deposits are associated with broad redox boundaries and feature sodic alteration of source rocks and potassic alteration of host rocks.

  6. Genetic Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, and Rh mineralogy in Noril'sk sulfide ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, E. M.; Kulagov, E. A.; Serova, A. A.; Kulikova, I. M.; Korotaeva, N. N.; Sereda, E. V.; Tushentsova, I. N.; Belyakov, S. N.; Zhukov, N. N.

    2015-09-01

    The undeformed ore-bearing intrusions of the Noril'sk ore field (NOF) cut through volcanic rocks of the Late Permian-Early Triassic trap association folded in brachysynclines. Due to the nonuniform load on the roof of intrusive bodies, most sulfide melts were squeezed, up to the tops of ore-bearing intrusions; readily fusible Ni-Fe-Cu sulfide melts were almost completely squeezed. In our opinion, not only one but two stages of mineralization developed at the Noril'sk deposits: (i) syntrap magmatic and (ii) epigenetic post-trap metamorphic-hydrothermal. All platinum-group minerals (PGM) and minerals of gold are metasomatic in the Noril'sk ores. They replaced sulfide solid solutions and exsolution structures. All types of PGM and Au minerals occur in the ores, varying in composition from pyrrhotite to chalcopyrite, talnakhite, mooihoekite, and rich in galena; they are localized in the inner and outer contact zones and differ only in the quantitative proportions of ore minerals. The aureoles of PGM and Au-Ag minerals are wider than the contours of sulfide bodies and coincide with halos of fluid impact on orebodies and adjacent host rocks. The pneumatolytic PGM and Au-Ag minerals are correlated in abundance with the dimensions of sulfide bodies. Their amounts are maximal in veins of late fusible ore composed of eutectic PbS ss and iss intergrowths, as well as at their contacts. The Pd and Pt contents in eutectic sulfide ores of NOF are the world's highest. In the process of noble-metal mineral formation, the fluids supply Pd, Pt, Au, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, and a part of Te, whereas Fe, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ag, Rh, a part of Te and Pd are leached from the replaced sulfide minerals. The pneumatolytic PGM of the early stage comprises Pd and Pt intermetallic compounds enriched in Au along with Pd-Pt-Fe-Ni-Cu-Sn-Pb(As) and (Pd,Pt,Au)(Sn,Sb,Bi,Te,As) solid solutions. Pneumatolytic PGM and Au minerals of the middle stage are products of solid-phase transformation and recrystallization of

  7. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    alteration by hydrothermal fluids. The second trend consists of pyrites from porphyry Cu and epithermal Au deposits, which are characterised by compositions that preserve the Au/As signature of mineralizing magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, confirming the role of this sulfide in controlling metal ratios in ore systems.

  8. A new occurrence of telluride minerals in South Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, H.; Larson, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of drill cores from the Haile gold mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina, has revealed grains containing large amounts of Te with various combinations of Pb, Ag and Au in pyrite. These telluride minerals have so far not been identified. The nearby Brewer mine, on the basis of chemical evidence, also contains tellurides. The probable telluride localities in South Carolina are now expanded to three, significantly increasing the few reports of Te minerals from the Au deposits of the southeastern Piedmont, many of which are now considered to be volcanogenic. The occurrence of telluride minerals in gold ore from the Haile-Brewer area may help to explain the divergence in Au/Ag ratios reported in chemical analyses of drill core, ore samples and production records. Te, in addition, may be useful in geochemical exploration programmes in the SE Piedmont, including programmes using heavy mineral concentrates derived from stream alluvium. -R.S.M.

  9. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  10. Spin resonance transport properties of a single Au atom in S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangyuan, Wang; Guiqin, Li

    2016-07-01

    The spin transport properties of S-Au-S junction and Au-Au-Au junction between Au nanowires are investigated with density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function. We mainly focus on the spin resonance transport properties of the center Au atom. The breaking of chemical bonds between anchor atoms and center Au atom significantly influences their spin transmission characteristics. We find the 0.8 eV orbital energy shift between anchor S atoms and the center Au atom can well protect the spin state stored in the S-Au-S junction and efficiently extract its spin state to the current by spin resonance mechanism, while the spin interaction of itinerant electrons and the valence electron of the center Au atom in the Au-Au-Au junction can extract the current spin information into the center Au atom. Fermi energy drift and bias-dependent spin filtering properties of the Au-Au-Au junction may transform information between distance, bias, and electron spin. Those unique properties make them potential candidates for a logical nanocircuit. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 20121318158).

  11. Mineral bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    In the last 25 years, the introduction of biotechnological methods in hydrometallurgy has created new opportunities and challenges for the mineral processing industry. This was especially true for the production of metal values from mining wastes and low-and-complex-grade mineral resources, which were considered economically not amenable for processing by conventional extraction methods. Using bio-assisted heap, dump and in-situ leaching technologies, copper and uranium extractions gained their first industrial applications. The precious metal industries were the next to adopt the bio-preoxidation technique in the extraction of gold from refractory sulfide-bearing ores and concentrates. A variety of other bioleaching opportunities exist for nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc sulfide leaching. Recently developed bioremediation methods and biosorption technologies have shown a good potential for industrial applications to remove trace heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations from contaminated soils, and mining and processing effluents.

  12. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.; Okada, T.

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  13. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vitamins and Minerals KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamins and Minerals Print A ... of a good thing? What Are Vitamins and Minerals? Vitamins and minerals make people's bodies work properly. ...

  14. Solid Inclusions in Au-nuggets, genesis and derivation from alkaline rocks of the Guli Massif, Northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorani, Sami N.

    2016-04-01

    A total of 112 Au-nuggets, collected from alluvial placer deposits of the Ingarinda River from the Guli massif, located in northem Siberia, Russia, were investigated. The Guli massif consists of a huge dunite-clinopyroxenite complex (the largest complex in the world), an alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite (melilite, nephelinite, ijolite) enveloping the dunite and carbonatite intrusions, associated with disseminated schlieren type chromitite and Au-Ag, Pt placer deposits. The nuggets are characterized by various sizes and shapes and show chemical compositions Au, Au-Ag and AuCu, typical for a derivate of carbon-atites and/or ultramafic complexes. A great variety of oxide, silicate, REE-minerals, carbonate and sulphide inclusions have been detected in the nuggets, which are identical in mineralogy and chemical composition to mineral constituents of the alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite surrounding the Guli dunite core complex thus, considered as the source for Au-nuggets.

  15. /Au Back Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Compaan, Alvin D.; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of CdTe thin-film solar cells with Cu-free MoO3- x /Au back contacts. CdTe solar cells with sputtered CdTe absorbers of thicknesses from 0.5 to 1.75 μm were fabricated on Pilkington SnO2:F/SnO2-coated soda-lime glasses coated with a 60- to 80-nm sputtered CdS layer. The MoO3- x /Au back contact layers were deposited by thermal evaporation. The incorporation of MoO3- x layer was found to improve the open circuit voltage ( V OC) but reduce the fill factor of the ultrathin CdTe cells. The V OC was found to increase as the CdTe thickness increased.

  16. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  17. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  18. Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins’ luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed. PMID:24373347

  19. New Minerals and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, William D.

    1997-01-01

    Defines geodiversity, compares it to biodiversity, and discusses the mineral classification system. Charts the discovery of new minerals in Australia over time and focuses on uses of these minerals in technological advances. (DDR)

  20. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  1. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  2. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L. Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2014-12-14

    Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

  3. Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46 and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Amala; Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Kothalawala, Nuwan

    2013-11-01

    High resolution ESI mass spectrometry of the ``22 kDa'' nanocluster reveals the presence of a mixture containing Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46, and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters, where R = -CH2CH2Ph. MALDI TOF MS data confirm the purity of the sample and a UV-vis spectrum shows minor features. Au102(SC6H5COOH)44, whose XRD crystal structure was recently reported, is not observed. This is due to ligand effects, because the 102 : 44 composition is produced using aromatic ligands. However, the 103-, 104- and 105-atom nanoclusters, protected by -SCH2CH2Ph and -SC6H13 ligands, are at or near 58 electron shell closing.High resolution ESI mass spectrometry of the ``22 kDa'' nanocluster reveals the presence of a mixture containing Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46, and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters, where R = -CH2CH2Ph. MALDI TOF MS data confirm the purity of the sample and a UV-vis spectrum shows minor features. Au102(SC6H5COOH)44, whose XRD crystal structure was recently reported, is not observed. This is due to ligand effects, because the 102 : 44 composition is produced using aromatic ligands. However, the 103-, 104- and 105-atom nanoclusters, protected by -SCH2CH2Ph and -SC6H13 ligands, are at or near 58 electron shell closing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03872f

  4. Application of Hyperspectral Methods in Hydrothermal Mineral System Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laukamp, Carsten; Cudahy, Thomas; Gessner, Klaus; Haest, Maarten; Cacetta, Mike; Rodger, Andrew; Jones, Mal; Thomas, Matilda

    2010-05-01

    Hyperspectral infrared reflectance spectra are used to identify abundances and compositional differences of mineral groups and single mineral phases. 3D mineral maps are derived from surface (airborne and satellite sensed) and sub-surface (drill core) mineralogical data and integrated with geological, geochemical and geophysical datasets, enabling a quantitative mineral systems analysis. The Western Australian Centre of Excellence for 3D Mineral Mapping is working on a variety of mineral deposits to showcase the emerging applications of hyperspectral techniques in mineral system studies. Applied remote sensing technologies comprise hyperspectral airborne surveys (HyMap) covering 126 bands in the visible and shortwave infrared, as well as satellite-based multispectral surveys (ASTER) featuring 14 bands from the visible to thermal infrared. Drill cores were scanned with CSIRO's HyLoggingTM systems, which allow a fast acquisition of mineralogical data in cm-spacing and thereby providing statistically significant datasets. Building on procedures developed for public Australian geosurvey data releases for north Queensland, Broken Hill and Kalgoorlie (http://c3dmm.csiro.au), the ultimate goal is to develop sensor-independent scalars based on the position, depth and shape of selected absorption features in the visible-near (VNIR), shortwave (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR), which can be applied to a wide range of mineral deposit types. In the Rocklea Dome Channel Iron Ore deposits of the Pilbara (Western Australia) for example, hyperspectral drill core data were processed into 3D mineral maps to delineate major ore zones by identifying various ore types and possible contaminants. Vitreous (silica-rich) iron ore was successfully separated from ochreous goethitic ore, with both of them requiring different metallurgical processing. The silicified vitreous iron ore as well as outlined carbonate-rich zones are presumably related to overprinting groundwater effects. The

  5. Sonophotocatalytic mineralization of Norflurazon in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Vergara, Carola; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-03-01

    Norflurazon (4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]pyridazin-3(2H)-one; C12H9ClF3N3O) is an excellent weed controlling agent being practiced in the agricultural lands. The excessive addition or the undissolved Norflurazon (maximum solubility 28 mg/L at 25 °C) enters into the aquatic environment and causes the adverse effects associated with its high concentration. To avoid the perilous effects, visible light assisted photocatalysis set-up coupled with the 42 kHz ultrasound producing bath type sonicator is used to completely mineralize the Norflurazon. TiO2, ZnO and gold loaded zinc oxide nanocatalysts were utilized to study the mineralization of Norflurazon. Au-ZnO shows the greater efficiency for the sonophotocatalytic removal of Norflurazon among the various nanocatalysts employed to study the mineralization. The order of Norflurazon mineralization was sonophotocatalysis > sonocatalysis > photocatalysis. The additive effect was achieved for the sonophotocatalytic degradation. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LCMS) analyses were employed to identify the various intermediates produced during the mineralization. The identification of four pseudo molecular ions and various intermediates using the LCMS analysis evidently suggests the sonophotocatalytic degradation was preceded in various decay pathways. A suitable mechanism has been proposed for the sonophotocatalytic mineralization of Norflurazon.

  6. Sonophotocatalytic mineralization of Norflurazon in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Vergara, Carola; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-03-01

    Norflurazon (4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]pyridazin-3(2H)-one; C12H9ClF3N3O) is an excellent weed controlling agent being practiced in the agricultural lands. The excessive addition or the undissolved Norflurazon (maximum solubility 28 mg/L at 25 °C) enters into the aquatic environment and causes the adverse effects associated with its high concentration. To avoid the perilous effects, visible light assisted photocatalysis set-up coupled with the 42 kHz ultrasound producing bath type sonicator is used to completely mineralize the Norflurazon. TiO2, ZnO and gold loaded zinc oxide nanocatalysts were utilized to study the mineralization of Norflurazon. Au-ZnO shows the greater efficiency for the sonophotocatalytic removal of Norflurazon among the various nanocatalysts employed to study the mineralization. The order of Norflurazon mineralization was sonophotocatalysis > sonocatalysis > photocatalysis. The additive effect was achieved for the sonophotocatalytic degradation. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LCMS) analyses were employed to identify the various intermediates produced during the mineralization. The identification of four pseudo molecular ions and various intermediates using the LCMS analysis evidently suggests the sonophotocatalytic degradation was preceded in various decay pathways. A suitable mechanism has been proposed for the sonophotocatalytic mineralization of Norflurazon. PMID:26735720

  7. Determination of relative sensitivity factors during secondary ion sputtering of silicate glasses by Au+, Au2+ and Au3+ ions.

    PubMed

    King, Ashley; Henkel, Torsten; Rost, Detlef; Lyon, Ian C

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Au-cluster ions have been successfully used for organic analysis in secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cluster ions, such as Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+), can produce secondary ion yield enhancements of up to a factor of 300 for high mass organic molecules with minimal sample damage. In this study, the potential for using Au(+), Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) primary ions for the analysis of inorganic samples is investigated by analyzing a range of silicate glass standards. Practical secondary ion yields for both Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) ions are enhanced relative to those for Au(+), consistent with their increased sputter rates. No elevation in ionization efficiency was found for the cluster primary ions. Relative sensitivity factors for major and trace elements in the standards showed no improvement in quantification with Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) ions over the use of Au(+) ions. Higher achievable primary ion currents for Au(+) ions than for Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) allow for more precise analyses of elemental abundances within inorganic samples, making them the preferred choice, in contrast to the choice of Au(2)(+) and Au(3)(+) for the analysis of organic samples. The use of delayed secondary ion extraction can also boost secondary ion signals, although there is a loss of overall sensitivity.

  8. New data on the age of gold mineralization of the Lugokan ore cluster (Eastern Transbaikalia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redin, Yu. O.; Dultsev, V. F.; Nevolko, P. A.; Ponomarchuk, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Lugokan ore cluster is located in the southeastern part of Transbaikalia within the Aga-Borzya structural-formational zone of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of K-bearing minerals of syngenetic to ore parageneses has been carried out applying stepwise heating technique: it has been demonstrated that the earliest gold-ore mineral associations are Au-pyrite-arsenopyrite (163 ±1.9 Ma) and Au-chalcopyrite (160 ±2 Ma). The later parageneses encompass the Au-polymetallic (156.3 ± 1.8 Ma) and Au-Bi (155.9 ± 4.5 Ma) one. By their ages and position in the general scheme of the Late Jurassic magmatism of Eastern Transbaikalia, the Lugokan's ore cluster gold-bearing mineral associations corresponds to the time of intrusion of the Shakhtama pluton (161 Ma) and the Porphyry Complex (159-155 Ma).

  9. Determinants of pathologic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    Physiologic mineralization is necessary for the formation of skeletal tissues and for their appropriate functions during adulthood. Mineralization has to be controlled and restricted to specific regions. If the mineralization process occurs in regions that normally do not mineralize, there can be severe consequences (pathologic or ectopic mineralization). Recent findings have indicated that physiologic and pathologic mineralization events are initiated by matrix vesicles, membrane-enclosed particles released from the plasma membranes of mineralization-competent cells. The understanding of how these vesicles are released from the plasma membrane and initiate the mineralization process may provide novel therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic mineralization. In addition, other regulators (activators and inhibitors) of physiologic mineralization have been identified and characterized, and there is evidence that the same factors also contribute to the regulation of pathologic mineralization. Finally, programmed cell death (apoptosis) may be a contributor to physiologic mineralization and if occurring after tissue injury may induce pathologic mineralization and mineralization-related differentiation events in the injured and surrounding areas. This review describes how the understanding of mechanisms and factors regulating physiologic mineralization can be used to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic or ectopic mineralization events.

  10. Centrality dependence of antiproton production in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Hallman, T.J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W. ||||||||[Universities Space Sciences Research Association

    1995-11-13

    We have measured the yields of antiprotons in Au+Au interactions in the rapidity range 1.2{lt}{ital y}{lt}2.8 as a function of centrality using a beam line spectrometer. The shapes of the invariant multiplicity distributions at {ital p}{sub {ital t}}=0 are used to explore the dynamics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  11. Au20: A Tetrahedral Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Li, Xi; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2003-02-07

    Photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a 20 atom gold cluster has an extremely large energy gap, which is even greater than that of C60, and an electron affinity comparable with that of C60. This observation suggests that the Au20 cluster must be extremely stable and chemically inert. Using relativistic density functional calculations, we found that Au20 possesses a remarkable tetrahedral structure, which is a fragment of the bulk face-centered cubic lattice of gold with a small structural relaxation. Au20 is thus a true cluster molecule, while at the same time it is exactly part of the bulk, but with very different properties. The tetrahedral Au20 may possess interesting catalytic properties and may be synthesized in bulk quantity or assembled on non-interacting surfaces.

  12. Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics of Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Au Deposits in P.R. China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second report concerning results of a joint project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Tianjin Geological Academy to study sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Since the 1980s, Chinese geologists have devoted a large-scale exploration and research effort to the deposits. As a result, there are more than 20 million oz of proven Au reserves in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Additional estimated and inferred resources are present in over 160 deposits and occurrences, which are undergoing exploration. This makes China second to Nevada in contained ounces of Au in Carlin-type deposits. It is likely that many of the Carlin-type Au ore districts in China, when fully developed, could have resource potential comparable to the multi-1,000-tonne Au resource in northern Nevada. The six chapters of this report describe sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits that were visited during the project. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits and Carlin-type Au deposits and also provide a working classification for the sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 provide descriptions that were compiled from the literature in China in three main areas: the Dian-Qian-Gui, the Qinling fold belt, and Middle-Lower Yangtze River areas. Chapter 6 contains a weights-of-evidence (WofE), GIS-based mineral assessment of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Qinling fold belt and Dian-Qian-Gui areas. Appendices contain scanned aeromagnetic (Appendix I) and gravity (Appendix II) geophysical maps of south and central China. Data tables of the deposits (Appendix III) also are available in the first report as an interactive database at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-466/. Geochemical analysis of ore samples from the deposits visited are contained in Appendix IV.

  13. Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24797697

  14. Bartering for Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Kathie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students are assigned occupations that rely on specific minerals. To obtain the needed minerals, students learn how to trade services and commodities. Includes details on preparation, modeling behaviors, and printed materials. (DDR)

  15. Cu-Ag sulfides as indicators of pre-porphyritic epithermal Au-Ag deposits in Northeastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savva, N. E.; Sidorov, A. A.; Volkov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Au-Ag mineralization of the Olcha and Teploe epithermal deposits underwent thermal metamorphism due to porphyritic intrusions. The presence of Bi-bearing galena and matildite in the ores (Teploe), Cu-Te-bearing naumannite (Olcha), the occurrence of middle- and high-temperature facies of metasomatic rocks (epidote and actinolite), and temperature formation conditions are related, firstly, to the influence of granitoids on the ore process, which supplied not only Cu and Mo, but also Bi, Te, and, secondly, to the heating of host rocks containing pre-porphyritic epithermal Au-Ag mineralization. The abundance of Cu-Ag sulfides and Cu-acanthite resulted from the enrichment of later mineral phases in Cu and Ag under the substance redistribution with the formation of Ag-acanthite ores. The data considered in the paper are of practical importance for regional forecasting of metallogenic constructions, exploration, and evaluation of the epithermal Au-Ag deposits.

  16. A spectrophotometric study of aqueous Au(III) halide-hydroxide complexes at 25-80 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Al; McPhail, D. C.; Brugger, Joël

    2009-06-01

    The mobility and transport of gold in low-temperature waters and brines is affected by the aqueous speciation of gold, which is sensitive in particular to pH, oxidation and halide concentrations. In this study, we use UV-Vis spectrophotometry to identify and measure the thermodynamic properties of Au(III) aqueous complexes with chloride, bromide and hydroxide. Au(III) forms stable square planar complexes with hydroxide and halide ligands. Based on systematic changes in the absorption spectra of solutions in three binary systems NaCl-NaBr, NaCl-NaOH and NaBr-NaOH at 25 °C, we derived log dissociation constants for the following mixed and end-member halide and hydroxide complexes: [AuCl 3Br] -, [AuCl 2Br 2] -, [AuBr 3Cl] - and [AuBr 4] -; [AuCl 3(OH)] -, [AuCl 2(OH) 2] -, [AuCl(OH) 3] - and [Au(OH) 4] -; and [AuBr 3(OH)] -, [AuBr 2(OH) 2] - and [AuBr(OH) 3] -. These are the first reported results for the mixed chloride-bromide complexes. Increasing temperature to 80 °C resulted in an increase in the stability of the mixed chloride-bromide complexes, relative to the end-member chloride and bromide complexes. For the [AuCl (4-n)(OH) n] - series of complexes ( n = 0-4), there is an excellent agreement between our spectrophotometric results and previous electrochemical results of Chateau et al. [Chateau et al. (1966)]. In other experiments, the iodide ion (I -) was found to be unstable in the presence of Au(III), oxidizing rapidly to I 2(g) and causing Au to precipitate. Predicted Au(III) speciation indicates that Au(III) chloride-bromide complexes can be important in transporting gold in brines with high bromide-chloride ratios (e.g., >0.05), under oxidizing (atmospheric), acidic (pH < 5) conditions. Native gold solubility under atmospheric oxygen conditions is predicted to increase with decreasing pH in acidic conditions, increasing pH in alkaline conditions, increasing chloride, especially at acid pH, and increasing bromide for bromide/chloride ratios greater than 0

  17. Au36(SPh)23 nanomolecules.

    PubMed

    Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Dass, Amala

    2011-06-22

    A new core size protected completely by an aromatic thiol, Au(36)(SPh)(23), is synthesized and characterized by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and UV-visible spectroscopy. The synthesis involving core size changes is studied by MS, and the complete ligand coverage by aromatic thiol group is shown by NMR.

  18. Lead isotope compositions as guides to early gold mineralization: The North Amethyst vein system, Creede district, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Pb isotope compositions from the late stage of the North Amethyst vein system and from the Bondholder and central and southern Creede mining districts are more radiogenic than the host volcanic rocks of the central cluster of the San Juan volcanic field. Our Pb isotope results indicate that early Au mineralization of the North Amethyst area may represent the product of an older and relatively local hydrothermal system distinct from that of the younger base metal and Ag mineralization found throughout the region. Fluids that deposited Au minerals may have derived their Pb isotope composition by a greater degree of interaction with shallow, relatively less radiogenic volcanic wall rocks. The younger, base metal and Ag-rich mineralization that overprints the Au mineralization in the North Amethyst area clearly has a more radiogenic isotopic signature, which implies that the later mineralization derived a greater component of its Pb from Proterozoic source rocks, or sediments derived from them.Paragenetically early sulfide-rich vein assemblages have the least radiogenic galenas and generally also have the highest Au contents. Thus, identification of paragenetically early vein assemblages with relatively unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions similar to those of the North Amethyst area provides an additional exploration tool for Au in the central San Juan Mountains area.

  19. The Agan epithermal gold-silver deposit and prospects for the discovery of high-sulfidation mineralization in northeast Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Savva, N. E.; Sidorov, A. A.; Kolova, E. E.; Chizhova, I. A.; Alekseev, V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The Arman volcanotectonic depression (VTD) containing the Agan deposit is distinguished as the most promising area for the discovery of high-sulfidation (HS) epithermal Au deposit during prospecting in the Central Okhotsk ore district of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanogenic belt (OChVB). Studies reveal that the volcanic rocks of the Agan deposit strongly differ from those of the reference HS-type epithermal deposits. It was found that quartz-alunite metasomatites in the ore field are characterized by low Au content and Sn content two orders of magnitude higher than those of Cu and Mo. The pair-correlation coefficients are K cor (Au-Sn) = 0.73 and K cor(Au-Cu) = 0.22. The ore bodies of the Agan deposit do not contain enargite and luzonite—the main indicator minerals for Au productive HS-type mineralization; porous ("vuggy") quartz is weakly manifested. In terms of the mineral complex, the epithermal mineralization revealed in the metasomatites of the deposit is close to the intermediate sulfidation type. At the same time, this mineralization, in many of its features, is similar to the mineralization developed in siliceous and quartz-alunite lithocaps, which are formed above degassing intrusions. In this setting, HS-type ore-bearing fluids either are not formed in the system or do not reach epithermal depths.

  20. Reagan issues mineral policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  1. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  2. Quantitative Characterization Guidelines of Erionite Series Minerals for Regulatory Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, A.; Dogan, M.

    2013-05-01

    erionite series minerals - the most carcinogenic minerals known - require a special attention from the mineralogical community, which is a prerequisite to establish their true carcinogenic properties. References: Dogan, A.U., Baris, Y.I., Dogan, M., Emri, S., Steel, I., Elmishad, A.G., and Carbone, M., 2006. Genetic predisposition to fiber carcinogenesis causes a mesothelioma epidemic in Turkey. Cancer Research, v. 66 (10), p. 5063-5068, this research paper is highlighted in Nature Reviews-Cancer, v. 6, p. 489. Dogan, A.U. and Dogan, M., 2008, Re-evaluation and re-classification of erionite series minerals, Environmental Geochemistry and Health, v. 30, p. 355-366. Dogan, A.U., Dogan, M., and Hoskins, J.A. 2008, Erionite series minerals: Mineralogical and carcinogenic properties, Environmental Geochemistry and Health, v. 30, p. 367-381.

  3. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Anne M. Sickles

    2014-05-13

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  4. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  5. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  6. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  7. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  8. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  9. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  10. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  11. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  12. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  14. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  15. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  16. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2003-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  17. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  19. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  20. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials

  1. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2002-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  2. The Miner's Canary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinier, Lani

    2005-01-01

    Miners used canaries as early warning signals: when a canary gasped for breath, the miners knew there was a problem with the atmosphere in the mine. The experience of people of color in higher education can be used similarly as a diagnostic tool.

  3. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  4. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  5. Underground mineral extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  6. Mineral replacement reactions and element mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Christine V.; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Hövelmann, Jörn; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    When a mineral is out of equilibrium with an aqueous fluid, reactions will take place in an attempt to reach a new equilibrium. Commonly in the Earth dissolution at a mineral-fluid interface initiates a coupled reaction involving dissolution and precipitation (Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2014). This is a ubiquitous reaction during such processes as metamorphism, metasomatism and weathering. When rock-forming minerals such as feldspars, olivine, pyroxenes are in contact with aqueous fluids (typically NaCl-rich) resultant new phases are formed and elements present in the parent mineral are released to the fluid and therefore mobilized for transport elsewhere. This has been shown in a number of systems such as the albitisation of feldspars (Hövelmann et al., 2010) when a Ca-bearing plagioclase is replaced by albite (NaAlSi3O8). However during this reaction not only is Ca released to the fluid but most other minor elements, such as Mg, Pb, rare earth elements amongst others, are almost totally mobilized and removed in solution. This interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction has many implications for the redistributon of elements in the crust of the Earth. It is also of note that albitisation occurs often in areas of high mineralization, such as in the Curnamona Province in S. Australia (Au-Cu and Ag-Pb-Zn deposits) and the Bamble District of S. Norway. Secondly atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image these reactions at a nanoscale, especially at the calcite-fluid interface, such as the formation of apatite from phosphate-bearing solutions, and the sequestration of toxic elements, eg., Se and As. References Ruiz-Agudo E., Putnis C.V., Putnis A. (2014) Coupled dissolution and precipitation at mineral-fluid interfaces. Chemical Geology, 383, 132-146. Putnis C.V. and Ruiz-Agudo E. (2013) The mineral-water interface: where minerals react with the environment. Elements, 9, 177-182. Hövelmann J., Putnis A., Geisler T., Schmidt B.C., Golla-Schindler U. (2009

  7. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2010 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2009 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. National reserves information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the

  8. Why Mineral Interfaces Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Andrew; Putnis, Christine V.

    2015-04-01

    While it is obvious that reactions between a mineral and an aqueous solution take place at the mineral-fluid interface it is only relatively recently that high spatial resolution studies have demonstrated how the local structure of the mineral surface and the chemical composition of the fluid at the interface control both the short-range and the long-range consequences of mineral-fluid interaction. Long-range consequences of fluid-mineral interaction control element cycles in the earth, the formation of ore-deposits, the chemical composition of the oceans through weathering of rocks and hence climate changes. Although weathering is clearly related to mineral dissolution, to what extent do experimentally measured dissolution rates of minerals help to understand weathering, especially weathering mechanisms? This question is related to the short-range, local reactions that take place when a mineral, that is not stable in the fluid, begins to dissolve. In this case the fluid composition at the interface will become supersaturated with respect to a different phase or phases. This may be a different composition of the same mineral e.g. a Ca-rich feldspar dissolving in a Na-rich solution results in a fluid at the interface which may be supersaturated with respect to an Na-rich feldspar. Alternatively, the interfacial fluid could be supersaturated with respect to a different mineral e.g. an Na-rich zeolite, depending on the temperature. Numerous experiments have shown that the precipitation of a more stable phase at the mineral-fluid interface results in a coupling between the dissolution and the precipitation, and the replacement of one mineral by another. This process separates the short-range mechanisms which depend only on the composition of the interfacial solution, and the long-range consequences that depend on the composition of the residual fluid released from the reacting parent mineral. Typically such residual fluids may carry metal ions tens to hundreds of

  9. Synthesis and optical property characterization of elongated AuPt and Pt@Au metal nanoframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Hong, Soonchang; Moh, Sang Hyun; Park, Sungho

    2016-02-01

    We report a facile method to synthesize elongated nanoframes consisting of Pt and Au in solution. Pentagonal Au nanorods served as templates and successfully led to an elongated AuPt nanoframe after etching the core Au. Subsequently, the coating of Au around Pt ridges resulted in Pt@Au metal nanoframes. The resulting elongated nanostructure exhibited 5 well-defined ridges continuously connected along the long axis. During the shape evolution from pure Au nanorods to elongated Pt@Au metal nanoframes, their corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance bands were monitored. Especially, unique surface plasmon features were observed for elongated Pt@Au nanoframes where the short-axis oscillation of surface free electrons is strongly coupled but the long-axis oscillation is not coupled among the ridges.We report a facile method to synthesize elongated nanoframes consisting of Pt and Au in solution. Pentagonal Au nanorods served as templates and successfully led to an elongated AuPt nanoframe after etching the core Au. Subsequently, the coating of Au around Pt ridges resulted in Pt@Au metal nanoframes. The resulting elongated nanostructure exhibited 5 well-defined ridges continuously connected along the long axis. During the shape evolution from pure Au nanorods to elongated Pt@Au metal nanoframes, their corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance bands were monitored. Especially, unique surface plasmon features were observed for elongated Pt@Au nanoframes where the short-axis oscillation of surface free electrons is strongly coupled but the long-axis oscillation is not coupled among the ridges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08200e

  10. Minerals Yearbook, centennial edition 1981. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook Marks the centennial of the first annual publication of comprehensive mineral industry statistics by the Federal Government. This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 71 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  11. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapters on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  12. A new type of noble metal mineralization in the Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogush, I. A.; Cherkashin, V. I.; Ryabov, G. V.; Abdullayev, M. Sh.

    2016-01-01

    The weathering crust of the Beden ultrabasite massif (the basin of Big Laba River) is identified and studied. Anomalously high contents of noble metals (Au, Pt, Pd) are revealed in the basal horizon of the Jurassic part of the weathering crust. For this reason we suspect an existence of a belt of noble metal miner-alization in the Paleozoic ultrabasites in the Peredovoi Range of the Northern Caucasus.

  13. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  14. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  15. Mineral resources of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compiled and edited by Wright, Nancy A.; Williams, Paul L.

    1974-01-01

    Although the existence of mineral deposits in Antarctica is highly probable, the chances of finding them are quite small. Minerals have been found there in great variety but only as occurrences. Manganese nodules, water (as ice), geothermal energy, coal, petroleum, and natural gas are potential resources that could perhaps be exploited in the future. On the basis of known mineral occurrences in Antarctica and relationships between geologic provinces of Antarctica and those of neighboring Gondwana continents, the best discovery probability for a base-metal deposit in any part of Antarctica is in the Andean orogen; it is estimated to be 0.075 (75 chances in 1,000).

  16. The giant Pebble Cu-Au-Mo deposit and surrounding region, southwest Alaska: introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.; Lang, James R.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The Pebble deposit is located about 320 km southwest of and 27 km northwest of the village of Iliamna in Alaska (Fig. 1A). It is one of the largest porphyry deposits in terms of contained Cu (Fig. 2A) and it has the largest Au endowment of any porphyry deposit in the world (Fig. 2B). The deposit comprises the Pebble West and Pebble East zones that represent two coeval hydrothermal centers within a single system (Lang et al., 2013). Together the measured and indicated resources total 5,942 million metric tons (Mt) at 0.42% Cu, 0.35 g/t Au, and 250 ppm Mo with an inferred resource of 4,835 Mt at 0.24% Cu, 0.26 g/t Au, and 215 ppm Mo. In addition, the deposit contains significant concentrations of Ag, Pd, and Re (Northern Dynasty Minerals, 2011).

  17. Definitions of Health Terms: Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/definitions/mineralsdefinitions.html Definitions of Health Terms : Minerals To use the sharing features on this page, ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements Minerals Minerals are those elements on the earth and ...

  18. Minerals Management Service: Strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-30

    This plan addresses the management of the mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf in an environmentally sound and safe manner and the timely collection, verification, and distribution of mineral revenues from Federal and Indian lands. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) manages the Nation`s natural gas, oil and other mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and collects, accounts for, and disburses revenues from offshore federal mineral leases and from onshore mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands.

  19. Cretaceous Cu-Au, pyrite, and Fe-oxide-apatite deposits in the Ningwu basin, Lower Yangtze Area, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin-Jie; Lu, Bang-Cheng; Wang, Tie-Zhu; Che, Lin-Rui

    2015-05-01

    The Cretaceous Ningwu volcanic basin of the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt of eastern China hosts numerous Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits. The mineralization in the Ningwu basin is associated with subvolcanic rocks, consisting of gabbro-diorite porphyry and/or pyroxene diorite. However, the mineralization is associated with subvolcanic and volcanic rock suite belonging to the Niangniangshan Formation in the Tongjing Cu-Au deposit, including nosean-bearing aegirine-augite syenites, quartz syenites, and quartz monzonites. The zoning displayed by the alteration and mineralization comprises: (1) an upper light-colored zone of argillic, carbonate, and pyrite alteration and silicification that is locally associated with pyrite and gold mineralization, (2) a central dark-colored zone of diopside, fluorapatite-magnetite, phlogopite, and garnet alteration associated with fluorapatite-magnetite mineralization, and (3) a lowermost light-colored zone of extensive albite alteration. The Cu-Au and pyrite orebodies are peripheral to the Fe-oxide-apatite deposits in this area and overlie the iron orebodies, including the Meishan Cu-Au deposit in the northern Ningwu basin and the pyrite deposits in the central Ningwu basin. The δ34S values of sulfides from the Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits in the Ningwu basin show large variation, with a mixed sulfur source, including magmatic sulfur and/or a mixture of sulfur derived from a magmatic component, country rock, and thermochemical reduction of sulfate at 200-300 °C. The ore-forming fluids associated with iron mineralization were derived mainly from magmatic fluids, and the late-stage ore-forming fluids related to Cu-Au and pyrite mineralization may have formed by the introduction of cooler meteoric water to the system. The Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits of the Ningwu basin formed in an extensional environment and are associated with a large-scale magmatic

  20. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also, many nutrients interact with each other. Most nutritionists believe in designing an overall program of supplements. ... SUPPLEMENTS? In addition to vitamins and minerals, some nutritionists suggest that people with HIV take supplements of ...

  1. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  2. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.

    2013-12-01

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features.

  3. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  4. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  5. The magic gold cluster Au20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, E. S.; Remacle, F.

    The 20-nanogold cluster Au20 exhibits a large variety of two- and three-dimensional isomeric forms. Among them is the ground-state isomer Au20(Td) representing the stable cluster with a unique tetrahedral shape, with all atoms on the surface, and large HOMO-LUMO gap which even slightly exceeds that of the buckyball fullerene C60. The anionic cluster Au-20(Td) that holds its parent tetrahedral symmetry features a high catalytic activity. The list of the properties of the 20-nanogold clusters surveyed in the present work ranges from the energetic order of stability of its isomers to the optical absorption and excitation spectra of the Au20(Td) cluster. We also report the structures and properties of its doubly charged clusters Au2+20 and Au2-20 and computationally confirm that Au2-20 is indeed stable. The zero-point-energy-corrected adiabatic second electron affinity of Au20(Td) amounts to 0.43-0.53 eV that is consistent with the experimental data. In addition, we provide computational evidence of the existence of the novel, hollow cage isomer of Au20 and analyze its key properties.0

  6. Minerals yearbook, 1983. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  7. Minerals yearbook, 1982. volume 1. metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  8. Mathematical model for bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Svetlana V.; Safranek, Lee; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Ou, Miao-jung Yvonne; McKee, Marc D.; Murshed, Monzur; Rauch, Frank; Zuhr, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Defective bone mineralization has serious clinical manifestations, including deformities and fractures, but the regulation of this extracellular process is not fully understood. We have developed a mathematical model consisting of ordinary differential equations that describe collagen maturation, production and degradation of inhibitors, and mineral nucleation and growth. We examined the roles of individual processes in generating normal and abnormal mineralization patterns characterized using two outcome measures: mineralization lag time and degree of mineralization. Model parameters describing the formation of hydroxyapatite mineral on the nucleating centers most potently affected the degree of mineralization, while the parameters describing inhibitor homeostasis most effectively changed the mineralization lag time. Of interest, a parameter describing the rate of matrix maturation emerged as being capable of counter-intuitively increasing both the mineralization lag time and the degree of mineralization. We validated the accuracy of model predictions using known diseases of bone mineralization such as osteogenesis imperfecta and X-linked hypophosphatemia. The model successfully describes the highly nonlinear mineralization dynamics, which includes an initial lag phase when osteoid is present but no mineralization is evident, then fast primary mineralization, followed by secondary mineralization characterized by a continuous slow increase in bone mineral content. The developed model can potentially predict the function for a mutated protein based on the histology of pathologic bone samples from mineralization disorders of unknown etiology. PMID:26347868

  9. Geology and mineralization of the Wyoming Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hausel, W.D.; Edwards, B.R.; Graff, P.J.; ,

    1991-01-01

    The Wyoming Province is an Archean craton which underlies portions of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and much of Wyoming. The cratonic block consists of Archean age granite-gneiss with interspersed greenstone belts and related supracrustal terranes exposed in the cores of several Laramide uplifts. Resources found in the Province and in the adjacent accreted Proterozoic terrane include banded iron formation, Au, Pt, Pd, W, Sn, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, and diamonds. The Province shows many similarities to the mineral-rich cratons of the Canadian shield, the Rhodesian and Transvaal cratons of southern Africa, and the Pilbara and Yilgarn blocks of Western Australia, where much of the world's precious and strategic metal and gemstone resources are located.

  10. Minerals Yearbook, 1989. Volume i. Metals and Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral industry during 1989 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on advanced materials also has been added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  11. PGE mineralization of dunite-wehrlite massifs at the Gutara-Uda interfluve, Eastern Sayan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhonoshin, A. S.; Tolstykh, N. D.; Podlipsky, M. Yu.; Kolotilina, T. B.; Vishnevsky, A. V.; Benedyuk, Yu. P.

    2013-05-01

    The Pt-Pd and Au-Ag mineralization hosted in both wehrlite without visible links to sulfide mineralization (dispersed assemblage of the Tartai massif) and disseminated Cu-Ni sulfide ore (ore assemblage of the Ognit massif) was found in dunite-wehrlite massifs localized in the fold framework of the Siberian Craton. The Pt minerals in both assemblages comprise sperrylite (PtAs2) and secondary Pt-Fe-Ni alloys in the Ognit massif and Pt-Fe-Cu and Pt-Cu alloys in the Tartai massif. The Pd minerals are widespread in the ore assemblages as compounds with Te, Sb, and Bi, whereas in the dispersed assemblage Pd is concentrated primarily in Pd-Cu-Sb compounds. Both assemblages are characterized by similar substitution of sperrylite with orcelite (Ni5 - xAs2) and then with secondary Pt-Fe-Ni or Pt-Fe-Cu and Pt-Cu alloys; the occurrence of Au-Ag alloys with prevalence of Ag over Au; and replacement of them with auricupride (Cu3Au) at the late stage. Sperrylite in both assemblages contains Ir impurities, while the Pd minerals contain Cu and Ni admixtures, which are typical of mineral assemblages related to the ultramafic intrusions with nickel specialization. PGM were formed under a low sulfur fugacity and high As, Bi, and Sb activities. The postmagmatic fluids affected the primary mineral assemblages under reductive conditions, and this effect resulted in replacement of sperrylite with Ni arsenide (orcelite) and Pt-Fe-Ni and Pt-Fe-Cu alloys; Ni and Cu sulfides were replaced with awaruite and native copper.

  12. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  13. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. It contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  14. Minerals yearbook, 1994. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1994 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. The volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. The volume also contains chapters on Survey Methods, a Statistical Summary of Nonfuel Minerals, and Trends in Mining and Quarrying.

  15. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  16. Extraterrestrial magnetic minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Markov, G. P.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Sharonova, Z. V.

    2012-07-01

    Thermomagnetic and microprobe analyses are carried out and a set of magnetic characteristics are measured for 25 meteorites and 3 tektites from the collections of the Vernadsky Geological Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Museum of Natural History of the North-East Interdisciplinary Science Research Institute, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It is found that, notwithstanding their type, all the meteorites contain the same magnetic minerals and only differ by concentrations of these minerals. Kamacite with less than 10% nickel is the main magnetic mineral in the studied samples. Pure iron, taenite, and schreibersite are less frequent; nickel, various iron spinels, Fe-Al alloys, etc., are very rare. These minerals are normally absent in the crusts of the Earth and other planets. The studied meteorites are more likely parts of the cores and lower mantles of the meteoritic parent bodies (the planets). Uniformity in the magnetic properties of the meteorites and the types of their thermomagnetic (MT) curves is violated by secondary alterations of the meteorites in the terrestrial environment. The sediments demonstrate the same monotony as the meteorites: kamacite is likely the only extraterrestrial magnetic mineral, which is abundant in sediments and associated with cosmic dust. The compositional similarity of kamacite in iron meteorites and in cosmic dust is due to their common source; the degree of fragmentation of the material of the parent body is the only difference.

  17. American Strategic Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, John H., Jr.; Chidester, Alfred H.

    American Strategic Minerals is a collection of six papers that were presented in December 1982 at a conference organized by the Center for the Study of Marine Policy at the University of Delaware. According to editor Gerard J. Mangone, director of the center, the papers were commissioned “to investigate not only the objective resource situation, but also past United States policy on strategic minerals and future options open to Washington.” The authors and their chapter titles are John C. Kraft, University of Delaware: “Strategic minerals and world stability” V. Anthony Cammarota, Jr., U.S. Bureau of Mines: “America's dependence on strategic minerals” John D. Morgan, U.S. Bureau of Mines: “Future demands of the United States for strategic minerals” J. Robert Moore, University of Texas: “Alternative sources of strategic minerals from the seabed” Allan I. Mendelowitz and John E. Watson, U.S. General Accounting Office: “U.S. mining investments in developing countries” and James W. Curlin, Nautilus Press: “The political dimensions of strategic minerals.”

  18. Typing mineral deposits using their associated rocks, grades and tonnages using a probabilistic neural network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic neural network is employed to classify 1610 mineral deposits into 18 types using tonnage, average Cu, Mo, Ag, Au, Zn, and Pb grades, and six generalized rock types. The purpose is to examine whether neural networks might serve for integrating geoscience information available in large mineral databases to classify sites by deposit type. Successful classifications of 805 deposits not used in training - 87% with grouped porphyry copper deposits - and the nature of misclassifications demonstrate the power of probabilistic neural networks and the value of quantitative mineral-deposit models. The results also suggest that neural networks can classify deposits as well as experienced economic geologists. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2006.

  19. Synthesis and Optical Responses of Ag@Au/Ag@Au Double Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Li; Yang, Da-Jie; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-02-01

    We synthesize hollow-structured Ag@Au nanoparticles with single porous shell and Ag@Au/Ag@Au double shells by using the galvanic replacement reaction and investigate their linear and nonlinear optical properties. Our results show that the surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the hollow porous nanoparticles could be easily tuned in a wide range in the visible and near infrared region by controlling the volume of HAuCl4. The nonlinear optical refraction of the double-shelled Ag@Au/Ag@Au nanoparticles is prominently enhanced by the plasmon resonance. Our findings may find applications in biosensors and nonlinear optical nanodevices.

  20. Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K.; Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

  1. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    Color is a problem for scientific study. One aspect is the vocabulary one used to describe color. Mint green, bottle green, and Kelly green are nice names but not of great utility in that people's physical perception of color is not always the same. In some industries, such as colored fabric manufacture, current use is to send a set of standard colors which are matched by the producer. This is similar to the use of the Munsell color charts in geology. None of these processes makes use of physical optical spectral studies. The reason is that they are difficult to obtain and interpret. For a geologist, color is very important but we rarely have the possibility to standardize the method of our color perception. One reason is that color is both a reflective and transmission phenomenon. The thickness of the sample is critical to any transmission characteristics. Hence, a field color determination is different from one made by using a petrographic microscope. Green glauconite in a hand specimen is not the same color in 30 μm thick thin section seen with a microscope using transmitted light.A second problem is that color in a spectral identification is the result of several absorption emissions,with overlapping signal, forming a complicated spectrum. Interpretation depends very greatly on the spectrum of the light source and the conditions of transmission-reflection of the sample. As a result, for this text, we will not attempt to analyze the physical aspect of green in green clays. In the discussion which follows, reference is made concerning color, to thin section microscopic perception.Very briefly, green clay minerals are green, because they contain iron. This is perhaps not a great revelation to mineralogists, but it is the key to understanding the origin and stability of green clay minerals. In fact, iron can color minerals either red or green or in various shades of orange and brown. The color most likely depends upon the relative abundance of the iron ion valence

  2. Electrochemical formation of Au clusters in polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, D.W.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J.; Baer, D.R.

    1999-10-01

    The reduction of chloroaurate and the incorporation of Au clusters in polyaniline, PANI, films have been investigated. The chloroaurate complex is generated at the electrode surface during Cl{sup {minus}} doping of Au/PANI. FTIE and UV/vis data indicate that chloroaurate interacts with PANI and that its reduction to metallic Au occurs preferentially at the nitrogen linkages. The voltammetric and XPS results show that the uptake of both protons and anions is suppressed by the formation of Au clusters due to this interaction. The ability to reduce chloroaurate in PANI films is also demonstrated for Pt electrodes coated with PANI in solutions containing KAuCl{sub 4}. The preliminary results indicate that Au cluster size distribution remains fairly constant regardless of the method used.

  3. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bulk film analysis using C 60+, Au 3+, and Au + primary ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlan, X. A.; Gilmore, I. S.; Henderson, A.; Lockyer, N. P.; Vickerman, J. C.

    2006-07-01

    The damage characteristics of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have been studied under bombardment by C 60+, Au 3+ and Au + primary ions. The observed damage cross-sections for the three ion beams are not dramatically different. The secondary ion yields however were significantly enhanced by the polyatomic primary ions where the secondary ion yield of the [M + H] + is on average 5× higher for C 60+ than Au 3+ and 8× higher for Au 3+ than Au +. Damage accumulates under Au + and Au 3+ bombardment while C 60+ bombardment shows a lack of damage accumulation throughout the depth profile of the PET thick film up to an ion dose of ˜1 × 10 15 ions cm -2. These properties of C 60+ bombardment suggest that the primary ion will be a useful molecular depth profiling tool.

  4. Distribution and formation conditions of noble metal mineralization in coal-bearing basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredin, V. V.

    2007-02-01

    Original data and a survey of the literature indicate that Au and Au-PGE mineralization are abundant in coal measures. Anomalous contents of noble metals have been established in basins with various types of basement, composed of granite, volcanic rocks, schist, and limestone. These basins are located in Au-and PGE-bearing ore districts, as well as at a considerable distance from known ore deposits and occurrences. Ore formation in coal-bearing basins may occur during sedimentation, peat accumulation, and diagenesis of organic matter or may be epigenetic. Noble metals are supplied to sedimentary basins as minerals that are transported by water and air and as ion species migrating along with surface and subsurface in-and exfiltration solutions of various chemical and genetic types. Ore mineralization concentrates in coal seams and host sedimentary beds of various grain size, including conglomerate, sand, and clay, as well as in zones of hydrothermal alteration superimposed on basement rocks and the sedimentary cover. The mode of occurrence of noble metals in coal basins is diverse as well (noble metal minerals, isomorphic admixtures in sulfides, and organic compounds). The data presented allow coal-bearing basins to be regarded as promising for economic noble metal mineralization fit for recovery as by-products in the course of coal mining.

  5. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  6. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  7. Investigation of the Phase Equilibria of Sn-Cu-Au Ternary and Ag-Sn-Cu-Au Quaternary Systems and Interfacial Reactions in Sn-Cu/Au Couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yee-Wen; Jao, Chien-Chung; Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yung; Lee, Chiapyng

    2007-02-01

    The phase equilibria of the Sn-Cu-Au ternary, Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary systems and interfacial reactions between Sn-Cu alloys and Au were experimentally investigated at specific temperatures in this study. The experimental results indicated that there existed three ternary intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and a complete solid solubility between AuSn and Cu6Sn5 phases in the Sn-Cu-Au ternary system at 200°C. No quaternary IMC was found in the isoplethal section of the Ag-Sn-Cu-Au quaternary system. Three IMCs, AuSn, AuSn2, and AuSn4, were found in all couples. The same three IMCs and (Au,Cu)Sn/(Cu,Au)6Sn5 phases were found in all Sn-Cu/Au couples. The thickness of these reaction layers increased with increasing temperature and time. The mechanism of IMC growth can be described by using the parabolic law. In addition, when the reaction time was extended and the Cu content of the alloy was increased, the AuSn4 phase disappeared gradually. The (Au, Cu)Sn and (Cu,Au)6Sn5 layers played roles as diffusion barriers against Sn in Sn-Cu/Au reaction couple systems.

  8. Spatial databases of the Humboldt Basin mineral resource assessment, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Moyer, Lorre A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the origin, generation, and format of tract map databases for deposit types that accompany the metallic mineral resource assessment for the Humboldt River Basin, northern Nevada, (Wallace and others, 2004, Chapter 2). The deposit types include pluton-related polymetallic, sedimentary rock-hosted Au-Ag, and epithermal Au-Ag. The tract maps constitute only part of the assessment, which also includes new research and data for northern Nevada, discussions on land classification, and interpretation of the assessment maps. The purpose of the assessment was to identify areas that may have a greater favorability for undiscovered metallic mineral deposits, provide analysis of the mineral-resource favorability, and present the assessment of the Humboldt River basin and adjacent areas in a digital format using a Geographic Information System (GIS).

  9. Thermal and photoinduced reduction of ionic Au(III) to elemental Au nanoparticles by dissolved organic matter in water: possible source of naturally occurring Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely observed in ore deposits, coal, soil, and environmental water. Identifying the source of these naturally occurring AuNPs could be helpful for not only the discovery of Au deposits through advanced exploration methods, but also the elucidation of the biogeochemical cycle and environmental toxicity of ionic Au and engineered AuNPs. Here, we investigated the effect of natural/simulated sunlight and heating on the reduction of ionic Au by ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM) in river water. The reductive process probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that phenolic, alcoholic, and aldehyde groups in DOM act as reductive sites. Long-time exposure with thermal and photoirradiation induced the further fusion and growth of AuNPs to branched Au nanostructure as precipitation. The formation processes and kinetics of AuNPs were further investigated using humic acid (HA) as the DOM model, with comprehensive characterizing methods. We have observed that HA can reduce ionic Au(III) complex (as chloride or hydroxyl complex) to elemental Au nanoparticles under sunlight or heating. In this process, nearly all of the Au(III) could be reduced to AuNPs, in which HA serves as not only the reductive agent, but also the coating agent to stabilize and disperse AuNPs. The size and stability of AuNPs were highly dependent on the concentration ratio of Au(III) to HA. These results imply that, besides biological processes, this thermal or photochemical reduction process is another possible source of naturally occurring AuNPs in natural environments, which possibly has critical impacts on the transport and transformation of Au and engineered AuNPs.

  10. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  11. Marine mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Fillmore, E.

    1990-01-01

    This book includes the following topics: law of the sea; minerals of the deep seabed; placers and subseabed metallics; industrial chemical materials and coal; the United State exclusive economic zone: the management challenge; and the United Kingdom and Norway: offshore petroleum development policies.

  12. Bioleaching of Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    F. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    Bioleaching is the term used to describe the microbial dissolution of metals from minerals. The commercial bioleaching of metals, particularly those hosted in sulfide minerals, is supported by the technical disciplines of biohydrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, chemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering. The study of the natural weathering of these same minerals, above and below ground, is also linked to the fields of geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry. Studies of abandoned and disused mines indicate that the alterations of the natural environment due to man's activities leave as remnants microbiological activity that continues the biologically mediated release of metals from the host rock (acid rock drainage; ARD). A significant fraction of the world's copper, gold and uranium is now recovered by exploiting native or introduced microbial communities. While some members of these unique communities have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, our knowledge of the composition of these communities, and the function of the individual species present remains relatively limited. Nevertheless, bioleaching represents a major strategy in mineral resource recovery whose importance will increase as ore reserves decline in quality, become more difficult to process (due to increased depth, increased need for comminution, for example), and as environmental considerations eliminate traditional physical processes such as smelting, which have served the mining industry for hundreds of years.

  13. Oxidants from Pulverized Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2007-06-01

    Joel Hurowitz (previously at State University of New York at Stony Brook and now at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Nick Tosca, Scott McLennan, and Martin Schoonen (SUNY at Stony Brook) studied the production of hydrogen peroxide from freshly pulverized minerals in solution. Their experiments focused on olivine, augite, and labradorite; silicate minerals of basaltic planetary surfaces, such as the Moon and Mars, that are exposed to the intense crushing and grinding of impact cratering processes. The hydrogen peroxide produced in the experiments was enough to adequately explain the oxidizing nature of Martian regolith first determined by the Viking Landers and the results suggest, for the first time, that mechanically activated mineral surfaces may be an important part of the overall explanation for the Viking Lander biology experiment results. Hurowitz and coauthors further showed that when the pulverized minerals are heat-treated to high temperature under vacuum (to cause dehydroxylation) there is almost a 20 times increase in hydrogen peroxide production, a result which may be highly relevant to lunar dust. These careful studies demonstrate the importance of and concern about reactive dusts on planetary surfaces from two standpoints: the health of astronauts on surface maneuvers who may inadvertently breath it and the viability of possible Martian organic species to survive in such a corrosive, antiseptic surface environment.

  14. Identification of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The lab described in this article was developed to satisfy two major goals. First, the activity is designed to show students the proper techniques used to identify the seven characteristics of all minerals. Second, the lab gives students a glimpse into the life of a professional field geologist. The author has students complete this lab at the end…

  15. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  16. Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, Guillermo O.; Cortés, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Méndez de Leo, Lucila P.; Williams, Federico J.; Tognalli, Nicolás G.; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, María Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by π-π stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the π-π stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems.Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show

  17. Controlled Synthesis of Au@AgAu Yolk-Shell Cuboctahedra with Well-Defined Facets.

    PubMed

    Londono-Calderon, Alejandra; Bahena, Daniel; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of Au@AgAu yolk-shell cuboctahedra nanoparticles formed by galvanic replacement in a seed-mediated method is described. Initially, single-crystal Au seeds are used for the formation of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes, which serve as the template material for the deposition of an external Au layer. The well-controlled synthesis yields the formation of cuboctahedra nanoparticles with smooth inner and outer Au/Ag surfaces. The deposition/oxidation process is described to understand the formation of cuboctahedra and octahedra nanoparticles. The Au core maintains the initial morphology of the seed and remains static at the center of the yolk-shell because of residual Ag. Structural analysis of the shell indicates intrinsic stacking faults (SFs) near the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analysis show an Au-Ag nonordered alloy forming the shell. The three-dimensional structure of the nanoparticles presented open facets on the [111] as observed by electron tomography SIRT reconstruction over a stack of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The geometrical model was validated by analyzing the direction of streaks in coherent nanobeam diffraction (NBD). The catalytic activity was evaluated using a model reaction based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NTP) by NaBH4 in the presence of Au@AgAu yolk-shell nanoparticles. PMID:27385583

  18. Minerals yearbook 1977. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report contains chapters on virtually all metallic and nonmetallic mineral commodities important to the domestic economy. In addition, it includes a general review chapter on the mineral industries, a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, and a statistical summary.

  19. Au40: A Large Tetrahedral Magic Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Walter, Michael

    2011-01-01

    40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au{sub 40} could be such a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au{sub 40} has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au{sub 20}, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

  20. Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks-A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Causey, J.D.; Eppinger, R.G.; Gray, J.E.; Johnson, C.A.; Lund, K.I.; Schulz, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    A compilation of data on global Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks refines previous descriptive models for their occurrence and provides important information for mineral resource assessments and exploration programs. This compilation forms the basis for a new classification of such deposits, which is speculative at this early stage of research. As defined herein, the Co-Cu-Au deposits contain 0.1 percent or more by weight of Co in ore or mineralized rock, comprising disseminated to semi-massive Co-bearing sulfide minerals with associated Fe- and Cu-bearing sulfides, and local gold, concentrated predominantly within rift-related, siliciclastic metasedimentary rocks of Proterozoic age. Some deposits have appreciable Ag ? Bi ? W ? Ni ? Y ? rare earth elements ? U. Deposit geometry includes stratabound and stratiform layers, lenses, and veins, and (or) discordant veins and breccias. The geometry of most deposits is controlled by stratigraphic layering, folds, axial-plane cleavage, shear zones, breccias, or faults. Ore minerals are mainly cobaltite, skutterudite, glaucodot, and chalcopyrite, with minor gold, arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, bismuthinite, and bismuth; some deposits have appreciable tetrahedrite, uraninite, monazite, allanite, xenotime, apatite, scheelite, or molybdenite. Magnetite can be abundant in breccias, veins, or stratabound lenses within ore or surrounding country rocks. Common gangue minerals include quartz, biotite, muscovite, K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, and scapolite; many deposits contain minor to major amounts of tourmaline. Altered wall rocks generally have abundant biotite or albite. Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary successions constitute the predominant geologic setting. Felsic and (or) mafic plutons are spatially associated with many deposits and at some localities may be contemporaneous with, and involved in, ore formation. Geoenvironmental data for the Blackbird mining district in central Idaho indicate that weathering of

  1. Carbon Mineral Ecology: Predicting the Undiscovered Minerals of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Hummer, D. R.; Downs, R. T.; Hystad, G.; Golden, J.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity and distribution of Earth's minerals through deep time reflects key events in our planet's crustal evolution. Studies in mineral ecology exploit mineralogical databases to document diversity-distribution relationships of minerals, which reveal that all carbon-bearing minerals, as well as subsets containing C with O, H, Ca, or Na, conform to Large Number of Rare Events (LNRE) distributions. LNRE models facilitate prediction of total mineral diversity, and thus point to minerals that exist on Earth but have not yet been discovered and described. Our model predicts that at least 548 C minerals exist on Earth today, indicating that at least 145 carbon-bearing mineral species have yet to be discovered. Furthermore, by analyzing subsets of the most common additional elements in carbon-bearing minerals (i.e., 378 C + O species; 282 C + H species; 133 C + Ca species; and 100 C + Na species), we predict that 129 of these missing carbon minerals contain oxygen, 118 contain hydrogen, 52 contain calcium, and more than 60 contain sodium. The majority of these as yet undescribed minerals are predicted to be hydrous carbonates, many of which may have been overlooked because they are colorless, poorly crystalized, and/or water-soluble. We propose the identities of plausible as yet undescribed carbon minerals, as well as search strategies for their discovery. Some of these minerals will be natural examples of known synthetic compounds, including carbides such as calcium carbide (CaC2), crystalline hydrocarbons such as pyrene (C16H10), and numerous oxalates, anhydrous carbonates, and hydrous carbonates. Many other missing carbon minerals will be isomorphs of known carbon minerals, notably of the more than 100 different hydrous carbonate structures. An understanding of Earth's "missing" minerals provides a more complete picture of geochemical processes that influence crustal evolution.

  2. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Volume I of the 1988 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 79 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains chapters on mining and quarrying trends and on the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines and a statistical summary.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1984. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  4. Minerals yearbook, 1985. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the 1985 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  5. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  6. Longitudinal scaling of net-protons in AuAu and pp collisions at RHIC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming

    2008-10-01

    BRAHMS has studied net-protons distributions in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Net-proton distributions reflect the net-baryon yields and can be used to extract the nuclear stopping in the collisions, thus providing information on baryon number transport and energy available for particle production. The talk will present final and preliminary results from the above mentioned systems. It will be shown that in p+p and in Au+Au central collisions that net-proton distributions exhibit longitudinal scaling once the target contribution to the projectile rapidity range is corrected for. The difference between p+p and Au+Au will be discussed. Aspects of future measurements at the LHC of net-baryons at mid-rapidity will be brought forth.

  7. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  8. Porphyry Cu-Au and associated polymetallic Fe-Cu-Au deposits in the Beiya Area, western Yunnan Province, south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.-W.; Cai, X.-P.; Xiao, Q.-B.; Peters, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Alkaline porphyries in the Beiya area are located east of the Jinshajiang suture, as part of a Cenozoic alkali-rich porphyry belt in western Yunnan. The main rock types include quartz-albite porphyry, quartz-K-feldspar porphyry and biotite-K-feldspar porphyry. These porphyries are characterised by high alkalinity [(K2O + Na2O)% > 10%], high silica (SiO2% > 65%), high Sr (> 400??ppm) and 87Sr/86Sr (> 0.706)] ratio and were intruded at 65.5??Ma, between 25.5 to 32.5??Ma, and about 3.8??Ma, respectively. There are five main types of mineral deposits in the Beiya area: (1) porphyry Cu-Au deposits, (2) magmatic Fe-Au deposits, (3) sedimentary polymetallic deposits, (4) polymetallic skarn deposits, and (5) palaeoplacers associated with karsts. The porphyry Cu-Au and polymetallic skarn deposits are associated with quartz-albite porphyry bodies. The Fe-Au and polymetallic sedimentary deposits are part of an ore-forming system that produced considerable Au in the Beiya area, and are characterised by low concentrations of La, Ti, and Co, and high concentrations of Y, Yb, and Sc. The Cenozoic porphyries in western Yunnan display increased alkalinity away from the Triassic Jinshajiang suture. Distribution of both the porphyries and sedimentary deposits in the Beiya area are interpreted to be related to partial melting in a disjointed region between upper mantle lithosphere of the Yangtze Plate and Gondwana continent, and lie within a shear zone between buried Palaeo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle lithosphere, caused by the subduction and collision of India and Asia. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mineral bridges in nacre.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio G; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2011-12-01

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (>100nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (<60nm), earlier reported to be mineral bridges, found to be such.

  10. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, H.C.; Thomson, B.M.

    2009-09-15

    A review of literature published in 2008 and early 2009 on research related to the production of acid mine drainage and/or in the dissolution of minerals as a result of mining, with special emphasis on the effects of these phenomena on the water quality in the surrounding environment, is presented. This review is divided into six sections: 1) Site Characterization and Assessment, 2) Protection, Prevention, and Restoration, 3) Toxicity Assessment, 4) Environmental Fate and Transport, 5) Biological Characterization, and 6) Treatment Technologies. Because there is much overlap in research areas associated with minerals and mine drainage, many papers presented in this review can be classified into more than one category, and the six sections should not be regarded as being mutually-exclusive, nor should they be thought of as being all-inclusive.

  11. Thermal Expansion of AuIn2

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, C K; Siekhaus, W J

    2004-07-12

    The thermal expansion of AuIn{sub 2} gold is of great interest in soldering technology. Indium containing solders have been used to make gold wire interconnects at low soldering temperature and over time, AuIn{sub 2} is formed between the gold wire and the solder due to the high heat of formation and the high inter-metallic diffusion of indium. Hence, the thermal expansion of AuIn{sub 2} alloy in comparison with that of the gold wire and the indium-containing solder is critical in determining the integrity of the connection. We present the results of x-ray diffraction measurement of the coefficient of linear expansion of AuIn{sub 2} as well as the bulk expansion and density changes over the temperature range of 30 to 500 C.

  12. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  13. New isotopic evidence bearing on bonanza (Au-Ag) epithermal ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, James A.; Mathur, Ryan; Kamenov, George D.; Shimizu, Toru; Brueseke, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    New Cu, S, and Pb isotope data provide evidence for a magmatic source of metal(loid)s and sulfur in epithermal Au-Ag deposits even though their ore-forming solutions are composed primarily of heated meteoric (ground) waters. The apparent isotopic discrepancy between ore metals and ore-forming solutions, and even between the ore and associated gangue minerals, indicates two different sources of epithermal ore-forming constituents: (1) a shallow geothermal system that not only provides the bulk of water for the ore-forming solutions but also major chemical constituents leached from host rocks (silica, aluminum, potassium, sodium, calcium) to make gangue minerals and (2) metals and metalloids (As, Te, Sb, etc.) and sulfur (±Se) derived from deeper magma bodies. Isotopic data are consistent with either vapor-phase transport of metal(loids) and sulfur and their subsequent absorption by shallow geothermal waters or formation of metallic (Au, Ag, Cu phases) nanoparticles at depth from magmatic fluids prior to encountering the geothermal system. The latter is most consistent with ore textures that indicate physical transport and aggregation of nanoparticles were significant ore-forming processes. The recognition that epithermal Au-Ag ores form in tectonic settings that produce magmas capable of releasing metal-rich fluids necessary to form these deposits can refine exploration strategies that previously often have focused on locating fossil geothermal systems.

  14. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  15. Salton sea minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The long-held notion that precious metals, minerals, and other useful substances can be extracted from natural waters is starting to become realized at several locations of geothermal brines. In a recent study by A. Maimoni of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory it was determined that there is a high potential for minerals recovery from the hot brines of a 1000-MWe geothermal power station at the Salton Sea geothermal field in southern California. The study estimated that the revenue from the minerals could substantially exceed that from the power station (Geothermics, 11, 239-258, 1982).According to the study, ‘A 1000-MWe power plant could recover 14-31% of the U.S. demand for manganese.’ In the example of lithium production, such a geothermal plant could produce 5-10 times the annual world output of lithium. Large quantities of lead and zinc could be extracted, as well as significant amounts of gold, platinum, and silver. The chemical composition of the brines is incredibly complex, however, for reasons not currently understood.

  16. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of energetic atom depositions of Au/Au(100) film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-yu, Zhang; Zheng-ying, Pan; Jia-yong, Tang

    1999-04-01

    The energetic atom deposition of thin Au/Au(100) film has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using the Au-Au interatomic interaction potential with embedded atom method. By investigating the variation of coverage curves and Bragg diffraction intensities during the film growth, the transition of Stranski-Kranstanov growth mode to Frank-van der Merwe growth mode was observed with the increase of the incident energy of deposition atoms. The role of energetic atoms in the film growth is discussed by analyzing the transport properties of deposited atoms and the evolution of incident energy and substrate temperatures.

  18. Unravelling Thiol's Role in Directing Asymmetric Growth of Au Nanorod-Au Nanoparticle Dimers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yihan; Liu, Changxu; Shi, Zhan; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Han, Yu

    2016-01-13

    Asymmetric nanocrystals have practical significance in nanotechnologies but present fundamental synthetic challenges. Thiol ligands have proven effective in breaking the symmetric growth of metallic nanocrystals but their exact roles in the synthesis remain elusive. Here, we synthesized an unprecedented Au nanorod-Au nanoparticle (AuNR-AuNP) dimer structure with the assistance of a thiol ligand. On the basis of our experimental observations, we unraveled for the first time that the thiol could cause an inhomogeneous distribution of surface strains on the seed crystals as well as a modulated reduction rate of metal precursors, which jointly induced the asymmetric growth of monometallic dimers.

  19. Counterion-Mediated Assembly of Spherical Nucleic Acid-Au Nanoparticle Conjugates (SNA-AuNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Guerrero-García, Guillermo; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael; Afosr Muri Team

    2015-03-01

    Controlled crystallization of colloids from solution has been a goal of material scientists for decades. Recently, nucleic acid functionalized spherical Au nanoparticles (SNA-AuNPs) have been programmed to assemble in a wide variety of crystal structures. In this approach, the assembly is driven by Watson-Crick hybridization between DNAs coating the AuNPs. Here, we show that counterions can induce ordered assembly of SNA-AuNPs in bulk solutions, even in the absence of base pairing interactions. The electrostatics-driven assembly of spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates (SNA-AuNPs) is probed as a function of counterion concentration and counterion valency [ +1 (Na+) or +2 (Ca2+) ] by in situ solution X-ray scattering. Assemblies of AuNPs capped with single-stranded (ss-) or double-stranded (ds-) DNA are examined. SAXS reveals disordered (gas-like) --> face-centered-cubic (FCC) --> glass-like phase transitions with increasing solution ionic strength. These studies demonstrate how non-base-pairing interactions can be tuned to create crystalline assemblies of SNA-AuNPs. The dependence of the inter-SNA-AuNP interactions on counterion valency and stiffness of the DNA corona will be discussed.

  20. Major issues in miner health.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    1998-01-01

    As recently as the last few decades, thousands of miners died in explosions, roof collapses, fires, and floods each year, and lung disease caused by inhaling mineral dusts was ubiquitous. Miners worked virtually unprotected, and were often treated as expendable bodies fulfilling critical roles in this important industry, which in the United States comprises about 5% of the gross domestic product. PMID:9799195

  1. Kinetics of Phase Transformations in CuAu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, O.; Ludwig, K.

    1997-03-01

    We have performed time resolved x-ray scattering studies of the kinetics of phase transformations in CuAu alloys. The equilibrium phase diagram of CuAu presents two first-order ordering transitions which separate the stability range of a high temperature disordered phase and two ordered phases: CuAuI and CuAuII. CuAuII is a modulated phase having a wavelength ten times larger than CuAuI. Our study focused on the competition between CuAuI and CuAuII as well as on the interaction between order and strain as the lattice changes from cubic in the disordered phase to tetragonal in CuAuI. During CuAuI formation from the disordered phase, CuAuII appears and persists even for quenches deep below the coexistence point of CuAuI and CuAuII. We have also found that the formation of CuAuI from CuAuII is considerably slower than the formation of CuAuI from the disordered phase for equal quench temperatures. Langevin simulations based on EMT are in good qualitative agreement with the x-ray results(Elder, Malis, Ludwig, Chakraborty, Goldenfeld in preparation.). With increasing quench depth we also observe a change in kinetics from an incoherent nucleation process to a continuous transformation of the lattice while ordering.

  2. Minerals yearbook, 1992. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral and materials industry during 1992 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Yearbook volumes follows: Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials, nonrenewable organic materials, and nonferrous metals recycling also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989, 1990, and 1991 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on materials recycling has been initiated in this 1992 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1991. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1991 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Mineral, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials and nonrenewable organic materials also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 and 1990 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on nonferrous metals recycling has been initiated in this 1991 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  4. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  5. Disseminated gold-sulfide mineralization at the Zhaima deposit, eastern Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, K. R.; Kuzmina, O. N.; Dyachkov, B. A.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Naumov, E. A.; Kirillov, M. V.; Annikova, I. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The Zhaima gold-sulfide deposit is located in the northwestern part of the West Kalba gold belt in eastern Kazakhstan. The mineralization is hosted in Lower Carboniferous volcanic and carbonate rocks formed under conditions of marginal-sea and island-arc volcanic activity. The paper considers the mineralogy and geochemistry of primary gold-sulfide ore and Au-bearing weathering crusts. Au-bearing arsenopyrite-pyrite mineralization formed during only one productive stage. Disseminated, stringer-disseminated, and massive rocks are enriched in Ti, Cr, V, Cu, and Ni, which correspond to the mafic profile of basement. The main ores minerals are represented by finely acicular arsenopyrite containing Au (up to few tens of ppm) and cubic and pentagonal dodecahedral pyrite with sporadic submicroscopic inclusions of native gold. The sulfur isotopic composition of sulfides is close to that of the meteoritic standard (δ34S =-0.2 to +0.2). The 40Ar/39Ar age of three sericite samples from ore veinlets corresponds to the Early Permian: 279 ± 3.3, 275.6 ± 2.9, and 272.2 ± 2.9 Ma. The mantle source of sulfur, ore geochemistry, and spatial compatibility of mineralization with basic dikes allow us to speak about the existence of deep fluid-magmatic systems apparently conjugate with the Tarim plume.

  6. Synthesis and crystal structure determination of LaAuO[sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, M.; Jansen, M. )

    1993-08-01

    A new ternary oxide of gold and lanthanum, LaAuO[sub 3], has been prepared from Au[sub 2]O[sub 3] [center dot] 2H[sub 2]O and La(OH)[sub 3] by applying high oxygen pressure and adding aqueous KOH (55%) as a mineralizer. The bright yellow and diamagnetic LaAuO[sub 3] crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system, Pbcm, a = 403.35(7), b = 1307.3(2), c = 569.52(8) pm. Z = 4. The crystal structure (determined from 980 unique reflections with a final R value of 5.7% (R[sub w] = 4.7%)) consists of a grid of cubes formed by the oxygens which are either centered by lanthanum ions or face centered by gold ions. Thus, lanthanum is coordinated eightfold, and gold fourfold, by oxygen. LaAuO[sub 3] may be described as a CaF[sub 2] structure sheared within the (110) plane by half a translational period along [0 0 1].

  7. The geology of aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite group minerals: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2001-03-01

    Aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite supergroup (APS minerals) occur in a wide range of environments of formation covering the metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary realms. Supergene processes, including mineral dressing and dumping when sulphide ores are mined, as well as hypogene alteration are also responsible for the precipitation of APS minerals. In these environments, complex solid solution series (s.s.s.) can form. The general formula of these alunite minerals is AB 3 (XO 4) 2(OH) 6, where A is a large cation (Na, U, K, Ag, NH 4, Pb, Ca, Ba, Sr, REE). B sites are occupied by cations of the elements Al, Fe, Cu and Zn. In nature, the anion (XO 4) x- is dominated by P and S. Mineral dressing and identification of APS minerals often needs a combination of highly sophisticated measures including Atterberg settling methods, XRD, DTA, TGA, TEM-EDX, SEM, EMPA and XRF. In sedimentary rocks APS minerals occur in various rocks and environments of deposition: calcareous, phosphorite-bearing, argillaceous-carbonaceous, arenaceous, coal-bearing environments, in soils and paleosols, in saprolite (bauxites, laterites) and in calcareous-argillaceous sequences hosting Carlin-type SHDG deposits. In igneous rocks, APS minerals may be encountered mainly in acidic through intermediate pyroclastic, volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. They occur in barren volcanic rocks and porphyry-type intrusions that have sparked epithermal Au-Ag-base metal deposits, Au-Sb mineralization, APS-bearing argillite and alunite deposits in their immediate surroundings. Granitic and pegmatitic rocks are rarely host of supergene APS mineralization. During low-grade stage regional metamorphism, peraluminous parent rocks originating from a sedimentary or igneous protolith may also give rise to APS mineralization. Peraluminous parent rocks enriched in S and/or P are a prerequisite for the formation of APS minerals that are stable up to a temperature of 400°C at moderately high fluid pressure of up

  8. Enzymatic mineralization of silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Declercq, Heidi A; Gheysens, Tom; Dendooven, Jolien; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Cornelissen, Ria; Dubruel, Peter; Kaplan, David L

    2014-07-01

    The present study focuses on the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mediated formation of apatitic minerals on porous silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds. Porous SFP scaffolds impregnated with different concentrations of ALP are homogeneously mineralized under physiological conditions. The mineral structure is apatite while the structures differ as a function of the ALP concentration. Cellular adhesion, proliferation, and colonization of osteogenic MC3T3 cells improve on the mineralized SFP scaffolds. These findings suggest a simple process to generate mineralized scaffolds that can be used to enhanced bone tissue engineering-related utility. PMID:24610728

  9. Suppression of ϒ production in d +Au and Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hill, K.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wimsatt, G.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-07-01

    We report measurements of ϒ meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au +Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ϒ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au +Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for ϒ (1 S + 2 S + 3 S) in the rapidity range | y | < 1 in d +Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24 (stat.) ± 0.03 (syst.) ± 0.10 (p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au +Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of RAA = 0.49 ± 0.1 (stat.) ± 0.02 (syst.) ± 0.06 (p + psyst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state ϒ mesons in Au +Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au +Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d +Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au +Au can be made.

  10. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila; Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-05-01

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  11. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  12. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  13. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  14. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  15. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  16. Gold enrichment and the Bi-Au association in pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide deposits, Escanaba trough, Southern Gorda Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tormanen, T.O.; Koski, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    High gold contents (to 10.1 ppm, avg 1.4 ppm, n = 34) occur in pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide samples from the sediment-covered floor of the Escanaba trough, the slow-spreading, southernmost segment of Gorda Ridge. These concentrations reflect the presence of primary gold, formed during high-temperature hydrothermal activity in mounds and chimneys, and secondary gold deposited during sea-floor weathering of massive sulfide. Primary gold occurs as fine-grained (2 ??m) secondary gold grains have a porous, flaky morphology and occur in samples in which pyrrhotite is oxidized and replaced by Fe oxyhydroxides, Fe sulfate, and sulfur. Mounds and chimneys dominated by pyrrhotite and containing lesser amounts of isocubanite, chalcopyrite, and Fe-rich sphalerite were formed by high-temperature (estimated range 325??-275??C), reduced, low-sulfur vent fluids. The mineral and fluid compositions during this main stage of hydrothermal venting reflect subsurface interaction between circulating hydrothermal fluids and turbiditic sediment containing as much as 1.1 percent organic carbon. As the deposition of pyrrhotite, Cu-Fe sulfides, and sphalerite waned, a volumetrically minor suite of sulfarsenide, arsenide, Bi, and Au minerals was deposited from highly reduced, late main-stage fluids diffusing through mounds and chimneys. The low solubility of Au as a bisulfide complex and the absence of fluid mixing during this stage of hydrothermal activity apparently inhibited the precipitation of gold directly from solution. Instead, gold precipitation is thought to be linked to elevated concentrations of Bi in the late main-stage fluids. The textural relationships of Au and Bi minerals in pyrrhotite-rich samples, low melting point of native bismuth (271.4??C), and recent experimental results on Au and Bi in hydrothermal fluids contribute to the hypothesis that gold was effectively scavenged from the Escanaba trough vent fluids by coexisting droplets of liquid bismuth. Additional phase

  17. Water, mineral waters and health.

    PubMed

    Petraccia, Luisa; Liberati, Giovanna; Masciullo, Stefano Giuseppe; Grassi, Marcello; Fraioli, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    The authors focus on water resources and the use of mineral waters in human nutrition, especially in the different stages of life, in physical activity and in the presence of some morbid conditions. Mineral water is characterized by its purity at source, its content in minerals, trace elements and other constituents, its conservation and its healing properties recognized by the Ministry of Health after clinical and pharmacological trials. Based on total salt content in grams after evaporation of 1l mineral water dried at 180 degrees C (dry residues), mineral waters can be classified as: waters with a very low mineral content, waters low in mineral content, waters with a medium mineral content, and strongly mineralized waters. Based on ion composition mineral waters can be classified as: bicarbonate waters, sulfate waters, sodium chloride or saltwater, sulfuric waters. Based on biological activity mineral waters can be classified as: diuretic waters, cathartic waters, waters with antiphlogistic properties. Instructions for use, doses, and current regulations are included.

  18. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  19. Subaqueous environment and volcanic evolution of the Late Cretaceous Chelopech Au-Cu epithermal deposit, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, Isabelle; Moritz, Robert

    2014-12-01

    A detailed field and petrographic study constrains the volcanic evolution and environment setting of the volcano-sedimentary-hosted Chelopech Cu-Au epithermal deposit, Bulgaria. Magmatic activity and associated high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization occurred at about 91 Ma in the Panagyurishte ore district of the Eastern European Banat-Timok-Srednogorie metallogenic belt. Volcanic and hydrothermal activity took place in a complex subaqueous setting, resulting in the intercalation of quartz sandstone with andesitic volcanic and volcaniclastic breccia. There are also hypabyssal andesite intrusion, phreatomagmatic breccia and interbeds of pyroclastic, oolithic and bioclastic rocks. The presence of altered cerebroid ooid-bearing sedimentary units characteristic of salty environment is in accordance with a lagoon environment predating the mineralization at Chelopech. Four principal stages of evolution for the Chelopech district are proposed based on field and petrographic observations. Initial volcanism occurred in a lake or in a coastal, shallow lagoon environment above crystalline basement. The Chelopech "phreatomagmatic" breccia and subsurface andesites were emplaced at this time. Subsequent hydrothermal activity produced the different hydrothermal breccia types, advanced argillic and quartz-phyllic alteration, and Au-Cu vein and replacement mineralization. The end of volcanism and hydrothermal activity was associated with opening of a pull-apart basin that covered the Chelopech environment with a sedimentary flysch. Tertiary compression faulting juxtaposed various rocks and tilted the ore deposit during the Alpine orogeny.

  20. Hearing protection for miners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.

    2008-10-15

    A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  1. Mineral industries of the USSR - 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The report discusses mainly the mineral industries in the USSR, with a small section included concerning the mineral industries of Poland. Topics discussed include labor, foreign trade, metals, non-metallic minerals, and mineral fuels.

  2. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  3. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura; Su, Dangshen; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  4. The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

    2013-04-01

    The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

  5. Adsorbate-modified Electron Relaxation in Au-Au_2S Nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, Sarah; Averitt, Richard; Wolfgang, John; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi

    2001-03-01

    Au-Au_2S nanoshells are 50 nm nanoparticles consisting of an Au_2S core encapsulated by a thin (<5 nm) Au shell. Their optical properties are determined by the metallic shell layer, whose inner and outer radii control plasmon frequency and whose thickness determines plasmon linewidth[1]. We studied the time-resolved relaxation of hot electrons in the Au shell, using degenerate pump-probe spectroscopy. The electron relaxation for nanoshells in solution was appreciably slower than relaxation for bulk gold, moreover, adsorbed molecules on the nanoshell surface strongly modify this relaxation. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the molecules providing the strongest modification of relaxation possess the largest induced dipole moments above a metal surface, indicating that the adsorbate-induced perturbation of the nanoshell electron dynamics appears to be primarily electronic in nature. [1] R. D. Averitt, D. Sarkar and N. J. Halas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4217 (1997).

  6. Odd-Even Pattern Observed in Polyaniline/(Au0 – Au8) Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jonke, Alex P.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Janata, Jiri

    2012-01-12

    Theoretically predicted effect of odd-even pattern of electron pairing on behavior of gold clusters in polyaniline/AuN (N = 0 to 8) has been confirmed experimentally. In these composites the atomic Au clusters with even number of atoms exhibit higher catalytic activity for electrochemical oxidation of n-propanol in 1 M NaOH than the odd-number atoms clusters. Also, infrared spectroscopy shows that even numbered PANI/AuN composites affect the N-H stretching vibration more strongly than the corresponding odd numbered ones. This behavior matches the theoretically predicted variations of HOMO-LUMO gap energy and the stability of the atomic Au clusters. It also agrees with the earlier experimental work in which the UPS spectra of isolated, mass-selected Au clusters have been reported.

  7. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  8. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2013-08-01

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (π±, K±, p, p¯) produced in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to pT=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to pT=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate pT region, between 2 and 5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon-to-meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The pT-dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

  9. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Novelo, T.E.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Maldonado, R.D.; Oliva, A.I.; Alonzo-Medina, G.M.

    2015-03-15

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} and Au{sub 3}Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au{sub 3}Cu and Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation.

  10. Mercury contamination in agricultural soils from abandoned metal mines classified by geology and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sik; Jung, Myung Chae

    2012-01-01

    This survey aimed to compare mercury concentrations in soils related to geology and mineralization types of mines. A total of 16,386 surface soils (0~15 cm in depth) were taken from agricultural lands near 343 abandoned mines (within 2 km from each mine) and analyzed for Hg by AAS with a hydride-generation device. To meaningfully compare mercury levels in soils with geology and mineralization types, three subclassification criteria were adapted: (1) five mineralization types, (2) four valuable ore mineral types, and (3) four parent rock types. The average concentration of Hg in all soils was 0.204 mg kg(-1) with a range of 0.002-24.07 mg kg(-1). Based on the mineralization types, average Hg concentrations (mg kg(-1)) in the soils decreased in the order of pegmatite (0.250) > hydrothermal vein (0.208) > hydrothermal replacement (0.166) > skarn (0.121) > sedimentary deposits (0.045). In terms of the valuable ore mineral types, the concentrations decreased in the order of Au-Ag-base metal mines ≈ base metal mines > Au-Ag mines > Sn-W-Mo-Fe-Mn mines. For parent rock types, similar concentrations were found in the soils derived from sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks followed by heterogeneous rocks with igneous and metamorphic processes. Furthermore, farmland soils contained relatively higher Hg levels than paddy soils. Therefore, it can be concluded that soils in Au, Ag, and base metal mines derived from a hydrothermal vein type of metamorphic rocks and pegmatite deposits contained relatively higher concentrations of mercury in the surface environment.

  11. Mercury contamination in agricultural soils from abandoned metal mines classified by geology and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sik; Jung, Myung Chae

    2012-01-01

    This survey aimed to compare mercury concentrations in soils related to geology and mineralization types of mines. A total of 16,386 surface soils (0~15 cm in depth) were taken from agricultural lands near 343 abandoned mines (within 2 km from each mine) and analyzed for Hg by AAS with a hydride-generation device. To meaningfully compare mercury levels in soils with geology and mineralization types, three subclassification criteria were adapted: (1) five mineralization types, (2) four valuable ore mineral types, and (3) four parent rock types. The average concentration of Hg in all soils was 0.204 mg kg(-1) with a range of 0.002-24.07 mg kg(-1). Based on the mineralization types, average Hg concentrations (mg kg(-1)) in the soils decreased in the order of pegmatite (0.250) > hydrothermal vein (0.208) > hydrothermal replacement (0.166) > skarn (0.121) > sedimentary deposits (0.045). In terms of the valuable ore mineral types, the concentrations decreased in the order of Au-Ag-base metal mines ≈ base metal mines > Au-Ag mines > Sn-W-Mo-Fe-Mn mines. For parent rock types, similar concentrations were found in the soils derived from sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks followed by heterogeneous rocks with igneous and metamorphic processes. Furthermore, farmland soils contained relatively higher Hg levels than paddy soils. Therefore, it can be concluded that soils in Au, Ag, and base metal mines derived from a hydrothermal vein type of metamorphic rocks and pegmatite deposits contained relatively higher concentrations of mercury in the surface environment. PMID:21814815

  12. Two types of noble metal mineralization in the Kaalamo massif (Karelia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Ruchyev, A. M.; Golubev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Noble metal mineralization of the syngenetic (Southern Kaalamo) and epigenetic (Surisuo) types are defined in the Kaalamo massif. The ƩPt, Pd, Au content is as high as 0.9-1.1 g/t. Syngenetic mineralization started at the late magmatic stage (at around 800°C) gradually evolving to cease during the hydrothermal-metasomatic stage (<271°C). Epigenetic mineralization was formed at temperatures ranging from 500 to <230°C in zones of intense shear deformations and low-temperature metasomatosis during the collisional stage of the Svecofennian tectono-magmatic cycle (approximately 1.85 Ga ago). Taking into consideration the geological position of the Kaalamo massif in the Raakhe-Ladoga metallogenic zone with widely developed intense shear dislocations, the epigenetic mineralization type seems to be more promising with respect to noble metals.

  13. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and

  14. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  17. Au-loaded TiO2 and Ag-loaded TiO2 synthesized by modified sol-gel/impregnation method as photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninsonti, Hathaithip; Sriwichai, Saengrawee; Wetchakun, Natda; Kangwansupamonkon, Wiyong; Phanichphant, Sukon

    2016-02-01

    In this work, Au-loaded TiO2 and Ag-loaded TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by modified sol-gel method together with impregnation method. The samples were characterized by their physicochemical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to obtain the correlation between structure and photocatalytic properties. XRD results indicated unloaded TiO2, Au-loaded TiO2 and Ag-loaded TiO2 nanoparticles were all in the anatase phase with average crystallite size in the range of 10-13 nm. In addition, XPS analysis confirmed the presence of Au and Ag elements in Au-loaded TiO2 and Ag-loaded TiO2 nanoparticles, respectively. The photocatalytic activities of TiO2, Au-loaded TiO2 and Ag-loaded TiO2 nanoparticles were evaluated through the mineralization of formic acid under UV-light illumination. The results showed that Au-loading and Ag-loading could effectively improve the photocatalytic activities of TiO2. Furthermore, Au-loaded TiO2 exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than Ag-loaded TiO2.

  18. A velocity map imaging study of gold-rare gas complexes: Au-Ar, Au-Kr, and Au-Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, W. Scott; Woodham, Alex P.; Plowright, Richard J.; Wright, Timothy G.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2010-06-01

    The ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the gold-rare gas atom van der Waals complexes (Au-RG, RG=Ar, Kr, and Xe) have been studied by velocity map imaging. Photofragmentation of Au-Ar and Au-Kr at several wavelengths permits extrapolation to zero of the total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra as monitored in the Au(P23/2∘[5d106p]) fragment channel, facilitating the determination of ground state dissociation energies of D0″(Au-Ar)=149±13 cm-1 and D0″(Au-Kr)=240±19 cm-1, respectively. In the same spectral region, transitions to vibrational levels of an Ω'=1/2 state of the Au-Xe complex result in predissociation to the lower Au(P21/2∘[5d106p])+Xe(S10[5p6]) fragment channel for which TKER extrapolation yields a value of D0″(Au-Xe)=636±27 cm-1. Asymmetric line shapes for transitions to the v'=14 level of this state indicate coupling to the Au(P23/2∘[5d106p])+Xe(S10[5p6]) continuum, which allows us to refine this value to D0″(Au-Xe)=607±5 cm-1. The dissociation dynamics of this vibrational level have been studied at the level of individual isotopologues by fitting the observed excitation spectra to Fano profiles. These fits reveal a remarkable variation in the predissociation dynamics for different Au-Xe isotopologues. For Au-Ar and Au-Xe, the determined ground state dissociation energies are in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations; the agreement of the Au-Kr value with theory is less satisfactory.

  19. Microelectrophoresis of selected mineral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, B. J.; Tipps, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Particle mobilities of ilmenite, labradorite plagioclase, enstatite pyroxene, and olivine were measured with a Rank microelectrophoresis system to evaluate indicated mineral separability. Sodium bicarbonate buffer suspension media with and without additives (0.0001 M DTAB and 5 percent v/v ethylene glycol) were used to determine differential adsorption by mineral particles and modification of relative mobilities. Good separability between some minerals was indicated; additives did not enhance separability.

  20. Mineral Time Capsules on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Like dinosaur-age insects trapped in amber, biomolecules sequestered in million-year-old sulfate minerals could provide a glimpse into the past, say researchers who've recently analyzed such minerals from N orth America. The same minerals have recently been discovered on Mars , so they may be a good place to look for traces of past life on the red planet, the researchers say.

  1. [Preventing cardiovascular risk in miners].

    PubMed

    Lipatova, L V; Izmailova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results concerning usage of intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners with cardiovascular diseases. After cardiovascular state assessment, the miners at high cardiovascular risk were subjected to prophylactic procedures with traditional medical treatment added by intravenous laser therapy. Findings are anti-arrhythmic, antihypertensive, antiatherogenic and anti-aggregation effects of complex treatment with intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners at high cardiovascular risk and its subsequent decrease due to treatment. PMID:27265943

  2. Lithogeochemistry of mineralized and altered rock samples from the northern Talkeetna Mountains, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, Thomas D.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralized and altered rock samples collected from the northern Talkeetna Mountains, Alaska, were analyzed by two different inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) methods for as many as 44 elements; by fire assay and either direct-coupled plasma (DCP) or atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) for gold (Au); by cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) for mercury (Hg); and by irradiated neutron activation analysis (INAA) for tungsten (W). The analytical results showed that some samples contain high values of multiple elements and may be potential indicators of hydrothermal mineralization in the area.

  3. Antiproton distributions in Au+nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, D.; Debbe, R.; Bennett, M.J.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, B.S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Carroll, J.B.; Hallman, T.J.; Chiba, J.; Tanaka, K.H.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C.; Doke, T.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Hayano, R.S.; Heckman, H.H.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Welsh, R.C.

    1997-09-01

    Experiment E878 at the BNL-AGS has measured the invariant cross sections of antiprotons produced near p{sub t}=0 in interactions of 10.8 GeV/c Au beams with targets of Al, Cu, and Au. The data were measured for a wide range of centralities and rapidities using a focusing beamline spectrometer and a high-rate centrality detector. We compare our data with the predictions of simple models and sophisticated transport models to explore the physics of antiproton production and annihilation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance of Au/SnO2 by Modification with Ag and Cu for Photoinduced Reactions under Visible-Light Irradiation over a Wide Range.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Hashimoto, Keiji; Kominami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-18

    Gold particles supported on tin(IV) oxide (0.2 wt% Au/SnO2) were modified with copper and silver by the multistep photodeposition method. Absorption around λ=550 nm, attributed to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au, gradually shifted to longer wavelengths on modification with Cu and finally reached λ=620 nm at 0.8 wt% Cu. On the other hand, the absorption shifted to shorter wavelength with increasing amount of Ag and reached λ=450 nm at 0.8 wt% Ag. These Cu- and Ag-modified 0.2 wt% Au/SnO2 materials (Cu-Au/SnO2 and Ag-Au/SnO2) and 1.0 wt% Au/SnO2 were used for mineralization of formic acid to carbon dioxide in aqueous suspension under irradiation with visible light from a xenon lamp and three kinds of light-emitting diodes with different wavelengths. The reaction rates for the mineralization of formic acid over these materials depend on the wavelength of light. Apparent quantum efficiencies of Cu-Au/SnO2, Au/SnO2, and Ag-Au/SnO2 reached 5.5% at 625 nm, 5.8% at 525 nm, and 5.1% at 450 nm, respectively. These photocatalysts can also be used for selective oxidation of alcohols to corresponding carbonyl compounds in aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. Broad responses to visible light in formic acid mineralization and selective alcohol oxidation were achieved when the three materials were used simultaneously.

  5. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  6. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  7. Thermodynamic properties of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.

    1962-01-01

    In the ten years since the publication of the national Bureau of Standards comprehensive tables of thermochemical properties, by Rossini and other (1952), a very large body of modern calorimetric and equilibrium data has become available. Because of the complex interrelations among many thermochemical data and the necessity for internal consistency among these values, a complete revision of this standard reference is required. This is also true of the summaries of thermochemical data for the sulfides (Richardson and Jeffes 1952) and for the oxides (Coughlin 1954). The following tables present critically selected values for the heat and free energy of formation, the logarithm of the equilibrium constant of formation Log Kf, the entropy and the molar volume, at 298.15°K (25.0°C) and one atmosphere for minerals.

  8. Mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Eggenstein, F.; Plester, K.

    1980-10-14

    A mineral mining installation comprises a longwall structure, such as a conveyor or a winning installation, and a roof support assembly constituted by a plurality of roof support units positioned side-by-side. At least some of the roof support units are provided with hydraulic bracing rams for bracing the longwall structure longitudinally. Each bracing ram is pivotally connected between the longwall structure and the floor sill of a respective roof support unit. Each ram is connected to its floor sill by connection means constituted by a bracket slidably mounted on that floor sill for movement towards, and away from, the longwall structure. Means are provided for securing each of the brackets to its floor sill in any one of a plurality of positions.

  9. Pneumoconiosis of shale miners.

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, A; Lamb, D; Brown, W R; Sclare, G; Middleton, W G

    1981-01-01

    Four patients are described in whom pneumoconiosis was diagnosed towards the end of a lifetime's work in shale mines. All developed complicated pneumoconiosis, diagnosed in two cases at necropsy, in one by lobectomy, and in one radiologically. Two of the patients were found at necropsy also to have peripheral squamous lung cancer.The clinical and histological features of the disease resembled the pneumoconioses of coalminers and kaolin workers and the lungs of three of the patients were shown to contain dust composed predominantly of kaolinite, mica, and silica. Shale miners' complicated pneumoconiosis has not previously been described. Although the British shale industry is now defunct, oil production from shale is expanding in other countries, notably the USA. It is suggested that control should be exercised over dust exposure levels in this industry and that epidemiological studies should be carried out to quantify the risks of both pneumoconiosis and bronchial carcinoma. Images PMID:7314011

  10. Marine Mineral Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Fren N.

    This book is the forty-first in the Elsevier Oceanography Series, and with it the series has come full circle. Its first title, published in 1964, was John Mero's landmark study The Mineral Resources of the Sea [Mero, 1964]. Looking back at that first major treatise and comparing it with this and other recent books on the topic [e.g., Teleki et al., 1987] one cannot help but be impressed with how well Mero used the sparse data and studies that had been put together by his time. Twenty-two years and many millions of dollars later a substantial mining-oriented base of knowledge has been built — we know much more about the economics and the engineering — yet the basic premises and conclusions that Mero assembled are still intact, and answers to the fundamental questions (e.g., formation processes for manganese nodules) are not in much better condition than they were then.

  11. The role of interfaces in the magnetoresistance of Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Enders, A.; Monchesky, T. L.; Myrtle, K.; Urban, R.; Heinrich, B.; Kirschner, J.; Zhang, X.-G.; Butler, W. H.

    2001-06-01

    The electron transport and magnetoresistance (MR) were investigated in high quality crystalline epitaxial Fe(001) and Au(001) films and exchange coupled Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) trilayer structures. Fits to the experimental data were based on the semiclassical Boltzmann equation, which incorporates the electronic properties obtained from first-principles local density functional calculations. The fits require a surprisingly high asymmetry for the spin dependent electron lifetimes in Fe, {tau}{sup {down_arrow}}/{tau}{sup {up_arrow}}=10 at room temperature. Despite the large atomic terraces at the Au/vacuum and Fe/GaAs interfaces the scattering at the outer interfaces was found to be diffuse. The origin of MR in Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) structures is due to electron channeling in the Au spacer layer. The measured MR is consistent with the diffusivity parameters s{sup {up_arrow}}=0.55, s{sup {down_arrow}}=0.77 at the metal{endash}metal interfaces. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Minerals Bill introduced in House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A bill that aims to strengthen a national minerals policy and to establish a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of this policy was introduced in the House of Representatives on April 30 by James D. Santini (D-Nev.). Entitled the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), the legislation, if passed, also would amend tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic minerals; it would provide the means for the Secretary of the Interior to make withdrawn public lands available for mineral development; and it would create a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals.Santini estimates that 4 billion tons of minerals are needed annually to sustain the nation's economy. Much of the minerals are supplied by other nations, however; Santini wants to see an end to the United States' dependence on foreign countries, especially those that seem relatively unstable politically. ‘The U.S. has placed its national security in the hands of a few foreign nations,’ Santini said in a recent press conference. ‘We are heavily dependent on the region of southern Africa for 76% of our cobalt, 93% of our platinum, 48% of our chromium, and a host of other strategic and critical minerals. Without these minerals, we cannot build jet aircraft, weapons, or other military hardware vitally important to our national security.’

  13. Robust Au-Ag-Au bimetallic atom-scale junctions fabricated by self-limited Ag electrodeposition at Au nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tai-Wei; Bohn, Paul W

    2011-10-25

    Atom-scale junctions (ASJs) exhibit quantum conductance behavior and have potential both for fundamental studies of adsorbate-mediated conductance in mesoscopic conductors and as chemical sensors. Electrochemically fabricated ASJs, in particular, show the stability needed for molecular detection applications. However, achieving physically robust ASJs at high yield is a challenge because it is difficult to control the direction and kinetics of metal deposition. In this work, a novel electrochemical approach is reported, in which Au-Ag-Au bimetallic ASJs are reproducibly fabricated from an initially prepared Au nanogap by sequential overgrowth and self-limited thinning. Applying a potential across specially prepared Au nanoelectrodes in the presence of aqueous Ag(I) leads to preferential galvanic reactions resulting in the deposition of Ag and the formation of an atom-scale junction between the electrodes. An external resistor is added in series with the ASJ to control self-termination, and adjusting solution chemical potential (concentration) is used to mediate self-thinning of junctions. The result is long-lived, mechanically stable ASJs that, unlike previous constructions, are stable in flowing solution, as well as to changes in solution media. These bimetallic ASJs exhibit a number of behaviors characteristic of quantum structures, including long-lived fractional conductance states, that are interpreted to arise from two or more quantized ASJs in series.

  14. Fabrication of segmented Au/Co/Au nanowires: insights in the quality of Co/Au junctions.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bumjin; Pellicer, Eva; Guerrero, Miguel; Chen, Xiangzhong; Choi, Hongsoo; Nelson, Bradley J; Sort, Jordi; Pané, Salvador

    2014-08-27

    Electrodeposition is a versatile method, which enables the fabrication of a variety of wire-like nanoarchitectures such as nanowires, nanorods, and nanotubes. By means of template-assisted electrodeposition, segmented Au/Co/Au nanowires are grown in anodic aluminum oxide templates from two different electrolytes. To tailor the properties of the cobalt segments, several electrochemical conditions are studied as a function of current density, pulse deposition, and pH. The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties are accordingly investigated. Changes in the deposition conditions affect the cobalt electrocrystallization process directly. Cobalt tends to crystallize mainly in the hexagonal close-packed structure, which is the reason cobalt might not accommodate satisfactorily on the face-centered cubic Au surface or vice versa. We demonstrate that by modifying the electrolyte and the applied current densities, changes in the texture and the crystalline structure of cobalt lead to a good quality connection between dissimilar segments. In particular, lowering the bath pH, or using pulse plating at a high overpotential, produces polycrystalline fcc Co and thus well-connected Co/Au bimetallic junctions with smooth interface. These are crucial factors to be carefully considered taking into account that nanowires are potential building blocks in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:25025496

  15. Multiple Mesozoic mineralization events in South China—an introduction to the thematic issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui-Zhong; Zhou, Mei-Fu

    2012-08-01

    Mesozoic mineral deposits in South China include world-class deposits of W, Sn and Sb and those that provide the major sources of Ta, Cu, Hg, As, Tl, Pb, Zn, Au and Ag for the entire country. These deposits can be classified into polymetallic hydrothermal systems closely related to felsic intrusive rocks (Sn-W -Mo granites, Cu porphyries, polymetallic and Fe skarns, and polymetallic vein deposits) and low-temperature hydrothermal systems with no direct connection to igneous activities (MVT deposits, epithermal Au and Sb deposits). Recent studies have shown that they formed in the Triassic (Indosinian), Jurassic-Cretaceous (Early Yanshanian), and Cretaceous (Late Yanshanian) stages. Indosinian deposits include major MVT (Pb-Zn-Ag) deposits and granite-related W-Sn deposits. Early Yanshanian deposits are low-temperature Sb-Au and high-temperature W-Sn and Cu porphyry types. Many Late Yanshanian deposits are low-temperature Au-As-Sb-Hg and U deposits, and also include high-temperature W-Sn polymetallic deposits. The formation of these deposits is linked with a specific tectonothermal evolution and igneous activities. This special issue brings together some of the latest information in eight papers that deal with the origins and tectonic environments of mineral deposits formed in these stages. We anticipate that this issue will stimulate more interests in these ore deposits in South China.

  16. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  17. Facile Syntheses of Monodisperse Ultra-Small Au Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Bertino, Massimo F.; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Lai S.

    2006-11-02

    During our effort to synthesize the tetrahedral Au20 cluster, we found a facile synthetic route to prepare monodisperse suspensions of ultra-small Au clusters AuN (N<12) using diphosphine ligands. In our monophasic and single-pot synthesis, a Au precursor ClAu(I)PPh3 and a bidentate phosphine ligand P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 (Ph = phenyl) are dissolved in an organic solvent. Au(I) is reduced slowly by a borane-tert-butylamine complex to form Au clusters coordinated by the diphosphine ligand. The Au clusters are characterized by both high resolution mass spectrometry and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the mean cluster size obtained depends on the chain length M of the ligand. In particular, a single monodispersed Au11 cluster is obtained with the P(Ph)2(CH2)3P(Ph)2 ligand, whereas P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 ligands with M = 5 and 6 yield Au10 and Au8 clusters. The simplicity of our synthetic method makes it suitable for large-scale production of nearly monodisperse ultrasmall Au clusters. It is suggested that diphosphines provide a set of flexible ligands to allow size-controlled synthesis of Au nanoparticles.

  18. Mineral Detector for Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, S. T.; Hart, S. D.; Gulick, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a Raman spectral analysis tool that uses machine learning algorithms to classify pure minerals in igneous rocks. Experiments show greater than 90% accuracy classifying a test set of pure minerals against a database of similar reference minerals using an artificial neural network. Efforts are currently underway to improve this tool for use as a mineral detector in rock samples, an important milestone toward autonomously classifying rocks based on spectral, and previous imaging work. Although pure mineral classification has been widely successful, applying the same methods to rocks is difficult because the spectra may represent a combination of multiple, and often competing, mineral signatures. In such cases some minerals may appear with more intensity than others resulting in masking of weaker minerals. Furthermore, with our particular spectrometer (852 nm excitation, ~50 micron spot size), minerals such as potassium feldspar fluoresce, both obscuring its characteristic Raman features and suppressing those of weaker minerals. For example, plagioclase and quartz, two key minerals for determining the composition of igneous rocks, are often hidden by minerals such as potassium feldspar and pyroxene, and are consequently underrepresented in the spectral analysis. These technicalities tend to skew the perceived composition of a rock from its actual composition. Despite these obstacles, an experiment involving a training set of 26 minerals (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz) and a test set of 57 igneous rocks (basalt, gabbro, andesite, diorite, dacite, granodiorite, rhyolite, granite) shows that generalizations derived from their spectral data are consistent with expected trends: as rock composition goes from felsic to mafic there is a marked increase in the detection of minerals such as plagioclase and pyroxene along with a decrease in the detection of minerals such as quartz and potassium feldspar. The results suggest that phaneritic

  19. Suppression of Upsilon production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV (vol 735, pg 127, 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Gliske, S.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.

    2014-07-30

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Υ (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Aucollisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Υ mesons in Au + Aucollisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  20. Nanoporous Au: an unsupported pure gold catalyst?

    SciTech Connect

    Wittstock, A; Neumann, B; Schaefer, A; Dumbuya, K; Kuebel, C; Biener, M; Zielasek, V; Steinrueck, H; Gottfried, M; Biener, J; Hamza, A; B?umer, M

    2008-09-04

    The unique properties of gold especially in low temperature CO oxidation have been ascribed to a combination of various effects. In particular, particle sizes below a few nm and specific particle-support interactions have been shown to play important roles. On the contrary, recent reports revealed that monolithic nanoporous gold (npAu) prepared by leaching a less noble metal, such as Ag, out of the corresponding alloy can also exhibit remarkably high catalytic activity for CO oxidation, even though no support is present. Therefore, it was claimed to be a pure and unsupported gold catalyst. We investigated npAu with respect to its morphology, surface composition and catalytic properties. In particular, we studied the reaction kinetics for low temperature CO oxidation in detail taking mass transport limitation due to the porous structure of the material into account. Our results reveal that Ag, even if removed almost completely from the bulk, segregates to the surface resulting in surface concentrations of up to 10 at%. Our data suggest that this Ag plays a significant role in activation of molecular oxygen. Therefore, npAu should be considered as a bimetallic catalyst rather than a pure Au catalyst.

  1. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  2. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  3. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  4. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  5. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  6. Nitrogen mineralization in production agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the effects of N management and how it relates to the N cycle in soil ecosystems is essential to determining N availability. This manuscript describes the importance of N mineralization to production agriculture and introduces a special issue on “N Mineralization in Production Agricult...

  7. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger.

  8. Plant macro- and micronutrient minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All plants must obtain a number of inorganic mineral elements from their environment to ensure successful growth and development of both vegetative and reproductive tissues. A total of fourteen mineral nutrients are considered to be essential. Several other elements have been shown to have beneficia...

  9. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  10. From Mountain Men to Miners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert L.; Fogel, Jared A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines three of the changes wrought by coal mining: (1) the miner's working conditions; (2) the establishment of company towns; and (3) the violence that ensued when miners from Harlan County, Kentucky, referred to as "Bloody Harlan," tried to better their lives by joining labor unions. (CMK)

  11. Mineral Resources and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of panels created by the Committee on Mineral Resources and the Environment (COMRATE) to study four topic areas of mineral resources and the environment. The topic areas studied by the panels were: technology, supply, the environment, and demand. Section I, the report of the technology panel,…

  12. 76 FR 6110 - Conflict Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... FR 80948 (December 23, 2010)]. The original comment period for Release No. 34-63547 is scheduled to... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 229 and 249 RIN 3235-AK84 Conflict Minerals AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... 1934 (the ``Exchange Act'') and would require any such issuer for which conflict minerals are...

  13. Investigating Minerals: Promoting Integrated Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rudi; Carmack, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    "Mineral Detectives!" is one of eighteen lessons in the "Private Whys?" integrated science unit, which uses a guided inquiry investigation to teach students in grades three through five about the role of minerals in our lives. The University of North Texas developed "Private Whys?" with funding from the Copper Development Association. This lesson…

  14. Electron transmission characteristics of Au/1,4-benzenedithiol/Au junctions.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, K; Tsutsui, M; Kurokawa, S; Sakai, A

    2009-01-14

    Electron transmission through individual 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules bridging between two gold electrodes (Au/BDT/Au junctions) has been studied by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Measurements were made at room temperature on three junction states of conductance 0.005G(0), 0.01G(0), and 0.1G(0), respectively, where G(0) is the quantum unit of conductance. All I-V curves are linear around zero bias and nonlinearly increase upward for biases above approximately 0.2 V. Absence of plateaus in the observed I-V characteristics up to +/- 1 V indicates that the electron transmission spectrum of Au/BDT/Au has no peaks within +/- 0.5 eV from the Fermi level.

  15. High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

  16. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Density Distributions from Au+Au Collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.

    2001-09-03

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} has been measured for Au+Au collisions at s{sub NN}=130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most-central Au+Au collisions for |{eta}|{<=}5.4 is found to be 4200{+-}470 . The evolution of dN{sub ch}/d{eta} with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at midrapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  17. Systematics of Global Observables in Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2006-07-11

    Charged particles produced in Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 and 62.4 GeV have been measured in the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The comparison of the results for Cu+Cu and Au+Au for the most central collisions at the same energy reveals that the particle density per nucleon participant pair and the extended longitudinal scaling behavior are similar in both systems. This implies that for the most central events in symmetric nucleus-nucleus collisions the particle density per nucleon participant pair does not depend on the size of the two colliding nuclei but only on the collision energy. Also the extended longitudinal scaling seems independent of the colliding energy and species for central collisions. In addition, there is an overall factorization of dNch/d{eta} shapes as a function of collision centraliry between Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at the same energy.

  18. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu to UU collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloczynski, John; Huang, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Xilin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-07-01

    We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation with the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.

  19. Ex situ aqueous mineral carbonation.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, Stephen J; O'Connor, William K; Dahlin, David C; Penner, Larry R; Rush, Hank

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO2 to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of approximately $69/ton of CO2 sequestered was improved with process improvements to $54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring 55 000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO2 emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical.

  20. Ex Situ Aqueous Mineral Carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Penner, L.R.; Rush, G.E.

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO2 to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of ~$69/ton of CO2 sequestered was improved with process improvements to ~$54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring ~55 000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO2 emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical.

  1. Ex situ aqueous mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; William K. O'Connor; David C. Dahlin; Larry R. Penner; Hank Rush

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, OR (formerly the Albany Research Center) has studied ex situ mineral carbonation as a potential option for carbon dioxide sequestration. Studies focused on the reaction of Ca-, Fe-, and Mg-silicate minerals with gaseous CO{sub 2} to form geologically stable, naturally occurring solid carbonate minerals. The research included resource evaluation, kinetic studies, process development, and economic evaluation. An initial cost estimate of about $69/ton of CO{sub 2} sequestered was improved with process improvements to about 54/ton. The scale of ex situ mineral carbonation operations, requiring about 55,000 tons of mineral to carbonate, the daily CO{sub 2} emissions from a 1-GW, coal-fired power plant, may make such operations impractical. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Mineral Physicochemistry based Geoscience Products for Mapping the Earth's Surface and Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laukamp, C.; Cudahy, T.; Caccetta, M.; Haest, M.; Rodger, A.; Western Australian Centre of Excellence3D Mineral Mapping

    2011-12-01

    Mineral maps derived from remotes sensing data can be used to address geological questions about mineral systems important for exploration and mining. This paper focuses on the application of geoscience-tuned multi- and hyperspectral sensors (e.g. ASTER, HyMap) and the methods to routinely create meaningful higher level geoscience products from these data sets. The vision is a 3D mineral map of the earth's surface and subsurface. Understanding the physicochemistry of rock forming minerals and the related diagnostic absorption features in the visible, near, mid and far infrared is a key for mineral mapping. For this, reflectance spectra obtained with lab based visible and infrared spectroscopic (VIRS) instruments (e.g. Bruker Hemisphere Vertex 70) are compared to various remote and proximal sensing techniques. Calibration of the various sensor types is a major challenge with any such comparisons. The spectral resolution of the respective instruments and the band positions are two of the main factors governing the ability to identify mineral groups or mineral species and compositions of those. The routine processing method employed by the Western Australian Centre of Excellence for 3D Mineral Mapping (http://c3dmm.csiro.au) is a multiple feature extraction method (MFEM). This method targets mineral specific absorption features rather than relying on spectral libraries or the need to find pure endmembers. The principle behind MFEM allows us to easily compare hyperspectral surface and subsurface data, laying the foundation for a seamless and accurate 3-dimensional mineral map. The advantage of VIRS techniques for geoscientific applications is the ability to deliver quantitative mineral information over multiple scales. For example, C3DMM is working towards a suite of ASTER-derived maps covering the Australian continent, scheduled for publication in 2012. A suite of higher level geoscience products of Western Australia (e.g. AlOH group abundance and composition) are now

  3. Some thoughts on di-jet correlation in Au + Au collisions from PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Jiangyong

    2006-07-11

    PHENIX has measured the two particle azimuth correlation in Au + Au at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV. Jet shape and yield at the away side are found to be strongly modified at intermediate and low pT, and the modifications vary dramatically with pT and centrality. At high pT, away side jet peak reappears but the yield is suppressed. We discuss the possible physics pictures leading to these complicated modifications.

  4. Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-08-19

    Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays.

  5. Moon's Pink Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.; Taylor, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 2010 remote-sensing discovery of lunar regolith rich in Mg-Al spinel on the rims and central peaks of impact craters and inner rings of basins on the Moon, researchers have been designing experiments to better understand the origin and formation history of spinel-rich rocks and what they mean for the construction of the lunar crust. The newly detected rock type is referred to as pink spinel anorthosite, or PSA, due to high plagioclase and low abundance (<5%) of mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. Two recent studies tested specific hypotheses of PSA production on the Moon. Juliane Gross (American Museum of Natural History and the Lunar and Planetary Institute, LPI) and colleagues at the LPI, University of Hawaii, and NASA Johnson Space Center conducted experiments to model the crystallization of spinel in impact melts from impact events. Tabb Prissel (Brown University) and colleagues from Brown conducted experiments to model a plutonic formation of spinel from magma-wallrock interactions. In each study, comparisons of the remote sensing data with Apollo lunar samples or lunar meteorites were crucial for testing the PSA formation hypotheses with the experimental results. Definitive answers aren't in yet. PSA could form from impact melting of the right target rocks. Equally likely is PSA formation by reaction of basaltic magma and crust. One big unknown is the effect space weathering has in determining the amount of spinel in the PSA..

  6. Universal ripper miner

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  7. Mineral evolution of bone.

    PubMed

    Ravaglioli, A; Krajewski, A; Celotti, G C; Piancastelli, A; Bacchini, B; Montanari, L; Zama, G; Piombi, L

    1996-03-01

    A study on the evolution with age of the mineral composition of bones was performed on samples belonging to human and other common mammalian species (cattle, sheep, dog). The study was carried out on the ashes obtained by calcination of the bone samples (1 h at 900 degrees C). The calcined powders were carefully examined by X-ray diffraction, from which precise quantitative evaluation (also confirmed by chemical analysis) of the crystalline phases present was derived. These data were analysed as a function of the introduced fractional age phi, a new relative scale that allows even largely different lifespan species to be compared. An overall linear increase in (Ca + Mg)/P ratio with log phi was found and the other considerations on molecular constitution (especially as regards Mg2+ substituting for Ca2+ in very young subjects) of the various phases detected were formulated and relative implications evaluated. The results appear promising for an improvement of knowledge in the field of biomedical experimentation and clinical implantology.

  8. Mineral Commodity Profiles: Selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Brown, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Selenium, which is one of the chalcogen elements in group 16 (or 6A) of the periodic table, is a semiconductor that is chemically similar to sulfur for which it substitutes in many minerals and synthetic compounds. It is a byproduct of copper refining and, to a much lesser extent, lead refining. It is used in many applications, the major ones being a decolorizer for glass, a metallurgical additive to free-machining varieties of ferrous and nonferrous alloys, a constituent in cadmium sulfoselenide pigments, a photoreceptor in xerographic copiers, and a semiconductor in electrical rectifiers and photocells. Refined selenium amounting to more than 1,800 metric tons (t) was produced by 14 countries in 2000. Japan, Canada, the United States, and Belgium, which were the four largest producers, accounted for nearly 85 percent of world production. An estimated 250 t of the world total is secondary selenium, which is recovered from scrapped xerographic copier drums and selenium rectifiers; the selenium in nearly all other uses is dissipated (not recoverable as waste or scrap). The present selenium reserve bases for the United States and the world (including the United States), which are associated with copper deposits, are expected to be able to satisfy demand for selenium for several decades without difficulty.

  9. Evidence of Significant Covalent Bonding in Au(CN)2-

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; wang, Yi-Lei; Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiaopeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai S.

    2009-11-18

    There have been intense recent interests in the homogeneous catalytic chemistry of Au(I) complexes.1 Among the Au(I) molecules, the Au(CN)2- ion is the most stable and has been widely used in gold extraction back to ancient times. Although AuCN in the condensed phase has been studied, including solution phase vibrational spectroscopy2 and crystal structures,3 the free AuCN molecule has been studied only very recently by microwave spectroscopy.4 The important Au(CN)2- complex has not been observed and studied in the gas phase. Because of the relativistic effects,5 Au-containing molecules exhibit distinctly different properties among the coinage elements. To elucidate the nature of the Au-ligand binding, high-level ab initio calculations are needed due to the complicated electron correlation and relativistic effects.6-8 The structure and bonding of the AuCN molecule were first examined computationally by Frenking and co-workers.7 Recent high-precision calculations by Pyykkö and co-workers suggest multiple-bond characters between Au-C in AuCN because the Au-C bond length is only slightly longer than the sum of the triple bond covalent radii.

  10. The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-H.; Wang, D.-C.; Chen, G.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.

    2008-03-01

    The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl4- and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Oxidation of Cu-Au Alloy Surfaces: Effect of Bulk Au Concentration.

    PubMed

    Okada, Michio; Tsuda, Yasutaka; Oka, Kohei; Kojima, Kazuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the oxidation of Cu-Au alloy surfaces, viz., Cu3Au(111), CuAu(111), and Au3Cu(111), using hyperthermal O2 molecular beam (HOMB). We observed strong Au segregation to the top layer of the corresponding clean (111) surfaces. This forms a protective layer that hinders further oxidation into the bulk. The higher the concentration of Au in the protective layer formed, the higher the protective efficacy. As a result, of the three Cu-Au surfaces studied, Au3Cu(111) is the most stable against dissociative adsorption of O2, even with HOMB. We also found that this protective property breaks down for oxidations occurring at temperatures above 300 K. PMID:27516137

  12. Bonding, Luminescence, Metallophilicity in Linear Au3 and Au2Ag Chains Stabilized by Rigid Diphosphanyl NHC Ligands.

    PubMed

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Carrara, Serena; De Cola, Luisa; Tobon, Yeny; Giovanella, Umberto; Botta, Chiara; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The heterofunctional and rigid ligand N,N'-diphosphanyl-imidazol-2-ylidene (PCNHCP; P = P(t-Bu)2), through its phosphorus and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors, stabilizes trinuclear chain complexes, with either Au3 or AgAu2 cores, and dinuclear Au2 complexes. The two oppositely situated PCNHCP (L) ligands that "sandwich" the metal chain can support linear and rigid structures, as found in the known tricationic Au(I) complex [Au3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 (OTf = CF3SO3; [Au3L2](OTf)3; Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 103-105) now also obtained by transmetalation from [Ag3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Ag3L2](OTf)3), or in the mixed-metal tricationic [Au2Ag(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Au2AgL2](OTf)3). The latter was obtained stepwise by the addition of AgOTf to the digold(I) complex [Au2(μ2-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC)2](OTf)2 ([Au2L2](OTf)2). The latter contains two dangling P donors and displays fluxional behavior in solution, and the Au···Au separation of 2.8320(6) Å in the solid state is consistent with metallophilic interactions. In the solvento complex [Au3Cl2(tht)(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)](OTf)·MeCN ([Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN), which contains only one L and one tht ligand (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the metal chain is bent (148.94(2)°), and the longer Au···Au separation (2.9710(4) Å) is in line with relaxation of the rigidity due to a more "open" structure. Similar features were observed in [Au3Cl2(SMe2)L](OTf)·2MeCN. A detailed study of the emission properties of [Au3L2](OTf)3, [Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN, [Au2L2](OTf)2, and [Au2AgL2](OTf)3 was performed by means of steady state and time-resolved photophysical techniques. The complex [Au3L2](OTf)3 displays a bright (photoluminescence quantum yield = 80%) and narrow emission band centered at 446 nm with a relatively small Stokes' shift and long-lived excited-state lifetime on the microsecond timescale, both in solution and in the solid state. In line with the very narrow emission

  13. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions atsqrt sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-10-06

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for {radical}sNN = 200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y| < 0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Oxidation of Cu-Au Alloy Surfaces: Effect of Bulk Au Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Michio; Tsuda, Yasutaka; Oka, Kohei; Kojima, Kazuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the oxidation of Cu-Au alloy surfaces, viz., Cu3Au(111), CuAu(111), and Au3Cu(111), using hyperthermal O2 molecular beam (HOMB). We observed strong Au segregation to the top layer of the corresponding clean (111) surfaces. This forms a protective layer that hinders further oxidation into the bulk. The higher the concentration of Au in the protective layer formed, the higher the protective efficacy. As a result, of the three Cu-Au surfaces studied, Au3Cu(111) is the most stable against dissociative adsorption of O2, even with HOMB. We also found that this protective property breaks down for oxidations occurring at temperatures above 300 K. PMID:27516137

  15. Bonding, Luminescence, Metallophilicity in Linear Au3 and Au2Ag Chains Stabilized by Rigid Diphosphanyl NHC Ligands.

    PubMed

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Carrara, Serena; De Cola, Luisa; Tobon, Yeny; Giovanella, Umberto; Botta, Chiara; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The heterofunctional and rigid ligand N,N'-diphosphanyl-imidazol-2-ylidene (PCNHCP; P = P(t-Bu)2), through its phosphorus and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors, stabilizes trinuclear chain complexes, with either Au3 or AgAu2 cores, and dinuclear Au2 complexes. The two oppositely situated PCNHCP (L) ligands that "sandwich" the metal chain can support linear and rigid structures, as found in the known tricationic Au(I) complex [Au3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 (OTf = CF3SO3; [Au3L2](OTf)3; Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 103-105) now also obtained by transmetalation from [Ag3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Ag3L2](OTf)3), or in the mixed-metal tricationic [Au2Ag(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Au2AgL2](OTf)3). The latter was obtained stepwise by the addition of AgOTf to the digold(I) complex [Au2(μ2-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC)2](OTf)2 ([Au2L2](OTf)2). The latter contains two dangling P donors and displays fluxional behavior in solution, and the Au···Au separation of 2.8320(6) Å in the solid state is consistent with metallophilic interactions. In the solvento complex [Au3Cl2(tht)(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)](OTf)·MeCN ([Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN), which contains only one L and one tht ligand (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the metal chain is bent (148.94(2)°), and the longer Au···Au separation (2.9710(4) Å) is in line with relaxation of the rigidity due to a more "open" structure. Similar features were observed in [Au3Cl2(SMe2)L](OTf)·2MeCN. A detailed study of the emission properties of [Au3L2](OTf)3, [Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN, [Au2L2](OTf)2, and [Au2AgL2](OTf)3 was performed by means of steady state and time-resolved photophysical techniques. The complex [Au3L2](OTf)3 displays a bright (photoluminescence quantum yield = 80%) and narrow emission band centered at 446 nm with a relatively small Stokes' shift and long-lived excited-state lifetime on the microsecond timescale, both in solution and in the solid state. In line with the very narrow emission

  16. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral... Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Only § 57.5070 Miner training. (a) Mine operators must provide annual training to all miners at a mine covered by this part who...

  17. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  18. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  19. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  20. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  1. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  2. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  3. 43 CFR 3815.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3815.1 Section 3815.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Stock Driveway Withdrawals § 3815.1 Mineral locations. Under authority of the provisions of...

  4. 43 CFR 3816.1 - Mineral locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral locations. 3816.1 Section 3816.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Mineral Locations in Reclamation Withdrawals § 3816.1 Mineral locations. The Act of April 23, 1932 (47 Stat. 136;...

  5. Characteristics of Mineralized Volcanic Centers in Javanese Sunda Island Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setijadji, L. D.; Imai, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2007-05-01

    The subduction-related arc magmatism in Java island, Sunda Arc, Indonesia might have started in earliest Tertiary period, but the distinctively recognizable volcanic belts related with Java trench subduction occurred since the Oligocene. We compiled geoinformation on volcanic centers of different epochs, distribution of metallic mineral deposits, petrochemistry of volcanic rocks, geologic structures, and regional gravity image in order to elucidate characteristics of the known mineralized volcanic centers. Metallic deposits are present in various styles from porphyry-related, high-sulfidation, and low-sulfidation epithermal systems; all related with subaerial volcanism and subvolcanic plutonism. Only few and small occurrences of volcanigenic massive sulfides deposits suggest that some mineralization also occurred in a submarine environment. Most locations of mineral deposits can be related with location of Tertiary volcanic centers along the volcanic arcs (i.e. volcanoes whose genetic link with subduction is clear). On the other side there is no mineralization has been identified to occur associated with backarc magmatism whose genetic link with subduction is under debate. There is strong evidence that major metallic deposit districts are located within compressive tectonic regime and bound by coupling major, deep, and old crustal structures (strike-slip faults) that are recognizable from regional gravity anomaly map. So far the most economical deposits and the only existing mines at major industry scale are high-grade epithermal gold deposits which are young (Upper Miocene to Upper Pliocene), concentrated in Bayah dome complex in west Java, and are associated with alkalic magmatism-volcanism. On the other hand, known porphyry Cu-Au deposits are associated with old (Oligocene to Upper Miocene) stocks, and except for one case, all deposits are located in east Java. Petrochemical data suggest a genetic relationship between porphyry mineralization with low- to

  6. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

  7. Slab melting and the origin of gold in Au and Au-Cu deposits: geochemical clues from recent adakites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polve, M.; Maury, R.; Joron, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    Understanding the genetic processes responsible for the common occurrence of Au and Au-Cu deposits in subduction environments is a fairly "hot" question nowadays, as it is clear that most subduction-related magmatic rocks are barren. Studies of space and time relationships between magmatic intrusions, hydrothermal episodes and Au deposits have shown that, very often, Au deposits are associated with adakitic intrusions (Thieblemont et al, 1997, Sajona and Maury, 1998). Adakites are here understood as being generated by melting of the subducting oceanic crust. This study aims to check wether or not magmas derived from melted oceanic crust do contain significantly more Au than regular calc-alkaline magmas by measuring directly Au concentrations in fresh (and barren) adakites and equivalent calc-alkaline andesites. There is a lack of reliable data on Au content in unaltered adakites and andesites, because Au analyses are generally done on hydrothermalized rocks in connection with Au deposits and also because old measurements may give overestimated Au contents, due to technical limitations. Therefore we compiled recent literature data on gold contents of fresh calc-alkaline rocks, and measured Au on a selection of 40 well studied and dated adakites from different localities (Philippines, Baja California). Analyses have been performed either by INAA or by ICP-MS after Au extraction with aqua regia, following the method described by Terashima (1988). Preliminary results show that, for equivalent Si02 contents, adakites are systematically enriched in Au compared to regular dacites, even if regional trends also exist. Moreover, Au seems to behave as an incompatible element in adakitic magmas, whereas in calc-alkaline dacites it is controlled by sulfide crystallization. Our data suggest that, not excluding any other processes related to the hydrothermal phase in the deposit generation, adakites may indeed represent the source of Au, a possible explanation for the adakite-Au

  8. USGS exploration geochemistry studies at the Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska-pdf of presentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Kelley, Karen D.; Fey, David L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Minsley, Burke J.; Smith, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    From 2007 through 2010, scientists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been conducting exploration-oriented geochemical and geophysical studies in the region surrounding the giant Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska. The Cretaceous Pebble deposit is concealed under tundra, glacial till, and Tertiary cover rocks, and is undisturbed except for numerous exploration drill holes. These USGS studies are part of a nation-wide research project on evaluating and detecting concealed mineral resources. This report focuses on exploration geochemistry and comprises illustrations and associated notes that were presented as a case study in a workshop on this topic. The workshop, organized by L.G. Closs and R. Glanzman, is called 'Geochemistry in Mineral Exploration and Development,' presented by the Society of Economic Geologists at a technical conference entitled 'The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Integrative Exploration and New Discoveries,' held at Keystone, Colorado, October 2-5, 2010.

  9. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  10. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  11. The large Bystrinskoe Cu-Au-Fe deposit (Eastern Trans-Baikal Region): Russia's first example of a skarn-porphyry ore-forming system related to adakite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenker, V. A.; Abramov, S. S.; Kiseleva, G. D.; Krylova, T. L.; Yazykova, Yu. I.; Bortnikov, N. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Bystrinskoe skarn-porphyry Cu-Au-Fe deposit (Eastern Trans-Baikal Region) is confined to skarn zones, which were formed along the contact of granitoids referred to the Shakhtama intrusive complex (J2-3), with terrigenous-carbonate sedimentary rocks. Commercial (Cu-Au-Fe ± W, Mo) mineralization was formed due to the regional postcollision development involving the intrusion of porphyritic granitoids, the derivatives of oxidized adakite highly magnesian magmas enriched in water, sulfur, and metals, which could develop under melting of garnet-bearing amphibolite in the mafic lower crustal arc.

  12. Re-Os isotopic and trace element compositions of pyrite and origin of the Cretaceous Jinchang porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Heilongjiang Province, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Huang, Xiao-Wen; Cui, Bin; Wang, Bo-Chao; Yin, Yi-Fan; Wang, Jing-Rui

    2016-11-01

    The Jinchang Cu-Au deposit in Northeast China contains more than 76 tons of Au and 4683 tons of Cu with average ore grades of 11.34 g/t Au and 1.44% Cu. The deposit is typical of porphyry types and consists of gold orebodies mainly hosted in a ∼113 Ma granitic porphyry and breccia pipes within the porphyry intrusion. Mineralization is closely associated with early potassic alteration and late phyllic alteration. Pyrite is the main Au-bearing mineral and contains 1.48-18.9 ppb Re and 11.4-38 ppt common Os. Extremely low common Os concentrations and high Re/Os ratios are indicative of derivation of ore-forming materials from the crust. Low Re in pyrite from the Jinchang deposit may indicate a mixing source of mantle and crust or a crustal source. Five Re-Os isotopic analyses yield a model 1 isochron age of 114 ± 22 Ma (2σ, MSWD = 0.15), similar to the age of the host porphyry. Pyrite contains detectable Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Au, Sb, Pb and Bi. Pyrite has Co/Ni ratios similar to that of volcanogenic and hydrothermal sulfide deposits, indicating a magmatic-hydrothermal origin, and has Au and As contents similar to that of porphyry-epithermal systems. Pyrite grains from potassic and phyllic alteration stages have different trace element contents, reflecting the evolution of ore-forming fluids from magmatic dominated to magmatic mixed with meteoric water. In combination with regional geology, our new results are suggestive of origin of the Jinchang Cu-Au deposit from contemporary intrusions of granitic porphyries related to the Early Cretaceous subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate.

  13. The mineral disorders in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Linshaw, M; Aigbe, M; Kaskel, F

    1998-05-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role that metals/minerals play in health and disease. Minerals contribute in essential ways to the fundamental biochemical and physiological functions of cells. Deficit of an essential mineral leads to aberrations in cell function. Alternatively, minerals in excess have significant toxicity, and in an era of increasing threat to a safe environment, the potential for toxic tissue injury to contribute to progressive renal insufficiency and ultimately to unexplained renal failure remains a major concern. This review provides information on selected minerals that are attracting growing attention with respect to their influence on renal function in health and disease. Although all minerals have the potential to cause toxicity if consumed in sufficient quantity, most are essential nutrients whose deficiency is associated with significant health problems. Certain minerals, including aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury are considered toxic. Their suggested positive effects on the health of animals has been recently summarized, but in humans they are not currently known to exert any clearly beneficial biological or biochemical effect.

  14. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  15. BET Measurements: Outgassing of Minerals.

    PubMed

    Clausen; Fabricius

    2000-07-01

    Outgassing minerals at elevated temperatures prior to BET measurements can lead to phase changes, especially in the case of amorphous and poorly crystalline materials. In order to evaluate the applicability of the BET method when low outgassing temperatures are required, selected aquifer minerals were outgassed at different temperatures and for different times. The studied minerals are 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, quartz, calcite, alpha-alumina, and kaolinite. The results demonstrate that measured specific surface areas of iron oxides are strongly dependent on outgassing conditions because the surface area increased by 170% with increasing temperature. In the poorly crystalline minerals, phase changes caused by heating were observed at temperatures lower than 100 degrees C. Therefore low outgassing temperatures are preferable for minimizing phase changes. As demonstrated in this study, stable BET values can be obtained by increasing the outgassing time without heating iron oxides. For quartz, calcite, alpha-alumina, and kaolinite, stable BET values were obtained after outgassing the minerals at 100 to 250 degrees C for 2 h. However, outgassing these minerals at room temperature (20 degrees C) only resulted in minor errors, implying that aquifer sediments containing poorly crystalline materials can be outgassed at low temperatures if the outgassing time is increased. Scanning electron microscopy of the studied minerals demonstrated that the particle size as calculated from BET data compares well with particle size observed by scanning electron microscopy images. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Mineral Commodity Profiles -- Rubidium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Reese, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- Rubidium is a soft, ductile, silvery-white metal that melts at 39.3 ?C. One of the alkali metals, it is positioned in group 1 (or IA) of the periodic table between potassium and cesium. Naturally occurring rubidium is slightly radioactive. Rubidium is an extremely reactive metal--it ignites spontaneously in the presence of air and decomposes water explosively, igniting the liberated hydrogen. Because of its reactivity, the metal and several of its compounds are hazardous materials, and must be stored and transported in isolation from possible reactants. Although rubidium is more abundant in the earth?s crust than copper, lead, or zinc, it forms no minerals of its own, and is, or has been, produced in small quantities as a byproduct of the processing of cesium and lithium ores taken from a few small deposits in Canada, Namibia, and Zambia. In the United States, the metal and its compounds are produced from imported raw materials by at least one company, the Cabot Corporation (Cabot, 2003). Rubidium is used interchangeably or together with cesium in many uses. Its principal application is in specialty glasses used in fiber optic telecommunication systems. Rubidium?s photoemissive properties have led to its use in night-vision devices, photoelectric cells, and photomultiplier tubes. It has several uses in medical science, such as in positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging, the treatment of epilepsy, and the ultracentrifugal separation of nucleic acids and viruses. A dozen or more other uses are known, which include use as a cocatalyst for several organic reactions and in frequency reference oscillators for telecommunications network synchronization. The market for rubidium is extremely small, amounting to 1 to 2 metric tons per year (t/yr) in the United States. World resources are vast compared with demand.

  17. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  18. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  19. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  20. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    DOE PAGES

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squaredmore » Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  1. Fragrance sensitivity in coal miners.

    PubMed

    Goodfield, M J; Saihan, E M

    1988-02-01

    In a prospective study, we have examined the incidence of fragrance sensitivity in Nottinghamshire coal miners. Our results confirm previous reports of an increased incidence of such sensitivity in miners (45%) when compared with both male (20%) and female (13%) non-miners. This increased incidence is not related to an increased use of perfumed cosmetics, but may be related to the use of a highly perfumed body lotion in subjects who already have a high incidence of irritant hand eczema. There was no significant increase in the rate of positive reactions to other applied allergens.

  2. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Nižná Boca Sb-Au Hydrothermal Ore Deposit (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Pršek, Jaroslav; Chovan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Samples from hydrothermal Sb-Au mineralization in the area SE of Nižná Boca village in the N&iAzke Tatry Mountains were investigated using a variety of geochemical and mineralogical methods. Ore minerals typically occur in N-S striking quartz-carbonate veins hosted by an I-type biotite granodiorite to tonalite of Variscan Age (the Ďumbier Type). Paragenetic associations in the deposit are comparable to other mineralizations of the same type in the Ďumbierske Nízke Tatry Mountains. A quartz-arsenopyrite, pyrite stage of mineralization is the oldest with a calculated temperature of formation of about 445°C. It is followed by a quartz-carbonate-stibnite, zinkenite stage and, in turn, a quartz-carbonate-sphalerite-galena, boulangerite-gold stage. The gold typically contains between 9-18 wt.% Ag regardless of mineral association. No evidence for further generations of gold was found although it is possible that some gold was remobilized from the structure of the auriferous arsenopyrite. The Au and Ag content of the bulk ore ranges from 0.53 g.t-1 to 20.2 g.t-1 and from 0.9 g.t-1 to 31.2 g.t-1, respectively. A tetrahedrite-chalcopyrite stage is followed by a barite-hematite stage - the youngest assemblage in the deposit. Fluid inclusions from the first mineralization stage are usually less than 3 μm in size and contain less than 3.6 wt.% CO2; salinity, density and homogenization temperature range from 2.7-16.3 wt.% NaCl(eq), 0.85-1.03 g.cm-1 and 128-280°C, respectively.

  3. Fe impurities weaken the ferromagnetic behavior in Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Crespo, P; García, M A; Fernández Pinel, E; Multigner, M; Alcántara, D; de la Fuente, J M; Penadés, S; Hernando, A

    2006-10-27

    In this Letter, we report on a crucial experiment showing that magnetic impurities reduce the ferromagnetic order temperature in thiol-capped Au glyconanoparticles (GNPs). The spontaneous magnetization of AuFe GNPs exhibits a fast decrease with temperature that contrasts with the almost constant value of the magnetization observed in Au NPs. Moreover, hysteresis disappears below 300 K. Both features indicate that Fe impurities reduce the high local anisotropy field responsible for the ferromagnetic behavior in Au GNPs. As a consequence, the amazing ferromagnetism in Au NPs should not be associated with the presence of magnetic impurities.

  4. Enhanced spin pumping at yttrium iron garnet/Au interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Burrowes, C.; Heinrich, B.; Kardasz, B.; Montoya, E. A.; Girt, E.; Sun Yiyan; Song, Young-Yeal; Wu Mingzhong

    2012-02-27

    Spin injection across the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au interface was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The spin mixing conductance was determined by comparing the Gilbert damping parameter {alpha} in YIG/Au and YIG/Au/Fe heterostructures. The main purpose of this study was to correlate the spin pumping efficiency with chemical modifications of the YIG film surface using in situ etching and deposition techniques. By means of Ar{sup +} ion beam etching, one is able to increase the spin mixing conductance at the YIG/Au interface by a factor of 5 compared to the untreated YIG/Au interface.

  5. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Locatable Minerals AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... approved information collection, Locatable Minerals-36 CFR part 228, subpart A. DATES: Comments must be... entry to the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tony Ferguson, Director, Minerals and...

  6. Mineral Losses During Extreme Environmental Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advisory groups that make recommendations for mineral intakes continue to identify accurate determinations of sweat mineral losses during physical activity as a critical void in their deliberations. Although estimates of sweat mineral concentrations are available, they are highly variable. Practica...

  7. Ore mineralogy of the Serra Pelada Au-Pd-Pt deposit, Carajás, Brazil and implications for ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, Gabriel V.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Lobato, Lydia M.; Wall, Vic

    2016-08-01

    Serra Pelada is a world-class hydrothermal Au-Pd-Pt deposit located at the eastern border of the Amazon craton, northern Brazil. The rocks at Serra Pelada have experienced intense tropical weathering for about 70 Ma, but drill core samples preserve the primary mineralogy and hydrothermal alteration features, with extreme grades of Au, Pd and Pt individually reaching hundreds of parts per million (ppm) by weight. Mineralization at Serra Pelada occurs in hydrothermally altered metasiltstones and dolomitic metasandstones at the hinge zone of a recumbent syncline, comprising zones of hematite, chlorite-carbon, argillic, and siliceous alteration. The main hydrothermal gangue minerals are quartz, kaolinite, sericite, amesite, hematite, monazite, florencite and variable amounts of highly reflective carbonaceous matter. Hydrothermal carbon input is evident from precipitated carbon occurring along crenulation planes and veinlets associated with the precious metals. Ore and accessory minerals include a variety of sulphide, selenide, arsenide, sulphate and oxide minerals, including gold with variable metal contents, palladian gold, fischesserite, sudovikovite, sperrylite, selenian braggite, isomertieite, mertieite-II and secondary Au-Pt-Pd alloys. The composition of fischesserite varies from the ideal formula (Ag3AuSe2) towards a more Ag-rich composition, indicating a disordered solid solution form that is stable only above 260 °C, consistent with the high thermal maturity of associated carbonaceous matter approaching graphite. Primary ore and gangue minerals at Serra Pelada comprise a suite of elements that are best transported in oxidising conditions and precipitated upon reduction. This suggests that fluid mixing between a highly oxidised (metal carrier) and a reduced fluid was a key process for high-grade noble metal precipitation at Serra Pelada.

  8. Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

    2009-10-29

    The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

  9. Geological development and mineralization in the Atacama segment of the South American Andes, northern Chile (26°15' 27°25'S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Carlos M.; Townley, Brian C.; Lahsen, Alfredo A.; Egaña, Antonio M.

    1993-12-01

    Between the Late Jurassic and the Middle Miocene, widespread magmatism, tectonic events and hydrothermal mineralization characterized the geological evolution of the Atacama segment of the South American Andes. A characteristic feature of this zone is the coincidence in time and space between subduction-generated igneous activity, crustal deformation and mineralization in the magmatic arcs, which formed longitudinal belts migrating eastward. Mineralization in the last 140 Ma is generally restricted to four longitudinal metallogenic belts, in which hydrothermal activity was channelled along crustal-scale faults (1) the Atacama Fault System, along which Early Cretaceous Cu-Au-bearing breccia pipes, veins and stockwork were formed; (2) the Inca do Oro Belt, which contains Upper Cretaceous low sulphur precious metal epithermal mineralization, and Middle Eocene Cu-Mo-Au-bearing breccia pipes; (3) the West Fissure System, which hosts Upper Eocene to Early Oligocene porphyry copper deposits and high sulphur precious metal epithermal mineralization; and (4) the Maricunga Belt, when contains Upper Oligocene to Middle Miocene high sulphur precious metal epithermal deposits and Au-rich porphyry mineralization.

  10. Metallogeny of precious and base metal mineralization in the Murchison Greenstone Belt, South Africa: indications from U-Pb and Pb-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaguin, J.; Poujol, M.; Boulvais, P.; Robb, L. J.; Paquette, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    The 3.09 to 2.97 Ga Murchison Greenstone Belt is an important metallotect in the northern Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa), hosting several precious and base metal deposits. Central to the metallotect is the Antimony Line, striking ENE for over 35 km, which hosts a series of structurally controlled Sb-Au deposits. To the north of the Antimony Line, hosted within felsic volcanic rocks, is the Copper-Zinc Line where a series of small, ca. 2.97 Ga Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS)-type deposits occur. New data are provided for the Malati Pump gold mine, located at the eastern end of the Antimony Line. Crystallizations of a granodiorite in the Malati Pump Mine and of the Baderoukwe granodiorite are dated at 2,964 ± 7 and 2,970 ± 7 Ma, respectively (zircon U-Pb), while pyrite associated with gold mineralization yielded a Pb-Pb age of 2,967 ± 48 Ma. Therefore, granodiorite emplacement, sulfide mineral deposition and gold mineralization all happened at ca. 2.97 Ga. It is, thus, suggested that the major styles of orogenic Au-Sb and the Cu-Zn VMS mineralization in the Murchison Greenstone Belt are contemporaneous and that the formation of meso- to epithermal Au-Sb mineralization at fairly shallow levels was accompanied by submarine extrusion of felsic volcanic rocks to form associated Cu-Zn VMS mineralization.

  11. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Kokh, Konstantin A.; Bakakin, Vladimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag2-xAuxSe with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag2Se - Ag1.94Au0.06Se, fischesserite Ag3AuSe2 - Ag3.2Au0.8Se2 and gold selenide AuSe - Au0.94Ag0.06Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe.

  12. Bactericidal mechanisms of Au@TNBs under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lingqiao; Shan, Chao; Liang, Jialiang; Ni, Jinren; Tong, Meiping

    2015-04-01

    Au@TNBs nanocomposites were synthesized by depositing Au nanoparticles onto the surfaces of TiO2 nanobelts (TNBs). The disinfection activities of Au@TNBs on model cell type, Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), were examined under visible light irradiation conditions. Au@TNBs exhibited stronger bactericidal properties toward E. coli than those of TNBs and Au NPs under visible light irradiation. The bactericidal mechanisms of Au@TNBs under light conditions were explored, specifically, the specific active species controlling the inactivation of bacteria were determined. Active species (H2O2, diffusing ∙OH, ∙O2-, 1O2, and e-) generated by Au@TNBs were found to play important roles on the inactivation of bacteria. Moreover, the concentrations of H2O2, ·OH, ·O2-, and 1O2 generated in the antimicrobial system were estimated. Without the presence of active species, the direct contact of Au@TNBs with bacterial cells was found to have no bactericidal effect. The reusability of Au@TNBs were also determined. Au@TNBs exhibited strong antibacterial activity toward E. coli even in five consecutively reused cycles. This study indicated that the fabricated Au@TNBs could be potentially utilized to inactivate bacteria in water.

  13. Monolithic Nanocrystalline Au Fabricated by the Compaction of Nanoscale Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Biener, J; Hsiung, L M; Hamza, A V; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-07-28

    We describe a two-step dealloying/compaction process to produce nanocrystalline Au. First, nanocrystalline/nanoporous Au foam is synthesized by electrochemically-driven dealloying. The resulting Au foams exhibit porosities of 60 and 70% with pore sizes of {approx} 40 and 100 nm, respectively, and a typical grain size of <50 nm. Second, the nanoporous foams are fully compacted to produce nanocrystalline monolithic Au. The compacted Au was characterized by TEM and X-ray diffraction and tested by depth-sensing nanoindentation. The compacted nanocrystalline Au exhibits an average grain size of <50 nm and hardness values ranging from 1.4 to 2.0 GPa, which are up to 4.5 times higher than the hardness values obtained from polycrystalline Au.

  14. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Řezanka, P.; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Kasálková, N.; Hubáček, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-03-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  15. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  16. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  17. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  18. Tunable VO2/Au hyperbolic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayakarao, S.; Mendoza, B.; Devine, A.; Kyaw, C.; van Dover, R. B.; Liberman, V.; Noginov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is known to have a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition at ˜68 °C. Therefore, it can be used as a tunable component of an active metamaterial. The lamellar metamaterial studied in this work is composed of subwavelength VO2 and Au layers and is designed to undergo a temperature controlled transition from the optical hyperbolic phase to the metallic phase. VO2 films and VO2/Au lamellar metamaterial stacks have been fabricated and studied in electrical conductivity and optical (transmission and reflection) experiments. The observed temperature-dependent changes in the reflection and transmission spectra of the metamaterials and VO2 thin films are in a good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The demonstrated optical hyperbolic-to-metallic phase transition is a unique physical phenomenon with the potential to enable advanced control of light-matter interactions.

  19. Fabrication of a chitosan/glucose oxidase-poly(anilineboronic acid)-Au(nano)/Au-plated Au electrode for biosensor and biofuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Qin, Xiaoli; Li, Zou; Fu, Yingchun; Qin, Cong; Wu, Feng; Su, Zhaohong; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Hu, Jiming

    2012-01-15

    Enzyme immobilization is one of the key factors in constructing high-performance enzyme biosensors and biofuel cells (BFCs). Herein, we propose a new protocol for efficient immobilization of a glycoprotein enzyme based on the interaction of the 1, 2- or 1, 3-diols in the glycoprotein with a boronic acid functionalized monomer. Briefly, casting a mixture of glucose oxidase (GOx) and anilineboronic acid (ABA) followed by a NaAuCl(4) solution to an Au-plated Au electrode surface yielded a GOx-poly(ABA) (PABA)-gold nanoparticle (Au(nano)) bionanocomposite, and chitosan (CS) was then cast and air-dried. In the present protocol, the small-sized Au(nano) or Au subnanostructures can form near/on the enzyme molecule, which greatly promotes the electron transfer of enzymatic reaction and enhances the amperometric responses. The thus-prepared CS/GOx-PABA-Au(nano)/Au-plated Au electrode worked well in the first-/second generation biosensing modes and as a bioanode in a monopolar biofuel cell, with analytical or cell-power performance superior to those of most analogues hitherto reported. PMID:22099959

  20. Mineral and water nutrition.

    PubMed

    Beede, D K

    1991-07-01

    In providing minerals to dairy cattle it is important to distinguish between dietary requirements and feeding recommendations. The requirement is the absolute amount of an element needed to meet the animal's metabolic needs for maintenance, growth, pregnancy, and lactation divided by the coefficient of absorption; this is estimated by the factorial method. Actual estimates of requirements for lactating dairy cattle have been determined for Ca and P. The major difficulties in relying on the requirement estimate are that dry matter intake varies and the true absorption coefficient of the mixture of feeds in the ration generally is unknown. Therefore, feeding recommendations, based on feeding graded concentrations of an element, often offer more applicable information. With the exception of Ca and P, the current feeding recommendations for the other macrominerals, Mg, Na, K, Cl and S, have resulted from feeding trials. With certain environmental and physiologic situations the feeding recommendations may vary. For example, during heat stress the dietary K recommendation for the lactating cow should be higher than in cool weather because of increased sweating and decreased feed intake. Another example may be that the source of supplemental Mg may affect what dietary inclusion rate will yield optimal performance and should be recommended. An important consideration in dairy ration formulation in the future will address the interrelationships of the various macrominerals. There is accumulating evidence that shows that different concentrations of Na, Cl, and K may interrelate and affect lactational performance. Many times the naturally occurring concentrations of one or more of these elements may have to be associated with varying concentrations of the others in order to optimize animal performance and health. Much experimentation likely will examine these interrelationships in the future. Supplementation of trace elements in diets of dairy cattle is common practice. This

  1. Highwall miners pursue thinner seams

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-04-15

    OEMs have implemented design changes to reduce the machine's footprint and to mine more accurately. Three manufacturers offer highwall mining systems, American Highwall Systems (AMS), ICG Addcar and Superior Highwall Miners. Latest developments in their machines are reported. 3 photos.

  2. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ..., Release No. 34-63547 (Dec. 15, 2010) [75 FR 80948] (the ``Proposing Release''). \\5\\ Public Law 111-203... (Jan. 7, 2011) (``WGC I''). \\33\\ Conflict Minerals, Release No. 34-63793 (Jan. 28, 2011) [76 FR...

  3. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  4. The Zapot pegmatite mineral county

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Soregaroli, A.E.; Gordon, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Zapot pegmatite is currently being mined for mineral specimens (chiefly amazonite, topaz and smoky quartz in miarolitic cavities), for gemstones (topaz and smoky quartz) and for decorative rock (amazonite). The deposit is owned and operated by Harvey Gordon Minerals of Reno, Nevada, and is the only amazonite-topaz mining operation in the state. Thousands of specimens from this operation have reached the collector market.

  5. Mineral of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration averaging 0.13 percent. Magnesium is found in over 60 minerals, and also is recovered from seawater, wells, and lake brines and bitterns.

  6. Photocatalysis enhancement of Au/BFO nanoparticles using plasmon resonance of Au NPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Cai, Zhongyang; Ma, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) nanoparticles was synthesized via sol-gel technique, and successfully loaded with small sizes of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) by impregnation-reduction method to extremely enhance the BFO photocatalytic activity. The obviously stronger optical absorption of Au/BFO observed from the UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum confirmed that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect occured on the surface of Au NPs. And the surface plasmon-induced localized electric field could allow the formation of electron/hole pairs in the near surface region of BFO which can migrate to the surface without undergoing electron/hole (e-/h+) pair recombination. The more electrons and holes formed, the more ·OH will be generated to decompose the CR solution. When the gold loading in Au/BFO nanoparticles is 3.36 wt%, the obtained Au/BFO catalyst exhibits best photocatalytic activity evaluated by photocatalysis degradation of Congo red (CR) solution under the visible light irradiation.

  7. Suppression of high transverse momentum π0 spectra in Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2008-02-01

    Au + Au, s1/2 = 200 GeV measurements at RHIC, obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors, have all indicated a suppression of high p⊥ particle production, relative to an appropriately normalized NN level. For central collisions and vanishing pseudo-rapidity these experiments exhibit suppression in charged meson production, especially at medium-to-large transverse momenta. In the PHENIX experiment similar behaviour has been reported for π0 spectra. In a recent work [1] on the simpler D + Au interaction, to be considered perhaps as a tune-up for Au + Au, we reported on a pre-hadronic cascade mechanism which can explain the mixed observation of moderately reduced p⊥ suppression at higher pseudo-rapidity as well as the Cronin enhancement at mid-rapidity. Here, we present the extension of this work to the more massive ion-ion collisions. Our major thesis is that much of the suppression is generated in a late stage cascade of colourless pre-hadrons produced after an initial short-lived coloured phase. We present a pQCD argument to justify this approach and to estimate the time duration τp of this initial phase. Of essential importance is the brevity in time of the coloured phase existence relative to that of the strongly interacting pre-hadron phase, the latter essentially an interactive cascade. These distinctions in phase are of course not strict, but adequate for treating the suppression of moderate and high p⊥ mesons.

  8. Reactivity of Two-Dimensional Au9, Pt9, and Au18Pt18 against Common Molecules.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Lauren; Takahashi, Keisuke

    2016-09-19

    Adsorption of common molecules over two-dimensional Au9, Pt9, and Au18Pt18 is investigated with implementation of first-principles calculations. In general, it is found that Pt9 and Au18Pt18 exhibit low adsorption energies where Au18Pt18 preserves the structural integrity of the molecule and surface. In particular, adsorption of molecules onto Au18Pt18 frequently results in low adsorption energies and high reactivity with minor surface reconstruction of Au18Pt18 and average bond lengths of molecules. The decrease in adsorption energy can be attributed to the presence of platinum, while gold can be considered responsible for structural stability. In addition, molecule dissociation is observed in the cases of H2, HCl, CH4, SO, and SO2 when Pt atoms are involved. Thus, two-dimensional Au9, Pt9, and Au18Pt18 show low adsorption energies against common molecules, reflecting adsorption energies observed in small Au and Pt clusters. These results demonstrate that Au18Pt18 can successfully utilize the low adsorption energies associated with platinum while preserving the integrity of the surface structure using gold atoms, making it possible to adsorb desired molecules using select areas of the Au18Pt18 surface. PMID:27608367

  9. The Magic Au60 Nanocluster: A New Cluster-Assembled Material with Five Au13 Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongbo; Fu, Fangyu; Zhang, Jun; Chai, Jinsong; Kang, Xi; Li, Peng; Li, Shengli; Zhou, Hongping; Zhu, Manzhou

    2015-07-13

    Herein, we report the synthesis and atomic structure of the cluster-assembled [Au60Se2(Ph3P)10(SeR)15](+) material. Five icosahedral Au13 building blocks from a closed gold ring with Au-Se-Au linkages. Interestingly, two Se atoms (without the phenyl tail) locate in the center of the cluster, stabilized by the Se-(Au)5 interactions. The ring-like nanocluster is unprecedented in previous experimental and theoretical studies of gold nanocluster structures. In addition, our optical and electrochemical studies show that the electronic properties of the icosahedral Au13 units still remain unchanged in the penta-twinned Au60 nanocluster, and this new material might be a promising in optical limiting material. This work offers a basis for deep understanding on controlling the cluster-assembled materials for tailoring their functionalities.

  10. Geological, fluid inclusion and isotopic studies of the Yinshan Cu-Au-Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, South China: Implications for ore genesis and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Guang; Ni, Pei; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Zhao, Kui-Dong; Chen, Hui; Ding, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Chao; Cai, Yi-Tao

    2013-09-01

    The Yinshan Cu-Au-Pb-Zn-Ag deposit is located in Dexing, South China. Ore bodies are primarily hosted in low-grade phyllite of the Neoproterozoic Shuangqiaoshan Group along EW- and NNW-striking fault zones. Pb-Zn-Ag mineralization is dictated by Jurassic rhyolitic quartz porphyries (ca. 172 Ma), whereas Cu-Au mineralization is associated with Jurassic dacite porphyries (ca. 170 Ma). The main ore minerals are pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, tetrahedrite-tennatite, gold, silver, and silver sulphosalt, and the principal gangue minerals are quartz, sericite, calcite, and chlorite. Two-phase liquid-rich (type I), two-phase vapor-rich (type II), and halite-bearing (type III) fluid inclusions can be observed in the hydrothermal quartz-sulfides veins. Type I inclusions are widespread and have homogenization temperatures of 187-303 °C and salinities of 4.2-9.5 wt.% NaCl equivalent in the Pb-Zn-Ag mineralization, and homogenization temperatures of 196-362 °C and salinities of 3.5-9.9 wt.% NaCl equivalent in the Cu-Au mineralization. The pervasive occurrence of type I fluid inclusions with low-moderate temperatures and salinities implies that the mineralizing fluids formed in epithermal environments. The type II and coexisting type III inclusions, from deeper levels below the Cu-Au ore bodies, share similar homogenization temperatures of 317-448 °C and contrasting salinities of 0.2-4.2 and 30.9-36.8 wt.% NaCl equivalent, respectively, which indicates that boiling processes occurred. The sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfides (δ34S = -1.7‰ to +3.2‰) suggest a homogeneous magmatic sulfur source. The lead isotopes of sulfides (206Pb/204Pb = 18.01-18.07; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.55-15.57; and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.03-38.12) are consistent with those of volcanic-subvolcanic rocks (206Pb/204Pb = 18.03-18.10; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.56-15.57; and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.02-38.21), indicating a magmatic origin for lead in the ore. The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions (δ18O = +7.8

  11. Ligand effects on the stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters: Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24, and Au102(SR)44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kang, Sunwoo; Han, Young-Kyu

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the electrochemical and thermodynamic stability of Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24, and Au102(SR)44, R = CH3, C6H13, CH2CH2Ph, Ph, PhF, and PhCOOH, in order to examine ligand effects on the stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters, Aum(SR)n. Aliphatic thiols, in general, have higher electrochemical and thermodynamic stability than aromatic thiols, and the -SCH2CH2Ph thiol is particularly appealing because of its high electrochemical and thermodynamic stability. The stabilization of Aum by nSR for Aum(SR)n can be rationalized by the stabilization of an Au atom by an SR for the simple molecule AuSR, regardless of interligand interaction and system size and shape. Thiol moieties play a strong role in the electron oxidation and reduction of Aum(SR)n. Accounting for the characteristics of thiol ligands is essential for understanding the electronic and thermodynamic stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters.We have studied the electrochemical and thermodynamic stability of Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24, and Au102(SR)44, R = CH3, C6H13, CH2CH2Ph, Ph, PhF, and PhCOOH, in order to examine ligand effects on the stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters, Aum(SR)n. Aliphatic thiols, in general, have higher electrochemical and thermodynamic stability than aromatic thiols, and the -SCH2CH2Ph thiol is particularly appealing because of its high electrochemical and thermodynamic stability. The stabilization of Aum by nSR for Aum(SR)n can be rationalized by the stabilization of an Au atom by an SR for the simple molecule AuSR, regardless of interligand interaction and system size and shape. Thiol moieties play a strong role in the electron oxidation and reduction of Aum(SR)n. Accounting for the characteristics of thiol ligands is essential for understanding the electronic and thermodynamic stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HOMO, LUMO, and HOMO-LUMO gaps; optimized geometries and radial

  12. Au99(SPh)42 nanomolecules: aromatic thiolate ligand induced conversion of Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60.

    PubMed

    Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Dass, Amala

    2014-12-10

    A new aromatic thiolate protected gold nanomolecule Au99(SPh)42 has been synthesized by reacting the highly stable Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 with thiophenol, HSPh. The ubiquitous Au144(SR)60 is known for its high stability even at elevated temperature and in the presence of excess thiol. This report demonstrates for the first time the reactivity of the Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 with thiophenol to form a different 99-Au atom species. The resulting Au99(SPh)42 compound, however, is unreactive and highly stable in the presence of excess aromatic thiol. The molecular formula of the title compound is determined by high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and confirmed by the preparation of the 99-atom nanomolecule using two ligands, namely, Au99(SPh)42 and Au99(SPh-OMe)42. This mass spectrometry study is an unprecedented advance in nanoparticle reaction monitoring, in studying the 144-atom to 99-atom size evolution at such high m/z (∼12k) and resolution. The optical and electrochemical properties of Au99(SPh)42 are reported. Other substituents on the phenyl group, HS-Ph-X, where X = -F, -CH3, -OCH3, also show the Au144 to Au99 core size conversion, suggesting minimal electronic effects for these substituents. Control experiments were conducted by reacting Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 with HS-(CH2)n-Ph (where n = 1 and 2), bulky ligands like adamantanethiol and cyclohexanethiol. It was observed that conversion of Au144 to Au99 occurs only when the phenyl group is directly attached to the thiol, suggesting that the formation of a 99-atom species is largely influenced by aromaticity of the ligand and less so on the bulkiness of the ligand.

  13. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  14. Diversity of Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Mineralization in the Manus Back-Arc Basin, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gena, K.; Chiba, H.

    2004-12-01

    The Manus back-arc basin in the Western Pacific hosts three contrasting style of mineralization called Vienna Wood, Pacmanus and Onsen site. The three deposits have distinct geology and geochemical characteristics. The Vienna Wood site in the Central Manus Basin (CMB) is hosted by mid-oceanic ridge type basalt. The mineralization is dominated by wurtzite, marcasite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, Fe-oxide and gangue minerals of anhydrite, gypsum and quartz. The filling temperatures and salinities of the inclusion range from 200-260_E#8249;C and 4.8-6.6 NaCl equiv. wt% respectively. Bulk chemical analyses of the ores indicate that the mineralization in the Vienna Wood site can be classified into the Zn-Cu type. The simple mineral assemblage indicates simple basalt-seawater interaction and is a modern analogue of the ophiolite hosted VVMS deposits. The mineralization in the Pacmanus site is hosted by dacitic lavas is characterised by a complex mineral assemblage of marcasite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, bornite, enargite, covellite, chalcocite, digenite, galena, tennantite, native gold, PbAs-sulfosalts and gangue minerals of barite, rare silica, anhydrite and native sulphur. The temperature of mineralization ranges from 230-280_E#8249;C. Bulk chemical composition of the ore samples indicates that the mineralization in the Pacmanus site can be classified into the Zn-Cu-Pb-Au type. The mineral assemblage, character of the ores and tectonic setting resembles those of ancient Kuroko and currently forming hydrothermal deposits in Lau Basin and in Okinawa Trough. The Onsen hydrothermal site in the Desmos caldera is hosted by basaltic andesite. The advanced argillic alteration is characterised by both high and low temperature acid stable minerals of pyrophyllite, natroalunite, quartz, cristobalite, amorphous silica, anhydrite, gypsum, pyrite, marcasite, enargite, covellite and native sulphur. The mineralization occurs at a temperature range of 240 to 340_E#8249;C. The high

  15. A study of photodegradation of sulforhodamine B on Au-TiO 2/bentonite under UV and visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyi; Suyoulema; Wang, Wenbo; Sarina

    2009-12-01

    Au-TiO 2/bentonite samples were prepared via deposition-precipitation method and calcined at different temperatures. These samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffusion reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), BET method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and TEM. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were tested by photodegradation of sulforhodamine B (SRB) under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light irradiation. The result showed that Au-TiO 2/bentonite catalysts exhibited higher efficiency for mineralizing SRB than the well-known commercial TiO 2 photocatalyst P25 in terms of COD changes. The most important advantage of Au-TiO 2/bentonite over P25 was that it could be readily separated from aqueous suspensions by sedimentation after the reaction. It can maintain almost the same activity after being repeatedly used for 12 times. Possible mechanisms for SRB photoreaction in the presence of Au-TiO 2/bentonite were proposed in this paper.

  16. Simulation of Electric Field in Semi Insulating Au/CdTe/Au Detector under Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; Kubat, J.; Belas, E.; Hoschl, P.; Moravec, P.; Praus, P.

    2009-08-02

    We report our simulations on the profile of the electric field in semi insulating CdTe and CdZnTe with Au contacts under radiation flux. The type of the space charge and electric field distribution in the Au/CdTe/Au structure is at high fluxes result of a combined influence of charge formed due to band bending at the electrodes and from photo generated carriers, which are trapped at deep levels. Simultaneous solution of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations is used for the calculation. We show, that the space charge originating from trapped photo-carriers starts to dominate at fluxes 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, when the influence of contacts starts to be negligible.

  17. Electrochemical responses and electrocatalysis at single au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Cox, Jonathan T; Zhang, Bo

    2010-03-10

    Steady-state electrochemical responses have been obtained at single Au nanoparticles using Pt nanoelectrodes. A Au single-nanoparticle electrode (SNPE) is constructed by chemically immobilizing a single Au nanoparticle at a SiO(2)-encapsulated Pt disk nanoelectrode, which was previously modified by an amine-terminated silane. The Au SNPE has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, underpotential deposition of Cu, and steady-state cyclic voltammetry. It has been found that the presence of a single Au nanoparticle enhances the electron transfer from the Pt nanoelectrode to the redox molecules, and the voltammetric response at the Au SNPE depends on the size of the Au nanoparticle. The Au SNPE has been utilized to examine the oxygen-reduction reaction in a KOH solution to explore the feasibility of measuring the electrocatalytic activity at a single-nanoparticle level. It has been shown that the electrocatalytic activity of single Au nanoparticles can be directly measured using SNPEs, and the electrocatalytic activity is dependent on the size of the Au nanoparticles. This study can help to understand the structure-function relationship in nanoparticle-based electrocatalysis.

  18. Mineral-resource data bases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Data bases are essential for modern scientific research. The new and exciting work being done in the Mineral Resource Program in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) usually begins with the question, "Where are the known deposits?" A mineral-resource data base containing this type of information and more can be useful not just to USGS scientists, but to anyone who needs such data. Users of the data bases from outside the USGS include mining and exploration companies, environmental groups, academia, other Federal Agencies, and the general public. At present, the USGS has two large mineral-resource data bases, MRDS (Mineral Resource Data System) and MAS (Minerals Availability System). MRDS was built and is mamtained by the USGS, and MAS was built and maintained by the Bureau of Mines. In 1996, after the Bureau was abolished, MAS was transferred to the USGS. The two data bases were compiled for different purposes and contain very different mformation. For instance, MAS contains information on costs, details of mining methods, and feasibility studies. MRDS has mineralogical and geologic data that are not contained in MAS. Because they are both mineral-resource data bases, however, they contain some information in common, such as location, name(s) of sites, and commodities present. Both data bases are international in scope, and both are quite large. MRDS contains over 110,000 records, while MAS has over 220,000. One reason that MAS has more records is that it contains information on smelters, mill sites, and fossil fuel sites, as well as mineral- resource sites. The USGS is working to combine the information in both data bases. This is a large undertaking that will require some years to complete. In the interim, information from both data bases will still be available

  19. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  20. Contrasting siliceous replacement mineralization, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Ilchik, R.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Seedorff, C.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Fine-grained siliceous replacement of carbonate-bearing rocks (jasperoid) occurs in most mineral districts in east-central Nevada. In most of these occurrences, jasperoid contains Au and(or) Ag and little or no base metals, although concentrations and ratios vary significantly. Broadly, two end-members are distinguished: (1) silicification as an intermediate- to late-stage part of complex alteration associated with igneous centers, and (2) jasperoids lacking other associated alteration and having few or no associated igneous rocks. Within this region, siliceous replacements are found with all metallic ([+-] magmatic) suites. No single factor in these occurrences relates the distribution, metal contents, fluid geochemistry, igneous rocks and associated alteration. Summarizing these characteristics: geochemical and fluid inclusion evidence shows that fluids in igneous-related jasperoids can be high-salinity magmatic (Ely), low-salinity magmatic (McCullough Butte), or metoric (Ward). Fluids in igneous-poor systems are low-salinity, exchanged meteoric waters from which a minor magmatic component can not be excluded. At this level of detail, the best predictor of Ag:Au are the district-scale alteration characteristics. Siliceous replacement takes place in many kinds systems and probably requires no more than a cooling, mildly acidic hydrothermal fluid. Metal suites, other fluid characteristics, and geological environment all need to be considered in evaluating the significance of any jasperoid.

  1. Manipulation of superparamagnetic beads on patterned Au/Co/Au multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, A.; Holzinger, D.; Urbaniak, M.; Ehresmann, A.; Stobiecki, F.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetophoresis of water-suspended 4 μm-diameter superparamagnetic beads above topographically patterned, sputter deposited Ti(4 nm)/Au(60 nm)/[Co(0.7 nm)/Au(1 nm)] × 3 multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated. The results impressively demonstrate that the magnetic stray field landscape above the stripe structure when superimposed with an external, slowly rotating, field enables the directed transport of magnetic beads across the stripe panel with velocities up to 12 μm s-1.

  2. Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

    2010-02-10

    We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Admittance of Au/1,4-benzenedithiol/Au single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Kazumasa; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2012-12-01

    Employing the admittance formula for double-barrier junctions [Fu and Dudley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 65 (1993)], we have estimated an ac susceptance (imaginary part of admittance) of Au/1,4-benzenedithiol/Au single-molecule junctions from their current-voltage characteristics. In the MHz regime, we find that the junction susceptance shows a very small (˜0.1 aF) capacitive component that can be entirely masked by a larger electrode capacitance. Direct ac signal transmission measurements up to 1 GHz reveal no molecular signals and confirm the smallness of the molecular capacitance in the MHz regime.

  4. Two-Particle Interferometry of 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2004-04-19

    The PHENIX experiment has measured pion-pion, kaon-kaon, and proton-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200GeV. The correlations are fit to extract radii using both the Bowler Coulomb correction and full calculation of the two-particle wave function. The resulting radii are similar for all three species and decrease with increasing k{sub t} as expected for collective flow. The R{sub out} and R{sub side} radii are approximately equal indicating a short emission duration.

  5. Beam Energy Scan a Case for the Chiral Magnetic Effect in Au-Au Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Longacre, R.

    2014-01-05

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is predicted for Au-Au collisions at RHIC. However, many backgrounds can give signals that make the measurement hard to interpret. The STAR experiment has made measurements at different collisions energy ranging from √(sNN)=7.7 GeV to 62.4 GeV. In the analysis that is presented we show that the CME turns on with energy and is not present in central collisions where the induced magnetic is small.

  6. Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations on Au64+ - Au69+ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2006-03-31

    Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are an adequate tool for the description of the structure of highly charged multi-electron ions and for the analysis of their spectra. They demonstrate this by way of a re-investigation of n=3, {Delta}n=0 transitions in the EUV spectra of Na-, Mg-, Al-like, and Si-like ions of Au that have been obtained previously by heavy-ion accelerator based beam-foil spectroscopy. They discuss the evidence and propose several revisions on the basis of the multi-reference many-body perturbation theory calculations of Ne- through P-like ions of Au.

  7. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-01

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  8. Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2006-01-01

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  9. 1996 annual report on Alaska's mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Jill L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the fifteenth annual report that has been prepared in response to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Current Alaskan mineral projects and events that occurred during 1995 are summarized. For the purpose of this document, the term 'minerals' encompasses both energy resources (oil and gas, coal and peat, uranium, and geothermal) and nonfuel-mineral resources (metallic and industrial minerals).

  10. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  11. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  12. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  13. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  14. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  15. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  16. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  17. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  18. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  19. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  20. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  1. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  2. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  3. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  4. 43 CFR 3861.3 - Mineral surveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral surveyors. 3861.3 Section 3861.3..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL PATENT APPLICATIONS Surveys and Plats § 3861.3 Mineral surveyors....

  5. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral rights. 8.5 Section 8.5 Public... INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas..., but mineral rights not acquired will be subordinated to the Government's right to regulate...

  6. 43 CFR 3830.10 - Locatable minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locatable minerals. 3830.10 Section 3830..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING, RECORDING, AND MAINTAINING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES; GENERAL PROVISIONS Mining Law Minerals § 3830.10 Locatable minerals....

  7. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  8. Portable Radiometer Identifies Minerals in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Machida, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Hand-held optical instrument aids in identifying minerals in field. Can be used in exploration for minerals on foot or by aircraft. The radiometer is especially suitable for identifying clay and carbonate minerals. Radiometer measures reflectances of mineral at two wavelengths, computes ratio of reflectances, and displays ratio to user.

  9. Traditional Methods for Mineral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Robert E.; Carpenter, Charles E.

    This chapter describes traditional methods for analysis of minerals involving titrimetric and colorimetric procedures, and the use of ion selective electrodes. Other traditional methods of mineral analysis include gravimetric titration (i.e., insoluble forms of minerals are precipitated, rinse, dried, and weighed) and redox reactions (i.e., mineral is part of an oxidation-reduction reaction, and product is quantitated). However, these latter two methods will not be covered because they currently are used little in the food industry. The traditional methods that will be described have maintained widespread usage in the food industry despite the development of more modern instrumentation such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (Chap. 24). Traditional methods generally require chemicals and equipment that are routinely available in an analytical laboratory and are within the experience of most laboratory technicians. Additionally, traditional methods often form the basis for rapid analysis kits (e.g., Quantab®; for salt determination) that are increasingly in demand. Procedures for analysis of minerals of major nutritional or food processing concern are used for illustrative purposes. For additional examples of traditional methods refer to references (1-6). Slight modifications of these traditional methods are often needed for specific foodstuffs to minimize interferences or to be in the range of analytical performance. For analytical requirements for specific foods see the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International (5) and related official methods (6).

  10. CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS

    SciTech Connect

    Y. ZHAO; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

  11. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  12. Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

    2008-09-01

    Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

  13. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  14. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies. PMID:23452438

  15. High resolution X-ray computed tomography studies of Grasberg porphyry Cu-Au ores, Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, J. Richard; Mote, Alison S.; Ketcham, Richard A.

    2008-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) provides unique information of the geological and metallurgical significance for gold and related ore minerals in the supergiant Grasberg porphyry Cu-Au deposit. Digital radiographs have proved to be an effective means of screening samples for the presence of gold for HRXCT studies. Digital radiograph effectiveness is limited by the thickness of samples (typically to ≤2 cm), as well as the associated minerals. Thus, preselecting samples for gold studies using HRXCT is most effective using digital radiographs combined with assay information. Differentiating between metallic mineral grains with relatively small differences in density, e.g., bornite (5.1 g/cm3) from chalcopyrite (4.2 g/cm3), is relatively straightforward for isolated monominerallic grains or composites in a similar lower-density matrix, but difficulties are encountered with the interpretation of typical intergrown ore minerals. X-ray beam-hardening artifacts lead to inconsistency in attenuation determination, both within and among slice images, complicating quantitative processing. However, differentiation of chalcopyrite and bornite has been successful in smaller-diameter (≤22-mm) cores of Grasberg ores. Small-diameter (≤10 mm) cores of the Grasberg stockwork Cu-Au ore were analyzed using HRXCT methods scanned at the minimum spacing currently available (7.5 μm), and data reduction protocols using the Blob3D program were modified to improve the quantification of grain sizes and shapes. Grains as small as 6.5 μm have been identified. All of these grains are in direct contact with chalcopyrite, providing support for gold distribution in porphyry copper systems being a result of exsolution from copper sulfides. HRXCT scanning (±digital radiography) precisely defines the in situ location of mineral grains of interest within a sample, which then can be studied in conventional petrographic sections, and other types of analytical studies conducted, e

  16. Quartz-sericite and argillic alterations at the Peschanka Cu-Mo-Au deposit, Chukchi Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchenko, L. I.; Baksheev, I. A.; Nagornaya, E. V.; Chitalin, A. F.; Nikolaev, Yu. N.; Kal'ko, I. A.; Prokofiev, V. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The porphyry Peschanka copper-molybdenum-gold deposit and the Nakhodka ore field located in the Baimka ore trend on the western Chukchi Peninsula are spatially related to monzonitic rocks of the Early Cretaceous Egdykgych Complex. Two types of quartz-sericite metasomatic rocks (QSR) have been identified at both the deposits and the ore field: (I) chlorite-quartz-muscovite rock with bornite and chalcopyrite (porphyry type) and (II) tourmaline-quartz-carbonate-muscovite ± phengite rock accompanied by veins with base-metal mineralization (subepithermal or transitional type), as well as carbonate-quartz-illite rock (argillic alteration) accompanied by veins with precious metal mineralization (epithermal type). The QSR I chlorite evolves from chamosite to clinochlore, which is caused by increasing H2S activity in mineralizing fluid and precipitation of sulfide minerals. The QSR I clinochlore is significantly depleted in silica as compared with that from the rocks affected by argillic alteration. The chemical composition of muscovite from both quartz-sericite alterations is similar. The QSR II carbonates evolve from calcite through dolomite to siderite, which results from the increasing activity of CO2 followed by the decreasing activity of H2S in mineralizing fluid. The Mn content in dolomite is similar to that in beresite (quartz-muscovite-carbonate-pyrite metasomatic rock) of the intrusion-related gold deposits. Illite from argillic alteration is depleted in Al as compared with that of postvolcanic epithermal Au-Ag deposits. However, carbonates from the discussed argillic alteration rhodochrosite and Mn-rich dolomite are similar to those from quartz-illite rock at postvolcanic epithermal Au-Ag deposits.

  17. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Curet-Arana, María C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-09-01

    Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH3 < NO < CO < CH3 < HCO < NH2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl,< HCO3 < CH2 < CN b HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N2, NH3 and CH4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.

  18. Anomalous magnetic moment at Ba in Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhati, A. K.; Kaur, J.; Bansal, N.; Negi, D.; Kumar, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Kumar, V.; Dey, C. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) technique is employed to measure the local susceptibility at the recoil implanted Ba ions in Au following the nuclear reaction 120Sn(12C, 3nγ)129Ba. We have observed first time the local paramagnetic susceptibility of 5.26(18) at Ba ions comparable to 4f-ions in any non-ferromagnetic metal at room temperature which seems to be related to the electronic s-d and s-f transfer at positive lattice pressure.

  19. Radioactivity in bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; Rubio Montero, M P; Gómez Escobar, V; Jurado Vargas, M

    1999-06-01

    Consumption of bottled mineral water is a growing practice and is sometimes a necessity rather than a choice. In this work, a study of the radioactive content of a wide selection of commercial bottled mineral waters for human intake was carried out. The origins of the analyzed waters were very different, coming from various locations in France, Portugal and Spain. Their total alpha and beta activity concentrations were determined and also gamma spectrometry was used to detect some radionuclides. In some cases, the waters presented high values of the total alpha and beta activity concentrations surpassing the reference levels established by the CSN, the Spanish. Regulatory Organization. In these cases, a determination of uranium and 226Ra was also performed by using low-level liquid scintillation counting. The results revealed a strong correlation between radioactive content and dry residue, and lead one to conclude that high radioactive content is mainly related to the mineralization in waters of underground origin.

  20. Respiratory disability in coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.C.; Lapp, N.L.; Seaton, D.

    1980-06-20

    It has been suggested that the assessment of ventilatory capacity alone is inadequate for the determination of disabling occupational respiratory impairment in coal miners. The Department of Labor has accepted this view and now routinely requests blood gas analyses in those claimants not meeting the ventilatory criteria. We tested the validity of this contention by selecting two groups of coal miners claiming total disability. The first consisted of 150 claimants who were referred for spirometry, while the second consisted of 50 claimants who had been referred for blood gas studies. Of those in group 1, eight met the extant criteria for disability, while only two of those in group 2 satisfied the criteria, and, in both, cardiac disease was responsible. We conclude that blood gas analyses are unnecessary in the determination of pulmonary disability in coal miners.

  1. Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Alison; Storrs, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater Alison Bradford and Alex Storrs Towson University We analyze Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to determine the abundance of minerals near Aristarchus crater. Following the calibration of Robinson et al. (2007) we present ratio maps of images obtained in August of 2005 showing the abundance of TiO2 and other minerals in this interesting area in the middle of Oceanus Procellarum. A prominent cleft (Schroter's Valley, presumably a collapsed lava tube) makes this region of special interest for analyzing the formation of mare basalts. Reference: Robinson, M.S., et al. (2007): "High resolution mapping of TiO2 abundances on the Moon using the Hubble Space Telescope", GRL 34, L13203

  2. Photosynthetic electron transport system promotes synthesis of Au-nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shabnam, Nisha; Pardha-Saradhi, P

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a novel, green, efficient and economically viable light mediated protocol for generation of Au-nanoparticles using most vital organelle, chloroplasts, of the plant system is portrayed. Thylakoids/chloroplasts isolated from Potamogeton nodosus (an aquatic plant) and Spinacia oleracea (a terrestrial plant) turned Au³⁺ solutions purple in presence of light of 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ photon flux density (PFD) and the purple coloration intensified with time. UV-Vis spectra of these purple colored solutions showed absorption peak at ∼545 nm which is known to arise due to surface plasmon oscillations specific to Au-nanoparticles. However, thylakoids/chloroplasts did not alter color of Au³⁺ solutions in dark. These results clearly demonstrated that photosynthetic electron transport can reduce Au³⁺ to Au⁰ which nucleate to form Au-nanoparticles in presence of light. Transmission electron microscopic studies revealed that Au-nanoparticles generated by light driven photosynthetic electron transport system of thylakoids/chloroplasts were in range of 5-20 nm. Selected area electron diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction indicated crystalline nature of these nanoparticles. Energy dispersive X-ray confirmed that these nanoparticles were composed of Au. To confirm the potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in generation of Au-nanoparticles, thylakoids/chloroplasts were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles in presence of light of PFD ranging from 60 to 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹. The capacity of thylakoids/chloroplasts to generate Au-nanoparticles increased remarkably with increase in PFD, which further clearly demonstrated potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in reduction of Au³⁺ to Au⁰ to form nanoparticles. The light driven donation of electrons to metal ions by thylakoids/chloroplasts can be exploited for large scale production of nanoparticles. PMID:23976990

  3. Photosynthetic electron transport system promotes synthesis of Au-nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shabnam, Nisha; Pardha-Saradhi, P

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a novel, green, efficient and economically viable light mediated protocol for generation of Au-nanoparticles using most vital organelle, chloroplasts, of the plant system is portrayed. Thylakoids/chloroplasts isolated from Potamogeton nodosus (an aquatic plant) and Spinacia oleracea (a terrestrial plant) turned Au³⁺ solutions purple in presence of light of 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ photon flux density (PFD) and the purple coloration intensified with time. UV-Vis spectra of these purple colored solutions showed absorption peak at ∼545 nm which is known to arise due to surface plasmon oscillations specific to Au-nanoparticles. However, thylakoids/chloroplasts did not alter color of Au³⁺ solutions in dark. These results clearly demonstrated that photosynthetic electron transport can reduce Au³⁺ to Au⁰ which nucleate to form Au-nanoparticles in presence of light. Transmission electron microscopic studies revealed that Au-nanoparticles generated by light driven photosynthetic electron transport system of thylakoids/chloroplasts were in range of 5-20 nm. Selected area electron diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction indicated crystalline nature of these nanoparticles. Energy dispersive X-ray confirmed that these nanoparticles were composed of Au. To confirm the potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in generation of Au-nanoparticles, thylakoids/chloroplasts were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles in presence of light of PFD ranging from 60 to 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹. The capacity of thylakoids/chloroplasts to generate Au-nanoparticles increased remarkably with increase in PFD, which further clearly demonstrated potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in reduction of Au³⁺ to Au⁰ to form nanoparticles. The light driven donation of electrons to metal ions by thylakoids/chloroplasts can be exploited for large scale production of nanoparticles.

  4. Evaluation of the Olympus AU 400 clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Bilić, A; Alpeza, I; Rukavina, A S

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the Olympus AU 400 clinical chemistry analyzer was evaluated according to the guidelines of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The following analytes were tested: glucose, urea, creatinine, calcium, AST, ALT, CK, LDH, ALP and amylase. The Olympus AU 400 was compared with the Olympus AU 800. Coefficients of correlation showed high correlation between the compared analyzers. Other performances (intra- and inter-assay variation, carry-over and interferences) of the analyzer were satisfactory.

  5. Geochemical and geochronological constraints on the genesis of Au-Te deposits at Cripple Creek, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, K.D.; Romberger, S.B.; Beaty, D.W.; Pontius, J.A.; Snee, L.W.; Stein, H.J.; Thompson, T.B.

    1998-01-01

    The Cripple Creek district (653 metric tons (t) of Au) consists of Au-Te veins and disseminated gold deposits that are spatially related to alkaline igneous rocks in an Oligocene intrusive complex. Vein paragenesis includes quartz-biotite-K feldspar-fluorite-pyrite followed by base metal sulfides and telluride minerals. Disseminated deposits consist of microcrystalline native gold with pyrite that are associated with zones of pervasive adularia. New 40Ar/39Ar dates indicate that there was a complex magmatic and hydrothermal history. Relatively felsic rocks (tephriphonolite, trachyandesite, and phonolite) were emplaced into the complex over about 1 m.y., from 32.5 ?? 0.1 (1??) to 31.5 ?? 0.1 Ma. A younger episode of phonolite emplacement outside of the complex is indicated by an age of 30.9 ?? 0.1 Ma. Field relationships suggest that at least one episode of mafic and ultramafic dike emplacement occurred after relatively more felsic rocks and prior to the main gold mineralizing event. Only a single whole-rock date for mafic phonolite (which indicated a maximum age of 28.7 Ma) was obtained. However, constraints on the timing of mineralization are provided by paragenetically early vein minerals and K feldspar from the disseminated gold pyrite deposits. Early vein minerals (31.3 ?? 0.1-29.6 ?? 0.1 Ma) and K feldspar (29.8 ?? 0.1 Ma) from the Cresson disseminated deposit, together with potassically altered phonolite adjacent to the Pharmacist vein (28.8 and 28.2 ?? 0.1 Ma), suggest there was a protracted history of hydrothermal activity that began during the waning stages of phonolite and early mafic-ultramafic activity and continued, perhaps intermittently, for at least 2 m.y. Estimated whole-rock ??18O values of the alkaline igneous rocks range from 6.4 to 8.2 per mil. K feldspar and albite separates from igneous rocks have lead isotope compositions of 206Pb/204Pb = 17.90 to 18.10, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.51 to 15.53, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.35 to 38.56. These isotopic

  6. Geochemistry and Minerality of Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Horton, T. W.; Beaman, M.

    2010-12-01

    Kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4) and gibbsite (Al(OH)3) are capable of forming in a variety of environments including anthropogenic solutions such as wine. Here, we evaluate the geochemistry of twelve white wines in order to assess the potential relationship between kaolinite/gibbsite saturation and minerality, a common wine descriptor used to express the rock and/or soil character in the aromas and flavors of wines. Aluminum and Si concentrations ranged from 228-1,281 µg L-1 and 6,583-19,746 µg L-1, respectively, where Si and Al are the only elements to demonstrate positive covariance with minerality scores. Sulfur levels varied from 25,013-167,383 µg L-1 and show the strongest negative covariance with minerality scores. However, like all of the elements studied (Al, Si, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, and Fe), these trends were not significantly different than random at the 95% confidence level. In contrast, the relative degrees of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation display strong positive covariance with minerality scores and these trends are not random at the greater than 95% confidence level. Overall, our tasters were able to accurately assess the degree of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation amongst the twelve wines based on the objective of assessing minerality. Although the wines were undersaturated with respect to gibbsite/kaolinite, geochemical modeling reveals that increasing the wines’ pHs from ~3.3 to 4.1-4.6 (which is achievable on the palate where saliva has a pH of 7.4) results in gibbsite/kaolinite oversaturation. By considering that minerality is a function of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation and decreasing S, the origin of minerality’s taste and chemical origin in wine with known physical standards becomes increasingly crystalline.

  7. Nucleoside phosphorylation by phosphate minerals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    In the presence of formamide, crystal phosphate minerals may act as phosphate donors to nucleosides, yielding both 5'- and, to a lesser extent, 3'-phosphorylated forms. With the mineral Libethenite the formation of 5'-AMP can be as high as 6% of the adenosine input and last for at least 10(3) h. At high concentrations, soluble non-mineral phosphate donors (KH(2)PO(4) or 5'-CMP) afford 2'- and 2':3'-cyclic AMP in addition to 5'-and 3'-AMP. The phosphate minerals analyzed were Herderite Ca[BePO(4)F], Hureaulite Mn(2+)(5)(PO(3)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4), Libethenite Cu(2+)(2)(PO(4))(OH), Pyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl, Turquoise Cu(2+)Al(6)(PO(4))(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(4), Fluorapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F, Hydroxylapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, Vivianite Fe(2+)(3)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(8), Cornetite Cu(2+)(3)(PO(4))(OH)(3), Pseudomalachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), Reichenbachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), and Ludjibaite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4)). Based on their behavior in the formamide-driven nucleoside phosphorylation reaction, these minerals can be characterized as: 1) inactive, 2) low level phosphorylating agents, or 3) active phosphorylating agents. Instances were detected (Libethenite and Hydroxylapatite) in which phosphorylation occurs on the mineral surface, followed by release of the phosphorylated compounds. Libethenite and Cornetite markedly protect the beta-glycosidic bond. Thus, activated nucleic monomers can form in a liquid non-aqueous environment in conditions compatible with the thermodynamics of polymerization, providing a solution to the standard-state Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG degrees ') problem, the major obstacle for polymerizations in the liquid phase in plausible prebiotic scenarios.

  8. Systematic studies of the centrality dependence of soft photon production in Au + Au collision with PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannier, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Since the earliest days of Heavy Ion Physics thermal soft photon radiation emitted during the reaction had been theorized as a smoking gun signal for formation of a quark-gluon plasma and as a tool to characterize its properties. In recent years the existence of excess photon radiation in heavy ion collisions over the expectation from initial hard interactions has been confirmed at both RHIC and LHC energies by PHENIX and ALICE respectively. There the radiation has been found to exhibit elliptic flow v2 well above what can currently be reconciled with a picture of early emission from a plasma phase. During the 2007 and 2010 Au + Au runs PHENIX has measured a high purity sample of soft photons down to pT > 0.4 GeV / c using an external conversion method. We present recent systematic studies by PHENIX from that sample on the centrality dependence of the soft photon yield, and elliptic and triangular flow v2 and v3 in Au + Au collisions which fill in the experimental picture and enable discrimination of competing soft photon production scenarios.

  9. Degree of chemical nonequilibrium in central Au-Au collisions at RHIC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; El-Bakry, M. Y.; Habashy, D. M.; Mohamed, M. T.; Abbas, Ehab

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the difference between hadron resonance gas (HRG) calculations for chemical freeze-out parameters at fully and partly chemical equilibria. To this end, the results are compared with the particle ratios measured in central Au-Au collisions at a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies, √ {s{ NN}} = 7.7 - 200 GeV as offered by the STAR experiment. We restrict the discussion to STAR, because of large statistics and overall homogeneity of STAR measurements (one detector) against previous experiments. We find that the matter produced at these energies is likely in fully chemical equilibria, which is consistent with recent lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) results. The possible improvements by partial chemical equilibria (γS ≠ 1) are very limited. We also discuss these results with the ones deduced from ϕ/π- and Ω-/π- ratios. These hadron ratios are sensitive to the degree of chemical equilibrium. Accordingly, the conclusion that the matter produced reaches fully chemical equilibria in central Au-Au at relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) energies is confirmed.

  10. "Au Revoir" to Film Illiteracy: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of "Au Revior Les Enfants."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbitt, J. Catherine

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the power of film and films as teaching tools. Describes how the 1987 French film "Au Revior Les Enfants" can serve these purposes. Discusses its historical context, and ways to show the film in class. Lists numerous topics (on important film themes, and on technical aspects of film) for student projects. (SR)

  11. Charged-particle rapidity density in Au+Au collisions in a quark combination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Yao, Tao; Xie, Qu-Bing

    2007-03-01

    Rapidity/pseudorapidity densities for charged particles and their centrality, rapidity, and energy dependence in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are studied in a quark combination model. Using a Gaussian-type rapidity distribution for constituent quarks as a result of Landau hydrodynamic evolution, the data at sNN=130,200 GeV at various centralities in full pseudorapidity range are well described, and the charged-particle multiplicities are reproduced as functions of the number of participants. The energy dependence of the shape of the dNch/dη distribution is also described at various collision energies sNN=200,130,62.4 GeV in central collisions with same value of parameters except 19.6 GeV. The calculated rapidity distributions and yields for the charged pions and kaons in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are compared with experimental data of the BRAHMS Collaboration.

  12. Modeling Hydrothermal Mineralization: Fractal or Multifrcatal Models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Q.

    2004-05-01

    Hydrothermal mineralization occurs when the natural geo-processes involve the interaction of ore material-carrying hydrothermal fluids with rocks in the earth's crust in a specific geological environment. Mineralization can cause element concentration enrichment or depletion in the country rocks. Local enrichment may form ore body that can be mined for profit at the current economic and technological conditions. To understand the spatial distribution of element concentration enrichment or depletion caused by mineralization in a mineral district is essential for mineral exploration and mineral prediction. Grade-tonnage model and mineral deposits size distribution model are common models used for characterizing mineral deposits. This paper proposes a non-linear mineralization model on the basis of a modified classical igneous differentiation mineralization model to describe the generation of multifractal distribution of element concentration in the country rocks as well as grade-tonnage fractal/multifractal distribution of ore deposits that have been often observed in hydrothermal mineralization. This work may also lead to a singularity model to explain the common properties of mineralization and mineralization-associated geochemical anomaly diversity and the generalized self-similarity of the anomalies. The model has been applied to a case study of mineral deposits prediction and mineral resource assessment in the Abitibi district, northern Ontario, Canada.

  13. Viewing minerals, atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    With state-of-the-art technology supported by scissors and bungy cords, Earth scientists are beginning to look at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interactions on an atomic scale.The instrument that can provide such a detailed view is the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which made a great theoretical and practical splash when it was introduced in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer, physicists at IBM's laboratory in Zurich. They won a Nobel Prize in Physics for their work 5 years later.

  14. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  15. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  16. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  17. 43 CFR 3873.1 - Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregation of mineral from non-mineral...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) ADVERSE CLAIMS, PROTESTS AND CONFLICTS Segregation § 3873.1 Segregation of mineral from non-mineral land. Where a survey...

  18. Divided café-au-lait macule of the mouth.

    PubMed

    Sergay, Amanda; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2007-05-01

    We describe a 4-year-old, otherwise healthy boy with a congenital history of a perioral and labial segmental café-au-lait macule, who was noted to have unilateral localized gingival hyperpigmentation that aligned with the café-au-lait macule. This case is highly illustrative of the embryologic timing of the genetic event locally, which leads to café-au-lait type hyperpigmentation. Because the facial features and the ectoderm overlying the facial muscles develop around the third to fourth week of gestation, the distribution of this café-au-lait macule suggests development at the same time.

  19. Enhanced photoluminescence in Au-embedded ITO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsu; Park, Sunghoon; Jin, Changhyun; Lee, Chongmu

    2011-12-01

    Gold (Au)-embedded indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires were synthesized by thermal evaporation of a mixture of In(2)O(3,) SnO(2) and graphite powders on Si (100) substrates coated with Au thin films followed by annealing. At the initial stages of annealing, Au formed a continuous linear core located along the long axis of each ITO nanowire. The morphology of the Au core changed from a continuous line to a discrete line, and then to a droplet-like chain, finally evolving into a peapod in which crystalline Au nanoparticles were encapsulated in crystalline ITO with increasing annealing temperature. The ITO nanowires with the Au core showed an emission band at ~380 nm in the ultraviolet region. The ultraviolet emission intensity increased rapidly with increasing annealing temperature. The intensity of emission from the Au-peapod ITO nanowires (annealed at 750 °C) was approximately 20 times higher than that of the emission from the Au-core/ITO-shell ITO nanowires with a continuous linear shaped-Au core (annealed at 550 °C). This ultraintense ultraviolet emission might have originated mainly from the enhanced crystalline quality of the annealed ITO nanowires. PMID:22087582

  20. Heatless synthesis of well dispersible Au nanoparticles using pectin biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanan B; Zahran, M K; Emam, Hossam E

    2016-10-01

    Due to its potency to utilize in enormous applications, preparation of nanogold is of interest. Moreover, getting of highly dispersed nanogold with small size is extremely needful in specific fields. Herein, Au nanocolloid was prepared using alkali catalyzed pectin biopolymer. Pectin was concurrently used as reductant for Au ions and stabilizer for the produced Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reducing sugars were evaluated in the colloidal solution reflecting the role alkali in catalytic degradation of pectin to produce much powerful reducing moieties. The obtained Au nanocolloid was monitored via changing in color, UV-visible spectral and transmission electron microscopy. Using of NaOH as strong alkali achieving rapid rate of degradation reaction, resulted in 0.45g/L reducing sugars from 0.2g/L pectin which produced AuNPs with mean size of 6.5nm. In case of Na2CO3 which attained slow degradation rate led to, slightly low reducing sugar content (0.41g/L), fabricated comparatively size of AuNPs (7.5nm). In both cases, well distributed AuNPs was obtained with suitable stabilization up to 5 months and Na2CO3 exhibited higher stability. The current successful method used to produce small sized AuNPs with high dispersion is an innovative, one-step, easily, costless, energy saving and eco-friendly method.

  1. An Exploration of Catalytic Chemistry on Au/Ni(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia T. Ceyer

    2011-12-09

    This project explored the catalytic oxidation chemistry that can be effected on a Au/Ni(111) surface alloy. A Au/Ni(111) surface alloy is a Ni(111) surface on which less than 60% of the Ni atoms are replaced at random positions by Au atoms. The alloy is produced by vapor deposition of a small amount of Au onto Ni single crystals. The Au atoms do not result in an epitaxial Au overlayer or in the condensation of the Au into droplets. Instead, Au atoms displace and then replace Ni atoms on a Ni(111) surface, even though Au is immiscible in bulk Ni. The two dimensional structure of the clean Ni surface is preserved. This alloy is found to stabilize an adsorbed peroxo-like O2 species that is shown to be the critical reactant in the low temperature catalytic oxidation of CO and that is suspected to be the critical reactant in other oxidation reactions. This investigation revealed a new, practically important catalyst for CO oxidation that has since been patented.

  2. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  3. Heatless synthesis of well dispersible Au nanoparticles using pectin biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanan B; Zahran, M K; Emam, Hossam E

    2016-10-01

    Due to its potency to utilize in enormous applications, preparation of nanogold is of interest. Moreover, getting of highly dispersed nanogold with small size is extremely needful in specific fields. Herein, Au nanocolloid was prepared using alkali catalyzed pectin biopolymer. Pectin was concurrently used as reductant for Au ions and stabilizer for the produced Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reducing sugars were evaluated in the colloidal solution reflecting the role alkali in catalytic degradation of pectin to produce much powerful reducing moieties. The obtained Au nanocolloid was monitored via changing in color, UV-visible spectral and transmission electron microscopy. Using of NaOH as strong alkali achieving rapid rate of degradation reaction, resulted in 0.45g/L reducing sugars from 0.2g/L pectin which produced AuNPs with mean size of 6.5nm. In case of Na2CO3 which attained slow degradation rate led to, slightly low reducing sugar content (0.41g/L), fabricated comparatively size of AuNPs (7.5nm). In both cases, well distributed AuNPs was obtained with suitable stabilization up to 5 months and Na2CO3 exhibited higher stability. The current successful method used to produce small sized AuNPs with high dispersion is an innovative, one-step, easily, costless, energy saving and eco-friendly method. PMID:27212212

  4. Enhanced ultraviolet photoresponse in Au/ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanti, Moumita; Basak, Durga

    2014-09-01

    ZnO nanorods (NRs) have been decorated by Au nanoparticles (NPs) by a chemical method. The ultraviolet (UV) photoresponse of Au/ZnO NRs has been investigated. As the loading of Au NPs increases, the photocurrent as well as the photo-to-dark current ratio (gain) increases attaining a maximum gain value which is ∼15 times higher than that of the pristine ZnO NRs. Photoresponse enhancement is probably due to efficient separation of photo-generated electron-holes by an enhanced electric field and hot carrier injection over the Au localized Schottky junctions.

  5. Heterostructured Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt) nanoparticles with compartmentalized composition, morphology, and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Patrick S; Bae, In-Tae; Maye, Mathew M

    2015-10-14

    The synthesis, processing, and galvanic exchange of three heterostructured nanoparticle systems is described. The surface accessibility and redox potential of a Au/Pd-Ag dumbbell nanoparticle, where a Au/Pd core/shell region, and a silver region make up the domains, was used to prepare the new nanostructures with controlled composition, morphology, and microstructure. Results indicate that the silver domain was particularly susceptible to galvanic displacement, and was exchanged to Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt). Interestingly, the dumbbell morphology remained after exchange, and the silver region was transformed to hollow, parachute, or concentric domains respectively. The morphology and microstructure change was visualized via TEM and HRTEM, and the composition changes were probed via STEM-EDS imaging and XPS. The electrocatalytic activity of the Au/Pd-M towards methanol oxidation was studied, with results indicating that the Au/Pd-Pt nanoparticles had high activity attributed to the porous nature of the platinum domains. PMID:26351824

  6. Baryon Stopping in Au+Au and p+p collisions at 62 and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahms Collaboration; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    BRAHMS has measured rapidity density distributions of protons and antiprotons in both p+p and Au+Au collisions at 62 GeV and 200 GeV. From these distributions the yields of so-called ‘net-protons’, that is the difference between the proton and antiproton yields, can be determined. The rapidity dependence of the net-proton yields from peripheral Au+Au collisions is found to have a similar behaviour to that found for the p+p results, while a quite different rapidity dependence is found for central Au+Au collisions. The net-proton distributions can be used together with model calculations to find the net-baryon yields as a function of rapidity, thus yielding information on the average rapidity loss of beam particles, the baryon transport properties of the medium, and the amount of ‘stopping’ in these collisions.

  7. Platinum-group minerals in the Santo Tomas II (Philex) porphyry copper-gold deposit, Luzon Island, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkian, M.; Koopmann, G.

    1995-02-01

    Mineralized quartz diorites of the Santo Tomas II porphyry copper-gold deposit, carry high Au contents (average: 1.8 ppm) as well as 160 ppb Pd and 38 ppb Pt. Values of other platinum-group elements (PGE) and rhenium are below the analytical detection limits. There is a significant positive correlation between Au and Cu. The highest Pd values were detected in the most Au- and Cu-rich rocks. Platinum-group minerals (PGM) occur exclusively as inclusions in chalcopyrite and bornite. Potential Pd and Pt contents in sulphide concentrates are estimated at 1.5 g/t and 0.4 g/t, respectively. The precious metal assemblages consist of merenskyite (main PGM), kotulskite, moncheite, native gold, electrum, hessite and petzite. Polyphase fluid inclusions in quartz veinlets, associated with a PGM-bearing bornite-chalcopyrite-magnetite assemblage, are characterized by high salinity (35 to > 60 eq. wt% NaCl) and high trapping temperatures (between 380 and 520 °C). They may represent primary magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, which have been responsible for the transport of Pd, Pt and Au as chloride complexes.

  8. Component conversion from pure Au nanorods to multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods assisted by Pt nanoframe templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2016-06-01

    We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications.We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03484e

  9. Ordered arrays of Au catalysts by FIB assisted heterogeneous dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkouider, A.; Ronda, A.; David, T.; Favre, L.; Abbarchi, M.; Naffouti, M.; Osmond, J.; Delobbe, A.; Sudraud, P.; Berbezier, I.

    2015-12-01

    Synthesizing Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts that are homogeneous in size and have controlled position is becoming a challenging and crucial prequisite for the fabrication of ordered semiconductor nanowires. In this study, Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts are synthesized via dewetting of Au layers on Si(111) during thermal annealing in an ultra-high vacuum. In the first part of the paper, the mechanism of homogeneous dewetting is analyzed as a function of the Au-deposited thickness (h Au). We distinguish three different dewetting regimes: (I) for a low thickness ({h}{{Au}}≤slant 0.4 {nm}), a submonolyer coverage of Au is stabilized and there is no dewetting. (II) For an intermediate thickness (0.4 {nm}\\lt {h}{Au}≤slant 5 {nm}), there is both dewetting and Au0.8Si0.2 phase formation. The size and density of the Au0.8Si0.2 clusters are directly related to h Au. When cooling down to room temperature, the clusters decompose and reject the Si at the Au/Si substrate interface. (III) For a large thickness ({h}{{Au}}\\gt 5 {nm}), only dewetting takes place, without forming AuSi clusters. In this regime, the dewetting is kinetically controlled by the self-diffusion of Au (activation energy ∼0.43 eV) without evidence of an Si-alloying effect. As a practical consequence, when relying solely on the homogeneous dewetting of Au/Si(111) to form the Au0.8Si0.2 catalysts (without a supply of Si atoms from vapor), regime II should be used to obtain good size and density control. In the second part of the paper, a process for ordering the catalysts using focused ion beam-(FIB) assisted dewetting (heterogeneous dewetting) is developed. We show that no matter what the FIB milling conditions and the Au nominal thickness are, dewetting is promoted by ion beam irradiation and is accompanied by the formation of Au0.8Si0.2 droplets. The droplets preferentially form on the patterned areas, while in similar annealing conditions, they do not form on the unpatterned areas. This behavior is attributed

  10. Genesis of Middle Miocene Yellowstone hotspot-related bonanza epithermal Au-Ag deposits, Northern Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, J. A.; Unger, D. L.; Kamenov, G. D.; Fayek, M.; Hames, W. E.; Utterback, W. C.

    2008-09-01

    Epithermal deposits with bonanza Au-Ag veins in the northern Great Basin (NGB) are spatially and temporally associated with Middle Miocene bimodal volcanism that was related to a mantle plume that has now migrated to the Yellowstone National Park area. The Au-Ag deposits formed between 16.5 and 14 Ma, but exhibit different mineralogical compositions, the latter due to the nature of the country rocks hosting the deposits. Where host rocks were primarily of meta-sedimentary or granitic origin, adularia-rich gold mineralization formed. Where glassy rhyolitic country rocks host veins, colloidal silica textures and precious metal-colloid aggregation textures resulted. Where basalts are the country rocks, clay-rich mineralization (with silica minerals, adularia, and carbonate) developed. Oxygen isotope data from quartz (originally amorphous silica and gels) from super-high-grade banded ores from the Sleeper deposit show that ore-forming solutions had δ 18O values up to 10‰ heavier than mid-Miocene meteoric water. The geochemical signature of the ores (including their Se-rich nature) is interpreted here to reflect a mantle source for the “epithermal suite” elements (Au, Ag, Se, Te, As, Sb, Hg) and that signature is preserved to shallow crustal levels because of the similar volatility and aqueous geochemical behavior of the “epithermal suite” elements. A mantle source for the gold in the deposits is further supported by the Pb isotopic signature of the gold ores. Apparently the host rocks control the mineralization style and gangue mineralogy of ores. However, all deposits are considered to have derived precious metals and metalloids from mafic magmas related to the initial emergence of the Yellowstone hotspot. Basalt-derived volatiles and metal(loid)s are inferred to have been absorbed by meteoric-water-dominated geothermal systems heated by shallow rhyolitic magma chambers. Episodic discharge of volatiles and metal(loid)s from deep basaltic magmas mixed with

  11. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-25

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater.

  12. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater.

  13. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater. PMID:26911272

  14. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater. PMID:26911272

  15. Gold Apes Hydrogen. The Structure and Bonding in the Planar B7Au2- and B7Au2 Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Hua JIN.; Wang, Lai S.; Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2006-02-09

    We produced the B7Au2- mixed cluster and studied its electronic structure and chemical bonding using photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The photoelectron spectra of B7Au2- were observed to be relatively simple with vibrational resolution, in contrast to the complicated spectra observed for pure B7-, which had contributions from three isomers (Alexandrova et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2004, 108, 3509). Theoretical calculations show that B7Au2- possesses an extremely stable planar structure, identical to that of B7H2-, demonstrating that Au mimics H in its bonding to boron, analogous to the Au-Si bonding. The ground state structure of B7Au2- (B7H2-) can be viewed as adding two Au (H) atoms to the terminal B atoms of a higher-lying planar isomer of B7-. The bonding and stability in the planar B7Au2- (B7H2-) clusters are elucidated on the basis of the strong covalent B-Au (H) bonding and the concepts of aromaticity/antiaromaticity in these systems.

  16. PHENIX Results for J/{psi} Transverse Momentum and Rapidity Dependence in Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, A. M.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured J/{psi} production in {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at forward (1.2 < |y| < 2.2) and mid (|y| < 0.35) rapidities. The most recent results for the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence of J/{psi} production are presented and compared with PHENIX baseline p + p measurements and selected theoretical calculations. We find that the J/{psi} production is significantly more suppressed, as compared to p + p, at forward rapidity than at mid rapidity in central Au+Au collisions.

  17. Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-09-29

    We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur. PMID:17026027

  18. Detrital Mineral Grains in Tektites.

    PubMed

    Bairnes, V E

    1963-12-27

    Abundant detrital crystalline mineral grains have been found in layered Muong Nong-type indochinite tektites from Nong Sapong, northeastern Thailand. These grains are an integral part of some tektite layers, and their presence furnishes strong presumptive evidence that indochinites, as well as other tektite groups in which layered specimens occur, formed from surficial earth materials.

  19. Mineral evolution and Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight C.

    2015-01-01

    The field of mineral evolution—a merger of mineralogy and Earth history—coalesced in 2008 with the first of several global syntheses by Robert Hazen and coworkers in the American Mineralogist. They showed that the cumulative abundance of mineral species has a stepwise trend with first appearances tied to various transitions in Earth history such as the end of planetary accretion at ca. 4.55 Ga and the onset of bio-mediated mineralogy at ca. >2.5 Ga. A global age distribution is best established for zircon. Observed abundance of zircon fluctuates through more than an order of magnitude during successive supercontinent cycles. The pulse of the Earth is also recorded, albeit imperfectly, by the 87Sr/86Sr composition of marine biogenic calcite; the Sr-isotopic ratio of this mineral reflects the balance of inputs of primitive strontium at mid-ocean ridges and evolved strontium that drains off the continents. A global mineral evolution database, currently in the works, will greatly facilitate the compilation and analysis of extant data and the expansion of research in mineralogy outside its traditional bounds and into more interdisciplinary realms.

  20. Mineral of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  1. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  2. Mineral impurities in coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Raask, E.

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses the many and varied problems associated with coal combustion and suggests remedial measures to assist in producing electrical energy from coal more efficiently. Contents include: influence of coal mineral matter on boiler design; mineral impurities in coal; quality of coal utilized in power stations; coal grinding, abrasive fuel minerals and plant wear; particulates silicate minerals in boiler flame; reactions of nonsilicate impurities in coal flame; creation, capture and coalescence of particulate ash in boiler flame; slag viscosity; sintering, fusion and slagging propensities of coal ashes, adhesion of ash deposit on boiler tubes and refractory materials; deposition mechanisms, rate measurements and the mode of formation of boiler deposits; thermal radiation and heat transfer properties of boiler deposits; measures to combat boiler fouling and slagging; some specific ash-related problems with US Coals; use of additives in coal fired boilers; high temperature corrosion in coal-fired plants; ash impaction erosion wear; low temeprature fouling and corrosion; comparison of ash-related problems in pulverized fuel and other coal-fired systems.

  3. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  4. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  5. Detrital Mineral Grains in Tektites.

    PubMed

    Bairnes, V E

    1963-12-27

    Abundant detrital crystalline mineral grains have been found in layered Muong Nong-type indochinite tektites from Nong Sapong, northeastern Thailand. These grains are an integral part of some tektite layers, and their presence furnishes strong presumptive evidence that indochinites, as well as other tektite groups in which layered specimens occur, formed from surficial earth materials. PMID:17834370

  6. Mineral of the month: rhenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magyar, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium, an exotic, heat-resistant metal, has grown in importance since its discovery nearly 80 years ago. First isolated by a team of German chemists studying a platinum ore, the mineral was named for the Rhine River. From then until the 1960s, only 2 metric tons of rhenium were produced worldwide. In 2004, worldwide production was 40 metric tons.

  7. Ore-microscopic and geochemical characteristics of gold-bearing sulfide minerals, El Sid Gold mine, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bouseily, A. M.; El-Dahhar, M. A.; Arslan, A. I.

    1985-07-01

    Gold deposits at El Sid are confined to hydrothermal quartz veins which contain pyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite and galena. These veins occur at the contact between granite and serpentinite and extend into the serpentinite through a thick zone of graphite schist. Gold occurs in the mineralized zone either as free gold in quartz gangue or dissolved in the sulfide minerals. Ore-microscopic study revealed that Au-bearing sulfides were deposited in two successive stages with early pyrite and arsenopyrite followed by sphalerite and galena. Gold was deposited during both stages, largely intergrown with sphalerite and filling microfractures in pyrite and arsenopyrite. Spectrochemical analyses of separated pyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite and galena showed that these sulfides have similar average Au contents. Pyrite is relatively depleted in Ag and Te. This suggests that native gold was deposited in the early stage of mineralization. Arsenopyrite and galena show relatively high concentrations of Te. They are also respectively rich in Au and Ag. Tellurides are, thus, expected to be deposited together with arsenopyrite and galena.

  8. Ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in Au/semiconductor nanoheterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambright, Scott

    The charge carrier dynamics in several Au/semiconductor core/shell heterostructures were examined. Firstly, Au/CdS core/shell nanocomposites were synthesized in a four step procedure culminating in a cation exchange performed on the shell. Previous studies of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in Au/CdS nanocomposites with epitaxial boundary regions reported the suppression of plasmon character in transient absorption spectra accompanied by broadband photoinduced absorption. The coupling of electron wavefunctions with lattice defects at the boundary of the two domains has been blamed for these phenomena. In the current study, transmission electron micrographs of Au/CdS synthesized using cation exchange showed no evidence of strain on the lattice of either component, while femtosecond transient absorption data show the retention of bleach regions attributed to CdS's 1S(e)-1S3/2(h) transition and Au's plasmon resonance. Accelerated rates of bleach recovery for both excitations ( tauexiton ≈ 300 ps, tauplasmon ≈ .7 ps) indicated that the interaction of Au and CdS domains leads to faster relaxation to their respective photoexcitations when compared to relaxation times in isolated Au and CdS nanoparticles. It was believed that the Au/CdS boundary was non-epitaxial in the presented core/shell nanocomposites. Secondly, these non-epitaxial Au/CdS core/shells were subsequently used to demonstrate near-field energy transfer from 5 nm diameter Au cores to CdS-encapsulated CdSe quantum dots. To this end, Au/CdS and CdSe/CdS nanocrystals were embedded in semiconductor-matrix-encapsulated-nanocrystal-arrays (SMENA) together. The encapsulation of both domains in the high band-gap semiconductor CdS was a means to suppress charge transfer between the two nanoparticles. The fluorescence intensity in these films was enhanced 6-fold in some cases as a result of the presence of Au domains. It was also demonstrated that the fluorescence enhancement was independent of the potential

  9. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  10. Chemical Bonding in Sulfide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2006-08-01

    An understanding of chemical bonding and electronic structure in sulfide minerals is central to any attempt at understanding their crystal structures, stabilities and physical properties. It is also an essential precursor to understanding reactivity through modeling surface structure at the molecular scale. In recent decades, there have been remarkable advances in first principles (ab initio) methods for the quantitative calculation of electronic structure. These advances have been made possible by the very rapid development of high performance computers. Several review volumes that chart the applications of these developments in mineralogy and geochemistry are available (Tossell and Vaughan, 1992; Cygan and Kubicki, 2001). An important feature of the sulfide minerals is the diversity of their electronic structures, as evidenced by their electrical and magnetic properties (see Pearce et al. 2006, this volume). Thus, sulfide minerals range from insulators through semiconductors to metals, and exhibit every type of magnetic behavior. This has presented problems for those attempting to develop bonding models for sulfides, and also led to certain misconceptions regarding the kinds of models that may be appropriate. In this chapter, chemical bonding and electronic structure models for sulfides are reviewed with emphasis on more recent developments. Although the fully ab initio quantitative methods are now capable of a remarkable degree of sophistication in terms of agreement with experiment and potential to interpret and predict behavior with varying conditions, both qualitative and more simplistic quantitative approaches will also be briefly discussed. This is because we believe that the insights which they provide are still helpful to those studying sulfide minerals. In addition to the application of electronic structure models and calculations to solid sulfides, work on sulfide mineral surfaces (Rosso and Vaughan 2006a,b) and solution complexes and clusters (Rickard

  11. Discriminant diagrams for iron oxide trace element fingerprinting of mineral deposit types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Céline; Beaudoin, Georges

    2011-04-01

    Magnetite and hematite are common minerals in a range of mineral deposit types. These minerals form partial to complete solid solutions with magnetite, chromite, and spinel series, and ulvospinel as a result of divalent, trivalent, and tetravalent cation substitutions. Electron microprobe analyses of minor and trace elements in magnetite and hematite from a range of mineral deposit types (iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG), Kiruna apatite-magnetite, banded iron formation (BIF), porphyry Cu, Fe-Cu skarn, Fe-Ti, V, Cr, Ni-Cu-PGE, Cu-Zn-Pb volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) and Archean Au-Cu porphyry and Opemiska Cu veins) show compositional differences that can be related to deposit types, and are used to construct discriminant diagrams that separate different styles of mineralization. The Ni + Cr vs. Si + Mg diagram can be used to isolate Ni-Cu-PGE, and Cr deposits from other deposit types. Similarly, the Al/(Zn + Ca) vs. Cu/(Si + Ca) diagram can be used to separate Cu-Zn-Pb VMS deposits from other deposit types. Samples plotting outside the Ni-Cu-PGE and Cu-Zn-Pb VMS fields are discriminated using the Ni/(Cr + Mn) vs. Ti + V or Ca + Al + Mn vs. Ti + V diagrams that discriminate for IOCG, Kiruna, porphyry Cu, BIF, skarn, Fe-Ti, and V deposits.

  12. Prediction of hidden Au and Cu-Ni ores from depleted mines in Northwestern China: four case studies of integrated geological and geophysical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ping; Shen, Yuanchao; Liu, Tiebing; Li, Guangming; Zeng, Qingdong

    2008-07-01

    Integrated geological and geophysical investigations were carried out in 26 active mines in Northwestern China during the period 2001-2006 to explore for hidden extensions of known ore bodies and to search for new mineralization. This paper presents four case studies from northwest China: the Kuoerzhenkuoa volcanogenic hydrothermal gold deposit, the Nanjinshan breccia-associated gold deposit, the Duolanasayi deposit, associated with a ductile-shear zone, and the Hulu magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide deposit. In these studies, detailed mine-scale geological studies were carried out to determine the location and controls on ore formation. Based on these investigations and a review of previous exploration data, genetic models for the deposits were evaluated, and specific new targets were generated. These target areas were tested with surface geophysical surveys using the Stratagem EH4 system, a hybrid-source magnetotellurics (MT) method. Analysis of the data obtained in the surveys identified geophysical target anomalies that were subsequently drilled. Many of these test holes demonstrate the presence of Au and Cu-Ni mineralization. Evaluation of the geological models was crucial in developing conceptual targets as a basis for surface geophysical surveys. These models established the most likely target areas where Au and Cu-Ni mineralization could occur, but they did not define the limits or the geometries of the mineralized zones. Hybrid MT surveys played an important role in defining the location of buried mineralized systems and in testing the validity of the conceptual targets. The resistivity cross-sections obtained by imaging the MT data established the boundaries and geometries of the host rocks, including the distribution of lithology, structures, alteration, and mineralization. The four case studies in this paper show how this integrated geological and geophysical approach was used successfully to discover hidden mineral deposits.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program—Mineral resource science supporting informed decisionmaking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Doebrich, Jeff L.

    2016-09-19

    The USGS Mineral Resources Program (MRP) delivers unbiased science and information to increase understanding of mineral resource potential, production, and consumption, and how mineral resources interact with the environment. The MRP is the Federal Government’s sole source for this mineral resource science and information. Program goals are to (1) increase understanding of mineral resource formation, (2) provide mineral resource inventories and assessments, (3) broaden knowledge of the effects of mineral resources on the environment and society, and (4) provide analysis on the availability and reliability of mineral supplies.

  14. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  15. Registration of ‘AU-1101’ peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AU-1101’ (Reg. No. CV-xxx, PI 661498) is a large-seeded virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) with high yield and medium maturity, uniform pod size and shape, high grade, superior shelling characters, low oil content, normal oleic acid content, and good flavor. AU-...

  16. Experimental Evidence for Electron Channeling in Fe/ Au (100) Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dekadjevi, D. T.; Ryan, P. A.; Hickey, B. J.; Fulthorpe, B. D.; Tanner, B. K.

    2001-06-18

    We present transport and structural data from epitaxial (100) and (111) Au/Fe superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy. From their analysis, we conclude that an electron channeling mechanism, due to strong specular reflection of the minority spin carrier at the Au/Fe interfaces, is responsible for the high conductivity in the (100) superlattices.

  17. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions. PMID:12935009

  18. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

    DOE PAGES

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developedmore » which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

  19. High-spin level scheme of {sup 183}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.T.; Zhou, X.H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Guo, Y. X.; Lei, X.G.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M.L.; De Angelis, G.; Marginean, N.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Axiotis, M.; Rusu, C.; Martinez, T.

    2005-01-01

    High-spin states in {sup 183}Au have been studied experimentally using the {sup 159}Tb({sup 29}Si,5n){sup 183}Au reaction at a beam energy of 140 MeV. Three- or higherfold {gamma}-ray coincidences have been measured using the detector array of GASP. The level scheme of {sup 183}Au was revised and extended. A rotational band proposed as the unfavored signature branch of the {pi}i{sub 13/2} band has been observed for {sup 183}Au. Interaction properties between the two negative-signature bands of the {pi}h{sub 9/2}-{pi}f{sub 7/2} system have been discussed for the light odd-A Au nuclei.

  20. Electrical Transport Properties of Au-Doped Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong Seung; Hong, Su Heon; Kim, Hyung Kwon; Kwon, Young Whan; Jin, Jung Il; Hwang, Sung Woo; Ahn, Doyeol

    2005-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules were doped with Au atoms and their electrical transport properties were measured. The Au doping was carried out by incubating a mixture of HAuCl4\\cdot3H2O and DNA solutions. The binding of Au atoms to DNA bases was identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The Au-doped DNA molecules were deposited on nanoelectrodes and the presence of the molecules between the electrodes was determined by both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Measurement of the current-voltage characteristics showed that the Au-doped DNA molecules exhibited a higher conductivity than undoped DNA molecules. Detailed analysis of the chemical composition shows that there is a strong possibility of reliably controlling the conductivity of DNA molecules using this method.

  1. Magmatic to hydrothermal evolution of the Deva porphyry Cu-Au complex, Apuseni mts, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascanu, P. M.; Rosu, E.; Kouzmanov, K.; Pettke, T.; Heinrich, C. A.; Udubasa, G.

    2003-04-01

    Geological processes in magma chambers and subvolcanic conduits -- such as saturation of a sulphide melt or a magmatic volatile phase, or simply increasing copper contents with progressive melt fractionation -- drastically influence whether or not a rich porphyry-type ore deposit may form. The aim of this study is to constrain the magma chamber processes involved in the genesis of an economic porphyry-type Cu-Au deposit. Our study focuses on the Deva porphyry ore-related magmatic system, which belongs to the South Apuseni calk-alkaline Miocene magmatic-metallogenic district. This district includes several similar magmatic structures (e.g., Deva, Rosia Poieni-Rosia Montana, Brad-Barza, Bolcana). Clear field relationships and minimal epithermal overprint make the Deva system very suitable for an extensive petrologic study of the role of magmatic chamber processes in the formation of porphyry-type ore deposits. Three types of andesites with variable Hbl to Bt+Hbl abundances forming subvolcanic bodies and plugs can be distinguished within the 10 km sized structure. K-Ar dating demonstrates development of the magmatic system within a relatively short period (12.8--11.8 Ma). The porphyry Cu-Au deposit has a central position and is related to the younger biotite-rich andesite. Specific processes such as magmatic fractionation, magma mixing, melt - phenocryst re-equilibration, or the exsolution of a sulphide melt and a magmatic volatile phase are well recorded as textural and microchemical features in phenocrysts in mineralized and barren intrusions. These include sieve textures of plagioclase and amphibole, coexisting melt and fluid inclusion assemblages in plagioclase and early hydrothermal quartz, core to rim chemical variations and sometimes inverse zonation of phenocrysts. In-situ EMP and LA-ICP-MS analyses of major to trace elements of melt and fluid inclusions and their host phenocrysts combined with detailed petrographic mapping will be used to reconstruct the

  2. Geochemical properties of soils surrounding the Deliklitaş Au deposit, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirat, Güllü; Aydin, Nasuh

    2016-08-01

    The Deliklitaş gold deposit is in northwest Turkey, where a renowned gold province containing many major hydrothermal deposits related to Tertiary volcanic rocks. Because of the limited outcrops in the region, one of the most effective ways to prospect for new deposits is soil sampling. In this study, 183 soil samples were systematically collected from the area around the Deliklitaş Au deposit. Metal content of the samples, and their relationships and distribution according to distance away from the ore body were statistically investigated. The analysis of metals and metalloids in soil samples yielded the following metal ranges: Au from 0.005 to 0.54 mg/kg (average 0.04); Ag from 0.03 to 2.66 (average 0.22); As from 3.4 to 315 (average 30.3); Sb from 0.15 to 19.25 (average 1.62); Cu from 2.5 to 35 (average 11.73); Pb from 17.4 to 545 (average 73.76) and from Zn 14-1240 mg/kg of soil (average 106.71). For the areal distribution of metals 50%, 70%, 90% and 95% of the cumulative data were used for contouring element contents in the soils, using 50% as the baseline value and 95% as the anomalous value. Eigen values, Varimax Rotation method with Kaiser Normalization tested and determined the suitability of the number of data sets. Factor numbers were determined as 3, according to Eigen values determined for the soil samples. Factor 1 refers to ore minerals of epithermal system, Factor 2 refers to main rock sources of Pb and Zn and Factor 3 refers to environmental effects. Agsbnd Au, Pbsbnd Zn and Sbsbnd As pairs show high correlation in the cluster analysis indicating element relations. Please add an overarching sentence here, on implications etc.

  3. Geochemical properties of soils surrounding the Deliklitaş Au deposit, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirat, Güllü; Aydin, Nasuh

    2016-08-01

    The Deliklitaş gold deposit is in northwest Turkey, where a renowned gold province containing many major hydrothermal deposits related to Tertiary volcanic rocks. Because of the limited outcrops in the region, one of the most effective ways to prospect for new deposits is soil sampling. In this study, 183 soil samples were systematically collected from the area around the Deliklitaş Au deposit. Metal content of the samples, and their relationships and distribution according to distance away from the ore body were statistically investigated. The analysis of metals and metalloids in soil samples yielded the following metal ranges: Au from 0.005 to 0.54 mg/kg (average 0.04); Ag from 0.03 to 2.66 (average 0.22); As from 3.4 to 315 (average 30.3); Sb from 0.15 to 19.25 (average 1.62); Cu from 2.5 to 35 (average 11.73); Pb from 17.4 to 545 (average 73.76) and from Zn 14-1240 mg/kg of soil (average 106.71). For the areal distribution of metals 50%, 70%, 90% and 95% of the cumulative data were used for contouring element contents in the soils, using 50% as the baseline value and 95% as the anomalous value. Eigen values, Varimax Rotation method with Kaiser Normalization tested and determined the suitability of the number of data sets. Factor numbers were determined as 3, according to Eigen values determined for the soil samples. Factor 1 refers to ore minerals of epithermal system, Factor 2 refers to main rock sources of Pb and Zn and Factor 3 refers to environmental effects. Agsbnd Au, Pbsbnd Zn and Sbsbnd As pairs show high correlation in the cluster analysis indicating element relations. Please add an overarching sentence here, on implications etc.

  4. High Transverse Momentum {eta} Meson Production in p+p,d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S. S.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}R{sub NN}=200 GeV. The eta mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, RdAu(p{sub T}){approx}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest pT broadening ('Cronin enhancement'). In central Au+Au reactions, the eta yields are significantly suppressed, with RAuAu(p{sub T}){approx}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of pT for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-pT world average of R{sub {eta}}/{pi}{sup 0}{approx}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies {radical}R{sub NN}{approx}3-1800 GeV as well as, for high scaled momentum xp, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}R=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-pT eta production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

  5. Geochemical element mobility during the hydrothermal alteration in the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposits at Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Doner, Zeynep; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposit represents one of the important copper source and mineral deposits in the Anatolian tectonic belt at Balikesir province, NW Turkey. It considered as a vein-type deposit locally associated with intense hydrothermal alteration within the brecciation, quartz stockwork veining, and brittle fracture zones in the main host rock that represented by hornfels, as well as generally related to the shallow intermediate to silicic intrusive Eybek pluton. Based on the field and geologic relationships and types of ore mineral assemblages and the accompanied alteration types, there are two mineralization zones; hypogene (primary) and oxidation/supergene zones are observed associated with three alteration zones; potassic, phyllic, and propylitic zones related to this porphyry deposit. The phyllic and propylitic alterations locally surrounded the potassic alteration. The ore minerals related to the hypogene zone represented by mostly chalcopyrite, Molybdenite, and pyrite with subordinate amount of marcasite, enargite, and gold. On the other hand they include mainly cuprite with chalcopyrite, pyrite and gold as well as hematite and goethite at the oxidation/supergene zone. This study deals with the quantitative calculations of the mass/volume changes (gains and losses) of the major and trace elements during the different episodes of alteration in this porphyry deposit. These mass balance data reveal that the potassic alteration zone that the main Cu- and Mo-enriched zone, has enrichment of K, Si, Fe, and Mg, and depletion of Na referring to replacement of plagioclase and amphibole by K-feldspar, sericite and biotite. While the propylitic alteration that is the main Mo- and Au-enriched zone is accompanied with K and Na depletion with enrichment of Si, Fe, Mg, and Ca forming chlorite, epidote, carbonate and pyrite. On the other hand the phyllic alteration that occurred in the outer part around the potassic alteration, characterized by less amount

  6. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  7. Local structure of disordered Au-Cu and Au-Ag alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, A. I.; Machavariani, V. Sh.; Rubshtein, A.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Voronel, A.; Stern, E. A.

    2000-10-01

    X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-diffraction (XRD) measurements of disordered alloys AuxCu1-x and Au0.5Ag0.5 prepared by melt spinning were performed. In the Au0.5Ag0.5 alloy, no significant local deviations of the atoms from the average fcc lattice were detected while in AuxCu1-x alloys, significant deviations of atoms from the average fcc lattice were found. Mean-square vibrations of the Cu-Cu distances revealed by the XAFS in AuxCu1-x alloys indicate the weakening of contact between Cu atoms in the dilute limit. Our computer simulation for AuxCu1-x clusters of 105 atoms reproduces the main features of both the XAFS and XRD data.

  8. Dynamic aperture calculation for the RHIC 2010 100 GeV Au-Au run lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the dynamic aperture calculation with the 2010 RHIC 100 GeV Au-Au run lattices. This study was initiated to understand the observed large beam decay in the Yellow ring after rf re-bucketing in the beginning of this run. The off-line linear lattice models and the interaction region non-linearity models are used. The large beam decay in the Yellow ring after re-bucketing was eventually eliminated by lowering the Yellow tunes to 0.21 from 0.235 with {beta}* = 0.7m lattice. In this note we only focus on the numeric simulation instead of the beam experiments.

  9. Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    We compare three semimicroscopic theories to the first data on particle production in central Au+Au collisions taken at RHIC by the PHOBOS Collaboration as well as to existing data on central Pb+Pb collisions taken at the SPS by the NA49 Collaboration. The Linear Extrapolation of Ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon Scattering to nucleus-nucleus collisions (LEXUS) represents the SPS data quite well but predicts too many particles at RHIC. The wounded nucleon model predicts too few particles at both the SPS and RHIC; the collective tube model predicts fewer particles still. This suggests a transition in the dynamics of particle production between s=17 and 56A GeV as one goes from the SPS to RHIC.

  10. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p¯ production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p¯ should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high pT region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p¯ suppression.

  11. Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2007-08-15

    We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high p{sub T} region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p suppression.

  12. Study of Kaon Isospin Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Andrew

    2002-10-01

    Recent theoretical studies have suggested that in heavy ion collisions the formation of disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) may result from the restoration and subsequent re-breaking of chiral symmetry. Searches for DCC have so far focused on the pion sector with little attention given to the Kaon sector. Recently however, Kapusta has suggested the observation of enhanced production of Ω and \\overlineΩ at s_NN = 17 GeV, in Pb+Pb collisions, can in part be explained by the production of many small strange DCC regions. Gavin and Kapusta have additionally shown that strange DCCs production may induce anomalous fluctuations of the Kaon total isospin. We present a statistical analysis of Kaon isospin fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at 130- and 200-GeV measured with the STAR apparatus. The analysis is based on the ν_dyn fluctuation measure which correlates the production of neutral and charged kaons.

  13. Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

    2010-02-10

    We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:20050692

  14. Strangeness Production in Au+Au Reactions at √ {SNN} = 62.4\\ GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, Ionut-Cristian

    The measurement of strangeness is a valuable tool for understanding the reaction mechanism of nuclear collisions since all the strange particles need to be created during the reaction. Also, strangeness enhancement is one of the predicted signals of the QGP. In the present work we will discuss the behaviour of the strangeness production (i.e. K/π ratio) with rapidity and baryo-chemical potential in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 A GeV. In this particular reaction, BRAHMS is able to identify particles over 3.5 rapidity units and thereby cover a wide range of bar {p}/p ratios, including the fragmentation region. We will show spectra and ratios of identified particles as a function of pT and rapidity.

  15. A comparative study of the Au + H2, Au+ + H2, and Au- + H2 systems: Potential energy surfaces and dynamics of reactive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorta-Urra, Anaís; Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the Au- + H2 collision, a new global potential energy surface (PES) describing the ground electronic state of AuH 2- system is developed and compared with the PESs of the neutral [Zanchet et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 034301 (2010)] and cationic systems [Anaís et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 091102 (2011)]. We found that Au- - H2 presents a H-Au-H insertion minimum attributed to the stabilization of the LUMO 3b2 orbital, which can be considered as the preamble of the chemisorption well appearing in larger gold clusters. While the LUMO orbital is stabilized, the HOMO 6a1 is destabilized, creating a barrier at the geometry where the energy orbitals' curves are crossing. In the anion, this HOMO is doubly occupied, while in the neutral system is half-filled and completely empty in the cation, explaining the gradual disappearance of the well and the barrier as the number of electrons decreases. The cation presents a well in the entrance channel partially explained by electrostatic interactions. The three systems' reactions are highly endothermic, by 1.66, 2.79, and 3.23 eV for AuH, AuH+, and AuH- products, respectively. The reaction dynamics is studied using quasi-classical trajectory method for the three systems. The one corresponding to the anionic system is new in this work. Collision energies between 1.00 and 8.00 eV, measured for the cation, are in good agreement with the simulated cross section for the AuH+. It was also found that the total fragmentation, in three atoms, competes becoming dominant at sufficiently high energy. Here, we study the competition between the two different reaction pathways for the anionic, cationic, and neutral species, explaining the differences using a simple model based on the topology of the potential energy surfaces.

  16. Modeling the Accretion Structure of AU Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Ján; Peters, Geraldine J.

    2012-12-01

    AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked Hα emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including Hα, Hβ, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R ⊙, thickness of 5.2 R ⊙, density of 1.0 × 10-13 g cm-3, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of ~8000 K transferring ~2.4 × 10-9 M ⊙ yr-1. We show Hα Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the Hα profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

  17. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.

  18. Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Daizy

    2009-07-01

    Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size ˜15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (1 1 1) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications.

  19. Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tables Online DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets Search the list ... Supplements: Background Information Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information Vitamin and Mineral Fact Sheets Botanical Supplement Fact Sheets ...

  20. Mineral Resources, Economic Growth, and World Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, David B.; Andrews, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    World mineral supply and demand is discussed. The economics of future mineral availability in terms of effects on pollution, land use, energy consumption, human settlements, and the international distribution of income are emphasized. (DT)

  1. Organosulfur-functionalized Au, Pd, and Au-Pd nanoparticles on 1D silicon nanowire substrates: preparation and XAFS studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Xingtai; Tang, Yuanhong; Sham, Tsun Kong

    2005-08-30

    A hybrid preparative method was developed to prepare organosulfur-functionalized Au nanoparticles (NPs) on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by reacting HAuCl(4) with SiNW in the presence of thiol. A number of organosulfur molecules-dodecanethiol, hexanethiol, 1,6-hexanedithiol, and tiopronin-were used to functionalize the Au surface. Size-selected NPs ranging from 1.6 to 7.5 nm were obtained by varying the S/Au ratio and the concentration of HAuCl(4). This method was further extended to the preparation Pd and Pd-Au bimetallic NPs on SiNWs. The morphology of the metal nanostructures was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The local structure and bonding of the SiNW-supported metal nanostructures were studied using X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS) [including both X-ray near-edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXAFS)] at the Au L(3)-, Pd K-, S K-, and Si K-edges. It was also found that the annealing of the thiol-capped Au NPs up to 500 degrees C transforms the surface of the thiol-capped NPs to gold sulfide, as identified using Au L(3)- and S K-edge XANES. We also illustrate that this preparative approach can be used to form size-controllable Au NPs on carbon nanotubes. PMID:16114963

  2. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  3. Mesozoic hydrothermal alteration associated with gold mineralization in the Mercur district, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.N.; Parry, W.T. )

    1990-09-01

    K/Ar dates and chemical data show that a Mesozoic gold-bearing hydrothermal system altered black shales of the Mississippian Great Blue Limestone throughout an area encompassing the Mercur gold district, Utah. K/Ar dates of illite veins and illite-rich, clay-sized separates of altered shales that are enriched in Au, As, Hg, Sc, and other heavy metals indicate that hydrothermal activity occurred from 193 to 122 Ma. Several ages from within the Mercur district cluster near 160 Ma and may date the minimum age of gold mineralization.

  4. Geologic setting and characteristic of mineral deposits in the central Wasatch Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Base- and precious-metal deposits in the central Wasatch Mountains southeast of Salt Lake City were mined for more than 100 years beginning in 1868. Deposits present in the Park City, Little Cottonwood, and Big Cottonwood mining districts include Ag-Pb-Zn ± Cu ± Au replacement and veins, a low-grade porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Cu-bearing skarns, a quartz monzonite-type (low F) porphyry Mo deposit, and high sulfidation (quartz-alunite) Au deposits. Most production came from polymetallic replacement and vein deposits in the Park City mining district, which has a recorded production of more than 1.4 million oz Au , 253 million oz Ag, 2.7 billion lbs Pb, 1.5 billion lbs Zn, and 129 million lbs Cu from 1872 to 1978. Production in the Little and Big Cottonwood districts, mostly from Pb-Ag replacement deposits, was much smaller. Most mineral deposits in the central Wasatch Mountains are genetically related to the Wasatch igneous belt, a series of high-K calc-alkaline stocks and cogenetic volcanic rocks that formed about 41(?) to 30 Ma. The mineral deposits mostly formed near the end of magmatic activity between about 36 to 31.4 Ma. A subeconomic porphyry Mo deposit in the Little Cottonwood stock is notably younger having formed about 26 to 23.5 Ma. The intrusive rocks were emplaced mostly along the westward extension of the west-trending Uinta arch during a period of NW-SE-directed extension, and much of the mineralization in the Park City district controlled by ENE-striking normal faults. About 15 degrees of eastward tilting of the central Wasatch Mountains during Late Cenozoic Basin and Range extension has resulted in progressively deeper levels of exposure from <1 km on the east to about 11 km on the west and in profound variations in the types of minerals deposits exposed in different parts of the range. Most deposits formed at paleodepths ≤5 km, and the most productive deposits in the Park City district formed at depths of 1 to 2 km. The prophyry Mo deposit in the

  5. CO Oxidation mechanism on CeO2-supported Au nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

    2013-09-08

    To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters(NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design Au13 and Au12 supported on a flat and a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the Au-CeO2 interface and the Au NC as well.

  6. Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: A detailed comparison of observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

  7. Influence of contacts on charge collection in an Au/CdTe/Au detector: A Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; KUBAT, J.; BELAS, E.; HOSCHL, P.; MORAVEC, P.; AND Praus, P.

    2010-12-01

    We report our simulations on the influence of contacts on charge collection in semi-insulating (CdZn)Te with Au contacts under radiation flux, employing simultaneous solutions of the drift-diffusion and Poisson equations. The type of the space charge and the distribution of the electric field in the Au/(CdZn)Te/Au structure at high fluxes reflect the combined influence of charge generated by band bending at the electrodes, and from photogenerated carriers trapped at deep levels. We show that the space charge originating from the latter approaches dominance at high fluxes while the influence of the contacts becomes negligible. The ratio of trapping and collection times at low fluxes strongly depends on band bending, due mainly to a change in the occupation of deep levels by injection or depletion from the contacts. Such dependence is weak at high fluxes; in this case, the space charge due to trapped carriers prevails over that formed due to band bending. These phenomena can cause the formation an electric-field minimum within the device (the pinch point), the position of which is influenced by the nature of the contacts. The field minimum can completely disappear or develop into a dead layer as band bending changes.

  8. USSR and Afghanistan mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Shroder, J.F. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Afghanistan is a geological complex in which plentiful minerals and fuels were formed. Western geologists explored that country during the last 100 years and produced many reports and maps. Real progress in a systematic analysis, however, was not made until the intensive efforts of the Soviet Union during the past two decades. By diplomatic and economic maneuvers, the Soviets took control of Afghanistan's nascent hydrocarbon indusry during the 1960s. Following the 1973 coup, the Soviets and Afghan supporters replaced pro-Western technical advisors and hampered Western-linked development. Intensive field investgations led to the discovery of hundreds of mineral deposits and several good petroleum prospects. The current Russian military occupation is partially subsidized with Afghanistan resources. 83 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Quarterly minerals outlook, June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the mineral industry of Wyoming. Petroleum production shows a slight annual decline. Many producers have been shutting in their natural gas wells due to the sharp decline in demand. Activities in the base, precious, and ferrous metals industry are summarized. Uranium and trona production is down from the previous year. Other minerals mentioned are gypsum, limestone, bentonite, and phosphorus. Production of coal is given by county. Electric utilities have not used all the coal they bought last year, and construction of several power plants have been delayed indefinitely. Underground coal gasification projects are mentioned. Tables present production forecasts for coal to 1990, for oil and gas to 1988, and for uranium and trona to 1987. 5 tables.

  10. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... yogurt legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils Zinc Zinc helps your immune system, which is ... peanuts legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils When people don't get enough of these ...

  11. Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past two decades, the aquaculture industry has expanded rapidly throughout the world and is expected to continue to grow in the years to come due to the high cost of harvesting fish from the oceans, the un-sustainability of ocean fishing methods, and the increased demand for fish as a resul...

  12. Miners custom-make trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Maintenance Department at Glenharold Mine in Stanton, North Dakota, has developed a custom solution to a nagging problem. Employees have fabricated a flatbed trailer to haul large equipment and have saved the mine the expense of investing in a new tractor-trailer. Using Lincoln Electric's Jetweld LH-100M to fillet weld Tl steel, the miners constructed a 200-t-capacity flatbed from scraps. The trailer can haul a D-10 bulldozer or a 60 cu-yd dragline bucket.

  13. Evaporites, petroleum and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book illustrates the expanding knowledge of evaporites as important reservoir seals, fluid aquitards, ore-hosting sediments, and economically viable sediments in their own right. Researchers, oil and gas professionals, minerals resource professionals, environmental specialists and others within geology and the other earth sciences shall utilize the information within this book in their understanding of the many recent discoveries and concepts involved in the field of evaporite sedimentology.

  14. Mineral of the month: garnet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Garnet is the general name given to a group of complex silicate minerals, all with isometric crystal structure, similar properties and chemical compositions. Garnet occurs in every color of the spectrum except blue, but it is most commonly red, purple, brown and green. Garnet necklaces dating from the Bronze Age have been found in graves and also among the ornaments adorning the oldest Egyptian mummies.

  15. Mine and mineral occurrences of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, G.J.; Bliss, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This inventory of more than 1000 mines and mineral occurrences in Afghanistan was compiled from published literature and the files of project members of the National Industrial Minerals project of the U.S. Geological Survey. The compiled data have been edited for consistency and most duplicates have been deleted. The data cover metals, industrial minerals, coal, and peat. Listings in the table represent several levels of information, including mines, mineral showings, deposits, and pegmatite fields.

  16. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore » coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  17. Wafer-level Au-Au bonding in the 350-450 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofteberg, Hannah R.; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Fasting, Eivind J.; Moen, Alexander S.; Taklo, Maaike M. V.; Poppe, Erik U.; Simensen, Christian J.

    2014-08-01

    Metal thermocompression bonding is a hermetic wafer-level packaging technology that facilitates vertical integration and shrinks the area used for device sealing. In this paper, Au-Au bonding at 350, 400 and 450 °C has been investigated, bonding wafers with 1 µm Au on top of 200 nm TiW. Test Si laminates with device sealing frames of 100, 200, and 400 µm in width were realized. Bond strengths measured by pull tests ranged from 8 to 102 MPa and showed that the bond strength increased with higher bonding temperatures and decreased with increasing frame width. Effects of eutectic reactions, grain growth in the Au film and stress relaxation causing buckles in the TiW film were most pronounced at 450 °C and negligible at 350 °C. Bond temperature below the Au-Si eutectic temperature 363 °C is recommended.

  18. Diamond and Unusual Minerals Discovered from the Chromitite in Polar Ural: A First Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Bai, W.; Fang, Q.; Meng, F.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Ultrahigh pressure (UHP) minerals, such as diamond, coesite, and pseudomorphs of octahedral olivine, and as well as about 80 other mineral species have been recovered from podiform chromitites of the Luobusa ophiolite, southern Tibet, and a new mineral, Luobusaite (Fe0.82Si2), has been approved recently by CNMMN. The UHP minerals from Luobusa are controversial because they have not found in situ and because ophiolites are currently believed to form at shallow levels above oceanic spreading centers. More detailed study and experimental work are needed to understand the origin and significance of these unusual minerals and investigations of other ophiolites are needed to determine if such minerals occur elsewhere. For this purpose, we collected about 1500 kg of chromitite from two orebodies in an ultramafic body in the Polar Urals. Thus far, more than 60 different mineral species have been separated from these ores. The most exciting discovery is the common occurrence of diamond, a typical UHP mineral in the Luobusa chromitites. Diamonds from Ural chromitite are clear, colorless, well-developed crystals with octahedral morphology, generally 0.2-0.3 mm in size. Attached with the diamonds and perhaps also occurring as inclusions within them are many minerals as chromite, MnNiCrFe alloy, native Si and Ta, corundum, zircon, feldspar, garnet, moissanite, confirming their natural origin and suggesting a long residence time in the mantle. Other mineral group include: (1) native elements: Cr, W, Ni, Co, Si, Al and Ta; (2) carbides: SiC and WC; (3) alloys: Cr-Fe, Si-Al-Fe, Ni-Cu, Ag-Au, Ag-Sn, Fe-Si, Fe-P, and Ag-Zn-Sn; (4) oxides: NiCrFe, PbSn, REE, rutile and Si- bearing rutile, ilmenite, corundum, chromite, MgO, and SnO2; (5) silicates: kyanite, pseudomorphs of octahedral olivine, zircon, garnet, feldspar, and quartz,; (6) sulfides of Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, Pb, Ab, AsFe, FeNi, CuZn, and CoFeNi; and (7) iron groups: native Fe, FeO, and Fe2O3. These minerals are very similar in

  19. Is Struvite a Prebiotic Mineral?

    PubMed Central

    Gull, Maheen; Pasek, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The prebiotic relevance of mineral struvite, MgNH4PO4·6H2O, was studied experimentally as a phosphorylating reagent and, theoretically, to understand the geochemical requirements for its formation. The effectiveness of phosphorylation by the phosphate mineral, monetite, CaHPO4, was also studied to compare to the efficiency of struvite. The experiments focused on the phosphorylation reactions of the minerals with organic compounds, such as nucleosides, glycerol and choline chloride, and heat at 75 °C for about 7–8 days and showed up to 28% phosphorylation of glycerol. In contrast, the compositional requirements for the precipitation of struvite are high ammonium and phosphate concentrations, as well as a little Ca2+ dissolved in the water. Combined, these requirements suggest that it is not likely that struvite was present in excess on the early Earth to carry out phosphorylation reactions. The present study focuses on the thermodynamic aspects of struvite formation, complementing the results given by Orgel and Handschuh (1973), which were based on the kinetic effects. PMID:25369744

  20. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.