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  1. 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... of the H1N1 flu vaccine. 1 The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is safe and well tested. Clinical trials ...

  2. Vaccines against influenza A (H1N1) pandemic.

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gomez, Jose Luis; Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; de León-Rosales, Samuel Ponce

    2009-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported, as of September 2009, that the influenza A (H1N1) influenza pandemic has originated >300,000 laboratory-confirmed cases and 3917 deaths in 191 countries. It is recognized that pandemic vaccines have their greatest impact as a preventive strategy when administered before or near the peak incidence of cases in an outbreak. Therefore, vaccination campaigns should be in place when influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines are available. We undertook this study to provide updated information on clinical evaluation of influenza A (H1N1) vaccines and review recommendations for influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaigns and public health policy. The following methods were used: 1) review of registry at ClinicalTrials.gov. 2) search of PubMed Central (PMC) for influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. 3) review of recommendations of WHO, Mexican Health Secretariat (SSA) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaigns. Until October 1, 2009 there were 11 available influenza A (H1N1) candidate strains provided by WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network. ClinicalTrials.gov registers 45 phase I and II clinical trials evaluating immunogenicity and safety of influenza A (H1N1) vaccines. Preliminary results support administration of a single dose and use of adjuvants. Main recommendations of WHO, SSA and ACIP include epidemiologic considerations, objectives, definition of target groups and reinforcement of other mitigation measures. The present pandemic of influenza A (H1N1) has shown mild to moderate severity. Vaccination strategies in Mexico will have the objective of decreasing severe outcomes, slowing transmission, protecting groups at increased risk of infection, complications, or death, and preventing overload of health services. Control of the pandemic should include reinforcement of other non-pharmacologic measures of mitigation and, importantly, an adequate strategy of social communication.

  3. [Vaccination against influenza A (H1N1) in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, A P; Kostinov, M P; Kuselman, A I; Voznesenskaia, N V

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of alterations of immune response regulation and possible risk of antenatal development of fetus in postvaccination period in pregnant women immunized against influenza A (H1N1). Women were vaccinated with MonoGrippol plus vaccine in the II trimester of physiological pregnancy. At certain intervals ofthe vaccination period (before the vaccination, 7 and 30 days after the vaccination) major biochemical markers in blood sera (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, urea) and levels of key cytokines in spontaneous and stimulated test (IL-1alpha, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IFNgamma, TNFalpha) were evaluated. Vaccination safety for the fetus and trophoblast development was evaluated by using human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and trophoblasitc beta-1-glycoprotein (TBG) levels. During vaccination in 13% of cases mild local reactions were noted, in 26.1%--general systemic reactions in the form of weakness, dizziness and headaches. Levels of major biochemical markers at days 7 and 30 after the vaccination did not have any significant difference from the initial values (p > 0.05). Cytokine levels in spontaneous and stimulated tests also did not change significantly. Markers of the course of pregnancy and fetus development (HCG, AFP and TBG) in the two groups observed had comparable values. Vaccination of pregnant women against influenza A (H1N1) by Russian subunit formulation (MonoGrippol plus) showed reactogenicity comparable to control group by the level of influence on general metabolic and immunologic homeostasis and on the course of pregnancy, which is an evidence of its safety.

  4. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Chilean commercial turkeys with genetic and serologic comparisons to U.S. H1N1 avian influenza vaccine isolates.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Gonder, Eric; Tilley, Becky; Hernandez, Andres; Hodgson, Jorge; Wojcinski, Helen; Jiang, Haijun; Suarez, David L

    2011-12-01

    Beginning in April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus caused acute respiratory disease in humans, first in Mexico and then around the world. The resulting pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) virus was isolated in swine in Canada in June 2009 and later in breeder turkeys in Chile, Canada, and the United States. The pH1N1 virus consists of gene segments of avian, human, and swine influenza origin and has the potential for infection in poultry following exposure to infected humans or swine. We examined the clinical events following the initial outbreak of pH1N1 in turkeys and determined the relatedness of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segments from the pH1N1 to two H1N1 avian influenza (AI) isolates used in commercial turkey inactivated vaccines. Overall, infection of turkey breeder hens with pH1N1 resulted in -50% reduction of egg production over 3-4 weeks. Genetic analysis indicated one H1N1 AI vaccine isolate (Alturkey/North Carolina/17026/1988) contained approximately 92% nucleotide sequence similarity to the pH1N1 virus (A/Mexico/4109/2009); whereas, a more recent AI vaccine isolate (A/ swine/North Carolina/00573/2005) contained 75.9% similarity. Comparison of amino acids found at antigenic sites of the HA protein indicated conserved epitopes at the Sa site; however, major differences were found at the Ca2 site between pH1N1 and A/ turkey/North Carolina/127026/1988. Hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) tests were conducted with sera produced in vaccinated turkeys in North Carolina to determine if protection would be conferred using U.S. AI vaccine isolates. HI results indicate positive reactivity (HI titer > or = 5 log2) against the vaccine viruses over the course of study. However, limited cross-reactivity to the 2009 pH1N1 virus was observed, with positive titers in a limited number of birds (6 out of 20) beginning only after a third vaccination. Taken together, these results demonstrate that turkeys treated with these vaccines would likely not be protected against pH

  5. Perspectives of Pulmonologists on the 2009-2010 H1N1 Vaccination Effort.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah J; Cowan, Anne E; Wortley, Pascale M

    2012-01-01

    Persons with high-risk conditions such as asthma were a target group for H1N1 vaccine recommendations. We conducted a mailed survey of a national sample of pulmonologists to understand their participation in the 2009-2010 H1N1 vaccine campaign. The response rate was 59%. The majority of pulmonologists strongly recommended H1N1 vaccine for children (73%) and adults aged 25-64 years (51%). Only 60% of respondents administered H1N1 vaccine in their practice compared to 87% who offered seasonal influenza vaccine. Other than vaccine supply, respondents who provided H1N1 vaccine reported few logistical problems. Two-thirds of respondents would be very likely to vaccinate during a future influenza pandemic; this rate was higher among those who provided H1N1 vaccine and/or seasonal flu vaccine. In total, the H1N1 vaccine-related experiences of pulmonologists seemed to be positive. However, additional efforts are needed to increase participation in future pandemic vaccination campaigns.

  6. Predicting H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs: the role of individual difference in consideration of future consequences.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xiaoli; Kim, Jarim

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the influence of individual difference in consideration of future consequences on H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs (i.e., perceived susceptibility to and severity of the H1N1 flu, perceived efficacy and safety of the H1N1 vaccine, and perceived self-efficacy in obtaining the H1N1 vaccine). A survey of 411 college students showed that consideration of future consequences had no direct effect on vaccine uptake, but higher consideration of future consequences was associated with greater perceived severity of the flu, higher perceived effectiveness of the vaccine, and greater perceived self-efficacy. Additional analysis suggested that consideration of future consequences had a significant indirect effect on vaccine uptake through perceived vaccine efficacy. Results of the study also revealed gender and racial differences in some of the H1N1-related health beliefs. Implications of the findings for vaccine risk communication are discussed.

  7. Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women--National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS).

    PubMed

    Ding, Helen; Santibanez, Tammy A; Jamieson, Denise J; Weinbaum, Cindy M; Euler, Gary L; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Lu, Peng-Jun; Singleton, James A

    2011-06-01

    We sought to describe vaccination with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent (2009 H1N1) and trivalent seasonal (seasonal) vaccines among pregnant women during the 2009 through 2010 influenza season. A national H1N1 flu survey was conducted April through June 2010. The 2009 H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage estimates were 45.7% and 32.1%, respectively, among pregnant women aged 18-49 years. Receipt of a health care provider's recommendation for vaccination, perceived effectiveness of influenza vaccinations, and perceived high chance of influenza infection were independently associated with higher 2009 H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage. Pregnancy during October 2009 through January 2010 was independently associated with higher 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage. The 2009 H1N1 vaccination level among pregnant women was higher than the seasonal vaccination level during the 2009 through 2010 season; it was also higher than vaccination among nonpregnant women with and without high-risk conditions. Health care providers and public health messaging played important roles in influencing vaccination behavior.

  8. Protection of Mice against Lethal Challenge with 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus by 1918-Like and Classical Swine H1N1 Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tsibane, Tshidi; Stertz, Silke; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Palese, Peter; Basler, Christopher F.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    The recent 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus infection in humans has resulted in nearly 5,000 deaths worldwide. Early epidemiological findings indicated a low level of infection in the older population (>65 years) with the pandemic virus, and a greater susceptibility in people younger than 35 years of age, a phenomenon correlated with the presence of cross-reactive immunity in the older population. It is unclear what virus(es) might be responsible for this apparent cross-protection against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. We describe a mouse lethal challenge model for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain, used together with a panel of inactivated H1N1 virus vaccines and hemagglutinin (HA) monoclonal antibodies to dissect the possible humoral antigenic determinants of pre-existing immunity against this virus in the human population. By hemagglutinination inhibition (HI) assays and vaccination/challenge studies, we demonstrate that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is antigenically similar to human H1N1 viruses that circulated from 1918–1943 and to classical swine H1N1 viruses. Antibodies elicited against 1918-like or classical swine H1N1 vaccines completely protect C57B/6 mice from lethal challenge with the influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 virus isolate. In contrast, contemporary H1N1 vaccines afforded only partial protection. Passive immunization with cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against either 1918 or A/California/04/2009 HA proteins offered full protection from death. Analysis of mAb antibody escape mutants, generated by selection of 2009 H1N1 virus with these mAbs, indicate that antigenic site Sa is one of the conserved cross-protective epitopes. Our findings in mice agree with serological data showing high prevalence of 2009 H1N1 cross-reactive antibodies only in the older population, indicating that prior infection with 1918-like viruses or vaccination against the 1976 swine H1N1 virus in the USA are likely to provide protection against the 2009 pandemic H1N1

  9. Vitamin D Levels, Natural H1N1 Infection and Response to H1N1 Vaccine among HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Momplaisir, Florence; Frank, Ian; Meyer, Wa; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemary; Tebas, Pablo

    2012-05-20

    BACKGROUND: Beyond its role in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D plays a critical role in immunological responses to pathogens. We evaluated the relationship between 25-OH vitamin D levels and susceptibility to natural H1N1 infection and H1N1 vaccine responses in HIV infected individuals. METHODS: This was a sub study of an H1N1 vaccine trial conducted at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009/10. We compared the 25-OH vitamin D levels among individuals with and without baseline evidence of prior H1N1 infection and between vaccine responders and non-responders. RESULTS: 120 participants enrolled in the trial, 71% male, 68% African American, median age 46 years. The majority had controlled HIV disease. At baseline, 86% had 25-OH vitamin D levels < 30 ng/ml and 54% had levels < 20 ng/ml. Thirty participants (25%) had evidence of prior H1N1 exposure. There was no difference in mean 25-OH vitamin D levels among patients with or without prior natural H1N1 infection (21 ng/ml vs 20 ng/ml, p=0.72). Among participants without previous H1N1 exposure, only 61% developed protective antibody titers following vaccination. 25-OH vitamin D levels were similar between vaccine responders (20 ng/ml) and non-responders (20 ng/ml) (p=0.83). CONCLUSION: Although 25-OH vitamin D deficiency was very common among HIV-infected individuals, it was not associated with natural susceptibility to H1N1 or to vaccine responses.

  10. Canadian newspaper coverage of the A/H1N1 vaccine program.

    PubMed

    Rachul, Christen M; Ries, Nola M; Caulfield, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    The A/H1N1 mass vaccination program in Canada garnered considerable attention from the media, including extensive newspaper coverage. Media reports have been shown to influence the public's health care decisions, including vaccination choices. We analyzed Canadian newspapers' portrayal of the A/H1N1 vaccine including mention of risks and benefits of the vaccine and whether the article supported, questioned or was neutral about the vaccine. We compiled a data set of Canadian newspaper articles (N = 234) and conducted a frequency content analysis to examine discussion and/or mention of evidence concerning vaccination, risks of the A/H1N1 virus and the vaccine, and tone of article in regards to the vaccination program in Canada. Reasons for getting vaccinated appeared in 71.8% of the articles, whereas only 18.4% provided reasons against getting vaccinated. Discussion of evidence to support claims for or against getting vaccinated appeared in only 27.8% and 6.8% of the articles, respectively. Risks associated with contracting the A/H1N1 virus were discussed in 49.6% of the articles and risks of the A/H1N1 vaccine were discussed in 12.4% of the articles. Newspaper coverage in Canada was largely supportive of the A/H1N1 mass vaccination program. However, serious risks associated with contracting the A/H1N1 virus were also frequently discussed in the print media. The news articles rarely presented direct evidence to support statements that the vaccine was safe, effective and properly tested. Known risks (such as potential allergic reactions and flu-like side effects) of the vaccine were rarely reported. The relationship between media portrayals and vaccine uptake warrants further research.

  11. College students' perceptions of H1N1 flu risk and attitudes toward vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meagan A; Marczinski, Cecile A

    2011-10-13

    College students are highly susceptible to the H1N1 virus, yet previous studies suggest that college students perceive themselves at low risk for the flu. We surveyed 514 undergraduates to assess their perceptions of H1N1 flu risk and opinions about flu vaccines. A third of respondents stated that they were not at risk of getting the H1N1 flu because they were young. Responses indicated a distrust of the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccinations; only 15.8% of participants planned on receiving H1N1 vaccination. Top reasons for refusing the H1N1 vaccine included questioning vaccine safety and effectiveness, and concerns about potential serious and/or benign side effects. Top reasons for H1N1 vaccination acceptance included receiving a doctor recommendation for the vaccine, having previously gotten a seasonal vaccine, and being at high-risk for influenza. Our findings suggest that college students are inaccurate in assessing their risk level and are unlikely to seek vaccinations.

  12. Vaccine Narratives and Public Health: Investigating Criticisms of H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Abeysinghe, Sudeepa

    2015-02-25

    Vaccine hesitancy is often understood and explored on the level of individual decision-making. However, questions surrounding the risk and efficacy of vaccination are evident in wider public discourse; social narratives of vaccination inform and impact on the individual level. This paper takes a narrative analysis approach from the sociology of health to examine data drawn from a wider study on global public health responses to the H1N1 pandemic. The paper concentrates upon criticisms to mass vaccination as recounted within the Council of Europe's debate of the handling of H1N1. It shows that three narratives were particularly dominant: problematizing the use of vaccination as a public health response; criticising the efficacy of the vaccines; and, questioning the safety of the strategy. This debate presents an important case study in understanding the way in which vaccines are problematized within the public discourse.

  13. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims who received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Amr; Deming, Michael; Elkreem, Eman Abd; El-Refay, Samir; Afifi, Salma; Abukela, Mohammed; Earhart, Kenneth; El-Sayed, Nasr; El-Gabay, Hatem

    2011-07-01

    In Egypt, vaccination against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was required of pilgrims departing for the 2009 Hajj. A survey of 551 pilgrims as they returned to Egypt found 542 (98.1% [weighted]) reported receiving the vaccine; 6 (1.0% [weighted]) were infected with influenza virus A (H3N2) but none with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus.

  14. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Hajj Pilgrims Who Received Predeparture Vaccination, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kandeel, Amr; Abdel Kereem, Eman; El-Refay, Samir; Afifi, Salma; Abukela, Mohammed; Earhart, Kenneth; El-Sayed, Nasr; El-Gabaly, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    In Egypt, vaccination against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was required of pilgrims departing for the 2009 Hajj. A survey of 551 pilgrims as they returned to Egypt found 542 (98.1% [weighted]) reported receiving the vaccine; 6 (1.0% [weighted]) were infected with influenza virus A (H3N2) but none with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus. PMID:21762583

  15. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: an update.

    PubMed

    Goel, M K; Goel, M; Khanna, P; Mittal, K

    2011-01-01

    The world witnessed a the first influenza pandemic in this century and fourth overall since first flu pandemic was reported during the World War I. The past experiences with influenza viruses and this pandemic of H1N1 place a consider-able strain on health services and resulted in serious illnesses and a large number of deaths. Develop-ing countries were declared more likely to be at risk from the pandemic effects, as they faced the dual problem of highly vulnerable populations and limited resources to respond H1N1. The public health experts agreed that vaccination is the most effective ways to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic. The vaccines for H1N1 virus have been used in over 40 countries and administered to over 200 million people helped in a great way and on August 10, 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) announced H1N1 to be in postpandemic period. But based on knowledge about past pandemics, the H1N1 (2009) virus is expected to continue to circulate as a seasonal virus and may undergo some agenic-variation. As WHO strongly recommends vaccination, vigilance for regular updating of the composition of influenza vaccines, based on an assessment of the future impact of circulating viruses along with safety surveillance of the vaccines is necessary. This review has been done to take a stock of the currently available H1N1 vaccines and their possible use as public health intervention in the postpandemic period.

  16. Encephalitis related to a H1N1 vaccination: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ussel, Isabelle Van; Boer, Willem; Parizel, Paul; Cras, Patrick; Jorens, Philippe G

    2014-09-01

    To illustrate that acute, even dramatic, demyelination of the central nervous system and encephalitis can occur after viral, i.e., influenza A/H1N1 vaccination or infection. We describe a case of encephalitis/acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with vaccination against influenza A/H1N1 and review the available literature. We report a case of a 26-year-old female who developed symptoms of acute encephalitis 5 days after vaccination against the pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 influenza. MRI of the brain showed confluent T2-hyperintense signal intensity changes in the deep white matter which further confirmed the diagnosis of encephalitis/acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Despite therapy with immunoglobulins and corticosteroids, her persistent vegetative state continued. In light of the dramatic cause of this case, we reviewed all 21 other previously reported cases of central nervous system demyelination related to H1N1 vaccination and/or infection. The available data suggest that even severe central nervous system demyelination i.e. acute encephalitis/disseminated encephalomyelitis and transverse myelitis may very rarely be associated with vaccination against novel influenza A/H1N1 or with A/H1N1 infection itself. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy: comparison between post-H1N1 vaccination and sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Peltola, Hanna; Sarkanen, Tomi; Moghadam, Keivan K; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Partinen, Markku

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to compare post-Pandemrix vaccination (postvaccine) childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) vs. sporadic pre-H1N1 pandemic (pre-H1N1) cases. Clinical, anthropometric, polysomnographic, and cerebrospinal hypocretin 1 (hcrt-1) measurements were collected together with the video recordings of cataplexy in 27 Finnish patients with NC onset after H1N1 Pandemrix vaccination (mean age, 12±4 years; 52% boys) and 42 Italian NC patients with NC onset before the H1N1 pandemic (mean age, 11±3 years; 48% boys). All subjects carried the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele. Postvaccine subjects were older at NC onset (12±3 vs. 9±3 years; P=.008) and displayed a shorter mean sleep latency in multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) (2.3±2.2 vs. 3.7±2.9 min; P=.026) compared to pre-H1N1 cases. Anthropometric, clinical (core NC symptoms), hcrt-1 deficiency, and polysomnographic data did not differ among groups, but higher disrupted nocturnal sleep was observed in postvaccine subjects. Comparison of cataplexy features at video assessment showed an overlapping picture with the exception for hyperkinetic movements which appeared to be more evident in pre-H1N1 subjects. The clinical picture of childhood NC was similar in postvaccine and pre-H1N1 children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Events temporarily associated with anti-influenza A (H1N1) vaccination in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Patricia; Reyna, Jesús; Saldaña, Paulina; Richardson, Vesta L

    2011-10-01

    In Mexico from December 2009 to June 2010, 45,490,501 doses of the vaccine against the influenza virus were administered; 27,048,330 of those corresponded to influenza A (H1N1) and 18,442,171 to seasonal influenza. Therefore, the assessment of events temporarily associated with vaccination (ETAV) is mandatory. The database corresponding to the ETAV associated with influenza (A [H1N1] and seasonal) immunization reported between December 2009 and June 2010 was analyzed. Patients who displayed at least one ETAV with one of the following schedules were included: A) influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, B) seasonal influenza vaccine, C) influenza A (H1N1) vaccine and seasonal influenza vaccine. A total of 597 ETAVs were reported. The 20- to 49-year-old age group was the most affected one (52.9%). The ETAV notification rate for influenza A (H1N1) vaccination was 1.41/100,000 applied doses vs. 0.74/100,000 applied doses corresponding to the seasonal influenza vaccination. Fifty seven events were considered serious (14 corresponded to Guillain-Barré syndrome) and these were considered coincidental unrelated events. There is no evidence of an increased rate of Guillain-Barré Syndrome with respect to the cases expected in the general population. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  20. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  1. Vaccine-related internet search activity predicts H1N1 and HPV vaccine coverage: implications for vaccine acceptance.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Internet is a primary source for health-related information, and Internet search activity is associated with infectious disease outbreaks. The authors hypothesized that Internet search activity for vaccine-related information would predict vaccination coverage. They examined Internet search activity for H1N1 and human papilloma virus (HPV) disease and vaccine information in relation to H1N1 and HPV vaccine uptake. Google Insight for Search was used to assess the volume of Internet search queries for H1N1- and vaccine-related terms in the United States in 2009, the year of the H1N1 pandemic. Vaccine coverage data were also obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at the state level for H1N1 vaccinations in 2009. These same measures were collected at the state level for HPV- and vaccine-related search terms in 2010 as well as HPV vaccine uptake in that year. Analyses showed that the search terms H1N1 and vaccine were correlated with H1N1 vaccine uptake; ordinal regression found the H1N1 search term was independently associated with H1N1 vaccine coverage. Similarly, the correlation between vaccine search volume and HPV coverage was significant; ordinal regression showed the search term vaccine independently predicted HPV vaccination coverage. This is among the first studies to show that Internet search activity is associated with vaccination coverage. The Internet should be exploited as an opportunity to dispel vaccine misinformation by providing accurate information to support vaccine decision making.

  2. Understanding African American college students' H1N1 vaccination decisions.

    PubMed

    Cole, Angela P; Gill, Janel M; Fletcher, Kyla Day; Shivers, Cassandra A; Allen, Lauren Chanel; Mwendwa, Denee T

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of cognitive appraisals and individual differences in discomfort with uncertainty, as measured by a short form of Webster and Kruglanski's (1994) Need for Closure (NFC) scale, on African American college students' self-reported H1N1 vaccination decisions during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic. Howard University undergraduates, who self-identified as Black or African American and met U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) H1N1 high-priority group criteria, completed computer-administered surveys that included (a) questions about H1N1 vaccination status; self-efficacy; perceived costs, benefits, and efficaciousness of the H1N1 vaccine; and potential barriers to vaccination, including flu-shot frequency; (b) demographic measures; and (c) a short form of Kruglanski's NFC scale (Orehek et al., 2010). A sequential multinomial logistic regression revealed (a) a significant effect of NFC on vaccination status such that higher NFC was associated with lower odds of being vaccinated or intending to be vaccinated, after controlling for demographic variables, comfort with flu vaccinations more generally, and several other potential vaccination barriers, χ(2)(2, 217) = 10.08, p = .006; and (b) vaccination status was best accounted for by a model that included perceptions of the vaccine's costs, benefits, and efficaciousness, and participants' self-efficacy for being vaccinated, χ(2)(6, 217) = 57.24, p < .001. Our data suggest the importance of cognitive appraisals and traits (i.e., comfort with uncertainty) in the process individuals use to make potentially life-saving vaccination decisions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Cases of Narcolepsy-Cataplexy Syndrome Following H1N1 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    NALBANTOĞLU, Mecbure; BENBİR, Gülçin; KARADENİZ, Derya; ALTINTAŞ, Ayşe; SAVRAN OĞUZ, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome is a rare sleep disorder related with human leukocyte antigens (HLA-DQB1*0602) caused by the loss of hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin producing neurons. Recently, in European countries, Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome developing following H1N1 vaccination has attracted attention. Our first patient was a 9-year-old boy, who was referred to our clinic with the complaint of daytime sleepiness developed 1.5 month after H1N1 vaccination. After a couple of weeks, weakness of the upper extremities while laughing was added to the clinical picture. He also developed hypnopompic hallucinations and nightmares. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) following full-night polysomnography (PSG) showed that the mean sleep latency was 0.6 minutes; and all of the naps had sleep-onset REM periods. Our second patient was a 50 year-oldman, who presented to our clinic complaining of sleep paralysis and REM sleep behavior disorder developed 4 months after H1N1 vaccination. He developed daytime sleepiness 6 months after and cataplexy 8 months after H1N1 vaccination. He was also diagnosed as having Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome upon PSG and MSLT. We investigated HLA-DRB1/ DQB1 locus with Polymerase Chain Reaction-Sequence Specific Primer technique. The first patient had HLA-DQB1*0602.47 and DQB1*03.01 heterozygous loci; and the second patient had HLA-DQB1*0602.47 and DQB1*02.01 heterozygous loci. These patients are the first reported cases of Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome related with H1N1 vaccination in Turkey. Although there is no specific marker, temporal relationship between vaccination and onset of disease symptoms suggests a possible causal relationship. In the presence of an underlying genetic predisposition, it was thought that H1N1 vaccination could trigger Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome.

  4. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  5. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilyard, Karen M.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance…

  6. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  7. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilyard, Karen M.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance…

  8. Novel pandemic A (H1N1) influenza vaccination among pregnant women: motivators and barriers.

    PubMed

    Steelfisher, Gillian K; Blendon, Robert J; Bekheit, Mark M; Mitchell, Elizabeth W; Williams, Jennifer; Lubell, Keri; Peugh, Jordon; DiSogra, Charles A

    2011-06-01

    We sought to examine motivators and barriers related to monovalent 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccination among pregnant women. We conducted a national poll of pregnant women using a random online sample (237) and opt-in supplement (277). In all, 42% of pregnant women reported getting the vaccine. Vaccination was positively associated with attitudinal factors including believing the vaccine is very safe or benefits the baby, and with provider recommendations. Women in racial/ethnic minority groups, women with less education, and women <35 years were less likely to get the vaccine and had differing views and experiences. Despite H1N1 vaccination rates that are higher than past seasonal influenza rates, barriers like safety concerns may persist in a pandemic. Messaging from providers that encourages women to believe the vaccine is very safe and benefits their baby may be compelling. Messaging and outreach during future pandemics may require customization to increase vaccination among high-risk groups.

  9. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D.; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J.; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients’ CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research. PMID:26090827

  10. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients' CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research.

  11. Attitudes toward and Uptake of H1N1 Vaccine among Health Care Workers during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen Hellyer, Joan M.; DeVries, Aaron S.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Lackore, Kandace A.; James, Katherine M.; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y.; Poland, Gregory A.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though recommended by many and mandated by some, influenza vaccination rates among health care workers, even in pandemics, remain below optimal levels. The objective of this study was to assess vaccination uptake, attitudes, and distinguishing characteristics (including doctor-nurse differences) of health care workers who did and did not receive the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in late 2009. Methodology/Principal Findings In early 2010 we mailed a self-administered survey to 800 physicians and 800 nurses currently licensed and practicing in Minnesota. 1,073 individuals responded (cooperation rate: 69%). 85% and 62% of Minnesota physicians and nurses, respectively, reported being vaccinated. Accurately estimating the risk of vaccine side effects (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.5–2.7), agreeing with a professional obligation to be vaccinated (OR 10.1; 95% CI 7.1–14.2), an ethical obligation to follow public health authorities' recommendations (OR 9.9; 95% CI 6.6–14.9), and laws mandating pandemic vaccination (OR 3.1; 95% CI 2.3–4.1) were all independently associated with receiving the H1N1 influenza vaccine. Conclusions/Significance While a majority of health care workers in one midwestern state reported receiving the pandemic H1N1 vaccine, physicians and nurses differed significantly in vaccination uptake. Several key attitudes and perceptions may influence health care workers' decisions regarding vaccination. These data inform how states might optimally enlist health care workers' support in achieving vaccination goals during a pandemic. PMID:22216290

  12. Behaviors and perceptions regarding seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Barbra M; Scott, Janice; Hart, Jan; Winn, Virginia D; Gibbs, Ronald S; Lynch, Anne M

    2011-06-01

    We examined vaccination rates during pregnancy against both seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza and reasons for nonadherence to recommended guidelines during the 2009 through 2010 influenza season. Demographic and vaccination data were collected using a cross-sectional approach. Among 813 postpartum women, 520 (64%) reported receiving the seasonal influenza vaccination and 439 (54%) reported receiving the H1N1 influenza vaccination during pregnancy. Most received vaccinations at their obstetrician's office. Major reasons for not receiving vaccination were: not knowledgeable about the vaccine importance (25%), concerns for effects on fetal and maternal health (18% and 9%, respectively), and not knowledgeable about where to obtain vaccination (9%). Reported H1N1 influenza vaccination rates were significantly lower in blacks (37%) compared with non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, and Asian/other (57%, 59%, and 58%, respectively; P < .0001). Subsequent campaigns for improving vaccination rates in pregnancy should focus on educating patients about vaccine importance and safety. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Safety of pandemic H1N1 vaccines in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wijnans, Leonoor; de Bie, Sandra; Dieleman, Jeanne; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2011-10-06

    During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic several pandemic H1N1 vaccines were licensed using fast track procedures, with relatively limited data on the safety in children and adolescents. Different extensive safety monitoring efforts were put in place to ensure timely detection of adverse events following immunization. These combined efforts have generated large amounts of data on the safety of the different pandemic H1N1 vaccines, also in children and adolescents. In this overview we shortly summarize the safety experience with seasonal influenza vaccines as a background and focus on the clinical and post marketing safety data of the pandemic H1N1 vaccines in children. We identified 25 different clinical studies including 10,505 children and adolescents, both healthy and with underlying medical conditions, between the ages of 6 months and 23 years. In addition, large monitoring efforts have resulted in large amounts of data, with almost 13,000 individual case reports in children and adolescents to the WHO. However, the diversity in methods and data presentation in clinical study publications and publications of spontaneous reports hampered the analysis of safety of the different vaccines. As a result, relatively little has been learned on the comparative safety of these pandemic H1N1 vaccines - particularly in children. It should be a collective effort to give added value to the enormous work going into the individual studies by adhering to available guidelines for the collection, analysis, and presentation of vaccine safety data in clinical studies and to guidance for the clinical investigation of medicinal products in the pediatric population. Importantly the pandemic has brought us the beginning of an infrastructure for collaborative vaccine safety studies in the EU, USA and globally. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Medina, Rafael A; Manicassamy, Balaji; Stertz, Silke; Seibert, Christopher W; Hai, Rong; Belshe, Robert B; Frey, Sharon E; Basler, Christopher F; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-06-15

    The 1918 influenza A virus caused the most devastating pandemic, killing approximately 50 million people worldwide. Immunization with 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 virus vaccines results in cross-protective antibodies against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, indicating antigenic similarities among these viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccination with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine elicits 1918 virus cross-protective antibodies in mice and humans, and that vaccination or passive transfer of human-positive sera reduced morbidity and conferred full protection from lethal challenge with the 1918 virus in mice. The spread of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in the population worldwide, in addition to the large number of individuals already vaccinated, suggests that a large proportion of the population now have cross-protective antibodies against the 1918 virus, greatly alleviating concerns and fears regarding the accidental exposure/release of the 1918 virus from the laboratory and the use of the virus as a bioterrorist agent.

  15. Narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination

    PubMed Central

    van der Most, Robbert; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Destexhe, Eric; Wettendorff, Martine; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data from several European countries suggested an increased risk of the chronic sleep disorder narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix™, an AS03-adjuvanted, pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine. Further research to investigate potential associations between Pandemrix™ vaccination, A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and narcolepsy is required. Narcolepsy is most commonly caused by a reduction or absence of hypocretin produced by hypocretin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus, and is tightly associated with HLA-II DQB1*06:02. Consequently, research focusing on CD4+ T-cell responses, building on the hypothesis that for disease development, T cells specific for antigen(s) from hypocretin neurons must be activated or reactivated, is considered essential. Therefore, the following key areas of research can be identified, (1) characterization of hypothetical narcolepsy-specific auto-immune CD4+ T cells, (2) mapping epitopes of such T cells, and (3) evaluating potential mechanisms that would enable such cells to gain access to the hypothalamus. Addressing these questions could further our understanding of the potential links between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and/or infection. Of particular interest is that any evidence of a mimicry-based mechanism could also explain the association between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection. PMID:24342916

  16. Factors influencing the uptake of 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine in a multiethnic Asian population.

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping; Sam, I-Ching

    2010-06-17

    The study aimed to determine factors influencing the uptake of 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine in a multiethnic Asian population. Population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted between October and December 2009. Approximately 70% of overall participants indicated willingness to be vaccinated against the 2009 H1N1 influenza. Participants who indicated positive intention to vaccinate against 2009 H1N1 influenza were more likely to have favorable attitudes toward the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. A halal (acceptable to Muslims) vaccine was the main factor that determined Malay participants' decision to accept vaccination, whereas safety of the vaccine was the main factor that influenced vaccination decision for Chinese and Indian participants. The study highlights the challenges in promoting the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. Ethnic-sensitive efforts are needed to maximize acceptance of H1N1 vaccines in countries with diverse ethnic communities and religious practices. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hilyard, Karen M; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S

    2014-06-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance of the H1N1 vaccine, we examined data from a representative national sample of parents (n = 684), using the health belief model as a framework. The most important predictors of vaccine acceptance were "cues to action" at multiple levels, from intrapersonal to mass communication, including the influence of friends, family, the media, and modeling by the Obama family; costs and benefits and self-efficacy were also significant predictors of vaccine acceptance. Higher perceived levels of H1N1 risk were not associated with vaccine uptake. Results suggest that traditional measures of perceived risk may not account for the cost-benefit analysis inherent in vaccine decision making, and that messages designed to emphasize disease risk may be ineffective. The authors recommend emphasizing cues to action that support norming and modeling of vaccine acceptance.

  18. Racial and ethnic disparities in uptake and location of vaccination for 2009-H1N1 and seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Maurer, Jurgen; Harris, Katherine M

    2011-07-01

    To learn more about racial and ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination during the 2009-H1N1 pandemic, we examined nationally representative survey data of US adults. We found disparities in 2009-H1N1 vaccine uptake between Blacks and Whites (13.8% vs 20.4%); Whites and Hispanics had similar 2009-H1N1 vaccination rates. Physician offices were the dominant location for 2009-H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccinations, especially among minorities. Our results highlight the need for a better understanding of how communication methods and vaccine distribution strategies affect vaccine uptake within minority communities.

  19. Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease: the role of H1N1 infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Partinen, Markku; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Julkunen, Ilkka; Vaarala, Outi

    2014-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterised by loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. The prevalence of narcolepsy is about 30 per 100 000 people, and typical age at onset is 12-16 years. Narcolepsy is strongly associated with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 genotype, and has been thought of as an immune-mediated disease. Other risk genes, such as T-cell-receptor α chain and purinergic receptor subtype 2Y11, are also implicated. Interest in narcolepsy has increased since the epidemiological observations that H1N1 infection and vaccination are potential triggering factors, and an increase in the incidence of narcolepsy after the pandemic AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination in 2010 from Sweden and Finland supports the immune-mediated pathogenesis. Epidemiological observations from studies in China also suggest a role for H1N1 virus infections as a trigger for narcolepsy. Although the pathological mechanisms are unknown, an H1N1 virus-derived antigen might be the trigger.

  20. Narcolepsy and influenza A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 vaccination in the United States.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Jonathan; Weintraub, Eric; Vellozzi, Claudia; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-11-11

    To assess the occurrence of narcolepsy after influenza vaccines used in the United States that contained the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strain. A population-based cohort study in the Vaccine Safety Datalink with an annual population of more than 8.5 million people. All persons younger than 30 years who received a 2009 pandemic or a 2010-2011 seasonal influenza vaccine were identified. Their medical visit history was searched for a first-ever occurrence of an ICD-9 narcolepsy diagnosis code through the end of 2011. Chart review was done to confirm the diagnosis and determine the date of symptom onset. Cases were patients who met the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd edition, narcolepsy diagnostic criteria. We compared the observed number of cases after vaccination to the number expected to occur by chance alone. The number vaccinated with 2009 pandemic vaccine was 650,995 and with 2010-2011 seasonal vaccine was 870,530. Among these patients, 70 had a first-ever narcolepsy diagnosis code after vaccination, of which 16 had a chart-confirmed incident diagnosis of narcolepsy. None had their symptom onset during the 180 days after receipt of a 2009 pandemic vaccine compared with 6.52 expected, and 2 had onset after a 2010-2011 seasonal vaccine compared with 8.83 expected. Influenza vaccines containing the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus strain used in the United States were not associated with an increased risk of narcolepsy. Vaccination with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine viral antigens does not appear to be sufficient by itself to increase the incidence of narcolepsy in a population. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Associations between health communication behaviors, neighborhood social capital, vaccine knowledge, and parents' H1N1 vaccination of their children.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo; Lin, Leesa; Viswanath, K

    2013-10-01

    During the H1N1 pandemic in 2009-10, the vaccination behavior of parents played a critical role in preventing and containing the spread of the disease and the subsequent health outcomes among children. Several studies have examined the relationship between parents' health communication behaviors and vaccinations for children in general. Little is known, however, about the link between parents' health communication behaviors and the vaccination of their children against the H1N1 virus, and their level of vaccine-related knowledge. We drew on a national survey among parents with at least one child less than 18 years of age (n=639) to investigate Parents' H1N1-related health communication behaviors including sources of information, media exposure, information-seeking behaviors, H1N1-related knowledge, and neighborhood social capital, as well as the H1N1 vaccination rates of their children. Findings showed that there is a significant association between the degree at which parents obtained H1N1 vaccination for their children and health communication variables: watching the national television news and actively seeking H1N1 information. And this association was moderated by the extent of the parents' H1N1-related knowledge. In addition, the parents' degree of neighborhood social capital mediated the association between H1N1 knowledge of the parents and H1N1 vaccination acceptance for their children. We found, compared to those with a low-level of neighborhood social capital, parents who have a high-level of neighborhood social capital are more likely to vaccinate their children. These findings suggest that it is necessary to design a strategic health communication campaign segmented by parent health communication behaviors.

  2. [Impact of vaccination against influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Navarre: comparison of different scenarios].

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; García Cenoz, Manuel; Irisarri, Fátima; Arriazu, Maite; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    A specific vaccination campaign against influenza A (H1N1) was conducted in 2009. We evaluated its impact in Navarre. In the cohort of non-institutionalised population with chronic diseases covered by the Navarre Health Service (n=131,333), assuming 100% effectiveness from day 8 after administration of the pandemic vaccine, we estimated its impact on the prevention of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 cases and hospitalisations between weeks 47/2009 and 3/2010. In the nine weeks of the study, 973 cases of influenza syndrome were diagnosed (7 per 1000); but only 28% were due to influenza A (H1N1) 2009. In addition, there were 14 hospitalisations with virological confirmation (11 per 100,000). With 19% coverage with the pandemic vaccine (versus 40% with the seasonal vaccine), 7.7% of cases and 10.5% of hospitalisations were prevented during the study period. For each case prevented, 1092 doses of pandemic vaccine were administered, and for each hospitalisation avoided 15,021 doses were administered. If coverage had been the same as for the seasonal vaccine, it would have been possible to prevent 16.2% of cases and 22.2% of hospitalisations. If coverage had been double than for the seasonal vaccine and vaccination campaign had taken place two weeks earlier, it would have been possible to prevent 70.7% of cases and 68.0% of hospitalizations, with 261 doses needed to prevent one case and 6206 doses to avoid one hospitalisation. Despite the high effectiveness of the vaccine, its impact in Navarre has been minimal due to low coverage and late initiation of the vaccination campaign.

  3. Factors Affecting Medical Students' Uptake of the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siang I.; Aung, Ei M.; Chin, Ik S.; Hing, Jeremy W.; Mummadi, Sanghamitra; Palaniandy, Ghunavadee D.; Jordan, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Pandemic influenza vaccination rate amongst healthcare workers in England 2009/2010 was suboptimal (40.3%). Targeting medical students before they enter the healthcare workforce is an attractive future option. This study assessed the H1N1 vaccine uptake rate amongst medical students and factors that influenced this. Methods. Anonymised, self-administered questionnaire at a medical school. Results. The uptake rate amongst 126 medical students offered the vaccine was 49.2% and intended uptake amongst 77 students was 63.6%. Amongst those offered the vaccine, the strongest barriers to acceptance were fear of side effects (67.9%), lack of vaccine information (50.9%), lack of perceived risk (45.3%), and inconvenience (35.8%). Having a chronic illness (OR 3.4 (95% CI 1.2–10.2)), 4th/5th year of study (OR 3.0 (95% CI 1.3–7.1)), and correct H1N1 knowledge (OR 2.6 (95% CI 1.1–6.0)) were positively associated with uptake. Non-white ethnicity was an independent negative predictor of uptake (OR 0.4 (95% CI 0.2–0.8)). Students who accepted the H1N1 vaccine were three times more likely (OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.2–7.7)) to accept future seasonal influenza vaccination. Conclusion. Efforts to increase uptake should focus on routine introduction of influenza vaccine and creating a culture of uptake during medical school years, evidence-based education on vaccination, and improving vaccine delivery. PMID:23251794

  4. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)–forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  5. Twin Peaks: A/H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus Infection and Vaccination in Norway, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Van Effelterre, Thierry; Dos Santos, Gaël; Shinde, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaccination campaigns against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus (A/H1N1p) began in autumn 2009 in Europe, after the declaration of the pandemic at a global level. This study aimed to estimate the proportion of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p in Norway who were already infected (asymptomatically or symptomatically) by A/H1N1p before vaccination, using a mathematical model. Methods A dynamic, mechanistic, mathematical model of A/H1N1p transmission was developed for the Norwegian population. The model parameters were estimated by calibrating the model-projected number of symptomatic A/H1N1p cases to the number of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system, accounting for potential under-reporting. It was assumed in the base case that the likelihood of vaccination was independent of infection/disease state. A sensitivity analysis explored the effects of four scenarios in which current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection would influence the likelihood of being vaccinated. Results The number of model-projected symptomatic A/H1N1p cases by week during the epidemic, accounting for under-reporting and timing, closely matched that of the laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system. The model-projected incidence of symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was 27% overall, 55% in people <10 years old and 41% in people 10–20 years old. The model-projected percentage of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p who were already infected with A/H1N1p before being vaccinated was 56% overall, 62% in people <10 years old and 66% in people 10–20 years old. The results were sensitive to assumptions about the independence of vaccination and infection; however, even when current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was assumed to reduce the likelihood of vaccination, the estimated percentage of individuals who were infected before vaccination remained at least 32% in all age groups. Conclusion This analysis

  6. Twin Peaks: A/H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus Infection and Vaccination in Norway, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Van Effelterre, Thierry; Dos Santos, Gaël; Shinde, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination campaigns against A/H1N1 2009 pandemic influenza virus (A/H1N1p) began in autumn 2009 in Europe, after the declaration of the pandemic at a global level. This study aimed to estimate the proportion of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p in Norway who were already infected (asymptomatically or symptomatically) by A/H1N1p before vaccination, using a mathematical model. A dynamic, mechanistic, mathematical model of A/H1N1p transmission was developed for the Norwegian population. The model parameters were estimated by calibrating the model-projected number of symptomatic A/H1N1p cases to the number of laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system, accounting for potential under-reporting. It was assumed in the base case that the likelihood of vaccination was independent of infection/disease state. A sensitivity analysis explored the effects of four scenarios in which current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection would influence the likelihood of being vaccinated. The number of model-projected symptomatic A/H1N1p cases by week during the epidemic, accounting for under-reporting and timing, closely matched that of the laboratory-confirmed A/H1N1p cases reported to the surveillance system. The model-projected incidence of symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was 27% overall, 55% in people <10 years old and 41% in people 10-20 years old. The model-projected percentage of individuals vaccinated against A/H1N1p who were already infected with A/H1N1p before being vaccinated was 56% overall, 62% in people <10 years old and 66% in people 10-20 years old. The results were sensitive to assumptions about the independence of vaccination and infection; however, even when current or previous symptomatic A/H1N1p infection was assumed to reduce the likelihood of vaccination, the estimated percentage of individuals who were infected before vaccination remained at least 32% in all age groups. This analysis suggests that over half the people vaccinated

  7. Effect of Repeated Vaccination With the Same Vaccine Component Against 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Baz, Iván; Casado, Itziar; Navascués, Ana; Díaz-González, Jorge; Aguinaga, Aitziber; Barrado, Laura; Delfrade, Josu; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-03-15

    The 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (A[H1N1]pdm09) vaccine component has remained unchanged from 2009. We estimate the effectiveness of current and prior inactivated influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination from influenza seasons 2010-2011 to 2015-2016. Patients attended with influenza-like illness were tested for influenza. Four periods with continued A(H1N1)pdm09 circulation were included in a test-negative design. We enrolled 1278 cases and 2343 controls. As compared to individuals never vaccinated against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, the highest effectiveness (66%; 95% confidence interval, 49%-78%) was observed in those vaccinated in the current season who had received 1-2 prior doses. The effectiveness was not statistically lower in individuals vaccinated in the current season only (52%) or in those without current vaccination and >2 prior doses (47%). However, the protection was lower in individuals vaccinated in the current season after >2 prior doses (38%; P = .009) or those currently unvaccinated with 1-2 prior doses (10%; P < .001). Current-season vaccination improved the effect in individuals with 1-2 prior doses and did not modify significantly the risk of influenza in individuals with >2 prior doses. Current vaccination or several prior doses were needed for high protection. Despite the decreasing effect of repeated vaccination, current-season vaccination was not inferior to no current-season vaccination.

  8. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Chilean commercial turkeys with genetic and serologic comparisons to U.S. H1N1 avian influenza vaccine isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beginning in April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus has caused acute respiratory disease in humans, first in Mexico and then spreading around the world. The resulting pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) virus was isolated in swine in Canada in June, 2009, and later in turkey breeders in Chile, ...

  9. Rhabdomyolysis secondary to influenza A H1N1 vaccine resulting in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Callado, Rodrigo Barbosa; Carneiro, Tassia Gabrielle Ponte; Parahyba, Camille Carneiro da Cunha; Lima, Neiberg de Alcantara; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A infection has been described as a major viral cause of infection-induced rhabdomyolysis, but to date, only one reported case was described as having been induced by influenza vaccine. We describe a case of a man who had been using statins and developed rhabdomyolysis the day after influenza A H1N1 vaccination. A 58-year-old man was admitted at the emergency room complaining of impaired gait. The patient reported receiving influenza A H1N1 vaccine 5 days prior to the admission, with symptoms beginning the day after the inoculation. He reported ascending weakness, intense myalgia in the lower back, upper and lower limbs. The admission laboratory tests showed serum creatine phosphokinase: 7600 IU/L, creatinine: 3.0 mg/dL, urea: 185 mg/dL, aspartate aminotransferase: 592 IU/L, alanine aminotransferase: 630 IU/L, potassium: 5.4 mEq/L, lactate dehydrogenase: 2828 IU/L. Despite intravenous fluid therapy, the patient still persisted with oliguria and urinary output of 0.17 ml/kg/h. Hemodialysis was initiated and renal function recovery was observed after two weeks. The patient was hemodynamically stable and asymptomatic at hospital discharge. This is a rare side effect of influenza A H1N1 vaccine. Physicians should advise patients to seek medical care when muscle symptoms are present and consider the possibility of rhabdomyolysis due to vaccination. Trials are required to better define the incidence of this important side effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Hemagglutinin Vaccine Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Yáñez, José M.; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; García-Echauri, Sergio A.; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Bulnes-Abundis, David; Salgado-Gallegos, Johari; Lara-Mayorga, Itzel M.; Webb-Vargas, Yenny; León-Angel, Felipe O.; Rivero-Aranda, Ramón E.; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M.; Zertuche-Guerra, Manuel I.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; White, Stephen W.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Russell, Charles J.; Alvarez, Mario M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The A/H1N1/2009 influenza pandemic made evident the need for faster and higher-yield methods for the production of influenza vaccines. Platforms based on virus culture in mammalian or insect cells are currently under investigation. Alternatively, expression of fragments of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in prokaryotic systems can potentially be the most efficacious strategy for the manufacture of large quantities of influenza vaccine in a short period of time. Despite experimental evidence on the immunogenic potential of HA protein constructs expressed in bacteria, it is still generally accepted that glycosylation should be a requirement for vaccine efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings We expressed the globular HA receptor binding domain, referred to here as HA63–286-RBD, of the influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus in Escherichia coli using a simple, robust and scalable process. The recombinant protein was refolded and purified from the insoluble fraction of the cellular lysate as a single species. Recombinant HA63–286-RBD appears to be properly folded, as shown by analytical ultracentrifugation and bio-recognition assays. It binds specifically to serum antibodies from influenza A/H1N1/2009 patients and was found to be immunogenic, to be capable of triggering the production of neutralizing antibodies, and to have protective activity in the ferret model. Conclusions/Significance Projections based on our production/purification data indicate that this strategy could yield up to half a billion doses of vaccine per month in a medium-scale pharmaceutical production facility equipped for bacterial culture. Also, our findings demonstrate that glycosylation is not a mandatory requirement for influenza vaccine efficacy. PMID:20661476

  11. Quantifying and explaining accessibility with application to the 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign.

    PubMed

    Heier Stamm, Jessica L; Serban, Nicoleta; Swann, Julie; Wortley, Pascale

    2017-03-01

    Accessibility and equity across populations are important measures in public health. This paper is specifically concerned with potential spatial accessibility, or the opportunity to receive care as moderated by geographic factors, and with horizontal equity, or fairness across populations regardless of need. Both accessibility and equity were goals of the 2009 vaccination campaign for the novel H1N1a influenza virus, including during the period when demand for vaccine exceeded supply. Distribution system design can influence equity and accessibility at the local level. We develop a general methodology that integrates optimization, game theory, and spatial statistics to measure potential spatial accessibility across a network, where we quantify spatial accessibility by travel distance and scarcity. We estimate and make inference on local (census-tract level) associations between accessibility and geographic, socioeconomic, and health care infrastructure factors to identify potential inequities in vaccine accessibility during the 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign in the U.S. We find that there were inequities in access to vaccine at the local level and that these were associated with factors including population density and health care infrastructure. Our methodology for measuring and explaining accessibility leads to policy recommendations for federal, state, and local public health officials. The spatial-specific results inform the development of equitable distribution plans for future public health efforts.

  12. Causality Assessment of Serious Neurologic Adverse Events Following 2009 H1N1 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S Elizabeth; Pahud, Barbara A; Vellozzi, Claudia; Donofrio, Peter D; Dekker, Cornelia L; Halsey, Neal; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger P; Marchant, Colin D; LaRussa, Philip S; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Tokars, Jerome I; McGeeney, Brian E; Sparks, Robert C; Aukes, Laurie L.; Jakob, Kathleen; Coronel, Silvia; Sejvar, James J; Slade, Barbara A; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    Background Adverse events occurring after vaccination are routinely reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We studied serious adverse events (SAEs) of a neurologic nature reported after receipt of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the 2009–10 influenza season. Investigators in the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) Network sought to characterize these SAEs and to assess their possible causal relationship to vaccination. Methods Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) physicians reviewed all SAE reports (as defined by the Code of Federal Regulations, 21CFR§314.80) after receipt of H1N1 vaccine reported to VAERS between October 1st 2009 and March 31st 2010. Non-fatal SAE reports with neurologic presentation were referred to CISA investigators, who requested and reviewed additional medical records and clinical information as available. CISA investigators assessed the causal relationship between vaccination and the event using modified WHO criteria as defined. Results 212 VAERS reports of non-fatal serious neurological events were referred for CISA review. Case reports were equally distributed by gender (50.9% female) with an age range of 6 months to 83 years (median 38 years). The most frequent diagnoses reviewed were: Guillain-Barré Syndrome (37.3%), seizures (10.8%), cranial neuropathy (5.7%), and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (3.8%). Causality assessment resulted in classification of 72 events as “possibly” related (33%), 108 as “unlikely” related (51%), and 20 as “unrelated” (9%) to H1N1 vaccination; none were classified as “probable” or “definite” and 12 were unclassifiable (6%). Conclusion The absence of a specific test to indicate whether a vaccine component contributes to the pathogenesis of an event occurring within a biologically plausible time period makes assessing causality difficult. The development of standardized protocols

  13. Causality assessment of serious neurologic adverse events following 2009 H1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Williams, S Elizabeth; Pahud, Barbara A; Vellozzi, Claudia; Donofrio, Peter D; Dekker, Cornelia L; Halsey, Neal; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger P; Marchant, Colin D; Larussa, Philip S; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Tokars, Jerome I; McGeeney, Brian E; Sparks, Robert C; Aukes, Laurie L; Jakob, Kathleen; Coronel, Silvia; Sejvar, James J; Slade, Barbara A; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2011-10-26

    Adverse events occurring after vaccination are routinely reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We studied serious adverse events (SAEs) of a neurologic nature reported after receipt of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Investigators in the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) network sought to characterize these SAEs and to assess their possible causal relationship to vaccination. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) physicians reviewed all SAE reports (as defined by the Code of Federal Regulations, 21CFR§314.80) after receipt of H1N1 vaccine reported to VAERS between October 1, 2009 and March 31, 2010. Non-fatal SAE reports with neurologic presentation were referred to CISA investigators, who requested and reviewed additional medical records and clinical information as available. CISA investigators assessed the causal relationship between vaccination and the event using modified WHO criteria as defined. 212 VAERS reports of non-fatal serious neurological events were referred for CISA review. Case reports were equally distributed by gender (50.9% female) with an age range of 6 months to 83 years (median 38 years). The most frequent diagnoses reviewed were: Guillain-Barré Syndrome (37.3%), seizures (10.8%), cranial neuropathy (5.7%), and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (3.8%). Causality assessment resulted in classification of 72 events as "possibly" related (33%), 108 as "unlikely" related (51%), and 20 as "unrelated" (9%) to H1N1 vaccination; none were classified as "probable" or "definite" and 12 were unclassifiable (6%). The absence of a specific test to indicate whether a vaccine component contributes to the pathogenesis of an event occurring within a biologically plausible time period makes assessing causality difficult. The development of standardized protocols for providers to use in evaluation of adverse events

  14. Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Naval Health Research Center Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant Women and Their Newborns Ava M.S. Conlin Anna...Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns Ava Marie S. Conlin, DO, MPH, Anna T. Bukowinski...with either the pandemic H1N1 vaccine between October 2009 and June 2010 or with seasonal influenza vaccine between October 2008 and June 2009. Rates of

  15. [Evaluation of the influenza a H1N1 vaccination in Castilla and Leon regions, Spain].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rubio, Alberto; Eiros Bouza, Jose María; Castrodeza Sanz, Jose Javier

    2010-10-16

    The recent approval of influenza A H1N1 monovalent vaccine has attracted considerable public health interest. The aim of this paper is to assess the development of vaccination campaign in Castilla y Leon. We have performed a descriptive analysis of the number of vaccines given in Castilla y Leon from November 16, 2009 to January 17, 2010, inside the designed campaign for that purpose. The total number of vaccines administered has been 116,243, 86,810 of which were from Focetria(®) which were administered to 3286 children under 18 years; 28,439 were from Pandemrix(®) and 994 from Panenza(®). The estimated vaccination coverage for all of the target groups has reached a percentage of 26.3% while the coverage achieved in pregnant women has been 4.7%. Of all the vaccines administered during this period, 82.2% were applied in the first month of the vaccination campaign. The introduction of pandemic vaccine in target groups of Castilla y Leon has been lower than expected, with a mismatch between the different health areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlates of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptance among Middle and High School Teachers in Rural Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gargano, Lisa M.; Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Weiss, Paul; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Teachers play an essential role in the school community, and H1N1 vaccination of teachers is critical to protect not only themselves but also adolescents they come in contact within the classroom through herd immunity. School-aged children have a greater risk of developing H1N1 disease than seasonal influenza. The goal of this study…

  17. Correlates of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptance among Middle and High School Teachers in Rural Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gargano, Lisa M.; Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Weiss, Paul; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Teachers play an essential role in the school community, and H1N1 vaccination of teachers is critical to protect not only themselves but also adolescents they come in contact within the classroom through herd immunity. School-aged children have a greater risk of developing H1N1 disease than seasonal influenza. The goal of this study…

  18. Single dose vaccination of the ASO3-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 monovalent vaccine in health care workers elicits homologous and cross-reactive cellular and humoral responses to H1N1 strains

    PubMed Central

    Lartey, Sarah; Pathirana, Rishi D; Zhou, Fan; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Montomoli, Emanuele; Wood, John; Cox, Rebecca Jane

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCW) were prioritized for vaccination during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic. We conducted a clinical trial in October 2009 where 237 HCWs were immunized with a AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 monovalent vaccine. In the current study, we analyzed the homologous and cross-reactive H1N1 humoral responses using prototype vaccine strains dating back to 1977 by the haemagglutinin inhibition (HI), single radial hemolysis SRH), antibody secreting cell (ASC) and memory B cell (MBC) assays. The cellular responses were assessed by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) ELISPOT and by intracellular staining (ICS) for the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). All assays were performed using blood samples obtained prior to (day 0) and 7, 14 and 21 d post-pandemic vaccination, except for ASC (day 7) and ICS (days 0 and 21). Vaccination elicited rapid HI, SRH and ASC responses against A(H1N1)pdm09 which cross reacted with seasonal H1N1 strains. MBC responses were detected against the homologous and seasonal H1N1 strains before vaccination and were boosted 2 weeks post-vaccination. An increase in cellular responses as determined by IFN-γ ELISPOT and ICS were observed 1–3 weeks after vaccination. Collectively, our data show that the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine induced rapid cellular and humoral responses against the vaccine strain and the response cross-reacted against prototype H1N1 strains dating back to 1977. PMID:26009966

  19. Design and Characterization of a Computationally Optimized Broadly Reactive Hemagglutinin Vaccine for H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Donald M.; Darby, Christopher A.; Lefoley, Bradford C.; Crevar, Corey J.; Alefantis, Timothy; Oomen, Raymond; Anderson, Stephen F.; Strugnell, Tod; Cortés-Garcia, Guadalupe; Vogel, Thorsten U.; Parrington, Mark; Kleanthous, Harold

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the challenges of developing influenza A vaccines is the diversity of antigenically distinct isolates. Previously, a novel hemagglutinin (HA) for H5N1 influenza was derived from a methodology termed computationally optimized broadly reactive antigen (COBRA). This COBRA HA elicited a broad antibody response against H5N1 isolates from different clades. We now report the development and characterization of a COBRA-based vaccine for both seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus isolates. Nine prototype H1N1 COBRA HA proteins were developed and tested in mice using a virus-like particle (VLP) format for the elicitation of broadly reactive, functional antibody responses and protection against viral challenge. These candidates were designed to recognize H1N1 viruses isolated within the last 30 years. In addition, several COBRA candidates were designed based on sequences of H1N1 viruses spanning the past 100 years, including modern pandemic H1N1 isolates. Four of the 9 H1N1 COBRA HA proteins (X1, X3, X6, and P1) had the broadest hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) activity against a panel of 17 H1N1 viruses. These vaccines were used in cocktails or prime-boost combinations. The most effective regimens that both elicited the broadest HAI response and protected mice against a pandemic H1N1 challenge were vaccines that contained the P1 COBRA VLP and either the X3 or X6 COBRA VLP vaccine. These mice had little or no detectable viral replication, comparable to that observed with a matched licensed vaccine. This is the first report describing a COBRA-based HA vaccine strategy that elicits a universal, broadly reactive, protective response against seasonal and pandemic H1N1 isolates. IMPORTANCE Universal influenza vaccine approaches have the potential to be paradigm shifting for the influenza vaccine field, with the goal of replacing the current standard of care with broadly cross-protective vaccines. We have used COBRA technology to develop an HA head

  20. Design and Characterization of a Computationally Optimized Broadly Reactive Hemagglutinin Vaccine for H1N1 Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Carter, Donald M; Darby, Christopher A; Lefoley, Bradford C; Crevar, Corey J; Alefantis, Timothy; Oomen, Raymond; Anderson, Stephen F; Strugnell, Tod; Cortés-Garcia, Guadalupe; Vogel, Thorsten U; Parrington, Mark; Kleanthous, Harold; Ross, Ted M

    2016-05-01

    One of the challenges of developing influenza A vaccines is the diversity of antigenically distinct isolates. Previously, a novel hemagglutinin (HA) for H5N1 influenza was derived from a methodology termed computationally optimized broadly reactive antigen (COBRA). This COBRA HA elicited a broad antibody response against H5N1 isolates from different clades. We now report the development and characterization of a COBRA-based vaccine for both seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus isolates. Nine prototype H1N1 COBRA HA proteins were developed and tested in mice using a virus-like particle (VLP) format for the elicitation of broadly reactive, functional antibody responses and protection against viral challenge. These candidates were designed to recognize H1N1 viruses isolated within the last 30 years. In addition, several COBRA candidates were designed based on sequences of H1N1 viruses spanning the past 100 years, including modern pandemic H1N1 isolates. Four of the 9 H1N1 COBRA HA proteins (X1, X3, X6, and P1) had the broadest hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) activity against a panel of 17 H1N1 viruses. These vaccines were used in cocktails or prime-boost combinations. The most effective regimens that both elicited the broadest HAI response and protected mice against a pandemic H1N1 challenge were vaccines that contained the P1 COBRA VLP and either the X3 or X6 COBRA VLP vaccine. These mice had little or no detectable viral replication, comparable to that observed with a matched licensed vaccine. This is the first report describing a COBRA-based HA vaccine strategy that elicits a universal, broadly reactive, protective response against seasonal and pandemic H1N1 isolates. Universal influenza vaccine approaches have the potential to be paradigm shifting for the influenza vaccine field, with the goal of replacing the current standard of care with broadly cross-protective vaccines. We have used COBRA technology to develop an HA head-based strategy that elicits

  1. Predicting peptide vaccine candidates against H1N1 influenza virus through theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Bello, Martiniano; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul; Contis-Montes de Oca, Arturo; Correa-Basurto, José

    2015-05-01

    Identification of potential epitopes that might activate the immune system has been facilitated by the employment of algorithms that use experimental data as templates. However, in order to prove the affinity and the map of interactions between the receptor (major histocompatibility complex, MHC, or T-cell receptor) and the potential epitope, further computational studies are required. Docking and molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations have been an effective source of generating structural information at molecular level in immunology. Herein, in order to provide a detailed understanding of the origins of epitope recognition and to select the best peptide candidate to develop an epitope-based vaccine, docking and MDs simulations in combination with MMGBSA free energy calculations and per-residue free energy decomposition were performed, taking as starting complexes those formed between four designed epitopes (P1-P4) from hemagglutinin (HA) of the H1N1 influenza virus and MHC-II anchored in POPC membrane. Our results revealed that the energetic contributions of individual amino acids within the pMHC-II complexes are mainly dictated by van der Waals interactions and the nonpolar part of solvation energy, whereas the electrostatic interactions corresponding to hydrogen bonds and salt bridges determine the binding specificity, being the most favorable interactions formed between p4 and MHC-II. Then, P1-P4 epitopes were synthesized and tested experimentally to compare theoretical and experimental results. Experimental results show that P4 elicited the highest strong humoral immune response to HA of the H1N1 and may induce antibodies that are cross-reactive to other influenza subtypes, suggesting that it could be a good candidate for the development of a peptide-based vaccine.

  2. Impact of Body Mass Index on Immunogenicity of Pandemic H1N1 Vaccine in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, S. Todd; Wolff, Mark; Hill, Heather R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Keitel, Wendy; Atmar, Robert; Patel, Shital; Sahly, Hana El; Munoz, Flor; Paul Glezen, W.; Brady, Rebecca; Frenck, Robert; Bernstein, David; Harrison, Christopher; Jackson, Mary Anne; Swanson, Douglas; Newland, Jason; Myers, Angela; Livingston, Robyn A; Walter, Emmanuel; Dolor, Rowena; Schmader, Kenneth; Mulligan, Mark J.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Rouphael, Nadine; Whitaker, Jennifer; Spearman, Paul; Keyserling, Harry; Shane, Andi; Eckard, Allison Ross; Jackson, Lisa A.; Frey, Sharon E.; Belshe, Robert B.; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin; Englund, Janet A.; Healy, Sara; Winokur, Patricia; Stapleton, Jack; Meier, Jeffrey; Kotloff, Karen; Chen, Wilbur; Hutter, Julia; Stephens, Ina; Wooten, Susan; Wald, Anna; Johnston, Christine; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Buddy Creech, C.; Todd Callahan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity emerged as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality related to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection. However, few studies examine the immune responses to H1N1 vaccine among children and adults of various body mass indices (BMI). Pooling data from 3 trials of unadjuvanted split-virus H1N1 A/California/07/2009 influenza vaccines, we analyzed serologic responses of participants stratified by BMI grouping. A single vaccine dose produced higher hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers at day 21 in obese compared to nonobese adults, but there were no significant differences in responses to H1N1 vaccine among children or adults of various BMI following 2 doses. PMID:24795475

  3. Socioeconomic status, demographics, beliefs and A(H1N1) vaccine uptake in the United States.

    PubMed

    Galarce, Ezequiel M; Minsky, Sara; Viswanath, K

    2011-07-18

    Early vaccination against influenza viruses is a cost-effective solution to prevent contagion and reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality. In the face of pandemic viruses, such as the A(H1N1), adequate rates of vaccine uptake play a critical role in containing the spread and effects of the disease. In order to understand the reasons underlying the relatively low 2009-2010 A(H1N1) vaccination rates, we conducted an online survey of 1569 respondents drawn from a nationally representative sample of United States (U.S.) adults age 18, and older. Because prior research suggests that vaccination rates are especially low among some U.S. population subgroups, we oversampled participants from minority ethnic/racial groups and those living under the Federal Poverty Level. Our results show that A(H1N1) vaccine uptake is associated with sociodemographic factors, A(H1N1)-related beliefs and seasonal vaccination. That is, A(H1N1) vaccination is strongly associated with age, urbanicity, perceiving the A(H1N1) vaccine as safe and seasonal flu vaccine uptake. Perceptions of safety and season flu vaccination show the strongest associations with A(H1N1) uptake. The reasons people gave to decline vaccination varied by respondents' sociodemographic group. For example, Black participants were the most likely ethnic/racial group to reported having tried to get the vaccine but found it unavailable. Together, these findings suggest some clear pointers towards strategic public health communication efforts calling for communication campaigns towards audiences segmented by social class, race/ethnicity and beliefs, often what advertisers call "psychodemographics". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Vaccination in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Lisa A.; Lavelle, Tara A.; Fiore, Anthony E.; Bridges, Carolyn B.; Reed, Carrie; Jain, Seema; Dunham, Kelly M.; Meltzer, Martin I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) was first identified in North America in April 2009. Vaccination against pH1N1 commenced in the U.S. in October 2009 and continued through January 2010. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of pH1N1 vaccination. Methodology A computer simulation model was developed to predict costs and health outcomes for a pH1N1 vaccination program using inactivated vaccine compared to no vaccination. Probabilities, costs and quality-of-life weights were derived from emerging primary data on pH1N1 infections in the US, published and unpublished data for seasonal and pH1N1 illnesses, supplemented by expert opinion. The modeled target population included hypothetical cohorts of persons aged 6 months and older stratified by age and risk. The analysis used a one-year time horizon for most endpoints but also includes longer-term costs and consequences of long-term sequelae deaths. A societal perspective was used. Indirect effects (i.e., herd effects) were not included in the primary analysis. The main endpoint was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in dollars per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results For vaccination initiated prior to the outbreak, pH1N1 vaccination was cost-saving for persons 6 months to 64 years under many assumptions. For those without high risk conditions, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranged from $8,000–$52,000/QALY depending on age and risk status. Results were sensitive to the number of vaccine doses needed, costs of vaccination, illness rates, and timing of vaccine delivery. Conclusions Vaccination for pH1N1 for children and working-age adults is cost-effective compared to other preventive health interventions under a wide range of scenarios. The economic evidence was consistent with target recommendations that were in place for pH1N1 vaccination. We also found that the delays in vaccine availability had a substantial

  5. Profiles of influenza A/H1N1 vaccine response using hemagglutination-inhibition titers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; Grill, Diane E; Oberg, Ann L; Tosh, Pritish K; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Poland, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To identify distinct antibody profiles among adults 50-to-74 years old using influenza A/H1N1 HI titers up to 75 days after vaccination. Healthy subjects 50 to 74 years old received the 2010-2011 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine. We measured venous samples from Days 0, 28, and 75 for HI and VNA and B-cell ELISPOTs. Of 106 subjects, HI titers demonstrated a ceiling effect for 11 or 10% for those with a pre-vaccination HI titer of 1:640 where no subject post-vaccination had an increase in titer. Of the remaining 95 subjects, only 37 or 35% overall had at least a 4-fold increase by Day 28. Of these 37, 3 waned at least 4-fold, and 13 others 2-fold. Thus 15% of the subjects showed waning antibody titers by Day 75. More than half failed to respond at all. The profiles populated by these subjects as defined by HI did not vary with age or gender. The VNA results mimicked the HI profiles, but the profiles for B-cell ELISPOT did not. HI titers at Days 0, 28, and 75 populate 4 biologically plausible profiles. Limitations include lack of consensus for operationally defining waning as well as for the apparent ceiling. Furthermore, though well accepted as a marker for vaccine response, assigning thresholds with HI has limitations. However, VNA closely matches HI in populating these profiles. Thus, we hold that these profiles, having face- and content-validity, may provide a basis for understanding variation in genomic and transcriptomic response to influenza vaccination in this age group.

  6. The Decision to Vaccinate or Not during the H1N1 Pandemic: Selecting the Lesser of Two Evils?

    PubMed Central

    Ashbaugh, Andrea R.; Herbert, Christophe F.; Saimon, Elena; Azoulay, Nelson; Olivera-Figueroa, Lening; Brunet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background With the release of the H1N1 vaccine, there was much controversy surrounding its use despite strong encouragements to be vaccinated in the media. Though studies have examined factors influencing people's decision to be vaccinated, few have focused on how general beliefs about the world or where an individual gathers information might influence that decision. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional web-based survey (N = 817) was conducted during the H1N1 outbreak after the vaccine was available. Variables examined included sociodemographic information, health related behaviours, specific beliefs concerning the H1N1 virus and its vaccine, as well as general beliefs, such as fear of contamination, intolerance of uncertainty, emotional states, coping behaviour, and the source of information concerning the virus. Three converging statistical methods were used to examine the associations – analysis of variance, logistic regression, and recursive partition modelling. The most consistent and strongest association was that negative beliefs about the H1N1 vaccine (e.g. fear of its side effects) was related to the decision not to be vaccinated, whereas beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus was related to the decision to be vaccinated. Most notably, having very strong negative beliefs about the vaccine was a more powerful predictor than even strong beliefs about the dangers of the H1N1 virus. Furthermore, obtaining information from the Internet, as compared to more traditional sources of information (e.g., TV, newspapers) was related to the decision not to be vaccinated. Conclusions/Significance These results are consistent with the Health Belief Model. Importantly they suggest that during future pandemics public health officials should not only discuss the dangers of the pandemic but also (i) take additional steps to reassure the public about the safety of vaccines and (ii) monitor the information disseminated over the Internet rather than

  7. Polysomnographic and actigraphic characteristics of patients with H1N1-vaccine-related and sporadic narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Alakuijala, Anniina; Sarkanen, Tomi; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    After the pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine, Pandemrix©, was used in late 2009 and early 2010, the incidence of narcolepsy increased in many European countries. This incidence mainly increased in children and adolescents and, to a lesser degree, in adults. 125 unmedicated patients, aged 4 to 61 years, were included in this case-series study. Of these, 69 were diagnosed to have an H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy and 57 had sporadic narcolepsy. Most of these patients had: an actigraphy recording of 1-2 weeks, polysomnography, a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 concentration analysis. Patients with H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy had shorter diagnostic delays, lower periodic leg movement index during sleep, earlier sleep-wake rhythm, and were younger in age at diagnosis, compared with sporadic cases. They also had shorter sleep latency and more sleep onset REM periods in MSLT, but these results were strongly age-dependent. Actigraphy showed quantitatively less sleep and more sleep fragmentation than polysomnography. Regarding polysomnographic and actigraphic characteristics, there were no dramatic deviations between H1N1-vaccine-related and sporadic narcolepsy. Circadian rhythms indicated some interesting new findings with respect to the H1N1-vaccine-related disease. An actigraphy recording of 1-2 weeks is useful when studying the nocturnal aspects of narcolepsy and sleep-wake rhythms of narcoleptic patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving influenza vaccine distribution in preparation for an H1N1 influenza pandemic: lessons from the field.

    PubMed

    Wahlen, Mongeon Kari J; Bessette, Richard R; Bernard, Matthew E; Springer, Donna J; Benson, Catherine A

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine distribution is an essential component of any healthcare organization's pandemic influenza plan. Variables surrounding distribution in these circumstances are often difficult to anticipate and require careful consideration. The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic provided organizations with an opportunity to test current models and overall organizational readiness for the next influenza pandemic. This article describes the experiences at a large, midwestern, multispecialty medical system in responding to the unique circumstances surrounding distribution of the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine. We discuss challenges, variables to consider when choosing a vaccine distribution model, institutional response, and lessons learned.

  9. Humoral and cellular responses to a non-adjuvanted monovalent H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in hospital employees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficacy of the H1N1 influenza vaccine relies on the induction of both humoral and cellular responses. This study evaluated the humoral and cellular responses to a monovalent non-adjuvanted pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine in occupationally exposed subjects who were previously vaccinated with a seasonal vaccine. Methods Sixty healthy workers from a respiratory disease hospital were recruited. Sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained prior to and 1 month after vaccination with a non-adjuvanted monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine (Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine Panenza, Sanofi Pasteur). Antibody titers against the pandemic A/H1N1 influenza virus were measured via hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays. Antibodies against the seasonal HA1 were assessed by ELISA. The frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation specific to the pandemic virus A/H1N peptides, seasonal H1N1 peptides and seasonal H3N2 peptides were assessed using ELISPOT and flow cytometry. Results At baseline, 6.7% of the subjects had seroprotective antibody titers. The seroconversion rate was 48.3%, and the seroprotection rate was 66.7%. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) were significantly increased (from 6.8 to 64.9, p < 0.05). Forty-nine percent of the subjects had basal levels of specific IFN-γ-producing T cells to the pandemic A/H1N1 peptides that were unchanged post-vaccination. CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to specific pandemic A/H1N1 virus peptides was also unchanged; in contrast, the antigen-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells significantly increased post-vaccination. Conclusion Our results indicate that a cellular immune response that is cross-reactive to pandemic influenza antigens may be present in populations exposed to the circulating seasonal influenza virus prior to pandemic or seasonal vaccination. Additionally, we found that the pandemic vaccine induced a

  10. Seroprotective Titers against 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus after Vaccination in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Nicolas C.; Marty, Francisco M.; Gagne, Lisa S.; Koo, Sophia; Verrill, Kelly A.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Cutler, Corey S.; Koreth, John; Armand, Philippe; Ho, Vincent T.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Baden, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Little data are available regarding the safety and immunologic response to pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We measured serum antibody titers against A/California/7/2009 H1N1 using a hemagglutination inhibition assay in 82 allogeneic HSCT recipients who received the 2009 H1N1 vaccine between November 2009 and January 2010 after it became available at our institution. The median time between HSCT and vaccination was 19 months (range, 2.5–94 months), and the median time from vaccination to specimen collection was 56 days (range, 14–140 days). Seroprotective antibody titers (hemagglutination inhibition titer ≥1:40) against 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus were detected in 51% of patients. The presence of chronic graft-versus-host disease and type of conditioning regimen did not affect the rate of detection of seroprotective titers after vaccination. Patients were more likely to have a seroprotective titer the farther away from HSCT they were (adjusted odds ratio, 1.79 per year; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–2.85). Rituximab administration in the year before vaccination was associated with a lack of seroprotective titer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–0.97). The vaccine was safe and well tolerated. Strategies are needed to improve the influenza vaccine response in this population, especially those receiving immunotherapy. PMID:20950701

  11. Safety of the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine among pregnant U.S. military women and their newborns.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Ava Marie S; Bukowinski, Anna T; Sevick, Carter J; DeScisciolo, Connie; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F

    2013-03-01

    To assess adverse pregnancy outcomes among active-duty U.S. military women who received pandemic H1N1 vaccine during pregnancy as well as adverse health outcomes among the newborns resulting from these pregnancies. The primary study population was a retrospective cohort of active-duty U.S. military women vaccinated during pregnancy with either the pandemic H1N1 vaccine between October 2009 and June 2010 or with seasonal influenza vaccine between October 2008 and June 2009. Rates of pregnancy loss, preeclampsia or eclampsia, and preterm labor were compared between pandemic H1N1 vaccine-exposed (n=10,376) and seasonal influenza vaccine-exposed pregnancies (n=7,560). A secondary study population consisted of newborns resulting from these pregnancies. Rates of preterm birth, birth defects, fetal growth problems, and the male-to-female sex ratio were compared between newborns exposed to pandemic H1N1 vaccine and newborns exposed to seasonal influenza vaccine in utero. No significant differences were observed in rates of pregnancy loss (6.4% compared with 6.5%), preeclampsia or eclampsia (5.8% compared with 5.2%), or preterm labor (6.5% compared with 6.2%) between pandemic H1N1 vaccine-exposed and seasonal influenza vaccine-exposed pregnancies. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in rates of preterm birth (6.2% compared with 6.3%), birth defects (2.1% compared with 2.0%), fetal growth problems (2.6% compared with 2.4%), or the male-to-female sex ratio (1.05 compared with 1.07) between newborns exposed in utero to pandemic H1N1 vaccine compared with seasonal influenza vaccine. Rates of all outcomes were lower or similar to overall general population rates. This study had at least 80% power to detect hazard ratios of 1.18-1.21 or odds ratios of 1.10-1.36, depending on outcome prevalence. No adverse pregnancy or newborn health outcomes associated with pandemic H1N1 vaccination during pregnancy were noted among our cohort. These findings should be used to

  12. Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Containing Hemagglutinin Confers Protection against 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Jaber; Bourgeois, Melissa; Quan, Fu-Shi; Lipatov, Aleksandr S.; Song, Jae-Min; Chen, Li-Mei; Compans, Richard W.; York, Ian; Kang, Sang-Moo; Donis, Ruben O.

    2011-01-01

    Immunization of the world population before an influenza pandemic such as the 2009 H1N1 virus spreads globally is not possible with current vaccine production platforms. New influenza vaccine technologies, such as virus-like-particles (VLPs), offer a promising alternative. Here, we tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a VLP vaccine containing hemagglutinin (HA) and M1 from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (H1N1pdm) in ferrets and compared intramuscular (i.m.) and intranasal (i.n.) routes of immunization. Vaccination of ferrets with VLPs containing the M1 and HA proteins from A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm) induced high antibody titers and conferred significant protection against virus challenge. VLP-vaccinated animals lost less weight, shed less virus in nasal washes, and had markedly lower virus titers in all organs tested than naïve controls. A single dose of VLPs, either i.m. or i.n., induced higher levels of antibody than did two doses of commercial split vaccine. Ferrets vaccinated with split vaccine were incompletely protected against challenge; these animals had lower virus titers in olfactory bulbs, tonsils, and intestines, but lost weight and shed virus in nasal washes to a similar extent as naïve controls. Challenge with heterologous A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) virus revealed that the VLPs conferred minimal cross-protection to heterologous infection, as revealed by the lack of reduction in nasal wash and lung virus titers and slightly higher weight loss relative to controls. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the strong immunogenicity and protective efficacy of VLPs compared to the split vaccine and show that i.n. vaccination with VLPs has the potential for highly efficacious vaccination against influenza. PMID:22030367

  13. Increased risk of narcolepsy in children and adults after pandemic H1N1 vaccination in France.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Monaca Charley, Christelle; Franco, Patricia; Drouot, Xavier; d'Ortho, Marie-Pia; Launois, Sandrine; Lignot, Séverine; Bourgin, Patrice; Nogues, Béatrice; Rey, Marc; Bayard, Sophie; Scholz, Sabine; Lavault, Sophie; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Saussier, Cristel; Pariente, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    An increased incidence of narcolepsy in children was detected in Scandinavian countries where pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine was used. A campaign of vaccination against pandemic H1N1 influenza was implemented in France using both ASO3-adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted vaccines. As part of a study considering all-type narcolepsy, we investigated the association between H1N1 vaccination and narcolepsy with cataplexy in children and adults compared with matched controls; and compared the phenotype of narcolepsy with cataplexy according to exposure to the H1N1 vaccination. Patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included from 14 expert centres in France. Date of diagnosis constituted the index date. Validation of cases was performed by independent experts using the Brighton collaboration criteria. Up to four controls were individually matched to cases according to age, gender and geographic location. A structured telephone interview was performed to collect information on medical history, past infections and vaccinations. Eighty-five cases with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included; 23 being further excluded regarding eligibility criteria. Of the 62 eligible cases, 59 (64% males, 57.6% children) could be matched with 135 control subjects. H1N1 vaccination was associated with narcolepsy-cataplexy with an odds ratio of 6.5 (2.1-19.9) in subjects aged<18 years, and 4.7 (1.6-13.9) in those aged 18 and over. Sensitivity analyses considering date of referral for diagnosis or the date of onset of symptoms as the index date gave similar results, as did analyses focusing only on exposure to ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine. Slight differences were found when comparing cases with narcolepsy-cataplexy exposed to H1N1 vaccination (n=32; mostly AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, n=28) to non-exposed cases (n=30), including shorter delay of diagnosis and a higher number of sleep onset rapid eye movement periods for exposed cases. No difference was found regarding history of infections. In

  14. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination among day care-aged children, Miami-Dade County.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Yessica; Leguen, Fermin; Zhang, Guoyan; O'Connell, Erin

    2012-06-08

    The aim of this study was to assess factors influencing 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination among a demographically diverse group of day care-aged children. Day care children were chosen because they were an initial target group for vaccination and are at higher risk of influenza infection than children cared for at home. A cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2010 among parents of day care aged children in 13 day care facilities in Miami-Dade County. Data was collected by an anonymous self-administered two-page 20 question survey which consisted of demographic variables and information regarding 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine knowledge, attitude and acceptance. Data was analyzed using SAS to conduct both bivariate and multivariate analyses. There were 773 participants in the study. The response rate ranged from 42% to 72.2% among day care centers. A total of 172 parents (22.3%) and 225 (29.1%) children had received the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine. Non-Hispanic White and Black parents were more likely to vaccinate their children than Hispanic and Haitian parents. Primary reasons for non-vaccination included vaccine safety (36.7%) and side effects (27.1%). Among parents who spoke with a health care professional, 274 (61.4%) stated the health care professional recommended the vaccine. Misperceptions about influenza vaccination among parents created a barrier to 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination. Parents who got the vaccine, who believed the vaccine was safe and whose children had a chronic condition were more likely to immunize their children. Clear, reliable and consistent vaccine information to the public and health care providers and initiatives targeting minority groups may increase vaccination coverage among this population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake, predictors of vaccination and self-reported barriers to vaccination among secondary school teachers and staff

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Julia E; Sales, Jessica M; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M; Murray, Dennis; Wingood, Gina M; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Teachers, like healthcare workers, may be a strategic target for influenza immunization programs. Influenza vaccination is critical to protect both teachers and the students they come into contact with. This study assessed factors associated with seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake among middle- and high-school teachers. Results Seventy-eight percent of teachers who planned to receive seasonal influenza vaccine and 36% of those who planned to receive H1N1 influenza vaccine at baseline reported that they did so. Seasonal vaccine uptake was significantly associated with perceived severity (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, p = 0.05) and self-efficacy (OR 4.46, p = 0.006). H1N1 vaccine uptake was associated with perceived barriers (OR 0.7, p = 0.014) and social norms (OR 1.39, p = 0.05). The number one reason for both seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake was to avoid getting seasonal/H1N1 influenza disease. The number one reason for seasonal influenza vaccine refusal was a concern it would make them sick and for H1N1 influenza vaccine refusal was concern about vaccine side effects. Methods Participants were recruited from two counties in rural Georgia. Data were collected from surveys in September 2009 and May 2010. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between teachers' attitudes toward seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccination and vaccine uptake. Conclusions There is a strong association between the intention to be vaccinated against influenza (seasonal or 2009 H1N1) and actual vaccination uptake. Understanding and addressing factors associated with teachers' influenza vaccine uptake may enhance future influenza immunization efforts. PMID:21263225

  16. A/H1N1 Vaccine Intentions in College Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in college students who have not previously received the A/H1N1 vaccine. Participants: Undergraduate communication students at a metropolitan southern university. Methods: In January-March 2010, students from voluntarily participating communication classes completed a…

  17. A/H1N1 Vaccine Intentions in College Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To test the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in college students who have not previously received the A/H1N1 vaccine. Participants: Undergraduate communication students at a metropolitan southern university. Methods: In January-March 2010, students from voluntarily participating communication classes completed a…

  18. Narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination: shaping the research on the observed signal.

    PubMed

    van der Most, Robbert; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Destexhe, Eric; Wettendorff, Martine; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data from several European countries suggested an increased risk of the chronic sleep disorder narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix(™), an AS03-adjuvanted, pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine. Further research to investigate potential associations between Pandemrix™ vaccination, A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and narcolepsy is required. Narcolepsy is most commonly caused by a reduction or absence of hypocretin produced by hypocretin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus, and is tightly associated with HLA-II DQB1*06:02. Consequently, research focusing on CD4(+) T-cell responses, building on the hypothesis that for disease development, T cells specific for antigen(s) from hypocretin neurons must be activated or reactivated, is considered essential. Therefore, the following key areas of research can be identified, (1) characterization of hypothetical narcolepsy-specific auto-immune CD4(+) T cells, (2) mapping epitopes of such T cells, and (3) evaluating potential mechanisms that would enable such cells to gain access to the hypothalamus. Addressing these questions could further our understanding of the potential links between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and/or infection. Of particular interest is that any evidence of a mimicry-based mechanism could also explain the association between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection.

  19. Immunogenicity and safety of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, J Kevin; Khandaker, Gulam; Rashid, Harunor; Heron, Leon; Ridda, Iman; Booy, Robert

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic has highlighted the need to have immunogenicity and safety data on the new pandemic vaccines. There is already considerable heterogeneity in the types of vaccine available and of study performed around the world. A systematic review and meta-analysis is needed to assess the immunogenicity and safety of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines. We searched Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and other online databases up to 1st October 2010 for studies in any language comparing different pandemic H1N1 vaccines, with or without placebo, in healthy populations aged at least 6 months. The primary outcome was seroprotection according to haemagglutination inhibition (HI). Safety outcomes were adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed for the primary outcome. We identified 18 articles, 1 only on safety and 17 on immunogenicity, although 1 was a duplicate. We included 16 articles in the meta-analysis, covering 17,921 subjects. Adequate seroprotection (≥70%) was almost invariably achieved in all age groups, and even after one dose and at low antigen content (except in children under 3 years receiving one dose of non-adjuvanted vaccine). Non-adjuvanted vaccine from international companies and adjuvanted vaccines containing oil in water emulsion (e.g. AS03, MF59), rather than aluminium, performed better. Two serious vaccination-associated adverse events were reported, both of which resolved fully. No death or case of Guillain-Barré syndrome was reported. The pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 vaccine, with or without adjuvant, appears generally to be seroprotective after just one dose and safe among healthy populations aged ≥36 months; very young children (6-35 months) may need to receive two doses of non-adjuvanted vaccine or one dose of AS03(A/B)-adjuvanted product to achieve seroprotection.

  20. "Trivalent influenza vaccination of healthy adults 3 years after the onset of swine-origin H1N1 pandemic: restricted immunogenicity of the new A/H1N1v constituent?".

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Bickel, M; Lassmann, C; Wicker, S; Friedrichs, I

    2013-04-01

    Influenza vaccination is advised annually to reduce the burden of influenza disease. For sufficient vaccine campaigns also a continuous adoption of influenza vaccines are necessary, due to particularly high genetic variability of influenza A virus. Therefore, we evaluate the effectiveness of the trivalent influenza vaccine 2010/2011, against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2) and influenza B. Immune response was investigated in paired sera from 92 healthcare workers with the hemagglutination inhibition assay (HI). Protective antibody levels (HI titer ≥40) were found after vaccination for influenza A/California/07/2009(H1N1): 84.71 % [GMT: 115.34]; for influenza A/Perth/16/2009(H3N2): 94.94 % [GMT: 268.47] and for influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008: 96.20 % [GMT: 176.83]; matching with the currently circulating virus strains. However, the highest seroprevalence rate was found against influenza B; pre- and post-vaccination titers as well, which may be due to comparatively high virus preservation. Remarkable, lowest seropositivity was seen against H1N1. Despite the significant titer rise, sufficient H1N1 herd immunity was still not achieved. It can be assumed that a high influenza A herd immunity may be a requirement for a successful booster vaccination.

  1. Risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome following pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 vaccination in Germany†

    PubMed Central

    Prestel, Jürgen; Volkers, Peter; Mentzer, Dirk; Lehmann, Helmar C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A prospective, epidemiologic study was conducted to assess whether the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany almost exclusively using an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine (Pandemrix) impacts the risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and its variant Fisher syndrome (FS). Methods Potential cases of GBS/FS were reported by 351 participating hospitals throughout Germany. The self-controlled case series methodology was applied to all GBS/FS cases fulfilling the Brighton Collaboration (BC) case definition (levels 1–3 of diagnostic certainty) with symptom onset between 1 November 2009 and 30 September 2010 reported until end of December 2010. Results Out of 676 GBS/FS reports, in 30 cases, GBS/FS (BC levels 1–3) occurred within 150 days following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. The relative incidence of GBS/FS within the primary risk period (days 5–42 post-vaccination) compared with the control period (days 43–150 post-vaccination) was 4.65 (95%CI [2.17, 9.98]). Similar results were found when stratifying for infections within 3 weeks prior to onset of GBS/FS and when excluding cases with additional seasonal influenza vaccination. The overall result of temporally adjusted analyses supported the primary finding of an increased relative incidence of GBS/FS following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. Conclusions The results indicate an increased risk of GBS/FS in temporal association with pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24817531

  2. Risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome following pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 vaccination in Germany.

    PubMed

    Prestel, Jürgen; Volkers, Peter; Mentzer, Dirk; Lehmann, Helmar C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2014-11-01

    A prospective, epidemiologic study was conducted to assess whether the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany almost exclusively using an AS03-adjuvanted vaccine (Pandemrix) impacts the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and its variant Fisher syndrome (FS). Potential cases of GBS/FS were reported by 351 participating hospitals throughout Germany. The self-controlled case series methodology was applied to all GBS/FS cases fulfilling the Brighton Collaboration (BC) case definition (levels 1-3 of diagnostic certainty) with symptom onset between 1 November 2009 and 30 September 2010 reported until end of December 2010. Out of 676 GBS/FS reports, in 30 cases, GBS/FS (BC levels 1-3) occurred within 150 days following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. The relative incidence of GBS/FS within the primary risk period (days 5-42 post-vaccination) compared with the control period (days 43-150 post-vaccination) was 4.65 (95%CI [2.17, 9.98]). Similar results were found when stratifying for infections within 3 weeks prior to onset of GBS/FS and when excluding cases with additional seasonal influenza vaccination. The overall result of temporally adjusted analyses supported the primary finding of an increased relative incidence of GBS/FS following influenza A(H1N1) vaccination. The results indicate an increased risk of GBS/FS in temporal association with pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccination in Germany. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Bell's palsy and influenza(H1N1)pdm09 containing vaccines: A self-controlled case series.

    PubMed

    Wijnans, Leonoor; Dodd, Caitlin N; Weibel, Daniel; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    An association between AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine and the occurrence of Bell's palsy was found in a population based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden. To evaluate this association in a different population, we conducted a self-controlled case series in a primary health care database, THIN, in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased risk of Bell's palsy following vaccination with any influenza vaccine containing A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like viral strains. Secondly, we investigated whether risks were different following pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines and seasonal influenza vaccines containing the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. The study population comprised all incident Bell's palsy cases between 1 June 2009 and 30 June 2013 identified in THIN. We determined the relative incidence (RI) of Bell's palsy during the 6 weeks following vaccination with either pandemic or seasonal influenza vaccine. All analyses were adjusted for seasonality and confounding variables. We found an incidence rate of Bell's palsy of 38.7 per 100,000 person years. Both acute respiratory infection (ARI) consultations and pregnancy were found to be confounders. When adjusted for seasonality, ARI consultations and pregnancies, the RI during the 42 days after vaccination with an influenza vaccine was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.72-1.01). The RI was similar during the 42 days following seasonal vaccine (0.96, 95%CI: 0.82-1.13) or pandemic vaccine (0.73, 95%CI: 0.47-1.12). We found no evidence for an increased incidence of Bell's palsy following seasonal influenza vaccination overall, nor for monovalent pandemic influenza vaccine in 2009.

  4. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine and Protection against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009-Associated Illness among US Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Matthew C.; Eick, Angelia A.; Blazes, David L.; Lee, Seung-eun; Perdue, Christopher L.; Lipnick, Robert; Vest, Kelly G.; Russell, Kevin L.; DeFraites, Robert F.; Sanchez, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A novel A/H1N1 virus is the cause of the present influenza pandemic; vaccination is a key countermeasure, however, few data assessing prior seasonal vaccine effectiveness (VE) against the pandemic strain of H1N1 (pH1N1) virus are available. Materials and Methods Surveillance of influenza-related medical encounter data of active duty military service members stationed in the United States during the period of April–October 2009 with comparison of pH1N1-confirmed cases and location and date-matched controls. Crude odds ratios (OR) and VE estimates for immunized versus non-immunized were calculated as well as adjusted OR (AOR) controlling for sex, age group, and history of prior influenza vaccination. Separate stratified VE analyses by vaccine type (trivalent inactivated [TIV] or live attenuated [LAIV]), age groups and hospitalization status were also performed. For the period of April 20 to October 15, 2009, a total of 1,205 cases of pH1N1-confirmed cases were reported, 966 (80%) among males and over one-half (58%) under 25 years of age. Overall VE for service members was found to be 45% (95% CI, 33 to 55%). Immunization with prior season's TIV (VE = 44%, 95% CI, 32 to 54%) as well as LAIV (VE = 24%, 95% CI, 6 to 38%) were both found to be associated with protection. Of significance, VE against a severe disease outcome was higher (VE = 62%, 95% CI, 14 to 84%) than against milder outcomes (VE = 42%, 95% CI, 29 to 53%). Conclusion A moderate association with protection against clinically apparent, laboratory-confirmed Pandemic (H1N1) 2009-associated illness was found for immunization with either TIV or LAIV 2008–09 seasonal influenza vaccines. This association with protection was found to be especially apparent for severe disease as compared to milder outcome, as well as in the youngest and older populations. Prior vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccines in 2004–08 was also independently associated with protection. PMID:20502705

  5. Efficacy of a high-growth reassortant H1N1 influenza virus vaccine against the classical swine H1N1 subtype influenza virus in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute, highly contagious respiratory disease caused by swine influenza A viruses (SwIVs), and it poses a potential global threat to human health. Classical H1N1 (cH1N1) SwIVs are still circulating and remain the predominant subtype in the swine population in China. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) harboring the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a novel cH1N1 isolate in China, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (GD/11) and six internal genes from the high-growth A/Puerto Rico/8/34(PR8) virus was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate seed virus for the preparation of an inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice and pigs challenged with GD/11 virus. Prime and boost inoculation of GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies and IgG antibodies for GD/11 in both mice and pigs. Complete protection of mice and pigs against cH1N1 SIV challenge was observed, with significantly fewer lung lesions and reduced viral shedding in vaccine-inoculated animals compared with unvaccinated control animals. Our data demonstrated that the GD/PR8 may serve as the seed virus for a promising SwIVs vaccine to protect the swine population.

  6. Public willingness to take a vaccine or drug under Emergency Use Authorization during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kumar, Supriya; Freimuth, Vicki S; Kidwell, Kelley; Musa, Donald

    2009-09-01

    On April 26, 2009, the United States declared a public health emergency in response to a growing but uncertain threat from H1N1 influenza, or swine flu. In June, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic. In the U.S., hospitalizations due to swine flu numbered 6,506 on August 6, 2009, with 436 deaths; all 50 states have reported cases. The declaration of a public health emergency, followed by the approval of multiple Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) by the Food and Drug Administration, allowed the distribution of unapproved drugs or the off-label use of approved drugs to the public. Thus far, there are 2 antiviral medications available to the public as EUA drugs. It is possible that an H1N1 vaccine will be initially released as an EUA in the fall in the first large-scale use of the EUA mechanism. This study explores the public's willingness to use a drug or vaccine under the conditions stipulated in the FDA's nonbinding guidance regarding EUAs. Using Knowledge Networks' panel, we conducted an internet survey with 1,543 adults from a representative sample of the U.S. population with 2 over samples of African Americans and Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Our completion rate was 62%. We examined willingness to accept an EUA drug or an H1N1 vaccine, the extent of worry associated with taking either, the conditions under which respondents would accept an EUA drug or vaccine, and the impact of language from the EUA fact sheets on people's willingness to accept a drug for themselves or their children. We also examined the association among these variables and race/ethnicity, education level, trust in government, previous vaccine acceptance, and perceived personal consequences from H1N1 influenza. These results provide critical insights into the challenges of communicating about EUA drugs and vaccine in our current pandemic.

  7. Public Willingness to Take a Vaccine or Drug Under Emergency Use Authorization during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Supriya; Freimuth, Vicki S.; Kidwell, Kelley; Musa, Donald

    2009-01-01

    On April 26, 2009, the United States declared a public health emergency in response to a growing but uncertain threat from H1N1 influenza, or swine flu. In June, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic. In the U.S., hospitalizations due to swine flu numbered 6,506 on August 6, 2009, with 436 deaths; all 50 states have reported cases. The declaration of a public health emergency, followed by the approval of multiple Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) by the Food and Drug Administration, allowed the distribution of unapproved drugs or the off-label use of approved drugs to the public. Thus far, there are 2 antiviral medications available to the public as EUA drugs. It is possible that an H1N1 vaccine will be initially released as an EUA in the fall in the first large-scale use of the EUA mechanism. This study explores the public's willingness to use a drug or vaccine under the conditions stipulated in the FDA's nonbinding guidance regarding EUAs. Using Knowledge Networks' panel, we conducted an internet survey with 1,543 adults from a representative sample of the U.S. population with 2 oversamples of African Americans and Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Our completion rate was 62%. We examined willingness to accept an EUA drug or an H1N1 vaccine, the extent of worry associated with taking either, the conditions under which respondents would accept an EUA drug or vaccine, and the impact of language from the EUA fact sheets on people's willingness to accept a drug for themselves or their children. We also examined the association among these variables and race/ethnicity, education level, trust in government, previous vaccine acceptance, and perceived personal consequences from H1N1 influenza. These results provide critical insights into the challenges of communicating about EUA drugs and vaccine in our current pandemic. PMID:19775200

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: systematic review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, J. Kevin; Khandaker, Gulam; Rashid, Harunor; Heron, Leon; Ridda, Iman; Booy, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Yin et al. (2011) Immunogenicity and safety of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: systematic review and meta‐analysis. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 299–305. The emergence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic has highlighted the need to have immunogenicity and safety data on the new pandemic vaccines. There is already considerable heterogeneity in the types of vaccine available and of study performed around the world. A systematic review and meta‐analysis is needed to assess the immunogenicity and safety of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccines. We searched Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and other online databases up to 1st October 2010 for studies in any language comparing different pandemic H1N1 vaccines, with or without placebo, in healthy populations aged at least 6 months. The primary outcome was seroprotection according to haemagglutination inhibition (HI). Safety outcomes were adverse events. Meta‐analysis was performed for the primary outcome. We identified 18 articles, 1 only on safety and 17 on immunogenicity, although 1 was a duplicate. We included 16 articles in the meta‐analysis, covering 17 921 subjects. Adequate seroprotection (≥70%) was almost invariably achieved in all age groups, and even after one dose and at low antigen content (except in children under 3 years receiving one dose of non‐adjuvanted vaccine). Non‐adjuvanted vaccine from international companies and adjuvanted vaccines containing oil in water emulsion (e.g. AS03, MF59), rather than aluminium, performed better. Two serious vaccination‐associated adverse events were reported, both of which resolved fully. No death or case of Guillain–Barré syndrome was reported. The pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 vaccine, with or without adjuvant, appears generally to be seroprotective after just one dose and safe among healthy populations aged ≥36 months; very young children (6–35 months) may need to receive two

  9. Immune response to 2009 H1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected adults in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Aurpibul, Linda; Thetket, Sunida; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Supindham, Taweewat; Wongkulab, Panuwat; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Chaiklang, Kanokporn; Kaewthip, Oranitcha; Sroysuwan, Piyathida; Wongthanee, Antika; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Suparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2012-01-01

    Background: In late 2009, the Thai Ministry of Public Health provided two million doses of the monovalent pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 vaccine (Panenza® Sanofi Pasteur), which was the only vaccine formulation available in Thailand, to persons at risk of more severe manifestations of the disease including HIV infection. Several studies have shown poorer immune responses to the 2009 H1N1 vaccines in HIV-infected individuals. There are limited data in this population in resource-limited countries. Results: At day 28 post-vaccination, seroconversion was found in 32.0% (95%CI 24.5 - 40.2) of the HIV-infected group and 35.0% (95%CI 15.4- 59.2) of the healthy controls (p = 0.79). Seroprotection rate was observed in 33.3% (95%CI 25.8–41.6) and 35.0% (95%CI 15.4–59.2) of the HIV-infected group and the control group, respectively (p = 0.88). Among HIV-infected participants, the strongest factor associated with vaccine response was age 42 y or younger (p = 0.05). Methods: We evaluated the immunogenicity of a single, 15µg/0.5ml dose of a monovalent, non-adjuvanted 2009 H1N1 vaccine in 150 HIV-infected Thai adults and 20 healthy controls. Immunogenicity was measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay (HI) at baseline and 28 d after vaccination. Seroconversion was defined as 1) pre-vaccination HI titer < 1:10 and post-vaccination HI titer ≥ 1:40, or 2) pre-vaccination HI titer ≥ 1:10 and a minimum of 4-fold rise in post-vaccination HI titer. Seroprotection was defined as a post-vaccination HI titer of ≥ 1:40. Conclusions: A low seroconversion rate to the 2009 H1N1 vaccine in both study groups, corresponding with data from trials in the region, may suggest that the vaccine used in our study is not very immunogenic. Further studies on different vaccines, dosing, adjuvants, or schedule strategies may be needed to achieve effective immunization in HIV-infected population. PMID:22906932

  10. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine and Protection against Pandemic (H1N1) 2009-Associated Illness Among US Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    severe) outcomes and warrants further investigation. Our findings further complement recent reports among civilian populations in Mexico [13,14] and among...et al. (2009) Infection and death from influenza A H1N1 virus in Mexico : a retrospective analysis. Lancet 374: 2072–2079. 14. Garcia-Garcia L...Valdespino-Gomez JL, Lazcano-Ponce E, Jimenez-Corona A, Higuera- Iglesias A, et al. (2009) Partial protection of seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine

  11. Italian post-marketing surveillance for adverse event reports after MF59-adjuvanted H1N1v vaccination.

    PubMed

    Parretta, Elisabetta; Ianniello, Benedetta; Ferrazin, Fernanda; Rossi, Francesco; Capuano, Annalisa

    2011-05-09

    According to European recommendations, the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA) required close monitoring of the safety of the MF59-adjuvanted H1N1v vaccine, which was the only vaccine available in Italy for prophylaxis of the A/H1N1 (2009) pandemic influenza. From October 2009 to June 2010, the Italian Pharmacovigilance Adverse Event (AE) Spontaneous Reporting System [Rete Nazionale Farmacovigilanza] (RNF) received 1330 reports of AEs temporally related with the pandemic influenza vaccination out of a total of 924,057 doses administered. Among these, 1,162 (87.37%) AE reports were classified 'non serious', 91 (6.84%) 'serious', 3 (0.23%) had a fatal outcome and 74 (5.56%) did not include the degree of seriousness. Among the serious AE reports, some unexpected AEs emerged. Even though some typical vaccine safety issues which emerged should be further explored, such as vaccination in pregnancy, the analysis of all AE reports sent to RNF shows that the vaccine has a well-tolerated safety profile which resembles that of the already available seasonal influenza vaccines. This contrasts with the widespread public concern about its safety, which has been one of the major causes of the low vaccination rate observed in Italy, as well as in other countries.

  12. What the Public Was Saying about the H1N1 Vaccine: Perceptions and Issues Discussed in On-Line Comments during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Natalie; Holmes, Bev

    2011-01-01

    During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, a vaccine was made available to all Canadians. Despite efforts to promote vaccination, the public's intent to vaccinate remained low. In order to better understand the public's resistance to getting vaccinated, this study addressed factors that influenced the public's decision making about uptake. To do this, we used a relatively novel source of qualitative data – comments posted on-line in response to news articles on a particular topic. This study analysed 1,796 comments posted in response to 12 articles dealing with H1N1 vaccine on websites of three major Canadian news sources. Articles were selected based on topic and number of comments. A second objective was to assess the extent to which on-line comments can be used as a reliable data source to capture public attitudes during a health crisis. The following seven themes were mentioned in at least 5% of the comments (% indicates the percentage of comments that included the theme): fear of H1N1 (18.8%); responsibility of media (17.8%); government competency (17.7%); government trustworthiness (10.7%); fear of H1N1 vaccine (8.1%); pharmaceutical companies (7.6%); and personal protective measures (5.8%). It is assumed that the more frequently a theme was mentioned, the more that theme influenced decision making about vaccination. These key themes for the public were often not aligned with the issues and information officials perceived, and conveyed, as relevant in the decision making process. The main themes from the comments were consistent with results from surveys and focus groups addressing similar issues, which suggest that on-line comments do provide a reliable source of qualitative data on attitudes and perceptions of issues that emerge in a health crisis. The insights derived from the comments can contribute to improved communication and policy decisions about vaccination in health crises that incorporate the public's views. PMID:21533161

  13. A novel sequence-based antigenic distance measure for H1N1, with application to vaccine effectiveness and the selection of vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Subieta, Krystina C.; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    H1N1 influenza causes substantial seasonal illness and was the subtype of the 2009 influenza pandemic. Precise measures of antigenic distance between the vaccine and circulating virus strains help researchers design influenza vaccines with high vaccine effectiveness. We here introduce a sequence-based method to predict vaccine effectiveness in humans. Historical epidemiological data show that this sequence-based method is as predictive of vaccine effectiveness as hemagglutination inhibition assay data from ferret animal model studies. Interestingly, the expected vaccine effectiveness is greater against H1N1 than H3N2, suggesting a stronger immune response against H1N1 than H3N2. The evolution rate of hemagglutinin in H1N1 is also shown to be greater than that in H3N2, presumably due to greater immune selection pressure. PMID:21123189

  14. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in non-vaccinated, pregnant women in Spain (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; González-Candelas, Fernando; Astray, Jenaro; Alonso, Jordi; Castro, Ady; Cantón, Rafael; Galán, Juan Carlos; Garin, Olatz; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Martín, Vicente; Mayoral, José María; Pumarola, Tomás; Quintana, José Maria; Tamames, Sonia; Llopis-González, Agustín; Domínguez, Angela

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the main characteristics of non-vaccinated pregnant women who were hospitalised for influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 pandemic versus pregnant women hospitalised for non-influenza-related reasons in Spain, and to characterise the clinical presentation of the disease in this population to facilitate early diagnosis and future action programmes. Understanding influenza infection during pregnancy is important as pregnant women are a high-risk population for increased morbidity from influenza infection. We investigated the socio-demographic and clinical features of 51 non-vaccinated, pregnant women infected with the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in Spain (cases) and compared them to 114 controls (non-vaccinated and non-infected pregnant women) aged 15-44 years. Substantial and significant odd ratios (ORs) for pandemic influenza A (H1N1) were found for the pregnant women who were obese compared with controls (body mass index > 30) (OR 3.03; 95% confidence intervals 1.13-8.11). The more prevalent symptoms observed in pandemic influenza-infected pregnant women were high temperature, cough (82.4%), malaise (80.5%), myalgia (56.1%), and headaches (54.9%). Our results suggest that the initial symptoms and risk factors for infection of pregnant women with the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus are similar to the symptoms and risk factors for seasonal influenza, which make early diagnosis difficult, and reinforces the need to identify and protect high-risk groups.

  15. Heterovariant Cross-Reactive B-Cell Responses Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus A Subtype H1N1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Song; Sasaki, Sanae; Baer, Jane; Khurana, Surender; Golding, Hana; Treanor, John J.; Topham, David J.; Sangster, Mark Y.; Jin, Hong; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Subbarao, Kanta; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The generation of heterovariant immunity is a highly desirable feature of influenza vaccines. The goal of this study was to compare the heterovariant B-cell response induced by the monovalent inactivated 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (A[H1N1]pdm09) vaccine with that induced by the 2009 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (sTIV) containing a seasonal influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (A[H1N1]) component in young and elderly adults. Methods. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAb) from young and elderly recipients of A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine or sTIV were tested for binding activity to various influenza antigens. Results. In A(H1N1)pdm09 recipients, the PPAb titers against homotypic A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were similar to those against the heterovariant seasonal A(H1N1) vaccine and were similar between young and elderly subjects. The PPAb avidity was higher among elderly individuals, compared with young individuals. In contrast, the young sTIV recipients had 10-fold lower heterovariant PPAb titers against the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine than against the homotypic seasonal A(H1N1) vaccine. In binding assays with recombinant head and stalk domains of hemagglutinin, PPAb from the A(H1N1)pdm09 recipients but not PPAb from the sTIV recipients bound to the conserved stalk domain. Conclusion. The A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine induced production of PPAb with heterovariant reactivity, including antibodies targeting the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain. PMID:23107783

  16. A/H1N1 vaccine intentions in college students: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    To test the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in college students who have not previously received the A/H1N1 vaccine. Undergraduate communication students at a metropolitan southern university. In January-March 2010, students from voluntarily participating communication classes completed a hardcopy survey assessing TPB and clinically significant constructs. Hierarchical regression equations predicted variance in vaccine intentions of students who had not received a flu shot (N=198; 70% Caucasian). The TPB model explained 51.7% (p<.001) of variance in vaccine intentions. Controlling for side effects, self-efficacy and perceived comparative susceptibility predicted intentions when entered in the first block, whereas attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control significantly contribute when entered in the second block. For students who have not previously received a flu vaccine, vaccine communication should utilize self-efficacy and perceived comparative susceptibility to employ the TPB to promote vaccine intentions.

  17. Determinants of Refusal of A/H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination in a High Risk Population: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    d'Alessandro, Eugenie; Hubert, Dominique; Launay, Odile; Bassinet, Laurence; Lortholary, Olivier; Jaffre, Yannick; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Background Our study analyses the main determinants of refusal or acceptance of the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine in patients with cystic fibrosis, a high-risk population for severe flu infection, usually very compliant for seasonal flu vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews in 3 cystic fibrosis referral centres in Paris, France. The study included 42 patients with cystic fibrosis: 24 who refused the vaccine and 18 who were vaccinated. The two groups differed quite substantially in their perceptions of vaccine- and disease-related risks. Those who refused the vaccine were motivated mainly by the fears it aroused and did not explicitly consider the 2009 A/H1N1 flu a potentially severe disease. People who were vaccinated explained their choice, first and foremost, as intended to prevent the flu's potential consequences on respiratory cystic fibrosis disease. Moreover, they considered vaccination to be an indirect collective prevention tool. Patients who refused the vaccine mentioned multiple, contradictory information sources and did not appear to consider the recommendation of their local health care provider as predominant. On the contrary, those who were vaccinated stated that they had based their decision solely on the clear and unequivocal advice of their health care provider. Conclusions/Significance These results of our survey led us to formulate three main recommendations for improving adhesion to new pandemic vaccines. (1) it appears necessary to reinforce patient education about the disease and its specific risks, but also general population information about community immunity. (2) it is essential to disseminate a clear and effective message about the safety of novel vaccines. (3) this message should be conveyed by local health care providers, who should be involved in implementing immunization. PMID:22506011

  18. Determinants of refusal of A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination in a high risk population: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    d'Alessandro, Eugenie; Hubert, Dominique; Launay, Odile; Bassinet, Laurence; Lortholary, Olivier; Jaffre, Yannick; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Our study analyses the main determinants of refusal or acceptance of the 2009 A/H1N1 vaccine in patients with cystic fibrosis, a high-risk population for severe flu infection, usually very compliant for seasonal flu vaccine. We conducted a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews in 3 cystic fibrosis referral centres in Paris, France. The study included 42 patients with cystic fibrosis: 24 who refused the vaccine and 18 who were vaccinated. The two groups differed quite substantially in their perceptions of vaccine- and disease-related risks. Those who refused the vaccine were motivated mainly by the fears it aroused and did not explicitly consider the 2009 A/H1N1 flu a potentially severe disease. People who were vaccinated explained their choice, first and foremost, as intended to prevent the flu's potential consequences on respiratory cystic fibrosis disease. Moreover, they considered vaccination to be an indirect collective prevention tool. Patients who refused the vaccine mentioned multiple, contradictory information sources and did not appear to consider the recommendation of their local health care provider as predominant. On the contrary, those who were vaccinated stated that they had based their decision solely on the clear and unequivocal advice of their health care provider. These results of our survey led us to formulate three main recommendations for improving adhesion to new pandemic vaccines. (1) it appears necessary to reinforce patient education about the disease and its specific risks, but also general population information about community immunity. (2) it is essential to disseminate a clear and effective message about the safety of novel vaccines. (3) this message should be conveyed by local health care providers, who should be involved in implementing immunization.

  19. From the Patient Perspective: the Economic Value of Seasonal and H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bacon, Kristina; Donohue, Julie M.; Wiringa, Ann E.; Bailey, Rachel R.; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Although studies have suggested that a patient’s perceived cost-benefit of a medical intervention could affect his or her utilization of the intervention, the economic value of influenza vaccine from the patient’s perspective remains unclear. Therefore, we developed a stochastic decision analytic computer model representing an adult’s decision of whether to get vaccinated. Different scenarios explored the impact of the patient being insured versus uninsured, influenza attack rate, vaccine administration costs and vaccination time costs. Results indicated that cost of avoiding influenza was fairly low, with one driver being required vaccination time. To encourage vaccination, decision makers may want to focus on ways to reduce this time, such as vaccinating at work, churches, or other normally frequented locations. PMID:21215340

  20. Safety and Immune Responses in Children After Concurrent or Sequential 2009 H1N1 and 2009–2010 Seasonal Trivalent Influenza Vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Sharon E.; Bernstein, David I.; Gerber, Michael A.; Keyserling, Harry L.; Munoz, Flor M.; Winokur, Patricia L.; Turley, Christine B.; Rupp, Richard E.; Hill, Heather; Wolff, Mark; Noah, Diana L.; Ross, Allison C.; Cress, Gretchen; Belshe, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Administering 2 separate vaccines for seasonal and pandemic influenza was necessary in 2009. Therefore, we conducted a randomized trial of monovalent 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine (2009 H1N1 vaccine) and seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; split virion) given sequentially or concurrently in previously vaccinated children. Methods. Children randomized to 4 study groups and stratified by age received 1 dose of seasonal TIV and 2 doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine in 1 of 4 combinations. Injections were given at 21-day intervals and serum samples for hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses were obtained prior to and 21 days after each vaccination. Reactogenicity and adverse events were monitored. Results. All combinations of vaccines were safe in the 531 children enrolled. Generally, 1 dose of 2009 H1N1 vaccine and 1 dose of TIV, regardless of sequence or concurrency of administration, was immunogenic in children ≥10 years of age; children <10 years of age required 2 doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine. Conclusions. Vaccines were generally well tolerated. The immune responses to 2009 H1N1 vaccine were adequate regardless of the sequence of vaccination in all age groups but the sequence affected titers to TIV antigens. Two doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine were required to achieve a protective immune response in children <10 years of age. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00943202. PMID:22802432

  1. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Loeffen, W L A; Stockhofe, N; Weesendorp, E; van Zoelen-Bos, D; Heutink, R; Quak, S; Goovaerts, D; Heldens, J G M; Maas, R; Moormann, R J; Koch, G

    2011-09-28

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named "pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009" (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to reduce exposure of human contacts with infected pigs, thereby preventing cross-species transfer, but also to protect pigs themselves, should this virus cause damage in the pig population. Three swine influenza vaccines, two of them commercially available and one experimental, were therefore tested and compared for their efficacy against an H1N1v challenge. One of the commercial vaccines is based on an American classical H1N1 influenza strain, the other is based on a European avian H1N1 influenza strain. The experimental vaccine is based on reassortant virus NYMC X179A (containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1v) and the internal genes of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)). Excretion of infectious virus was reduced by 0.5-3 log(10) by the commercial vaccines, depending on vaccine and sample type. Both vaccines were able to reduce virus replication especially in the lower respiratory tract, with less pathological lesions in vaccinated and subsequently challenged pigs than in unvaccinated controls. In pigs vaccinated with the experimental vaccine, excretion levels of infectious virus in nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, were at or below 1 log(10)TCID(50) per swab and lasted for only 1 or 2 days. An inactivated vaccine containing the HA and NA of an H1N1v is able to protect pigs from an infection with H1N1v, whereas swine influenza vaccines that are currently available are of limited efficaciousness. Whether vaccination of pigs against H1N1v will become opportune remains to be seen and will depend on future evolution of this strain in the pig population. Close monitoring of the pig population, focussing on presence and evolution of

  2. Immunogenicity of Licensed Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccines in HIV-Infected Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Pass, Robert F.; Nachman, Sharon; Flynn, Patricia M.; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Borkowsky, William; McAuley, James B.; Spector, Stephen A.; Petzold, Elizabeth; Levy, Wende; Siberry, George K.; Handelsman, Ed; Utech, L. Jill; Weinberg, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Background With the emergence of pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) in 2009, children and youth infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were vulnerable because of immunologic impairment and the greater virulence of this infection in young persons. Methods A multicenter study of the immunogenicity of 3 licensed influenza A (H1N1) monovalent vaccines (1 live attenuated and 2 inactivated) was conducted in children and youth with perinatal HIV infection, most of whom were receiving ≥3 antiretroviral drugs, had CD4% ≥15, and plasma HIV RNA levels <400 copies/mL. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition assay (HAI) antibody levels were measured and correlated with baseline demographic and clinical variables. Results One hundred forty-nine subjects were enrolled at 26 sites in the United States and Puerto Rico. Over 40% had baseline HAI titers ≥40. For subjects aged 6 months to <10 years, 79% and 68%, respectively, achieved a ≥40- and ≥4-fold rise in HAI titers after the second dose of vaccine. Three weeks after a single immunization with an inactivated vaccine, similar immunogenicity results were achieved in youth aged 10–24 years. With multivariable analysis, only Hispanic ethnicity and CD4% ≥15 were associated with achieving both HAI titer ≥40- and ≥4-fold rise in titer. Conclusions Although licensed pH1N1 vaccines produced HAI titers that were considered to be protective in the majority of HIV-infected children and youth, the proportion with titers ≥40- and ≥4-fold rise in titer was lower than expected for children without HIV infection. Vaccine immunogenicity was lower in HIV-infected children and youth with evidence of immune suppression. PMID:24363932

  3. Risk for Congenital Malformation With H1N1 Influenza Vaccine: A Cohort Study With Sibling Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Ström, Peter; Lundholm, Cecilia; Cnattingius, Sven; Ekbom, Anders; Örtqvist, Åke; Feltelius, Nils; Granath, Fredrik; Stephansson, Olof

    2016-12-20

    Earlier studies reporting varying risk estimates for congenital malformation in offspring of mothers undergoing vaccination against H1N1 influenza during pregnancy did not consider the potential role of confounding by familial (genetic and shared environmental) factors. To evaluate an association between maternal H1N1 vaccination during pregnancy and offspring malformation, with familial factors taken into account. Population-based prospective study. Sweden. Liveborn offspring born between 1 October 2009 and 1 October 2011 to mothers receiving monovalent AS03-adjuvanted H1N1 influenza vaccine (Pandemrix [GlaxoSmithKline]) during pregnancy. A total of 40 983 offspring were prenatally exposed to the vaccine, 14 385 were exposed within the first trimester (14 weeks), and 7502 were exposed during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. Exposed offspring were compared with 197 588 unexposed offspring. Corresponding risks in exposed versus unexposed siblings were also estimated. Congenital malformation, with subanalyses for congenital heart disease, oral cleft, and limb deficiency. Congenital malformation was observed in 2037 (4.97%) exposed offspring and 9443 (4.78%) unexposed offspring. Adjusted risk for congenital malformation was 4.98% in exposed offspring versus 4.96% in unexposed offspring (risk difference, 0.02% [95% CI, -0.26% to 0.30%]). The corresponding risk differences were 0.16% (CI, -0.23% to 0.56%) for vaccination during the first trimester and 0.10% (CI, -0.41% to 0.62%) for vaccination in the first 8 weeks. Using siblings as comparators yielded no statistically significant risk differences. The study was based on live births, and the possibility that data on miscarriage or induced abortion could have influenced the findings cannot be ruled out. Study power was limited in analyses of specific malformations. When intrafamilial factors were taken into consideration, H1N1 vaccination during pregnancy did not seem to be linked to overall congenital malformation in

  4. Impact of information on intentions to vaccinate in a potential epidemic: Swine-origin Influenza A (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Chanel, Olivier; Luchini, Stéphane; Massoni, Sébastien; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination campaigns to prevent the spread of epidemics are successful only if the targeted populations subscribe to the recommendations of health authorities. However, because compulsory vaccination is hardly conceivable in modern democracies, governments need to convince their populations through efficient and persuasive information campaigns. In the context of the swine-origin A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic, we use an interactive study among the general public in the South of France, with 175 participants, to explore what type of information can induce change in vaccination intentions at both aggregate and individual levels. We find that individual attitudes to vaccination are based on rational appraisal of the situation, and that it is information of a purely scientific nature that has the only significant positive effect on intention to vaccinate.

  5. Influenza vaccination in the Americas: Progress and challenges after the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Ropero-Álvarez, Alba María; El Omeiri, Nathalie; Kurtis, Hannah Jane; Danovaro-Holliday, M. Carolina; Ruiz-Matus, Cuauhtémoc

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There has been considerable uptake of seasonal influenza vaccines in the Americas compared to other regions. We describe the current influenza vaccination target groups, recent progress in vaccine uptake and in generating evidence on influenza seasonality and vaccine effectiveness for immunization programs. We also discuss persistent challenges, 5 years after the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza pandemic. Methods: We compiled and summarized data annually reported by countries to the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) through the WHO/UNICEF joint report form on immunization, information obtained through PAHO's Revolving Fund for Vaccine Procurement and communications with managers of national Expanded Programs on Immunization (EPI). Results: Since 2008, 25 countries/territories in the Americas have introduced new target groups for vaccination or expanded the age ranges of existing target groups. As of 2014, 40 (89%) out of 45 countries/territories have policies established for seasonal influenza vaccination. Currently, 29 (64%) countries/territories target pregnant women for vaccination, the highest priority group according to WHO´s Stategic Advisory Group of Experts and PAHO/WHO's Technical Advisory Group on Vaccine-preventable Diseases, compared to only 7 (16%) in 2008. Among 23 countries reporting coverage data, on average, 75% of adults ≥60 years, 45% of children aged 6–23 months, 32% of children aged 5–2 years, 59% of pregnant women, 78% of healthcare workers, and 90% of individuals with chronic conditions were vaccinated during the 2013–14 Northern Hemisphere or 2014 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccination activities. Difficulties however persist in the estimation of vaccination coverage, especially for pregnant women and persons with chronic conditions. Since 2007, 6 tropical countries have changed their vaccine formulation from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere formulation and the timing of

  6. Determinants of Vaccine Immunogenicity in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women: Analysis of B and T Cell Responses to Pandemic H1N1 Monovalent Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Richardson, Kelly M.; Fenton, Terence; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Watts, D. Heather

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infections have high frequency and morbidity in HIV-infected pregnant women, underscoring the importance of vaccine-conferred protection. To identify the factors that determine vaccine immunogenicity in this group, we characterized the relationship of B- and T-cell responses to pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) vaccine with HIV-associated immunologic and virologic characteristics. pH1N1 and seasonal-H1N1 (sH1N1) antibodies were measured in 119 HIV-infected pregnant women after two double-strength pH1N1 vaccine doses. pH1N1-IgG and IgA B-cell FluoroSpot, pH1N1- and sH1N1-interferon γ (IFNγ) and granzyme B (GrB) T-cell FluoroSpot, and flow cytometric characterization of B- and T-cell subsets were performed in 57 subjects. pH1N1-antibodies increased after vaccination, but less than previously described in healthy adults. pH1N1-IgG memory B cells (Bmem) increased, IFNγ-effector T-cells (Teff) decreased, and IgA Bmem and GrB Teff did not change. pH1N1-antibodies and Teff were significantly correlated with each other and with sH1N1-HAI and Teff, respectively, before and after vaccination. pH1N1-antibody responses to the vaccine significantly increased with high proportions of CD4+, low CD8+ and low CD8+HLADR+CD38+ activated (Tact) cells. pH1N1-IgG Bmem responses increased with high proportions of CD19+CD27+CD21- activated B cells (Bact), high CD8+CD39+ regulatory T cells (Treg), and low CD19+CD27-CD21- exhausted B cells (Bexhaust). IFNγ-Teff responses increased with low HIV plasma RNA, CD8+HLADR+CD38+ Tact, CD4+FoxP3+ Treg and CD19+IL10+ Breg. In conclusion, pre-existing antibody and Teff responses to sH1N1 were associated with increased responses to pH1N1 vaccination in HIV-infected pregnant women suggesting an important role for heterosubtypic immunologic memory. High CD4+% T cells were associated with increased, whereas high HIV replication, Tact and Bexhaust were associated with decreased vaccine immunogenicity. High Treg increased antibody responses but decreased

  7. Maternal vaccination against H1N1 influenza and offspring mortality: population based cohort study and sibling design

    PubMed Central

    Ström, Peter; Lundholm, Cecilia; Cnattingius, Sven; Ekbom, Anders; Örtqvist, Åke; Feltelius, Nils; Granath, Fredrik; Stephansson, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the mortality in offspring of mothers who had influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination during pregnancy? Methods This was a prospective population based cohort study in seven healthcare regions in Sweden based on vaccinations taking place between 2 October 2009 and 26 November 2010. H1N1 vaccination data were linked with pregnancy and birth characteristics and offspring mortality data in 275 500 births (of which 1203 were stillbirths) from 137 886 mothers. Of these offspring, 41 183 had been exposed to vaccination with Pandemrix, a monovalent AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 influenza vaccine, during fetal life. A primary comparison group consisted of pregnancies of women who were not vaccinated during the same calendar period. In a second comparison, non-exposed siblings of infants prenatally exposed to vaccination were used as controls. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for stillbirth, early neonatal mortality (days 0-6 after birth), and subsequent mortality (beginning on day 7) in vaccinated versus non-vaccinated women, adjusting for mother’s age at delivery, body mass index, parity, smoking, country of birth, and disposable income and for sex of offspring. Study answer and limitations The results of this study suggest that AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination during pregnancy does not affect the risk of stillbirth, early neonatal death, or later mortality in the offspring. During follow-up, 1172 stillbirths, 380 early neonatal deaths, and 706 deaths thereafter occurred. Compared with general population controls, this corresponded to adjusted hazard ratios of 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 1.04) for stillbirth, 0.71 (0.44 to 1.14) for early neonatal death, and 0.97 (0.69 to 1.36) for later death. When siblings were used as controls, adjusted hazard ratios were 0.88 (0.59 to 1.30) for stillbirth, 0.82 (0.46 to 1.49) for early neonatal death, and 0.78 (0.52 to 1.19) for later death. Limitations of the study include lack of data on

  8. Factors Affecting Intention to Receive and Self-Reported Receipt of 2009 Pandemic (H1N1) Vaccine in Hong Kong: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qiuyan; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Fielding, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccination was a core component for mitigating the 2009 influenza pandemic (pH1N1). However, a vaccination program's efficacy largely depends on population compliance. We examined general population decision-making for pH1N1 vaccination using a modified Theory of Planned Behaviour (TBP). Methodology We conducted a longitudinal study, collecting data before and after the introduction of pH1N1 vaccine in Hong Kong. Structural equation modeling (SEM) tested if a modified TPB had explanatory utility for vaccine uptake among adults. Principal Findings Among 896 subjects who completed both the baseline and the follow-up surveys, 7% (67/896) reported being “likely/very likely/certain” to be vaccinated (intent) but two months later only 0.8% (7/896) reported having received pH1N1 vaccination. Perception of low risk from pH1N1 (60%) and concerns regarding adverse effects of the vaccine (37%) were primary justifications for avoiding pH1N1 vaccination. Greater perceived vaccine benefits (β = 0.15), less concerns regarding vaccine side-effects (β = −0.20), greater adherence to social norms of vaccination (β = 0.39), anticipated higher regret if not vaccinated (β = 0.47), perceived higher self-efficacy for vaccination (β = 0.12) and history of seasonal influenza vaccination (β = 0.12) were associated with higher intention to receive the pH1N1 vaccine, which in turn predicted self-reported vaccination uptake (β = 0.30). Social norm (β = 0.70), anticipated regret (β = 0.19) and vaccination intention (β = 0.31) were positively associated with, and accounted for 70% of variance in vaccination planning, which, in turn subsequently predicted self-reported vaccination uptake (β = 0.36) accounting for 36% of variance in reported vaccination behaviour. Conclusions/Significance Perceived low risk from pH1N1 and perceived high risk from pH1N1 vaccine inhibited pH1N1 vaccine uptake. Both the TPB and the additional

  9. Impact of cytokine in type 1 narcolepsy: Role of pandemic H1N1 vaccination ?

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, Michel; Libri, Valentina; Jaussent, Isabelle; Mottez, Estelle; Lopez, Régis; Lavault, Sophie; Regnault, Armelle; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures (pandemic influenza 2009 vaccination) provide strong support that narcolepsy type 1 is an immune-mediated disease. Considering the limited knowledge regarding the immune mechanisms involved in narcolepsy whether related to flu vaccination or not and the recent progresses in cytokine measurement technology, we assessed 30 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors using the Luminex technology in either peripheral (serum) or central (CSF) compartments in a large population of 90 children and adult patients with narcolepsy type 1 in comparison to 58 non-hypocretin deficient hypersomniacs and 41 healthy controls. Furthermore, we compared their levels in patients with narcolepsy whether exposed to pandemic flu vaccine or not, and analyzed the effect of age, duration of disease and symptom severity. Comparison for sera biomarkers between narcolepsy (n = 84, 54 males, median age: 15.5 years old) and healthy controls (n = 41, 13 males, median age: 20 years old) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of several pro- and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and growth factors with interferon-γ, CCL11, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-2 receptor being independently associated with narcolepsy. Increased levels of interferon-γ, CCL11, and interleukin-12 were found when close to narcolepsy onset. After several adjustments, only one CSF biomarker differed between narcolepsy (n = 44, 26 males, median age: 15 years old) and non-hypocretin deficient hypersomnias (n = 57, 24 males, median age: 36 years old) with higher CCL 3 levels found in narcolepsy. Comparison for sera biomarkers between patients with narcolepsy who developed the disease post-pandemic flu vaccination (n = 36) to those without vaccination (n = 48) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of three cytokines, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed

  10. Clinical and Immune Responses to Inactivated Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kotloff, Karen L.; Halasa, Natasha B.; Harrison, Christopher J.; Englund, Janet A.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; King, James C.; Creech, C. Buddy; Healy, Sara A.; Dolor, Rowena J.; Stephens, Ina; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Noah, Diana L.; Hill, Heather; Wolff, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background As the influenza AH1N1 pandemic emerged in 2009, children were found to experience high morbidity and mortality and were prioritized for vaccination. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, age-stratified trial assessed the safety and immunogenicity of inactivated influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in healthy children aged 6 months to 17 years. Methods Children received two doses of approximately 15 μg or 30 μg hemagglutin antigen 21 days apart. Reactogenicity was assessed for 8 days after each dose, adverse events through day 42, and serious adverse events or new-onset chronic illnesses through day 201. Serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers were measured on days 0 (pre-vaccination), 8, 21, 29, and 42. Results A total of 583 children received the first dose and 571 received the second dose of vaccine. Vaccinations were generally well-tolerated and no related serious adverse events were observed. The 15 μg dosage elicited a seroprotective HAI (≥1:40) in 20%, 47%, and 93% of children in the 6-35 month, 3-9 year, and 10-17 year age strata 21 days after dose 1 and in 78%, 82%, and 98% of children 21 days after dose 2, respectively. The 30 μg vaccine dosage induced similar responses. Conclusions The inactivated influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine exhibited a favorable safety profile at both dosage levels. While a single 15 or 30 μg dose induced seroprotective antibody responses in most 10-17 year olds, younger children required 2 doses, even when receiving dosages 4-6 fold higher than recommended. Well-tolerated vaccines are needed that induce immunity after a single dose for use in young children during influenza pandemics. PMID:25222307

  11. H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Italy Revisited: Has the Willingness to Get Vaccinated Suffered in the Long Run?

    PubMed Central

    Ludolph, Ramona; Nobile, Marta; Hartung, Uwe; Castaldi, Silvana; Schulz, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the long-term secondary effects of personal experience with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009/2010 and the perception of the institutional reaction to it on Italians’ willingness to get vaccinated in case of a novel influenza pandemic. Design and Methods We conducted 140 face-to-face interviews in the Registry Office of the Municipality of Milan, Italy, from October to December 2012. Results Willingness to get vaccinated during a novel influenza pandemic was best predicted by having been vaccinated against the seasonal flu in the past (OR=5.18; 95%CI: 1.40 to 19.13) and fear of losing one’s life in case of an infection with H1N1 (OR=4.09; 95%CI: 1.68 to 9.97). It was unaffected by the assessment of institutional performance. Conclusions The findings of this study do not point to long-term secondary effects of the institutional handling of the H1N1 pandemic. The results highlight the fact that behavioural intention is not the same as behaviour, and that the former cannot simply be taken as an indicator of the latter. Significance for public health Whereas influenza pandemics occurred rather rarely in the last centuries, their frequency can be expected to increase in the future due to the enhanced globalisation and still raising importance of air travelling. Recent examples (Ebola, H1N1, SARS, avian influenza) demonstrate that initially local disease outbreaks often become worldwide health threats of international concern. National and international health authorities are consequently urged to present preparedness plans on how to manage such health crises. However, their success highly depends on their acceptance by the public. To ensure the public compliance with recommended actions, effective communication is needed. Since communication is most successful when it meets the needs of the target audience, a full understanding of the audience is crucial. This study can help public health experts to better understand the

  12. H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Italy Revisited: Has the Willingness to Get Vaccinated Suffered in the Long Run?

    PubMed

    Ludolph, Ramona; Nobile, Marta; Hartung, Uwe; Castaldi, Silvana; Schulz, Peter J

    2015-07-16

    The aim of the study is to assess the long-term secondary effects of personal experience with the H1N1 pandemic of 2009/2010 and the perception of the institutional reaction to it on Italians' willingness to get vaccinated in case of a novel influenza pandemic. We conducted 140 face-to-face interviews in the Registry Office of the Municipality of Milan, Italy, from October to December 2012. Willingness to get vaccinated during a novel influenza pandemic was best predicted by having been vaccinated against the seasonal flu in the past (OR=5.18; 95%CI: 1.40 to 19.13) and fear of losing one's life in case of an infection with H1N1 (OR=4.09; 95%CI: 1.68 to 9.97). It was unaffected by the assessment of institutional performance. The findings of this study do not point to long-term secondary effects of the institutional handling of the H1N1 pandemic. The results highlight the fact that behavioural intention is not the same as behaviour, and that the former cannot simply be taken as an indicator of the latter. Significance for public healthWhereas influenza pandemics occurred rather rarely in the last centuries, their frequency can be expected to increase in the future due to the enhanced globalisation and still raising importance of air travelling. Recent examples (Ebola, H1N1, SARS, avian influenza) demonstrate that initially local disease outbreaks often become worldwide health threats of international concern. National and international health authorities are consequently urged to present preparedness plans on how to manage such health crises. However, their success highly depends on their acceptance by the public. To ensure the public compliance with recommended actions, effective communication is needed. Since communication is most successful when it meets the needs of the target audience, a full understanding of the audience is crucial. This study can help public health experts to better understand the variables determining people's willingness to get vaccinated

  13. Immunohistochemical screening for antibodies in recent onset type 1 narcolepsy and after H1N1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid M; Peeters, Els; Lammers, Gert J; Fronczek, Rolf

    2015-06-15

    Narcolepsy type 1 patients typically have undetectable hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as a result of a selective loss of the hypocretin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. An autoimmune attack targeting hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons is hypothesised. So far, no direct evidence for an autoimmune attack was found. One of the major limitations of previous studies was that none included patients close to disease onset. We screened serum of 21 narcolepsy type 1 patients close to disease onset (median 11 months), including 8 H1N1 vaccinated patients, for antibodies against hypocretin neurons using immunohistochemistry. No autoantibodies against hypocretin neurons could be detected.

  14. Coordination Costs for School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics, Maine, 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Cho, Bo-Hyun; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    School nurses played a key role in Maine's school-located influenza vaccination (SLV) clinics during the 2009-2010 pandemic season. The objective of this study was to determine, from the school district perspective, the labor hours and costs associated with outside-clinic coordination activities (OCA). The authors defined OCA as labor hours spent…

  15. Coordination Costs for School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics, Maine, 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Cho, Bo-Hyun; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    School nurses played a key role in Maine's school-located influenza vaccination (SLV) clinics during the 2009-2010 pandemic season. The objective of this study was to determine, from the school district perspective, the labor hours and costs associated with outside-clinic coordination activities (OCA). The authors defined OCA as labor hours spent…

  16. Immunization-Safety Monitoring Systems for the 2009 H1N1 Monovalent Influenza Vaccination Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    SUPPLEMENT ARTICLES PEDIATRICS Volume 127, Supplement 1, May 2011 S79 by on May 9, 2011 www.pediatrics.orgDownloaded from ters for Disease Control...influenza vaccines and live versus in- activated) were made. RTIMS investi- gators collected supplemental infor- mation by follow-up telephone and e-mail...been added for RCA had po- SUPPLEMENT ARTICLES PEDIATRICS Volume 127, Supplement 1, May 2011 S81 by on May 9, 2011 www.pediatrics.orgDownloaded from

  17. Recipients of vaccine against the 1976 "swine flu" have enhanced neutralization responses to the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    McCullers, Jonathan A; Van De Velde, Lee-Ann; Allison, Kim J; Branum, Kristen C; Webby, Richard J; Flynn, Patricia M

    2010-06-01

    BACKGROUND. The world is facing a novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. A pandemic scare with a similar influenza virus in 1976 resulted in the vaccination of nearly 45 million persons. We hypothesized that prior receipt of the 1976 "swine flu" vaccine would enhance immune responses to the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza strain. METHODS. A prospective, volunteer sample of employees aged > or = 55 years at a children's cancer hospital in August 2009 was assessed for antibody responses to the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and the 2008-2009 seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. RESULTS. Antibody responses by hemagglutination-inhibition assay were high against both the seasonal influenza virus (89.7% had a titer considered seroprotective) and pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (88.8% had a seroprotective titer). These antibodies were effective at neutralizing the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus in 68.1% of participants (titer > or = 40), but only 18.1% had detectable neutralizing titers against the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Of 116 participants, 46 (39.7%) received the 1976 "swine flu" vaccine. Receipt of this vaccine significantly enhanced neutralization responses; 8 (17.4%) of 46 vaccine recipients had titers > or = 160, compared with only 3 (4.3%) of 70 who did not receive the vaccine (P = .018 by chi(2) test). CONCLUSIONS. In this cohort, persons aged > or = 55 years had evidence of robust immunity to the 2008-2009 seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. These antibodies were cross-reactive but nonneutralizing against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza strain. Receipt of a vaccine to a related virus significantly enhanced the neutralization capacity of these responses, suggesting homologous vaccination against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus would have a similar effect.

  18. [Attitudes and side effects related to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination in healthcare personnel].

    PubMed

    Ormen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Vardar, Ilknur; Kaptan, Figen; El, Sibel; Ural, Serap; Kaya, Fatih; Coşkun, Nejat Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the attitudes towards H1N1 vaccination and to determine the safety and side effects following 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination. Pandemic influenza vaccine had been administered to the healthcare personnel in our research and training hospital in December 2009. The rate being vaccinated was established as 40% (800/2000). Four months following vaccination, the opinions about vaccination were asked to the healthcare workers, and also side effects were questioned to the vaccinated group. Two different questionnaires (for vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects) were delivered to the volunteers who agreed to participate in the study. Demographic features, reasons related to being vaccinated or not, were questioned. The vaccinated group was also questioned for the presence of chronic diseases, previous vaccinations (pandemic/seasonal influenza), local or systemic reactions that develop after vaccination. A total of 332 volunteers participated in the questionnaire. Of them 247 (74.4%) were vaccinated and 85 (25.6%) were unvaccinated. Male/female ratio of the participants was 1.2, and 55.7% of them were older than 30-year-old. Most of the participants (82.8%) were highly educated (high school and faculty-graduated). Vaccination rates were found statistically significant in advanced age group compared to young adults (p= 0.042); in male gender compared to females (p= 0.001) and in parents compared to subjects who didn't have children (p= 0.021). Vaccination rates were observed to be higher (57.5%) in non-medical staff (cleaning employers, administrative personnel, etc.) than the physicians (29.1%) and nurses (13.4%), and the rate was also high (54.7%) in personnel who worked in intensive care units, emergency department and administrative units than the personnel who worked in the clinics of internal medicine (22.3%) and surgery (23.1%) (p= 0.001). The most important causes of rejecting vaccination were being afraid of the

  19. Evaluation of the potential effects of AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine administration on the central nervous system of non-primed and A(H1N1)pdm09-primed cotton rats

    PubMed Central

    Planty, Camille; Mallett, Corey P.; Yim, Kevin; Blanco, Jorge C. G.; Boukhvalova, Marina; March, Thomas; van der Most, Robbert; Destexhe, Eric

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An increased risk of narcolepsy following administration of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix™) was described in children and adolescents in certain European countries. We investigated the potential effects of administration of the AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, non-adjuvanted vaccine antigen and AS03 Adjuvant System alone, on the central nervous system (CNS) in one-month-old cotton rats. Naïve or A(H1N1)pdm09 virus-primed animals received 2 or 3 intramuscular injections, respectively, of test article or saline at 2-week intervals. Parameters related to systemic inflammation (hematology, serum IL-6/IFN-γ/TNF-α) were assessed. Potential effects on the CNS were investigated by histopathological evaluation of brain sections stained with hematoxylin-and-eosin, or by immunohistochemical staining of microglia, using Iba1 and CD68 as markers for microglia identification/activation, albumin as indicator of vascular leakage, and hypocretin. We also determined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin levels and hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titers. Immunogenicity of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine was confirmed by the induction of hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. Both AS03-adjuvanted vaccine and AS03 alone activated transient innate (neutrophils/eosinophils) immune responses. No serum cytokines were detected. CNS analyses revealed neither microglia activation nor inflammatory cellular infiltrates in the brain. No differences between treatment groups were detected for albumin extravascular leakage, CSF hypocretin levels, numbers of hypocretin-positive neuronal bodies or distributions of hypocretin-positive axonal/dendritic projections. Consequently, there was no evidence that intramuscular administration of the test articles promoted inflammation or damage in the CNS, or blood-brain barrier disruption, in this model. PMID:27629482

  20. Behavioral change with influenza vaccination: factors influencing increased uptake of the pandemic H1N1 versus seasonal influenza vaccine in health care personnel.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Allen; Graff, Lesley; McLean, Daria

    2011-10-26

    Many health care personnel (HCP) choose not to get vaccinated against influenza despite recommendations to do so. The pH1N1 epidemic gave a unique opportunity to evaluate the attitudes to influenza vaccination of a group of HCP who routinely choose not to get vaccinated, but accepted the pH1N1 vaccine. HCP employed at a tertiary care hospital in Winnipeg, Canada who received the pH1N1 vaccine were invited to participate in an online survey asking about attitudes and experiences regarding seasonal and pH1N1 influenza and vaccination. Those eligible included primarily nurses, other clinical staff, and support staff, as few physicians work as employees. Of the 684 respondents (29% return rate), 504 reported routinely getting vaccinated (RV) for seasonal influenza and 180 reported routinely not getting vaccinated (NRV). These two groups had different attitude towards the two strains of influenza, with markedly lower level of concern about seasonal influenza than pH1N1 for the NRV group. The contrast was especially notable regarding the NRV's view of the seriousness of the illness, their sense of exposure risk, and their confidence in the vaccine effectiveness (for all, seasonalH1N1, p<0.001). The most common motivators for getting vaccinated for both NRV and RV groups related to concerns about personal or family safety, while the choice to decline seasonal vaccination related primarily to lack concern about the illness and concerns about vaccine effectiveness and safety. Coworkers were influential in the decision to get the pH1N1 vaccine for the NRV group. For HCP who do not routinely get the seasonal vaccination, perception of risk outweighing side effect concerns appeared to be a major influence in going ahead with the pH1N1 vaccine. Educational campaigns that focus on personal benefit, engage peer champions, and address concerns about the vaccine may improve influenza vaccine uptake among health care personnel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intent to receive influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccines - two counties, North Carolina, August 2009.

    PubMed

    2009-12-25

    On September 15, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the manufacture of four influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines. Before release of the first batches of the vaccine on September 30, intent to receive the vaccine was estimated at 50% among selected U.S. adult populations and as high as 70% for children. However, studies in previous years of seasonal influenza vaccination in children, who might require 2 doses based on age and prior vaccination status, have indicated poor compliance with recommendations. To measure intent to receive H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines among children and adults, during August 28-29, 2009, the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness, with state and local public health officials, conducted a community assessment in two counties. This report summarizes the results of that assessment, which determined that 64% of adults reported intent to receive H1N1 vaccine. In addition, 65% of parents reported intent to have all their children (aged 6 months to <18 years) vaccinated with H1N1 vaccine, and 51% said they would have all their children vaccinated with both H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines. The most commonly reported reasons for not intending to receive H1N1 vaccine were belief in a low likelihood of infection (18%) and concern over vaccine side effects (14%); 85% of participants said they received their H1N1 information from television. To increase coverage with H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines, public health departments should use television to focus public health messages on the risks for infection and severe illness and the safety profile of the vaccine.

  2. Extended antigen sparing potential of AS03-adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccines in children, and immunological equivalence of two formulations of AS03-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccines: results from two randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Fitoussi, Serge; Jilg, Wolfgang; Kerdpanich, Angkool; Montellano, May; Schwarz, Tino F; Watanveerade, Veerachai; Wenzel, Jürgen J; Zalcman, Gerard; Bambure, Vinod; Li, Ping; Caplanusi, Adrian; Madan, Anuradha; Gillard, Paul; Vaughn, David W

    2013-09-16

    Pandemic influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity and distribution agility is enhanced through the availability of equivalent antigen-sparing vaccines. We evaluated equivalence in terms of immunogenicity between GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines' A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)v-like-AS03 vaccines manufactured in Dresden (D-Pan), and Quebec (Q-Pan). In two studies, 334 adults 18-60 years of age received 2 doses of D-Pan or Q-Pan containing 3.75 μg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) adjuvanted with AS03A administered 21 days apart, and 209 children 3-9 years of age received 1 reduced dose of D-Panor Q-Pan (0.9 μg HA) or Q-Pan (1.9 μg HA) with AS03B. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres were assessed before and 21 days post-vaccination. HI persistence was assessed after 12 months in adults and 6 months in children. Pre-defined criteria for immunological equivalence of Q-Pan versus D-Pan were achieved in both populations. After one vaccine dose, ≥97.6% of adults and children had HI titres ≥1:40, with increases in titre ≥25.7-fold. CHMP and CBER regulatory acceptance criteria for influenza vaccines were exceeded by all groups in both studies at Day 21. In adults,the percentage with HI titres ≥1:40 at Month 12 was 82.9% (Q-Pan) and 84.0% (D-Pan). In children, the percentages at Month 6 were 75.3.3% (Q-Pan0.9), 85.1% (D-Pan0.9) and 79.3% (Q-Pan1.9). Safety profile of the study vaccines was consistent with previously published data. Two studies indicate that A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)v-like HA manufactured at two sites and combined with AS03 are equivalent in terms of immunogenicity in adults and children and highly immunogenic. Different HA doses elicited an adequate immune response through 180 days post-vaccination in children 3-9 years of age. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979407 and NCT01161160.

  3. Serologic cross reactivity of avian influenza H1 vaccinated commercial U.S. turkeys to the emergent H1N1 influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, the 2009 human H1N1 influenza virus was identified in turkey breeders in Chile, Canada and the U.S. resulting in infection and production losses. In these studies sera from turkeys vaccinated against avian influenza H1 were tested against the recent human pandemic H1N1 virus. Genetic ana...

  4. H1N1 vaccination in Sjögren's syndrome triggers polyclonal B cell activation and promotes autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Susanna; Folkersen, Lasse; Kvarnström, Marika; Meisgen, Sabrina; Petersen, Sven; Franzén-Malmros, Michaela; Mofors, Johannes; Brokstad, Karl A; Klareskog, Lars; Jonsson, Roland; Westerberg, Lisa S; Trollmo, Christina; Malmström, Vivianne; Ambrosi, Aurelie; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Nordmark, Gunnel; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2017-10-01

    Vaccination of patients with rheumatic disease has been reported to result in lower antibody titres than in healthy individuals. However, studies primarily include patients on immunosuppressive therapy. Here, we investigated the immune response of treatment-naïve patients diagnosed with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) to an H1N1 influenza vaccine. Patients with Sjögren's syndrome without immunomodulatory treatment and age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls were immunised with an H1N1 influenza vaccine and monitored for serological and cellular immune responses. Clinical symptoms were monitored with a standardised form. IgG class switch and plasma cell differentiation were induced in vitro in purified naïve B cells of untreated and hydroxychloroquine-treated patients and healthy controls. Gene expression was assessed by NanoString technology. Surprisingly, treatment-naïve patients with Sjögren's syndrome developed higher H1N1 IgG titres of greater avidity than healthy controls on vaccination. Notably, off-target B cells were also triggered resulting in increased anti-EBV and autoantibody titres. Endosomal toll-like receptor activation of naïve B cells in vitro revealed a greater propensity of patient-derived cells to differentiate into plasmablasts and higher production of class switched IgG. The amplified plasma cell differentiation and class switch could be induced in cells from healthy donors by preincubation with type 1 interferon, but was abolished in hydroxychloroquine-treated patients and after in vitro exposure of naïve B cells to chloroquine. This comprehensive analysis of the immune response in autoimmune patients to exogenous stimulation identifies a mechanistic basis for the B cell hyperactivity in Sjögren's syndrome, and suggests that caution is warranted when considering vaccination in non-treated autoimmune patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  5. Extended antigen sparing potential of AS03-adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccines in children, and immunological equivalence of two formulations of AS03-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccines: results from two randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity and distribution agility is enhanced through the availability of equivalent antigen-sparing vaccines. We evaluated equivalence in terms of immunogenicity between GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines’ A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)v-like-AS03 vaccines manufactured in Dresden (D-Pan), and Quebec (Q-Pan). Methods In two studies, 334 adults 18-60 years of age received 2 doses of D-Pan or Q-Pan containing 3.75 μg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) adjuvanted with AS03A administered 21 days apart, and 209 children 3-9 years of age received 1 reduced dose of D-Panor Q-Pan (0.9 μg HA) or Q-Pan (1.9 μg HA) with AS03B. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres were assessed before and 21 days post-vaccination. HI persistence was assessed after 12 months in adults and 6 months in children. Results Pre-defined criteria for immunological equivalence of Q-Pan versus D-Pan were achieved in both populations. After one vaccine dose, ≥97.6% of adults and children had HI titres ≥1:40, with increases in titre ≥25.7-fold. CHMP and CBER regulatory acceptance criteria for influenza vaccines were exceeded by all groups in both studies at Day 21. In adults,the percentage with HI titres ≥1:40 at Month 12 was 82.9% (Q-Pan) and 84.0% (D-Pan). In children, the percentages at Month 6 were 75.3.3% (Q-Pan0.9), 85.1% (D-Pan0.9) and 79.3% (Q-Pan1.9). Safety profile of the study vaccines was consistent with previously published data. Conclusion Two studies indicate that A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)v-like HA manufactured at two sites and combined with AS03 are equivalent in terms of immunogenicity in adults and children and highly immunogenic. Different HA doses elicited an adequate immune response through 180 days post-vaccination in children 3-9 years of age. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979407 and NCT01161160. PMID:24041010

  6. A monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for measuring the potency of 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Falko; Vasudevan, Anupama; Soto, Jackeline; Kumar, Arunima; Williams, Ollie; Weir, Jerry P

    2014-09-01

    The potency of inactivated influenza vaccines is determined using a single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay. This assay is relatively easy to standardize, it is not technically demanding, and it is capable of measuring the potency of several vaccine strain subtypes in a multivalent vaccine. Nevertheless, alternative methods that retain the major advantages of the SRID, but with a greater dynamic range of measurement and with reduced reagent requirements, are needed. The feasibility of an ELISA-based assay format was explored as an alternative potency assay for inactivated influenza vaccines. Several murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), specific for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), were evaluated for their potential to capture and quantify HA antigen. Vaccine samples, obtained from four licensed influenza vaccine manufacturers, included monovalent bulk vaccine, monovalent vaccine, and trivalent vaccine. Traditional SRID potency assays were run in parallel with the mAb-ELISA potency assay using the reference antigen standard appropriate for the vaccine samples being tested. The results indicated that the ELISA potency assay can quantify HA over a wide range of concentrations, including vaccine at subpotent doses, and the ELISA and SRID potency values correlated well for most vaccine samples. Importantly, the assay was capable of quantifying A/California HA in a trivalent formulation. This study demonstrates the general feasibility of the mAb approach and strongly suggests that such ELISAs have potential for continued development as an alternative method to assay the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Determinants of Receiving the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Vaccine and Intention to Receive the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fu, Yang-chih; Wang, Da-Wei; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The paper examines the factors associated with both receiving pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccines and individuals’ intentions to get the next seasonal influenza vaccine in Taiwan. Methods We conducted a representative nationwide survey with in-person household interviews during April–July 2010. Multivariate logistic regression incorporated socio-demographic background, household characteristics, health status, behaviors, and perceptions of influenza and vaccination. Results We completed interviews with 1,954 respondents. Among those, 548 (28.0%) received the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccination, and 469 (24.0%) intended to get the next seasonal influenza vaccine. Receipt of the H1N1 vaccine was more prevalent among schoolchildren, the elderly, those who had contact with more people in their daily lives, and those who had received influenza vaccinations in previous years. In comparison, the intention to receive the next seasonal influenza vaccine tended to be stronger among children, the elderly, and those who reported less healthy status or lived with children, who received a seasonal influenza vaccination before, and who worried more about a possible new pandemic. Conclusions Children, the elderly, and those who had gotten seasonal flu shots before in Taiwan were more likely to both receive a pandemic H1N1 vaccination and intend to receive a seasonal influenza vaccine. PMID:24971941

  8. Unique biomarkers for B-cell function predict the serum response to pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Phillips, Mitch; Mendez, Nicholas V.; Landin, Ana Marie

    2012-01-01

    In order to develop predictive markers for a beneficial humoral immune response, we evaluated the in vivo and in vitro response to the pandemic (p)H1N1 vaccine in young and elderly individuals. We measured serum antibody response and associated this with the in vitro B-cell response to the vaccine, measured by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Both responses decrease with age and are significantly correlated. The percentage of switched memory B cells in blood, both before and after vaccination, is decreased with age. The percentage of switched memory B cells at t0 correlates with the hemagglutination inhibition response and therefore, we suggest that this may be used as a predictive marker for B-cell responsiveness. AID induced by CpG before vaccination also predicts the robustness of the vaccine response. Plasmablasts showed a trend to increase after vaccination in young individuals only. This report establishes molecular biomarkers of response, percentage of switched memory B cells and AID response to CpG, useful for identifying individuals at risk of poor response and also for measuring improvements in vaccines and monitoring optimal humoral responses. PMID:22281510

  9. Safety and efficacy of a novel live attenuated influenza vaccine against pandemic H1N1 in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is the predominant influenza strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers a...

  10. Cold-adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus live vaccine elicits cross-reactive immune responses against seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik Lin

    2012-05-01

    The rapid transmission of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus (pH1N1) among humans has raised the concern of a potential emergence of reassortment between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic influenza strains, especially the avian H5N1 influenza virus. Here, we report that the cold-adapted pH1N1 live attenuated vaccine (CApH1N1) elicits cross-reactive immunity to seasonal and H5 influenza A viruses in the mouse model. Immunization with CApH1N1 induced both systemic and mucosal antibodies with broad reactivity to seasonal and H5 strains, including HAPI H5N1 and the avian H5N2 virus, providing complete protection against heterologous and heterosubtypic lethal challenges. Our results not only accentuate the merit of using live attenuated influenza virus vaccines in view of cross-reactivity but also represent the potential of CApH1N1 live vaccine for mitigating the clinical severity of infections that arise from reassortments between pH1N1 and highly pathogenic H5 subtype viruses.

  11. Maintaining the momentum: Key factors influencing acceptance of influenza vaccination among pregnant women following the H1N1 pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Beth A; MacKinnon-Cameron, Donna; McNeil, Shelly; Kalil, Jennifer; Halperin, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    This survey study compared pre- and post-pandemic knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and intended behaviors of pregnant women regarding influenza vaccination (seasonal and/or pandemic) during pregnancy in order to determine key factors influencing their decision to adhere to influenza vaccine recommendations. Only 36% of 662 pre-pandemic respondents knew that influenza was more severe in pregnant women, compared to 62% of the 159 post-pandemic respondents. Of the pre-pandemic respondents, 41% agreed or strongly agreed that that it was safer to wait until after the first 3 months to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine, whereas 23% of the post-pandemic cohort agreed or strongly agreed; 32% of pre-pandemic participants compared to 11% of post-pandemic respondents felt it was best to avoid all vaccines while pregnant. Despite 61% of the pre-pandemic cohort stating that they would have the vaccine while pregnant if their doctor recommended it and 54% citing their doctor/nurse as their primary source of vaccine information, only 20% said their doctor discussed influenza vaccination during their pregnancy, compared to 77% of the post-pandemic respondents who reported having this conversation. Women whose doctors discussed influenza vaccine during pregnancy had higher overall knowledge scores (P < 0.0001; P = 0.005) and were more likely to believe the vaccine is safe in all stages of pregnancy (P < 0.0001; P = 0.001) than those whose doctors did not discuss influenza vaccination. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic experience appeared to change attitudes and behaviours of health care providers and their pregnant patients toward influenza vaccination. PMID:25668670

  12. Vaccine procurement during an influenza pandemic and the role of Advance Purchase Agreements: Lessons from 2009-H1N1.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark

    2015-07-24

    Vaccines are hugely important tools in minimising the effect pandemic influenza could have on a population. The reforms introduced by the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework are ill-suited to providing sufficient levels of access to vaccines to meet the needs of developing states, and as such developing states will continue to be reliant upon the traditional methods of vaccine procurement to procure the majority of the vaccines they required. Using procurement during 2009-H1N1 as a case study, this paper examines the methods of procurement utilised by states in order to determine if the procurement tools available to developing states are sufficient to procure adequate levels of pandemic influenza vaccines. Particular focus is given to the role Advance Purchase Agreements (APAs) play in the procurement process. By exploring this case study it is possible to argue that these procurement methods are ineffective for developing states, and when the next influenza pandemic occurs, demand will once again outstrip supply globally, due to supply of vaccines being dominated by the developed states with APAs in place.

  13. Protective efficacy of a human endogenous retrovirus envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based hemagglutin vaccine against pandemic influenza H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yoo; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Cho, Yeon-Dong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Han-Sam; Choi, Tae-Jin; Poo, Ha-Ryoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of DNA vaccines, overcoming their lower efficacy relative to that of conventional vaccines remains a challenge. Here, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based HA vaccine against swine influenza A/California/04/2009(H1N1) hemagglutin (HA) (AcHERV-sH1N1-HA) as an alternative to conventional vaccines and evaluated its efficacy in two strains of mice, BALB/c and C57BL/6. A commercially available, killed virus vaccine was used as a positive control. Mice were intramuscularly administered AcHERV-sH1N1-HA or the commercial vaccine and subsequently given two booster injections. Compared with the commercial vaccine, AcHERV-sH1N1-HA induced significantly higher levels of cellular immune responses in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Unlike cellular immune responses, humoral immune responses depended on the strain of mice. Following immunization with AcHERV-sH1N1-HA, C57BL/6 mice showed HA-specific IgG titers 10- to 100-fold lower than those of BALB/c mice. In line with the different levels of humoral immune responses, the survival of immunized mice after intranasal challenge with sH1N1 virus (A/California/04/2009) depended on the strain. After challenge with 10-times the median lethal dose (MLD50) of sH1N1 virus, 100% of BALB/c mice immunized with the commercial vaccine or AcHERV-sH1N1-HA survived. In contrast, C57BL/6 mice immunized with AcHERV-sH1N1-HA or the commercial vaccine showed 60% and 70% survival respectively, after challenge with sH1N1 virus. In all mice, virus titers and results of histological analyses of lung tissues were consistent with the survival data. Our results indicate the importance of humoral immune response as a major defense system against influenza viral infection. Moreover, the complete survival of BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-sH1N1-HA after challenge with sH1N1 virus suggests the potential of baculoviral vector-based vaccines to achieve an efficacy comparable to

  14. Immune Responses in Pigs Vaccinated with Adjuvanted and Non-Adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm/09 Influenza Vaccines Used in Human Immunization Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Eric A.; Carr, B. Veronica; Inman, Charlotte F.; Prentice, Helen; Brown, Ian H.; Brookes, Sharon M.; Garcon, Fanny; Hill, Michelle L.; Iqbal, Munir; Elderfield, Ruth A.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Gubbins, Simon; Bailey, Mick; Charleston, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Following the emergence and global spread of a novel H1N1 influenza virus in 2009, two A(H1N1)pdm/09 influenza vaccines produced from the A/California/07/09 H1N1 strain were selected and used for the national immunisation programme in the United Kingdom: an adjuvanted split virion vaccine and a non-adjuvanted whole virion vaccine. In this study, we assessed the immune responses generated in inbred large white pigs (Babraham line) following vaccination with these vaccines and after challenge with A(H1N1)pdm/09 virus three months post-vaccination. Both vaccines elicited strong antibody responses, which included high levels of influenza-specific IgG1 and haemagglutination inhibition titres to H1 virus. Immunisation with the adjuvanted split vaccine induced significantly higher interferon gamma production, increased frequency of interferon gamma-producing cells and proliferation of CD4−CD8+ (cytotoxic) and CD4+CD8+ (helper) T cells, after in vitro re-stimulation. Despite significant differences in the magnitude and breadth of immune responses in the two vaccinated and mock treated groups, similar quantities of viral RNA were detected from the nasal cavity in all pigs after live virus challenge. The present study provides support for the use of the pig as a valid experimental model for influenza infections in humans, including the assessment of protective efficacy of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22427834

  15. Seasonal Influenza A H1N1pdm09 Virus and Severe Outcomes: A Reason for Broader Vaccination in Non-Elderly, At-Risk People

    PubMed Central

    Omeñaca, Manuel; Panadero, Carolina; Royo, Laura; Vengoechea, Jose J.; Fandos, Sergio; de Pablo, Francisco; Bello, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent pandemics of influenza A H1N1pdm09 virus have caused severe illness, especially in young people. Very few studies on influenza A H1N1pdm09 in post-pandemic periods exist, and there is no information on the severity of both seasonal influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) from the same season, adjusting for potential confounders, including vaccine. Methods and Results We performed a retrospective observational study of adults hospitalized during the 2014 season with influenza A(H1N1) or A(H3N2). All patients underwent the same diagnostic and therapeutic protocol in a single hospital, including early Oseltamivir therapy. We included 234 patients: 146 (62.4%) influenza A(H1N1) and 88 (37.6%) A(H3N2). A(H1N1) patients were younger (p<0.01), developed more pneumonia (p<0.01), respiratory complications (p = 0.015), ARDS (p = 0.047), and septic shock (p = 0.049), were more frequently admitted to the ICU (p = 0.022), required IMV (p = 0.049), and were less frequently vaccinated (p = 0.008). After adjusting for age, comorbidities, time from onset of illness, and vaccine status, influenza A(H1N1) (OR, 2.525), coinfection (OR, 2.821), and no vaccination (OR, 3.086) were independent risk factors for severe disease. Conclusions Hospitalized patients with influenza A(H1N1) were more than twice as likely to have severe influenza. They were younger and most had not received the vaccine. Our findings suggest that seasonal influenza A(H1N1) maintains some features of pandemic viruses, and recommend wider use of vaccination in younger adult high-risk patients. PMID:27832114

  16. Atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head after influenza A-(H1N1) v-2009 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kuether, G; Dietrich, B; Smith, T; Peter, C; Gruessner, S

    2011-09-16

    In the recent pandemic influenza A-(H1N1) v-2009 vaccination campaign, adjuvanted vaccines have been used because of their antigen-sparing effect. According to available reports, the rate of severe vaccination reactions has not increased, as compared with previous seasonal influenza vaccinations. Here we describe an adult female patient who was vaccinated with an AS03 adjuvanted split-virus vaccine injected into the left arm. She experienced a prolonged and painful local reaction for 4 weeks. During this time, persistent incapacitating pain shifted into the left shoulder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the injection site detected atraumatic humeral head osteonecrosis in conjunction with bursitis of the rotator cuff region. Clinical and laboratory examination revealed no other underlying disease. Using analgetic medication and physical therapy, resting pain completely remitted within the following 14 weeks. Pain on exertion declined within the following 6 months. Atraumatic osteonecrosis, a relatively rare disorder which initially presents non-specific clinical symptoms, has never been associated with parenteral influenza vaccination. Although the available data cannot establish a causal relationship, our patient's clinical course - with a continuous transition from increased local post-vaccination reactions to symptoms of a severe shoulder lesion with osteonecrosis - raises the question of a pathogenetic link. Considering the vascular pathogenesis of osteonecrosis, we hypothesize that our patient's enhanced local immunologic reaction may have led to regional vasculitis as the cause of bone destruction. As mild forms of osteonecrosis may have escaped previous clinical attention, it is the purpose of our report to increase awareness of this exceptional event as a possible side effect of parenteral adjuvanted vaccination.

  17. Analysis of public responses to preparedness policies: the cases of H1N1 influenza vaccination and gas mask distribution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During several months in 2009–2010, the Israeli population was asked to take part in two preparedness programs: Acquisition of gas masks against a potential chemical-warfare attack, and vaccination against the A/H1N1 influenza pandemics. Compliance with the first request was moderate and did not attract much attention, whereas compliance with the second request was very low and was accompanied by significant controversy. The aims of this study are to compare the public’s attitudes towards these two preparedness campaigns, and to explore the roles of trust, reasoned assessment, and reflexive reactions in the public’s response to governmental preparedness policies. Methods The comparative analysis was based on a telephone survey of 2,018 respondents representing a cross-section of the adult Israeli population. Univariate analysis to describe associations of public response and attitude was performed by Chi-square tests. Findings A set of queries related to actual compliance, trust in credibility of authorities, personal opinions, reasons for non-compliance, and attitudes towards uncertainties was used to characterize the response to mask-acquisition and vaccination. In the case of mask-acquisition, the dominant response profile was of trusting compliance based on non-conditional belief in the need to adhere to the recommendation (35.6% of respondents). In the case of vaccination, the dominant response profile was of trusting non-compliance based on a reflective belief in the need for adherence (34.8% of respondents). Among the variables examined in the study, passivity was found to be the major reason for non-compliance with mask-acquisition, whereas reasoned assessment of risk played a major role in non-compliance with vaccination. Realization of the complexity in dealing with uncertainty related to developing epidemics and to newly-developed vaccines was identified in the public’s response to the H1N1 vaccination campaign. Conclusions The newly

  18. Surveillance for adverse events following receipt of pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine in the Post-Licensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring (PRISM) System, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Yih, W Katherine; Lee, Grace M; Lieu, Tracy A; Ball, Robert; Kulldorff, Martin; Rett, Melisa; Wahl, Peter M; McMahill-Walraven, Cheryl N; Platt, Richard; Salmon, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    The Post-Licensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring (PRISM) system is a cohort-based active surveillance network initiated by the US Department of Health and Human Services to supplement preexisting and other vaccine safety monitoring systems in tracking the safety of monovalent pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine in the United States during 2009-2010. PRISM investigators conducted retrospective analysis to determine whether 2009 H1N1 vaccination was associated with increased risk of any of 14 prespecified outcomes. Five health insurance and associated companies with 38 million members and 9 state/city immunization registries contributed records on more than 2.6 million doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine. Data on outcomes came from insurance claims. Complementary designs (self-controlled risk interval, case-centered, and current-vs.-historical comparison) were used to optimize control for confounding and statistical power. The self-controlled risk interval analysis of chart-confirmed Guillain-Barré syndrome found an elevated but not statistically significant incidence rate ratio following receipt of inactivated 2009 H1N1 vaccine (incidence rate ratio = 2.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 15.0) and no cases following live attenuated 2009 H1N1 vaccine. The study did not control for infection prior to Guillain-Barré syndrome, which may have been a confounder. The risks of other health outcomes of interest were generally not significantly elevated after 2009 H1N1 vaccination.

  19. [Immunogenicity of inactivated subunit adsorbed monovalent vaccine against influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) strain].

    PubMed

    Zverev, V V; Kostinov, M P; Mikhailova, N A; Zhirova, S N; Mironov, A N; Terkacheva, O A; Romanova, A A; Cherdantsev, A P

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity of Pandeflu subunit vaccine against influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) was evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. The vaccine was intramuscularly injected twice at an interval of 28 days. Each dose (0.5 ml) contains A(HIN1) influenza virus hemagglutinin (15 +/- 2.2 microg), aluminum hydroxide (Denmark) (0.475 +/- 0.075 microg), and the preservative thiomerosal (merthiolate) (50 +/- 7.5 microg). The level of antibodies was determined in the microneutralization assay. After administration of two doses of the vaccine at a 28-day interval, the geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT) reached 1:21.1 with a further increase to 1:30 (the baseline GMAT) was 1:6.1). The frequencies of seroconversion and seroprotection were 71.4 and 59.2%, respectively; the antibody increase factor was 4.92, which meets the CPMP criteria. The administration of the vaccine did not result in adverse reactions in the postvaccination period.

  20. Comparison of the Long-Term Immunogenicity of Two Pandemic Influenza A/H1N1 2009 Vaccines, the MF59-Adjuvanted and Unadjuvanted Vaccines, in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon Young; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, In Seon; Noh, Ji Yun; Heo, Jung Yeon; Choi, Won Suk; Lee, Jacob; Kim, Woo Joo

    2012-01-01

    Since the first reports of the A/H1N1 virus in April 2009, the pandemic influenza virus spread globally and circulated for a long time. The primary method for the control of influenza is vaccination, but levels of influenza vaccine-induced antibody are known to decline rapidly during a 6-month period. In adults aged 18 to 64 years, we compared the long-term immunogenicity of two of the influenza A/H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccines, 3.75-μg MF59-adjuvanted vaccine and 15-μg unadjuvanted vaccine. The serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) titers were determined prevaccination and at 1, 6, and 10 months after vaccination. One hundred six (88.3%) of the 120 subjects were monitored for the entire 10-month period after receiving the influenza A/H1N1 2009 monovalent vaccine. There were 60 patients who received the unadjuvanted vaccine and 46 patients who received the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. The seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates, and the geometric mean titer (GMT) folds fulfilled the criteria of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) at 1 month after vaccination irrespective of the vaccine composition. Although the GMTs at 1 month postvaccination were somewhat higher in the unadjuvanted vaccine recipients than in the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine recipients, the difference was not significant (P = 0.29). The seroprotection rates at 6 and 10 months postvaccination were preserved above 70% but only in the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine recipients. In conclusion, low-dose MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine, even with 3.75 μg hemagglutinin antigen, might induce excellent long-term immunity that is comparable to the conventional dose of unadjuvanted vaccine among healthy adults aged 18 to 64 years. PMID:22379067

  1. Guillain-Barré Syndrome During the 2009–2010 H1N1 Influenza Vaccination Campaign: Population-based Surveillance Among 45 Million Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Matthew E.; Viray, Melissa; Sejvar, James J.; Lewis, Paige; Baughman, Andrew L.; Connor, Walter; Danila, Richard; Giambrone, Greg P.; Hale, Christa; Hogan, Brenna C.; Meek, James I.; Murphree, Rendi; Oh, John Y.; Reingold, Arthur; Tellman, Norisse; Conner, Susan M.; Singleton, James A.; Lu, Peng-Jun; DeStefano, Frank; Fridkin, Scott K.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Morgan, Oliver W.

    2012-01-01

    Because of widespread distribution of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine (pH1N1 vaccine) and the prior association between Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and the 1976 H1N1 influenza vaccine, enhanced surveillance was implemented to estimate the magnitude of any increased GBS risk following administration of pH1N1 vaccine. The authors conducted active, population-based surveillance for incident cases of GBS among 45 million persons residing at 10 Emerging Infections Program sites during October 2009–May 2010; GBS was defined according to published criteria. The authors determined medical and vaccine history for GBS cases through medical record review and patient interviews. The authors used vaccine coverage data to estimate person-time exposed and unexposed to pH1N1 vaccine and calculated age- and sex-adjusted rate ratios comparing GBS incidence in these groups, as well as age- and sex-adjusted numbers of excess GBS cases. The authors received 411 reports of confirmed or probable GBS. The rate of GBS immediately following pH1N1 vaccination was 57% higher than in person-time unexposed to vaccine (adjusted rate ratio = 1.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.21), corresponding to 0.74 excess GBS cases per million pH1N1 vaccine doses (95% confidence interval: 0.04, 1.56). This excess risk was much smaller than that observed during the 1976 vaccine campaign and was comparable to some previous seasonal influenza vaccine risk assessments. PMID:22582209

  2. Induction of protective immunity against H1N1 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 with spray-dried and electron-beam sterilised vaccines in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Scherließ, Regina; Ajmera, Ankur; Dennis, Mike; Carroll, Miles W; Altrichter, Jens; Silman, Nigel J; Scholz, Martin; Kemter, Kristina; Marriott, Anthony C

    2014-04-17

    Currently, the need for cooled storage and the impossibility of terminal sterilisation are major drawbacks in vaccine manufacturing and distribution. To overcome current restrictions a preclinical safety and efficacy study was conducted to evaluate new influenza A vaccine formulations regarding thermal resistance, resistance against irradiation-mediated damage and storage stability. We evaluated the efficacy of novel antigen stabilizing and protecting solutions (SPS) to protect influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 split virus antigen under experimental conditions in vitro and in vivo. Original or SPS re-buffered vaccine (Pandemrix) was spray-dried and terminally sterilised by irradiation with 25 kGy (e-beam). Antigen integrity was monitored by SDS-PAGE, dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography and functional haemagglutination assays. In vitro screening experiments revealed a number of highly stable compositions containing glycyrrhizinic acid (GA) and/or chitosan. The most stable composition was selected for storage tests and in vivo assessment of seroconversion in non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis) using a prime-boost strategy. Redispersed formulations with original adjuvant were administered intramuscularly. Storage data revealed high stability of protected vaccines at 4°C and 25°C, 60% relative humidity, for at least three months. Animals receiving original Pandemrix exhibited expected levels of seroconversion after 21 days (prime) and 48 days (boost) as assessed by haemagglutination inhibition and microneutralisation assays. Animals vaccinated with spray-dried and irradiated Pandemrix failed to exhibit seroconversion after 21 days whereas spray-dried and irradiated, SPS-protected vaccines elicited similar seroconversion levels to those vaccinated with original Pandemrix. Boost immunisation with SPS-protected vaccine resulted in a strong increase in seroconversion but had only minor effects in animals treated with non SPS-protected vaccine. In conclusion

  3. Vaccination against 2009 pandemic H1N1 in a population dynamical model of Vancouver, Canada: timing is everything

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Much remains unknown about the effect of timing and prioritization of vaccination against pandemic (pH1N1) 2009 virus on health outcomes. We adapted a city-level contact network model to study different campaigns on influenza morbidity and mortality. Methods We modeled different distribution strategies initiated between July and November 2009 using a compartmental epidemic model that includes age structure and transmission network dynamics. The model represents the Greater Vancouver Regional District, a major North American city and surrounding suburbs with a population of 2 million, and is parameterized using data from the British Columbia Ministry of Health, published studies, and expert opinion. Outcomes are expressed as the number of infections and deaths averted due to vaccination. Results The model output was consistent with provincial surveillance data. Assuming a basic reproduction number = 1.4, an 8-week vaccination campaign initiated 2 weeks before the epidemic onset reduced morbidity and mortality by 79-91% and 80-87%, respectively, compared to no vaccination. Prioritizing children and parents for vaccination may have reduced transmission compared to actual practice, but the mortality benefit of this strategy appears highly sensitive to campaign timing. Modeling the actual late October start date resulted in modest reductions in morbidity and mortality (13-25% and 16-20%, respectively) with little variation by prioritization scheme. Conclusion Delays in vaccine production due to technological or logistical barriers may reduce potential benefits of vaccination for pandemic influenza, and these temporal effects can outweigh any additional theoretical benefits from population targeting. Careful modeling may provide decision makers with estimates of these effects before the epidemic peak to guide production goals and inform policy. Integration of real-time surveillance data with mathematical models holds the promise of enabling public health

  4. Key points in evaluating immunogenicity of pandemic influenza vaccines: A lesson from immunogenicity studies of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, Satoko; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Ide, Yuichiro; Egawa, Yumi; Saito, Tomoko; Kondo, Kyoko; Ito, Kazuya; Kase, Tetsuo; Maeda, Akiko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-09-18

    Immunogenicity studies on pandemic influenza vaccine are necessary to inform rapid development and implementation of a vaccine during a pandemic. Thus, strategies for immunogenicity assessment are required. To identify essential factors to consider when evaluating the immunogenicity of pandemic influenza vaccines using the experience in Japan with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. We conducted a search of observational studies using PubMed and IchushiWeb. Search terms included "influenza vaccine AND (immunogenicity OR immune response) AND Japan AND (2009 OR pdm09) NOT review," and was limited to studies conducted in humans. A total of 33 articles were identified, of which 16 articles met the inclusion criteria. Immunogenicity of the commercially available influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine satisfied the international criteria for influenza vaccine immunogenicity in all study populations. The most remarkable immune response was observed in junior high school students, while the lowest immune response was observed in hematological malignancy patients. Similar to immunogenicity studies on seasonal influenza vaccines, factors such as patient background (e.g., age, underlying condition, pre-vaccination titer, body mass index, etc.) and study procedure (e.g., concurrent measurement of pre- and post-vaccination antibody titer, effects of infection during the study period) may have affected the assessment of immunogenicity to the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. In addition, prior vaccination with the seasonal influenza vaccine may inhibit antibody induction by the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. This review discusses factors and strategies that must be considered and addressed during immunogenicity assessments of pandemic influenza vaccines, which may provide useful information for future influenza pandemics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Low adherence to influenza vaccination campaigns: is the H1N1 virus pandemic to be blamed?

    PubMed

    Trivellin, Valeria; Gandini, Vera; Nespoli, Luigi

    2011-11-10

    Over the last few months, debates about the handling of the influenza virus A (H1N1) pandemic took place, in particular regarding the change of the WHO pandemic definition, economic interests, the dramatic communication style of mass media. The activation of plans to reduce the virus diffusion resulted in an important investment of resources. Were those investments proportionate to the risk? Was the pandemic overrated? The workload of the Pediatric Emergency Room (P.E.R.) at a teaching hospital in Varese (Northern Italy) was investigated in order to evaluate the local diffusion and severity of the new H1N1 influenza epidemic. A 100% increase of the number of P.E.R. visits, particularly for influenza-like illness, was recorded during weeks 42-46 of 2009 (October, 17 to November, 2); the low rate of hospitalization and the mild presentation of the infection gave rise to the conclusion that the pandemic risk was overrated. Mass media communications concerning the new virus created a disproportionate fear in the population that significantly enhanced the burden of cares at the hospital. In the absence of generally implemented measures for etiological diagnosis, the actual incidence of the H1N1 infection could not be estimated. Virus identification, in fact, was limited to children showing severe symptoms after consultancy with an infectious disease specialist. The alarming nature of the communication campaign and the choice to limit etiologic diagnosis to severe cases created a climate of uncertainty which significantly contributed to the massive admissions to the P.E.R.. The communication strategy adopted by the mass media was an important element during the pandemic: the absence of clarity contributed to the spread of a pandemic phobia that appeared to result more from the sensationalism of the campaign than from infection with the novel influenza A variant of human, avian, swine origin virus. One relevant effect of the media coverage was the extremely low adherence

  6. The Social Ecological Model as a Framework for Determinants of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Uptake in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Supriya; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Donald; Hilyard, Karen M.; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on influenza vaccine uptake has focused largely on intrapersonal determinants (perceived risk, past vaccine acceptance, perceived vaccine safety) and on physician recommendation. The authors used a social ecological framework to examine influenza vaccine uptake during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Surveying an adult population (n = 2,079) in…

  7. The Social Ecological Model as a Framework for Determinants of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Uptake in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Supriya; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Donald; Hilyard, Karen M.; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on influenza vaccine uptake has focused largely on intrapersonal determinants (perceived risk, past vaccine acceptance, perceived vaccine safety) and on physician recommendation. The authors used a social ecological framework to examine influenza vaccine uptake during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Surveying an adult population (n = 2,079) in…

  8. Febrile seizures after 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccination and infection: a nationwide registry-based study.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Inger Johanne; Aaberg, Kari Modalsli; Ghaderi, Sara; Gunnes, Nina; Trogstad, Lill; Magnus, Per; Håberg, Siri Eldevik

    2015-11-09

    During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, a monovalent pandemic strain vaccine containing the oil-in-water adjuvant AS03 (Pandemrix®) was offered to the Norwegian population. The coverage among children reached 54%. Our aim was to estimate the risk of febrile seizure in children after exposure to pandemic influenza vaccination or infection. The study population comprised 226,889 children born 2006-2009 resident in Norway per October 1st, 2009. Febrile seizure episodes were defined by emergency hospital admissions / emergency outpatient hospital care with International Classification of Diseases, Version 10, codes R56.0 or R56.8. The self-controlled case series method was applied to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) in pre-defined risk periods compared to the background period. The total observation window was ± 180 days from exposure day. Among 113,068 vaccinated children, 656 (0.6%) had at least one febrile seizure episode. The IRR of febrile seizures 1-3 days after vaccination was 2.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15-3.51). In the period 4-7 days after vaccination, no increased risk was observed. Among the 8172 children diagnosed with pandemic influenza, 84 (1.0%) had at least one febrile seizure episode. The IRR of febrile seizures on the same day as a diagnosis of influenza was 116.70 (95% CI: 62.81-216.90). In the period 1-3 days after a diagnosis of influenza, a tenfold increased risk was observed (IRR 10.12, 95% CI: 3.82 - 26.82). In this large population-based study with precise timing of exposures and outcomes, we found a twofold increased risk of febrile seizures 1-3 days after pandemic influenza vaccination. However, we found that pandemic influenza infection was associated with a much stronger increase in risk of febrile seizures.

  9. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    PubMed

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis.

  10. Cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis after H1N1 vaccination: a case report and review of the cutaneous side effects of influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, C; Livideanu, C Bulai; Maza, A; Lamant, L; Paul, C

    2011-01-01

    Cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis (CHP) is a rare disease mostly caused by viral infections and/or lymphoproliferative diseases. We describe a case of CHP associated with H1N1 vaccine during the winter 2009-2010 vaccination campaign and discuss the cutaneous side effects of influenza vaccines. A 6-year-old child presented with inflammatory subcutaneous nodules, which had appeared 1 month after the first injection of H1N1 vaccine and 1 week after the second injection. There was no history of recent infection. The skin lesions spontaneously disappeared without scarring. In CHP the abnormal cytokine secretion from neoplastic or reactive T cells promotes monocyte-macrophage activation and haemophagocytosis. Vaccination is not a common cause of CHP, but it seems possible that, as in infectious diseases, reactive T cells to the vaccine antigen could trigger CHP.

  11. Predictors of the Uptake of A (H1N1) Influenza Vaccine: Findings from a Population-Based Longitudinal Study in Tokyo

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Siyan; Nonaka, Daisuke; Nomoto, Marino; Kobayashi, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall pandemic A (H1N1) influenza vaccination rates remain low across all nations, including Japan. To increase the rates, it is important to understand the motives and barriers for the acceptance of the vaccine. We conducted this study to determine potential predictors of the uptake of A (H1N1) influenza vaccine in a cohort of Japanese general population. Methodology/Principal Findings By using self-administered questionnaires, this population-based longitudinal study was conducted from October 2009 to April 2010 among 428 adults aged 18–65 years randomly selected from each household residing in four wards and one city in Tokyo. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Of total, 38.1% of participants received seasonal influenza vaccine during the preceding season, 57.0% had willingness to accept A (H1N1) influenza vaccine at baseline, and 12.1% had received A (H1N1) influenza vaccine by the time of follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, people who had been vaccinated were significantly more likely to be living with an underlying disease (p = 0.001), to perceive high susceptibility to influenza (p = 0.03), to have willingness to pay even if the vaccine costs ≥ US$44 (p = 0.04), to have received seasonal influenza vaccine during the preceding season (p<0.001), and to have willingness to accept A (H1N1) influenza vaccine at baseline (p<0.001) compared to those who had not been vaccinated. Conclusions/Significance While studies have reported high rates of willingness to receive A (H1N1) influenza vaccine, these rates may not transpire in the actual practices. The uptake of the vaccine may be determined by several potential factors such as perceived susceptibility to influenza and sensitivity to vaccination cost in general population. PMID:21556152

  12. Pandemic influenza A/H1N1 vaccine administered sequentially or simultaneously with seasonal influenza vaccine to HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Tagliaferri, Laura; Daleno, Cristina; Valzano, Antonia; Picciolli, Irene; Tel, Francesca; Prunotto, Giulia; Serra, Domenico; Galeone, Carlotta; Plebani, Anna; Principi, Nicola

    2011-02-11

    In order to evaluate the immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of the 2009 A/H1N1 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine administered sequentially or simultaneously with seasonal virosomal-adjuvanted influenza vaccine to HIV-infected children and adolescents, 36 HIV-infected children and adolescents, and 36 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were randomised 1:1 to receive the pandemic vaccine upon enrollment and the seasonal vaccine one month later, or to receive the pandemic and seasonal vaccines simultaneously upon enrollment. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates against the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus were 100% two months after vaccine administration in both groups, regardless of the sequence of administration. Geometric mean titres against pandemic and seasonal antigens were significantly higher when the seasonal and pandemic vaccines were administered simultaneously than when the seasonal vaccine was administered alone. Local and systemic reactions were mild and not increased by simultaneous administration. In conclusion, the 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 MF59-adjuvanted vaccine is as immunogenic, safe and well tolerated in HIV-infected children and adolescents as in healthy controls. Its simultaneous administration with virosomal-adjuvanted seasonal antigens seems to increase immune response to both pandemic and seasonal viruses with the same safety profile as that of the pandemic vaccine alone. However, because this finding cannot be clearly explained by an immunological viewpoint, further studies are needed to clarify the reasons of its occurrence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Factors associated with willingness to be vaccinated against pandemic flu A/H1N1 in the adult population of the Health Department of Elche (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Tuells, J; Caballero, P; Nolasco, A; Montagud, E

    2012-01-01

    To assess, in the general population, the information sources, attitudes and willingness to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 in 2009. We carried out a cross sectional study between 25th November and 30th December 2009, through face to face interviews with a random sample (826) of adults resident in the Health Department of Elche (Spain). Respondents reported that television (57%) and the family doctor (47.9%) were their main sources of information about vaccinations. Eighty-two point two percent had a good opinion of vaccinations, 30.5% perceived A/H1N1 to be more severe than seasonal flu, with a higher rate among older and less educated people. Twenty-five point four percent of respondents were concerned about contracting it, especially among the less educated. Forty-two point one percent expressed their willingness to be vaccinated against seasonal flu. Eighteen point four percent intended to be vaccinated against A/H1N1. The bias towards vaccination increases with age and in the case of A/H1N1 decreases among more educated people. The family doctor was the main source of information when people wanted to be immunized against seasonal flu (OR = 1.43) and A/H1N1 (OR = 2.47). Low acceptance of the pandemic vaccination and low perceived severity of influenza A/H1N1. Previous vaccination experience with seasonal flu creates a predisposition to immunization against A/H1N1. Although the media were the leading source of information during this period, the family doctor's influence on their decision to be vaccinated was significant.

  14. Influenza H1N1pdm-specific maternal antibodies offer limited protection against wild-type virus replication and influence influenza vaccination in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Suguitan, Amorsolo L; Zengel, James R; Jacobson, Scott; Gee, Stephanie; Cetz, Janet; Cha, Paulyn; Chen, Zhongying; Broome, Rosemary; Jin, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective was to study passively acquired influenza H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm) maternal antibody kinetics and its impact on subsequent influenza infection and vaccination in ferrets during an outbreak of the H1N1pdm. Design and main outcome measures Infectivity of the H1N1pdm in the respiratory tract of ferrets was compared with the previous seasonal A/South Dakota/6/2007 (SD07, H1N1). Influenza-specific antibodies were quantitated and antibody-mediated protection against the homologous and heterologous H1N1 virus challenge infection was determined. Results H1N1pdm virus was approximately 10 times more infectious than SD07 in ferrets, replicated to higher viral titers in the upper respiratory tract and shed for a longer duration. Influenza-specific antibodies after natural infection persisted much longer in the circulation than passively acquired maternal antibodies. The protection conferred by the maternal antibodies was limited to the homologous virus strain and was ineffective against SD07 and H3N2 virus. Serum antibodies from maternal transmission or passive transfer interfered with homologous vaccine strain-mediated antibody responses in the ferret. A booster immunization was required to elicit a high level of antibody. Conclusions The findings support the rationale for a prime and boost immunization strategy in young children in whom maternal antibodies are present. PMID:24734293

  15. Influenza H1N1pdm-specific maternal antibodies offer limited protection against wild-type virus replication and influence influenza vaccination in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Suguitan, Amorsolo L; Zengel, James R; Jacobson, Scott; Gee, Stephanie; Cetz, Janet; Cha, Paulyn; Chen, Zhongying; Broome, Rosemary; Jin, Hong

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to study passively acquired influenza H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm) maternal antibody kinetics and its impact on subsequent influenza infection and vaccination in ferrets during an outbreak of the H1N1pdm. Infectivity of the H1N1pdm in the respiratory tract of ferrets was compared with the previous seasonal A/South Dakota/6/2007 (SD07, H1N1). Influenza-specific antibodies were quantitated and antibody-mediated protection against the homologous and heterologous H1N1 virus challenge infection was determined. H1N1pdm virus was approximately 10 times more infectious than SD07 in ferrets, replicated to higher viral titers in the upper respiratory tract and shed for a longer duration. Influenza-specific antibodies after natural infection persisted much longer in the circulation than passively acquired maternal antibodies. The protection conferred by the maternal antibodies was limited to the homologous virus strain and was ineffective against SD07 and H3N2 virus. Serum antibodies from maternal transmission or passive transfer interfered with homologous vaccine strain-mediated antibody responses in the ferret. A booster immunization was required to elicit a high level of antibody. The findings support the rationale for a prime and boost immunization strategy in young children in whom maternal antibodies are present.

  16. Cumulative Risk of Guillain–Barré Syndrome Among Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Populations During the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahed; Stewart, Brock; Tokars, Jerome; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to assess risk of Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) among influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent (pH1N1) vaccinated and unvaccinated populations at the end of the 2009 pandemic. Methods. We applied GBS surveillance data from a US population catchment area of 45 million from October 15, 2009, through May 31, 2010. GBS cases meeting Brighton Collaboration criteria were included. We calculated the incidence density ratio (IDR) among pH1N1 vaccinated and unvaccinated populations. We also estimated cumulative GBS risk using life table analysis. Additionally, we used vaccine coverage data and census population estimates to calculate denominators. Results. There were 392 GBS cases; 64 (16%) occurred after pH1N1vaccination. The vaccinated population had lower average risk (IDR = 0.83, 95% confidence interval = 0.63, 1.08) and lower cumulative risk (6.6 vs 9.2 cases per million persons, P = .012) of GBS. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that at the end of the influenza season cumulative GBS risk was less among the pH1N1vaccinated than the unvaccinated population, suggesting the benefit of vaccination as it relates to GBS. The observed potential protective effect on GBS attributed to vaccination warrants further study. PMID:24524517

  17. Interim estimates of 2015/16 vaccine effectiveness against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, Canada, February 2016.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Catharine; Skowronski, Danuta M; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Winter, Anne Luise; Dickinson, James A; De Serres, Gaston; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Drews, Steven J; Martineau, Christine; Eshaghi, Alireza; Krajden, Mel; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Using a test-negative design, the Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) assessed interim 2015/16 vaccine effectiveness (VE) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Adjusted VE showed significant protection of 64% (95% confidence interval (CI): 44-77%) overall and 56% (95%CI: 26-73%) for adults between 20 and 64 years-old against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 illness. Among the 67 A(H1N1)pdm09-positive specimens that were successfully sequenced, 62 (> 90%) belonged to the emerging genetic 6B.1 subclade, defined by S162N (potential gain of glycosylation) and I216T mutations in the haemagglutinin protein. Findings from the Canadian SPSN indicate that the 2015/16 northern hemisphere vaccine provided significant protection against A(H1N1)pdm09 illness despite genetic evolution in circulating viruses.

  18. A Qualitative Study of Vaccine Acceptability and Decision Making among Pregnant Women in Morocco during the A (H1N1) pdm09 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Lohiniva, Anna-Leena; Barakat, Amal; Dueger, Erica; Restrepo, Suzanne; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination uptake of pregnant women in Morocco during the A (H1N1) pdm09 pandemic was lower than expected. A qualitative study using open-ended questions was developed to explore the main determinants of acceptance and non-acceptance of the monovalent A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine among pregnant women in Morocco and to identify information sources that influenced their decision-making process. The study sample included 123 vaccinated and unvaccinated pregnant women who were in their second or third trimester between December 2009 and March 2010. They took part in 14 focus group discussions and eight in-depth interviews in the districts of Casablanca and Kenitra. Thematic qualitative analysis identified reasons for vaccine non-acceptance: (1) fear of the monovalent A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine, (2) belief in an A (H1N1) pdm09 pandemic conspiracy, (3) belief in the inapplicability of the monovalent A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine to Moroccans, (4) lack of knowledge of the monovalent A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine, and (5) challenges of vaccination services/logistics. Reasons for vaccine acceptance included: (1) perceived benefits and (2) modeling. Decision-making was strongly influenced by family, community, mass media, religious leaders and health providers suggesting that broad communication efforts should also be used to advocate for vaccination. Meaningful communication for future vaccine campaigns must consider these context-specific findings. As cultural and religious values are shared across many Arab countries, these findings may also provide valuable insights for seasonal influenza vaccine planning in the Middle East and North Africa region at large. PMID:25313555

  19. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  20. Factors influencing uptake of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine amongst healthcare workers in a regional pediatric centre: lessons for improving vaccination rates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suet Ching; Hawkins, Gillian; Aspinall, Esther; Patel, Neil

    2012-01-05

    Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination has been recommended for all frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in the UK since October 2009, to protect individuals and their patients from infection. Understanding the factors influencing vaccine uptake by HCW may improve future vaccination programmes in current and subsequent years. To assess the uptake of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, and factors affecting vaccine uptake, in frontline healthcare workers in a large pediatric hospital. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a regional Pediatric Hospital in Scotland incorporating intensive care and ECMO services. One page, anonymised questionnaires were distributed to all frontline HCW in high risk departments of the hospital. 260 questionnaires were completed, capturing an estimated 52% of all staff. Vaccination rate was 49.6%, and was significantly higher amongst doctors (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.5, P=0.005). Commonest reasons for vaccine uptake were high risk of contact with H1N1 (88%) and responsibility to protect patients (71%). Uncertainty about vaccine side-effects (47%), concern about vaccine safety (33%) and being too busy to attend the vaccine clinic (22%) were the commonest reasons for non-vaccination. Reasons for vaccination varied between staff grouping and department. 36% of non-vaccinated staff would accept the vaccine if offered. Vaccine uptake may be increased by addressing HCW knowledge and attitudes and access to vaccine. Future vaccination programmes should include targeted education and vaccine delivery, at the convenience of staff, and in their own department. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Characterization of Functional Antibody and Memory B-Cell Responses to pH1N1 Monovalent Vaccine in HIV-Infected Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Donna J.; Muresan, Petronella; Nachman, Sharon; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly M.; Dominguez, Teresa; Flynn, Patricia M.; Spector, Stephen A.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Bloom, Anthony; Weinberg, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated immune determinants of antibody responses and B-cell memory to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected children. Methods Ninety subjects 4 to <25 years of age received two double doses of pH1N1 vaccine. Serum and cells were frozen at baseline, after each vaccination, and at 28 weeks post-immunization. Hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers, avidity indices (AI), B-cell subsets, and pH1N1 IgG and IgA antigen secreting cells (ASC) were measured at baseline and after each vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies and pH1N1-specific Th1, Th2 and Tfh cytokines were measured at baseline and post-dose 1. Results At entry, 26 (29%) subjects had pH1N1 protective HAI titers (≥1:40). pH1N1-specific HAI, neutralizing titers, AI, IgG ASC, IL-2 and IL-4 increased in response to vaccination (p<0.05), but IgA ASC, IL-5, IL-13, IL-21, IFNγ and B-cell subsets did not change. Subjects with baseline HAI ≥1:40 had significantly greater increases in IgG ASC and AI after immunization compared with those with HAI <1:40. Neutralizing titers and AI after vaccination increased with older age. High pH1N1 HAI responses were associated with increased IgG ASC, IFNγ, IL-2, microneutralizion titers, and AI. Microneutralization titers after vaccination increased with high IgG ASC and IL-2 responses. IgG ASC also increased with high IFNγ responses. CD4% and viral load did not predict the immune responses post-vaccination, but the B-cell distribution did. Notably, vaccine immunogenicity increased with high CD19+CD21+CD27+% resting memory, high CD19+CD10+CD27+% immature activated, low CD19+CD21-CD27-CD20-% tissue-like, low CD19+CD21-CD27-CD20-% transitional and low CD19+CD38+HLADR+% activated B-cell subsets. Conclusions HIV-infected children on HAART mount a broad B-cell memory response to pH1N1 vaccine, which was higher for subjects with baseline HAI≥1:40 and increased with age, presumably due to prior exposure to pH1N1 or to other influenza vaccination/infection. The response

  2. Heterogeneity of T Cell Responses to Pandemic pH1N1 Monovalent Vaccine in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Richardson, Kelly; Fenton, Terence; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Watts, D Heather; Abzug, Mark J; Nachman, Sharon A; Levin, Myron J

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the Th1 protective and regulatory T and B cell (Treg and Breg) responses to pH1N1 monovalent influenza vaccine (IIV1) in HIV-infected pregnant women on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 52 study participants were cryopreserved before and after vaccination and analyzed by flow cytometry. pH1N1-specific Th1, Treg, and Breg responses were measured in PBMCs after in vitro stimulation with pH1N1 and control antigen. The cohort analysis did not detect changes in pH1N1-Th1, Treg, or Breg subsets postvaccination. However, individual analyses distinguished subjects who mounted vigorous Th1 responses postvaccination from others who did not. Postvaccination, high pH1N1-Th1 correlated with high pH1N1-Treg and Breg responses, suggesting that low influenza effector responses did not result from excessive vaccine-induced immune regulation. High postvaccination pH1N1-Th1 responses correlated with baseline high PHA- and pH1N1-IFN-γ ELISpot and circulating CD4(+)CD39(+)% and CD8(+)CD39(+)% Treg, with low CD8(+) cell numbers and CD19(+)FOXP3(+)% Breg, but not with CD4(+) cell numbers or HIV viral load. These data highlight the heterogeneity of T cell responses to vaccines in HIV-infected individuals on cART. Predictors of robust Th1 responses to IIV include CD8(+) cell numbers, T cell functionality, and circulating Breg and Treg.

  3. Immune response following H1N1pdm09 vaccination: differences in antibody repertoire and avidity in young adults and elderly populations stratified by age and gender.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Verma, Nitin; Talaat, Kawsar R; Karron, Ruth A; Golding, Hana

    2012-02-15

    The H1N1 2009 influenza (H1N1pdm09) pandemic had unexpected features, including lower morbidity and mortality in elderly populations. We performed in-depth elucidation of antibody responses generated post-H1N1pdm09 vaccination in elderly (aged 66-83 years) and younger (aged 18-45 or 46-65 years) adults using H1N1pdm09 whole-genome-fragment phage display library and measured antibody isotype and affinity to antigenic domains within hemagglutinin (HA). H1N1pdm09 vaccination induced 10-fold higher antibody levels in elderly compared with younger adults. These antibodies primarily targeted the HA1 globular domain, including neutralizing epitopes in the receptor-binding domain. Antibody epitope repertoire, isotype, and affinity maturation after H1N1pdm09 vaccination evolved independently for HA2, HA1, and HA1 N-terminus antigenic regions. Postvaccination serum samples from elderly subjects demonstrated substantially higher avidity than from younger subjects (>60% vs <30% resistance to 7 mol/L urea) and slower antibody dissociation rates using surface plasmon resonance. We also identified a gender difference in postvaccination antibody avidity (female < male subjects) in adults <65 years old. This is the first study in humans that provides evidence for a qualitatively superior antibody response in elderly adults after H1N1pdm09 vaccination. These findings may help explain the age-related mortality observed during the H1N1pdm09 pandemic. The difference in gender specific avidity merits further exploration.

  4. Description of a large urban school-located 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccination campaign, New York City 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Narciso, Heather E; Pathela, Preeti; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Kansagra, Susan M; May, Linda; Scaccia, Allison; Zucker, Jane R

    2012-04-01

    In the spring of 2009, New York City (NYC) experienced the emergence and rapid spread of pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus (pH1N1), which had a high attack rate in children and caused many school closures. During the 2009 fall wave of pH1N1, a school-located vaccination campaign for elementary schoolchildren was conducted in order to reduce infection and transmission in the school setting, thereby reducing the impact of pH1N1 that was observed earlier in the year. In this paper, we describe the planning and outcomes of the NYC school-located vaccination campaign. We compared consent and vaccination data for three vaccination models (school nurse alone, school nurse plus contract nurse, team). Overall, >1,200 of almost 1,600 eligible schools participated, achieving 26.8% consent and 21.5% first-dose vaccination rates, which did not vary significantly by vaccination model. A total of 189,902 doses were administered during two vaccination rounds to 115,668 students at 998 schools included in the analysis; vaccination rates varied by borough, school type, and poverty level. The team model achieved vaccination of more children per day and required fewer vaccination days per school. NYC's campaign is the largest described school-located influenza vaccination campaign to date. Despite substantial challenges, school-located vaccination is feasible in large, urban settings, and during a public health emergency.

  5. [Active surveillance of adverse effects of Pandemrix vaccine to prevent influenza A(H1N1) in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Galindo Santana, Belkys María; Peláez Sánchez, Otto Reinaldo; Galindo Sardiña, Miguel Angel; Leon Villafuerte, Milagros; Concepción Díaz, Damarys; Estruch Rancaño, C Luis; Martínez Sánchez, Raydel; Santín Peña, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    in April 2009, a new virus was identified in Mexico and North America as the cause of a respiratory disease. The virus quickly spread over other countries. On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) reported cases in 74 countries and territories located in 2 of its regions. The high sustained transmission of this virus worldwide led to establish the phase 6 or the pandemic phase, indicating that the situation had to do with spreading rather than increased severity. to report on already known or new events after the administration of vaccine A(H1N1) called Pandemrix, to identify the most frequent events occurred in pregnant women and to research into the associated severe events. a prospective descriptive study was designed to characterize the adverse effects of Pandemrix reported across the country from April 1st to June 30th, 2010. A total of 1,123,526 people were vaccinated in which 100% of pregnant women were included. active surveillance nationwide reported 5 763 signs and symptoms detected in 3 401 people (615 reports from pregnant women). The overall rate of reports was 302.7 x 100 000 doses administered. Adverse events such as fever, headache, pain, swelling and redness at the injection site, malaise, arthralgia, allergic reactions, nausea and vomiting were reported as common symptoms. These 10 symptoms and signs accounted for 79.1% of all the reported events. A total number of 80 317 pregnant women were vaccinated of whom 615 reported adverse effects, accounting for 0.8 % of the vaccinated pregnant women. Fever was the most notified symptom in children (193) followed by local reactions at the injection site (23), vomiting (20), arthralgia (17), headache (11), malaise (10) and high fever-related seizures (6). Eight events were analyzed as severe. the administration of the vaccine was related to 3 events, unrelated to other 3 events and 2 were classified as inconclusive (3 miscarriages). No deaths were reported. The capacity of the Cuban Health

  6. Effectiveness of the monovalent influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in Navarre, Spain, 2009-2010: cohort and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Morán, Julio; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Fernández-Alonso, Mirian; Guevara, Marcela; Cenoz, Manuel García; Reina, Gabriel; Alvarez, Nerea; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Salcedo, Esther; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2011-08-11

    We defined a population-based cohort (596,755 subjects) in Navarre, Spain, using electronic records from physicians, to evaluate the effectiveness of the monovalent A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in preventing influenza in the 2009-2010 pandemic season. During the 9-week period of vaccine availability and circulation of the A(H1N1)2009 virus, 4608 cases of medically attended influenza-like illness (MA-ILI) were registered (46 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for sociodemographic covariables, outpatient visits and major chronic conditions, vaccination was associated with a 32% (95% CI: 8-50%) reduction in the overall incidence of MA-ILI. In a test negative case-control analysis nested in the cohort, swabs from 633 patients were included, and 123 were confirmed for A(H1N1)2009 influenza. No confirmed case had received A(H1N1)2009 vaccine versus 9.6% of controls (p<0.001). The vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was 89% (95% CI: 36-100%) after adjusting for age, health care setting, major chronic conditions and period. Pandemic vaccine was effective in preventing MA-ILI and confirmed cases of influenza A(H1N1)2009 in the 2009-2010 season. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Partial protection of seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine against novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009: case-control study in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Valdespino-Gómez, Jose Luis; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Higuera-Iglesias, Anjarath; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Garcia-Anaya, Antonio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ponce-de-León-Rosales, Samuel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rodriguez-López, Mario Henry; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of 2008-9 seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine with cases of influenza A/H1N1 during the epidemic in Mexico. Design Frequency matched case-control study. Setting Specialty hospital in Mexico City, March to May 2009. Participants 60 patients with laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 and 180 controls with other diseases (not influenza-like illness or pneumonia) living in Mexico City or the State of Mexico and matched for age and socioeconomic status. Main outcome measures Odds ratio and effectiveness of trivalent inactivated vaccine against influenza A/H1N1. Results Cases were more likely than controls to be admitted to hospital, undergo invasive mechanical ventilation, and die. Controls were more likely than cases to have chronic conditions that conferred a higher risk of influenza related complications. In the multivariate model, influenza A/H1N1 was independently associated with trivalent inactivated vaccine (odds ratio 0.27, 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.66) and underlying conditions (0.15, 0.08 to 0.30). Vaccine effectiveness was 73% (95% confidence interval 34% to 89%). None of the eight vaccinated cases died. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests some protection from the 2008-9 trivalent inactivated vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009, particularly severe forms of the disease, diagnosed in a specialty hospital during the influenza epidemic in Mexico City. PMID:19808768

  8. Partial protection of seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine against novel pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009: case-control study in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Lourdes; Valdespino-Gómez, Jose Luis; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Higuera-Iglesias, Anjarath; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Garcia-Anaya, Antonio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ponce-de-León-Rosales, Samuel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Rodriguez-López, Mario Henry; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio

    2009-10-06

    To evaluate the association of 2008-9 seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine with cases of influenza A/H1N1 during the epidemic in Mexico. Frequency matched case-control study. Specialty hospital in Mexico City, March to May 2009. 60 patients with laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 and 180 controls with other diseases (not influenza-like illness or pneumonia) living in Mexico City or the State of Mexico and matched for age and socioeconomic status. Odds ratio and effectiveness of trivalent inactivated vaccine against influenza A/H1N1. Cases were more likely than controls to be admitted to hospital, undergo invasive mechanical ventilation, and die. Controls were more likely than cases to have chronic conditions that conferred a higher risk of influenza related complications. In the multivariate model, influenza A/H1N1 was independently associated with trivalent inactivated vaccine (odds ratio 0.27, 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.66) and underlying conditions (0.15, 0.08 to 0.30). Vaccine effectiveness was 73% (95% confidence interval 34% to 89%). None of the eight vaccinated cases died. Preliminary evidence suggests some protection from the 2008-9 trivalent inactivated vaccine against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 2009, particularly severe forms of the disease, diagnosed in a specialty hospital during the influenza epidemic in Mexico City.

  9. Effectiveness and safety of the A-H1N1 vaccine in children: a hospital-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To verify whether vaccination against the A-H1N1 virus in the paediatric population was effective in preventing the occurrence of influenza-like illness (ILI) or was associated with adverse events of special interest. Design, setting and patients A case–control analysis was performed as part of surveillance of children hospitalised through the emergency departments of eight paediatric hospitals/wards for ILI, neurological disorders, non-infectious muco-cutaneous diseases and vasculitis, thrombocytopaenia and gastroduodenal lesions. Results Among 736 children enrolled from November 2009 to August 2010, only 25 had been vaccinated with the pandemic vaccine. Out of 268 children admitted for a diagnosis compatible with the adverse events of special interest, six had received the A-H1N1 vaccine, although none of the adverse events occurred within the predefined risk windows. Only 35 children out of 244 admitted with a diagnosis of ILI underwent laboratory testing: 11 were positive and 24 negative for the A-H1N1 virus. None of the A-H1N1 positive children had received the pandemic vaccine. The OR of ILI associated with any influenza vaccination was 0.9 (95% CI 0.1 to 5.5). Conclusions The study provides additional information on the benefit–risk profile of the pandemic vaccine. No sign of risk associated with the influenza A-H1N1 vaccine used in Italy was found, although several limitations were observed: in Italy, pandemic vaccination coverage was low, the epidemic was almost over by mid December 2009 and the A-H1N1 laboratory test was performed only during the epidemic phase (in <10% of children). This study supports the importance of the existing network of hospitals for the evaluation of signals relevant to new vaccines and drugs. PMID:22021877

  10. Effectiveness of Pandemic H1N1-2009 Vaccination in Reducing Laboratory Confirmed Influenza Infections among Military Recruits in Tropical Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vernon J.; Tan, Chi Hsien; Yap, Jonathan; Cook, Alex R.; Ting, Pei-Jun; Loh, Jin-Phang; Gao, Qiuhan; Chen, Mark I.; Kang, Wee Lee; Tan, Boon Huan; Tambyah, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza vaccine effectiveness in tropical communities. We studied the effectiveness of a pandemic H1N1 vaccination program in reducing influenza cases in Singapore. Methods A surveillance study was conducted among military personnel presenting with febrile respiratory illness from mid-2009 to mid-2010. Consenting individuals underwent nasal washes, which were tested with RT-PCR and subtyped. A vaccination program (inactivated monovalent Panvax H1N1-2009 vaccine) was carried out among recruits. A Bayesian hierarchical model was used to quantify relative risks in the pre- and post-vaccination periods. An autoregressive generalised linear model (GLM) was developed to minimise confounding. Results Of 2858 participants, 437(15.3%), 60(2.1%), and 273(9.6%) had pandemic H1N1, H3N2, and influenza B. The ratio of relative risks for pandemic H1N1 infection before and after vaccination for the recruit camp relative to other camps was 0.14(0.016,0.49); for H3N2, 0.44(0.035,1.8); and for influenza B, 18(0.77,89). Using the GLM for the recruit camp, post-vaccination weekly cases decreased by 54%(37%,67%, p<0.001) from that expected without vaccination; influenza B increased by 66 times(9–479 times, p<0.001); with no statistical difference for H3N2 (p = 0.54). Conclusions Pandemic vaccination reduced H1N1-2009 disease burden among military recruits. Routine seasonal influenza vaccination should be considered. PMID:22053196

  11. Transient Impact of Rituximab in H1N1 Vaccination-associated Narcolepsy With Severe Psychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Alén, Reija; Partinen, Markku

    2016-09-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is an organic sleep disorder caused by the destruction of hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. In addition to daytime sleepiness, the spectrum and severity of symptoms are very variable. Psychiatric comorbidity and phenomena resembling psychotic symptoms are also common. Current treatment options for narcolepsy are symptomatic but there are few case reports of positive effect of immunotherapy. We report a very severely affected young boy treated with rituximab (RXB). A 12-year-old boy developed narcolepsy after Pandemrix H1N1 vaccination in 2010. He started to express severe psychiatric symptoms shortly after the onset. Cataplexy and sleepiness were devastatingly disabling. Conventional treatments did not have any effect on symptoms so we decided to try RXB, chimeric human monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed in B lymphocytes. After the first treatment his condition ameliorated dramatically. Unfortunately, the effect lasted only for 2 months. Following attempts did not show any effect. Effect of RXB on narcolepsy has not been reported before. Remarkable but short-lasting effect of RXB in narcolepsy is intriguing as it could imply that there is still ongoing B cell-mediated autoimmune response possible contributing to symptoms in narcolepsy.

  12. Serologic response after vaccination against influenza (A/H1N1)pdm09 in children with renal disease receiving oral immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Saikusa, Tomoko; Katafuchi, Yuno; Ushijima, Kosuke; Ohtsu, Yasushi; Tsumura, Naoki; Ito, Yuhei

    2015-09-11

    A limited number of reports are available regarding the effect of the influenza vaccine in pediatric patients receiving steroid and immunosuppressant therapy. The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine was administered to 15 children with renal disease who were receiving steroid and immunosuppressant therapy (treatment group) and 23 children with who were not receiving these drugs (non-treatment group). Titer transition of the hemagglutination inhibition antibody was compared between the 2 groups immediately before vaccination and 4 weeks and 6 months after vaccination. Multivariate analysis showed a significant correlation between geometric mean titer, SCR, and SPR with age, while no correlation was observed between treatment with immunosuppressant therapy and efficacy. No serious adverse reactions occurred after vaccination. This strain is not present in existing influenza vaccines, and A(H1N1)pdm09HA vaccination was administered alone in 2009. The children in this study had not previously been exposed to this strain. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of the A(H1N1)pdm09HA vaccine without the effects of vaccination or past infection with A(H1N1)pdm09HA or A(H3N2) vaccination in the previous year.

  13. [Pandemic influenza A (H1N1)v vaccination status and factors affecting vaccination: Ankara and Diyarbakır 2009 data from Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ertek, Mustafa; Sevencan, Funda; Kalaycıoğlu, Handan; Gözalan, Ayşegül; Simşek, Ciğdem; Culha, Gönül; Dorman, Vedat; Ozlü, Ahmet; Arıkan, Füsun; Aktaş, Dilber; Akın, Levent; Korukluoğlu, Gülay; Sevindi, Demet Furkan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine the frequency of the symptoms of influenza-like illness during influenza A (H1N1)v pandemic in two provinces where sentinel influenza surveillance was conducted and also to obtain opinions about H1N1 influenza and vaccination, H1N1 vaccination status and factors affecting vaccination. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the provinces of Ankara (capital city, located at Central Anatolia) and Diyarbakır (located at southeastern Anatolia). It was planned to include 455 houses in Ankara and 276 houses in Diyarbakır. The household participation rate in the study was 78.9% and 53.6% for Ankara and Diyarbakır, respectively. Our study was carried out between January-February 2010, with 1164 participants from Ankara and 804 from Diyarbakır, including every household subjects except for infants younger than 11 months and patients with primary/secondary immunodeficiency diseases. Data was collected by site teams consisting of a physician and a healthcare staff with informed consent. Of the participants 45.5% from Ankara and 35.3% from Diyarbakır stated that they had gone through an influenza-like illness. The most frequently indicated clinical symptoms were fatigue/weakness, rhinitis, sore throat and cough. The rates of admission to a physician with influenza like illness complaints were 50.6% and 58.7%; rates of hospitalization due to influenza-like illness were 1% and 1.5%, and rates of antiviral drug use were 3.8% and 1.9%, in Ankara ve Diyarbakır participants, respectively. The rate of personal precautions taken by the subjects for prevention from pandemic influenza were 59% and 53.3%, in Ankara and Diyarbakır, respectively. These precautions most frequently were "hand washing" and "avoiding crowded public areas". H1N1 influenza vaccine was applied in 9.3% of the participants in Ankara and in 3.7% of the participants in Diyarbakır. Vaccination rate was higher in both of the provinces in adults over 25 years old than

  14. Decreased Serologic Response in Vaccinated Military Recruits during 2011 Correspond to Genetic Drift in Concurrent Circulating Pandemic A/H1N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Faix, Dennis J.; Hawksworth, Anthony W.; Myers, Christopher A.; Hansen, Christian J.; Ortiguerra, Ryan G.; Halpin, Rebecca; Wentworth, David; Pacha, Laura A.; Schwartz, Erica G.; Garcia, Shawn M. S.; Eick-Cost, Angelia A.; Clagett, Christopher D.; Khurana, Surender; Golding, Hana; Blair, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Population-based febrile respiratory illness surveillance conducted by the Department of Defense contributes to an estimate of vaccine effectiveness. Between January and March 2011, 64 cases of 2009 A/H1N1 (pH1N1), including one fatality, were confirmed in immunized recruits at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, suggesting insufficient efficacy for the pH1N1 component of the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). Methodology/Principal Findings To test serologic protection, serum samples were collected at least 30 days post-vaccination from recruits at Fort Jackson (LAIV), Parris Island (LAIV and trivalent inactivated vaccine [TIV]) at Cape May, New Jersey (TIV) and responses measured against pre-vaccination sera. A subset of 78 LAIV and 64 TIV sera pairs from recruits who reported neither influenza vaccination in the prior year nor fever during training were tested by microneutralization (MN) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. MN results demonstrated that seroconversion in paired sera was greater in those who received TIV versus LAIV (74% and 37%). Additionally, the fold change associated with TIV vaccination was significantly different between circulating (2011) versus the vaccine strain (2009) of pH1N1 viruses (ANOVA p value = 0.0006). HI analyses revealed similar trends. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that the quantity, IgG/IgM ratios, and affinity of anti-HA antibodies were significantly greater in TIV vaccinees. Finally, sequence analysis of the HA1 gene in concurrent circulating 2011 pH1N1 isolates from Fort Jackson exhibited modest amino acid divergence from the vaccine strain. Conclusions/Significance Among military recruits in 2011, serum antibody response differed by vaccine type (LAIV vs. TIV) and pH1N1 virus year (2009 vs. 2011). We hypothesize that antigen drift in circulating pH1N1 viruses contributed to reduce vaccine effectiveness at Fort Jackson. Our findings have wider implications regarding vaccine

  15. A post-marketing surveillance study of a human live-virus pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine (Nasovac (®) ) in India.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prasad S; Raut, Sidram K; Dhere, Rajeev M

    2013-01-01

    A live attenuated pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine was developed in India. A post marketing surveillance was conducted retrospectively in healthy individuals (³ 3 years) who were vaccinated intranasally around one year before. After consent, the subjects recorded adverse events developing within 42 days. Among 7565 individuals (3 - 85 years), a total of 81 solicited adverse reactions (1%) were reported in 49 subjects (0.65%). The reactions included mild to moderate respiratory symptoms. No H1N1 case was encountered during one year postvaccination. The data show the safety of the live attenuated influenza vaccine platform developed in India.

  16. Chart-confirmed guillain-barre syndrome after 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination among the Medicare population, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Polakowski, Laura L; Sandhu, Sukhminder K; Martin, David B; Ball, Robert; Macurdy, Thomas E; Franks, Riley L; Gibbs, Jonathan M; Kropp, Garner F; Avagyan, Armen; Kelman, Jeffrey A; Worrall, Christopher M; Sun, Guoying; Kliman, Rebecca E; Burwen, Dale R

    2013-09-15

    Given the increased risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) found with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, both active surveillance and end-of-season analyses on chart-confirmed cases were performed across multiple US vaccine safety monitoring systems, including the Medicare system, to evaluate the association of GBS after 2009 monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccination. Medically reviewed cases consisted of H1N1-vaccinated Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized for GBS. These cases were then classified by using Brighton Collaboration diagnostic criteria. Thirty-one persons had Brighton level 1, 2, or 3 GBS or Fisher Syndrome, with symptom onset 1-119 days after vaccination. Self-controlled risk interval analyses estimated GBS risk within the 6-week period immediately following H1N1 vaccination compared with a later control period, with additional adjustment for seasonality. Our results showed an elevated risk of GBS with 2009 monovalent H1N1 vaccination (incidence rate ratio = 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.14, 5.11; attributable risk = 2.84 per million doses administered, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 5.48). This observed risk was slightly higher than that seen with previous seasonal influenza vaccines; however, additional results that used a stricter case definition (Brighton level 1 or 2) were not statistically significant, and our ability to account for preceding respiratory/gastrointestinal illness was limited. Furthermore, the observed risk was substantially lower than that seen with the 1976 swine influenza vaccine.

  17. US school morbidity and mortality, mandatory vaccination, institution closure, and interventions implemented during the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri; Elliott, Michael B; Swick, Zachary; Reddick, David

    2013-03-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic disproportionately affected school-aged children, but only school-based outbreak case studies have been conducted. The purposes of this study were to evaluate US academic institutions' experiences during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in terms of infection prevention interventions implemented and to examine factors associated with school closure during the pandemic. An online survey was sent to school nurses in May through July 2011. Hierarchical logistic regressions were used to determine predictive models for having a mandatory H1N1 vaccination policy for school nurses and school closure. In all, 1,997 nurses from 26 states participated. Very few nurses (3.3%, n=65) reported having a mandatory H1N1 influenza vaccination policy; nurses were more likely than all other school employees (p<.001) to be mandated to receive vaccine. Determinants of having a mandatory H1N1 vaccination policy were being employed by a hospital or public health agency, and the school being located in a western or northeastern state. Factors related to school closure included being in a western or northeastern state, having higher H1N1-related morbidity/mortality, being a school nurse employed by a public health agency or hospital, and being a private school. The most commonly implemented interventions included encouraging staff and students to exercise hand hygiene and increasing classroom cleaning; least commonly implemented interventions included discouraging face-to-face meetings, training staff on H1N1 influenza and/or respiratory hygiene, and discouraging handshaking. Schools should develop and continue to improve their pandemic plans, including collaborating with community response agencies.

  18. The priming effect of previous natural pandemic H1N1 infection on the immunogenicity to subsequent 2010-2011 influenza vaccination in children: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Kyeong; Eun, Byung Wook; Kim, Nam Hee; Lim, Jung Sub; Lee, Jun Ah; Kim, Dong Ho

    2016-08-22

    The effect of previous natural pandemic H1N1 (H1N1 pdm09) influenza infection on the immunogenicity to subsequent inactivated influenza vaccination in children has not been well studied. We aimed to evaluate the effect of H1N1 pdm09 natural infection and vaccination on the immunogenicity to subsequent 2010-2011 seasonal inactivated influenza vaccination in children. From October 2010 to May 2011, we conducted an open-label, multi-center study in children aged 6 months -18 years in Korea. We measured antibody titers with a hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay at baseline, 1 month, and 6 months after vaccination with trivalent split or subunit vaccines containing H1N1 pdm, A/H3N2, and B. The subjects were classified into 4 groups depending on the presence of laboratory-confirmed H1N1 pdm09 infection and/or vaccination in the 2009-2010 season; Group I: vaccination (-)/infection(-), Group II: vaccination (-)/infection(+), Group III: vaccination (+)/infection(-), Group IV: vaccination (+)/infection(+). Among the subjects in group I, 47 subjects who had a baseline titer >1:10 were considered to have an asymptomatic infection. They were included into the final group II (n = 80). We defined the new group II as the infection-primed (IP) group and group III as the vaccine-primed (VP) group. Seroconversion rate (57.5 % vs 35.9 %, p = 0.001), seroprotection rate at 6 months after vaccination (70.8 % vs 61.8 %, p = 0.032), and GMT at 1 month after vaccination (129.9 vs 66.5, p = 0.002) were significantly higher in the IP group than in the VP group. In the 9-18 year-old group, seroconversion rate and immunogenicity at 1 and 6 months were significantly higher in the IP group than in the VP group. However in the 1-7 year-old age group, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Previous H1N1 pdm09 infection appears to have positive effects on immunogenicity of subsequent inactivated influenza vaccines against H1N1 pdm09 in older

  19. Acceptance of a Vaccine Against Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Among Health Care Workers in Two Major Cities in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Esteves-Jaramillo, Alejandra; Omer, Saad B.; Gonzalez-Diaz, Esteban; Salmon, Daniel A.; Hixson, Brooke; Navarro, Francisco; Kawa–Karasik, Simon; Frew, Paula; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Noriega, Eduardo Rodriguez; Ramirez, Ylean; Rosas, Araceli; Acosta, Edgar; Badillo, Vianey Varela; Rio, Carlos Del

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Further cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) outbreak are expected in the coming months. Vaccination has been proven to be essential to control a pandemic of influenza; therefore, considerable efforts and resources have been devoted to develop a vaccine against the influenza A (H1N1) virus. With the current availability of the vaccine, it will be important to immunize as many people as possible. However, previous data with seasonal influenza vaccines have shown that there are multiple barriers related to perceptions and attitudes of the population that influence vaccine use. The aim of the study was to evaluate the acceptance of a newly developed vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A among healthcare workers (HCW) in Mexico. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among HCW in three hospitals in the two largest cities in Mexico—Mexico City and Guadalajara—between June and September 2009. Results A total of 1097 HCW participated in the survey. Overall, 80% (n = 880) intended to accept the H1N1 pandemic vaccine and 71.6% (n = 786) reported they would recommend the vaccine to their patients. Doctors were more likely to accept and recommend the vaccine than nurses. HCWs who intend to be immunized will be more likely to do so if they know that the vaccine is safe and effective. Conclusions Knowledge of the willingness to accept the vaccine can be used to plan strategies that will effectively respond to the needs of the population studied, reducing the health and economic impact of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. PMID:20304260

  20. Long-Term Immunogenicity of an Inactivated Split-Virion 2009 Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 Virus Vaccine with or without Aluminum Adjuvant in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenting; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, a global epidemic of influenza A(H1N1) virus caused the death of tens of thousands of people. Vaccination is the most effective means of controlling an epidemic of influenza and reducing the mortality rate. In this study, the long-term immunogenicity of influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) split vaccine was observed as long as 15 months (450 days) after immunization in a mouse model. Female BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with different doses of aluminum-adjuvanted vaccine. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (10× 50% lethal dose [LD50]) of homologous virus 450 days after immunization. The results showed that the supplemented aluminum adjuvant not only effectively enhanced the protective effect of the vaccine but also reduced the immunizing dose of the vaccine. In addition, the aluminum adjuvant enhanced the IgG antibody level of mice immunized with the H1N1 split vaccine. The IgG level was correlated to the survival rate of the mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 vaccine has good immunogenicity and provided long-term protection against lethal influenza virus challenge in mice. PMID:25589552

  1. Long-term immunogenicity of an inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus vaccine with or without aluminum adjuvant in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenting; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Ze

    2015-03-01

    In 2009, a global epidemic of influenza A(H1N1) virus caused the death of tens of thousands of people. Vaccination is the most effective means of controlling an epidemic of influenza and reducing the mortality rate. In this study, the long-term immunogenicity of influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) split vaccine was observed as long as 15 months (450 days) after immunization in a mouse model. Female BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with different doses of aluminum-adjuvanted vaccine. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (10× 50% lethal dose [LD(50)]) of homologous virus 450 days after immunization. The results showed that the supplemented aluminum adjuvant not only effectively enhanced the protective effect of the vaccine but also reduced the immunizing dose of the vaccine. In addition, the aluminum adjuvant enhanced the IgG antibody level of mice immunized with the H1N1 split vaccine. The IgG level was correlated to the survival rate of the mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted inactivated split-virion 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 vaccine has good immunogenicity and provided long-term protection against lethal influenza virus challenge in mice. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan nanogel greatly enhances the efficacy and heterosubtypic cross-reactivity of H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jihyun; Shim, Sang-Mu; Nguyen, Thi Quyen; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon-Hee; Webby, Richard; Poo, Haryoung

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the global outbreak of an influenza pandemic emphasized the need for an effective vaccine adjuvant. In this study, we examined the efficacy of poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan (PC) nanogel as an adjuvant for the influenza vaccine. PC nanogel significantly enhanced antigen-specific cross-presentation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Compared with alum, the protective efficacy of the pandemic H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) vaccine was substantially increased by PC nanogel, with increased hemagglutination-inhibition titers, CTL activity, and earlier virus clearance after homologous and heterosubtypic [A/Philippines/2/82 (H3N2)] virus challenges. However, CD8+ T cell-depleted mice displayed no protection against the heterosubtypic virus challenge after immunization with PC nanogel-adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccine. We also observed that using PC nanogel as a vaccine adjuvant had a dose-sparing effect and significantly enhanced the long-lasting protection of the pH1N1 vaccine. Together, these results suggest that PC nanogel is a promising vaccine adjuvant that could broadly prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:28322289

  3. A tool for the economic analysis of mass prophylaxis operations with an application to H1N1 influenza vaccination clinics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Hicks, Katherine A; Honeycutt, Amanda A; Hupert, Nathaniel; Khavjou, Olga; Messonnier, Mark; Washington, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    This article uses the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination program experience to introduce a cost analysis approach that may be relevant for planning mass prophylaxis operations, such as vaccination clinics at public health centers, work sites, schools, or pharmacy-based clinics. These costs are important for planning mass influenza vaccination activities and are relevant for all public health emergency preparedness scenarios requiring countermeasure dispensing. We demonstrate how costs vary depending on accounting perspective, staffing composition, and other factors. We also describe a mass vaccination clinic budgeting tool that clinic managers may use to estimate clinic costs and to examine how costs vary depending on the availability of volunteers or donated supplies and on the number of patients vaccinated per hour. Results from pilot tests with school-based H1N1 influenza vaccination clinic managers are described. The tool can also contribute to planning efforts for universal seasonal influenza vaccination.

  4. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease does not interfere with the adaptive immune response following challenge with pandemic A/H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Lager, Kelly M; Janke, Bruce H; Kehrli, Marcus E; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2013-10-01

    The implications of sequential prime and challenge with mismatched influenza A viruses is a concern in mammals, including humans. We evaluated the ability of pigs affected with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) to generate a humoral immune response against the heterologous challenge virus inciting the VAERD. Vaccinated and challenged (V/C) pigs were administered an inactivated swine δ-cluster H1N2 (MN08) vaccine with an HA similar to pre-2009 seasonal human viruses and challenged with heterologous A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 (H1N1pdm09). Vaccination induced MN08-specific hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody but not cross-reacting H1N1pdm09 HI antibody. However, vaccinated pigs demonstrated significantly higher post-challenge anti-H1N1pdm09 serum neutralizing (SN) antibodies at 14 and 21 days post inoculation (dpi) compared to nonvaccinated, challenged pigs (NV/C), indicating a priming effect of the vaccine. Serum and lung whole virus anti-H1N1pdm09 IgG ELISA antibodies in the vaccinated group were significantly higher than the challenge only pigs at all-time points evaluated. Lung IgA ELISA antibodies to both antigens were detected at 2, 5, and 21 dpi in vaccine-primed pigs, contrasted against mucosal ELISA antibody responses detected only at 21 dpi in the naïve-challenged group. Collectively, vaccine-primed pigs demonstrated a robust humoral immune response and elevated local adaptive cytokine levels, indicating VAERD does not adversely affect the induction of an immune response to challenge with heterologous virus despite the severe clinical disease and underlying lung pathology. Thus, original antigenic sin does not appear to be a component of VAERD.

  5. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of A/H1N1pdm Vaccine Among Subjects With Severe Motor and Intellectual Disability in the 2010/11 Influenza Season

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Megumi; Hanaoka, Tomoyuki; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kase, Tetsuo; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Background While the immunogenicity and effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccines among subjects with severe motor and intellectual disability (SMID) are known to be diminished, the efficacy of the A/H1N1pdm vaccine has not been evaluated. Methods We prospectively evaluated 103 subjects with SMID (mean age, 41.7 years) who received trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine during the 2010/11 influenza season. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titer was measured in serum samples collected pre-vaccination (S0), post-vaccination (S1), and end-of-season (S2) to evaluate subjects’ immunogenicity capacity. Vaccine efficacy was assessed based on antibody efficacy and achievement proportion. Results The proportions of seroprotection and seroconversion, and the geometric mean titer (GMT) ratio (GMT at S1/GMT at S0) for A/H1N1pdm were 46.0%, 16.0%, and 1.8, respectively—values which did not meet the European Medicines Evaluation Agency criteria. The achievement proportion was 26%. During follow-up, 11 of 43 subjects with acute respiratory illness were diagnosed with type A influenza according to a rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT), and A/H1N1pdm strains were isolated from the throat swabs of 5 of those 11 subjects. When either or both RIDT-diagnosed influenza or serologically diagnosed influenza (HI titer at S2/HI titer at S1 ≥2) were defined as probable influenza, subjects with A/H1N1pdm seroprotection were found to have a lower incidence of probable influenza (odds ratio, 0.31; antibody efficacy, 69%; vaccine efficacy, 18%). Conclusions In the present seasonal assessment, antibody efficacy was moderate against A/H1N1pdm among SMID subjects, but vaccine efficacy was low due to the reduced immunogenicity of SMID subjects. PMID:26780860

  6. Modifications in the polymerase genes of a swine-like triple-reassortant influenza virus to generate live attenuated vaccines against 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pena, Lindomar; Vincent, Amy L; Ye, Jianqiang; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice R; Angel, Matthew; Lorusso, Alessio; Gauger, Philip C; Janke, Bruce H; Loving, Crystal L; Perez, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    On 11 June 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus is the predominant influenza virus strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers and infected turkeys and swine in several countries. Thus, the development of a vaccine that is effective in multiple animal species is urgently needed. We have previously demonstrated that the introduction of temperature-sensitive mutations into the PB2 and PB1 genes of an avian H9N2 virus, combined with the insertion of a hemagglutinin (HA) tag in PB1, resulted in an attenuated (att) vaccine backbone for both chickens and mice. Because the new pandemic strain is a triple-reassortant (TR) virus, we chose to introduce the double attenuating modifications into a swine-like TR virus isolate, A/turkey/OH/313053/04 (H3N2) (ty/04), with the goal of producing live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV). This genetically modified backbone had impaired polymerase activity and restricted virus growth at elevated temperatures. In vivo characterization of two H1N1 vaccine candidates generated using the ty/04 att backbone demonstrated that this vaccine is highly attenuated in mice, as indicated by the absence of signs of disease, limited replication, and minimum histopathological alterations in the respiratory tract. A single immunization with the ty/04 att-based vaccines conferred complete protection against a lethal H1N1pdm virus infection in mice. More importantly, vaccination of pigs with a ty/04 att-H1N1 vaccine candidate resulted in sterilizing immunity upon an aggressive intratracheal challenge with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus. Our studies highlight the safety of the ty/04 att vaccine platform and its potential as a master donor strain for the generation of live attenuated vaccines for humans and livestock.

  7. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly.

  8. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  9. Non-neutralizing antibodies induced by seasonal influenza vaccine prevent, not exacerbate A(H1N1)pdm09 disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Reber, Adrian J; Kumar, Amrita; Ramos, Patricia; Sica, Gabriel; Music, Nedzad; Guo, Zhu; Mishina, Margarita; Stevens, James; York, Ian A; Jacob, Joshy; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-11-16

    The association of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) with increased infection by 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09) virus, initially observed in Canada, has elicited numerous investigations on the possibility of vaccine-associated enhanced disease, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unresolved. Here, we investigated if prior immunization with TIV enhanced disease upon A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in mice. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in TIV-immunized mice did not enhance the disease, as measured by morbidity and mortality. Instead, TIV-immunized mice cleared A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and recovered at an accelerated rate compared to control mice. Prior TIV immunization was associated with potent inflammatory mediators and virus-specific CD8 T cell activation, but efficient immune regulation, partially mediated by IL-10R-signaling, prevented enhanced disease. Furthermore, in contrast to suggested pathological roles, pre-existing non-neutralizing antibodies (NNAbs) were not associated with enhanced virus replication, but rather with promoted antigen presentation through FcR-bearing cells that led to potent activation of virus-specific CD8 T cells. These findings provide new insights into interactions between pre-existing immunity and pandemic viruses.

  10. Non-neutralizing antibodies induced by seasonal influenza vaccine prevent, not exacerbate A(H1N1)pdm09 disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Reber, Adrian J.; Kumar, Amrita; Ramos, Patricia; Sica, Gabriel; Music, Nedzad; Guo, Zhu; Mishina, Margarita; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Jacob, Joshy; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-01-01

    The association of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) with increased infection by 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09) virus, initially observed in Canada, has elicited numerous investigations on the possibility of vaccine-associated enhanced disease, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unresolved. Here, we investigated if prior immunization with TIV enhanced disease upon A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in mice. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in TIV-immunized mice did not enhance the disease, as measured by morbidity and mortality. Instead, TIV-immunized mice cleared A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and recovered at an accelerated rate compared to control mice. Prior TIV immunization was associated with potent inflammatory mediators and virus-specific CD8 T cell activation, but efficient immune regulation, partially mediated by IL-10R-signaling, prevented enhanced disease. Furthermore, in contrast to suggested pathological roles, pre-existing non-neutralizing antibodies (NNAbs) were not associated with enhanced virus replication, but rather with promoted antigen presentation through FcR-bearing cells that led to potent activation of virus-specific CD8 T cells. These findings provide new insights into interactions between pre-existing immunity and pandemic viruses. PMID:27849030

  11. High Vaccination Coverage among Children during Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 as a Potential Factor of Herd Immunity.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Toshihiko; Sato, Tomoki; Akita, Tomoyuki; Yanagida, Jiturou; Ohge, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Masao; Tanaka, Junko

    2016-10-17

    The objective of this study was to identify factors related to the expansion of infection and prevention of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. A retrospective non-randomized cohort study (from June 2009 to May 2010) on influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was conducted in a sample of residents from Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. The cumulative incidence of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and the pandemic vaccine effectiveness (VE) were estimated. The response rate was 53.5% (178,669/333,892). Overall, the odds ratio of non-vaccinated group to vaccinated group for cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was 2.18 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13-2.23) and the VE was 43.9% (CI: 42.8-44.9). The expansion of infection, indicating the power of transmission from infected person to susceptible person, was high in the 7-15 years age groups in each area. In conclusion, results from this survey suggested that schoolchildren-based vaccination rate participates in determining the level of herd immunity to influenza and children might be the drivers of influenza transmission. For future pandemic preparedness, vaccination of schoolchildren may help to prevent disease transmission during influenza outbreak.

  12. High Vaccination Coverage among Children during Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 as a Potential Factor of Herd Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Toshihiko; Sato, Tomoki; Akita, Tomoyuki; Yanagida, Jiturou; Ohge, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Masao; Tanaka, Junko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors related to the expansion of infection and prevention of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. A retrospective non-randomized cohort study (from June 2009 to May 2010) on influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was conducted in a sample of residents from Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. The cumulative incidence of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and the pandemic vaccine effectiveness (VE) were estimated. The response rate was 53.5% (178,669/333,892). Overall, the odds ratio of non-vaccinated group to vaccinated group for cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was 2.18 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13–2.23) and the VE was 43.9% (CI: 42.8–44.9). The expansion of infection, indicating the power of transmission from infected person to susceptible person, was high in the 7–15 years age groups in each area. In conclusion, results from this survey suggested that schoolchildren-based vaccination rate participates in determining the level of herd immunity to influenza and children might be the drivers of influenza transmission. For future pandemic preparedness, vaccination of schoolchildren may help to prevent disease transmission during influenza outbreak. PMID:27763532

  13. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species (1). Although its hemagglutinin gene is relat...

  14. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against the 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species. Although its hemagglutinin gene is related to North Ameri...

  15. Caspase 3 role and immunohistochemical expression in assessment of apoptosis as a feature of H1N1 vaccine-caused Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI)

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Abir Khalil; Magdy, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Background Drug-Induced Liver Injury (DILI) changes, occur post exposure to natural or chemical compounds including apoptosis. Aim To assess the H1N1 vaccine-caused DILI by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Methods This 2014’s experimental study was conducted on 70 albino rats. They were given ArepanrixTM H1N1 vaccine and were divided into 7 groups; 10 mice each, as control (non-vaccinated), vac2 and vac4 injected with 1st and 2nd doses of vaccine (suspension only) and euthanized after 3 weeks each, vac5 euthanized 6 weeks after 2nd dose, mix2 and mix4 injected with 1st and 2nd doses of vaccine (mixture of suspension and adjuvant) and euthanized after 3 weeks each, mix5 and euthanized 6 weeks after 2nd dose. Histopathological evaluation and histochemical assessment of metabolic protein, glycogen and collagen changes using PAS, bromophenol blue, Mallory’s trichrome and immunohistochemistry for caspase 3 on liver tissue paraffin sections were done. Image analysis system Leica QIIN 500 was used. Data were analyzed by SPSS software, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. Results Histopathological changes ranging from subtle up to necrosis were noticed, mainly in mix groups. Metabolic protein and glycogen changes were the maximum in mix5 group (p<0.01). Collagen deposition in sinusoids was higher in mix groups, and maximally in vac5 and mix5. Apoptotic hepatocytes expressing diffuse strong nuclear and cytoplasmic caspase 3 were the highest in mix5. Conclusion H1N1 vaccine can cause DILI by either direct toxic or idiosyncratic metabolic type reactions rather than immunologic hypersensitivity type. It ranges from subtle changes up to necrosis. Caspase 3 is pivotal in liver damage etiology, apoptosis induction and processing. Follow up for at least 2 months after the 2nd dose of H1N1 vaccine is recommended to rule out H1N1-induced DILI. PMID:28713494

  16. Hemagglutinin-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses following 2009-pH1N1 inactivated split-vaccine inoculation in humans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuguang; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Bin; Zhao, Yingze; Zhang, Wei; Han, Min; Wu, Ying; Shi, Guoli; Liu, Yingxia; Yan, Jinghua; Wu, Guizhen; Wang, Hua; Gao, George F; Zhu, Fengcai; Liu, William J

    2017-09-13

    Influenza A virus remains a major threat to public health, and the inactivated split-virus vaccine is the most prevalent vaccine used worldwide. However, our knowledge about cellular immune responses to the inactivated influenza virus vaccine and its correlation with humoral responses are yet limited, which has restricted our understanding of the vaccine's protective mechanisms. Herein, in two clinical trials, T-cell responses specific for both previously identified human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-I-restricted epitopes from influenza virus and hemagglutinin (HA) protein were longitudinally investigated before, during, and after a two-dose vaccination with the inactivated 2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009-pH1N1) vaccine. A robust antibody response in all of the donors after vaccination was observed. Though no CD8(+) T-cell responses to known epitopes were detected, HA-specific T-cell responses were primed following vaccination, and the responses were found to be mainly CD4(+) T-cell dependent. However, HA-specific T-cells circulating in peripheral blood dropped to baseline levels 6weeks after vaccination, but humoral immune responses maintained a high level for 4months post-vaccination. Significant correlations between the magnitude of the HA-specific T-cell responses and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were demonstrated, indicating a priming role of HA-specific T-cells for humoral immune responses. In conclusion, our study indicates that HA-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses can be primed by the inactivated 2009-pH1N1 vaccine, which may coordinate with the elicitation of antibody protection. These findings would benefit a better understanding of the immune protective mechanisms of the widely used inactivated 2009-pH1N1 vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of influenza-like illness and seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccination coverage among workers--United States, 2009-10 influenza season.

    PubMed

    Luckhaupt, Sara E; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Li, Jia; Sweeney, Marie; Santibanez, Tammy A

    2014-03-14

    During an influenza pandemic, information about the industry and occupation (I&O) of persons likely to be infected with influenza virus is important to guide key policy decisions regarding vaccine prioritization and exposure-control measures. Health-care personnel (HCP) might have increased opportunity for exposure to influenza infection, and they have been prioritized for influenza vaccination because of their own risk and the risk that infected HCP pose to patients. To identify other groups of workers that might be at increased risk for pandemic influenza infection, influenza-like illness (ILI) and vaccination coverage data from the 2009 National H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS), which was conducted during October 2009 through June 2010, were analyzed. In a representative sample of 28,710 employed adults, 5.5% reported ILI symptoms in the month before the interview, and 23.7% received the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza vaccine. Among employed adults, the highest prevalence of ILI was reported by those employed in the industry groups "Real estate and rental and leasing" (10.5%) and "Accommodation and food services" (10.2%), and in the occupation groups "Food preparation and serving related" (11.0%) and "Community and social services" (8.3%). Both seasonal influenza and pH1N1 vaccination coverage were relatively low in all of these groups of workers. Adults not in the labor force (i.e., homemakers, students, retired persons, and persons unable to work) had ILI prevalence and pH1N1 vaccination coverage similar to those found in all employed adults combined; in contrast, ILI prevalence was higher and pH1N1 vaccination coverage was lower among unemployed adults (i.e., those looking for work). These results suggest that adults employed in certain industries and occupations might have increased risk for influenza infection, and that the majority of these workers did not receive seasonal or pH1N1 influenza vaccine. Unemployed adults might also be considered a high risk group

  18. Intent to receive pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, compliance with social distancing and sources of information in NC, 2009.

    PubMed

    Horney, Jennifer A; Moore, Zack; Davis, Meredith; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2010-06-18

    Public adherence to influenza vaccination recommendations has been low, particularly among younger adults and children under 2, despite the availability of safe and effective seasonal vaccine. Intention to receive 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine has been estimated to be 50% in select populations. This report measures knowledge of and intention to receive pandemic vaccine in a population-based setting, including target groups for seasonal and H1N1 influenza. On August 28-29, 2009, we conducted a population-based survey in 2 counties in North Carolina. The survey used the 30x7 two-stage cluster sampling methodology to identify 210 target households. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Knowledge of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine was high, with 165 (80%) aware that a vaccine was being prepared. A total of 133 (64%) respondents intended to receive pandemic vaccine, 134 (64%) intended to receive seasonal vaccine, and 109 (53%) intended to receive both. Reporting great concern about H1N1 infection (PR 1.55; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.85), receiving seasonal influenza vaccine in 2008-09 (PR 1.47; 95%CI: 1.18, 1.82), and intending to receive seasonal influenza vaccine in 2009-10 (PR 1.27; 95%CI: 1.14, 1.42) were associated with intention to receive pandemic vaccine. Not associated were knowledge of vaccine, employment, having children under age 18, gender, race/ethnicity and age. Reasons cited for not intending to get vaccinated include not being at risk for infection, concerns about vaccine side effects and belief that illness caused by pandemic H1N1 would be mild. Forty-five percent of households with children under 18 and 65% of working adults reported ability to comply with self-isolation at home for 7-10 days if recommended by authorities. This is the first report of a population based rapid assessment used to assess knowledge and intent to receive pandemic vaccine in a community sample. Intention to receive pandemic and seasonal

  19. Intent to Receive Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Vaccine, Compliance with Social Distancing and Sources of Information in NC, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Horney, Jennifer A.; Moore, Zack; Davis, Meredith; MacDonald, Pia D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Public adherence to influenza vaccination recommendations has been low, particularly among younger adults and children under 2, despite the availability of safe and effective seasonal vaccine. Intention to receive 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine has been estimated to be 50% in select populations. This report measures knowledge of and intention to receive pandemic vaccine in a population-based setting, including target groups for seasonal and H1N1 influenza. Methodology and Principal Findings On August 28–29, 2009, we conducted a population-based survey in 2 counties in North Carolina. The survey used the 30×7 two-stage cluster sampling methodology to identify 210 target households. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Knowledge of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine was high, with 165 (80%) aware that a vaccine was being prepared. A total of 133 (64%) respondents intended to receive pandemic vaccine, 134 (64%) intended to receive seasonal vaccine, and 109 (53%) intended to receive both. Reporting great concern about H1N1 infection (PR 1.55; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.85), receiving seasonal influenza vaccine in 2008–09 (PR 1.47; 95%CI: 1.18, 1.82), and intending to receive seasonal influenza vaccine in 2009–10 (PR 1.27; 95%CI: 1.14, 1.42) were associated with intention to receive pandemic vaccine. Not associated were knowledge of vaccine, employment, having children under age 18, gender, race/ethnicity and age. Reasons cited for not intending to get vaccinated include not being at risk for infection, concerns about vaccine side effects and belief that illness caused by pandemic H1N1 would be mild. Forty-five percent of households with children under 18 and 65% of working adults reported ability to comply with self-isolation at home for 7–10 days if recommended by authorities. Conclusions and Significance This is the first report of a population based rapid assessment used to assess knowledge and intent to receive

  20. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 improves vaccination routine in subsequent years: a cohort study from 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tacken, Margot A J B; Jansen, Birgit; Mulder, Jan; Visscher, Stefan; Heijnen, Marie-Louise A; Campbell, Stephen M; Braspenning, Jozé C C

    2013-01-30

    In 2009 the pandemic influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 emerged with guidance that people at risk should be vaccinated. It is unclear how this event affected the underlying seasonal vaccination rate in subsequent years. To investigate the association of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal flu vaccination status in 2009 with vaccination rates in 2010 and 2011. Data were collected in 40 Dutch family practices on patients at risk for influenza during 2009-2011; data analysis was conducted in 2012. A multilevel logistic regression model (n=41,843 patients) adjusted for practice and patient characteristics (age and gender, as well as those patient groups at risk), showed that people who were vaccinated against A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009 were more likely to have been vaccinated in 2010 (OR 6.02; 95%CI 5.62-6.45, p<.0001). This likelihood was even more for people who were vaccinated against seasonal flu in 2009 (OR 13.83; 95%CI 12.93-14.78, p<.0001). A second analysis on the uptake rate in 2011 (n=39,468 patients) showed that the influence of the vaccination state in 2009 declined after two years, but the diminishing effect was smaller for people vaccinated against A(H1N1)pdm09 than for seasonal flu (OR 5.50; 95%CI 5.13-5.90, p<.0001; OR 10.98; 95%CI 10.26-11.75, p<.0001, respectively). Being vaccinated against A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza in the pandemic year 2009 enhanced the probability of vaccination in the next year and this was still effective in 2011. This suggests that peoples' vaccination routines were not changed by the rumor around the outbreak of A(H1N1)pdm09, but rather confirmed underlying behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Success of program linking data sources to monitor H1N1 vaccine safety points to potential for even broader safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Daniel; Yih, W Katherine; Lee, Grace; Rosofsky, Robert; Brown, Jeffrey; Vannice, Kirsten; Tokars, Jerome; Roddy, James; Ball, Robert; Gellin, Bruce; Lurie, Nicole; Koh, Howard; Platt, Richard; Lieu, Tracy

    2012-11-01

    In response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and subsequent vaccination program, the Department of Health and Human Services and collaborators developed the Post-Licensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring (PRISM) Program as a demonstration project to detect rare adverse events rapidly. The program monitored three million people who had received the H1N1 vaccine by linking data from large private health plans and from public immunization registries that had originally not been designed to share data, and on a larger scale than had been previously attempted. The program generated safety data in two weeks rather than three to six monty 10ths-the standard time frame achievable using health plan data. PRISM substantially contributed to the understanding of the safety of H1N1 vaccines. Its use in the case of H1N1 highlights the necessity of proactive planning, scalable infrastructure, and public-private partnerships in tracking adverse events after vaccination in epidemics. It also illustrates how data could be integrated to produce policy-relevant information for other medical products.

  2. Serologic cross reactivity of serum samples from avian influenza vaccinated commercial U.S. turkeys to the emergent H1N1 influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, the 2009 human H1N1 influenza virus was identified in turkey breeders in Chile and Canada resulting in infection and egg production losses. In the U.S., vaccination of turkeys against avian influenza may include H1 and H3 viruses also isolated from swine. We tested whether sera from turk...

  3. In vitro assessment of the allergenicity of novel MF59-adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine produced in dog kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Bencharitiwong, Ramon; Leonard, Stephanie; Tsai, Theodore; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2012-07-01

    A licensed inactivated MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine (Optaflu) produced in canine kidney cells (MDCK 33016-PF) contained no egg proteins and did not trigger degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells passively sensitized with human anti-dog IgE, supporting its safe use in dog-allergic individuals. The cell-derived pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine was also adjuvanted with the emulsion adjuvant MF59, and support for its similar safe use was sought. We sought to evaluate in vitro allergenicity of the MF59-adjuvanted cell-derived pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in subjects with dog allergy, with a mediator release assay. RBL-2H3 cells transfected with human Fcε receptor type 1 were sensitized with sera from adult dog-allergic subjects and stimulated with serial dilutions of pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine and dog dander extract. β-N-hexosaminidase release (NHR) was used as a marker of RBL degranulation.. Median dog dander-specific IgE in 30 dog-allergic subjects was 27.7 kU(A)/L (range 10.1; > 100); and in 5 dog non-allergic subjects was < 0.35 kU(A)/L (UniCAP system). Median (range) maximum NHR in dog-allergic subjects was: pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine 1.1% (0; 4.4) and dog dander 6.9% (0.7; 37.3), P < 0.001. In conclusion, MF59-adjuvanted pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine produced in continuous canine kidney cells did not trigger degranulation in RBL cells passively sensitized with human anti-dog IgE, supporting its safe use in dog-allergic individuals.

  4. Conservation and Diversity of Influenza A H1N1 HLA-Restricted T Cell Epitope Candidates for Epitope-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Paul ThiamJoo; Heiny, A. T.; Miotto, Olivo; Salmon, Jerome; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Lemonnier, Francois; August, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54) peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-γ ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007–2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes. Conclusions/Significance Seventeen (17) T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus. PMID:20090904

  5. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Adjuvanted Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Vaccines: A Multinational Self-Controlled Case Series in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Dieleman, Jeanne P.; Olberg, Henning K.; de Vries, Corinne S.; Sammon, Cormac; Andrews, Nick; Svanström, Henrik; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte; Hviid, Anders; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sommet, Agnès; Saussier, Christel; Castot, Anne; Heijbel, Harald; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Sparen, Par; Mosseveld, Mees; Schuemie, Martijn; van der Maas, Nicoline; Jacobs, Bart C.; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi; Storsaeter, Jann; Johansen, Kari; Kramarz, Piotr; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following the United States' 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign in the USA led to enhanced active surveillance during the pandemic influenza (A(H1N1)pdm09) immunization campaign. This study aimed to estimate the risk of GBS following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Methods A self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis was performed in Denmark, Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Information was collected according to a common protocol and standardised procedures. Cases classified at levels 1–4a of the Brighton Collaboration case definition were included. The risk window was 42 days starting the day after vaccination. Conditional Poisson regression and pooled random effects models estimated adjusted relative incidences (RI). Pseudo likelihood and vaccinated-only methods addressed the potential contraindication for vaccination following GBS. Results Three hundred and three (303) GBS and Miller Fisher syndrome cases were included. Ninety-nine (99) were exposed to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination, which was most frequently adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled RI for A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and GBS was 3.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.2–5.5), based on all countries. This lowered to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2–3.1) after adjustment for calendartime and to 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1–3.2) when we accounted for contra-indications. In a subset (Netherlands, Norway, and United Kingdom) we further adjusted for other confounders and there the RI decreased from 1.7 (adjusted for calendar month) to 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8), which is the main finding. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential of conducting European collaborative vaccine safety studies. The main, fully adjusted analysis, showed that the RI of GBS was not significantly elevated after influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (RI = 1.4 (95% CI: 0.7–2.8). Based on the upper limits of the pooled estimate we can rule

  6. [Adverse effects of seasonal flu vaccine and new influenza A (H1N1) vaccine in health care workers].

    PubMed

    Torruella, Joan Inglés; Soto, Rosa Gil; Valls, Rosa Carreras; Lozano, Judit Valverde; Carreras, Dolors Benito; Cunillera, Arnau Besora

    2013-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Valorar y comparar los efectos indeseados de la vacuna de la gripe estacional (VGE) y vacuna de la gripe A H1N1 (VGA) en trabajadores sanitarios. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal multicéntrico en trabajadores sanitarios de hospitales de agudos, centros de asistencia primaria, centros sociosanitarios, centros de salud mental y un hospital geriátrico participantes en la campaña de vacunación antigripal del 2009. Se enviaron encuestas autocumplimentadas a todos los vacunados con VGE y/o VGA. RESULTADOS: De los 1123 vacunados con VGE se obtienen 527 encuestas válidas (46,9%) y de 461 vacunados con VGA se obtienen 242 encuestas (52,5%). De los trabajadores participantes 527 estaban vacunados sólo con VGE, 117 vacunados previamente con VGE y después VGA (VGE+VGA) y 125 sólo vacunados sólo con VGA. El 18,4% (IC 95% 15,1-21,7) del grupo VGE presentaron algún efecto adverso a la vacuna VGE; en el grupo VGE+VGA el 45,3% (IC 95% 36,3-54,3) presentó una reacción adversa al recibir la VGA, y en el grupo VGA fue el 46,4% (IC 95% 37,7-55,1). En todos los participantes el problema más frecuente fue una reacción local. Las mujeres presentan mayor reacción a VGA y VGE que los hombres. Para todas las edades la VGE es menos reactógena que VGA y que la combinación de ambas vacunas, con la excepción de los trabajadores menores de 29 años. CONCLUSIONES: La VGA es más reactógena que la VGE, sin diferencias por orden de administración. Se observan variaciones por sexo y edad, pero siempre con mayor reactogenicidad para la VGA.

  7. Events supposedly attributable to vaccination or immunization during pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaigns in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Ropero-Álvarez, A M; Whittembury, A; Bravo-Alcántara, P; Kurtis, H J; Danovaro-Holliday, M C; Velandia-González, M

    2015-01-01

    As part of the vaccination activities against influenza A[H1N1]pdm vaccine in 2009-2010, countries in Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC) implemented surveillance of events supposedly attributable to vaccines and immunization (ESAVI). We describe the serious ESAVI reported in LAC in order to further document the safety profile of this vaccine and highlight lessons learned. We reviewed data from serious H1N1 ESAVI cases from LAC countries reported to the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization. We estimated serious ESAVI rates by age and target group, as well as by clinical diagnosis, and completed descriptive analyses of final outcomes and classifications given in country. A total of 1000 serious ESAVI were reported by 18 of the 29 LAC countries that vaccinated against A[H1N1]pdm. The overall reporting rate in LAC was 6.91 serious ESAVI per million doses, with country reporting rates ranging from 0.77 to 64.68 per million doses. Rates were higher among pregnant women (16.25 per million doses) when compared to health care workers (13.54 per million doses) and individuals with chronic disease (4.03 per million doses). The top three most frequent diagnoses were febrile seizures (12.0%), Guillain-Barré Syndrome (10.5%) and acute pneumonia (8.0%). Almost half (49.1%) of the serious ESAVI were reported among children aged <18 years of age; within this group, the highest proportion of cases was reported among those aged <2 years (53.1%). Of all serious ESAVI reported, 37.8% were classified as coincidental, 35.3% as related to vaccine components, 26.4% as non-conclusive and 0.5% as a programmatic error. This regional overview of A[H1N1]pdm vaccine safety data in LAC estimated the rate of serious ESAVI at lower levels than other studies. However, the ESAVI diagnosis distribution is comparable to the published literature. Lessons learned can be applied in the response to future pandemics.

  8. Recombinant equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) vaccine protects pigs against challenge with influenza A(H1N1)pmd09.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Lange, Elke; Beer, Martin; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) is not only an important respiratory pathogen in pigs but also a threat to human health. The pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus likely originated in swine through reassortment between a North American triple reassortant and Eurasian avian-like SIV. The North American triple reassortant virus harbors genes from avian, human and swine influenza viruses. An effective vaccine may protect the pork industry from economic losses and curb the development of new virus variants that may threaten public health. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of a recombinant equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) vaccine (rH_H1) expressing the hemagglutinin H1 of A(H1N1)pdm09 in the natural host. Our data shows that the engineered rH_H1 vaccine induces influenza virus-specific antibody responses in pigs and is able to protect at least partially against challenge infection: no clinical signs of disease were detected and virus replication was reduced as evidenced by decreased nasal virus shedding and faster virus clearance. Taken together, our results indicate that recombinant EHV-1 encoding H1 of A(H1N1)pdm09 may be a promising alternative for protection of pigs against infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 or other influenza viruses.

  9. Control of a Reassortant Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus Outbreak in an Intensive Swine Breeding Farm: Effect of Vaccination and Enhanced Farm Management Practices.

    PubMed

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Beato, Maria Serena; Angeloni, Giorgia; Monne, Isabella; Buniolo, Filippo; Zuliani, Federica; Morini, Matteo; Castellan, Alberto; Bonfanti, Lebana; Marangon, Stefano

    2015-04-13

    Influenza A viruses in swine cause considerable economic losses and raise concerns about their zoonotic potential. The current paucity of thorough empirical assessments of influenza A virus infection levels in swine herds under different control interventions hinders our understanding of their effectiveness. Between 2012 and 2013, recurrent outbreaks of respiratory disease caused by a reassortant pandemic 2009 H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus were registered in a swine breeding farm in North-East Italy, providing the opportunity to assess an outbreak response plan based on vaccination and enhanced farm management. All sows/gilts were vaccinated with a H1N1pdm-specific vaccine, biosecurity was enhanced, weaning cycles were lengthened, and cross-fostering of piglets was banned. All tested piglets had maternally-derived antibodies at 30 days of age and were detectable in 5.3% of ~90 day-old piglets. There was a significant reduction in H1N1pdm RT-PCR detections after the intervention. Although our study could not fully determine the extent to which the observed trends in seropositivity or RT-PCR positivity among piglets were due to the intervention or to the natural course of the disease in the herd, we provided suggestive evidence that the applied measures were useful in controlling the outbreak, even without an all-in/all-out system, while keeping farm productivity at full.

  10. Control of a Reassortant Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus Outbreak in an Intensive Swine Breeding Farm: Effect of Vaccination and Enhanced Farm Management Practices

    PubMed Central

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Beato, Maria Serena; Angeloni, Giorgia; Monne, Isabella; Buniolo, Filippo; Zuliani, Federica; Morini, Matteo; Castellan, Alberto; Bonfanti, Lebana; Marangon, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses in swine cause considerable economic losses and raise concerns about their zoonotic potential. The current paucity of thorough empirical assessments of influenza A virus infection levels in swine herds under different control interventions hinders our understanding of their effectiveness. Between 2012 and 2013, recurrent outbreaks of respiratory disease caused by a reassortant pandemic 2009 H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus were registered in a swine breeding farm in North-East Italy, providing the opportunity to assess an outbreak response plan based on vaccination and enhanced farm management. All sows/gilts were vaccinated with a H1N1pdm-specific vaccine, biosecurity was enhanced, weaning cycles were lengthened, and cross-fostering of piglets was banned. All tested piglets had maternally-derived antibodies at 30 days of age and were detectable in 5.3% of ~90 day-old piglets. There was a significant reduction in H1N1pdm RT-PCR detections after the intervention. Although our study could not fully determine the extent to which the observed trends in seropositivity or RT-PCR positivity among piglets were due to the intervention or to the natural course of the disease in the herd, we provided suggestive evidence that the applied measures were useful in controlling the outbreak, even without an all-in/all-out system, while keeping farm productivity at full. PMID:25932349

  11. Evaluation of the implementation of the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in local health departments (LHDs) in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    DiBiase, Lauren M; Davis, Sarah E H; Rosselli, Richard; Horney, Jennifer

    2011-05-23

    Effective conduct of vaccination campaigns by public health authorities can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with influenza. The emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza in April 2009 resulted in an unprecedented vaccination campaign in the US during the 2009-2010 influenza season. The variety of methods local health departments (LHDs) utilized to cope with a mismatch between public demand and supply and ever-changing guidelines have gone unexamined thus far. The purpose of this research is to identify and share lessons learned related to H1N1 influenza vaccination activities at LHDs. In April 2010, a comprehensive survey was developed to evaluate 2009-10 LHD H1N1 vaccination practices and document lessons learned. A stratified random sample was selected from NC's 85 LHDs. Interviews were conducted with key personnel involved in LHD vaccination campaigns. Results were analyzed to identify quantitative trends and qualitative themes. Twenty-five of 26 LHDs (96% response rate) participated in our survey. Each LHD utilized a different approach to address the challenges they faced during their H1N1 vaccination campaign. Variation between LHDs was found in terms of the types of vaccine-dispensing methods implemented and in the selection of outside organizations LHDs partnered with to assist with vaccinations. Having a Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) and pandemic influenza plan, hiring temporary staff, building on existing community partnerships, implementing a variety of vaccination strategies and using a variety of sites are strategies that will help LHDs deal more effectively with challenges posed by future pandemics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The reporting completeness of a passive safety surveillance system for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccines: a capture-recapture analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wan-Ting; Huang, Wei-I; Huang, Yu-Wen; Hsu, Chien-Wen; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang

    2012-03-09

    Adverse events following pandemic (H1N1) 2009 vaccines ("2009 H1N1 vaccines") in Taiwan were passively reported to the National Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting System. To evaluate the completeness of spontaneous reporting, cases of death, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), convulsion, Bell's palsy, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) after 2009 H1N1 vaccination that occurred between November 1, 2009 and August 31, 2010 were selected from the National Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting System (NADRRS) database and an additionally constructed nationwide large-linked database (LLDB), and matched on a unique personal identifier, date of vaccination (within ±7 days), and date of diagnosis (within ±7 days). Overall, matches occurred between the two data sources included 21 for death, 5 for GBS, 19 for convulsion, 22 for Bell's palsy, and 5 for ITP. The Chapman capture-recapture estimated spontaneous reporting completeness within 0-42 days of vaccination was 4% for death, 71% for GBS, 3% for convulsion, 9% for Bell's palsy, and 15% for ITP. For the interval ≥43 days after vaccination, reporting completeness was 0.1% for death, 14% for GBS, 0.1% for convulsion, <0.1% for Bell's palsy, and 0% for ITP. The estimated-to-expected ratio for Bell's palsy in the interval 0-42 days after vaccination was 1.48 (95% CI 1.11-1.98). Reporting completeness was higher for GBS than other adverse events after 2009 H1N1 vaccination. Linking the NADRRS to existing data sources in a capture-recapture analysis can be considered as an alternative to enhance Taiwan's postlicensure safety assessment of other routine vaccines. Nevertheless, the possibility of an increased risk for Bell's palsy detected by capture-recapture analyses needs further evaluation by controlled studies.

  13. Multi-Centre Observational Study of Transplacental Transmission of Influenza Antibodies following Vaccination with AS03A-Adjuvanted H1N1 2009 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Puleston, Richard; Bugg, George; Hoschler, Katja; Konje, Justin; Thornton, James; Stephenson, Iain; Myles, Puja; Enstone, Joanne; Augustine, Glenda; Davis, Yvette; Zambon, Maria; Nicholson, Karl; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Illness and death from influenza increase during pregnancy. In the United Kingdom pregnant women were targeted in a national programme for vaccination during the H1N1 2009–10 pandemic. Methods In this study, pregnant women were recruited in labour from November 9, 2009 to March 10, 2010. Pandemic vaccination status was determined. Venous cord blood collected at delivery was evaluated for transplacental transfer of antibodies by measurement of haemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization titres. Results Samples were collected from 77 vaccinated and 27 unvaccinated women. Seroprotection (HI titre ≥1∶40) was detected in 58 (75.3%, 95% CI 64.2–84.4) cord blood samples from vaccinated women and 5 (18.5%, 95% CI 6.3–38.1) from unvaccinated women (P<0.0001). There was evidence of transplacental seroprotection 8 days after maternal immunization (77.9%, 95 CI 66.2–87.1), maintained in most cases for at least 16 weeks. Discussion Immunization of pregnant women with AS03A-adjuvanted vaccine is followed by transplacental transfer of passive immunity at titres consistent with clinical protection in three-quarters of new-born infants. The findings support national and international pandemic H1N1 2009 recommendations for immunization during pregnancy. PMID:23372640

  14. Where are we in our understanding of the association between narcolepsy and one of the 2009 adjuvanted influenza A (H1N1) vaccines?

    PubMed

    Johansen, K; Brasseur, D; MacDonald, N; Nohynek, H; Vandeputte, J; Wood, D; Neels, P

    2016-07-01

    Evaluating new rare serious vaccine safety signals is difficult and complex work. To further assess the observed increase in narcolepsy cases seen in Europe with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine, the International Alliance for Biological Standardization (IABS) invited a wide range of experts to a one day meeting in Geneva in October 2015 to present data and to discuss the implications. The presentations covered the following topics: clinical picture of childhood narcolepsy following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaigns; epidemiological studies conducted to assess the risk of narcolepsy, other neurological and immune-related diseases following 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine; potential biases influencing the different epidemiological study designs; potential genetic contribution to the development of narcolepsy; potential biological mechanisms for development of narcolepsy in this setting including the role of the virus itself, antigenic differences between the vaccines and differences in AS03-adjuvanted vaccines. The presentations were followed by fulsome roundtable discussions. Members from affected families also attended and made informal comments to round out the day's deliberations. This meeting emphasized the value added in bringing together in a neutral setting a wide range of experts and vaccine producers to discuss such a complex new serious adverse event following immunization.

  15. Seroprotection of HIV-infected subjects after influenza A(H1N1) vaccination is directly associated with baseline frequency of naive T cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lorenzo A; Daniel, Alexander; Frank, Ian; Tebas, Pablo; Boyer, Jean D

    2014-08-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals, despite receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART), often have impaired vaccine responses. We examined the role that immune activation and cellular phenotypes play in influenza A(H1N1) vaccine responsiveness in HIV-infected subjects receiving ART. Subjects received the H1N1 vaccine (15-µg dose; Novartis), and antibody titers at baseline and after immunization were evaluated. Subjects were classified as responders if, by week 3, seroprotection guidelines were met. Responders had higher percentages of baseline naive T cells and lower percentages of terminally differentiated T cells, compared with nonresponders. Additionally, the naive CD4(+) T-cell percentage and age were negatively correlated. Preservation of naive T-cell populations by starting therapy early could impact vaccine responses against influenza virus and other pathogens, especially as this population ages.

  16. Seroprotection of HIV-Infected Subjects After Influenza A(H1N1) Vaccination Is Directly Associated With Baseline Frequency of Naive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Lorenzo A.; Daniel, Alexander; Frank, Ian; Tebas, Pablo; Boyer, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected individuals, despite receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART), often have impaired vaccine responses. We examined the role that immune activation and cellular phenotypes play in influenza A(H1N1) vaccine responsiveness in HIV-infected subjects receiving ART. Subjects received the H1N1 vaccine (15-µg dose; Novartis), and antibody titers at baseline and after immunization were evaluated. Subjects were classified as responders if, by week 3, seroprotection guidelines were met. Responders had higher percentages of baseline naive T cells and lower percentages of terminally differentiated T cells, compared with nonresponders. Additionally, the naive CD4+ T-cell percentage and age were negatively correlated. Preservation of naive T-cell populations by starting therapy early could impact vaccine responses against influenza virus and other pathogens, especially as this population ages. PMID:24610877

  17. Antigenic Differences between AS03 Adjuvanted Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic Vaccines: Implications for Pandemrix-Associated Narcolepsy Risk

    PubMed Central

    Vaarala, Outi; Vuorela, Arja; Partinen, Markku; Baumann, Marc; Freitag, Tobias L.; Meri, Seppo; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Olsen, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Rouvinen, Juha; Roivainen, Merja; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kilpi, Terhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy results from immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin secreting neurons in hypothalamus, however the triggers and disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Vaccine-attributable risk of narcolepsy reported so far with the AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination Pandemrix has been manifold compared to the AS03 adjuvanted Arepanrix, which contained differently produced H1N1 viral antigen preparation. Hence, antigenic differences and antibody response to these vaccines were investigated. Methods and Findings Increased circulating IgG-antibody levels to Pandemrix H1N1 antigen were found in 47 children with Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy when compared to 57 healthy children vaccinated with Pandemrix. H1N1 antigen of Arepanrix inhibited poorly these antibodies indicating antigenic difference between Arepanrix and Pandemrix. High-resolution gel electrophoresis quantitation and mass spectrometry identification analyses revealed higher amounts of structurally altered viral nucleoprotein (NP) in Pandemrix. Increased antibody levels to hemagglutinin (HA) and NP, particularly to detergent treated NP, was seen in narcolepsy. Higher levels of antibodies to NP were found in children with DQB1*06∶02 risk allele and in DQB1*06∶02 transgenic mice immunized with Pandemrix when compared to controls. Conclusions This work identified 1) higher amounts of structurally altered viral NP in Pandemrix than in Arepanrix, 2) detergent-induced antigenic changes of viral NP, that are recognized by antibodies from children with narcolepsy, and 3) increased antibody response to NP in association of DQB1*06∶02 risk allele of narcolepsy. These findings provide a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy. Although detailed mechanisms of Pandemrix in narcolepsy remain elusive, our results move the focus from adjuvant(s) onto the H1N1 viral proteins. PMID:25501681

  18. Antigenic differences between AS03 adjuvanted influenza A (H1N1) pandemic vaccines: implications for pandemrix-associated narcolepsy risk.

    PubMed

    Vaarala, Outi; Vuorela, Arja; Partinen, Markku; Baumann, Marc; Freitag, Tobias L; Meri, Seppo; Saavalainen, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Matti; Soliymani, Rabah; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Olsen, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Rouvinen, Juha; Roivainen, Merja; Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kilpi, Terhi

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy results from immune-mediated destruction of hypocretin secreting neurons in hypothalamus, however the triggers and disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Vaccine-attributable risk of narcolepsy reported so far with the AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination Pandemrix has been manifold compared to the AS03 adjuvanted Arepanrix, which contained differently produced H1N1 viral antigen preparation. Hence, antigenic differences and antibody response to these vaccines were investigated. Increased circulating IgG-antibody levels to Pandemrix H1N1 antigen were found in 47 children with Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy when compared to 57 healthy children vaccinated with Pandemrix. H1N1 antigen of Arepanrix inhibited poorly these antibodies indicating antigenic difference between Arepanrix and Pandemrix. High-resolution gel electrophoresis quantitation and mass spectrometry identification analyses revealed higher amounts of structurally altered viral nucleoprotein (NP) in Pandemrix. Increased antibody levels to hemagglutinin (HA) and NP, particularly to detergent treated NP, was seen in narcolepsy. Higher levels of antibodies to NP were found in children with DQB1*06:02 risk allele and in DQB1*06:02 transgenic mice immunized with Pandemrix when compared to controls. This work identified 1) higher amounts of structurally altered viral NP in Pandemrix than in Arepanrix, 2) detergent-induced antigenic changes of viral NP, that are recognized by antibodies from children with narcolepsy, and 3) increased antibody response to NP in association of DQB1*06:02 risk allele of narcolepsy. These findings provide a link between Pandemrix and narcolepsy. Although detailed mechanisms of Pandemrix in narcolepsy remain elusive, our results move the focus from adjuvant(s) onto the H1N1 viral proteins.

  19. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans. PMID:26919288

  20. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  1. Comparison of the Use of H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccinations between veterans and non-veterans in the United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Veterans of the U.S. armed forces tend to be older and have more chronic health problems than the general adult population, which may place them at greater risk of complications from influenza. Despite Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations, seasonal influenza vaccination rates for the general adult population remain well below the national goal of 80%. Achieving this goal would be facilitated by a clearer understanding of which factors influence vaccination. Methods Using the 2010 U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), this study estimates models of two types of vaccinations (H1N1 and seasonal flu), assesses if the correlates differ for these vaccinations, and analyses the distribution of the correlates by veteran status. Results Veterans, women, non-Hispanic whites, non-smokers, those at high risk, educated, with health insurance, and who use clinics as a usual source of care were more likely to receive both types of vaccinations. Those who were older, married, and with higher income were more likely to get vaccinated for seasonal flu, but not for H1N1. Age and number of children living in the household were found to have different effects for H1N1 compared to seasonal flu. Conclusion Veterans are more likely to get vaccinated for seasonal influenza and H1N1 compared to the general population. This might be due to Veterans having better access to care or Veterans participating in better health care practices. Future studies should examine potential differences in flu vaccination use among Veterans using Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system vs. non-VA users. PMID:24252569

  2. Immunogenicity Associated with the Routine Use of an Influenza A H1N1 Vaccine in Health Care Personnel in Guangzhou, China▿

    PubMed Central

    Di, Biao; Xu, Xinhong; Li, Tiegang; Lu, Enjie; Wu, Jibin; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Yiyun; Pickerill, Sam; Wang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    We present immunogenicity data on the routine vaccination of 103 health care personnel during the 2009 H1N1 national vaccination campaign. The seroprotection rate (percentage of samples with hemagglutination inhibition titers of ≥1:40) was 83.2% at 30 days postvaccination, lower than those obtained in previously published controlled trials. Low baseline antibody levels and an increase in seroprotection in a negative-control cohort suggest that the virus remains prevalent. PMID:20631339

  3. Association between the 2008–09 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine and Pandemic H1N1 Illness during Spring–Summer 2009: Four Observational Studies from Canada

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Danuta M.; De Serres, Gaston; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; Janjua, Naveed Z.; Boulianne, Nicole; Hottes, Travis S.; Rosella, Laura C.; Dickinson, James A.; Gilca, Rodica; Sethi, Pam; Ouhoummane, Najwa; Willison, Donald J.; Rouleau, Isabelle; Petric, Martin; Fonseca, Kevin; Drews, Steven J.; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Charest, Hugues; Hamelin, Marie-Ève; Boivin, Guy; Gardy, Jennifer L.; Li, Yan; Kwindt, Trijntje L.; Patrick, David M.; Brunham, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background In late spring 2009, concern was raised in Canada that prior vaccination with the 2008–09 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) was associated with increased risk of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) (pH1N1) illness. Several epidemiologic investigations were conducted through the summer to assess this putative association. Methods and Findings Studies included: (1) test-negative case-control design based on Canada's sentinel vaccine effectiveness monitoring system in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec; (2) conventional case-control design using population controls in Quebec; (3) test-negative case-control design in Ontario; and (4) prospective household transmission (cohort) study in Quebec. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for TIV effect on community- or hospital-based laboratory-confirmed seasonal or pH1N1 influenza cases compared to controls with restriction, stratification, and adjustment for covariates including combinations of age, sex, comorbidity, timeliness of medical visit, prior physician visits, and/or health care worker (HCW) status. For the prospective study risk ratios were computed. Based on the sentinel study of 672 cases and 857 controls, 2008–09 TIV was associated with statistically significant protection against seasonal influenza (odds ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.59). In contrast, estimates from the sentinel and three other observational studies, involving a total of 1,226 laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 cases and 1,505 controls, indicated that prior receipt of 2008–09 TIV was associated with increased risk of medically attended pH1N1 illness during the spring–summer 2009, with estimated risk or odds ratios ranging from 1.4 to 2.5. Risk of pH1N1 hospitalization was not further increased among vaccinated people when comparing hospitalized to community cases. Conclusions Prior receipt of 2008–09 TIV was associated with increased risk of medically attended pH1N1 illness during the spring

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine against the 2009 pandemic A H1N1 in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Yang, PengHui; Duan, YueQiang; Wang, Cheng; Xing, Li; Gao, Xiao; Tang, Chong; Luo, DeYan; Zhao, ZhongPeng; Jia, Weihong; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Wang, Xiliang

    2011-01-17

    A novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus was transmitted from humans to humans worldwide. The live attenuated monovalent A H1N1 vaccine (LAMV) for intranasal administration has shown promising immunogenicity and safety in clinical trials and for human use, but the experimental data based on LAMV is incomplete. In this study, using reverse genetic technology, we produced a cold-adapted (ca), live attenuated BJ/AA ca that contained hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from a 2009 pandemic A H1N1 isolate, A/Beijing/501/2009 virus (BJ501), and the remaining six internal gene segments from the cold-adapted influenza H2N2 A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus (AA virus). BJ/AA ca exhibited phenotypes of temperature sensitivity (ts), ca, and attenuation (att). The candidate BJ/AA ca was immunogenic in mice and induced strong mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) in the respiratory tract. Two dosages of intranasal immunization induced robust HI antibodies and offered efficient protection against challenge by the wild-type (wt) 2009 pandemic A H1N1 (A/Beijing/501/2009 or A/California/07/2009) in mice and ferrets. These results support the evaluation of this vaccine made from a wt strain isolated in China for clinical trials. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bell’s palsy and influenza(H1N1)pdm09 containing vaccines: A self-controlled case series

    PubMed Central

    Wijnans, Leonoor; Weibel, Daniel; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Background An association between AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine and the occurrence of Bell’s palsy was found in a population based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden. To evaluate this association in a different population, we conducted a self-controlled case series in a primary health care database, THIN, in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased risk of Bell’s palsy following vaccination with any influenza vaccine containing A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like viral strains. Secondly, we investigated whether risks were different following pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines and seasonal influenza vaccines containing the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain. Methods The study population comprised all incident Bell’s palsy cases between 1 June 2009 and 30 June 2013 identified in THIN. We determined the relative incidence (RI) of Bell’s palsy during the 6 weeks following vaccination with either pandemic or seasonal influenza vaccine. All analyses were adjusted for seasonality and confounding variables. Results We found an incidence rate of Bell’s palsy of 38.7 per 100,000 person years. Both acute respiratory infection (ARI) consultations and pregnancy were found to be confounders. When adjusted for seasonality, ARI consultations and pregnancies, the RI during the 42 days after vaccination with an influenza vaccine was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.72–1.01). The RI was similar during the 42 days following seasonal vaccine (0.96, 95%CI: 0.82–1.13) or pandemic vaccine (0.73, 95%CI: 0.47–1.12). Conclusion We found no evidence for an increased incidence of Bell’s palsy following seasonal influenza vaccination overall, nor for monovalent pandemic influenza vaccine in 2009. PMID:28467420

  6. H1N1 Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a fever and cough. What causes H1N1 influenza? A virus causes H1N1. It spreads from person to person. ... least 24 hours after your fever breaks. H1N1 influenza treatment Your ... H1N1. This helps kill the virus so you can recover and aren’t contagious. ...

  7. Randomized Controlled Ferret Study to Assess the Direct Impact of 2008–09 Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine on A(H1N1)pdm09 Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Danuta M.; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; De Serres, Gaston; Janjua, Naveed Z.; Li, Guiyun; Sabaiduc, Suzana; Bouhy, Xavier; Couture, Christian; Leung, Anders; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; de Bruin, Erwin; Balshaw, Robert; Lavigne, Sophie; Petric, Martin; Koopmans, Marion; Boivin, Guy

    2014-01-01

    During spring-summer 2009, several observational studies from Canada showed increased risk of medically-attended, laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 illness among prior recipients of 2008–09 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Explanatory hypotheses included direct and indirect vaccine effects. In a randomized placebo-controlled ferret study, we tested whether prior receipt of 2008–09 TIV may have directly influenced A(H1N1)pdm09 illness. Thirty-two ferrets (16/group) received 0.5 mL intra-muscular injections of the Canadian-manufactured, commercially-available, non-adjuvanted, split 2008–09 Fluviral or PBS placebo on days 0 and 28. On day 49 all animals were challenged (Ch0) with A(H1N1)pdm09. Four ferrets per group were randomly selected for sacrifice at day 5 post-challenge (Ch+5) and the rest followed until Ch+14. Sera were tested for antibody to vaccine antigens and A(H1N1)pdm09 by hemagglutination inhibition (HI), microneutralization (MN), nucleoprotein-based ELISA and HA1-based microarray assays. Clinical characteristics and nasal virus titers were recorded pre-challenge then post-challenge until sacrifice when lung virus titers, cytokines and inflammatory scores were determined. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups of influenza-naïve animals. Antibody rise to vaccine antigens was evident by ELISA and HA1-based microarray but not by HI or MN assays; virus challenge raised antibody to A(H1N1)pdm09 by all assays in both groups. Beginning at Ch+2, vaccinated animals experienced greater loss of appetite and weight than placebo animals, reaching the greatest between-group difference in weight loss relative to baseline at Ch+5 (7.4% vs. 5.2%; p = 0.01). At Ch+5 vaccinated animals had higher lung virus titers (log-mean 4.96 vs. 4.23pfu/mL, respectively; p = 0.01), lung inflammatory scores (5.8 vs. 2.1, respectively; p = 0.051) and cytokine levels (p>0.05). At Ch+14, both groups had recovered. Findings in

  8. A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination: A retrospective evaluation of adverse maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes in a cohort of pregnant women in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Massimo; Bella, Antonino; Rota, Maria C; Clagnan, Elena; Gallo, Tolinda; D'Amato, Maurizio; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Ferrara, Lorenza; Demicheli, Vittorio; Martinelli, Domenico; Prato, Rosa; Rizzo, Caterina

    2015-05-05

    Although concerns about safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy have been raised in the past, vaccination of pregnant women was recommended in many countries during the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of adverse maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes among pregnant women vaccinated with a MF59-adjuvanted A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine. The study was carried out in four Italian regions (Piemonte, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia, Lazio, and Puglia) among 102,077 pregnant women potentially exposed during the second or third trimester of gestation to the vaccination campaign implemented in 2009/2010. Based on data retrieved from the regional administrative databases, the statistical analysis was performed using the Cox proportional-hazards model, adjusting for the propensity score to account for the potential confounding effect due to the socio-demographic characteristics and the clinical and reproductive history of women. A total of 100,332 pregnant women were eligible for the analysis. Of these, 2003 (2.0%) received the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination during the second or third trimester of gestation. We did not observe any statistically significant association between the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination and different maternal outcomes (hospital admissions for influenza, pneumonia, hypertension, eclampsia, diabetes, thyroid disease, and anaemia), fetal outcomes (fetal death after the 22nd gestational week) and neonatal outcomes (pre-term birth, low birth weight, low 5-min Apgar score, and congenital malformations). Pre-existing health-risk conditions (hospital admissions and drug prescriptions for specific diseases before the onset of pregnancy) were observed more frequently among vaccinated women, thus suggesting that concomitant chronic conditions increased vaccination uptake. The results of this study add some evidence on the safety of A/H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination during

  9. Immunogenicity and safety of cell-derived MF59®-adjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine for children

    PubMed Central

    Knuf, Markus; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Rümke, Hans; Rivera, Luis; Pedotti, Paola; Arora, Ashwani Kumar; Lattanzi, Maria; Kieninger, Dorothee; Cioppa, Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Mass immunization of children has the potential to decrease infection rates and prevent the transmission of influenza. We evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of different formulations of cell-derived MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine in children and adolescents. This was a randomized, single-blind, multicenter study with a total of 666 healthy subjects aged 6 months–17 y in one of 3 vaccination groups, each receiving formulations containing different amounts of influenza A/H1N1 antigen with or without MF59. A booster trivalent seasonal MF59 vaccine was administered one year after primary vaccinations. Antibody titers were assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays obtained on days 1, 22, 43, 366, and 387 (3 weeks post booster). Safety was monitored throughout the study. One vaccination with 3.75 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 50% MF59 (3.75_halfMF59) or 7.5 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 100% MF59 (7.5_fullMF59) induced an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% of children in the 1–<3, 3–8, and 9–17 y cohorts; however, 2 vaccinations with nonadjuvanted 15 μg A/H1N1 antigen were needed to achieve this response in the 1–<3 and 3–8 y cohorts. Among children aged 6–11 months, 1 dose of 7.5_fullMF59 resulted in an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% while 2 doses of 3.75_halfMF59 were required to achieve this result. All vaccines were well tolerated. Our findings support the immunogenicity and safety of the 3.75_halfMF59 (2 doses for children <12 months) and 7.5_fullMF59 vaccine formulations for use in children and adolescents aged 6 months to 17 y The use of the 3.75_halfMF59 could have the benefit of antigen and adjuvant sparing, increasing the available vaccine doses allowing vaccination of more people. PMID:25621884

  10. Association between Guillain-Barré syndrome and influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent inactivated vaccines in the USA: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Daniel A; Proschan, Michael; Forshee, Richard; Gargiullo, Paul; Bleser, William; Burwen, Dale R; Cunningham, Francesca; Garman, Patrick; Greene, Sharon K; Lee, Grace M; Vellozzi, Claudia; Yih, W Katherine; Gellin, Bruce; Lurie, Nicole

    2013-04-27

    The influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccination programme was the largest mass vaccination initiative in recent US history. Commensurate with the size and scope of the vaccination programme, a project to monitor vaccine adverse events was undertaken, the most comprehensive safety surveillance agenda in the USA to date. The adverse event monitoring project identified an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome after vaccination; however, some individual variability in results was noted. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare but serious health disorder in which a person's own immune system damages their nerve cells, causing muscle weakness, sometimes paralysis, and infrequently death. We did a meta-analysis of data from the adverse event monitoring project to ascertain whether influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent inactivated vaccines used in the USA increased the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Data were obtained from six adverse event monitoring systems. About 23 million vaccinated people were included in the analysis. The primary analysis entailed calculation of incidence rate ratios and attributable risks of excess cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome per million vaccinations. We used a self-controlled risk-interval design. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent inactivated vaccines were associated with a small increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (incidence rate ratio 2·35, 95% CI 1·42-4·01, p=0·0003). This finding translated to about 1·6 excess cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome per million people vaccinated. The modest risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome attributed to vaccination is consistent with previous estimates of the disorder after seasonal influenza vaccination. A risk of this small magnitude would be difficult to capture during routine seasonal influenza vaccine programmes, which have extensive, but comparatively less, safety monitoring. In view of the morbidity and mortality caused by 2009 H1N1 influenza and the effectiveness of the vaccine

  11. Incidence of narcolepsy before and after MF59-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in South Korean soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Jung; Lee, Sang Don; Lee, Eun; Namkoong, Kee; Choe, Kang-Won; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Hye Won; Heo, Jung Yeon

    2015-09-11

    Previous reports mostly from Europe suggested an association between an occurrence of narcolepsy and an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine adjuvanted with AS03 (Pandemrix(®)). During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaign, the Korean military performed a vaccination campaign with one type of influenza vaccine containing MF59-adjuvants. This study was conducted to investigate the background incidence rate of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers and the association of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine with the occurrence of narcolepsy in a young adult group. To assess the incidence of narcolepsy, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of suspicious cases of narcolepsy in 2007-2013 in the whole 20 military hospitals of the Korean military. The screened cases were classified according to the Brighton Collaboration case definition of narcolepsy. After obtaining the number of confirmed cases of narcolepsy per 3 months in 2007-2013, we compared the crude incidence rate of narcolepsy before and after the vaccination campaign. We included 218 narcolepsy suspicious cases in the initial review, which were screened by the diagnostic code on the computerized disease registry in 2007-2013. Forty-one cases were finally diagnosed with narcolepsy in 2007-2013 (male sex, 95%; median age, 21 years). The average background incidence rate of narcolepsy in Korean soldiers was 0.91 cases per 100,000 persons per year. During the 9 months before vaccination implementation (April to December 2009), 6 narcolepsy cases occurred, whereas during the next 9 months (January to September 2010) including the 3-month vaccination campaign, 5 cases occurred. The incidence of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers was not increased after the pandemic vaccination campaign using the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. Our results suggest that the MF59-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine did not contribute to the occurrence of narcolepsy in this young adult group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic on attitudes of healthcare workers toward seasonal influenza vaccination 2010/11.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Rabenau, H F; Bornmann, S; Gottschalk, R; Wicker, S

    2011-04-28

    The emergence of the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus provided a major challenge to health services around the world. However, vaccination rates for the public and for healthcare workers (HCWs) have remained low. We performed a study to review the reasons put forward by HCWs to refuse immunisation with the pandemic vaccine in 2009/10 and characterise attitudes in the influenza season 2010/11 due to the emergence of influenza A(H1N1)2009. A survey among HCWs and medical students in the clinical phase of their studies was conducted, using an anonymous questionnaire, at a German university hospital during an influenza vaccination campaign. 1,366 of 3,900 HCWs (35.0%) were vaccinated in the 2010/11 influenza season. Of the vaccinated HCWs, 1,323 (96.9%) completed the questionnaire in addition to 322 vaccinated medical students. Of the 1,645 vaccinees who completed the questionnaire, 712 had not been vaccinated against the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus in the 2009/10 season. The main reason put forward was the objection to the AS03 adjuvants (239/712, 33.6%). Of the HCWs and students surveyed, 270 of 1,645 (16.4%) stated that the pandemic had influenced their attitude towards vaccination in general. Many German HCWs remained unconvinced of the safety of the pandemic (adjuvanted) influenza vaccine. For this reason, effective risk communication should focus on educating the public and HCWs about influenza vaccine safety and the benefits of vaccination.

  13. Impact of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic on Canadian health care workers: a survey on vaccination, illness, absenteeism, and personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robyn; Ogunremi, Toju; Astrakianakis, George; Bryce, Elizabeth; Gervais, Robert; Gravel, Denise; Johnston, Lynn; Leduc, Stéphanie; Roth, Virginia; Taylor, Geoffrey; Vearncombe, Mary; Weir, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Data are limited on the impact of the 2009 H1N1 influenza A pandemic on health care worker (HCW) vaccination, illness, absenteeism, and personal protective equipment (PPE) use. A survey was completed by HCWs from 14 hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program who provided direct care to patients with pH1N1 influenza in high-risk units between September and December 2009. Surveys were returned from 986 HCWs (80% nurses, 14% respiratory therapists, and 6% physicians). HCWs working in an intensive care unit (78%) or a designated influenza ward (67%) were more compliant with wearing an N95 respirator for aerosol-generating medical procedures than those working in an emergency department (47%; P < .001). HCWs who worked in health care for >11 years were more compliant with wearing protective eyewear than those who worked for ≤11 years (69% vs 54%; P < .001). A total of 815 HCWs (83%) reported having received the pH1N1 influenza vaccine, and 372 (38%) reported having received the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccine. Influenza-like illness was reported by 236 (24%) HCWs, 170 of whom (72%) reported missing work. Experience working in health care improves PPE use and HCWs in emergency departments should be targeted for interventions to improve PPE compliance. pH1N1 influenza vaccine coverage was high, but seasonal influenza vaccine coverage was low, and significant HCW illness and absenteeism were reported. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Vaccine Does Not Increase the Mortality Rate of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Inoue, Eisuke; Tanaka-Taya, Keiko; Kono, Shigeru; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the mortality rate after administration of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine on patients with underlying diseases is currently scarce. We conducted a case-control study in Japan to compare the mortality rates of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia after the vaccines were administered and were not administered. Methods Between October 2009 and March 2010, we collected clinical records in Japan and conducted a 1∶1 matched case-control study. Patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia who died during this period were considered case patients, and those who survived were considered control patients. We determined and compared the proportion of each group that received the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and estimated the odds ratio. Finally, we conducted simulations that compensated for the shortcomings of the study associated with adjusted severity of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Results The case and control groups each comprised of 75 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. The proportion of patients who received the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine was 30.7% and 38.7% for the case and control groups, respectively. During that winter, the crude conditional odds ratio of mortality was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.25–1.47) and the adjusted conditional odds ratio was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.33–4.49); neither was significant. The simulation study showed more accurate conditional odds ratios of 0.63–0.71. Conclusions In our study, we detected no evidence that the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine increased the mortality rate of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. The results, however, are limited by the small sample size and low statistical power. A larger-scale study is required. PMID:24586445

  15. Receipt of A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine by prisons and jails - United States, 2009-10 influenza season.

    PubMed

    2012-01-06

    Approximately 2.3 million inmates were confined to U.S. prisons and jails on any given day in 2009. However, over the course of a year, approximately 10 million persons spend time in a correctional facility. To determine to what extent correctional facility populations were included in the national vaccine response to the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, staff members at the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center, aided by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC), conducted a survey to document whether jails and prisons received A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine during the 2009-10 pandemic period. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which found that 55% of jails did not receive A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine during the pandemic period, whereas only 14% of federal prisons and 11% of state prisons did not receive the vaccine. Greater inclusion of correctional facilities, especially smaller facilities, in pandemic preparedness planning might better protect correctional facility populations and the community as a whole in the event of future influenza pandemics.

  16. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Weibin; Chen, Aizhong; Miao, Yi; Xia, Shengli; Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan; Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling; Shu, Yuelong; Ma, Xiaowei; Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xiaojun; Bian, Chao; Sun, Bing

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  17. Psychogenic illness following vaccination: exploratory study of mass vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in 2009 in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Adverse events during mass vaccination campaigns have had a profoundly negative impact on vaccine coverage rates. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of reported psychogenic illness cases following mass vaccination that needed further interventions of the national immunization program. Materials and Methods We collected documents that were submitted to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for vaccine injury compensation, and analyzed cases of psychogenic illness following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination in 2009 which were confirmed by the Korean Advisory Committee on Vaccine Injury Compensation. Results During the 2009-2010 influenza season, 13 million Koreans were vaccinated against pandemic influenza. Of 28 reported psychogenic illness cases following immunization, 25 were vaccinated through school-located mass immunization. Significant numbers of them were female adolescents (68%) or had underlying vulnerable conditions or emotional life stressors (36%). They required lengthy hospitalization (median, 7 days) and high medical costs (median, US $1,582 per case). Conclusion Health authorities and organizers of future mass vaccinations should be well aware of the possible occurrence of psychogenic illness, acknowledge their detailed characteristics, and take its economic burden into account to mitigate the risk of transmission of infectious diseases efficiently. PMID:28168171

  18. A/H1N1 antibodies and TRIB2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients diagnosed in conjunction with the Pandemrix vaccination campaign in Sweden 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lind, Alexander; Ramelius, Anita; Olsson, Tomas; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Lamb, Favelle; Khademi, Mohsen; Ambati, Aditya; Maeurer, Markus; Nilsson, Anna-Lena; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Fink, Katharina; Lernmark, Åke

    2014-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder related to hypocretin deficiency resulting from a specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area. The disease is thought to be autoimmune due to a strong association with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the H1N1 2009 flu pandemic (A/H1N1PDM09). In response to this, the Swedish vaccination campaign began in October of the same year, using the influenza vaccine Pandemrix(®). A few months later an excess of narcolepsy cases was observed. It is still unclear to what extent the vaccination campaign affected humoral autoimmunity associated with narcolepsy. We studied 47 patients with narcolepsy (6-69 years of age) and 80 healthy controls (3-61 years of age) selected after the Pandemrix vaccination campaign. The first aim was to determine antibodies against A/H1N1 and autoantibodies to Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2), a narcolepsy autoantigen candidate as well as to GAD65 and IA-2 as disease specificity controls. The second aim was to test if levels and frequencies of these antibodies and autoantibodies were associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. In vitro transcribed and translated [(35)S]-methionine and -cysteine-labeled influenza A virus (A/California/04/2009/(H1N1)) segment 4 hemagglutinin was used to detect antibodies in a radiobinding assay. Autoantibodies to TRIB2, GAD65 and IA-2 were similarly detected in standard radiobinding assays. The narcolepsy patients had higher median levels of A/H1N1 antibodies than the controls (p = 0.006). A/H1N1 antibody levels were higher among the <13 years old (n = 12) compared to patients who were older than 30 years (n = 12, p = 0.014). Being HLA-DQB1*06:02 positive was associated with higher A/H1N1 antibody levels in both patients and controls (p = 0.026). Serum autoantibody levels to TRIB2 were low overall and high binders did not differ between patients and controls. We observed an association between levels of A/H1N1

  19. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17) versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20) donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31–50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous

  20. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jürchott, Karsten; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Thiel, Andreas; Neumann, Avidan Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17) versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20) donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31-50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous

  1. Perinatal survival and health after maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination: A cohort study of pregnancies stratified by trimester of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Baum, Ulrike; Leino, Tuija; Gissler, Mika; Kilpi, Terhi; Jokinen, Jukka

    2015-09-11

    Large cohort studies demonstrated the safety of vaccination with the AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine, but data on first trimester vaccination safety are limited. We conducted a nationwide register-based retrospective cohort study in Finland, included singleton pregnancies present on 01 November 2009 and followed them from 01 November 2009 until delivery. Pregnancies with abortive outcome, pregnancies that started before 01 February 2009 and pregnancies of women, who received the AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine prior to the onset of pregnancy, were excluded. Our main outcome measures were hazard ratios comparing the risk of stillbirth, early neonatal death, moderately preterm birth, very preterm birth, moderately low birth weight, very low birth weight, and being small for gestational age between pregnancies exposed and unexposed to maternal influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. The study population comprised 43,604 pregnancies; 34,241 (78.5%) women were vaccinated at some stage during pregnancy. The rates of stillbirth, early neonatal death, moderately preterm birth, and moderately low birth weight were similar between pregnant women exposed and unexposed to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. After adjusting for known risk factors, the relative rates were 0.90 (95% confidence interval 0.55-1.45) for very preterm birth, 0.84 (0.61-1.16) for very low birth weight, and 1.17 (0.98-1.40) for being small for gestational age. Also, in the subanalysis of 7839 women vaccinated during the first trimester, the rates did not indicate that maternal vaccination during the first trimester had any adverse impact on perinatal survival and health. The risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes was not associated with the exposure to the AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine. This study adds reassuring evidence on the safety of AS03 adjuvanted influenza vaccines when given in the first trimester and supports the recommendation of influenza vaccination to all

  2. In vivo evaluation of vaccine efficacy against challenge with a contemporary field isolate from the α cluster of H1N1 swine influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Susan E.; Gramer, Marie R.; King, Vickie L.; Mathur, Sheerin; Rapp-Gabrielson, Vicki J.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus vaccines currently contain a mixture of isolates that reflect the genetic and antigenic characteristics of the currently circulating strains. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a trivalent inactivated swine influenza virus vaccine (Flusure XP) in pigs challenged with a contemporary α-cluster H1N1 field isolate of Canadian swine origin. Pigs were allocated to vaccinated, placebo, and negative-control groups and monitored for respiratory disease for 5 d after challenge. On the challenge day and 5 d after challenge the serum of the vaccinated pigs had reciprocal hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers 40 for all the vaccine viruses but ≤ 20 for the challenge virus. Gross lesions were present in the lungs of all pigs that had been inoculated with the challenge virus, but the proportion of lung tissue consolidated did not differ significantly between the placebo and vaccinated pigs. However, the amount of virus was significantly reduced in the nasal secretions, lungs, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in the vaccinated pigs compared with the placebo pigs. These results indicate that swine vaccinated with Flusure XP were partially protected against experimental challenge with a swine α-cluster H1N1 virus that is genetically similar to viruses currently circulating in Canadian swine. PMID:23814353

  3. Immunogenicity, boostability, and sustainability of the immune response after vaccination against Influenza A virus (H1N1) 2009 in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Huijskens, Elisabeth; Rossen, John; Mulder, Paul; van Beek, Ruud; van Vugt, Hennie; Verbakel, Johannes; Rimmelzwaan, Guus; Koopmans, Marion; Peeters, Marcel

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of a new influenza A virus (H1N1) variant in 2009 led to a worldwide vaccination program, which was prepared in a relatively short period of time. This study investigated the humoral immunity against this virus before and after vaccination with a 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1) monovalent MF59-adjuvanted vaccine, as well as the persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies. Our prospective longitudinal study included 498 health care workers (mean age, 43 years; median age, 44 years). Most (89%) had never or only occasionally received a seasonal influenza virus vaccine, and 11% were vaccinated annually (on average, for >10 years). Antibody titers were determined by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay at baseline, 3 weeks after the first vaccination, and 5 weeks and 7 months after the second vaccination. Four hundred thirty-five persons received two doses of the 2009 vaccine. After the first dose, 79.5% developed a HI titer of ≥40. This percentage increased to 83.3% after the second dose. Persistent antibodies were found in 71.9% of the group that had not received annual vaccinations and in 43.8% of the group that had received annual vaccinations. The latter group tended to have lower HI titers (P=0.09). With increasing age, HI titers decreased significantly, by 2.4% per year. A single dose of the 2009 vaccine was immunogenic in almost 80% of the study population, whereas an additional dose resulted in significantly increased titers only in persons over 50. Finally, a reduced HI antibody response against the 2009 vaccine was found in adults who had previously received seasonal influenza virus vaccination. More studies on the effect of yearly seasonal influenza virus vaccination on the immune response are warranted.

  4. Association between monovalent influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine and pneumonia among the elderly in the 2009-2010 season in Japan: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Kyoko; Suzuki, Kanzo; Washio, Masakazu; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Maeda, Akiko; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between monovalent influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 (H1N1pdm) vaccine and pneumonia in elderly people. Study design was a hospital-based, matched case-control study. Cases comprised patients ≥ 65 years old who had been newly diagnosed with pneumonia. For each case, 2 controls were defined as individuals with other diseases (not pneumonia) who were matched by sex, age, entry date, and the visited hospital. Study period was the interval from 1 September 2009 until 30 September 2010. Because a pandemic of influenza A (H1N1) occurred during study period, we analyzed selected subjects who had enrolled during the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pneumonia in H1N1pdm-vaccinated subjects compared with unvaccinated subjects using a conditional logistic regression model to assess the association between H1N1pdm vaccine and pneumonia. The subjects during the period of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic were 20 cases and 40 controls. Subjects who had received H1N1pdm vaccine showed a significantly decreased OR for pneumonia (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.01-0.98) compared with unvaccinated subjects. In conclusion, H1N1pdm vaccination may have prevented pneumonia among the elderly during the 2009-2010 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in Japan.

  5. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bodewes, Rogier; Stittelaar, Koert J; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Simon, James; Fouchier, Ron A M; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2011-03-01

    Serum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine exhibited significantly reduced lung virus titers but no substantial clinical protection against pH1N1-associated disease. However, priming with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine significantly increased the efficacy of a pandemic MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine against pH1N1 challenge. Elucidating the mechanism involved in this priming principle will contribute to our understanding of vaccine- and infection-induced correlates of protection. Furthermore, a practical consequence of these findings is that during an emerging pandemic, the implementation of a priming strategy with an available adjuvanted seasonal vaccine to precede the eventual pandemic vaccination campaign may be useful and life-saving.

  6. Efficacy of Vaccination with Different Combinations of MF59-Adjuvanted and Nonadjuvanted Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines against Pandemic H1N1 (2009) Influenza Virus Infection in Ferrets▿

    PubMed Central

    van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Kreijtz, Joost H. C. M.; Bodewes, Rogier; Stittelaar, Koert J.; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Simon, James; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Serum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine exhibited significantly reduced lung virus titers but no substantial clinical protection against pH1N1-associated disease. However, priming with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine significantly increased the efficacy of a pandemic MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine against pH1N1 challenge. Elucidating the mechanism involved in this priming principle will contribute to our understanding of vaccine- and infection-induced correlates of protection. Furthermore, a practical consequence of these findings is that during an emerging pandemic, the implementation of a priming strategy with an available adjuvanted seasonal vaccine to precede the eventual pandemic vaccination campaign may be useful and life-saving. PMID:21209108

  7. Why were Turks unwilling to accept the A/H1N1 influenza-pandemic vaccination? People's beliefs and perceptions about the swine flu outbreak and vaccine in the later stage of the epidemic.

    PubMed

    Gaygısız, Ümmügülsüm; Gaygısız, Esma; Özkan, Türker; Lajunen, Timo

    2010-12-16

    This study investigated the acceptability of the A/H1N1 influenza vaccination and related factors among 1137 adults in the later stage of the A/H1N1 outbreak in Turkey. Having already been vaccinated or intending to get vaccinated were related to trust in the vaccine effectiveness, perceived risk of the side effects, and benefits of getting vaccinated. Perceived long term consequences of the A/H1N1 infection, perceptions of the A/H1N1 information in media, and barriers for getting vaccinated were related to intention whereas anticipated epidemic situation in Turkey, being chronically ill, and being not married were related to having already been vaccinated. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. HA1-2-fljB Vaccine Induces Immune Responses against Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xilong; Yang, Yun; Jiao, Yang; Song, Hongqin; Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Wu, Lili; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, a novel pandemic swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus caused a public emergency of international concern. Vaccination is the primary strategy for the control of influenza epidemics. However, the poor immunopotency of many vaccine antigens is a major barrier to the development of effective vaccines against influenza. Flagellin, a Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) ligand, has been used as an adjuvant to enhance the immunopotency of vaccines in preclinical studies. Here, we developed a recombinant candidate vaccine, HA1-2-fljB, in which the globular head of the hemagglutinin (HA) antigen (residues 62-284) from H1N1 virus was fused genetically to the N-terminus of Salmonella typhimurium fljB. The recombinant HA1-2-fljB protein was expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli, and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant HA1-2-fljB were evaluated in a mouse model. Immunization with HA1-2-fljB elicited robust IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies and completely protected the mice against infection by swine-origin influenza A/swine/Jangsu/38/2010 (H1N1). These results suggest that HA antigen placed at the N-terminus of flagellin is also an excellent starting point for creating a fusion HA1-2-fljB protein as a candidate vaccine, and the recombinant HA1-2-fljB protein will contribute to the development of a more effective vaccine against swine-origin influenza virus infection.

  9. Pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccination, preceding infections and clinical findings in UK children with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verity, C; Stellitano, L; Winstone, A M; Stowe, J; Andrews, N; Miller, E

    2014-06-01

    To record clinical findings in all new cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) or Fisher syndrome (FS) in UK children in the 2 years following September 2009 and determine the proportion temporally associated with recent infections, pandemic H1N1 (2009) strain influenza vaccination or seasonal influenza vaccination. A prospective UK-wide epidemiological study using the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit system. Children aged 16 years or less meeting the Brighton Collaboration criteria for GBS or FS. 112 children with GBS (66 boys and 46 girls) and 3 boys with FS were identified in 2 years. All but one recovered sufficiently to go home. The annual UK incidence rate of GBS in patients less than 15 years old was 0.45/100 000, similar to other countries. There was evidence of infection in the 3 months preceding onset in 92/112 GBS and 3/3 FS cases. Of those living in England, 7 cases received pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccination before GBS symptom onset (3/7 were within 6 months including 1 within 3 months); 2 children received 2010/2011 seasonal influenza vaccination within 6 months of GBS onset. The numbers vaccinated were not significantly greater than expected by chance. The outcome for childhood GBS and FS after 6 months was better than reported in adults. Most UK GBS and FS cases had infections in the preceding 3 months. When considering the children living in England, there was no significantly increased risk of GBS after pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccination or 2010/2011 seasonal influenza vaccination. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Entrapment of H1N1 Influenza Virus Derived Conserved Peptides in PLGA Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Response and Vaccine Efficacy in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Jagadish; Kang, Kyung-il; Xia, Ming; Elaish, Mohamed; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Dhakal, Santosh; Arcos, Jesus; Torrelles, Jordi B.; Jiang, X.; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs are believed to be one of the important sources of emerging human and swine influenza viruses (SwIV). Influenza virus conserved peptides have the potential to elicit cross-protective immune response, but without the help of potent adjuvant and delivery system they are poorly immunogenic. Biodegradable polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticle (PLGA-NP) based vaccine delivery system enhances cross-presentation of antigens by the professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, Norovirus P particle containing SwIV M2e (extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2) chimera and highly conserved two each of H1N1 peptides of pandemic 2009 and classical human influenza viruses were entrapped in PLGA-NPs. Influenza antibody-free pigs were vaccinated with PLGA-NPs peptides cocktail vaccine twice with or without an adjuvant, Mycobacterium vaccae whole cell lysate, intranasally as mist. Vaccinated pigs were challenged with a virulent heterologous zoonotic SwIV H1N1, and one week later euthanized and the lung samples were analyzed for the specific immune response and viral load. Clinically, pigs vaccinated with PLGA-NP peptides vaccine had no fever and flu symptoms, and the replicating challenged SwIV was undetectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Immunologically, PLGA-NP peptides vaccination (without adjuvant) significantly increased the frequency of antigen-specific IFNγ secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells response in the lung lymphocytes, despite not boosting the antibody response both at pre- and post-challenge. In summary, our data indicated that nanoparticle-mediated delivery of conserved H1N1 influenza peptides induced the virus specific T cell response in the lungs and reduced the challenged heterologous virus load in the airways of pigs. PMID:27093541

  11. No Evidence for Disease History as a Risk Factor for Narcolepsy after A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Favelle; Ploner, Alexander; Fink, Katharina; Maeurer, Markus; Bergman, Peter; Piehl, Fredrik; Weibel, Daniel; Sparén, Pär; Dahlström, Lisen Arnheim

    2016-01-01

    To investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy. Case-control study in Sweden. Cases included persons referred for a Multiple Sleep Latency Test between 2009 and 2010, identified through diagnostic sleep centres and confirmed through independent review of medical charts. Controls, selected from the total population register, were matched to cases on age, gender, MSLT-referral date and county of residence. Disease history (prescriptions and diagnoses) and vaccination history was collected through telephone interviews and population-based healthcare registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk-factor for narcolepsy. In total, 72 narcolepsy cases and 251 controls were included (range 3-69 years mean19-years). Risk of narcolepsy was increased in individuals with a disease history of nervous system disorders (OR range = 3.6-8.8) and mental and behavioural disorders (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-8.8) before referral. In a second analysis of vaccinated individuals only, nearly all initial associations were no longer statistically significant and effect sizes were smaller (OR range = 1.3-2.6). A significant effect for antibiotics (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8) and a marginally significant effect for nervous system disorders was observed. In a third case-only analysis, comparing cases referred before vaccination to those referred after; prescriptions for nervous system disorders (OR = 26.0 95% CI 4.0-170.2) and ADHD (OR = 35.3 95% CI 3.4-369.9) were statistically significant during the vaccination period, suggesting initial associations were due to confounding by indication. The findings of this study do not support disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy.

  12. Comparison of Pandemrix and Arepanrix, two pH1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccines differentially associated with narcolepsy development.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Louis; Leib, Ryan; Ollila, Hanna M; Bonvalet, Mélodie; Adams, Christopher M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-07-01

    Narcolepsy onset in children has been associated with the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic and vaccination with Pandemrix. However it was not clearly observed with other adjuvanted pH1N1 vaccines such as Arepanrix or Focetria. Our aim was to characterize the differences between Pandemrix and Arepanrix that might explain the risk for narcolepsy after Pandemrix vaccination using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry (MS). We found that Pandemrix (2009 batch) and Arepanrix (2010 batch) showed 5 main viral proteins: hemagglutinin HA1 and HA2 subunits, neuraminidase NA, nucleoprotein NP, and matrix protein MA1 and non-viral proteins from the Gallus gallus growth matrix used in the manufacturing of the vaccines. Latticed patterns of HA1, HA2 and NA indicated charge and molecular weight heterogeneity, a phenomenon likely caused by glycosylation and sulfation. Overall, Pandemrix contained more NP and NA, while Arepanrix displayed a larger diversity of viral and chicken proteins, with the exception of five chicken proteins (PDCD6IP, TSPAN8, H-FABP, HSP and TUB proteins) that were relatively more abundant in Pandemrix. Glycosylation patterns were similar in both vaccines. A higher degree of deamidation and dioxidation was found in Pandemrix, probably reflecting differential degradation across batches. Interestingly, HA1 146N (residue 129N in the mature protein) displayed a 10-fold higher deamidation in Arepanrix versus Pandemrix. In recent vaccine strains and Focetria, 146N is mutated to D which is associated with increased production yields suggesting that 146N deamidation may have also occurred during the manufacturing of Arepanrix. The presence of 146N in large relative amounts in Pandemrix and the wild type virus and in lower relative quantities in Arepanrix or other H1N1 vaccines may have affected predisposition to narcolepsy.

  13. Entrapment of H1N1 Influenza Virus Derived Conserved Peptides in PLGA Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Response and Vaccine Efficacy in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Jagadish; Kang, Kyung-il; Xia, Ming; Elaish, Mohamed; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Dhakal, Santosh; Arcos, Jesus; Torrelles, Jordi B; Jiang, X; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-01-01

    Pigs are believed to be one of the important sources of emerging human and swine influenza viruses (SwIV). Influenza virus conserved peptides have the potential to elicit cross-protective immune response, but without the help of potent adjuvant and delivery system they are poorly immunogenic. Biodegradable polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticle (PLGA-NP) based vaccine delivery system enhances cross-presentation of antigens by the professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, Norovirus P particle containing SwIV M2e (extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2) chimera and highly conserved two each of H1N1 peptides of pandemic 2009 and classical human influenza viruses were entrapped in PLGA-NPs. Influenza antibody-free pigs were vaccinated with PLGA-NPs peptides cocktail vaccine twice with or without an adjuvant, Mycobacterium vaccae whole cell lysate, intranasally as mist. Vaccinated pigs were challenged with a virulent heterologous zoonotic SwIV H1N1, and one week later euthanized and the lung samples were analyzed for the specific immune response and viral load. Clinically, pigs vaccinated with PLGA-NP peptides vaccine had no fever and flu symptoms, and the replicating challenged SwIV was undetectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Immunologically, PLGA-NP peptides vaccination (without adjuvant) significantly increased the frequency of antigen-specific IFNγ secreting CD4 and CD8 T cells response in the lung lymphocytes, despite not boosting the antibody response both at pre- and post-challenge. In summary, our data indicated that nanoparticle-mediated delivery of conserved H1N1 influenza peptides induced the virus specific T cell response in the lungs and reduced the challenged heterologous virus load in the airways of pigs.

  14. Plant-based rapid production of recombinant subunit hemagglutinin vaccines targeting H1N1 and H5N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, Mark; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Damon, Emily; Mett, Vadim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Bi, Hong; Farrance, Christine; Shamloul, Moneim; Kushnir, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 swine influenza virus was isolated from infected humans in Mexico and the United States, and rapidly spread around the world. Another virus, a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype, identified by the World Health Organization as a potential pandemic threat in 1997, continues to be a significant risk. While vaccination is the preferred strategy for the prevention and control of influenza infections, the traditional egg-based approach to producing influenza vaccines does not provide sufficient capacity and adequate speed to satisfy global needs to combat newly emerging strains, seasonal or potentially pandemic. Significant efforts are underway to develop and implement new cell substrates with improved efficiency for influenza vaccine development and manufacturing. In recent years, plants have been used to produce recombinant proteins including subunit vaccines and antibodies. The main advantages of using plant systems for the production of vaccine antigens against influenza are their independence from pathogenic viruses, and cost and time efficiency. Here, we describe the large-scale production of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) strains of influenza virus in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and their immunogenicity (serum hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing antibodies), and safety in animal models. These results support the testing of these candidate vaccines in human volunteers and also the utility of our plant expression system for large-scale recombinant influenza vaccine production.

  15. The social ecological model as a framework for determinants of 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Supriya; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H; Musa, Donald; Hilyard, Karen M; Freimuth, Vicki S

    2012-04-01

    Research on influenza vaccine uptake has focused largely on intrapersonal determinants (perceived risk, past vaccine acceptance, perceived vaccine safety) and on physician recommendation. The authors used a social ecological framework to examine influenza vaccine uptake during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Surveying an adult population (n = 2,079) in January 2010 with significant oversamples of Blacks and Hispanics, this study found that 18.4% (95% confidence interval = 15.6-21.5) had gotten the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. Variables at each level of the social ecological model were significant predictors of uptake as well as of intent to get the vaccine. The intrapersonal level explained 53%, the interpersonal explained 47%, the institutional level explained 34%, and the policy and community levels each explained 8% of the variance associated with vaccine uptake. The levels together explained 65% of the variance, suggesting that interventions targeting multiple levels of the framework would be more effective than interventions aimed at a single level.

  16. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif; Nielsen, Jens; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-04-26

    The composition of current influenza protein vaccines has to be reconsidered every season to match the circulating influenza viruses, continuously changing antigenicity. Thus, influenza vaccines inducing a broad cross-reactive immune response would be a great advantage for protection against both seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA vaccine components. We found that pigs challenged with a virus homologous to the HA and NA DNA vaccine components were well protected from infection. In addition, heterologous challenge virus was cleared rapidly compared to the unvaccinated control pigs. Immunisation by electroporation induced HI antibodies >40 HAU/ml seven days after second vaccination. Heterologous virus challenge as long as ten weeks after last immunisation was able to trigger a vaccine antibody HI response 26 times higher than in the control pigs. The H3N2 DNA vaccine HA and NA genes also triggered an effective vaccine response with protective antibody titres towards heterologous H3N2 virus. The described influenza DNA vaccine is able to induce broadly protective immune responses even in a larger animal, like the pig, against both heterologous and homologous virus challenges despite relatively low HI titres after vaccination. The ability of this DNA vaccine to limit virus shedding may have an impact on virus spread among pigs which could possibly extend to humans as well, thereby diminishing the

  17. ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC.

    PubMed

    Paula, Stéfano Ivani de; Paula, Gustavo Ivani de; Cunegundes, Kelly Simone Almeida; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de

    2016-11-03

    This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods.

  18. ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC

    PubMed Central

    de PAULA, Stéfano Ivani; de PAULA, Gustavo Ivani; CUNEGUNDES, Kelly Simone Almeida; de MORAES-PINTO, Maria Isabel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods. PMID:27828623

  19. H1N1pdm09 Adjuvanted Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults: A Randomized Trial of Two Single versus Two Double Doses

    PubMed Central

    Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Camacho, Luiz A. B.; Souza, Thiago M. L.; Luz, Paula M.; Vasconcellos, Mauricio T. L.; Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem B. W.; Morgado, Mariza G.; Nunes, Estevão P.; Lemos, Alberto S.; Ferreira, Ana C. G.; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Siqueira, Marilda M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Background Since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk of severe disease from pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09), vaccination was recommended as a prevention strategy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and persistence of the immune response after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09) with an adjuvanted vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults using two single and two double doses. Methodology/Principal Findings Open label, randomized trial to evaluate the immune response following H1N1pdm09 vaccination in HIV-infected participants compared to HIV-negative controls (NCT01155037). HIV-infected participants were randomized to receive 2 single (3.75 µg hemagglutinin) or 2 double (7.5 µg hemagglutinin) doses of the vaccine, 21 days apart. Controls received one dose of the vaccine. The primary endpoint was seroconversion as measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Two hundred fifty six HIV-infected participants (129 and 127 randomized to single and double doses, respectively) and 71 HIV-negative controls were enrolled. Among HIV-infected participants, seroconversion increased from 46.7% and 51.7% after the first dose to 77.2% and 83.8% after the second dose of the vaccine using single and double doses, respectively. Participants aged >40 years showed higher seroconversion compared to younger participants. Seroconversion among HIV-infected women and those with nadir CD4<200 cells/mm3 was significantly higher with double doses. Persistence of protective antibodies six months after vaccination was achieved by 80% and 89.9% of the HIV-infected participants who received single and double doses, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Our results support the recommendation of two double doses of adjuvanted H1N1pdm09 vaccine for HIV-infected individuals, particularly women, and those aged >40 years or with nadir CD4<200 cells/mm3, to achieve antibody levels

  20. The Impact of Immunosenescence on Humoral Immune Response Variation after Influenza A/H1N1 Vaccination in Older Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Haralambieva, Iana H.; Painter, Scott D.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Lambert, Nathaniel D.; Goergen, Krista M.; Oberg, Ann L.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly, the factors underlying the reduced vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in this age group are not completely understood. Age and immunosenescence factors, and their impact on humoral immunity after influenza vaccination, are of growing interest for the development of better vaccines for the elderly. Methods We assessed associations between age and immunosenescence markers (T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles – TREC content, peripheral white blood cell telomerase – TERT expression and CD28 expression on T cells) and influenza A/H1N1 vaccine-induced measures of humoral immunity in 106 older subjects at baseline and three timepoints post-vaccination. Results TERT activity (TERT mRNA expression) was significantly positively correlated with the observed increase in the influenza-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response at Day 28 compared to baseline (p-value=0.025). TREC levels were positively correlated with the baseline and early (Day 3) influenza A/H1N1-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response (p-value=0.042 and p-value=0.035, respectively). The expression and/or expression change of CD28 on CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells at baseline and Day 3 was positively correlated with the influenza A/H1N1-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response at baseline, Day 28 and Day 75 post-vaccination. In a multivariable analysis, the peak antibody response (HAI and/or VNA at Day 28) was negatively associated with age, the percentage of CD8+CD28low T cells, IgD+CD27- naïve B cells, and percentage overall CD20- B cells and plasmablasts, measured at Day 3 post-vaccination. The early change in influenza-specific memory B cell ELISPOT response was positively correlated with the observed increase in influenza A/H1N1-specific HAI antibodies at Day 28 and Day 75 relative to baseline (p-value=0.007 and p-value=0.005, respectively). Conclusion Our data suggest that influenza-specific humoral immunity

  1. Healthcare workers under a mandated H1N1 vaccination policy with employment termination penalty: a survey to assess employee perception.

    PubMed

    Winston, Lori; Wagner, Stephanie; Chan, Shu

    2014-08-20

    The ethical debate over mandatory healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccination is a heated one. Our study hospital instituted a mandatory employee influenza vaccination policy for the 2009-2010 influenza season during the highly publicized pandemic of the H1N1 "Swine Flu." Under this mandate there was no informed declination option, and termination of employment was the consequence for noncompliance. Our objective was to examine HCW perceptions of the H1N1 influenza virus, the vaccine, and the strict mandated vaccination policy. A survey was designed, distributed, and anonymously collected. In total, 202 completed questionnaires were obtained via accidental sampling by the investigators achieving a 100% response rate. Data analysis showed that 31.7% of surveyed HCWs felt the mandate was an infringement on their rights and 3.5% of HCWs would electively seek employment elsewhere. Significantly more nurses and clerks/technicians were opposed to the mandate compared to other types of employees. 96% felt that the mandating hospital should be liable should a significant adverse effect occur from receiving the vaccine. While the mandate helped to increase HCW influenza vaccination rates dramatically, the strict consequence of employment termination created negative feelings of coercion. Adopting a policy that includes a declination option with mandatory masking during influenza season might be a more widely acceptable and still adequate approach.

  2. Investigating the effect of AS03 adjuvant on the plasma cell repertoire following pH1N1 influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Galson, J. D.; Trück, J.; Kelly, D. F.; van der Most, R.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza pandemics require rapid deployment of effective vaccines for control. Adjuvants such as AS03 improve vaccine immunogenicity, but this mechanism is poorly understood. We used high-throughput B cell receptor sequencing of plasma cells produced following AS03-adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccination, as well as pre-pandemic seasonal influenza vaccination to elucidate the effect of the adjuvant on the humoral immune response. By analyzing mutation levels, it was possible to distinguish sequences from cells that were recently activated from naïve B cells from those that were activated by memory recall. We show that the adjuvant functions through two mechanisms. First, the adjuvant stimulates increased activation of naïve B cells, thus reducing immune interference with previous vaccine responses. Second, the adjuvant is able to increase the adaptability of the recalled cells to give improved specificity to the new vaccine antigen. We thus show how AS03 enhances pH1N1 immune responses, and reduces immune interference. PMID:27849037

  3. Impacts of a mass vaccination campaign against pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Taiwan: a time-series regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Un-In; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lu, Min-Chi; Lu, Po-Liang; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2014-06-01

    A multicenter, hospital-wide, clinical and epidemiological study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the mass influenza vaccination program during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and the impact of the prioritization strategy among people at different levels of risk. Among the 34 359 medically attended patients who displayed an influenza-like illness and had a rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) at one of the three participating hospitals, 21.0% tested positive for influenza A. The highest daily number of RIDT-positive cases in each hospital ranged from 33 to 56. A well-fitted multiple linear regression time-series model (R(2)=0.89) showed that the establishment of special community flu clinics averted an average of nine cases daily (p=0.005), and an increment of 10% in daily mean level of population immunity against pH1N1 through vaccination prevented five cases daily (p<0.001). Moreover, the regression model predicted five-fold or more RIDT-positive cases if the mass influenza vaccination program had not been implemented, and 39.1% more RIDT-positive cases if older adults had been prioritized for vaccination above school-aged children. Mass influenza vaccination was an effective control measure, and school-aged children should be assigned a higher priority for vaccination than older adults during an influenza pandemic. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute transverse myelitis and acute motor axonal neuropathy developed after vaccinations against seasonal and 2009 A/H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nozomu; Watanabe, Kosuke; Ohta, Kiyobumi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) has been described as an uncommon complication of vaccinations and is rarely accompanied by inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. We report a case of a 77-year-old woman who developed ATM and acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) following vaccinations against seasonal and 2009 A/H1N1 influenza. She manifested ophthalmoplegia, quadriparesis and sensory impairment. MR imaging showed a longitudinally-extensive spinal cord lesion, and nerve conduction study revealed motor axonal polyneuropathy. Despite prompt treatment, her symptoms poorly recovered. While concurrent ATM and AMAN may suggest the presence of a common antigen, their scarcity indicates the importance of other factors causing immunologic disruptions.

  5. Evaluation of replication, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated cold-adapted pandemic H1N1 influenza virus vaccine in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Vogel, Leatrice; Subbarao, Kanta

    2012-08-17

    We studied the replication of influenza A/California/07/09 (H1N1) wild type (CA09wt) virus in two non-human primate species and used one of these models to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated cold-adapted vaccine, which contains the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase from the H1N1 wild type (wt) virus and six internal protein gene segments of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted (ca) master donor virus. We infected African green monkeys (AGMs) and rhesus macaques with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of CA09wt and CA09ca influenza viruses. The virus CA09wt replicated in the upper respiratory tract of all animals but the titers in upper respiratory tract tissues of rhesus macaques were significant higher than in AGMs (mean peak titers 10(4.5) TCID(50)/g and 10(2.0) TCID(50)/g on days 4 and 2 post-infection, respectively; p<0.01). Virus replication was observed in the lungs of all rhesus macaques (10(2.0)-10(5.4) TCID(50)/g) whereas only 2 out of 4 AGMs had virus recovered from the lungs (10(2.5)-10(3.5) TCID(50)/g). The CA09ca vaccine virus was attenuated and highly restricted in replication in both AGMs and rhesus macaques. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the CA09ca vaccine in rhesus macaques because CA09wt virus replicated more efficiently in this species. One or two doses of vaccine were administered intranasally and intratracheally to rhesus macaques. For the two-dose group, the vaccine was administered 4-weeks apart. Immunogenicity was assessed by measuring hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibodies in the serum and specific IgA antibodies to CA09wt virus in the nasal wash. One or two doses of the vaccine elicited a significant rise in HAI titers (range 40-320). Two doses of CA09ca elicited higher pH1N1-specific IgA titers than in the mock-immunized group (p<0.01). Vaccine efficacy was assessed by comparing titers of CA09wt challenge virus in the respiratory tract of mock-immunized and CA09ca vaccinated monkeys

  6. Social and political determinants of vaccine hesitancy: Lessons learned from the H1N1 pandemic of 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Mesch, Gustavo S; Schwirian, Kent P

    2015-11-01

    Public acceptance of vaccination programs is essential for vaccine preventable diseases. However, increasing sectors of the population have expressed hesitancy about participating in such programs, leading to the re-emergence of vaccine preventable diseases. In this study we rely on a recreancy hypothesis to test the association between confidence in the government and local hospitals and the willingness to take the vaccine. A secondary analysis of a survey that used a large sample of the U.S. population conducted in October 2009 was used (N = 968). The results indicate that 36.1% of the respondents expressed willingness to be vaccinated. Those with the greatest trust in the government were the most likely to be vaccinated (43.4%), and those least confident were the least willing (15.8%). From the ones reporting being confident in the local health system, 38.4% were willing to be vaccinated, and from those not confident, only 23.5% were willing to be vaccinated. The decision to get vaccinated in the midst of a contagious outbreak involves many considerations. Trust in the government's technical and organization skill to deal with the infectious outbreak along with trust in medical organizations predict the adoption of recommended protection measures. The results indicate that public compliance with vaccination plans in health crisis requires the development of social and institutional trust. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Persistence and avidity maturation of antibodies to A(H1N1)pdm09 in healthcare workers following repeated annual vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Synnøve; Tete, Sarah M; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Hoschler, Katja; Montomoli, Emanuele; Brokstad, Karl A; Cox, Rebecca J

    2015-08-07

    Healthcare workers are at increased risk of influenza infection through direct patient care, particularly during the early stages of a pandemic. Although influenza vaccination is widely recommended in Healthcare workers, data on long-term immunogenicity of vaccination in healthcare workers are lacking. The present study was designed to assess the persistence of the humoral response after pandemic vaccination as well as the impact of repeated annual vaccination in healthcare workers (n=24). Pandemic influenza vaccination resulted in a significant increase in haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers with 93-100% of subjects achieving protective titers 21-days post each of the three annual vaccinations. Seroprotective antibodies measured by HI, microneutralization and single radial hemolysis assays were present in 77-94% of healthcare workers 6 months post-vaccination. Repeated vaccination resulted in an increased duration of seroprotective antibodies with seroprotective titers increasing from 35-62% 12 months after 2009 pandemic vaccination to 50-75% 12 months after 2010 vaccination. Furthermore, repeated annual vaccination augmented the avidity of influenza-specific IgG antibodies. In conclusion, we have shown that A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination induces high seroprotective titers that persist for at least 6 months. We demonstrate that repeated vaccination is beneficial to healthcare workers and results in further avidity maturation of vaccine-induced antibodies.

  8. Aerosol Delivery of a Candidate Universal Influenza Vaccine Reduces Viral Load in Pigs Challenged with Pandemic H1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sophie B.; Hemmink, Johanneke D.; Porter, Emily; Harley, Ross; Shelton, Holly; Aramouni, Mario; Everett, Helen E.; Brookes, Sharon M.; Bailey, Michael; Townsend, Alain M.; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are a major health threat to livestock and humans, causing considerable mortality, morbidity, and economic loss. Current inactivated influenza vaccines are strain specific and new vaccines need to be produced at frequent intervals to combat newly arising influenza virus strains, so that a universal vaccine is highly desirable. We show that pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in which the hemagglutinin signal sequence has been suppressed (S-FLU), when administered to pigs by aerosol can induce CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Neutralizing Ab was not produced. Detection of a BAL response correlated with a reduction in viral titer in nasal swabs and lungs, following challenge with H1N1 pandemic virus. Intratracheal immunization with a higher dose of a heterologous H5N1 S-FLU vaccine induced weaker BAL and stronger tracheobronchial lymph node responses and a lesser reduction in viral titer. We conclude that local cellular immune responses are important for protection against influenza A virus infection, that these can be most efficiently induced by aerosol immunization targeting the lower respiratory tract, and that S-FLU is a promising universal influenza vaccine candidate. PMID:27183611

  9. Experimental transmission of avian-like swine H1N1 influenza virus between immunologically naïve and vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Lucy E; Jonczyk, Magdalena; Jervis, Carley M; Flack, Deborah J; Lyall, John; Foote, Alasdair; Mumford, Jennifer A; Brown, Ian H; Wood, James L; Elton, Debra M

    2011-09-01

    Infection of pigs with swine influenza has been studied experimentally and in the field; however, little information is available on the natural transmission of this virus in pigs. Two studies in an experimental transmission model are presented here, one in immunologically naïve and one in a combination of vaccinated and naïve pigs. To investigate the transmission of a recent 'avian-like' swine H1N1 influenza virus in naive piglets, to assess the antibody response to a commercially available vaccine and to determine the efficiency of transmission in pigs after vaccination. Transmission chains were initiated by intranasal challenge of two immunologically naïve pigs. Animals were monitored daily for clinical signs and virus shedding. Pairs of pigs were sequentially co-housed, and once virus was detected in recipients, prior donors were removed. In the vaccination study, piglets were vaccinated and circulating antibody levels were monitored by haemagglutination inhibition assay. To study transmission in vaccinates, a pair of infected immunologically naïve animals was co-housed with vaccinated recipient pigs and further pairs of vaccinates were added sequentially as above. The chain was completed by the addition of naive pigs. Transmission of the H1N1 virus was achieved through a chain of six pairs of naïve piglets and through four pairs of vaccinated animals. Transmission occurred with minimal clinical signs and, in vaccinates, at antibody levels higher than previously reported to protect against infection. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Deep Sequencing for Evaluation of Genetic Stability of Influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) Vaccine Viruses.

    PubMed

    Laassri, Majid; Majid, Laassri; Zagorodnyaya, Tatiana; Plant, Ewan P; Petrovskaya, Svetlana; Bidzhieva, Bella; Ye, Zhiping; Simonyan, Vahan; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Virus growth during influenza vaccine manufacture can lead to mutations that alter antigenic properties of the virus, and thus may affect protective potency of the vaccine. Different reassortants of pandemic "swine" H1N1 influenza A vaccine (121XP, X-179A and X-181) viruses as well as wild type A/California/07/2009(H1N1) and A/PR/8/34 strains were propagated in embryonated eggs and used for DNA/RNA Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing. The RNA sequences of these viruses published in NCBI were used as references for alignment of the sequencing reads generated in this study. Consensus sequences of these viruses differed from the NCBI-deposited sequences at several nucleotides. 121XP stock derived by reverse genetics was more heterogeneous than X-179A and X-181 stocks prepared by conventional reassortant technology. Passaged 121XP virus contained four non-synonymous mutations in the HA gene. One of these mutations (Lys226Glu) was located in the Ca antigenic site of HA (present in 18% of the population). Two non-synonymous mutations were present in HA of viruses derived from X-179A: Pro314Gln (18%) and Asn146Asp (78%). The latter mutation located in the Sa antigenic site was also detected at a low level (11%) in the wild-type A/California/07/2009(H1N1) virus, and was present as a complete substitution in X-181 viruses derived from X-179A virus. In the passaged X-181 viruses, two mutations emerged in HA: a silent mutation A1398G (31%) in one batch and G756T (Glu252Asp, 47%) in another batch. The latter mutation was located in the conservative region of the antigenic site Ca. The protocol for RNA sequencing was found to be robust, reproducible, and suitable for monitoring genetic consistency of influenza vaccine seed stocks.

  11. Adverse events with the influenza A(H1N1) vaccine Pandemrix® at healthcare professionals in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana Isabel; Ribeiro Vaz, Inês; Santos, Cristina; Polónia, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: Os profissionais de saúde foram um grupo prioritário para vacinação contra a pandemia da Gripe A (H1N1), Pandemrix®. Assim, monitorizar os eventos adversos relacionados com esta vacina neste grupo específico poderá originar informação valiosa relacionada com o perfil de segurança da vacina. O nosso objetivo foi identificar os eventos adversos após imunização com a vacina Pandemrix® em profissionais de saúde. Material e Métodos: Foi desenhado um questionário de monitorização dos eventos adversos ocorridos com a vacina Pandemrix®. O questionário foi distribuído aos profissionais de saúde a trabalhar em três centros hospitalares da região norte do País, vacinados no período de 26 de Outubro de 2009 a 31 de janeiro de 2009. Resultados: Dos 2358 profissionais de saúde que aceitaram participar no estudo, 864 (37%) devolveram o questionário preenchido. Destes, 73% experienciaram pelo menos um evento adverso após imunização, mas só 8% experienciaram um evento inesperado. Os eventos adversos mais frequentemente reportados foram os esperados e muito comuns: reações locais no local de administração (57%), mialgia (31%), fadiga (incluindo astenia) (24%) e dor de cabeça (19%). Não foram reportados casos de eventos de maior gravidade para a saúde, tais como morte ou risco de vida. O género feminino e a existência de doença de base foram fatores de risco independentes para o desenvolvimento de pelo menos um evento adverso após imunização com a Pandemrix®. Conclusões: O nosso trabalho sugere um perfil de segurança aceitável da vacina pandémica Pandermix® em profissionais de saúde. Tanto a frequência como a severidade dos eventos adversos não se verificaram superiores ao esperado.

  12. Willingness to receive pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine among doctors and nurses in public health facilities in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fatiregun, Akinola Ayoola; Adeyemo, Adeola Aisha; Olowookere, Samuel Anu

    2012-03-16

    As part of global efforts to contain the spread of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1), the Federal Ministry of Health of Nigeria is embarking on the vaccination of health care workers employed in health facilities nationwide. This study was designed to assess the willingness of doctors and nurses working in public health facilities in Ibadan, Nigeria to receive the influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed. Stratified simple random sampling was used to select a total of 304 doctors and nurses who worked at the public primary (70), secondary (51) and tertiary (183) levels of health care facilities in Ibadan. A self-administered, structured questionnaire that contained items on socio-demographics, sources of information, knowledge about the infection and the vaccine, risk perception, willingness to receive the vaccine and suggestions to improve vaccination acceptance by health-care workers was used to collect the data. A total of 255 providers responded for an overall response rate of 84%. The mean age of the respondents was 35.0 ± 9.7 years. A high proportion (88.2%) of the participants, including 94.9% of the doctors and 87.0% of the nurses, reported a willingness to receive the vaccine. Perceptions regarding the risk of contracting influenza, the availability of effective vaccinations for prevention and beliefs that the disease is fatal were reasons given by respondents who reported willingness to receive the vaccination. Those participants who reported ever hearing about the pandemic (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.2) and those who had a high-risk perception of contracting the disease (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.7) were likely to receive the vaccine. Doctors and nurses at the three levels of health care facilities in Ibadan were willing to receive the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. Efforts should be made to deliver the vaccines via adequate planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The immunogenetics of narcolepsy associated with A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (Pandemrix) supports a potent gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, I L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Szakács, A; Silveira, A; Franzén, L; Azhary, V; Maeurer, M; Feltelius, N; Darin, N; Hallböök, T; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Kockum, I; Olsson, T

    2017-03-23

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination campaign from 2009 to 2010 was associated with a sudden increase in the incidence of narcolepsy in several countries. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*06:02 allele, and protective associations with the DQB1*06:03 allele have been reported. Several non-HLA gene loci are also associated, such as common variants of the T-cell receptor-α (TRA), the purinergic receptor P2RY11, cathepsin H (CTSH) and TNFSF4/OX40L/CD252. In this retrospective multicenter study, we investigated if these predisposing gene loci were also involved in vaccination-associated narcolepsy. We compared HLA- along with single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes for non-HLA regions between 42 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 1990 population-based controls. The class II gene loci associations supported previous findings. Nominal association (P-value<0.05) with TRA as well as suggestive (P-value<0.1) associations with P2RY11 and CTSH were found. These associations suggest a very strong gene-environment interaction, in which the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain or Pandemrix vaccine can act as potent environmental triggers.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 23 March 2017; doi:10.1038/gene.2017.1.

  14. A single immunization with inactivated H1N1 influenza vaccine formulated with delta inulin adjuvant (Advax™) overcomes pregnancy-associated immune suppression and enhances passive neonatal protection.

    PubMed

    Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Kolpe, Annasaheb; Li, Lei; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-08-06

    Pregnant women and neonates represent high-risk groups for influenza infection, and in general have suppressed responses to standard influenza vaccines due to pregnancy-associated immune suppression and immune system immaturity, respectively. We therefore wished to test whether addition of Advax™, a polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin, to an inactivated influenza vaccine (A/H1N1/PR8) administered during pregnancy would safely enhance vaccine immunogenicity and thereby provide improved protection of pregnant mothers and their newborns. Pregnant mice received a single intramuscular injection of β-propiolactone-inactivated H1N1 antigen alone or with Advax adjuvant. Pregnant dams receiving Advax-adjuvanted vaccine exhibited significantly increased serum and breast milk anti-influenza IgG titers. This translated into higher serum anti-influenza IgG titers in the pups of these dams. Complete protection was seen in pups of dams that received Advax-adjuvanted vaccine whereas no survival was seen in pups of control mothers or mothers immunized with unadjuvanted influenza vaccine. Cross-fostering studies confirmed that enhanced protection of pups of dams that received Advax-adjuvanted vaccine was mediated by enhanced transfer of maternal IgG to the pups via breast-feeding. The delta inulin adjuvant was not associated with any reproductive or developmental adverse effects. This study shows that Advax adjuvant was safe when administered with influenza vaccine during pregnancy and provided protection of pups via enhanced breast milk transfer of anti-influenza antibodies, not seen with administration of unadjuvanted vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost comparison of 2 mass vaccination campaigns against influenza A H1N1 in New York City.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Susan M; McGinty, Meghan D; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Marquez, Monica L; Rosselli-Fraschilla, Annmarie; Zucker, Jane R; Farley, Thomas A

    2012-07-01

    Objectives. We estimated and compared total costs and costs per dose administered for 2 influenza A 2009 monovalent vaccine campaigns in New York City: an elementary school-located campaign targeting enrolled children aged 4 years and older, and a community-based points-of-dispensing campaign for anyone aged 4 years and older. Methods. We determined costs from invoices or we estimated costs. We obtained vaccination data from the Citywide Immunization Registry and reports from the community points of dispensing. Results. The school campaign delivered approximately 202,089 vaccines for $17.9 million and $88 per dose. The community campaign delivered 49,986 vaccines for $7.6 million and $151 per dose. At projected capacity, the school campaign could have delivered 371,827 doses at $53 each or $13 each when we excluded the value of in-kind resources. The community points of dispensing could have administered 174,000 doses at $51 each or $24 each when we excluded the value of in-kind resources. Conclusions. The school campaign delivered vaccines at a lower cost per dose than did the community campaign. Had demand been higher, both campaigns may have delivered vaccine at lower, more comparable cost per dose.

  16. Cost Comparison of 2 Mass Vaccination Campaigns Against Influenza A H1N1 in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Kansagra, Susan M.; McGinty, Meghan D.; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Marquez, Monica L.; Rosselli-Fraschilla, Annmarie; Zucker, Jane R.; Farley, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated and compared total costs and costs per dose administered for 2 influenza A 2009 monovalent vaccine campaigns in New York City: an elementary school–located campaign targeting enrolled children aged 4 years and older, and a community-based points-of-dispensing campaign for anyone aged 4 years and older. Methods. We determined costs from invoices or we estimated costs. We obtained vaccination data from the Citywide Immunization Registry and reports from the community points of dispensing. Results. The school campaign delivered approximately 202 089 vaccines for $17.9 million and $88 per dose. The community campaign delivered 49 986 vaccines for $7.6 million and $151 per dose. At projected capacity, the school campaign could have delivered 371 827 doses at $53 each or $13 each when we excluded the value of in-kind resources. The community points of dispensing could have administered 174 000 doses at $51 each or $24 each when we excluded the value of in-kind resources. Conclusions. The school campaign delivered vaccines at a lower cost per dose than did the community campaign. Had demand been higher, both campaigns may have delivered vaccine at lower, more comparable cost per dose. PMID:22676501

  17. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19–20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  18. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19-20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients.

  19. Factors Affecting Intention among Students to Be Vaccinated against A/H1N1 Influenza: A Health Belief Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Teitler-Regev, Sharon; Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri

    2011-01-01

    The outbreak of A/H1N1 influenza (henceforth, swine flu) in 2009 was characterized mainly by morbidity rates among young people. This study examined the factors affecting the intention to be vaccinated against the swine flu among students in Israel. Questionnaires were distributed in December 2009 among 387 students at higher-education institutions. The research questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and Health Belief Model principles. The results show that the factors positively affecting the intention to take the swine flu vaccine were past experience with seasonal flu shot and three HBM categories: higher levels of perceived susceptibility for catching the illness, perceived seriousness of illness, and lower levels of barriers. We conclude that offering the vaccine at workplaces may raise the intention to take the vaccine among young people in Israel. PMID:22229099

  20. Likely Correlation between Sources of Information and Acceptability of A/H1N1 Swine-Origin Influenza Virus Vaccine in Marseille, France

    PubMed Central

    Ninove, Laetitia; Sartor, Catherine; Badiaga, Sékéné; Botelho, Elizabeth; Brouqui, Philippe; Zandotti, Christine; De Lamballerie, Xavier; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel; Gould, Ernest A.; Charrel, Rémi N.; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background In France, there was a reluctance to accept vaccination against the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus despite government recommendation and investment in the vaccine programme. Methods and Findings We examined the willingness of different populations to accept A/H1N1vaccination (i) in a French hospital among 3315 employees immunized either by in-house medical personnel or mobile teams of MDs and (ii) in a shelter housing 250 homeless persons. Google was used to assess the volume of enquiries concerning incidence of influenza. We analyzed the information on vaccination provided by Google, the website of the major French newspapers, and PubMed. Two trust Surveys were used to assess public opinion on the trustworthiness of people in different professions. Paramedics were significantly more reluctant to accept immunisation than qualified medical staff. Acceptance was significantly increased when recommended directly by MDs. Anecdotal cases of directly observed severe infections were followed by enhanced acceptance of paramedical staff. Scientific literature was significantly more in favour of vaccination than Google and French newspaper websites. In the case of the newspaper websites, information correlated with their recognised political reputations, although they would presumably claim independence from political bias. The Trust Surveys showed that politicians were highly distrusted in contrast with doctors and pharmacists who were considered much more trustworthy. Conclusions The low uptake of the vaccine could reflect failure to convey high quality medical information and advice relating to the benefits of being vaccinated. We believe that the media and internet contributed to this problem by raising concerns within the general population and that failure to involve GPs in the control programme may have been a mistake. GPs are highly regarded by the public and can provide face-to-face professional advice and information. The top-down strategy of vaccine

  1. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Cognitive Profile in Children with Narcolepsy with or without Association to the H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Szakács, Attila; Hallböök, Tove; Tideman, Pontus; Darin, Niklas; Wentz, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidity and the cognitive profile in children and adolescents with narcolepsy in western Sweden and the relationship of these problems to H1N1 vaccination. Patients: Thirty-eight patients were included in the study. Design: We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study to investigate psychiatric comorbidity using a test battery of semistructured interviews generating Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnoses, including the Development and Well-Being Assessment and the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder rating scale. The Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were used to screen for autistic traits and psychotic symptoms, respectively. The cognitive assessments were made by a clinical psychologist using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition, or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition. Measurements and Results: In the post-H1N1 vaccination (PHV) narcolepsy group (n = 31), 43% of patients had psychiatric comorbidity, 29% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattentive type, 20% had major depression, 10% had general anxiety disorder, 7% had oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), 3% had pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (i.e., atypical autism), and 3% had eating disorder not otherwise specified (anorectic type). In the non–post-H1N1 vaccination (nPHV) narcolepsy group, one of seven patients had ADHD, inattentive type and ODD. The most frequent psychiatric symptom was temper tantrums, which occurred in 94% of the patients in the PHV group and 71% of the patients in the nPHV narcolepsy group. The cognitive assessment profile was similar in both groups and showed normal results for mean full-scale IQ and perceptual speed but decreased verbal comprehension and working memory. Patients with

  2. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in Croatia in 2010-2011: a season with predominant circulation of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kurečić Filipović, S; Gjenero-Margan, I; Kissling, E; Kaić, B; Cvitković, A

    2015-09-01

    This is a retrospective study using the test-negative case-control method to estimate seasonal 2010-2011 influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) in Croatia. Of patients consulting a physician for influenza-like illness (ILI) and for whom a swab was taken, we compared RT-PCR influenza-positive and RT-PCR influenza-negative patients. We used a structured questionnaire and physicians' records to obtain information on vaccination status and potential confounders. We conducted a complete case analysis using logistic regression to measure adjusted VE overall, against A(H1N1)pdm09 and in age groups. Out of 785 interviewed patients, 495 eligible patients were included in the study, after applying exclusion criteria [217 cases, of which 92·6% were A(H1N1)pdm09 positive, 278 controls]. Crude VE was 31·9% [95% confidence interval (CI) -40·9 to 67·1] and adjusted VE was 20·7% (95% CI -71·4 to 63·3), with higher VE in youngest and oldest age groups. Results from this first VE study in Croatia suggest a low to moderate VE for the 2010-2011 season. Studies year on year are needed with a greater sample size to provide more precise estimates, and also by age group and risk groups for vaccination.

  3. Best practice model for immunization: one home care agency's experience providing H1N1 and seasonal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Elizabeth; Howard, Leigh Ann

    2010-10-01

    This article may serve as a framework for school-based immunization initiatives. During the fall of 2009, VNA Home Health & Hospice, in close collaboration with the Maine Centers for Disease Control, organized and performed over 113 school-based clinics. These efforts helped Maine achieve a very high percentage of vaccination rates in the state's school-age population.

  4. Costs of School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts…

  5. Costs of School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts…

  6. A cluster of nonspecific adverse events in a military reserve unit following pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccination-possible stimulated reporting?

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael M; Arana, Jorge; Stewart, Brock; Hartshorn, Mary; Hrncir, David; Wang, Henry; Lamias, Mark; Locke, Michael; Stamper, John; Tokars, Jerome I; Engler, Renata J

    2012-03-23

    On February 20, 2010, a 23 year old male Army Reservist (index case) with symptom onset 4 h after receiving inactivated monovalent pandemic 2009 (H1N1) vaccine (MIV) was hospitalized with possible Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Within 1-2 days, 13 reservists from the same unit presented to the emergency department and 14 filed Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) reports of nonspecific symptoms following MIV. To describe the spectrum of adverse events (AE) among reservists in the unit after MIV and to identify factors contributing to this cluster of reports. We reviewed the reservists' VAERS reports and hospital records for demographics, influenza vaccination status, diagnostic results and outcome. All VAERS reports after vaccination from the same MIV lot were also screened. We conducted a survey of unit reservists to identify contributing factors for this cluster. The presumptive diagnosis of GBS in the index case was not confirmed. All other reservists demonstrated normal exam findings and laboratory investigations. VAERS reports following vaccination from the same MIV lot revealed no consistent pattern. Our survey of factors contributing to the cluster was returned by 55 reservists (response rate 28%). AEs following MIV were significantly more often reported by female and black reservists. There was a tendency for concern about the safety of the 2010-2011 seasonal influenza vaccine to be higher for reservists that reported an AE to MIV (p=0.13) or that sought medical attention for their symptoms (p=0.08). This cluster represents possible stimulated reporting following receipt of inactivated pandemic 2009 (H1N1) vaccine among service personnel. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. 'Out of two bad choices, I took the slightly better one': vaccination dilemmas for Scottish and Polish migrant women during the H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Sim, J A; Ulanika, A A; Katikireddi, S V; Gorman, D

    2011-08-01

    Pregnancy has been identified as a risk factor for complications from pandemic H1N1 influenza, and pregnant women were identified as a target group for vaccination in the UK in the 2009 pandemic. Poland took a more conservative approach, and did not offer vaccination to pregnant women. Poland accounts for the largest wave of recent migrants to the UK, many of whom are in their reproductive years and continue to participate actively in Polish healthcare systems after migration. The authors speculated that different national responses may shape differences in approaches to the vaccine between Scottish and Polish women. This study therefore aimed to assess how pregnant Polish migrants to Scotland weighed up the risks and benefits of the vaccine for pandemic H1N1 influenza in comparison with their Scottish counterparts. A qualitative interview-based study comparing the views of Scottish and Polish pregnant women on H1N1 vaccination was carried out in 'real time' during the first 2 weeks of the vaccination programme in November 2009. One-to-one interviews were conducted with 10 women (five Polish and five Scottish) in their native language. Interviews were transcribed, translated, coded and analysed for differences and similarities in decision-making processes between the two groups. Contrary to expectations, Scottish and Polish women drew on a strikingly similar set of considerations in deciding whether or not to accept the vaccine, with individual women reaching different conclusions. Almost all of the women adopted a critical stance towards the vaccine. While most women understood that pregnancy was a risk factor for complications from influenza, their primary concern was protecting family health overall and their fetus in particular. Deciding whether or not to accept the vaccine was difficult for women. Some identified a contradiction between the culture of caution which characterizes pregnancy-related advice, and the fact that they were being urged to accept what

  8. Costs of school-located influenza vaccination clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A; Tipton, Meredith L; Dube, Nancy L; Messonnier, Mark L

    2012-10-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts completed a clinic day survey on staff time; four of the six also provided data for materials and supplies. For all clinics, average per-dose labor cost was estimated at $5.95. Average per-dose material cost, excluding vaccine, was $5.76. From the four complete clinic survey responses, total per-dose cost was estimated to be an average of $13.51 (range = $4.91-$32.39). Use of donated materials and uncompensated volunteer staff could substantially reduce per-dose cost. Average per-dose cost could also be lowered by increasing the number of doses administered in a clinic.

  9. GENE SIGNATURES ASSOCIATED WITH ADAPTIVE HUMORAL IMMUNITY FOLLOWING SEASONAL INFLUENZA A/H1N1 VACCINATION

    PubMed Central

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Salk, Hannah M.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Grill, Diane E.; Oberg, Ann L.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify gene expression markers shared between both influenza hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) and virus-neutralization antibody (VNA) responses. We enrolled 158 older subjects who received the 2010–2011 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Influenza-specific HAI and VNA titers, and mRNA-sequencing were performed using blood samples obtained at Days 0, 3 and 28 post-vaccination. For antibody response at Day 28 vs Day 0, several genesets were identified as significant in predictive models for HAI (n=7) and VNA (n=35) responses. Five genesets (comprising the genes MAZ, TTF, GSTM, RABGGTA, SMS, CA, IFNG, and DOPEY) were in common for both HAI and VNA. For response at Day 28 vs Day 3, many genesets were identified in predictive models for HAI (n=13) and VNA (n=41). Ten genesets (comprising biologically related genes, such as MAN1B1, POLL, CEBPG, FOXP3, IL12A, TLR3, TLR7, and others) were shared between HAI and VNA. These identified genesets demonstrated a high degree of network interactions and likelihood for functional relationships. Influenza-specific HAI and VNA responses demonstrated a remarkable degree of similarity. Although unique geneset signatures were identified for each humoral outcome, several genesets were determined to be in common with both HAI and VNA response to influenza vaccine. PMID:27534615

  10. Immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 MF59-adjuvanted vaccine in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; D'Angelo, Emanuela; Daleno, Cristina; Peia, Francesco; Scala, Alessia; Serra, Domenico; Mirra, Nadia; Galeone, Carlotta; Principi, Nicola

    2010-11-23

    In order to evaluate the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 MF59-adjuvanted vaccine in patients with β-thalassemia major, 31 subjects (19 males; mean age 17.8±8.7 years) with β-thalassemia major and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Four weeks after vaccination, seroconversion rates were about 80% and seroprotection rates 100% in both groups. Three months after vaccination, most of the subjects remained seroconverted and the seroprotection rates were 93.5% among the patients and 100% among the controls. Safety and tolerability were also very good, with no differences between the groups. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. No Evidence for Disease History as a Risk Factor for Narcolepsy after A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Favelle; Ploner, Alexander; Fink, Katharina; Maeurer, Markus; Bergman, Peter; Piehl, Fredrik; Weibel, Daniel; Sparén, Pär; Dahlström, Lisen Arnheim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy. Methods Case-control study in Sweden. Cases included persons referred for a Multiple Sleep Latency Test between 2009 and 2010, identified through diagnostic sleep centres and confirmed through independent review of medical charts. Controls, selected from the total population register, were matched to cases on age, gender, MSLT-referral date and county of residence. Disease history (prescriptions and diagnoses) and vaccination history was collected through telephone interviews and population-based healthcare registers. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk-factor for narcolepsy. Results In total, 72 narcolepsy cases and 251 controls were included (range 3–69 years mean19-years). Risk of narcolepsy was increased in individuals with a disease history of nervous system disorders (OR range = 3.6–8.8) and mental and behavioural disorders (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.6–8.8) before referral. In a second analysis of vaccinated individuals only, nearly all initial associations were no longer statistically significant and effect sizes were smaller (OR range = 1.3–2.6). A significant effect for antibiotics (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.8) and a marginally significant effect for nervous system disorders was observed. In a third case-only analysis, comparing cases referred before vaccination to those referred after; prescriptions for nervous system disorders (OR = 26.0 95% CI 4.0–170.2) and ADHD (OR = 35.3 95% CI 3.4–369.9) were statistically significant during the vaccination period, suggesting initial associations were due to confounding by indication. Conclusion The findings of this study do not support disease history before A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination as a risk factor for narcolepsy. PMID:27120092

  12. Perspectives of Immunization Program Managers on 2009-10 H1N1 Vaccination in the United States: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seib, Katherine; Wells, Katelyn; Hannan, Claire; Orenstein, Walter A.; Whitney, Ellen A. S.; Hinman, Alan R.; Berkelman, Ruth L.; Omer, Saad B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In June and July 2010, we conducted a national internet-based survey of 64 city, state, and territorial immunization program managers (IPMs) to assess their experiences in managing the 2009-10 H1N1 influenza vaccination campaign. Fifty-four (84%) of the managers or individuals responsible for an immunization program responded to the survey. To manage the campaign, 76% indicated their health department activated an incident command system (ICS) and 49% used an emergency operations center (EOC). Forty percent indicated they shared the leadership of the campaign with their state-level emergency preparedness program. The managers' perceptions of the helpfulness of the emergency preparedness staff was higher when they had collaborated with the emergency preparedness program on actual or simulated mass vaccination events within the previous 2 years. Fifty-seven percent found their pandemic influenza plan helpful, and those programs that mandated that vaccine providers enter data into their jurisdiction's immunization information system (IIS) were more likely than those who did not mandate data entry to rate their IIS as valuable for facilitating registration of nontraditional providers (42% vs. 25%, p<0.05) and tracking recalled influenza vaccine (50% vs. 38%, p<0.05). Results suggest that ICS and EOC structures, pandemic influenza plans, collaborations with emergency preparedness partners during nonemergencies, and expanded use of IIS can enhance immunization programs' ability to successfully manage a large-scale vaccination campaign. Maintaining the close working relationships developed between state-level immunization and emergency preparedness programs during the H1N1 influenza vaccination campaign will be especially important as states prepare for budget cuts in the coming years. PMID:22360580

  13. 2009 H1N1 Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Seth J.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Dowdle, Walter R.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Within 2 months of its discovery last spring, a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus, currently referred to as 2009 H1N1, caused the first influenza pandemic in decades. The virus has caused disproportionate disease among young people with early reports of virulence similar to that of seasonal influenza. This clinical review provides an update encompassing the virology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the 2009 H1N1 virus. Because information about this virus, its prevention, and treatment are rapidly evolving, readers are advised to seek additional information. We performed a literature search of PubMed using the following keywords: H1N1, influenza, vaccine, pregnancy, children, treatment, epidemiology, and review. Studies were selected for inclusion in this review on the basis of their relevance. Recent studies and articles were preferred. PMID:20007905

  14. Serum-Free Suspension Culture of MDCK Cells for Production of Influenza H1N1 Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ding; Peng, Wen-Juan; Ye, Qian; Liu, Xu-Ping; Zhao, Liang; Fan, Li; Xia-Hou, Kang; Jia, Han-Jing; Luo, Jian; Zhou, Lin-Ting; Li, Bei-Bei; Wang, Shi-Lei; Xu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Ze; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Development of serum-free suspension cell culture processes is very important for influenza vaccine production. Previously, we developed a MDCK suspension cell line in a serum-free medium. In the present study, the growth kinetics of suspension MDCK cells and influenza virus production in the serum-free medium were investigated, in comparison with those of adherent MDCK cells in both serum-containing and serum-free medium. It was found that the serum-free medium supported the stable subculture and growth of both adherent and suspension cells. In batch culture, for both cell lines, the growth kinetics in the serum-free medium was comparable with those in the serum-containing medium and a commercialized serum-free medium. In the serum-free medium, peak viable cell density (VCD), haemagglutinin (HA) and median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) titers of the two cell lines reached 4.51×106 cells/mL, 2.94Log10(HAU/50 μL) and 8.49Log10(virions/mL), and 5.97×106 cells/mL, 3.88Log10(HAU/50 μL), and 10.34Log10(virions/mL), respectively. While virus yield of adherent cells in the serum-free medium was similar to that in the serum-containing medium, suspension culture in the serum-free medium showed a higher virus yield than adherent cells in the serum-containing medium and suspension cells in the commercialized serum-free medium. However, the percentage of infectious viruses was lower for suspension culture in the serum-free medium. These results demonstrate the great potential of this suspension MDCK cell line in serum-free medium for influenza vaccine production and further improvements are warranted.

  15. Pitfalls in anti-influenza T cell detection by Elispot using thimerosal containing pandemic H1N1 vaccine as antigen.

    PubMed

    Chauvat, A; Benhamouda, N; Loison, E; Gougeon, M L; Gey, A; Levionnois, E; Ravel, P; Abitbol, V; Roncelin, S; Marcheteau, E; Quintin-Colonna, F; Fridman, W H; Launay, O; Tartour, E

    2012-04-30

    Monitoring T cells in combination with humoral response may be of value to predict clinical protection and cross-protective immunity after influenza vaccination. Elispot technique which measures cytokine produced after antigen-specific T cell stimulation is used routinely to detect and characterize anti-viral T cells. We found that the preservative thimerosal present in most H1N1 pandemic vaccines, induced in vitro abortive activation of T cells followed by cell death leading to false-positive results with the Elispot technique. The size of the spots, usually not measured in routine analysis, appears to be a discriminative criterion to detect this bias. Multi-dose vials of vaccine containing thimerosal remain important for vaccine delivery and our results alert about false-positive results of Elispot to monitor the clinical efficacy of these vaccines. We showed that this finding extends for other T cell monitoring techniques based on cytokine production such as ELISA. Although measuring in vitro immune response using the whole vaccine used for human immunization directly reflects in vivo global host response to the vaccine, the present study strongly supports the use of individual vaccine components for immune monitoring due to the presence of contaminants, such as thimerosal, leading to a bias in interpretation of the results.

  16. The Lao Experience in Deploying Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccine: Lessons Made Relevant in Preparing for Present Day Pandemic Threats.

    PubMed

    Xeuatvongsa, Anonh; Mirza, Sara; Winter, Christian; Feldon, Keith; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Phonekeo, Darouny; Denny, Justin; Khanthamaly, Viengphone; Kounnavong, Bounheuang; Lylianou, Doualy; Phousavath, Sisouphane; Norasingh, Sisouveth; Boutta, Nao; Olsen, Sonja; Bresee, Joseph; Moen, Ann; Corwin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Lao PDR, as did most countries of the Mekong Region, embarked on a pandemic vaccine initiative to counter the threat posed by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Overall, estimated vaccine coverage of the Lao population was 14%, with uptake in targeted health care workers and pregnant women 99% and 41%, respectively. Adverse Events Following Immunization accounted for only 6% of survey driven, reported vaccination experiences, with no severe consequences or deaths. Public acceptability of the vaccine campaign was high (98%). Challenges to vaccine deployment included: 1) no previous experience in fielding a seasonal influenza vaccine, 2) safety and efficacy concerns, and 3) late arrival of vaccine 10 months into the pandemic. The Lao success in surmounting these hurdles was in large measure attributed to the oversight assigned the National Immunization Program, and national sensitivities in responding to the avian influenza A(H5N1) crisis in the years leading up to the pandemic. The Lao "lessons learned" from pandemic vaccine deployment are made even more relevant four years on, given the many avian influenza strains circulating in the region, all with pandemic potential.

  17. System factors to explain 2009 pandemic H1N1 state vaccination rates for children and high-risk adults in US emergency response to pandemic.

    PubMed

    Davila-Payan, Carlo; Swann, Julie; Wortley, Pascale M

    2014-01-03

    During the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, children and high-risk adults had priority for vaccination. Vaccine in short supply was allocated to states pro-rata by population, but vaccination rates as of January 2010 varied among states from 21.3% to 84.7% for children and 10.4% to 47.2% for high-risk adults. States had different campaign processes and decisions. To determine program and system factors associated with higher state pandemic vaccination coverage for children and high-risk adults during an emergency response with short supply of vaccine. Regression analysis of factors predicting state-specific H1N1 vaccination coverage in children and high-risk adults, including state campaign information, demographics, preventive or health-seeking behavior, preparedness funding, providers, state characteristics, and surveillance data. Our modeling explained variation in state-specific vaccination coverage with an adjusted R-squared of 0.82 for children and 0.78 for high-risk adults. We found that coverage of children was positively associated with programs focusing on school clinics and with a larger proportion of doses administered in public sites; negatively with the proportion of children in the population, and the proportion not visiting a doctor because of cost. The coverage for high-risk adults was positively associated with shipments of vaccine to "general access" locations, including pharmacy and retail, with the percentage of women with a Pap smear within the past 3 years and with past seasonal influenza vaccination. It was negatively associated with the expansion of vaccination to the general public by December 4, 2009. For children and high-risk adults, coverage was positively associated with the maximum number of ship-to-sites and negatively associated with the proportion of medically underserved population. Findings suggest that distribution and system decisions such as vaccination venues and providers targeted can positively impact vaccination rates for

  18. Increased Incidence and Clinical Picture of Childhood Narcolepsy following the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination Campaign in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Partinen, Markku; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Ilveskoski, Ismo; Hublin, Christer; Linna, Miika; Olsén, Päivi; Nokelainen, Pekka; Alén, Reija; Wallden, Tiina; Espo, Merimaaria; Rusanen, Harri; Olme, Jan; Sätilä, Heli; Arikka, Harri; Kaipainen, Pekka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Kirjavainen, Turkka

    2012-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy is a rare neurological sleep disorder especially in children who are younger than 10 years. In the beginning of 2010, an exceptionally large number of Finnish children suffered from an abrupt onset of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and cataplexy. Therefore, we carried out a systematic analysis of the incidence of narcolepsy in Finland between the years 2002–2010. Methods All Finnish hospitals and sleep clinics were contacted to find out the incidence of narcolepsy in 2010. The national hospital discharge register from 2002 to 2009 was used as a reference. Findings Altogether 335 cases (all ages) of narcolepsy were diagnosed in Finland during 2002–2009 giving an annual incidence of 0.79 per 100 000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 0.62–0.96). The average annual incidence among subjects under 17 years of age was 0.31 (0.12–0.51) per 100 000 inhabitants. In 2010, 54 children under age 17 were diagnosed with narcolepsy (5.3/100 000; 17-fold increase). Among adults ≥20 years of age the incidence rate in 2010 was 0.87/100 000, which equals that in 2002–2009. Thirty-four of the 54 children were HLA-typed, and they were all positive for narcolepsy risk allele DQB1*0602/DRB1*15. 50/54 children had received Pandemrix vaccination 0 to 242 days (median 42) before onset. All 50 had EDS with abnormal multiple sleep latency test (sleep latency <8 min and ≥2 sleep onset REM periods). The symptoms started abruptly. Forty-seven (94%) had cataplexy, which started at the same time or soon after the onset of EDS. Psychiatric symptoms were common. Otherwise the clinical picture was similar to that described in childhood narcolepsy. Interpretation A sudden increase in the incidence of abrupt childhood narcolepsy was observed in Finland in 2010. We consider it likely that Pandemrix vaccination contributed, perhaps together with other environmental factors, to this increase in genetically susceptible children. PMID:22470463

  19. Punctuated Evolution of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase (A/H1N1) under Opposing Migration and Vaccination Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus contains two highly variable envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The structure and properties of HA, which is responsible for binding the virus to the cell that is being infected, change significantly when the virus is transmitted from avian or swine species to humans. Here we focus first on the simpler problem of the much smaller human individual evolutionary amino acid mutational changes in NA, which cleaves sialic acid groups and is required for influenza virus replication. Our thermodynamic panorama shows that very small amino acid changes can be monitored very accurately across many historic (1945–2011) Uniprot and NCBI strains using hydropathicity scales to quantify the roughness of water film packages. Quantitative sequential analysis is most effective with the fractal differential hydropathicity scale based on protein self-organized criticality (SOC). Our analysis shows that large-scale vaccination programs have been responsible for a very large convergent reduction in common influenza severity in the last century. Hydropathic analysis is capable of interpreting and even predicting trends of functional changes in mutation prolific viruses directly from amino acid sequences alone. An engineered strain of NA1 is described which could well be significantly less virulent than current circulating strains. PMID:25143953

  20. A De-O-acylated Lipooligosaccharide-Based Adjuvant System Promotes Antibody and Th1-Type Immune Responses to H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji In; Park, Shin Ae; Wui, Seo Ri; Ko, Ara; Han, Ji Eun; Choi, Jung Ah; Kim, Kwang Sung; Cho, Yang Je

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are agents that are used to promote immune responses to vaccine antigens and thereby to enhance the protective efficacy of the vaccines. In this study, we investigated the adjuvant activity of CIA06, an adjuvant system that is composed of a toll-like receptor 4 agonist de-O-acylated lipooligosaccharide (dLOS) and aluminum hydroxide, on the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Greenflu-S® in mice. CIA06 significantly enhanced influenza-specific serum IgG, hemagglutination-inhibition, and virus-neutralizing antibody titers, which eliminated vaccine dose-dependency in the antibody response. Mice immunized with the CIA06-adjuvanted Greenflu-S showed Th1-type-predominant cytokine profiles, and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were induced. Immunization of mice with the CIA06-adjuvanted vaccine reduced the mortality and morbidity of mice upon lethal challenges with influenza virus, and no excessive inflammatory responses were observed in the lung tissues of the immunized mice after viral infection. These data suggest that the dLOS-based adjuvant system CIA06 can be used to promote the immune responses to influenza vaccine or to spare antigen dose without causing harmful inflammatory responses. PMID:27891512

  1. A Prospective Study of the Factors Shaping Antibody Responses to the AS03-Adjuvanted Influenza A/H1N1 Vaccine in Cancer Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Hottinger, Andreas F.; George, Anne-Claude C.; Bel, Michael; Favet, Laurence; Combescure, Christophe; Meier, Sara; Grillet, Stéphane; Posfay-Barbe, Klara; Kaiser, Laurent; Siegrist, Claire-Anne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the determinants of antibody responses to adjuvanted influenza A/H1N1/09 vaccines in a cohort of cancer outpatients. Patients and Methods. Patients with cancer and controls were enrolled in a prospective single-center field study. Two doses of AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine were administered to patients and one dose was administered to controls. Antibody responses were measured using hemagglutination inhibition and confirmed by microneutralization. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) and seroprotection rates (defined as GMTs ≥40) were compared. Results. Immunizations were safe and well tolerated in 197 cancer patients (lymphoma, 57; glioma, 26; lung or head and neck, 37; gastrointestinal, 41; breast, 36) and 138 controls. Similar seroprotection rates (82.3% versus 87%) and GMTs (336.9 versus 329.9) were achieved after two doses of adjuvanted vaccine in cancer patients and one dose in controls. Univariate analyses identified older age, prior immunization against seasonal influenza, lymphoma, CD4 count, active chemotherapy, and rituximab and steroid treatments as being associated with weaker antibody responses. However, only age and chemotherapy plus rituximab remained independent determinants of vaccine responses in multivariate analyses. Conclusions. Two doses of AS03-adjuvanted influenza vaccine elicited potent antibody responses in most cancer patients despite ongoing chemotherapy, with the exception of rituximab-induced B-cell depletion. Oncology patients treated in an outpatient setting benefit from preventive vaccination against influenza with adjuvanted vaccines. PMID:22357731

  2. Guillain-Barré syndrome and adjuvanted pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: multinational case-control study in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Dieleman, Jeanne; Romio, Silvana; Johansen, Kari; Weibel, Daniel; Bonhoeffer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Design Case-control study. Setting Five European countries. Participants 104 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant Miller-Fisher syndrome matched to one or more controls. Case status was classified according to the Brighton Collaboration definition. Controls were matched to cases on age, sex, index date, and country. Main outcome measures Relative risk estimate for Guillain-Barré syndrome after pandemic influenza vaccine. Results Case recruitment and vaccine coverage varied considerably between countries; the most common vaccines used were adjuvanted (Pandemrix and Focetria). The unadjusted pooled risk estimate for all countries was 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 6.0). After adjustment for influenza-like illness/upper respiratory tract infection and seasonal influenza vaccination, receipt of pandemic influenza vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (adjusted odds ratio 1.0, 0.3 to 2.7). The 95% confidence interval shows that the absolute effect of vaccination could range from one avoided case of Guillain-Barré syndrome up to three excess cases within six weeks after vaccination in one million people. Conclusions The risk of occurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome is not increased after pandemic influenza vaccine, although the upper limit does not exclude a potential increase in risk up to 2.7-fold or three excess cases per one million vaccinated people. When assessing the association between pandemic influenza vaccines and Guillain-Barré syndrome it is important to account for the effects of influenza-like illness/upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal influenza vaccination, and calendar time. PMID:21750072

  3. Increasing uptake of influenza vaccine by pregnant women post H1N1 pandemic: a longitudinal study in Melbourne, Australia, 2010 to 2014.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Pollock, Wendy Elizabeth; Tapper, Lauren; Sommerville, Maree; McDonald, Susan

    2015-03-05

    A Melbourne (Australia) university affiliated, tertiary obstetric hospital provides lay and professional education about influenza vaccine in pregnancy annually each March, early in the local influenza season. Responding to a 2011 survey of new mothers' opinions, the hospital made influenza vaccine freely available in antenatal clinics from 2012. We wished to determine influenza vaccination uptake during pregnancy with these strategies 5 years after 2009 H1N1. Face to face interviews based on US Center for Disease Control and Prevention Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System with new mothers in postnatal wards each July, 2010 to 2014. We calculated recalled influenza vaccine uptake each year and assessed trends with chi square tests, and logistic regression. We recorded 1086 interviews. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy increased by 6% per year (95% confidence interval 4 to 8%): from 29.6% in 2010 to 51.3% in 2014 (p < 0.001). Lack of discussion from maternity caregivers was a persistent reason for non-vaccination, recalled by 1 in 2 non-vaccinated women. Survey respondents preferred face to face consultations with doctors and midwives, internet and text messaging as information sources about influenza vaccination. Survey responses indicate messages about vaccine safety in pregnancy and infant benefits are increasingly being heeded. However, there was progressively lower awareness of maternal benefits of influenza vaccination, especially for women with risk factors for severe disease. We observed improving influenza vaccination during pregnancy. There is potential to integrate technology such as text message or internet with antenatal consultations to increase vaccination coverage further.

  4. Personal Decision-Making Criteria Related to Seasonal and Pandemic A(H1N1) Influenza-Vaccination Acceptance among French Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Bouadma, Lila; Barbier, François; Biard, Lucie; Esposito-Farèse, Marina; Le Corre, Bertrand; Macrez, Annick; Salomon, Laurence; Bonnal, Christine; Zanker, Caroline; Najem, Christophe; Mourvillier, Bruno; Lucet, Jean Christophe; Régnier, Bernard; Wolff, Michel; Tubach, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza-vaccination rates among healthcare workers (HCW) remain low worldwide, even during the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic. In France, this vaccination is free but administered on a voluntary basis. We investigated the factors influencing HCW influenza vaccination. Methods In June–July 2010, HCW from wards of five French hospitals completed a cross-sectional survey. A multifaceted campaign aimed at improving vaccination coverage in this hospital group was conducted before and during the 2009 pandemic. Using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, we assessed the relationships between seasonal (SIV) and pandemic (PIV) influenza vaccinations, and sociodemographic and professional characteristics, previous and current vaccination statuses, and 33 statements investigating 10 sociocognitive domains. The sociocognitive domains describing HCWs' SIV and PIV profiles were analyzed using the classification-and-regression–tree method. Results Of the HCWs responding to our survey, 1480 were paramedical and 401 were medical with 2009 vaccination rates of 30% and 58% for SIV and 21% and 71% for PIV, respectively (p<0.0001 for both SIV and PIV vaccinations). Older age, prior SIV, working in emergency departments or intensive care units, being a medical HCW and the hospital they worked in were associated with both vaccinations; while work shift was associated only with PIV. Sociocognitive domains associated with both vaccinations were self-perception of benefits and health motivation for all HCW. For medical HCW, being a role model was an additional domain associated with SIV and PIV. Conclusions Both vaccination rates remained low. Vaccination mainly depended on self-determined factors and for medical HCW, being a role model. PMID:22848342

  5. Influenza H1N1 (swine flu) vaccination: a safety surveillance feasibility study using self-reporting of serious adverse events and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Isla S; MacDonald, Thomas M; Shakir, Saad; Dryburgh, Moira; Mantay, Brian J; McDonnell, Patrick; Layton, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    AIMS During the global H1N1 influenza A (swine flu) pandemic 2009–2010, swine flu vaccines were expeditiously licensed and a mass vaccination programme for high risk groups, including pregnant women, was introduced in the UK. This pilot active safety surveillance study was performed to establish the feasibility of rapidly monitoring the new swine flu vaccines in large patient numbers receiving or offered the vaccination under normal conditions of use within a short time frame. METHODS A cohort design with safety data capture through modern technologies was carried out in Scotland, UK during the winter swine flu vaccination programme 2009–2010 in individuals receiving or offered the swine flu vaccination. The main outcome measures were self-reported serious adverse events (SAEs) and pregnancy outcomes. RESULTS The cohort comprised 4066 people; 3754 vaccinated and 312 offered the vaccination but not vaccinated. There were 939 self-reported events (838 different events), 53 judged to fit SAE criteria by the investigators, with nine judged as possibly, probably or definitely vaccine related. None of the seven deaths (six in vaccinees) were judged as vaccine related. One hundred and twenty-eight women reported 130 pregnancies during the study with 117 pregnant at study start. There were reports of four miscarriages in three women and six possible congenital abnormalities in live births. CONCLUSIONS Overall, no significant safety issues were identified. The methodology and use of modern technologies to collect safety data from large numbers of patients was successful and could be used again in similar safety studies. PMID:22082196

  6. Influenza H1N1 (swine flu) vaccination: a safety surveillance feasibility study using self-reporting of serious adverse events and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Isla S; MacDonald, Thomas M; Shakir, Saad; Dryburgh, Moira; Mantay, Brian J; McDonnell, Patrick; Layton, Deborah

    2012-05-01

    During the global H1N1 influenza A (swine flu) pandemic 2009-2010, swine flu vaccines were expeditiously licensed and a mass vaccination programme for high risk groups, including pregnant women, was introduced in the UK. This pilot active safety surveillance study was performed to establish the feasibility of rapidly monitoring the new swine flu vaccines in large patient numbers receiving or offered the vaccination under normal conditions of use within a short time frame. A cohort design with safety data capture through modern technologies was carried out in Scotland, UK during the winter swine flu vaccination programme 2009-2010 in individuals receiving or offered the swine flu vaccination. The main outcome measures were self-reported serious adverse events (SAEs) and pregnancy outcomes. The cohort comprised 4066 people; 3754 vaccinated and 312 offered the vaccination but not vaccinated. There were 939 self-reported events (838 different events), 53 judged to fit SAE criteria by the investigators, with nine judged as possibly, probably or definitely vaccine related. None of the seven deaths (six in vaccinees) were judged as vaccine related. One hundred and twenty-eight women reported 130 pregnancies during the study with 117 pregnant at study start. There were reports of four miscarriages in three women and six possible congenital abnormalities in live births. Overall, no significant safety issues were identified. The methodology and use of modern technologies to collect safety data from large numbers of patients was successful and could be used again in similar safety studies. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Efficiency of Points of Dispensing for Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccination, Los Angeles County, California, USA, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Brandon; Teutsch, Steven; Borse, Rebekah H.; Meltzer, Martin I.; Bagwell, DeeAnn; Plough, Alonzo; Fielding, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    During October 23–December 8, 2009, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health used points of dispensing (PODs) to improve access to and increase the number of vaccinations against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. We assessed the efficiency of these units and access to vaccines among ethnic groups. An average of 251 persons per hour (SE 65) were vaccinated at the PODs; a 10% increase in use of live-attenuated monovalent vaccines reduced that rate by 23 persons per hour (SE 7). Vaccination rates were highest for Asians (257/10,000 persons), followed by Hispanics (114/10,000), whites (75/100,000), and African Americans (37/10,000). Average distance traveled to a POD was highest for whites (6.6 miles; SD 6.5) and lowest for Hispanics (4.7 miles; SD ±5.3). Placing PODs in areas of high population density could be an effective strategy to reach large numbers of persons for mass vaccination, but additional PODs may be needed to improve coverage for specific populations. PMID:24656212

  8. Factors Affecting the Acceptance of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 Vaccine amongst Essential Service Providers: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Alice; Palmer, Katie; Rees, Emily; Riddell, Zoe; Roberts, Charlotte; Jordan, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Although mentioned in the UK pandemic plan, essential service providers were not among the priority groups. They may be important targets of future influenza pandemic vaccination campaigns. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among 380 employees from West Midlands police headquarters and 15 operational command units in the West Midlands Area during December 2009–February 2010 to identify factors affecting intention to accept the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. One hundred and ninety nine (52.4%) employees completed the questionnaire. 39.7% were willing to accept the vaccine. The most common reasons for intention to accept were worry about catching Swine Flu (n = 42, 53.2%) and about infecting others (n = 40, 50.6%). The most common reason for declination was worry about side effects (n = 45, 57.0%). The most important factor predicting vaccine uptake was previous receipt of seasonal vaccine (OR 7.9 (95% CI 3.4, 18.5)). Employees aged <40 years, males, current smokers, and those who perceived a greater threat and severity of swine flu were also more likely to agree to the vaccine. The findings of this study could be used to improve future pandemic immunization strategies. Targeted education programs should be used to address misconceptions; the single most important factor which might lead to a large improvement in uptake is to allay concern about side effects. PMID:26343848

  9. Opinion about seasonal influenza vaccination among the general population 3 years after the A(H1N1)pdm2009 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Boiron, Karine; Sarazin, Marianne; Debin, Marion; Raude, Jocelyn; Rossignol, Louise; Guerrisi, Caroline; Odinkemelu, Didi; Hanslik, Thomas; Colizza, Vittoria; Blanchon, Thierry

    2015-11-27

    To assess the opinions of the French general population about seasonal influenza vaccination three years after the A(H1N1)pdm 09 pandemic and identify factors associated with a neutral or negative opinion about this vaccination. The study was conducted using data collected from 5374 participants during the 2012/2013 season of the GrippeNet.fr study. The opinion about seasonal influenza vaccination was studied on three levels ("positive", "negative" or "neutral"). The link between the participant's characteristics and their opinion regarding the seasonal influenza vaccination were studied using a multinomial logistic regression with categorical variables. The "positive" opinion was used as the reference for identifying individuals being at risk of having a "neutral" or a "negative" opinion. Among the participants, 39% reported having a positive opinion about seasonal influenza vaccine, 39% a neutral opinion, and 22% a negative opinion. Factors associated with a neutral or negative opinion were young age, low educational level, lack of contact with sick or elderly individuals, lack of treatment for a chronic disease and taking a homeopathic preventive treatment. These results show that an important part of the French population does not have a positive opinion about influenza vaccination in France. Furthermore, it allows outlining the profiles of particularly reluctant individuals who could be targeted by informative campaigns. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Psychiatric comorbidity and cognitive profile in children with narcolepsy with or without association to the H1N1 influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Szakács, Attila; Hallböök, Tove; Tideman, Pontus; Darin, Niklas; Wentz, Elisabet

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidity and the cognitive profile in children and adolescents with narcolepsy in western Sweden and the relationship of these problems to H1N1 vaccination. Thirty-eight patients were included in the study. We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study to investigate psychiatric comorbidity using a test battery of semistructured interviews generating Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnoses, including the Development and Well-Being Assessment and the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder rating scale. The Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were used to screen for autistic traits and psychotic symptoms, respectively. The cognitive assessments were made by a clinical psychologist using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Third Edition, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition, or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition. In the post-H1N1 vaccination (PHV) narcolepsy group (n = 31), 43% of patients had psychiatric comorbidity, 29% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattentive type, 20% had major depression, 10% had general anxiety disorder, 7% had oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), 3% had pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (i.e., atypical autism), and 3% had eating disorder not otherwise specified (anorectic type). In the non-post-H1N1 vaccination (nPHV) narcolepsy group, one of seven patients had ADHD, inattentive type and ODD. The most frequent psychiatric symptom was temper tantrums, which occurred in 94% of the patients in the PHV group and 71% of the patients in the nPHV narcolepsy group. The cognitive assessment profile was similar in both groups and showed normal results for mean full-scale IQ and perceptual speed but decreased verbal comprehension and working memory. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity had a significantly lower full

  11. Humoral immune response to influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 in patients with natural infection and in vaccine recipients in the 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Takuji; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Nishimura, Naoko; Ozaki, Takao; Miyata, Akiko; Suzuki, Eitaro; Okafuji, Teruo; Okafuji, Takao; Ochiai, Hitoshi; Nagata, Nobuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Ihara, Toshiaki

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 mainly affected adolescents and children, and most of the elderly in Japan escaped clinical illness. To clarify the role of humoral immunity in the infection, the time kinetics of hemagglutination inhibition (HI), neutralization (NT), and IgG subclass antibody response directed against influenza A(H1N1)pdm2009 were analyzed in three consecutive specimens obtained from 51 young adults and children (group 1) who contracted pandemic influenza and from 74 pediatric clinic employees (group 2) inoculated with pandemic monovalent vaccine. In group 1 patients, 6 and 30 patients had lower HI and NT antibody in the acute phase respectively. Thereafter, HI and NT antibody titers increased fourfold or more in 50 patients with peak response in the third specimens obtained four weeks after the onset. IgG1 in 45 patients, IgG3 in 18 patients, and IgG4 in 29 patients showed elevated responses. Forty (54%) and 70 (95%) subjects in group 2 had positive HI and NT antibodies in the prevaccination samples, with increased antibody responses in the follow-up peaking in the second specimens. Forty of those vaccinated had increased IgG1 responses peaking in the third specimens, whereas elevated IgG3 was observed in 22 recipients with the highest level in the second samples. IgG4 did not show any increase in subjects in group 2. A few participants showed an IgG2 response in both groups. An immunologically naive population contracted influenza with apparent clinical symptoms. However, already primed subjects through subclinical infection elicited the unique pattern of IgG subclass responses by vaccination, which differed from those of naive populations.

  12. Efficacy and effectiveness of seasonal and pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 influenza vaccines in low and middle income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Breteler, Janna K; Tam, John S; Jit, Mark; Ket, Johannes C F; De Boer, Michiel R

    2013-10-25

    Influenza vaccines have been recommended for populations at risk for severe infection in low and middle income countries (LMICs) although knowledge of the evidence-base for their effectiveness and efficacy is limited in these countries. The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the evidence-base for the effectiveness and efficacy of influenza vaccines in LMICs and to explore critical knowledge gaps. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane were searched for seasonal and pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 influenza vaccine effectiveness and efficacy studies performed in LMICs. Eligible studies included RCTs and observational studies, published in English, French, Spanish or Portuguese between 1960 and 2011, which assessed laboratory-confirmed influenza and/or influenza-related outcomes in any population. Risk of bias was assessed by two reviewers independently. Random effects pooled estimates were obtained when sufficient data were available. A total of 6465 articles were screened. Forty-one studies were included on seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness and efficacy and one study on pandemic vaccine effectiveness. In middle income countries (MICs), efficacy of seasonal influenza vaccines was shown against laboratory-confirmed influenza in children (pooled efficacy 72% (95%CI: 65-77) and 81% (95%CI: 69-89), for one and two years follow-up respectively) and in the elderly (pooled efficacy 43% (95%CI: 25-56) and 58% (95%CI: 23-78), for live attenuated and inactivated vaccine respectively). Inactivated influenza vaccines were also found to be effective against cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary syndromes. Seasonal influenza vaccines can provide protection in children, the elderly and patients with coronary syndromes in MICs, and seem to be equally effective as compared to high income countries. Data for other high risk groups and from low income countries were limited or prone to bias, and are needed to further facilitate evidence-based decision making

  13. Evaluation of seasonal influenza vaccines for H1N1pdm09 and type B viruses based on a replication-incompetent PB2-KO virus.

    PubMed

    Ui, Hiroki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Uraki, Ryuta; Kiso, Maki; Oishi, Kohei; Murakami, Shin; Mimori, Shigetaka; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-04

    Vaccination is the first line of protection against influenza virus infection in humans. Although inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines are available, each vaccine has drawbacks in terms of immunogenicity and safety. To overcome these issues, our group has developed a replication-incompetent PB2-knockout (PB2-KO) influenza virus that replicates only in PB2-expressing cells. Here we generated PB2-KO viruses possessing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) segments from H1N1pdm09 or type B viruses and tested their vaccine potential. The two PB2-KO viruses propagated efficiently in PB2-expressing cells, and expressed chimeric HA as expected. Virus-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in mice immunized with the viruses, and the immunized mice showed milder clinical signs and/or lower virus replication levels in the respiratory tract upon virus challenge. Our results indicate that these PB2-KO viruses have potential as vaccine candidates.

  14. Risk of Narcolepsy after AS03 Adjuvanted Pandemic A/H1N1 2009 Influenza Vaccine in Adults: A Case-Coverage Study in England

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nicholas; Kosky, Christopher; Dennis, Gary; Eriksson, Sofia; Hall, Andrew; Leschziner, Guy; Reading, Paul; Shneerson, John M.; Donegan, Katherine; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: An increased risk of narcolepsy has been observed in children following ASO3-adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (Pandemrix) vaccine. We investigated whether this risk extends to adults in England. Methods: Six adult sleep centers in England were visited between November 2012 and February 2014 and vaccination/clinical histories obtained from general practitioners. Suspected narcolepsy cases aged older than 17 y were selected. The risk of narcolepsy following Pandemrix was calculated using cases diagnosed by the time of the center visits and those with a diagnosis by November 30, 2011 after which there was increased awareness of the risk in children. The odds of vaccination in cases and in matched population data were compared using a case-coverage design. Results: Of 1,446 possible cases identified, most had onset before 2009 or were clearly not narcolepsy. Of the 60 remaining cases, 20 were excluded after expert review, leaving 40 cases with narcolepsy; 5 had received Pandemrix between 3 and 18 mo before onset. All the vaccinated cases had cataplexy, two received a diagnosis by November 2011 and two were aged 40 y or older. The odds ratio for vaccination in cases compared to the population was 4.24 (95% confidence interval 1.45–12.38) using all cases and 9.06 (1.90–43.17) using cases with a diagnosis by November 2011, giving an attributable risk of 0.59 cases per 100,000 doses. Conclusions: We found a significantly increased risk of narcolepsy in adults following Pandemrix vaccination in England. The risk was lower than that seen in children using a similar study design. Citation: Stowe J, Andrews N, Kosky C, Dennis G, Eriksson S, Hall A, Leschziner G, Reading P, Shneerson JM, Donegan K, Miller E. Risk of narcolepsy after AS03 adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza vaccine in adults: a case-coverage study in England. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1051–1057. PMID:26856903

  15. Comparative study of lymphocytes from individuals that were vaccinated and unvaccinated against the pandemic 2009-2011 H1N1 influenza virus in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Deise Nascimento de; Isaía, Henrique Ataíde; Henzel, Andréia; Simão, Eder; Gassen, Rodrigo Benedetti; Rodrigues Junior, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    While no single factor is sufficient to guarantee the success of influenza vaccine programs, knowledge of the levels of immunity in local populations is critical. Here, we analyzed influenza immunity in a population from Southern Brazil, a region with weather conditions that are distinct from those in the rest of country, where influenza infections are endemic, and where greater than 50% of the population is vaccinated annually. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 40 individuals. Of these, 20 had received the H1N1 vaccine, while the remaining 20 were unvaccinated against the disease. Cells were stimulated in vitro with the trivalent post-pandemic influenza vaccine or with conserved major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) peptides derived from hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Cell viability was then analyzed by [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide)]-based colorimetric assay (MTT), and culture supernatants were assayed for helper T type 1 (Th1) and Th2-specific cytokine levels. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated, but not unvaccinated, individuals exhibited significant proliferation in vitro in the presence of a cognate influenza antigen. After culturing with vaccine antigens, cells from vaccinated individuals produced similar levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ, while those from unvaccinated individuals produced higher levels of IFN-γ than of IL-10. Our data indicate that peripheral blood lymphocytes from vaccinated individuals are stimulated upon encountering a cognate antigen, but did not support the hypothesis that cross-reactive responses related to previous infections can ameliorate the immune response. Moreover, monitoring IL-10 production in vaccinated individuals could comprise a valuable tool for predicting disease evolution.

  16. Immunogenicity and Cross Protection in Mice Afforded by Pandemic H1N1 Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Containing Wild-Type Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Petukhova, Galina; Korenkov, Daniil; Losev, Igor; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    Since conserved viral proteins of influenza virus, such as nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 protein, are the main targets for virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), we hypothesized that introduction of the NP gene of wild-type virus into the genome of vaccine reassortants could lead to better immunogenicity and afford better protection. This paper describes in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies of two new reassortants of pandemic H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) candidates. One had the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from A/South Africa/3626/2013 H1N1 wild-type virus on the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 master donor virus backbone (6 : 2 formulation) while the second had the HA, NA, and NP genes of the wild-type virus on the same backbone (5 : 3 formulation). Although both LAIVs induced similar antibody immune responses, the 5 : 3 LAIV provoked greater production of virus-specific CTLs than the 6 : 2 variant. Furthermore, the 5 : 3 LAIV-induced CTLs had higher in vivo cytotoxic activity, compared to 6 : 2 LAIV. Finally, the 5 : 3 LAIV candidate afforded greater protection against infection and severe illness than the 6 : 2 LAIV. Inclusion in LAIV of the NP gene from wild-type influenza virus is a new approach to inducing cross-reactive cell-mediated immune responses and cross protection against pandemic influenza. PMID:28210631

  17. Effect of a polysaccharide from Poria cocos on humoral response in mice immunized by H1N1 influenza and HBsAg vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yajun; Li, Shuai; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Chunzhi; Ma, Hao; Zhao, Xiunan; Wu, Junhua; Liu, Kunlu; Shan, Junjie; Wang, Yuxia

    2016-10-01

    Poria cocos has a long history of medicinal use in China. Polysaccharides and their derivatives in the medicine exhibit many beneficial biological activities including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiviral activities. In this study, a new polysaccharide (PCP-II) was isolated from sclerotium of Poria cocos. Its physico-chemical characters were identified and its adjuvant activity was investigated in mice co-immunized with H1N1 influenza vaccine and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The results revealed that PCP-II has a molecular weight of 29.0kDa. It was composed of fucose, mannose, glucose and galactose in molar ration of 1.00:1.63:0.16:6.29 respectively. Pharmacological data demonstrated that PCP-II increased antigen-specific antibody levels in mice immunized with influenza vaccine. PCP-II also elicited anti-HBsAg antibodies at significantly higher titers and generated robust and durable immunity compared to mice immunized with HBsAg-alum following two administrations. PCP-II improved proliferation of splenocytes, stimulated IL-12p70 and TNF-α productions in dendritic cells and macrophages respectively. These results suggested that PCP-II-adjuvanted vaccines enhanced humoral and cellular immunity. PCP-II could be developed as an efficacious adjuvant in human and animal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete Protection against Influenza Virus H1N1 Strain A/PR/8/34 Challenge in Mice Immunized with Non-Adjuvanted Novirhabdovirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Rouxel, Ronan N.; Mérour, Emilie; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Brémont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Novirhabdoviruses like Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) are fish-infecting Rhabdoviruses belonging to the Mononegavirales order. By reverse genetics, we previously showed that a recombinant VHSV expressing the West Nile Virus (WNV) E glycoprotein could serve as a vaccine platform against WNV. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of the Novirhabdovirus platform as a vaccine against influenza virus. Recombinant Novirhabdoviruses, rVHSV-HA and rIHNV-HA, expressing at the viral surface the hemagglutinin HA ectodomain were generated and used to immunized mice. We showed that mice immunized with either, rVHSV-HA or rIHNV-HA, elicited a strong neutralizing antibody response against influenza virus. A complete protection was conferred to the immunized mice when challenged with a lethal dose of influenza H1N1 A/PR/8/34 virus. Furthermore we showed that although acting as inert antigen in mice, since naturally inactivated over 20°C, mice immunized with rVHSV-HA or rIHNV-HA in the absence of adjuvant were also completely protected from a lethal challenge. Novirhabdoviruses platform are of particular interest as vaccines for mammals since they are cost effective to produce, relatively easy to generate and very effective to protect immunized animals. PMID:27711176

  19. Effects of immunizing school children with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) monovalent vaccine on absenteeism among students and teachers in Maine.

    PubMed

    Graitcer, Samuel B; Dube, Nancy L; Basurto-Davila, Ricardo; Smith, Peter F; Ferdinands, Jill; Thompson, Mark; Uzicanin, Amra; Gargiullo, Paul; Chaves, Sandra S; Robinson, Sara; Sears, Stephen; Tipton, Meredith; Monto, Arnold S; Mills, Dora; Shay, David K

    2012-07-06

    The overall and indirect effects of immunizing school children with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic virus vaccine prior to and during the peak of virus circulation were evaluated on student and teacher school absenteeism. We used records collected from late 2009 through early 2010 from schools in four Maine counties. Mixed logistic regression models were used to estimate the daily association between school-level immunization coverage and absenteeism by level of influenza activity, after adjusting for the proportion of students receiving reduced-cost lunches, student minority status, absences adjacent to weekends and Thanksgiving, rural school location, and the circulation of other respiratory viruses. Increasing student immunization coverage was associated with reduced absenteeism during periods of high influenza activity. For example, as immunization coverage during the peak week of pandemic virus circulation increased from 38% to 69% (the 10th and 90th percentiles of observed coverage, respectively), relative reductions in daily absenteeism among all students, unimmunized students, and teachers were 8.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.5, 9.9), 5.7% (95% CI: 4.2, 7.3), and 8.7% (95% CI: 1.3, 16), respectively. Increased vaccination coverage among school-aged Maine children had modest overall and indirect effects on student and teacher absenteeism, despite vaccination occurring just prior and during peak pandemic virus circulation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Risk of Narcolepsy after AS03 Adjuvanted Pandemic A/H1N1 2009 Influenza Vaccine in Adults: A Case-Coverage Study in England.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nicholas; Kosky, Christopher; Dennis, Gary; Eriksson, Sofia; Hall, Andrew; Leschziner, Guy; Reading, Paul; Shneerson, John M; Donegan, Katherine; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    An increased risk of narcolepsy has been observed in children following ASO3-adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (Pandemrix) vaccine. We investigated whether this risk extends to adults in England. Six adult sleep centers in England were visited between November 2012 and February 2014 and vaccination/clinical histories obtained from general practitioners. Suspected narcolepsy cases aged older than 17 y were selected. The risk of narcolepsy following Pandemrix was calculated using cases diagnosed by the time of the center visits and those with a diagnosis by November 30, 2011 after which there was increased awareness of the risk in children. The odds of vaccination in cases and in matched population data were compared using a case-coverage design. Of 1,446 possible cases identified, most had onset before 2009 or were clearly not narcolepsy. Of the 60 remaining cases, 20 were excluded after expert review, leaving 40 cases with narcolepsy; 5 had received Pandemrix between 3 and 18 mo before onset. All the vaccinated cases had cataplexy, two received a diagnosis by November 2011 and two were aged 40 y or older. The odds ratio for vaccination in cases compared to the population was 4.24 (95% confidence interval 1.45-12.38) using all cases and 9.06 (1.90-43.17) using cases with a diagnosis by November 2011, giving an attributable risk of 0.59 cases per 100,000 doses. We found a significantly increased risk of narcolepsy in adults following Pandemrix vaccination in England. The risk was lower than that seen in children using a similar study design. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. High proportions of regulatory B and T cells are associated with decreased cellular responses to pH1N1 influenza vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth (IMPAACT P1088).

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Petzold, Elizabeth; Anthony, Patricia; Cunningham, Coleen K; Spector, Stephen A; Nachman, Sharon; Siberry, George K; Handelsman, Edward; Flynn, Patricia M

    2013-05-01

    HIV-infected individuals have poor responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. To evaluate the potential role of regulatory T (Treg) and B cells (Breg), we analyzed their correlation with humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to pandemic influenza (pH1N1) monovalent vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth. Seventy-four HIV-infected, 4- to 25-y old participants in a 2-dose pH1N1 vaccine study had circulating and pH1N1-stimulated Treg and Breg measured by flow cytometry at baseline, post-dose 1 and post-dose 2. Concomitantly, CMI was measured by ELISPOT and flow cytometry; and antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). At baseline, most of the participants had pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses, whose magnitude positively correlated with the baseline pH1N1, but not with seasonal H1N1 HAI titers. pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses did not change post-dose 1 and significantly decreased post-dose 2. In contrast, circulating CD4+CD25+% and CD4+FOXP3+% Treg increased after vaccination. The decrease in IFNγ ELISPOT results was marginally associated with higher pH1N1-specific CD19+FOXP3+ and CD4+TGFβ+% Breg and Treg, respectively. In contrast, increases in HAI titers post-dose 1 were associated with significantly higher circulating CD19+CD25+% post-dose 1, whereas increases in IFNγ ELISPOT results post-dose 1 were associated with higher circulating CD4+/C8+CD25+FOXP3+%. In conclusion, in HIV-infected children and youth, influenza-specific Treg and Breg may contribute to poor responses to vaccination. However, robust humoral and CMI responses to vaccination may result in increased circulating Treg and/or Breg, establishing a feed-back mechanism.

  2. High proportions of regulatory B and T cells are associated with decreased cellular responses to pH1N1 influenza vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth (IMPAACT P1088)

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Petzold, Elizabeth; Anthony, Patricia; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Spector, Stephen A.; Nachman, Sharon; Siberry, George K.; Handelsman, Edward; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals have poor responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. To evaluate the potential role of regulatory T (Treg) and B cells (Breg), we analyzed their correlation with humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to pandemic influenza (pH1N1) monovalent vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth. Seventy-four HIV-infected, 4- to 25-y old participants in a 2-dose pH1N1 vaccine study had circulating and pH1N1-stimulated Treg and Breg measured by flow cytometry at baseline, post-dose 1 and post-dose 2. Concomitantly, CMI was measured by ELISPOT and flow cytometry; and antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). At baseline, most of the participants had pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses, whose magnitude positively correlated with the baseline pH1N1, but not with seasonal H1N1 HAI titers. pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses did not change post-dose 1 and significantly decreased post-dose 2. In contrast, circulating CD4+CD25+% and CD4+FOXP3+% Treg increased after vaccination. The decrease in IFNγ ELISPOT results was marginally associated with higher pH1N1-specific CD19+FOXP3+ and CD4+TGFβ+% Breg and Treg, respectively. In contrast, increases in HAI titers post-dose 1 were associated with significantly higher circulating CD19+CD25+% post-dose 1, whereas increases in IFNγ ELISPOT results post-dose 1 were associated with higher circulating CD4+/C8+CD25+FOXP3+%. In conclusion, in HIV-infected children and youth, influenza-specific Treg and Breg may contribute to poor responses to vaccination. However, robust humoral and CMI responses to vaccination may result in increased circulating Treg and/or Breg, establishing a feed-back mechanism. PMID:23370281

  3. Upregulation of IL-21 Receptor on B Cells and IL-21 Secretion Distinguishes Novel 2009 H1N1 Vaccine Responders from Nonresponders among HIV-Infected Persons on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pallikkuth, Suresh; Kanthikeel, Sudheesh Pilakka; Silva, Sandra Y.; Fischl, Margaret; Pahwa, Rajendra; Pahwa, Savita

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying failure of novel 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine-induced Ab responses in HIV-infected persons are poorly understood. This study prospectively evaluated 16 HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy and eight healthy controls (HC) who received a single 15 μg dose of nonadjuvanted novel 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine during the 2009 H1N1 epidemic. Peripheral blood was collected at baseline (T0) and at 7 d (T1) and 28 d (T2) postvaccination for evaluation of immune responses. Prevaccination hemagglutination inhibition Ab titer was <1:20 in all except one study participant. At T2, all HC and 8 out of 16 patients (50%) developed a vaccine-induced Ab titer of ≥1:40. Vaccine responder (R) and vaccine nonresponder patients were comparable at T0 in age, CD4 counts, virus load, and B cell immunophenotypic characteristics. At T2, HC and R patients developed an expansion of phenotypic and functional memory B cells and ex vivo H1N1-stimulated IgG Ab-secreting cells in an ELISPOT assay. The memory B cell response was preceded by a significant expansion of plasmablasts and spontaneous H1N1-specific Ab-secreting cells at T1. At T2, HC and R patients also exhibited significant increases in serum IL-21 levels and in the frequency and mean fluorescence intensity of IL-21R–expressing B cells, which correlated with serum H1N1 Ab titers. Vaccine nonresponder patients failed to develop the above-described vaccine-induced immunologic responses. The novel association of novel 2009 H1N1 vaccine-induced Ab responses with IL-21/IL-21R upregulation and with development of memory B cells and plasmablasts has implications for future research in vaccine design. PMID:21531891

  4. Narcolepsy, 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic influenza, and pandemic influenza vaccinations: what is known and unknown about the neurological disorder, the role for autoimmunity, and vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Schur, Peter H; MacDonald, Noni E; Steinman, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The vaccine safety surveillance system effectively detected a very rare adverse event, narcolepsy, in subjects receiving AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the European inactivation/purification protocol. The reports of increased cases of narcolepsy in non-vaccinated subjects infected with wild A(H1N1) pandemic influenza virus suggest a role for the viral antigen(s) in disease development. However, additional investigations are needed to better understand what factor(s) in wild influenza infection trigger(s) narcolepsy in susceptible hosts. An estimated 31 million doses of European AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine were used in more than 47 countries. The Canadian AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine was used with high coverage in Canada where an estimated 12 million doses were administered. As no similar narcolepsy association has been reported to date with the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine made using the Canadian inactivation/purification protocol, this suggests that the AS03 adjuvant alone may not be responsible for the narcolepsy association. To date, no narcolepsy association has been reported with the MF59®-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine. This review article provides a brief background on narcolepsy, outlines the different types of vaccine preparations including the ones for influenza, reviews the accumulated evidence for the safety of adjuvants, and explores the association between autoimmune diseases and natural infections. It concludes by assimilating the historical observations and recent clinical studies to formulate a feasible hypothesis on why vaccine-associated narcolepsy may not be solely linked to the AS03 adjuvant but more likely be linked to how the specific influenza antigen component of the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccine was prepared. Careful and long-term epidemiological studies of subjects who developed narcolepsy in association with AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1) pandemic vaccine prepared with

  5. One dose of an MF59-adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N1 vaccine recruits pre-existing immune memory and induces the rapid rise of neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Faenzi, Elisa; Zedda, Luisanna; Bardelli, Monia; Spensieri, Fabiana; Borgogni, Erica; Volpini, Gianfranco; Buricchi, Francesca; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Montanaro, Fabio; Belli, Riccardo; Lattanzi, Maria; Piccirella, Simona; Montomoli, Emanuele; Ahmed, Syed Sohail; Rappuoli, Rino; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Finco, Oretta; Castellino, Flora; Galli, Grazia

    2012-06-08

    Protective antibody responses to a single dose of 2009 pandemic vaccines have been observed in the majority of healthy subjects aged more than 3 years. These findings suggest that immune memory lymphocytes primed by previous exposure to seasonal influenza antigens are recruited in the response to A/H1N1 pandemic vaccines and allow rapid seroconversion. However, a clear dissection of the immune memory components favoring a fast response to pandemic vaccination is still lacking. Here we report the results from a clinical study where antibody, CD4+ T cell, plasmablast and memory B cell responses to one dose of an MF59-adjuvanted A/H1N1 pandemic vaccine were analyzed in healthy adults. While confirming the rapid appearance of antibodies neutralizing the A/H1N1 pandemic virus, we show here that the response is dominated by IgG-switched antibodies already in the first week after vaccination. In addition, we found that vaccination induces the rapid expansion of pre-existing CD4+ T cells and IgG-memory B lymphocytes cross-reactive to seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 antigens. These data shed light on the different components of the immune response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination and may have implications in the design of vaccination strategies against future influenza pandemics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of live, attenuated H1N1 and H3N2 cold-adapted and avian-human influenza A reassortant viruses and inactivated virus vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Sears, S D; Clements, M L; Betts, R F; Maassab, H F; Murphy, B R; Snyder, M H

    1988-12-01

    The infectivity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live, attenuated influenza A/Texas/1/85 (H1N1) and A/Bethesda/1/85 (H3N2) avian-human (ah) and cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccines were compared in 252 seronegative adult volunteers. The immunogenicity and efficacy of the H1N1 reassortant vaccine were also compared with those of the trivalent inactivated virus vaccine. Each reassortant vaccine was satisfactorily attenuated. The 50% human infectious dose was 10(4.9) for ca H1N1, 10(5.4) for ah H1N1, 10(6.4) for ca H3N2, and 10(6.5) TCID50 for ah H3N2 reassortant virus. Within a subtype, the immunogenicities of ah and ca vaccines were comparable. Five to seven weeks after vaccination, volunteers were challenged with homologous wild-type influenza A virus. The magnitude of shedding of virus after challenge was greater than 100-fold less in H1N1 vaccinees and greater than 10-fold less in H3N2 vaccinees compared with unimmunized controls. The vaccines were equally efficacious, as indicated by an 86%-100% reduction in illness. Thus, the ah A/Mallard/New York/6750/78 and the ca A/Ann Arbor/6/60 reassortant viruses are comparable.

  7. Evaluation of the attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a live virus vaccine generated by codon-pair bias de-optimization of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Andrew J.; Santos, Celia P.; Anafu, Amanda; Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Codon-pair bias de-optimization (CPBD) of viruses involves re-writing viral genes using statistically underrepresented codon pairs, without any changes to the amino acid sequence or codon usage. Previously, this technology has been used to attenuate the influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus. The de-optimized virus was immunogenic and protected inbred mice from challenge. In order to assess whether CPBD could be used to produce a live vaccine against a clinically relevant influenza virus, we generated an influenza A/California/07/2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus with de-optimized HA and NA gene segments (2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)Min), and evaluated viral replication and protein expression in MDCK cells, and attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy in outbred ferrets. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)Min virus grew to a similar titer as the 2009 pH1N1 wild type (wt) virus in MDCK cells (~106 TCID50/ml), despite reduced HA and NA protein expression on western blot. In ferrets, intranasal inoculation of 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)Min virus at doses ranging from 103 to 105 TCID50 led to seroconversion in all animals and protection from challenge with the 2009 pH1N1 wt virus 28 days later. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)Min virus did not cause clinical illness in ferrets, but replicated to a similar titer as the wt virus in the upper and lower respiratory tract, suggesting that de-optimization of additional gene segments may be warranted for improved attenuation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the potential of using CPBD technology for the development of a live influenza virus vaccine if the level of attenuation is optimized. PMID:26655630

  8. Factors associated with receipt of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccination among school-aged children: Maricopa County, Arizona, 2009-2010 influenza season.

    PubMed

    Baty, Steven A; Ayala, Aurimar; Odish, Mazen; Cadwell, Betsy L; Schumacher, Mare; Sunenshine, Rebecca H

    2013-01-01

    To target school-aged children (SAC), who were identified as a priority for pandemic 2009 Influenza A (pH1N1) vaccination, Maricopa County (MC) initiated school-based influenza vaccination in 69% of its 706 schools during the 2009-2010 influenza season. To determine factors associated with receipt of pH1N1 monovalent and 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccination among SAC and evaluate the association of school-based vaccination with vaccination status of SAC. Random-digit dialing was used to survey 600 MC households with willing adult participants and children grades K-12. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with pH1N1 and seasonal vaccine receipt. Arizona. Household adults with children grades K-12. Characteristics of children, parents, and households were obtained. Among 909 SAC, 402 (44%) received pH1N1 and 436 (48%) received seasonal vaccination. Factors associated with pH1N1 vaccination included vaccine availability at school (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-2.7), high-risk medical condition in child (AOR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4-4.0), elementary versus high school attendance (AOR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0-2.7), and seasonal influenza vaccination (AOR: 10.0; 95% CI: 6.4-15.6). Factors associated with seasonal vaccination included Hispanic ethnicity (AOR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.2), health insurance coverage (AOR: 4.8; 95% CI: 1.7-13.7), elementary versus high school attendance (AOR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.0-2.5), and pH1N1 vaccination (AOR: 10.5; 95% CI: 6.7-16.6). Availability of pH1N1 vaccine at school was independently associated with pH1N1 vaccination of MC school-aged children. School-based influenza vaccination campaigns should be considered to increase vaccination among this population.

  9. Autoantibodies against ganglioside GM3 are associated with narcolepsy-cataplexy developing after Pandemrix vaccination against 2009 pandemic H1N1 type influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Anna-Helena; Vuorela, Arja; Freitag, Tobias L; Pizza, Fabio; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Partinen, Markku; Vaarala, Outi; Meri, Seppo

    2015-09-01

    Following the mass vaccinations against pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus in 2009, a sudden increase in juvenile onset narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) was detected in several European countries where AS03-adjuvanted Pandemrix vaccine had been used. NC is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. In human NC, the hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus or the hypocretin signaling pathway are destroyed by an autoimmune reaction. Both genetic (e.g. HLA-DQB1*0602) and environmental risk factors (e.g. Pandemrix) contribute to the disease development, but the underlying and the mediating immunological mechanisms are largely unknown. Influenza virus hemagglutinin is known to bind gangliosides, which serve as host cell virus receptors. Anti-ganglioside antibodies have previously been linked to various neurological disorders, like the Guillain-Barré syndrome which may develop after infection or vaccination. Because of these links we screened sera of NC patients and controls for IgG anti-ganglioside antibodies against 11 human brain gangliosides (GM1, GM2, GM3, GM4, GD1a, GD1b, GD2, GD3, GT1a, GT1b, GQ1b) and a sulfatide by using a line blot assay. Samples from 173 children and adolescents were analyzed: 48 with Pandemrix-associated NC, 20 with NC without Pandemrix association, 57 Pandemrix-vaccinated and 48 unvaccinated healthy children. We found that patients with Pandemrix-associated NC had more frequently (14.6%) anti-GM3 antibodies than vaccinated healthy controls (3.5%) (P = 0.047). Anti-GM3 antibodies were significantly associated with HLA-DQB1*0602 (P = 0.016) both in vaccinated NC patients and controls. In general, anti-ganglioside antibodies were more frequent in vaccinated (18.1%) than in unvaccinated (7.3%) individuals (P = 0.035). Our data suggest that autoimmunity against GM3 is a feature of Pandemrix-associated NC and that autoantibodies against gangliosides were induced by Pandemrix vaccination

  10. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of a shear-thinning recoverable peptide hydrogel from native sequences and application for influenza H1N1 vaccine adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hongzhou; Shi, Jishu; Laskin, Julia; Liu, Ziyan; McVey, David S.; Sun, Xiuzhi S.

    2011-10-07

    Peptide hydrogels are considered injectable materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Most published hydrogel-forming sequences contain either alternating-charged and noncharged residues or amphiphilic blocks. Here, we report a self-assembling peptide, h9e (FLIVIGSIIGPGGDGPGGD), designed by rationally combining two native sequences from an elastic segment of spider silk and a trans-membrane segment of human muscle L-type calcium channel. The turning segment GSII of h9e promoted hydrogel formation in both Ca2+ solution and acidic pH conditions at water content greater than 99.5%. Although h9e Ca2+ hydrogel and h9e acidic hydrogel have the same sequence, they have distinct physical properties. The shear-thinning, rapid-strengthrecovering h9e Ca2+ hydrogel was used as an H1N1 influenza vaccine adjuvant. The h9e adjuvant was biologically safe and improved immune response by 70% compared with an oil-based commercial adjuvant.

  12. Medical students' participation in the 2009 Novel H1N1 influenza vaccination administration: policy alternatives for effective student utilization to enhance surge capacity in disasters.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Heather E; Barnett, Daniel J; Hayanga, Awori J; Brown, Meghan E; Filak, Andrew T

    2011-06-01

    As cases of 2009 novel H1N1 influenza became prevalent in Cincinnati, Ohio, Hamilton County Public Health called upon the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine to enhance its surge capacity in vaccination administration. Although the collaboration was well organized, it became evident that a system should exist for medical students' involvement in disaster response and recovery efforts in advance of a disaster. Therefore, 5 policy alternatives for effective utilization of medical students in disaster-response efforts have been examined: maintaining the status quo, enhancing the Medical Reserve Corps, creating medical school-based disaster-response units, using students within another selected disaster-response organization, or devising an entirely new plan for medical students' utilization. The intent of presenting these policy alternatives is to foster a policy dialogue around creating a more formalized approach for integrating medical students into disaster surge capacity-enhancement strategies. Using medical students to supplement the current and future workforce may help substantially in achieving goals related to workforce requirements. Discussions will be necessary to translate policy into practice.

  13. Revisiting the 1976 "swine flu" vaccine clinical trials: cross-reactive hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antibodies and their role in protection against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Li, Xing; Gao, Jin; Lin, Zhengshi; Jing, Xianghong; Plant, Ewan; Zoueva, Olga; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Ye, Zhiping

    2011-12-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses are genetically similar to A/New Jersey/76 H1N1 virus (NJ/76), the strain selected for the 1976 "swine flu" vaccines. Approximately 45 million people in the United States were vaccinated against NJ/76 30 years ago, but the impact of this nationwide immunization on the current pandemic is largely unknown. Archived human serum samples collected during the 1976 swine flu vaccine trials were assessed for cross-reactive antibody responses to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses. Administration of an NJ/76 monovalent vaccine or the combination of a bivalent vaccine (NJ/76 H1N1 and A/Victoria/75 H3N2) plus a B/Hong Kong/72 monovalent vaccine increased hemagglutinin inhibition (HAI) and neuraminidase inhibition (NAI) antibodies cross-reacting with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses. We showed that cross-reactive human HAI antibodies elicited by the 1976 swine flu vaccination played a dominant role in protecting recipient mice against the wild-type A/California/04/2009. Cross-reactive human NAI antibodies were also protective in recipient mice after a lethal challenge with a hemagglutinin mismatched virus bearing the A/California/04/2009 neuraminidase gene. Transfer of human serum samples with an original HAI titer of 43 or an original NAI titer of 472 was estimated to protect 50% of recipient mice from a lethal infection under the experimental conditions described. The 1976 swine flu vaccination induced cross-reactive HAI and NAI antibodies that were functionally protective in mice, suggesting that this vaccination campaign might have had a positive impact on older adults (≥50 years) in the United States during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

  14. Profiling of Humoral Response to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection and Vaccination Measured by a Protein Microarray in Persons with and without History of Seasonal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Reimerink, Johan; Mulder, Paul G. H.; van Beek, Janko; Meijer, Adam; de Bruin, Erwin; Friesema, Ingrid; de Jong, Menno D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Rossen, John W. A.; Koopmans, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Background The influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination on the antibody response produced by natural infection or vaccination is not well understood. Methods We compared the profiles of antibody responses of 32 naturally infected subjects and 98 subjects vaccinated with a 2009 influenza A(H1N1) monovalent MF59-adjuvanted vaccine (Focetria®, Novartis), with and without a history of seasonal influenza vaccination. Antibodies were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and by protein microarray (PA) using the HA1 subunit for seven recent and historic H1, H2 and H3 influenza viruses, and three avian influenza viruses. Serum samples for the infection group were taken at the moment of collection of the diagnostic sample, 10 days and 30 days after onset of influenza symptoms. For the vaccination group, samples were drawn at baseline, 3 weeks after the first vaccination and 5 weeks after the second vaccination. Results We showed that subjects with a history of seasonal vaccination generally exhibited higher baseline titers for the various HA1 antigens than subjects without a seasonal vaccination history. Infection and pandemic influenza vaccination responses in persons with a history of seasonal vaccination were skewed towards historic antigens. Conclusions Seasonal vaccination is of significant influence on the antibody response to subsequent infection and vaccination, and further research is needed to understand the effect of annual vaccination on protective immunity. PMID:23365683

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Belanov, Sergei S.; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E.

    2015-01-01

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009–2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009–2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates. PMID:26615216

  16. Pandemic influenza A H1N1 vaccine in recipients of solid organ transplants: immunogenicity and tolerability outcomes after vero cell derived, non-adjuvanted, whole-virion vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lagler, Heimo; Wenisch, Judith M; Tobudic, Selma; Gualdoni, Guido A; Rödler, Susanne; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, Susanne; Jaksch, Peter; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Popow-Kraupp, Theresia; Burgmann, Heinz

    2011-09-16

    During the 2009/10 pandemic of influenza A (H1N1), the American Society of Transplantation and other health organizations recommended that immunocompromised patients should be vaccinated as the key preventive measure. Since there are no data available for the immunogenicity of the unadjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine in immunocompromised patients - as opposed to the adjuvanted preparation - the objective of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity of an adjuvant-free H1N1 vaccine in recipients of solid organ transplants. Patients were recruited at the Vienna General Hospital, Austria. The vaccination schedule consisted of 2 doses of a whole-virion, vero cell derived, inactivated, non-adjuvanted influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) vaccine given with an interval of 3 weeks. A hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay on blood samples obtained prior to the first and after each vaccination was used for serologic analysis. The primary immunologic endpoint was the seroconversion rate, defined as the proportion of subjects with an individual 4-fold increase in HI titer of at least 1:40. In addition, virus-specific IgG antibodies to the pandemic H1N1 strain were measured using a commercially available ELISA. Twenty-five organ transplant patients (16 males, 9 females) aged 25-79 years were vaccinated and provided blood samples for serologic analysis. The time elapsed since transplantation was 10 months to 25 years (mean: 9 years; 95% CI 6-13 years). The vaccine was well tolerated and no local adverse events were noticed. After two vaccinations 37% of the patients demonstrated seroconversion in the HI assay as defined above and 70% had virus-specific IgG antibodies. Among the HI vaccine responders were 6 of 14 heart transplant recipients and 1 of 4 liver transplant recipients. The number and type of immunosuppressive agents did not significantly differ in their effect on the immune response. Our results show that the novel vero cell derived and adjuvant-free pandemic

  17. Modifications in the Polymerase Genes of a Swine-Like Triple-Reassortant Influenza Virus To Generate Live Attenuated Vaccines against 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Lindomar; Vincent, Amy L.; Ye, Jianqiang; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice R.; Angel, Matthew; Lorusso, Alessio; Gauger, Philip C.; Janke, Bruce H.; Loving, Crystal L.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    On 11 June 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus is the predominant influenza virus strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers and infected turkeys and swine in several countries. Thus, the development of a vaccine that is effective in multiple animal species is urgently needed. We have previously demonstrated that the introduction of temperature-sensitive mutations into the PB2 and PB1 genes of an avian H9N2 virus, combined with the insertion of a hemagglutinin (HA) tag in PB1, resulted in an attenuated (att) vaccine backbone for both chickens and mice. Because the new pandemic strain is a triple-reassortant (TR) virus, we chose to introduce the double attenuating modifications into a swine-like TR virus isolate, A/turkey/OH/313053/04 (H3N2) (ty/04), with the goal of producing live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV). This genetically modified backbone had impaired polymerase activity and restricted virus growth at elevated temperatures. In vivo characterization of two H1N1 vaccine candidates generated using the ty/04 att backbone demonstrated that this vaccine is highly attenuated in mice, as indicated by the absence of signs of disease, limited replication, and minimum histopathological alterations in the respiratory tract. A single immunization with the ty/04 att-based vaccines conferred complete protection against a lethal H1N1pdm virus infection in mice. More importantly, vaccination of pigs with a ty/04 att-H1N1 vaccine candidate resulted in sterilizing immunity upon an aggressive intratracheal challenge with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus. Our studies highlight the safety of the ty/04 att vaccine platform and its potential as a master donor strain for the generation of live attenuated vaccines for humans and livestock. PMID:20962084

  18. Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross‐reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades

    PubMed Central

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril J.; Thomsen, Joakim S.; Jensen, Kim L.; Nielsen, Lars P.; Aasted, Bent; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bragstad et al. (2010) Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross‐reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 13–23. Background  Alternative influenza vaccines and vaccine production forms are needed as the conventional protein vaccines do not induce broad cross‐reactivity against drifted strains. Furthermore, fast vaccine production is especially important in a pandemic situation, and broader vaccine reactivity would diminish the need for frequent change in the vaccine formulations. Objective  In this study, we compared the ability of pandemic influenza DNA vaccines to induce immunity against distantly related strains within a subtype with the immunity induced by conventional trivalent protein vaccines against homologous virus challenge. Methods  Ferrets were immunised by particle‐mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with DNA vaccines based on the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) and/or the matrix (M) and nucleoprotein genes of the 1918 H1N1 Spanish influenza pandemic virus or the 1968 H3N2 Hong Kong influenza pandemic virus. The animals were challenged with contemporary H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. Results  We demonstrated that DNA vaccines encoding proteins of the original 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus induced protective cross‐reactive immune responses in ferrets against infection with a 1947 H1N1 virus and a recent 1999 H1N1 virus. Similarly, a DNA vaccine, based on the HA and NA of the 1968 H3N2 pandemic virus, induced cross‐reactive immune responses against a recent 2005 H3N2 virus challenge. Conclusions  DNA vaccines based on pandemic or recent seasonal influenza genes induced cross‐reactive immunity against contemporary virus challenge as good as or superior to contemporary conventional trivalent protein vaccines. This suggests a unique ability of influenza DNA to induce cross‐protective immunity

  19. Pandemic vaccination strategies and influenza severe outcomes during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and the post-pandemic influenza season: the Nordic experience.

    PubMed

    Gil Cuesta, Julita; Aavitsland, Preben; Englund, Hélène; Gudlaugsson, Ólafur; Hauge, Siri Helene; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Sigmundsdóttir, Guðrún; Tegnell, Anders; Virtanen, Mikko; Krause, Tyra Grove

    2016-04-21

    During the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, the five Nordic countries adopted different approaches to pandemic vaccination. We compared pandemic vaccination strategies and severe influenza outcomes, in seasons 2009/10 and 2010/11 in these countries with similar influenza surveillance systems. We calculated the cumulative pandemic vaccination coverage in 2009/10 and cumulative incidence rates of laboratory confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infections, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and deaths in 2009/10 and 2010/11. We estimated incidence risk ratios (IRR) in a Poisson regression model to compare those indicators between Denmark and the other countries. The vaccination coverage was lower in Denmark (6.1%) compared with Finland (48.2%), Iceland (44.1%), Norway (41.3%) and Sweden (60.0%). In 2009/10 Denmark had a similar cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions and deaths compared with the other countries. In 2010/11 Denmark had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions (IRR: 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-3.0) and deaths (IRR: 8.3; 95% CI: 5.1-13.5). Compared with Denmark, the other countries had higher pandemic vaccination coverage and experienced less A(H1N1)pdm09-related severe outcomes in 2010/11. Pandemic vaccination may have had an impact on severe influenza outcomes in the post-pandemic season. Surveillance of severe outcomes may be used to compare the impact of influenza between seasons and support different vaccination strategies.

  20. Kinetics of lung lesion development and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in pigs with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease induced by challenge with pandemic (2009) A/H1N1 influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this report was to characterize the enhanced clinical disease and lung lesions observed in pigs vaccinated with inactivated H1N2 swine delta-cluster influenza A virus and challenged with pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 human influenza virus. Eighty-four, six-week-old, crossbred pigs were rand...

  1. Effect of previous and current vaccination against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B during the post-pandemic period 2010-2016 in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Jesús; Pozo, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that the protective effect of the current influenza vaccine could be influenced by vaccination in previous seasons. We estimated the combined effect of the previous and current influenza vaccines from the 2010–2011 season to the 2015–2016 season in Spain. Methods We performed a test-negative case-control study in patients ≥9 years old. We estimated the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and B virus. Results We included 1206 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases, 1358 A(H3N2) cases and 1079 B cases. IVE against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in the pooled-season analysis was 53% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 21% to 72%) for those vaccinated only in the current season and 50% (95%CI: 23% to 68%) for those vaccinated in the both current and previous seasons. Against the influenza A(H3N2) virus, IVE was 17% (95%CI: -43% to 52%) for those vaccinated only in the current season and 3% (95%CI: -33% to 28%) for those vaccinated in both seasons. Regarding influenza B, we obtained similar IVEs for those vaccinated only in the current and those vaccinated in both seasons: 57% (95%CI: 12% to 79%) and 56% (95%CI: 36% to 70%), respectively. Conclusion Our results suggested no interference between the previous and current influenza vaccines against A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses, but a possible negative interference against A(H3N2) virus. PMID:28614376

  2. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6-35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6-35 months and 3-17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158.

  3. Evaluation of the attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a live virus vaccine generated by codon-pair bias de-optimization of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Anafu, Amanda; Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-20

    Codon-pair bias de-optimization (CPBD) of viruses involves re-writing viral genes using statistically underrepresented codon pairs, without any changes to the amino acid sequence or codon usage. Previously, this technology has been used to attenuate the influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus. The de-optimized virus was immunogenic and protected inbred mice from challenge. In order to assess whether CPBD could be used to produce a live vaccine against a clinically relevant influenza virus, we generated an influenza A/California/07/2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus with de-optimized HA and NA gene segments (2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min)), and evaluated viral replication and protein expression in MDCK cells, and attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy in outbred ferrets. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus grew to a similar titer as the 2009 pH1N1 wild type (wt) virus in MDCK cells (∼10(6)TCID50/ml), despite reduced HA and NA protein expression on western blot. In ferrets, intranasal inoculation of 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus at doses ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50 led to seroconversion in all animals and protection from challenge with the 2009 pH1N1 wt virus 28 days later. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus did not cause clinical illness in ferrets, but replicated to a similar titer as the wt virus in the upper and lower respiratory tract, suggesting that de-optimization of additional gene segments may be warranted for improved attenuation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the potential of using CPBD technology for the development of a live influenza virus vaccine if the level of attenuation is optimized. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Immune responses elicited to a live-attenuated influenza virus vaccine compared to a traditional whole-inactivated virus vaccine for pandemic H1N1in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States there are currently two influenza vaccine platforms approved for use in humans - conventional inactivated virus and live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV). One of the major challenges for influenza vaccination is designing a platform that provides cross-protection across strains...

  5. Live attenuated influenza A virus vaccine protects against heterologous challenge with A(H1N1)pdm09 without inducing vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines that provide broad cross-protection against antigenic variants are necessary to prevent infection and shedding of the wide array of IAV cocirculating in swine. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines provide only partial protection against IAV with substantial antigen...

  6. Effect on Cellular and