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Sample records for auditory signals requires

  1. Attention to natural auditory signals.

    PubMed

    Caporello Bluvas, Emily; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2013-11-01

    The challenge of understanding how the brain processes natural signals is compounded by the fact that such signals are often tied closely to specific natural behaviors and natural environments. This added complexity is especially true for auditory communication signals that can carry information at multiple hierarchical levels, and often occur in the context of other competing communication signals. Selective attention provides a mechanism to focus processing resources on specific components of auditory signals, and simultaneously suppress responses to unwanted signals or noise. Although selective auditory attention has been well-studied behaviorally, very little is known about how selective auditory attention shapes the processing on natural auditory signals, and how the mechanisms of auditory attention are implemented in single neurons or neural circuits. Here we review the role of selective attention in modulating auditory responses to complex natural stimuli in humans. We then suggest how the current understanding can be applied to the study of selective auditory attention in the context natural signal processing at the level of single neurons and populations in animal models amenable to invasive neuroscience techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  2. Preferred levels of auditory danger signals.

    PubMed

    Zera, J; Nagórski, A

    2000-01-01

    An important issue at the design stage of the auditory danger signal for a safety system is the signal audibility under various conditions of background noise. The auditory danger signal should be clearly audible but it should not be too loud to avoid fright, startling effects, and nuisance complaints. Criteria for designing auditory danger signals are the subject of the ISO 7731 (International Organization for Standardization [ISO], 1986) international standard and the EN 457 European standard (European Committee for Standardization [CEN], 1992). It is required that the A-weighted sound pressure level of the auditory danger signal is higher in level than the background noise by 15 dB. In this paper, the results of an experiment are reported, in which listeners adjusted most preferred levels of 3 danger signals (tone, sweep, complex sound) in the presence of a noise background (pink noise and industrial noise). The measurements were done for 60-, 70-, 80-, and 90-dB A-weighted levels of noise. Results show that for 60-dB level of noise the most preferred level of the danger signal is 10 to 20 dB above the noise level. However, for 90-dB level of noise, listeners selected a level of the danger signal that was equal to the noise level. Results imply that the criterion in the existing standards is conservative as it requires the level of the danger signal to be higher than the level of noise regardless of the noise level.

  3. Methods for Predicting Job-Ability Requirements: I. Ability Requirements as a Function of Changes in the Characteristics of an Auditory Signal Identification Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheaton, George R.; And Others

    The relationship between variations in an auditory signal identification task and consequent changes in the abilities related to identification performance was investigated. Characteristics of the signal identification task were manipulated by varying signal duration and signal-to-noise ratio. Subjects received a battery of reference ability tests…

  4. Comodulation Enhances Signal Detection via Priming of Auditory Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Sollini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic environments are composed of complex overlapping sounds that the auditory system is required to segregate into discrete perceptual objects. The functions of distinct auditory processing stations in this challenging task are poorly understood. Here we show a direct role for mouse auditory cortex in detection and segregation of acoustic information. We measured the sensitivity of auditory cortical neurons to brief tones embedded in masking noise. By altering spectrotemporal characteristics of the masker, we reveal that sensitivity to pure tone stimuli is strongly enhanced in coherently modulated broadband noise, corresponding to the psychoacoustic phenomenon comodulation masking release. Improvements in detection were largest following priming periods of noise alone, indicating that cortical segregation is enhanced over time. Transient opsin-mediated silencing of auditory cortex during the priming period almost completely abolished these improvements, suggesting that cortical processing may play a direct and significant role in detection of quiet sounds in noisy environments. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Auditory systems are adept at detecting and segregating competing sound sources, but there is little direct evidence of how this process occurs in the mammalian auditory pathway. We demonstrate that coherent broadband noise enhances signal representation in auditory cortex, and that prolonged exposure to noise is necessary to produce this enhancement. Using optogenetic perturbation to selectively silence auditory cortex during early noise processing, we show that cortical processing plays a crucial role in the segregation of competing sounds. PMID:27927950

  5. Temporal expectation weights visual signals over auditory signals.

    PubMed

    Menceloglu, Melisa; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2017-04-01

    Temporal expectation is a process by which people use temporally structured sensory information to explicitly or implicitly predict the onset and/or the duration of future events. Because timing plays a critical role in crossmodal interactions, we investigated how temporal expectation influenced auditory-visual interaction, using an auditory-visual crossmodal congruity effect as a measure of crossmodal interaction. For auditory identification, an incongruent visual stimulus produced stronger interference when the crossmodal stimulus was presented with an expected rather than an unexpected timing. In contrast, for visual identification, an incongruent auditory stimulus produced weaker interference when the crossmodal stimulus was presented with an expected rather than an unexpected timing. The fact that temporal expectation made visual distractors more potent and visual targets less susceptible to auditory interference suggests that temporal expectation increases the perceptual weight of visual signals.

  6. Inhibitory Network Interactions Shape the Auditory Processing of Natural Communication Signals in the Songbird Auditory Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Pinaud, Raphael; Terleph, Thomas A.; Tremere, Liisa A.; Phan, Mimi L.; Dagostin, André A.; Leão, Ricardo M.; Mello, Claudio V.; Vicario, David S.

    2008-01-01

    The role of GABA in the central processing of complex auditory signals is not fully understood. We have studied the involvement of GABAA-mediated inhibition in the processing of birdsong, a learned vocal communication signal requiring intact hearing for its development and maintenance. We focused on caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), an area analogous to parts of the mammalian auditory cortex with selective responses to birdsong. We present evidence that GABAA-mediated inhibition plays a pronounced role in NCM's auditory processing of birdsong. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that approximately half of NCM's neurons are GABAergic. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings in a slice preparation demonstrate that, at rest, spontaneously active GABAergic synapses inhibit excitatory inputs onto NCM neurons via GABAA receptors. Multi-electrode electrophysiological recordings in awake birds show that local blockade of GABAA-mediated inhibition in NCM markedly affects the temporal pattern of song-evoked responses in NCM without modifications in frequency tuning. Surprisingly, this blockade increases the phasic and largely suppresses the tonic response component, reflecting dynamic relationships of inhibitory networks that could include disinhibition. Thus processing of learned natural communication sounds in songbirds, and possibly other vocal learners, may depend on complex interactions of inhibitory networks. PMID:18480371

  7. Auditory display of knee-joint vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Sridhar; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Bell, G. Douglas; Frank, Cyril B.

    2001-12-01

    Sounds generated due to rubbing of knee-joint surfaces may lead to a potential tool for noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage degeneration. In the work reported in the present paper, an attempt is made to perform computer-assisted auscultation of knee joints by auditory display (AD) of vibration signals (also known as vibroarthrographic or VAG signals) emitted during active movement of the leg. Two types of AD methods are considered: audification and sonification. In audification, the VAG signals are scaled in time and frequency using a time-frequency distribution to facilitate aural analysis. In sonification, the instantaneous mean frequency and envelope of the VAG signals are derived and used to synthesize sounds that are expected to facilitate more accurate diagnosis than the original signals by improving their aural quality. Auditory classification experiments were performed by two orthopedic surgeons with 37 VAG signals including 19 normal and 18 abnormal cases. Sensitivity values (correct detection of abnormality) of 31%, 44%, and 83%, and overall classification accuracies of 53%, 40%, and 57% were obtained with the direct playback, audification, and sonification methods, respectively. The corresponding d' scores were estimated to be 1.10, -0.36, and 0.55. The high sensitivity of the sonification method indicates that the technique could lead to improved detection of knee-joint abnormalities; however, additional work is required to improve its specificity and achieve better overall performance.

  8. Interhemispheric support during demanding auditory signal-in-noise processing.

    PubMed

    Stracke, Henning; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Pantev, Christo

    2009-06-01

    We investigated attentional effects on human auditory signal-in-noise processing in a simultaneous masking paradigm using magnetoencephalography. Test signal was a monaural 1000-Hz tone; maskers were binaural band-eliminated noises (BENs) containing stopbands of different widths centered on 1000 Hz. Participants directed attention either to the left or the right ear. In an "irrelevant visual attention" condition subjects focused attention on a screen. Irrespective of attention focus location, the signal appeared randomly either in the left or right ear. During auditory focused attention (left- or right-ear attention), the signal thus randomly appeared either in the attended ("relevant auditory attention" condition) or the nonattended ear ("irrelevant auditory attention" condition). Results showed that N1m source strength was overall increased in the left relative to the right hemisphere, and for right-ear versus left-ear stimulation. Moreover, when attention was focused on the signal ear (relevant auditory attention condition) and the BEN stopbands were narrow, the right-hemispheric N1m source strength was increased, relative to irrelevant auditory attention. Such increments were neither observed in the left hemisphere nor for wide BENs. These novel results indicate 1) left-hemispheric dominance and robustness during auditory signal-in-noise processing, and 2) right-hemispheric assistance during attentive and demanding auditory signal-in-noise processing.

  9. Contextual modulation of primary visual cortex by auditory signals

    PubMed Central

    Paton, A. T.

    2017-01-01

    Early visual cortex receives non-feedforward input from lateral and top-down connections (Muckli & Petro 2013 Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 23, 195–201. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.020)), including long-range projections from auditory areas. Early visual cortex can code for high-level auditory information, with neural patterns representing natural sound stimulation (Vetter et al. 2014 Curr. Biol. 24, 1256–1262. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.020)). We discuss a number of questions arising from these findings. What is the adaptive function of bimodal representations in visual cortex? What type of information projects from auditory to visual cortex? What are the anatomical constraints of auditory information in V1, for example, periphery versus fovea, superficial versus deep cortical layers? Is there a putative neural mechanism we can infer from human neuroimaging data and recent theoretical accounts of cortex? We also present data showing we can read out high-level auditory information from the activation patterns of early visual cortex even when visual cortex receives simple visual stimulation, suggesting independent channels for visual and auditory signals in V1. We speculate which cellular mechanisms allow V1 to be contextually modulated by auditory input to facilitate perception, cognition and behaviour. Beyond cortical feedback that facilitates perception, we argue that there is also feedback serving counterfactual processing during imagery, dreaming and mind wandering, which is not relevant for immediate perception but for behaviour and cognition over a longer time frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Auditory and visual scene analysis’. PMID:28044015

  10. Contextual modulation of primary visual cortex by auditory signals.

    PubMed

    Petro, L S; Paton, A T; Muckli, L

    2017-02-19

    Early visual cortex receives non-feedforward input from lateral and top-down connections (Muckli & Petro 2013 Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 23, 195-201. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.020)), including long-range projections from auditory areas. Early visual cortex can code for high-level auditory information, with neural patterns representing natural sound stimulation (Vetter et al. 2014 Curr. Biol. 24, 1256-1262. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.020)). We discuss a number of questions arising from these findings. What is the adaptive function of bimodal representations in visual cortex? What type of information projects from auditory to visual cortex? What are the anatomical constraints of auditory information in V1, for example, periphery versus fovea, superficial versus deep cortical layers? Is there a putative neural mechanism we can infer from human neuroimaging data and recent theoretical accounts of cortex? We also present data showing we can read out high-level auditory information from the activation patterns of early visual cortex even when visual cortex receives simple visual stimulation, suggesting independent channels for visual and auditory signals in V1. We speculate which cellular mechanisms allow V1 to be contextually modulated by auditory input to facilitate perception, cognition and behaviour. Beyond cortical feedback that facilitates perception, we argue that there is also feedback serving counterfactual processing during imagery, dreaming and mind wandering, which is not relevant for immediate perception but for behaviour and cognition over a longer time frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  11. Auditory false perception in schizophrenia: Development and validation of auditory signal detection task.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Harleen; Sowmya, Selvaraj; Sreeraj, Vanteemar S; Kalmady, Sunil V; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Amaresha, Anekal C; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2016-12-01

    Auditory hallucinations constitute an important symptom component in 70-80% of schizophrenia patients. These hallucinations are proposed to occur due to an imbalance between perceptual expectation and external input, resulting in attachment of meaning to abstract noises; signal detection theory has been proposed to explain these phenomena. In this study, we describe the development of an auditory signal detection task using a carefully chosen set of English words that could be tested successfully in schizophrenia patients coming from varying linguistic, cultural and social backgrounds. Schizophrenia patients with significant auditory hallucinations (N=15) and healthy controls (N=15) performed the auditory signal detection task wherein they were instructed to differentiate between a 5-s burst of plain white noise and voiced-noise. The analysis showed that false alarms (p=0.02), discriminability index (p=0.001) and decision bias (p=0.004) were significantly different between the two groups. There was a significant negative correlation between false alarm rate and decision bias. These findings extend further support for impaired perceptual expectation system in schizophrenia patients.

  12. Bioacoustic Signal Classification in Cat Auditory Cortex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    representation as the input ( front end ) to a self- organizing signal classifier and as training pattern for the output of a dynamic neural network. In the...potential use as a front end for a biological based signal classifier, their use as a trainer for network models, and their ability to predict spatial...usually contributing more spikes, at best level, than monotonic neurons. d) One region in the center of the dorsal-ventral extent of czt Al appears to have

  13. Auditory trace fear conditioning requires perirhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kholodar-Smith, D.B.; Boguszewski, P.; Brown, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus is well-known to be critical for trace fear conditioning, but nothing is known about the importance of perirhinal cortex (PR), which has reciprocal connections with hippocampus. PR damage severely impairs delay fear conditioning to ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) and discontinuous tones (pips), but has no effect on delay conditioning to continuous tones (Kholodar-Smith, Allen, and Brown, in press). Here we demonstrate that trace auditory fear conditioning also critically depends on PR function. The trace interval between the CS offset and the US onset was 16 s. Pre-training neurotoxic lesions were produced through multiple injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate along the full length of PR, which was directly visualized during the injections. Control animals received injections with phosphate-buffered saline. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the lesion volumes demonstrated that the neurotoxic damage was well-localized to PR and included most of its anterior-posterior extent. Automated video analysis quantified freezing behavior, which served as the conditional response. PR-damaged rats were profoundly impaired in trace conditioning to either of three different CSs (a USV, tone pips, and a continuous tone) as well as conditioning to the training context. Within both the lesion and control groups, the type of cue had no effect on the mean CR. The overall PR lesion effect size was 2.7 for cue conditioning and 3.9 for context conditioning. We suggest that the role of PR in trace fear conditioning may be distinct from some of its more perceptual functions. The results further define the essential circuitry underlying trace fear conditioning to auditory cues. PMID:18678265

  14. Motor-related signals in the auditory system for listening and learning.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David M; Mooney, Richard

    2015-08-01

    In the auditory system, corollary discharge signals are theorized to facilitate normal hearing and the learning of acoustic behaviors, including speech and music. Despite clear evidence of corollary discharge signals in the auditory cortex and their presumed importance for hearing and auditory-guided motor learning, the circuitry and function of corollary discharge signals in the auditory cortex are not well described. In this review, we focus on recent developments in the mouse and songbird that provide insights into the circuitry that transmits corollary discharge signals to the auditory system and the function of these signals in the context of hearing and vocal learning.

  15. Auditory Signal Processing in Communication: Perception and Performance of Vocal Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Learning and maintaining the sounds we use in vocal communication require accurate perception of the sounds we hear performed by others and feedback-dependent imitation of those sounds to produce our own vocalizations. Understanding how the central nervous system integrates auditory and vocal-motor information to enable communication is a fundamental goal of systems neuroscience, and insights into the mechanisms of those processes will profoundly enhance clinical therapies for communication disorders. Gaining the high-resolution insight necessary to define the circuits and cellular mechanisms underlying human vocal communication is presently impractical. Songbirds are the best animal model of human speech, and this review highlights recent insights into the neural basis of auditory perception and feedback-dependent imitation in those animals. Neural correlates of song perception are present in auditory areas, and those correlates are preserved in the auditory responses of downstream neurons that are also active when the bird sings. Initial tests indicate that singing-related activity in those downstream neurons is associated with vocal-motor performance as opposed to the bird simply hearing itself sing. Therefore, action potentials related to auditory perception and action potentials related to vocal performance are co-localized in individual neurons. Conceptual models of song learning involve comparison of vocal commands and the associated auditory feedback to compute an error signal that is used to guide refinement of subsequent song performances, yet the sites of that comparison remain unknown. Convergence of sensory and motor activity onto individual neurons points to a possible mechanism through which auditory and vocal-motor signals may be linked to enable learning and maintenance of the sounds used in vocal communication. PMID:23827717

  16. Auditory signal processing in communication: perception and performance of vocal sounds.

    PubMed

    Prather, Jonathan F

    2013-11-01

    Learning and maintaining the sounds we use in vocal communication require accurate perception of the sounds we hear performed by others and feedback-dependent imitation of those sounds to produce our own vocalizations. Understanding how the central nervous system integrates auditory and vocal-motor information to enable communication is a fundamental goal of systems neuroscience, and insights into the mechanisms of those processes will profoundly enhance clinical therapies for communication disorders. Gaining the high-resolution insight necessary to define the circuits and cellular mechanisms underlying human vocal communication is presently impractical. Songbirds are the best animal model of human speech, and this review highlights recent insights into the neural basis of auditory perception and feedback-dependent imitation in those animals. Neural correlates of song perception are present in auditory areas, and those correlates are preserved in the auditory responses of downstream neurons that are also active when the bird sings. Initial tests indicate that singing-related activity in those downstream neurons is associated with vocal-motor performance as opposed to the bird simply hearing itself sing. Therefore, action potentials related to auditory perception and action potentials related to vocal performance are co-localized in individual neurons. Conceptual models of song learning involve comparison of vocal commands and the associated auditory feedback to compute an error signal that is used to guide refinement of subsequent song performances, yet the sites of that comparison remain unknown. Convergence of sensory and motor activity onto individual neurons points to a possible mechanism through which auditory and vocal-motor signals may be linked to enable learning and maintenance of the sounds used in vocal communication. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  17. Hearing conspecific vocal signals alters peripheral auditory sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Megan D.; Wilczynski, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether hearing advertisement calls over several nights, as happens in natural frog choruses, modified the responses of the peripheral auditory system in the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea. Using auditory evoked potentials (AEP), we found that exposure to 10 nights of a simulated male chorus lowered auditory thresholds in males and females, while exposure to random tones had no effect in males, but did result in lower thresholds in females. The threshold change was larger at the lower frequencies stimulating the amphibian papilla than at higher frequencies stimulating the basilar papilla. Suprathreshold responses to tonal stimuli were assessed for two peaks in the AEP recordings. For the peak P1 (assessed for 0.8–1.25 kHz), peak amplitude increased following chorus exposure. For peak P2 (assessed for 2–4 kHz), peak amplitude decreased at frequencies between 2.5 and 4.0 kHz, but remained unaltered at 2.0 kHz. Our results show for the first time, to our knowledge, that hearing dynamic social stimuli, like frog choruses, can alter the responses of the auditory periphery in a way that could enhance the detection of and response to conspecific acoustic communication signals. PMID:25972471

  18. Differential auditory signal processing in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dukhwan; Kim, Chongsun; Chang, Sun O.

    2002-05-01

    Auditory evoked responses were collected in male zebra finches (Poephila guttata) to objectively determine differential frequency selectivity. First, the mating call of the animal was recorded and analyzed for its frequency components through the customized program. Then, auditory brainstem responses and cortical responses of each anesthetized animal were routinely recorded in response to tone bursts of 1-8 kHz derived from the corresponding mating call spectrum. From the results, most mating calls showed relatively consistent spectral structures. The upper limit of the spectrum was well under 10 kHz. The peak energy bands were concentrated in the region less than 5 kHz. The assessment of auditory brainstem responses and cortical evoked potentials showed differential selectivity with a series of characteristic scales. This system appears to be an excellent model to investigate complex sound processing and related language behaviors. These data could also be used in designing effective signal processing strategies in auditory rehabilitation devices such as hearing aids and cochlear implants. [Work supported by Brain Science & Engineering Program from Korean Ministry of Science and Technology.

  19. A basic study on universal design of auditory signals in automobiles.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Choi, Jong-dae; Maiguma, Ryo; Takada, Masayuki; Iwamiya, Shin-ichiro

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, the impression of various kinds of auditory signals currently used in automobiles and a comprehensive evaluation were measured by a semantic differential method. The desirable acoustic characteristic was examined for each type of auditory signal. Sharp sounds with dominant high-frequency components were not suitable for auditory signals in automobiles. This trend is expedient for the aged whose auditory sensitivity in the high frequency region is lower. When intermittent sounds were used, a longer OFF time was suitable. Generally, "dull (not sharp)" and "calm" sounds were appropriate for auditory signals. Furthermore, the comparison between the frequency spectrum of interior noise in automobiles and that of suitable sounds for various auditory signals indicates that the suitable sounds are not easily masked. The suitable auditory signals for various purposes is a good solution from the viewpoint of universal design.

  20. A Binaural Neuromorphic Auditory Sensor for FPGA: A Spike Signal Processing Approach.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Fernandez, Angel; Cerezuela-Escudero, Elena; Miro-Amarante, Lourdes; Dominguez-Moralse, Manuel Jesus; de Asis Gomez-Rodriguez, Francisco; Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a new architecture, design flow, and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation analysis of a neuromorphic binaural auditory sensor, designed completely in the spike domain. Unlike digital cochleae that decompose audio signals using classical digital signal processing techniques, the model presented in this paper processes information directly encoded as spikes using pulse frequency modulation and provides a set of frequency-decomposed audio information using an address-event representation interface. In this case, a systematic approach to design led to a generic process for building, tuning, and implementing audio frequency decomposers with different features, facilitating synthesis with custom features. This allows researchers to implement their own parameterized neuromorphic auditory systems in a low-cost FPGA in order to study the audio processing and learning activity that takes place in the brain. In this paper, we present a 64-channel binaural neuromorphic auditory system implemented in a Virtex-5 FPGA using a commercial development board. The system was excited with a diverse set of audio signals in order to analyze its response and characterize its features. The neuromorphic auditory system response times and frequencies are reported. The experimental results of the proposed system implementation with 64-channel stereo are: a frequency range between 9.6 Hz and 14.6 kHz (adjustable), a maximum output event rate of 2.19 Mevents/s, a power consumption of 29.7 mW, the slices requirements of 11141, and a system clock frequency of 27 MHz.

  1. The effect of psychological stress and expectation on auditory perception: A signal detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Robert; Hunter, Mike D; Woodruff, Peter W R

    2014-11-01

    Both psychological stress and predictive signals relating to expected sensory input are believed to influence perception, an influence which, when disrupted, may contribute to the generation of auditory hallucinations. The effect of stress and semantic expectation on auditory perception was therefore examined in healthy participants using an auditory signal detection task requiring the detection of speech from within white noise. Trait anxiety was found to predict the extent to which stress influenced response bias, resulting in more anxious participants adopting a more liberal criterion, and therefore experiencing more false positives, when under stress. While semantic expectation was found to increase sensitivity, its presence also generated a shift in response bias towards reporting a signal, suggesting that the erroneous perception of speech became more likely. These findings provide a potential cognitive mechanism that may explain the impact of stress on hallucination-proneness, by suggesting that stress has the tendency to alter response bias in highly anxious individuals. These results also provide support for the idea that top-down processes such as those relating to semantic expectation may contribute to the generation of auditory hallucinations.

  2. Increased BOLD Signals Elicited by High Gamma Auditory Stimulation of the Left Auditory Cortex in Acute State Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Hironori; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Hirano, Yoji; Nakamura, Itta; Oribe, Naoya; Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Kanai, Ryota; Kanba, Shigenobu; Ueno, Takefumi

    2016-10-01

    Recent MRI studies have shown that schizophrenia is characterized by reductions in brain gray matter, which progress in the acute state of the disease. Cortical circuitry abnormalities in gamma oscillations, such as deficits in the auditory steady state response (ASSR) to gamma frequency (>30-Hz) stimulation, have also been reported in schizophrenia patients. In the current study, we investigated neural responses during click stimulation by BOLD signals. We acquired BOLD responses elicited by click trains of 20, 30, 40 and 80-Hz frequencies from 15 patients with acute episode schizophrenia (AESZ), 14 symptom-severity-matched patients with non-acute episode schizophrenia (NASZ), and 24 healthy controls (HC), assessed via a standard general linear-model-based analysis. The AESZ group showed significantly increased ASSR-BOLD signals to 80-Hz stimuli in the left auditory cortex compared with the HC and NASZ groups. In addition, enhanced 80-Hz ASSR-BOLD signals were associated with more severe auditory hallucination experiences in AESZ participants. The present results indicate that neural over activation occurs during 80-Hz auditory stimulation of the left auditory cortex in individuals with acute state schizophrenia. Given the possible association between abnormal gamma activity and increased glutamate levels, our data may reflect glutamate toxicity in the auditory cortex in the acute state of schizophrenia, which might lead to progressive changes in the left transverse temporal gyrus.

  3. A transient auditory signal shifts the perceived offset position of a moving visual object.

    PubMed

    Chien, Sung-En; Ono, Fuminori; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Information received from different sensory modalities profoundly influences human perception. For example, changes in the auditory flutter rate induce changes in the apparent flicker rate of a flashing light (Shipley, 1964). In the present study, we investigated whether auditory information would affect the perceived offset position of a moving object. In Experiment 1, a visual object moved toward the center of the computer screen and disappeared abruptly. A transient auditory signal was presented at different times relative to the moment when the object disappeared. The results showed that if the auditory signal was presented before the abrupt offset of the moving object, the perceived final position was shifted backward, implying that the perceived visual offset position was affected by the transient auditory information. In Experiment 2, we presented the transient auditory signal to either the left or the right ear. The results showed that the perceived visual offset shifted backward more strongly when the auditory signal was presented to the same side from which the moving object originated. In Experiment 3, we found that the perceived timing of the visual offset was not affected by the spatial relation between the auditory signal and the visual offset. The present results are interpreted as indicating that an auditory signal may influence the offset position of a moving object through both spatial and temporal processes.

  4. Temporally selective processing of communication signals by auditory midbrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2011-01-01

    Perception of the temporal structure of acoustic signals contributes critically to vocal signaling. In the aquatic clawed frog Xenopus laevis, calls differ primarily in the temporal parameter of click rate, which conveys sexual identity and reproductive state. We show here that an ensemble of auditory neurons in the laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis (TS) of X. laevis specializes in encoding vocalization click rates. We recorded single TS units while pure tones, natural calls, and synthetic clicks were presented directly to the tympanum via a vibration-stimulation probe. Synthesized click rates ranged from 4 to 50 Hz, the rate at which the clicks begin to overlap. Frequency selectivity and temporal processing were characterized using response-intensity curves, temporal-discharge patterns, and autocorrelations of reduplicated responses to click trains. Characteristic frequencies ranged from 140 to 3,250 Hz, with minimum thresholds of −90 dB re 1 mm/s at 500 Hz and −76 dB at 1,100 Hz near the dominant frequency of female clicks. Unlike units in the auditory nerve and dorsal medullary nucleus, most toral units respond selectively to the behaviorally relevant temporal feature of the rate of clicks in calls. The majority of neurons (85%) were selective for click rates, and this selectivity remained unchanged over sound levels 10 to 20 dB above threshold. Selective neurons give phasic, tonic, or adapting responses to tone bursts and click trains. Some algorithms that could compute temporally selective receptive fields are described. PMID:21289132

  5. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Jun; Tsuchioka, Nobuyoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell–auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number. PMID:24324432

  6. Effects of age, signal level, and signal rate on the auditory middle latency response.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D A; Ruth, R A

    1996-04-01

    The effects of age, signal rate, and signal level on the maturing auditory middle latency response (AMLR) were evaluated in 50 normal-hearing subjects ranging in age from 2 days to 35 years. Ipsilateral and contralateral AMLR waveforms were recorded in newborns (n = 10), children (n = 10), preteens (n = 10), teens (n = 10), and adults (n = 10). The AMLR Pa waveform was obtained in 70 to 100 percent of all subjects. The variables of age, signal level, and site of recording significantly affected Pa peak amplitude and absolute latency. However, stimulus rate did not significantly affect the response.

  7. Sound Sequence Discrimination Learning Motivated by Reward Requires Dopaminergic D2 Receptor Activation in the Rat Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudoh, Masaharu; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that sound sequence discrimination learning requires cholinergic inputs to the auditory cortex (AC) in rats. In that study, reward was used for motivating discrimination behavior in rats. Therefore, dopaminergic inputs mediating reward signals may have an important role in the learning. We tested the possibility in the…

  8. Sounds and beyond: multisensory and other non-auditory signals in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Gruters, Kurtis G.; Groh, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is a major processing center situated mid-way along both the ascending and descending auditory pathways of the brain stem. Although it is fundamentally an auditory area, the IC also receives anatomical input from non-auditory sources. Neurophysiological studies corroborate that non-auditory stimuli can modulate auditory processing in the IC and even elicit responses independent of coincident auditory stimulation. In this article, we review anatomical and physiological evidence for multisensory and other non-auditory processing in the IC. Specifically, the contributions of signals related to vision, eye movements and position, somatosensation, and behavioral context to neural activity in the IC will be described. These signals are potentially important for localizing sound sources, attending to salient stimuli, distinguishing environmental from self-generated sounds, and perceiving and generating communication sounds. They suggest that the IC should be thought of as a node in a highly interconnected sensory, motor, and cognitive network dedicated to synthesizing a higher-order auditory percept rather than simply reporting patterns of air pressure detected by the cochlea. We highlight some of the potential pitfalls that can arise from experimental manipulations that may disrupt the normal function of this network, such as the use of anesthesia or the severing of connections from cortical structures that project to the IC. Finally, we note that the presence of these signals in the IC has implications for our understanding not just of the IC but also of the multitude of other regions within and beyond the auditory system that are dependent on signals that pass through the IC. Whatever the IC “hears” would seem to be passed both “upward” to thalamus and thence to auditory cortex and beyond, as well as “downward” via centrifugal connections to earlier areas of the auditory pathway such as the cochlear nucleus. PMID:23248584

  9. Cardiac Change of Retarded and Nonretarded Infants to an Auditory Signal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Travers, Robert M. W.

    1979-01-01

    To examine individual differences in conditions accompanying attention, the cardiac change of ten normal and retarded infants was measured in response to an auditory signal over 15 trials. (Author/DLS)

  10. The effect of auditory verbal imagery on signal detection in hallucination-prone individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Smailes, David; Ellison, Amanda; Fernyhough, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive models have suggested that auditory hallucinations occur when internal mental events, such as inner speech or auditory verbal imagery (AVI), are misattributed to an external source. This has been supported by numerous studies indicating that individuals who experience hallucinations tend to perform in a biased manner on tasks that require them to distinguish self-generated from non-self-generated perceptions. However, these tasks have typically been of limited relevance to inner speech models of hallucinations, because they have not manipulated the AVI that participants used during the task. Here, a new paradigm was employed to investigate the interaction between imagery and perception, in which a healthy, non-clinical sample of participants were instructed to use AVI whilst completing an auditory signal detection task. It was hypothesized that AVI-usage would cause participants to perform in a biased manner, therefore falsely detecting more voices in bursts of noise. In Experiment 1, when cued to generate AVI, highly hallucination-prone participants showed a lower response bias than when performing a standard signal detection task, being more willing to report the presence of a voice in the noise. Participants not prone to hallucinations performed no differently between the two conditions. In Experiment 2, participants were not specifically instructed to use AVI, but retrospectively reported how often they engaged in AVI during the task. Highly hallucination-prone participants who retrospectively reported using imagery showed a lower response bias than did participants with lower proneness who also reported using AVI. Results are discussed in relation to prominent inner speech models of hallucinations. PMID:26435050

  11. Effects of auditory noise on the psychophysical detection of visual signals: cross-modal stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, Elias; Mendez, Ignacio; Martinez, Lourdes; Flores, Amira; Mirasso, Claudio R

    2007-03-30

    Harper [D.W. Harper, Signal detection analysis of effect of white noise intensity on sensitivity to visual flicker, Percept. Mot. Skills 48 (1979) 791-798] demonstrated that the visual flicker sensitivity was an inverted U-like function of the intensity of different levels of auditory noise from 50 to 90dB (SPL), without concomitant changes in the response bias. The aim of the present study was to extend these observations in the context of the stochastic resonance, a counterintuitive phenomenon in which a particular level of noise enhances the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal. We show psychophysical evidence in a yes-no paradigm for the existence of a stochastic resonance-like phenomenon in the auditory-visual interactions. We show that the detection of a weak visual signal was an inverted U-like function of the intensity of different levels of auditory noise. Nevertheless, for a strong visual signal the auditory noise acts in detriment of the ability of visual detection. Our results suggest that auditory noise could be employed in vision rehabilitation interventions in order to improve the detection of weak visual signals.

  12. Auditory neglect.

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, E; Gentilini, M; Barbieri, C

    1989-01-01

    Auditory neglect was investigated in normal controls and in patients with a recent unilateral hemispheric lesion, by requiring them to detect the interruptions that occurred in one ear in a sound delivered through earphones either mono-aurally or binaurally. Control patients accurately detected interruptions. One left brain damaged (LBD) patient missed only once in the ipsilateral ear while seven of the 30 right brain damaged (RBD) patients missed more than one signal in the monoaural test and nine patients did the same in the binaural test. Omissions were always more marked in the left ear and in the binaural test with a significant ear by test interaction. The lesion of these patients was in the parietal lobe (five patients) and the thalamus (four patients). The relation of auditory neglect to auditory extinction was investigated and found to be equivocal, in that there were seven RBD patients who showed extinction, but not neglect and, more importantly, two patients who exhibited the opposite pattern, thus challenging the view that extinction is a minor form of neglect. Also visual and auditory neglect were not consistently correlated, the former being present in nine RBD patients without auditory neglect and the latter in two RBD patients without visual neglect. The finding that in some RBD patients with auditory neglect omissions also occurred, though with less frequency, in the right ear, points to a right hemisphere participation in the deployment of attention not only to the contralateral, but also to the ipsilateral space. PMID:2732732

  13. Presenting multiple auditory signals using multiple sound cards in Visual Basic 6.0.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason S; Spence, Charles

    2003-02-01

    In auditory research, it is often desirable to present more than two auditory stimuli at any one time. Although the technology has been available for some time, the majority of researchers have not utilized it. This article provides a simple means of presenting multiple, concurrent, independent auditory events, using two or more different sound cards installed within a single computer. By enabling the presentation of more auditory events, we can hope to gain a better understanding of the cognitive and attentional processes operating under more complex and realistic scenes, such as that embodied by the cocktail party effect. The software requirements are Windows 98SR2/Me/NT4/2000/XP, Visual Basic 6.0, and DirectX 7.0 or above. The hardware requirements are a Pentium II, 128 MB RAM, and two or more different sound cards.

  14. The influence of signal type on the internal auditory representation of a room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teret, Elizabeth

    Currently, architectural acousticians make no real distinction between a room impulse response and the auditory system's internal representation of a room. With this lack of a good model for the auditory representation of a room, it is indirectly assumed that our internal representation of a room is independent of the sound source needed to make the room characteristics audible. The extent to which this assumption holds true is examined with perceptual tests. Listeners are presented with various pairs of signals (music, speech, and noise) convolved with synthesized impulse responses of different reverberation times. They are asked to adjust the reverberation of one of the signals to match the other. Analysis of the data show that the source signal significantly influences perceived reverberance. Listeners are less accurate when matching reverberation times of varied signals than they are with identical signals. Additional testing shows that perception of reverberation can be linked to the existence of transients in the signal.

  15. Psychophysical evaluation of auditory signals in passenger vehicles.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chia-Fen; Dewi, Ratna Sari; Huang, Min-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Twenty-one experienced drivers were recruited for the evaluation of sounds of four functions (horn, indicator, door open warning, and parking sensor) made by 11 car brand names. Each participant was required to evaluate all of the above sound signals by a pair-comparison test. After the comparison test, each participant was shown his/her pair-comparison result and was asked to comment on their preference and appropriateness of a sound. The physical properties and interview data were compared and summarized to propose design recommendations. Our results indicate that complex tones and a fundamental frequency between 500 and 1000 Hz were most preferred for horns while for indicators the preferred sounds had a higher dominant frequency. To reduce monotony, the indicators with double clicks and an OFF time interval of between 330 and 400 ms between two clicks were most preferred. Regarding door warning sounds, the waveform starting with a higher intensity then fading towards zero intensity is most preferred while for parking sensors, sounds beginning with a longer OFF time (about 500 ms) and having 3 or 4 distinctive tempo variations were most preferred. The relationship between pleasurability and pitch, loudness, and the tempo of sound signals basically followed an inverted-U function. Sound designers should avoid using very extreme parameter values when generating sound for a given function.

  16. A psychophysiological evaluation of the perceived urgency of auditory warning signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. L.; Bartolome, D. S.; Burdette, D. W.; Comstock, J. R. Jr

    1995-01-01

    One significant concern that pilots have about cockpit auditory warnings is that the signals presently used lack a sense of priority. The relationship between auditory warning sound parameters and perceived urgency is, therefore, an important topic of enquiry in aviation psychology. The present investigation examined the relationship among subjective assessments of urgency, reaction time, and brainwave activity with three auditory warning signals. Subjects performed a tracking task involving automated and manual conditions, and were presented with auditory warnings having various levels of perceived and situational urgency. Subjective assessments revealed that subjects were able to rank warnings on an urgency scale, but rankings were altered after warnings were mapped to a situational urgency scale. Reaction times differed between automated and manual tracking task conditions, and physiological data showed attentional differences in response to perceived and situational warning urgency levels. This study shows that the use of physiological measures sensitive to attention and arousal, in conjunction with behavioural and subjective measures, may lead to the design of auditory warnings that produce a sense of urgency in an operator that matches the urgency of the situation.

  17. Coding of signals in noise by amphibian auditory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Narins, P M

    1987-01-01

    Rate-level (R-L) functions derived for pure-tones and pure-tones in broadband noise were obtained for auditory nerve fibers in the treefrog, Eleutherodactylus coqui. Normalized R-L functions for low-frequency, low-threshold fibers exhibit a horizontal rightward shift in the presence of broadband background noise. The magnitude of this shift is directly proportional to the noise spectrum level, and inversely proportional to the fiber's threshold. R-L functions for mid- and high-frequency fibers also show a horizontal shift, but to a lesser degree, consistent with their elevated thresholds relative to the low-frequency fibers. The implications of these findings for the processing of biologically significant sounds in the high levels of background noise in the animal's natural habitat are considered.

  18. Integration of auditory and somatosensory error signals in the neural control of speech movements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongqiang; Gracco, Vincent L; Max, Ludo

    2011-08-01

    We investigated auditory and somatosensory feedback contributions to the neural control of speech. In task I, sensorimotor adaptation was studied by perturbing one of these sensory modalities or both modalities simultaneously. The first formant (F1) frequency in the auditory feedback was shifted up by a real-time processor and/or the extent of jaw opening was increased or decreased with a force field applied by a robotic device. All eight subjects lowered F1 to compensate for the up-shifted F1 in the feedback signal regardless of whether or not the jaw was perturbed. Adaptive changes in subjects' acoustic output resulted from adjustments in articulatory movements of the jaw or tongue. Adaptation in jaw opening extent in response to the mechanical perturbation occurred only when no auditory feedback perturbation was applied or when the direction of adaptation to the force was compatible with the direction of adaptation to a simultaneous acoustic perturbation. In tasks II and III, subjects' auditory and somatosensory precision and accuracy were estimated. Correlation analyses showed that the relationships 1) between F1 adaptation extent and auditory acuity for F1 and 2) between jaw position adaptation extent and somatosensory acuity for jaw position were weak and statistically not significant. Taken together, the combined findings from this work suggest that, in speech production, sensorimotor adaptation updates the underlying control mechanisms in such a way that the planning of vowel-related articulatory movements takes into account a complex integration of error signals from previous trials but likely with a dominant role for the auditory modality.

  19. Detectability of auditory signals presented without defined observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, C. S.; Nichols, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ability to detect tones in noise was measured without defined observation intervals. Latency density functions were estimated for the first response following a signal and, separately, for the first response following randomly distributed instances of background noise. Detection performance was measured by the maximum separation between the cumulative latency density functions for signal-plus-noise and for noise alone. Values of the index of detectability, estimated by this procedure, were approximately those obtained with a 2-dB weaker signal and defined observation intervals. Simulation of defined- and non-defined-interval tasks with an energy detector showed that this device performs very similarly to the human listener in both cases.

  20. Role of the anterior insular cortex in integrative causal signaling during multisensory auditory-visual attention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianwen; Michels, Lars; Supekar, Kaustubh; Kochalka, John; Ryali, Srikanth; Menon, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Coordinated attention to information from multiple senses is fundamental to our ability to respond to salient environmental events, yet little is known about brain network mechanisms that guide integration of information from multiple senses. Here we investigate dynamic causal mechanisms underlying multisensory auditory-visual attention, focusing on a network of right-hemisphere frontal-cingulate-parietal regions implicated in a wide range of tasks involving attention and cognitive control. Participants performed three 'oddball' attention tasks involving auditory, visual and multisensory auditory-visual stimuli during fMRI scanning. We found that the right anterior insula (rAI) demonstrated the most significant causal influences on all other frontal-cingulate-parietal regions, serving as a major causal control hub during multisensory attention. Crucially, we then tested two competing models of the role of the rAI in multisensory attention: an 'integrated' signaling model in which the rAI generates a common multisensory control signal associated with simultaneous attention to auditory and visual oddball stimuli versus a 'segregated' signaling model in which the rAI generates two segregated and independent signals in each sensory modality. We found strong support for the integrated, rather than the segregated, signaling model. Furthermore, the strength of the integrated control signal from the rAI was most pronounced on the dorsal anterior cingulate and posterior parietal cortices, two key nodes of saliency and central executive networks respectively. These results were preserved with the addition of a superior temporal sulcus region involved in multisensory processing. Our study provides new insights into the dynamic causal mechanisms by which the AI facilitates multisensory attention.

  1. Detection of Auditory Signals in Quiet and Noisy Backgrounds while Performing a Visuo-spatial Task

    PubMed Central

    Rawool, Vishakha W.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The ability to detect important auditory signals while performing visual tasks may be further compounded by background chatter. Thus, it is important to know how task performance may interact with background chatter to hinder signal detection. Aim: To examine any interactive effects of speech spectrum noise and task performance on the ability to detect signals. Settings and Design: The setting was a sound-treated booth. A repeated measures design was used. Materials and Methods: Auditory thresholds of 20 normal adults were determined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz in the following conditions presented in a random order: (1) quiet with attention; (2) quiet with a visuo-spatial task or puzzle (distraction); (3) noise with attention and (4) noise with task. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) with three repeated factors (quiet versus noise, visuo-spatial task versus no task, signal frequency). Results: MANOVA revealed significant main effects for noise and signal frequency and significant noise–frequency and task–frequency interactions. Distraction caused by performing the task worsened the thresholds for tones presented at the beginning of the experiment and had no effect on tones presented in the middle. At the end of the experiment, thresholds (4 kHz) were better while performing the task than those obtained without performing the task. These effects were similar across the quiet and noise conditions. Conclusion: Detection of auditory signals is difficult at the beginning of a distracting visuo-spatial task but over time, task learning and auditory training effects can nullify the effect of distraction and may improve detection of high frequency sounds. PMID:27991458

  2. Piglets Learn to Use Combined Human-Given Visual and Auditory Signals to Find a Hidden Reward in an Object Choice Task

    PubMed Central

    Bensoussan, Sandy; Cornil, Maude; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Tallet, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Although animals rarely use only one sense to communicate, few studies have investigated the use of combinations of different signals between animals and humans. This study assessed for the first time the spontaneous reactions of piglets to human pointing gestures and voice in an object-choice task with a reward. Piglets (Sus scrofa domestica) mainly use auditory signals–individually or in combination with other signals—to communicate with their conspecifics. Their wide hearing range (42 Hz to 40.5 kHz) fits the range of human vocalisations (40 Hz to 1.5 kHz), which may induce sensitivity to the human voice. However, only their ability to use visual signals from humans, especially pointing gestures, has been assessed to date. The current study investigated the effects of signal type (visual, auditory and combined visual and auditory) and piglet experience on the piglets’ ability to locate a hidden food reward over successive tests. Piglets did not find the hidden reward at first presentation, regardless of the signal type given. However, they subsequently learned to use a combination of auditory and visual signals (human voice and static or dynamic pointing gestures) to successfully locate the reward in later tests. This learning process may result either from repeated presentations of the combination of static gestures and auditory signals over successive tests, or from transitioning from static to dynamic pointing gestures, again over successive tests. Furthermore, piglets increased their chance of locating the reward either if they did not go straight to a bowl after entering the test area or if they stared at the experimenter before visiting it. Piglets were not able to use the voice direction alone, indicating that a combination of signals (pointing and voice direction) is necessary. Improving our communication with animals requires adapting to their individual sensitivity to human-given signals. PMID:27792731

  3. Neuroestrogen signaling in the songbird auditory cortex propagates into a sensorimotor network via an 'interface' nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pawlisch, B A; Remage-Healey, L

    2015-01-22

    Neuromodulators rapidly alter activity of neural circuits and can therefore shape higher order functions, such as sensorimotor integration. Increasing evidence suggests that brain-derived estrogens, such as 17-β-estradiol, can act rapidly to modulate sensory processing. However, less is known about how rapid estrogen signaling can impact downstream circuits. Past studies have demonstrated that estradiol levels increase within the songbird auditory cortex (the caudomedial nidopallium, NCM) during social interactions. Local estradiol signaling enhances the auditory-evoked firing rate of neurons in NCM to a variety of stimuli, while also enhancing the selectivity of auditory-evoked responses of neurons in a downstream sensorimotor brain region, HVC (proper name). Since these two brain regions are not directly connected, we employed dual extracellular recordings in HVC and the upstream nucleus interfacialis of the nidopallium (NIf) during manipulations of estradiol within NCM to better understand the pathway by which estradiol signaling propagates to downstream circuits. NIf has direct input into HVC, passing auditory information into the vocal motor output pathway, and is a possible source of the neural selectivity within HVC. Here, during acute estradiol administration in NCM, NIf neurons showed increases in baseline firing rates and auditory-evoked firing rates to all stimuli. Furthermore, when estradiol synthesis was blocked in NCM, we observed simultaneous decreases in the selectivity of NIf and HVC neurons. These effects were not due to direct estradiol actions because NIf has little to no capability for local estrogen synthesis or estrogen receptors, and these effects were specific to NIf because other neurons immediately surrounding NIf did not show these changes. Our results demonstrate that transsynaptic, rapid fluctuations in neuroestrogens are transmitted into NIf and subsequently HVC, both regions important for sensorimotor integration. Overall, these

  4. Neuroestrogen signaling in the songbird auditory cortex propagates into a sensorimotor network via an `interface' nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Pawlisch, Benjamin A.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulators rapidly alter activity of neural circuits and can therefore shape higher-order functions, such as sensorimotor integration. Increasing evidence suggests that brain-derived estrogens, such as 17-β-estradiol, can act rapidly to modulate sensory processing. However, less is known about how rapid estrogen signaling can impact downstream circuits. Past studies have demonstrated that estradiol levels increase within the songbird auditory cortex (the caudomedial nidopallium, NCM) during social interactions. Local estradiol signaling enhances the auditory-evoked firing rate of neurons in NCM to a variety of stimuli, while also enhancing the selectivity of auditory-evoked responses of neurons in a downstream sensorimotor brain region, HVC (proper name). Since these two brain regions are not directly connected, we employed dual extracellular recordings in HVC and the upstream nucleus interfacialis of the nidopallium (NIf) during manipulations of estradiol within NCM to better understand the pathway by which estradiol signaling propagates to downstream circuits. NIf has direct input into HVC, passing auditory information into the vocal motor output pathway, and is a possible source of the neural selectivity within HVC. Here, during acute estradiol administration in NCM, NIf neurons showed increases in baseline firing rates and auditory-evoked firing rates to all stimuli. Furthermore, when estradiol synthesis was blocked in NCM, we observed simultaneous decreases in the selectivity of NIf and HVC neurons. These effects were not due to direct estradiol actions because NIf has little to no capability for local estrogen synthesis or estrogen receptors, and these effects were specific to NIf because other neurons immediately surrounding NIf did not show these changes. Our results demonstrate that transsynaptic, rapid fluctuations in neuroestrogens are transmitted into NIf and subsequently HVC, both regions important for sensorimotor integration. Overall, these

  5. Vocalization-whisking coordination and multisensory integration of social signals in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajnish P; Mielke, Falk; Bobrov, Evgeny; Brecht, Michael

    2014-12-08

    Social interactions involve multi-modal signaling. Here, we study interacting rats to investigate audio-haptic coordination and multisensory integration in the auditory cortex. We find that facial touch is associated with an increased rate of ultrasonic vocalizations, which are emitted at the whisking rate (∼8 Hz) and preferentially initiated in the retraction phase of whisking. In a small subset of auditory cortex regular-spiking neurons, we observed excitatory and heterogeneous responses to ultrasonic vocalizations. Most fast-spiking neurons showed a stronger response to calls. Interestingly, facial touch-induced inhibition in the primary auditory cortex and off-responses after termination of touch were twofold stronger than responses to vocalizations. Further, touch modulated the responsiveness of auditory cortex neurons to ultrasonic vocalizations. In summary, facial touch during social interactions involves precisely orchestrated calling-whisking patterns. While ultrasonic vocalizations elicited a rather weak population response from the regular spikers, the modulation of neuronal responses by facial touch was remarkably strong.

  6. AUX: a scripting language for auditory signal processing and software packages for psychoacoustic experiments and education.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bomjun J

    2012-06-01

    This article introduces AUX (AUditory syntaX), a scripting syntax specifically designed to describe auditory signals and processing, to the members of the behavioral research community. The syntax is based on descriptive function names and intuitive operators suitable for researchers and students without substantial training in programming, who wish to generate and examine sound signals using a written script. In this article, the essence of AUX is discussed and practical examples of AUX scripts specifying various signals are illustrated. Additionally, two accompanying Windows-based programs and development libraries are described. AUX Viewer is a program that generates, visualizes, and plays sounds specified in AUX. AUX Viewer can also be used for class demonstrations or presentations. Another program, Psycon, allows a wide range of sound signals to be used as stimuli in common psychophysical testing paradigms, such as the adaptive procedure, the method of constant stimuli, and the method of adjustment. AUX Library is also provided, so that researchers can develop their own programs utilizing AUX. The philosophical basis of AUX is to separate signal generation from the user interface needed for experiments. AUX scripts are portable and reusable; they can be shared by other researchers, regardless of differences in actual AUX-based programs, and reused for future experiments. In short, the use of AUX can be potentially beneficial to all members of the research community-both those with programming backgrounds and those without.

  7. What you see isn't always what you get: Auditory word signals trump consciously perceived words in lexical access.

    PubMed

    Ostrand, Rachel; Blumstein, Sheila E; Ferreira, Victor S; Morgan, James L

    2016-06-01

    Human speech perception often includes both an auditory and visual component. A conflict in these signals can result in the McGurk illusion, in which the listener perceives a fusion of the two streams, implying that information from both has been integrated. We report two experiments investigating whether auditory-visual integration of speech occurs before or after lexical access, and whether the visual signal influences lexical access at all. Subjects were presented with McGurk or Congruent primes and performed a lexical decision task on related or unrelated targets. Although subjects perceived the McGurk illusion, McGurk and Congruent primes with matching real-word auditory signals equivalently primed targets that were semantically related to the auditory signal, but not targets related to the McGurk percept. We conclude that the time course of auditory-visual integration is dependent on the lexicality of the auditory and visual input signals, and that listeners can lexically access one word and yet consciously perceive another.

  8. Effects of Signal-to-Noise Ratio on Auditory Cortical Frequency Processing

    PubMed Central

    Teschner, Magnus J.; Seybold, Bryan A.; Malone, Brian J.; Hüning, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support the robust processing of acoustic signals in the presence of background noise in the auditory system remain largely unresolved. Psychophysical experiments have shown that signal detection is influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the overall stimulus level, but this relationship has not been fully characterized. We evaluated the neural representation of frequency in rat primary auditory cortex by constructing tonal frequency response areas (FRAs) in primary auditory cortex for different SNRs, tone levels, and noise levels. We show that response strength and selectivity for frequency and sound level depend on interactions between SNRs and tone levels. At low SNRs, jointly increasing the tone and noise levels reduced firing rates and narrowed FRA bandwidths; at higher SNRs, however, increasing the tone and noise levels increased firing rates and expanded bandwidths, as is usually seen for FRAs obtained without background noise. These changes in frequency and intensity tuning decreased tone level and tone frequency discriminability at low SNRs. By contrast, neither response onset latencies nor noise-driven steady-state firing rates meaningfully interacted with SNRs or overall sound levels. Speech detection performance in humans was also shown to depend on the interaction between overall sound level and SNR. Together, these results indicate that signal processing difficulties imposed by high noise levels are quite general and suggest that the neurophysiological changes we see for simple sounds generalize to more complex stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Effective processing of sounds in background noise is an important feature of the mammalian auditory system and a necessary feature for successful hearing in many listening conditions. Even mild hearing loss strongly affects this ability in humans, seriously degrading the ability to communicate. The mechanisms involved in achieving high performance in background noise are not

  9. Human Engineer’s Guide to Auditory Displays. Volume 2. Elements of Signal Reception and Resolution Affecting Auditory Displays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    0011/0037-2 signal’s energy about its central frequency, an effect which may be demonstrated either physically or mathematically. As pointed out by...fatigue occurs as a linear function of log-time (Plomp, 1964a). Decay functions that are linear over time also have been reported (e.g., Luscher and...required to achieve threshold. 10 .-,- - NAVTRAEQUIPCEN 80-D-0011/0037-2 Under conditions of simultaneous masking the signal and masker are physically

  10. Searching for a talking face: the effect of degrading the auditory signal.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Paula C; Murphy, Thomas; Sumner, Christian J; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Roberts, Katherine L

    2014-12-01

    Previous research (e.g., McGurk & MacDonald, 1976) suggests that faces and voices are bound automatically, but recent evidence suggests that attention is involved in a task of searching for a talking face (Alsius & Soto-Faraco, 2011). We hypothesized that the processing demands of the stimuli may affect the amount of attentional resources required, and investigated what effect degrading the auditory stimulus had on the time taken to locate a talking face. Twenty participants were presented with between 2 and 4 faces articulating different sentences, and had to decide which of these faces matched the sentence that they heard. The results showed that in the least demanding auditory condition (clear speech in quiet), search times did not significantly increase when the number of faces increased. However, when speech was presented in background noise or was processed to simulate the information provided by a cochlear implant, search times increased as the number of faces increased. Thus, it seems that the amount of attentional resources required vary according to the processing demands of the auditory stimuli, and when processing load is increased then faces need to be individually attended to in order to complete the task. Based on these results we would expect cochlear-implant users to find the task of locating a talking face more attentionally demanding than normal hearing listeners.

  11. Frontal top-down signals increase coupling of auditory low-frequency oscillations to continuous speech in human listeners.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyojin; Ince, Robin A A; Schyns, Philippe G; Thut, Gregor; Gross, Joachim

    2015-06-15

    Humans show a remarkable ability to understand continuous speech even under adverse listening conditions. This ability critically relies on dynamically updated predictions of incoming sensory information, but exactly how top-down predictions improve speech processing is still unclear. Brain oscillations are a likely mechanism for these top-down predictions [1, 2]. Quasi-rhythmic components in speech are known to entrain low-frequency oscillations in auditory areas [3, 4], and this entrainment increases with intelligibility [5]. We hypothesize that top-down signals from frontal brain areas causally modulate the phase of brain oscillations in auditory cortex. We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to monitor brain oscillations in 22 participants during continuous speech perception. We characterize prominent spectral components of speech-brain coupling in auditory cortex and use causal connectivity analysis (transfer entropy) to identify the top-down signals driving this coupling more strongly during intelligible speech than during unintelligible speech. We report three main findings. First, frontal and motor cortices significantly modulate the phase of speech-coupled low-frequency oscillations in auditory cortex, and this effect depends on intelligibility of speech. Second, top-down signals are significantly stronger for left auditory cortex than for right auditory cortex. Third, speech-auditory cortex coupling is enhanced as a function of stronger top-down signals. Together, our results suggest that low-frequency brain oscillations play a role in implementing predictive top-down control during continuous speech perception and that top-down control is largely directed at left auditory cortex. This suggests a close relationship between (left-lateralized) speech production areas and the implementation of top-down control in continuous speech perception.

  12. The Role of Amygdala Nuclei in the Expression of Auditory Signaled Two-Way Active Avoidance in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, June-Seek; Cain, Christopher K.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Using a two-way signaled active avoidance (2-AA) learning procedure, where rats were trained in a shuttle box to avoid a footshock signaled by an auditory stimulus, we tested the contributions of the lateral (LA), basal (B), and central (CE) nuclei of the amygdala to the expression of instrumental active avoidance conditioned responses (CRs).…

  13. Decision-related cortical potentials during an auditory signal detection task with cued observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Cortical-evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing an auditory detection task with confidence rating responses. Unlike earlier studies that used similar procedures, the observation interval during which the auditory signal could occur was clearly marked by a visual cue light. By precisely defining the observation interval and, hence, synchronizing all perceptual decisions to the evoked potential averaging epoch, it was possible to demonstrate that high-confidence false alarms are accompanied by late-positive P3 components equivalent to those for equally confident hits. Moreover the hit and false alarm evoked potentials were found to covary similarly with variations in confidence rating and to have similar amplitude distributions over the scalp. In a second experiment, it was demonstrated that correct rejections can be associated with a P3 component larger than that for hits. Thus it was possible to show, within the signal detection paradigm, how the two major factors of decision confidence and expectancy are reflected in the P3 component of the cortical-evoked potential.

  14. Auditory detection and discrimination in deaf cats: psychophysical and neural thresholds for intracochlear electrical signals.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, M; Beitel, R E; Snyder, R L

    2001-11-01

    More than 30,000 hearing-impaired human subjects have learned to use cochlear implants for speech perception and speech discrimination. To understand the basic mechanisms underlying the successful application of contemporary speech processing strategies, it is important to investigate how complex electrical stimuli delivered to the cochlea are processed and represented in the central auditory system. A deaf animal model has been developed that allows direct comparison of psychophysical thresholds with central auditory neuronal thresholds to temporally modulated intracochlear electrical signals in the same animals. Behavioral detection thresholds were estimated in neonatally deafened cats for unmodulated pulse trains (e.g., 30 pulses/s or pps) and sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) pulse trains (e.g., 300 pps, SAM at 30 Hz; 300/30 AM). Animals were trained subsequently in a discrimination task to respond to changes in the modulation frequency of successive SAM signals (e.g., 300/8 AM vs. 300/30 AM). During acute physiological experiments, neural thresholds to pulse trains were estimated in the inferior colliculus (IC) and the primary auditory cortex (A1) of the anesthetized animals. Psychophysical detection thresholds for unmodulated and SAM pulse trains were virtually identical. Single IC neuron thresholds for SAM pulse trains showed a small but significant increase in threshold (0.4 dB or 15.5 microA) when compared with thresholds for unmodulated pulse trains. The mean difference between psychophysical and minimum neural thresholds within animals was not significant (mean = 0.3 dB). Importantly, cats also successfully discriminated changes in the modulation frequencies of the SAM signals. Performance on the discrimination task was not affected by carrier rate (100, 300, 500, 1,000, or 1,500 pps). These findings indicate that 1) behavioral and neural response thresholds are based on detection of the peak pulse amplitudes of the modulated and unmodulated signals

  15. Analysis of the influence of memory content of auditory stimuli on the memory content of EEG signal.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Khosrowabadi, Reza; Hussaini, Jamal; Habibi, Shaghayegh; Farid, Ali Akhavan; Kulish, Vladimir V

    2016-08-30

    One of the major challenges in brain research is to relate the structural features of the auditory stimulus to structural features of Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Memory content is an important feature of EEG signal and accordingly the brain. On the other hand, the memory content can also be considered in case of stimulus. Beside all works done on analysis of the effect of stimuli on human EEG and brain memory, no work discussed about the stimulus memory and also the relationship that may exist between the memory content of stimulus and the memory content of EEG signal. For this purpose we consider the Hurst exponent as the measure of memory. This study reveals the plasticity of human EEG signals in relation to the auditory stimuli. For the first time we demonstrated that the memory content of an EEG signal shifts towards the memory content of the auditory stimulus used. The results of this analysis showed that an auditory stimulus with higher memory content causes a larger increment in the memory content of an EEG signal. For the verification of this result, we benefit from approximate entropy as indicator of time series randomness. The capability, observed in this research, can be further investigated in relation to human memory.

  16. Analysis of the influence of memory content of auditory stimuli on the memory content of EEG signal

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in brain research is to relate the structural features of the auditory stimulus to structural features of Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Memory content is an important feature of EEG signal and accordingly the brain. On the other hand, the memory content can also be considered in case of stimulus. Beside all works done on analysis of the effect of stimuli on human EEG and brain memory, no work discussed about the stimulus memory and also the relationship that may exist between the memory content of stimulus and the memory content of EEG signal. For this purpose we consider the Hurst exponent as the measure of memory. This study reveals the plasticity of human EEG signals in relation to the auditory stimuli. For the first time we demonstrated that the memory content of an EEG signal shifts towards the memory content of the auditory stimulus used. The results of this analysis showed that an auditory stimulus with higher memory content causes a larger increment in the memory content of an EEG signal. For the verification of this result, we benefit from approximate entropy as indicator of time series randomness. The capability, observed in this research, can be further investigated in relation to human memory. PMID:27528219

  17. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2016-01-01

    Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM) pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation. PMID:26731108

  18. A Decline in Response Variability Improves Neural Signal Detection during Auditory Task Performance.

    PubMed

    von Trapp, Gardiner; Buran, Bradley N; Sen, Kamal; Semple, Malcolm N; Sanes, Dan H

    2016-10-26

    The detection of a sensory stimulus arises from a significant change in neural activity, but a sensory neuron's response is rarely identical to successive presentations of the same stimulus. Large trial-to-trial variability would limit the central nervous system's ability to reliably detect a stimulus, presumably affecting perceptual performance. However, if response variability were to decrease while firing rate remained constant, then neural sensitivity could improve. Here, we asked whether engagement in an auditory detection task can modulate response variability, thereby increasing neural sensitivity. We recorded telemetrically from the core auditory cortex of gerbils, both while they engaged in an amplitude-modulation detection task and while they sat quietly listening to the identical stimuli. Using a signal detection theory framework, we found that neural sensitivity was improved during task performance, and this improvement was closely associated with a decrease in response variability. Moreover, units with the greatest change in response variability had absolute neural thresholds most closely aligned with simultaneously measured perceptual thresholds. Our findings suggest that the limitations imposed by response variability diminish during task performance, thereby improving the sensitivity of neural encoding and potentially leading to better perceptual sensitivity.

  19. Inhibition in the auditory brainstem enhances signal representation and regulates gain in complex acoustic environments

    PubMed Central

    Keine, Christian; Rübsamen, Rudolf; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition plays a crucial role in neural signal processing, shaping and limiting responses. In the auditory system, inhibition already modulates second order neurons in the cochlear nucleus, e.g. spherical bushy cells (SBCs). While the physiological basis of inhibition and excitation is well described, their functional interaction in signal processing remains elusive. Using a combination of in vivo loose-patch recordings, iontophoretic drug application, and detailed signal analysis in the Mongolian Gerbil, we demonstrate that inhibition is widely co-tuned with excitation, and leads only to minor sharpening of the spectral response properties. Combinations of complex stimuli and neuronal input-output analysis based on spectrotemporal receptive fields revealed inhibition to render the neuronal output temporally sparser and more reproducible than the input. Overall, inhibition plays a central role in improving the temporal response fidelity of SBCs across a wide range of input intensities and thereby provides the basis for high-fidelity signal processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19295.001 PMID:27855778

  20. The tradeoff between signal detection and recognition rules auditory sensitivity under variable background noise conditions.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Marco

    2015-12-07

    Animal acoustic communication commonly takes place under masked conditions. For instance, sound signals relevant for mating and survival are very often masked by background noise, which makes their detection and recognition by organisms difficult. Ambient noise (AN) varies in level and shape among different habitats, but also remarkable variations in time and space occurs within the same habitat. Variable AN conditions mask hearing thresholds of the receiver in complex and unpredictable ways, thereby causing distortions in sound perception. When communication takes place in a noisy environment, a highly sensitive system might confer no advantage to the receiver compared to a less sensitive one. The effects of noise masking on auditory thresholds and hearing-related functions are well known, and the potential role of AN in the evolution of the species' auditory sensitivity has been recognized by few authors. The mechanism of the underlying selection process has never been explored, however. Here I present a simple fitness model that seeks for the best sensitivity of a hearing system performing the detection and recognition of the sound under variable AN conditions. The model predicts higher sensitivity (i.e. lower hearing thresholds) as best strategy for species living in quiet habitats and lower sensitivity (i.e. higher hearing thresholds) as best strategy for those living in noisy habitats provided the cost of incorrect recognition is not low. The tradeoff between detection and recognition of acoustic signals appears to be a key factor determining the best level of hearing sensitivity of a species when acoustic communication is corrupted by noise.

  1. Subthreshold membrane responses underlying sparse spiking to natural vocal signals in auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Krista Eva; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural acoustic communication signals, such as speech, are typically high-dimensional with a wide range of co-varying spectro-temporal features at multiple timescales. The synaptic and network mechanisms for encoding these complex signals are largely unknown. We are investigating these mechanisms in high-level sensory regions of the songbird auditory forebrain, where single neurons show sparse, object-selective spiking responses to conspecific songs. Using whole-cell in-vivo patch clamp techniques in the caudal mesopallium and the caudal nidopallium of starlings, we examine song-driven subthreshold and spiking activity. We find that both the subthreshold and the spiking activity are reliable (i.e., the same song drives a similar response each time it is presented) and specific (i.e. responses to different songs are distinct). Surprisingly, however, the reliability and specificity of the sub-threshold response was uniformly high regardless of when the cell spiked, even for song stimuli that drove no spikes. We conclude that despite a selective and sparse spiking response, high-level auditory cortical neurons are under continuous, non-selective, stimulus-specific synaptic control. To investigate the role of local network inhibition in this synaptic control, we then recorded extracellularly while pharmacologically blocking local GABA-ergic transmission. This manipulation modulated the strength and the reliability of stimulus-driven spiking, consistent with a role for local inhibition in regulating the reliability of network activity and the stimulus specificity of the subthreshold response in single cells. We discuss these results in the context of underlying computations that could generate sparse, stimulus-selective spiking responses, and models for hierarchical pooling. PMID:25728189

  2. Intensity invariance properties of auditory neurons compared to the statistics of relevant natural signals in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Jan; Weschke, Gerroth; Vogel, Astrid; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    The temporal pattern of amplitude modulations (AM) is often used to recognize acoustic objects. To identify objects reliably, intensity invariant representations have to be formed. We approached this problem within the auditory pathway of grasshoppers. We presented AM patterns modulated at different time scales and intensities. Metric space analysis of neuronal responses allowed us to determine how well, how invariantly, and at which time scales AM frequency is encoded. We find that in some neurons spike-count cues contribute substantially (20-60%) to the decoding of AM frequency at a single intensity. However, such cues are not robust when intensity varies. The general intensity invariance of the system is poor. However, there exists a range of AM frequencies around 83 Hz where intensity invariance of local interneurons is relatively high. In this range, natural communication signals exhibit much variation between species, suggesting an important behavioral role for this frequency band. We hypothesize, just as has been proposed for human speech, that the communication signals might have evolved to match the processing properties of the receivers. This contrasts with optimal coding theory, which postulates that neuronal systems are adapted to the statistics of the relevant signals.

  3. 78 FR 36738 - Signal System Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ...., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sean Crain, Electronic Engineer, Signal and Train Control Division, Office of Railroad Safety, FRA, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE... Report form into an electronic format. The electronic form required all of the same information as...

  4. Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) genes are required for auditory and vestibular mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Kurima, Kiyoto; Pan, Bifeng; Griffith, Andrew J; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1) gene can cause dominant and recessive forms of deafness in humans and mice. TMC1 is one of eight mammalian TMC genes of unknown function. The multi-pass transmembrane topologic structure of the proteins they encode suggests roles as a receptor, transporter, channel, or pump. Tmc1 and the closely related Tmc2 gene are expressed in neurosensory hair cells of the auditory and vestibular end organs of the mouse inner ear. Recent studies have demonstrated that Tmc1 and Tmc2 are specifically required for mechanoelectrical transduction in hair cells. The exact role of these proteins in mechanoelectrical transduction is unknown. TMC1 and TMC2 are viable candidates for the mechanoelectrical transduction channel of hair cells, whose component molecules have eluded identification for over 30 years. We expect that studies of TMC proteins will yield insights into molecular components and mechanisms of mechanosensation in auditory and vestibular hair cells, as well as in other tissues and organs.

  5. Dissociated lateralization of transient and sustained blood oxygen level-dependent signal components in human primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Christoph; Herdener, Marcus; Schneider, Peter; Federspiel, Andrea; Bach, Dominik R; Esposito, Fabrizio; di Salle, Francesco; Scheffler, Klaus; Kretz, Robert; Dierks, Thomas; Seifritz, Erich

    2007-02-15

    Among other auditory operations, the analysis of different sound levels received at both ears is fundamental for the localization of a sound source. These so-called interaural level differences, in animals, are coded by excitatory-inhibitory neurons yielding asymmetric hemispheric activity patterns with acoustic stimuli having maximal interaural level differences. In human auditory cortex, the temporal blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to auditory inputs, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), consists of at least two independent components: an initial transient and a subsequent sustained signal, which, on a different time scale, are consistent with electrophysiological human and animal response patterns. However, their specific functional role remains unclear. Animal studies suggest these temporal components being based on different neural networks and having specific roles in representing the external acoustic environment. Here we hypothesized that the transient and sustained response constituents are differentially involved in coding interaural level differences and therefore play different roles in spatial information processing. Healthy subjects underwent monaural and binaural acoustic stimulation and BOLD responses were measured using high signal-to-noise-ratio fMRI. In the anatomically segmented Heschl's gyrus the transient response was bilaterally balanced, independent of the side of stimulation, while in opposite the sustained response was contralateralized. This dissociation suggests a differential role at these two independent temporal response components, with an initial bilateral transient signal subserving rapid sound detection and a subsequent lateralized sustained signal subserving detailed sound characterization.

  6. Habitat-related differences in auditory processing of complex tones and vocal signal properties in four songbirds.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jeffrey R; Vélez, Alejandro; Henry, Kenneth S

    2015-04-01

    We examined temporal processing of harmonic tone complexes in two woodland species (tufted titmice and white-breasted nuthatches) and two open-habitat species (house sparrows and white-crowned sparrows). Envelope and fine-structure processing were quantified using the envelope following response (EFR) and frequency following response (FFR). We predicted stronger EFRs in the open-habitat species based on broader auditory filters and greater amplitude modulation of vocal signals in this group. We predicted stronger FFRs in woodland species based on narrower auditory filters. As predicted, EFR amplitude was generally greatest in the open habitat species. FFR amplitude, in contrast, was greatest in white-crowned sparrows with no clear difference between habitats. This result cannot be fully explained by species differences in audiogram shape and might instead reflect greater acoustic complexity of songs in the white-crowned sparrow. Finally, we observed stronger FFRs in woodland species when tones were broadcast with the next higher harmonic in the complex. Thus, species such as nuthatches that have songs with strong harmonics may process these sounds using enhanced spectral processing instead of enhanced amplitude-envelope processing. The results suggest coevolution between signal design and temporal processing of complex signals and underscore the need to study auditory processing with a diversity of signals.

  7. To modulate and be modulated: estrogenic influences on auditory processing of communication signals within a socio-neuro-endocrine framework.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kathleen M; Vicario, David S

    2012-02-01

    Gonadal hormones modulate behavioral responses to sexual stimuli, and communication signals can also modulate circulating hormone levels. In several species, these combined effects appear to underlie a two-way interaction between circulating gonadal hormones and behavioral responses to socially salient stimuli. Recent work in songbirds has shown that manipulating local estradiol levels in the auditory forebrain produces physiological changes that affect discrimination of conspecific vocalizations and can affect behavior. These studies provide new evidence that estrogens can directly alter auditory processing and indirectly alter the behavioral response to a stimulus. These studies show that: 1) Local estradiol action within an auditory area is necessary for socially relevant sounds to induce normal physiological responses in the brains of both sexes; 2) These physiological effects occur much more quickly than predicted by the classical time-frame for genomic effects; 3) Estradiol action within the auditory forebrain enables behavioral discrimination among socially relevant sounds in males; and 4) Estradiol is produced locally in the male brain during exposure to particular social interactions. The accumulating evidence suggests a socio-neuro-endocrinology framework in which estradiol is essential to auditory processing, is increased by a socially relevant stimulus, acts rapidly to shape perception of subsequent stimuli experienced during social interactions, and modulates behavioral responses to these stimuli. Brain estrogens are likely to function similarly in both songbird sexes because aromatase and estrogen receptors are present in both male and female forebrain. Estrogenic modulation of perception in songbirds and perhaps other animals could fine-tune male advertising signals and female ability to discriminate them, facilitating mate selection by modulating behaviors.

  8. Differential signaling to subplate neurons by spatially specific silent synapses in developing auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangying; Kao, Joseph P Y; Kanold, Patrick O

    2014-06-25

    Subplate neurons (SPNs) form one of the earliest maturing circuits in the cerebral cortex and are crucial to cortical development. In addition to thalamic inputs, subsets of SPNs receive excitatory AMPAR-mediated inputs from the developing cortical plate in the second postnatal week. Functionally silent (non-AMPAR-mediated) excitatory synapses exist in several systems during development, and the existence of such inputs can precede the appearance of AMPAR-mediated synapses. Because SPNs receive inputs from presynaptic cells in different cortical layers, we investigated whether AMPAR-mediated and silent synapses might originate in different layers. We used laser-scanning photostimulation in acute thalamocortical slices of mouse auditory cortex during the first 2 postnatal weeks to study the spatial origin of silent synapses onto SPNs. We find that silent synapses from the cortical plate are present on SPNs and that they originate from different cortical locations than functional (AMPAR-mediated) synapses. Moreover, we find that SPNs can be categorized based on the spatial pattern of silent and AMPAR-mediated connections. Because SPNs can be activated at young ages by thalamic inputs, distinct populations of cortical neurons at young ages have the ability to signal to SPNs depending on the activation state of SPNs. Because during development intracortical circuits are spontaneously active, our results suggest that SPNs might integrate ascending input from the thalamus with spontaneously generated cortical activity patterns. Together, our results suggest that SPNs are an integral part of the developing intracortical circuitry and thereby can sculpt thalamocortical connections.

  9. Auditory language comprehension of temporally reversed speech signals in native and non-native speakers.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Miklos; Cristescu, Tamara; Fink, Martina; Wittmann, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies in brain-injured patients with aphasia and children with specific language-learning deficits have shown the dependence of language comprehension on auditory processing abilities, i.e. the detection of temporal order. An impairment of temporal-order perception can be simulated by time reversing segments of the speech signal. In our study, we investigated how different lengths of time-reversed segments in speech influenced comprehension in ten native German speakers and ten participants who had acquired German as a second language. Results show that native speakers were still able to understand the distorted speech at segment lengths of 50 ms, whereas non-native speakers only could identify sentences with reversed intervals of 32 ms duration. These differences in performance can be interpreted by different levels of semantic and lexical proficiency. Our method of temporally-distorted speech offers a new approach to assess language skills that indirectly taps into lexical and semantic competence of non-native speakers.

  10. Operator Auditory Perception and Spectral Quantification of Umbilical Artery Doppler Ultrasound Signals

    PubMed Central

    Thuring, Ann; Brännström, K. Jonas; Ewerlöf, Maria; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Ley, David; Lingman, Göran; Liuba, Karina; Maršál, Karel; Jansson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Objective An experienced sonographer can by listening to the Doppler audio signals perceive various timbres that distinguish different types of umbilical artery flow despite an unchanged pulsatility index (PI). Our aim was to develop an objective measure of the Doppler audio signals recorded from fetoplacental circulation in a sheep model. Methods Various degrees of pathological flow velocity waveforms in the umbilical artery, similar to those in human complicated pregnancies, were induced by microsphere embolization of the placental bed (embolization model, 7 lamb fetuses, 370 Doppler recordings) or by fetal hemodilution (anemia model, 4 lamb fetuses, 184 recordings). A subjective 11-step operator auditory scale (OAS) was related to conventional Doppler parameters, PI and time average mean velocity (TAM), and to sound frequency analysis of Doppler signals (sound frequency with the maximum energy content [MAXpeak] and frequency band at maximum level minus 15 dB [MAXpeak-15 dB] over several heart cycles). Results We found a negative correlation between the OAS and PI: median Rho −0.73 (range −0.35– −0.94) and −0.68 (range −0.57– −0.78) in the two lamb models, respectively. There was a positive correlation between OAS and TAM in both models: median Rho 0.80 (range 0.58–0.95) and 0.90 (range 0.78–0.95), respectively. A strong correlation was found between TAM and the results of sound spectrum analysis; in the embolization model the median r was 0.91 (range 0.88–0.97) for MAXpeak and 0.91 (range 0.82–0.98) for MAXpeak-15 dB. In the anemia model, the corresponding values were 0.92 (range 0.78–0.96) and 0.96 (range 0.89–0.98), respectively. Conclusion Audio-spectrum analysis reflects the subjective perception of Doppler sound signals in the umbilical artery and has a strong correlation to TAM-velocity. This information might be of importance for clinical management of complicated pregnancies as an addition to conventional Doppler parameters

  11. Protein synthesis in the amygdala, but not the auditory thalamus, is required for consolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Maren, Stephen; Ferrario, Carrie R; Corcoran, Kevin A; Desmond, Timothy J; Frey, Kirk A

    2003-12-01

    The amygdala is an essential neural substrate for Pavlovian fear conditioning. Nevertheless, long-term synaptic plasticity in amygdaloid afferents, such as the auditory thalamus, may contribute to the formation of fear memories. We therefore compared the influence of protein synthesis inhibition in the amygdala and the auditory thalamus on the consolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning in Long-Evans rats. Rats received three tone-footshock trials in a novel conditioning chamber. Immediately after fear conditioning, rats were infused intra-cranially with the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. Conditional fear to the tone and conditioning context was assessed by measuring freezing behaviour in separate retention tests conducted at least 24 h following conditioning. Post-training infusion of anisomycin into the amygdala impaired conditional freezing to both the auditory and contextual stimuli associated with footshock. In contrast, intra-thalamic infusions of anisomycin or a broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor [1-(5'-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H7] did not affect conditional freezing during the retention tests. Pre-training intra-thalamic infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), which blocks synaptic transmission in the auditory thalamus, produced a selective deficit in the acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. Autoradiographic assays of cerebral [14C]-leucine incorporation revealed similar levels of protein synthesis inhibition in the amygdala and thalamus following intra-cranial anisomycin infusions. These results reveal that the establishment of long-term fear memories requires protein synthesis in the amygdala, but not the thalamus, after auditory fear conditioning. Forms of synaptic plasticity that depend on protein synthesis, such as long-term potentiation, are likely candidates for the encoding and long-term storage of fear memories in the amygdala.

  12. The contribution of auditory temporal processing to the separation of competing speech signals in listeners with normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Trudy J.; Pichora-Fuller, Kathy

    2002-05-01

    The hallmark of auditory function in aging adults is difficulty listening in a background of competing talkers, even when hearing sensitivity in quiet is good. Age-related physiological changes may contribute by introducing small timing errors (jitter) to the neural representation of sound, compromising the fidelity of the signal's fine temporal structure. This may preclude the association of spectral features to form an accurate percept of one complex stimulus, distinct from competing sounds. For simple voiced speech (vowels), the separation of two competing stimuli can be achieved on the basis of their respective harmonic (temporal) structures. Fundamental frequency (F0) differences in competing stimuli facilitate their segregation. This benefit was hypothesized to rely on the adequate temporal representation of the speech signal(s). Auditory aging was simulated via the desynchronization (~0.25-ms jitter) of the spectral bands of synthesized vowels. The perceptual benefit of F0 difference for the identification of concurrent vowel pairs was examined for intact and jittered vowels in young adults with normal hearing thresholds. Results suggest a role for reduced signal fidelity in the perceptual difficulties encountered in noisy everyday environments by aging listeners. [Work generously supported by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.

  13. Auditory Responses in the Barn Owl's Nucleus Laminaris to Clicks: Impulse Response and Signal Analysis of Neurophonic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Hermann; Brill, Sandra; Kempter, Richard; Carr, Catherine E.

    2009-01-01

    We used acoustic clicks to study the impulse response of the neurophonic potential in the barn owl's nucleus laminaris. Clicks evoked a complex oscillatory neural response with a component that reflected the best frequency measured with tonal stimuli. The envelope of this component was obtained from the analytic signal created using the Hilbert transform. The time courses of the envelope and carrier waveforms were characterized by fitting them with filters. The envelope was better fitted with a Gaussian than with the envelope of a gamma-tone function. The carrier was better fitted with a frequency glide than with a constant instantaneous frequency. The change of the instantaneous frequency with time was better fitted with a linear fit than with a saturating nonlinearity. Frequency glides had not been observed in the bird's auditory system before. The glides were similar to those observed in the mammalian auditory nerve. Response amplitude, group delay, frequency, and phase depended in a systematic way on click level. In most cases, response amplitude decreased linearly as stimulus level decreased, while group delay, phase, and frequency increased linearly as level decreased. Thus the impulse response of the neurophonic potential in the nucleus laminaris of barn owls reflects many characteristics also observed in responses of the basilar membrane and auditory nerve in mammals. PMID:19535487

  14. Verbal Recall of Auditory and Visual Signals by Normal and Deficient Reading Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Maureen Julianne

    Verbal recall of bisensory memory tasks was compared among 48 9- to 12-year old boys in three groups: normal readers, primary deficit readers, and secondary deficit readers. Auditory and visual stimulus pairs composed of digits, which incorporated variations of intersensory and intrasensory conditions were administered to Ss through a Bell and…

  15. Adaptive categorization of sound frequency does not require the auditory cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Tyler L; Lorenc, Maja; Jaramillo, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    A defining feature of adaptive behavior is our ability to change the way we interpret sensory stimuli depending on context. Rapid adaptation in behavior has been attributed to frontal cortical circuits, but it is not clear if sensory cortexes also play an essential role in such tasks. In this study we tested whether the auditory cortex was necessary for rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. We used a two-alternative choice sound-categorization task for rats in which the boundary that separated two acoustic categories changed several times within a behavioral session. These shifts in the boundary resulted in changes in the rewarded action for a subset of stimuli. We found that extensive lesions of the auditory cortex did not impair the ability of rats to switch between categorization contingencies and sound discrimination performance was minimally impaired. Similar results were obtained after reversible inactivation of the auditory cortex with muscimol. In contrast, lesions of the auditory thalamus largely impaired discrimination performance and, as a result, the ability to modify behavior across contingencies. Thalamic lesions did not impair performance of a visual discrimination task, indicating that the effects were specific to audition and not to motor preparation or execution. These results suggest that subcortical outputs of the auditory thalamus can mediate rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds.

  16. Engineered deafness reveals that mouse courtship vocalizations do not require auditory experience.

    PubMed

    Mahrt, Elena J; Perkel, David J; Tong, Ling; Rubel, Edwin W; Portfors, Christine V

    2013-03-27

    Auditory experience during development is necessary for normal language acquisition in humans. Although songbirds, some cetaceans, and maybe bats may also be vocal learners, vocal learning has yet to be well established for a laboratory mammal. Mice are potentially an excellent model organism for studying mechanisms underlying vocal communication. Mice vocalize in different social contexts, yet whether they learn their vocalizations remains unresolved. To address this question, we compared ultrasonic courtship vocalizations emitted by chronically deaf and normal hearing adult male mice. We deafened CBA/CaJ male mice, engineered to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptors in hair cells, by systemic injection of DT at postnatal day 2 (P2). By P9, almost all inner hair cells were absent and by P16 all inner and outer hair cells were absent in DTR mice. These mice did not show any auditory brainstem responses as adults. Wild-type littermates, also treated with DT at P2, had normal hair cells and normal auditory brainstem responses. We compared the temporal structure of vocalization bouts, the types of vocalizations, the patterns of syllables, and the acoustic features of each syllable type emitted by hearing and deaf males in the presence of a female. We found that almost all of the vocalization features we examined were similar in hearing and deaf animals. These findings indicate that mice do not need auditory experience during development to produce normal ultrasonic vocalizations in adulthood. We conclude that mouse courtship vocalizations are not acquired through auditory feedback-dependent learning.

  17. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visual distress signals required... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.110 Visual distress signals... passenger vessel subject to the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter C, unless visual...

  18. [The role of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in sound signal processing and auditory ascending transmission].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hua; Luo, Feng; Wang, Xin

    2014-06-25

    The ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) is an important nucleus in the central auditory pathway which connects the lower brainstem and the midbrain inferior colliculus (IC). Previous studies have demonstrated that neurons in the VNLL could respond to sound signal parameters. Frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of VNLL neurons are generally wider than FTCs of IC neurons, suggesting that the VNLL does not enhance abilities of frequency discrimination and coding. Two types of rate-intensity functions (RIFs) are found in the VNLL: monotonic and non-monotonic RIFs. Intensity-tuning of VNLL neurons are affected by the temporal firing patterns during processing and encoding intensity. There are multiple temporal firing patterns in VNLL neurons. Onset pattern has a precise timing characteristic which is well suited to encode temporal features of stimuli, and also very important to animal behavior including bat's echolocation. The VNLL accepts inputs from lower nuclei, uploads glycine inhibitory outputs to IC, and modulates response characteristics generating and acoustic signal processing of IC neurons. Recent research suggests that fast inhibitory projection from the VNLL may delay the first spike latency of IC neurons, and the delayed inhibitory projection from the VNLL may mediate the temporal firing patterns of IC neurons. But how inhibitory inputs from the VNLL integrate in IC, and how inhibitory inputs from the VNLL enhance the ability of detecting sound signal of IC neurons are not very clear and need more direct evidence at the level of neurons. These questions will help further understand the role of upload during IC processes acoustic signal, which are our research target in the future. This article reviews the current literature regarding the roles of the VNLL in sound signal processing and the auditory ascending transmission, including advances in the relevant research in our laboratory.

  19. Auditory, visual, and auditory-visual processing performance in typically developing children: modality independence versus dependence.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Roshni; Yathiraj, Asha

    2015-02-01

    The study was carried out to determine whether cross-modal interactions occur during processing of auditory and/or visual signals that require separation/closure, integration, and duration pattern perception in typically developing children. Thirty typically developing children were evaluated on three auditory processing tests (speech-in-noise test in Indian-English, dichotic-consonant vowel test, and duration pattern test) that tapped separation/closure, integration and duration pattern perception. The children were also evaluated on the visual and auditory-visual analogues of the auditory tests. Differences in modality were found in each of the processes that were tested. The performance when the auditory and visual modalities were tested simultaneously was significantly higher than the auditory or visual modality for tests that involved separation/closure and integration. In contrast, scores on the analogous auditory-visual duration pattern test were significantly higher than the auditory test but not the visual analogous test. Further, the scores of the auditory modality were significantly poorer than the visual modality for separation/closure and duration patterning but not for integration. Findings of the study indicate that performance on higher level processing varies depending on the modality that is assessed and supports the presence of cross-modality interactions.

  20. Retrosplenial Cortex Is Required for the Retrieval of Remote Memory for Auditory Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Travis P.; Mehlman, Max L.; Keene, Christopher S.; DeAngeli, Nicole E.; Bucci, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) has a well-established role in contextual and spatial learning and memory, consistent with its known connectivity with visuo-spatial association areas. In contrast, RSC appears to have little involvement with delay fear conditioning to an auditory cue. However, all previous studies have examined the contribution of…

  1. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  2. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  3. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  4. 49 CFR 236.205 - Signal control circuits; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal control circuits; requirements. 236.205... Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.205 Signal control circuits; requirements. The circuits shall be so... fouling point derail equipped with switch circuit controller is not in derailing position, (d) When...

  5. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  6. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  7. Auditory object salience: human cortical processing of non-biological action sounds and their acoustic signal attributes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Talkington, William J; Tallaksen, Katherine C; Frum, Chris A

    2012-01-01

    Whether viewed or heard, an object in action can be segmented as a distinct salient event based on a number of different sensory cues. In the visual system, several low-level attributes of an image are processed along parallel hierarchies, involving intermediate stages wherein gross-level object form and/or motion features are extracted prior to stages that show greater specificity for different object categories (e.g., people, buildings, or tools). In the auditory system, though relying on a rather different set of low-level signal attributes, meaningful real-world acoustic events and "auditory objects" can also be readily distinguished from background scenes. However, the nature of the acoustic signal attributes or gross-level perceptual features that may be explicitly processed along intermediate cortical processing stages remain poorly understood. Examining mechanical and environmental action sounds, representing two distinct non-biological categories of action sources, we had participants assess the degree to which each sound was perceived as object-like versus scene-like. We re-analyzed data from two of our earlier functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task paradigms (Engel et al., 2009) and found that scene-like action sounds preferentially led to activation along several midline cortical structures, but with strong dependence on listening task demands. In contrast, bilateral foci along the superior temporal gyri (STG) showed parametrically increasing activation to action sounds rated as more "object-like," independent of sound category or task demands. Moreover, these STG regions also showed parametric sensitivity to spectral structure variations (SSVs) of the action sounds-a quantitative measure of change in entropy of the acoustic signals over time-and the right STG additionally showed parametric sensitivity to measures of mean entropy and harmonic content of the environmental sounds. Analogous to the visual system, intermediate stages of the

  8. The autophagy pathway maintained signaling crosstalk with the Keap1-Nrf2 system through p62 in auditory cells under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken; Dan, Katsuaki; Goto, Fumiyuki; Tshuchihashi, Nana; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Fujioka, Masato; Kanzaki, Sho; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    The main purposes of our study were to consider the effect of autophagy on auditory cells under oxidative stress, and the function of possible crosstalk among p62, Keap1 and Nrf2 in autophagy-deficient auditory cells. First, we described how cell death was induced in auditory cell line (HEI-OC1) exposed to H2O2. We found that the decision for the cell death of auditory cells under oxidative stress depends on the balance between autophagy and necrosis due to ATP depletion, and autophagy plays a cytoprotective function in oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Our data clearly suggested that autophagy was a cell survival mechanism in H2O2-induced cell death, based on the observation that suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 sensitized, whereas activation of autophagy by rapamycin protected against H2O2-induced cell death. Next, our results regarding the relationship among p62, Nrf2 and Keap1 by siRNA paradoxically showed that p62 creates a positive feedback loop in the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. Autophagy impaired by Atg7 knockdown degrades Keap1 in a p62-dependent manner, whereas Nrf2 is activated. As a result, the cell death induced by H2O2 was promoted in auditory cells. Taken together, these results suggested that the autophagy pathway maintained signaling crosstalk with the Keap1-Nrf2 system through p62 in auditory cells under oxidative stress.

  9. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  10. Auditory scene analysis by echolocation in bats.

    PubMed

    Moss, C F; Surlykke, A

    2001-10-01

    Echolocating bats transmit ultrasonic vocalizations and use information contained in the reflected sounds to analyze the auditory scene. Auditory scene analysis, a phenomenon that applies broadly to all hearing vertebrates, involves the grouping and segregation of sounds to perceptually organize information about auditory objects. The perceptual organization of sound is influenced by the spectral and temporal characteristics of acoustic signals. In the case of the echolocating bat, its active control over the timing, duration, intensity, and bandwidth of sonar transmissions directly impacts its perception of the auditory objects that comprise the scene. Here, data are presented from perceptual experiments, laboratory insect capture studies, and field recordings of sonar behavior of different bat species, to illustrate principles of importance to auditory scene analysis by echolocation in bats. In the perceptual experiments, FM bats (Eptesicus fuscus) learned to discriminate between systematic and random delay sequences in echo playback sets. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the FM bat can assemble information about echo delay changes over time, a requirement for the analysis of a dynamic auditory scene. Laboratory insect capture experiments examined the vocal production patterns of flying E. fuscus taking tethered insects in a large room. In each trial, the bats consistently produced echolocation signal groups with a relatively stable repetition rate (within 5%). Similar temporal patterning of sonar vocalizations was also observed in the field recordings from E. fuscus, thus suggesting the importance of temporal control of vocal production for perceptually guided behavior. It is hypothesized that a stable sonar signal production rate facilitates the perceptual organization of echoes arriving from objects at different directions and distances as the bat flies through a dynamic auditory scene. Field recordings of E. fuscus, Noctilio albiventris, N

  11. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  12. Evolutionary diversification of the auditory organ sensilla in Neoconocephalus katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) correlates with acoustic signal diversification over phylogenetic relatedness and life history.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Johannes; Alt, Joscha A; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Schul, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2017-03-13

    Neoconocephalus Tettigoniidae are a model for the evolution of acoustic signals as male calls have diversified in temporal structure during the radiation of the genus. The call divergence and phylogeny in Neoconocephalus are established, but in tettigoniids in general, accompanying evolutionary changes in hearing organs are not studied. We investigated anatomical changes of the tympanal hearing organs during evolutionary radiation and divergence of intraspecific acoustic signals. We compared the neuroanatomy of auditory sensilla (crista acustica) from nine Neoconocephalus species for the number of auditory sensilla and the crista acustica length. These parameters were correlated to differences in temporal call features, body size, life histories, and different phylogenetic positions. By this, adaptive responses to shifting frequencies of male calls and changes in their temporal patterns can be evaluated against phylogenetic constraints and allometry. All species showed well-developed auditory sensilla, on average 32-35 between species. Crista acustica length and sensillum numbers correlated with body size, but not with phylogenetic position or life history. Statistically significant correlations existed also with specific call patterns: a higher number of auditory sensilla occurred in species with continuous calls or slow pulse rates, and a longer crista acustica occurred in species with double pulses or slow pulse rates. The auditory sensilla show significant differences between species despite their recent radiation, and morphological and ecological similarities. This indicates the responses to natural and sexual selection, including divergence of temporal and spectral signal properties. Phylogenetic constraints are unlikely to limit these changes of the auditory systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... processing. The signal format must meet the following minimum requirements: (a) Frequency assignment. The... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signal format requirements. 171.311 Section...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311...

  14. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... processing. The signal format must meet the following minimum requirements: (a) Frequency assignment. The... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Signal format requirements. 171.311 Section...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311...

  15. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... processing. The signal format must meet the following minimum requirements: (a) Frequency assignment. The... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Signal format requirements. 171.311 Section...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311...

  16. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... processing. The signal format must meet the following minimum requirements: (a) Frequency assignment. The... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Signal format requirements. 171.311 Section...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311...

  17. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... processing. The signal format must meet the following minimum requirements: (a) Frequency assignment. The... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Signal format requirements. 171.311 Section...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311...

  18. 46 CFR 161.013-7 - Signal requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-7 Signal requirements. (a) An electric light must have a flash characteristic of the International Morse Code for S-O-S... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal requirements. 161.013-7 Section...

  19. Acoustic duetting in Drosophila virilis relies on the integration of auditory and tactile signals

    PubMed Central

    LaRue, Kelly M; Clemens, Jan; Berman, Gordon J; Murthy, Mala

    2015-01-01

    Many animal species, including insects, are capable of acoustic duetting, a complex social behavior in which males and females tightly control the rate and timing of their courtship song syllables relative to each other. The mechanisms underlying duetting remain largely unknown across model systems. Most studies of duetting focus exclusively on acoustic interactions, but the use of multisensory cues should aid in coordinating behavior between individuals. To test this hypothesis, we develop Drosophila virilis as a new model for studies of duetting. By combining sensory manipulations, quantitative behavioral assays, and statistical modeling, we show that virilis females combine precisely timed auditory and tactile cues to drive song production and duetting. Tactile cues delivered to the abdomen and genitalia play the larger role in females, as even headless females continue to coordinate song production with courting males. These data, therefore, reveal a novel, non-acoustic, mechanism for acoustic duetting. Finally, our results indicate that female-duetting circuits are not sexually differentiated, as males can also produce ‘female-like’ duets in a context-dependent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07277.001 PMID:26046297

  20. Synaptic Plasticity and NO-cGMP-PKG Signaling Coordinately Regulate ERK-Driven Gene Expression in the Lateral Amygdala and in the Auditory Thalamus Following Pavlovian Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ota, Kristie T.; Monsey, Melissa S.; Wu, Melissa S.; Young, Grace J.; Schafe, Glenn E.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently hypothesized that NO-cGMP-PKG signaling in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) during auditory fear conditioning coordinately regulates ERK-driven transcriptional changes in both auditory thalamic (MGm/PIN) and LA neurons that serve to promote pre- and postsynaptic alterations at thalamo-LA synapses, respectively. In the…

  1. The acquisition of mechano‐electrical transducer current adaptation in auditory hair cells requires myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Marcotti, Walter; Corns, Laura F.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K.; Avraham, Karen B.; Steel, Karen P.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The transduction of sound into electrical signals occurs at the hair bundles atop sensory hair cells in the cochlea, by means of mechanosensitive ion channels, the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) channels.The MET currents decline during steady stimuli; this is termed adaptation and ensures they always work within the most sensitive part of their operating range, responding best to rapidly changing (sound) stimuli.In this study we used a mouse model (Snell's waltzer) for hereditary deafness in humans that has a mutation in the gene encoding an unconventional myosin, myosin VI, which is present in the hair bundles.We found that in the absence of myosin VI the MET current fails to acquire its characteristic adaptation as the hair bundles develop.We propose that myosin VI supports the acquisition of adaptation by removing key molecules from the hair bundle that serve a temporary, developmental role. Abstract Mutations in Myo6, the gene encoding the (F‐actin) minus end‐directed unconventional myosin, myosin VI, cause hereditary deafness in mice (Snell's waltzer) and humans. In the sensory hair cells of the cochlea, myosin VI is expressed in the cell bodies and along the stereocilia that project from the cells’ apical surface. It is required for maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanosensitive hair bundles formed by the stereocilia. In this study we investigate whether myosin VI contributes to mechano‐electrical transduction. We report that Ca2+‐dependent adaptation of the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) current, which serves to keep the transduction apparatus operating within its most sensitive range, is absent in outer and inner hair cells from homozygous Snell's waltzer mutant mice, which fail to express myosin VI. The operating range of the MET channels is also abnormal in the mutants, resulting in the absence of a resting MET current. We found that cadherin 23, a component of the hair bundle's transient lateral links

  2. Sensory augmentation: integration of an auditory compass signal into human perception of space

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Frank; O’Regan, J. Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Bio-mimetic approaches to restoring sensory function show great promise in that they rapidly produce perceptual experience, but have the disadvantage of being invasive. In contrast, sensory substitution approaches are non-invasive, but may lead to cognitive rather than perceptual experience. Here we introduce a new non-invasive approach that leads to fast and truly perceptual experience like bio-mimetic techniques. Instead of building on existing circuits at the neural level as done in bio-mimetics, we piggy-back on sensorimotor contingencies at the stimulus level. We convey head orientation to geomagnetic North, a reliable spatial relation not normally sensed by humans, by mimicking sensorimotor contingencies of distal sounds via head-related transfer functions. We demonstrate rapid and long-lasting integration into the perception of self-rotation. Short training with amplified or reduced rotation gain in the magnetic signal can expand or compress the perceived extent of vestibular self-rotation, even with the magnetic signal absent in the test. We argue that it is the reliability of the magnetic signal that allows vestibular spatial recalibration, and the coding scheme mimicking sensorimotor contingencies of distal sounds that permits fast integration. Hence we propose that contingency-mimetic feedback has great potential for creating sensory augmentation devices that achieve fast and genuinely perceptual experiences. PMID:28195187

  3. Sensory augmentation: integration of an auditory compass signal into human perception of space.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Frank; O'Regan, J Kevin

    2017-02-14

    Bio-mimetic approaches to restoring sensory function show great promise in that they rapidly produce perceptual experience, but have the disadvantage of being invasive. In contrast, sensory substitution approaches are non-invasive, but may lead to cognitive rather than perceptual experience. Here we introduce a new non-invasive approach that leads to fast and truly perceptual experience like bio-mimetic techniques. Instead of building on existing circuits at the neural level as done in bio-mimetics, we piggy-back on sensorimotor contingencies at the stimulus level. We convey head orientation to geomagnetic North, a reliable spatial relation not normally sensed by humans, by mimicking sensorimotor contingencies of distal sounds via head-related transfer functions. We demonstrate rapid and long-lasting integration into the perception of self-rotation. Short training with amplified or reduced rotation gain in the magnetic signal can expand or compress the perceived extent of vestibular self-rotation, even with the magnetic signal absent in the test. We argue that it is the reliability of the magnetic signal that allows vestibular spatial recalibration, and the coding scheme mimicking sensorimotor contingencies of distal sounds that permits fast integration. Hence we propose that contingency-mimetic feedback has great potential for creating sensory augmentation devices that achieve fast and genuinely perceptual experiences.

  4. Visual influences on auditory spatial learning

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The visual and auditory systems frequently work together to facilitate the identification and localization of objects and events in the external world. Experience plays a critical role in establishing and maintaining congruent visual–auditory associations, so that the different sensory cues associated with targets that can be both seen and heard are synthesized appropriately. For stimulus location, visual information is normally more accurate and reliable and provides a reference for calibrating the perception of auditory space. During development, vision plays a key role in aligning neural representations of space in the brain, as revealed by the dramatic changes produced in auditory responses when visual inputs are altered, and is used throughout life to resolve short-term spatial conflicts between these modalities. However, accurate, and even supra-normal, auditory localization abilities can be achieved in the absence of vision, and the capacity of the mature brain to relearn to localize sound in the presence of substantially altered auditory spatial cues does not require visuomotor feedback. Thus, while vision is normally used to coordinate information across the senses, the neural circuits responsible for spatial hearing can be recalibrated in a vision-independent fashion. Nevertheless, early multisensory experience appears to be crucial for the emergence of an ability to match signals from different sensory modalities and therefore for the outcome of audiovisual-based rehabilitation of deaf patients in whom hearing has been restored by cochlear implantation. PMID:18986967

  5. Regulatory T cells require TCR signaling for their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amanda M; Lu, Wen; Sindhava, Vishal J; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K; Yang, Enjun; Riese, Matthew J; Maltzman, Jonathan S; Jordan, Martha S; Kambayashi, Taku

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4(+) T cells that maintain immune tolerance in part by their ability to inhibit the proliferation of conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconvs). The role of the TCR and the downstream signaling pathways required for this suppressive function of Tregs are not fully understood. To yield insight into how TCR-mediated signals influence Treg suppressive function, we assessed the ability of Tregs with altered TCR-mediated signaling capacity to inhibit Tconv proliferation. Mature Tregs deficient in Src homology 2 domain containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76), an adaptor protein that nucleates the proximal signaling complex downstream of the TCR, were unable to inhibit Tconv proliferation, suggesting that TCR signaling is required for Treg suppressive function. Moreover, Tregs with defective phospholipase C γ (PLCγ) activation due to a Y145F mutation of SLP-76 were also defective in their suppressive function. Conversely, enhancement of diacylglycerol-mediated signaling downstream of PLCγ by genetic ablation of a negative regulator of diacylglycerol kinase ζ increased the suppressive ability of Tregs. Because SLP-76 is also important for integrin activation and signaling, we tested the role of integrin activation in Treg-mediated suppression. Tregs lacking the adaptor proteins adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein or CT10 regulator of kinase/CT10 regulator of kinase-like, which are required for TCR-mediated integrin activation, inhibited Tconv proliferation to a similar extent as wild-type Tregs. Together, these data suggest that TCR-mediated PLCγ activation, but not integrin activation, is required for Tregs to inhibit Tconv proliferation.

  6. Distinct roles of TRP channels in auditory transduction and amplification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Brendan P; Baker, Allison E; Gaudry, Quentin; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Wilson, Rachel I

    2013-01-09

    Auditory receptor cells rely on mechanically gated channels to transform sound stimuli into neural activity. Several TRP channels have been implicated in Drosophila auditory transduction, but mechanistic studies have been hampered by the inability to record subthreshold signals from receptor neurons. Here, we develop a non-invasive method for measuring these signals by recording from a central neuron that is electrically coupled to a genetically defined population of auditory receptor cells. We find that the TRPN family member NompC, which is necessary for the active amplification of sound-evoked motion by the auditory organ, is not required for transduction in auditory receptor cells. Instead, NompC sensitizes the transduction complex to movement and precisely regulates the static forces on the complex. In contrast, the TRPV channels Nanchung and Inactive are required for responses to sound, suggesting they are components of the transduction complex. Thus, transduction and active amplification are genetically separable processes in Drosophila hearing.

  7. Potyviruses differ in their requirement for TOR signalling.

    PubMed

    Ouibrahim, Laurence; Rubio, Ana Giner; Moretti, André; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Menand, Benoît; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe; Caranta, Carole

    2015-09-01

    Potyviruses are important plant pathogens that rely on many plant cellular processes for successful infection. TOR (target of rapamycin) signalling is a key eukaryotic energy-signalling pathway controlling many cellular processes such as translation and autophagy. The dependence of potyviruses on active TOR signalling was examined. Arabidopsis lines downregulated for TOR by RNAi were challenged with the potyviruses watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) and turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). WMV accumulation was found to be severely altered while TuMV accumulation was only slightly delayed. In another approach, using AZD-8055, an active site inhibitor of the TOR kinase, WMV infection was found to be strongly affected. Moreover, AZD-8055 application can cure WMV infection. In contrast, TuMV infection was not affected by AZD-8055. This suggests that potyviruses have different cellular requirements for active plant TOR signalling.

  8. 46 CFR 161.013-7 - Signal requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-7 Signal requirements. (a) An electric light must have a flash characteristic of the International Morse Code for...

  9. 46 CFR 161.013-7 - Signal requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-7 Signal requirements. (a) An electric light must have a flash characteristic of the International Morse Code for...

  10. Subcortical processing in auditory communication.

    PubMed

    Pannese, Alessia; Grandjean, Didier; Frühholz, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    The voice is a rich source of information, which the human brain has evolved to decode and interpret. Empirical observations have shown that the human auditory system is especially sensitive to the human voice, and that activity within the voice-sensitive regions of the primary and secondary auditory cortex is modulated by the emotional quality of the vocal signal, and may therefore subserve, with frontal regions, the cognitive ability to correctly identify the speaker's affective state. So far, the network involved in the processing of vocal affect has been mainly characterised at the cortical level. However, anatomical and functional evidence suggests that acoustic information relevant to the affective quality of the auditory signal might be processed prior to the auditory cortex. Here we review the animal and human literature on the main subcortical structures along the auditory pathway, and propose a model whereby the distinction between different types of vocal affect in auditory communication begins at very early stages of auditory processing, and relies on the analysis of individual acoustic features of the sound signal. We further suggest that this early feature-based decoding occurs at a subcortical level along the ascending auditory pathway, and provides a preliminary coarse (but fast) characterisation of the affective quality of the auditory signal before the more refined (but slower) cortical processing is completed.

  11. Mouse Spermatogenesis Requires Classical and Nonclassical Testosterone Signaling.

    PubMed

    Toocheck, Corey; Clister, Terri; Shupe, John; Crum, Chelsea; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Raj, Ganesh V; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Walker, William H

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone acts though the androgen receptor in Sertoli cells to support germ cell development (spermatogenesis) and male fertility, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which testosterone acts are not well understood. Previously, we found that in addition to acting through androgen receptor to directly regulate gene expression (classical testosterone signaling pathway), testosterone acts through a nonclassical pathway via the androgen receptor to rapidly activate kinases that are known to regulate spermatogenesis. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nonclassical testosterone signaling occurs in vivo as the MAP kinase cascade is rapidly activated in Sertoli cells within the testis by increasing testosterone levels in the rat. We find that either classical or nonclassical signaling regulates testosterone-mediated Rhox5 gene expression in Sertoli cells within testis explants. The selective activation of classical or nonclassical signaling pathways in Sertoli cells within testis explants also resulted in the differential activation of the Zbtb16 and c-Kit genes in adjacent spermatogonia germ cells. Delivery of an inhibitor of either pathway to Sertoli cells of mouse testes disrupted the blood-testis barrier that is essential for spermatogenesis. Furthermore, an inhibitor of nonclassical testosterone signaling blocked meiosis in pubertal mice and caused the loss of meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells in adult mouse testes. An inhibitor of the classical pathway caused the premature release of immature germ cells. Collectively, these observations indicate that classical and nonclassical testosterone signaling regulate overlapping and distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  12. From sensation to percept: the neural signature of auditory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Joos, Kathleen; Gilles, Annick; Van de Heyning, Paul; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2014-05-01

    An external auditory stimulus induces an auditory sensation which may lead to a conscious auditory perception. Although the sensory aspect is well known, it is still a question how an auditory stimulus results in an individual's conscious percept. To unravel the uncertainties concerning the neural correlates of a conscious auditory percept, event-related potentials may serve as a useful tool. In the current review we mainly wanted to shed light on the perceptual aspects of auditory processing and therefore we mainly focused on the auditory late-latency responses. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that perception is an active process in which the brain searches for the information it expects to be present, suggesting that auditory perception requires the presence of both bottom-up, i.e. sensory and top-down, i.e. prediction-driven processing. Therefore, the auditory evoked potentials will be interpreted in the context of the Bayesian brain model, in which the brain predicts which information it expects and when this will happen. The internal representation of the auditory environment will be verified by sensation samples of the environment (P50, N100). When this incoming information violates the expectation, it will induce the emission of a prediction error signal (Mismatch Negativity), activating higher-order neural networks and inducing the update of prior internal representations of the environment (P300).

  13. Complex Auditory Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    the five 10-ms cos2 rise/decay ramps. The stimuli were presented listeners. The error bars represent the mean of the standard diotically over TDH-50...earphones. errors computed for the individual listeners. The solid lines A two-alternative, forced-choice procedure was used. represent our...in dB components in the background. Squares represent thresholds averaged across listeners. Error har represent the mean of the standard errors com

  14. Auditory agnosia.

    PubMed

    Slevc, L Robert; Shell, Alison R

    2015-01-01

    Auditory agnosia refers to impairments in sound perception and identification despite intact hearing, cognitive functioning, and language abilities (reading, writing, and speaking). Auditory agnosia can be general, affecting all types of sound perception, or can be (relatively) specific to a particular domain. Verbal auditory agnosia (also known as (pure) word deafness) refers to deficits specific to speech processing, environmental sound agnosia refers to difficulties confined to non-speech environmental sounds, and amusia refers to deficits confined to music. These deficits can be apperceptive, affecting basic perceptual processes, or associative, affecting the relation of a perceived auditory object to its meaning. This chapter discusses what is known about the behavioral symptoms and lesion correlates of these different types of auditory agnosia (focusing especially on verbal auditory agnosia), evidence for the role of a rapid temporal processing deficit in some aspects of auditory agnosia, and the few attempts to treat the perceptual deficits associated with auditory agnosia. A clear picture of auditory agnosia has been slow to emerge, hampered by the considerable heterogeneity in behavioral deficits, associated brain damage, and variable assessments across cases. Despite this lack of clarity, these striking deficits in complex sound processing continue to inform our understanding of auditory perception and cognition.

  15. Meaning From Environmental Sounds: Types of Signal-Referent Relations and Their Effect on Recognizing Auditory Icons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Peter; Stevens, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the learnability of auditory icons, that is, environmental sounds that refer either directly or indirectly to meaningful events. Direct relations use the sound made by the target event whereas indirect relations substitute a surrogate for the target. Across 3 experiments, different indirect relations (ecological, in which…

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Survival Signaling Requires Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; Upadhyay, Awani; Ido, Liyana J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Identification of pro-cell survival signaling pathways has implications for cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disease. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor LET-23 (LET-23 EGFR) has a prosurvival function in counteracting excitotoxicity, and we identify novel molecular players required for this prosurvival signaling. uv1 sensory cells in the C. elegans uterus undergo excitotoxic death in response to activation of the OSM-9/OCR-4 TRPV channel by the endogenous agonist nicotinamide. Activation of LET-23 EGFR can effectively prevent this excitotoxic death. We investigate the roles of signaling pathways known to act downstream of LET-23 EGFR in C. elegans and find that the LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway, but not the IP3 receptor pathway, is required for efficient LET-23 EGFR activity in its prosurvival function. However, activation of LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway does not appear to be sufficient to fully mimic LET-23 EGFR activity. We screen for genes that are required for EGFR prosurvival function and uncover a role for phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes in EGFR prosurvival function. Finally, we show that exogenous application of phosphatidylcholine is sufficient to prevent some deaths in this excitotoxicity model. Our work implicates regulation of lipid synthesis downstream of EGFR in cell survival and death decisions. PMID:27605519

  17. Incorporating Auditory Models in Speech/Audio Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthi, Harish

    2011-12-01

    Following the success in incorporating perceptual models in audio coding algorithms, their application in other speech/audio processing systems is expanding. In general, all perceptual speech/audio processing algorithms involve minimization of an objective function that directly/indirectly incorporates properties of human perception. This dissertation primarily investigates the problems associated with directly embedding an auditory model in the objective function formulation and proposes possible solutions to overcome high complexity issues for use in real-time speech/audio algorithms. Specific problems addressed in this dissertation include: 1) the development of approximate but computationally efficient auditory model implementations that are consistent with the principles of psychoacoustics, 2) the development of a mapping scheme that allows synthesizing a time/frequency domain representation from its equivalent auditory model output. The first problem is aimed at addressing the high computational complexity involved in solving perceptual objective functions that require repeated application of auditory model for evaluation of different candidate solutions. In this dissertation, a frequency pruning and a detector pruning algorithm is developed that efficiently implements the various auditory model stages. The performance of the pruned model is compared to that of the original auditory model for different types of test signals in the SQAM database. Experimental results indicate only a 4-7% relative error in loudness while attaining up to 80-90 % reduction in computational complexity. Similarly, a hybrid algorithm is developed specifically for use with sinusoidal signals and employs the proposed auditory pattern combining technique together with a look-up table to store representative auditory patterns. The second problem obtains an estimate of the auditory representation that minimizes a perceptual objective function and transforms the auditory pattern back to

  18. Development of the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Auditory development involves changes in the peripheral and central nervous system along the auditory pathways, and these occur naturally, and in response to stimulation. Human development occurs along a trajectory that can last decades, and is studied using behavioral psychophysics, as well as physiologic measurements with neural imaging. The auditory system constructs a perceptual space that takes information from objects and groups, segregates sounds, and provides meaning and access to communication tools such as language. Auditory signals are processed in a series of analysis stages, from peripheral to central. Coding of information has been studied for features of sound, including frequency, intensity, loudness, and location, in quiet and in the presence of maskers. In the latter case, the ability of the auditory system to perform an analysis of the scene becomes highly relevant. While some basic abilities are well developed at birth, there is a clear prolonged maturation of auditory development well into the teenage years. Maturation involves auditory pathways. However, non-auditory changes (attention, memory, cognition) play an important role in auditory development. The ability of the auditory system to adapt in response to novel stimuli is a key feature of development throughout the nervous system, known as neural plasticity.

  19. Development of the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Auditory development involves changes in the peripheral and central nervous system along the auditory pathways, and these occur naturally, and in response to stimulation. Human development occurs along a trajectory that can last decades, and is studied using behavioral psychophysics, as well as physiologic measurements with neural imaging. The auditory system constructs a perceptual space that takes information from objects and groups, segregates sounds, and provides meaning and access to communication tools such as language. Auditory signals are processed in a series of analysis stages, from peripheral to central. Coding of information has been studied for features of sound, including frequency, intensity, loudness, and location, in quiet and in the presence of maskers. In the latter case, the ability of the auditory system to perform an analysis of the scene becomes highly relevant. While some basic abilities are well developed at birth, there is a clear prolonged maturation of auditory development well into the teenage years. Maturation involves auditory pathways. However, non-auditory changes (attention, memory, cognition) play an important role in auditory development. The ability of the auditory system to adapt in response to novel stimuli is a key feature of development throughout the nervous system, known as neural plasticity. PMID:25726262

  20. Required signal-to-interference ratios for shortwave broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, George

    1997-09-01

    The required signal-to-Interference (RSI) ratio for a specified grade of HF radio service is the hourly median wanted signal power at the input of the receiver needed relative to the sum of the hourly median unwanted signal power and the hourly median radio noise power in the RF bandwidth of the receiver, adjusted so that the hourly median ratio will not fall below the RSI ratio more than a certain percentage of the time due to minute-to-minute fading within the hour. Shortwave listeners are well aware of the deleterious effects of cochannel and adjacent channel interference. This type of interference is especially prevalent in the overcrowded international broadcast bands where it is manifested by cross talk and a beat note produced in the receiver by the carrier of the unwanted signal. Yet little agreement exists as to the magnitude of the amplitude-modulated, double sideband (AM-DSB) interfering signal that can be tolerated by the listener. Numerous protection ratios have been proposed in the literature, as well as by elements of the International Telecommunication Union. These values tend to range from 17 dB [International Frequency Registration Board, 1989] to as high as 50 dB for "good commercial quality," offset in carrier frequency of 500 Hz and 10 dB short-term fade protection [CCIR, 1970]. In this paper, several significant experiments are reviewed for the purpose of normalizing their findings to a common set of parameters. The parameters relate to articulation scoring, type of noise (if used), fading of wanted and unwanted signals, type of interference, listener skill, bandwidth of the receiver, carrier frequency offset, etc. From this compilation of normalized data, RSI values are recommended as they relate to the desired broadcast quality and the signal-to-noise ratio of the wanted signal. The RSI ratios are compatible for use in HF sky wave prediction programs that contain appropriate RF noise and interference combining subroutines. The recommended

  1. Pronephric Tubulogenesis Requires Daam1-Mediated Planar Cell Polarity Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gomez de la Torre Canny, Sol; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Cho, Kyucheol; Ji, Hong; Wagner, Daniel S.; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Habas, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Canonical β-catenin-mediated Wnt signaling is essential for the induction of nephron development. Noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways contribute to processes such as cell polarization and cytoskeletal modulation in several tissues. Although PCP components likely establish the plane of polarization in kidney tubulogenesis, whether PCP effectors directly modulate the actin cytoskeleton in tubulogenesis is unknown. Here, we investigated the roles of Wnt PCP components in cytoskeletal assembly during kidney tubule morphogenesis in Xenopus laevis and zebrafish. We found that during tubulogenesis, the developing pronephric anlagen expresses Daam1 and its interacting Rho-GEF (WGEF), which compose one PCP/noncanonical Wnt pathway branch. Knockdown of Daam1 resulted in reduced expression of late pronephric epithelial markers with no apparent effect upon early markers of patterning and determination. Inhibiting various points in the Daam1 signaling pathway significantly reduced pronephric tubulogenesis. These data indicate that pronephric tubulogenesis requires the Daam1/WGEF/Rho PCP pathway. PMID:21804089

  2. Evaluating auditory perception and communication demands required to carry out work tasks and complimentary hearing resources and skills for older workers with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M B; Shaw, L; Hodgins, H; Kuchar, D A; Bataghva, L Poost-Foroosh

    2010-01-01

    For older workers with acquired hearing loss, this loss as well as the changing nature of work and the workforce, may lead to difficulties and disadvantages in obtaining and maintaining employment. Currently there are very few instruments that can assist workplaces, employers and workers to prepare for older workers with hearing loss or with the evaluation of auditory perception demands of work, especially those relevant to communication, and safety sensitive workplaces that require high levels of communication. This paper introduces key theoretical considerations that informed the development of a new framework, The Audiologic Ergonomic (AE) Framework to guide audiologists, work rehabilitation professionals and workers in developing tools to support the identification and evaluation of auditory perception demands in the workplace, the challenges to communication and the subsequent productivity and safety in the performance of work duties by older workers with hearing loss. The theoretical concepts underpinning this framework are discussed along with next steps in developing tools such as the Canadian Hearing Demands Tool (C-HearD Tool) in advancing approaches to evaluate auditory perception and communication demands in the workplace.

  3. Auditory Imagination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Martyn

    Auditory imagination is used in this paper to describe a number of issues and activities related to sound and having to do with listening, thinking, recalling, imagining, reshaping, creating, and uttering sounds and words. Examples of auditory imagination in religious and literary works are cited that indicate a belief in an imagined, expected, or…

  4. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  5. Neural Correlates of Auditory Processing, Learning and Memory Formation in Songbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, R.; Terleph, T. A.; Wynne, R. D.; Tremere, L. A.

    Songbirds have emerged as powerful experimental models for the study of auditory processing of complex natural communication signals. Intact hearing is necessary for several behaviors in developing and adult animals including vocal learning, territorial defense, mate selection and individual recognition. These behaviors are thought to require the processing, discrimination and memorization of songs. Although much is known about the brain circuits that participate in sensorimotor (auditory-vocal) integration, especially the ``song-control" system, less is known about the anatomical and functional organization of central auditory pathways. Here we discuss findings associated with a telencephalic auditory area known as the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM). NCM has attracted significant interest as it exhibits functional properties that may support higher order auditory functions such as stimulus discrimination and the formation of auditory memories. NCM neurons are vigorously dr iven by auditory stimuli. Interestingly, these responses are selective to conspecific, relative to heterospecific songs and artificial stimuli. In addition, forms of experience-dependent plasticity occur in NCM and are song-specific. Finally, recent experiments employing high-throughput quantitative proteomics suggest that complex protein regulatory pathways are engaged in NCM as a result of auditory experience. These molecular cascades are likely central to experience-associated plasticity of NCM circuitry and may be part of a network of calcium-driven molecular events that support the formation of auditory memory traces.

  6. Requirement for Pangolin/dTCF in Drosophila Wingless signaling.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Liang; Nellen, Denise; Basler, Konrad

    2003-05-13

    The Wingless (Wg) protein is a secreted glycoprotein involved in intercellular signaling. On activation of the Wg signaling pathway, Armadillo is stabilized, causing target genes to be activated by the transcription factor Pangolin (Pan). This study investigated the roles of Pan in the developing wing of Drosophila by clonal analysis. Three different aspects of wing development were examined: cell proliferation, wing margin specification, and wg self-refinement. Our results indicate that Pan function is critically required for all three of these processes. Consequently, lack of pan causes a severe reduction in the activity of the Wg target genes Distalless and vestigial within their normal domain of expression. Loss of pan function does not, however, lead to a derepression of these genes outside this domain. Thus, although Pan is positively required for the induction of Wg targets in the wing imaginal disk, it does not appear to play a default repressor function in the absence of Wg input. In contrast, lack of zygotic pan function causes a milder phenotype than that caused by the lack of wg function in the embryo. We show that this difference cannot be attributed to maternally provided pan product, indicating that a Pan repressor function usually prevents the expression of embryonic Wg targets. Together, our results suggest that for embryonic patterning the activator as well as repressor forms of Pan play important roles, while for wing development Pan operates primarily in the activator mode.

  7. Supporting cell division is not required for regeneration of auditory hair cells after ototoxic injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jialin; Cafaro, Jon; Nehmer, Rachel; Stone, Jennifer

    2010-06-01

    In chickens, nonsensory supporting cells divide and regenerate auditory hair cells after injury. Anatomical evidence suggests that supporting cells can also transdifferentiate into hair cells without dividing. In this study, we characterized an organ culture model to study auditory hair cell regeneration, and we used these cultures to test if direct transdifferentiation alone can lead to significant hair cell regeneration. Control cultures (organs from posthatch chickens maintained without streptomycin) showed complete hair cell loss in the proximal (high-frequency) region by 5 days. In contrast, a 2-day treatment with streptomycin induced loss of hair cells from all regions by 3 days. Hair cell regeneration proceeded in culture, with the time course of supporting cell division and hair cell differentiation generally resembling in vivo patterns. The degree of supporting cell division depended upon the presence of streptomycin, the epithelial region, the type of culture media, and serum concentration. On average, 87% of the regenerated hair cells lacked the cell division marker BrdU despite its continuous presence, suggesting that most hair cells were regenerated via direct transdifferentiation. Addition of the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin to culture media prevented supporting cell division, but numerous hair cells were regenerated nonetheless. These hair cells showed signs of functional maturation, including stereociliary bundles and rapid uptake of FM1-43. These observations demonstrate that direct transdifferentiation is a significant mechanism of hair cell regeneration in the chicken auditory after streptomycin damage in vitro.

  8. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26093309

  9. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation.

    PubMed

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation.

  10. Central auditory disorders: toward a neuropsychology of auditory objects

    PubMed Central

    Goll, Johanna C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Analysis of the auditory environment, source identification and vocal communication all require efficient brain mechanisms for disambiguating, representing and understanding complex natural sounds as ‘auditory objects’. Failure of these mechanisms leads to a diverse spectrum of clinical deficits. Here we review current evidence concerning the phenomenology, mechanisms and brain substrates of auditory agnosias and related disorders of auditory object processing. Recent findings Analysis of lesions causing auditory object deficits has revealed certain broad anatomical correlations: deficient parsing of the auditory scene is associated with lesions involving the parieto-temporal junction, while selective disorders of sound recognition occur with more anterior temporal lobe or extra-temporal damage. Distributed neural networks have been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of such disorders as developmental dyslexia, congenital amusia and tinnitus. Auditory category deficits may arise from defective interaction of spectrotemporal encoding and executive and mnestic processes. Dedicated brain mechanisms are likely to process specialised sound objects such as voices and melodies. Summary Emerging empirical evidence suggests a clinically relevant, hierarchical and fractionated neuropsychological model of auditory object processing that provides a framework for understanding auditory agnosias and makes specific predictions to direct future work. PMID:20975559

  11. Myocardium and BMP signaling are required for endocardial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Palencia-Desai, Sharina; Rost, Megan S; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Ton, Quynh V; Craig, Michael P; Baltrunaite, Kristina; Koenig, Andrew L; Wang, Jinhu; Poss, Kenneth D; Chi, Neil C; Stainier, Didier Y R; Sumanas, Saulius

    2015-07-01

    Endocardial and myocardial progenitors originate in distinct regions of the anterior lateral plate mesoderm and migrate to the midline where they coalesce to form the cardiac tube. Endocardial progenitors acquire a molecular identity distinct from other vascular endothelial cells and initiate expression of specific genes such as nfatc1. Yet the molecular pathways and tissue interactions involved in establishing endocardial identity are poorly understood. The endocardium develops in tight association with cardiomyocytes. To test for a potential role of the myocardium in endocardial morphogenesis, we used two different zebrafish models deficient in cardiomyocytes: the hand2 mutant and a myocardial-specific genetic ablation method. We show that in hand2 mutants endocardial progenitors migrate to the midline but fail to assemble into a cardiac cone and do not express markers of differentiated endocardium. Endocardial differentiation defects were rescued by myocardial but not endocardial-specific expression of hand2. In metronidazole-treated myl7:nitroreductase embryos, myocardial cells were targeted for apoptosis, which resulted in the loss of endocardial nfatc1 expression. However, endocardial cells were present and retained expression of general vascular endothelial markers. We further identified bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) as a candidate myocardium-derived signal required for endocardial differentiation. Chemical and genetic inhibition of BMP signaling at the tailbud stage resulted in severe inhibition of endocardial differentiation while there was little effect on myocardial development. Heat-shock-induced bmp2b expression rescued endocardial nfatc1 expression in hand2 mutants and in myocardium-depleted embryos. Our results indicate that the myocardium is crucial for endocardial morphogenesis and differentiation, and identify BMP as a signal involved in endocardial differentiation.

  12. Corneal Wound Healing Requires IKB kinase β Signaling in Keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Qin; Kao, Winston; Xia, Ying

    2016-01-01

    IkB kinase β (IKKβ) is a key signaling kinase for inflammatory responses, but it also plays diverse cell type-specific roles that are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the role of IKKβ in the cornea using IkkβΔCS mice in which the Ikkβ gene was specifically deleted in the corneal stromal keratocytes. The IkkβΔCS corneas had normal morphology, transparency and thickness; however, they did not heal well from mild alkali burn injury. In contrast to the IkkβF/F corneas that restored transparency in 2 weeks after injury, over 50% of the IkkβΔCS corneas failed to fully recover. They instead developed recurrent haze with increased stromal thickness, severe inflammation and apoptosis. This pathogenesis correlated with sustained myofibroblast transformation with increased α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, higher levels of senescence β-Gal activity and scar tissue formation at the late stage of wound healing. In addition, the IkkβΔCS corneas displayed elevated expression of hemo-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a marker of oxidative stress, and activation of stress signaling pathways with increased JNK, c-Jun and SMAD2/3 phosphorylation. These data suggest that IKKβ in keratocytes is required to repress oxidative stress and attenuate fibrogenesis and senescence in corneal wound healing. PMID:26987064

  13. Cortical cholinergic input is required for normal auditory perception and experience-dependent plasticity in adult ferrets.

    PubMed

    Leach, Nicholas D; Nodal, Fernando R; Cordery, Patricia M; King, Andrew J; Bajo, Victoria M

    2013-04-10

    The nucleus basalis (NB) in the basal forebrain provides most of the cholinergic input to the neocortex and has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions related to the processing of sensory stimuli. However, the role that cortical acetylcholine release plays in perception remains unclear. Here we show that selective loss of cholinergic NB neurons that project to the cortex reduces the accuracy with which ferrets localize brief sounds and prevents them from adaptively reweighting auditory localization cues in response to chronic occlusion of one ear. Cholinergic input to the cortex was disrupted by making bilateral injections of the immunotoxin ME20.4-SAP into the NB. This produced a substantial loss of both p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR))-positive and choline acetyltransferase-positive cells in this region and of acetylcholinesterase-positive fibers throughout the auditory cortex. These animals were significantly impaired in their ability to localize short broadband sounds (40-500 ms in duration) in the horizontal plane, with larger cholinergic cell lesions producing greater performance impairments. Although they localized longer sounds with normal accuracy, their response times were significantly longer than controls. Ferrets with cholinergic forebrain lesions were also less able to relearn to localize sound after plugging one ear. In contrast to controls, they exhibited little recovery of localization performance after behavioral training. Together, these results show that cortical cholinergic inputs contribute to the perception of sound source location under normal hearing conditions and play a critical role in allowing the auditory system to adapt to changes in the spatial cues available.

  14. Auditory adaptation improves tactile frequency perception.

    PubMed

    Crommett, Lexi E; Pérez-Bellido, Alexis; Yau, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-11

    Our ability to process temporal frequency information by touch underlies our capacity to perceive and discriminate surface textures. Auditory signals, which also provide extensive temporal frequency information, can systematically alter the perception of vibrations on the hand. How auditory signals shape tactile processing is unclear: perceptual interactions between contemporaneous sounds and vibrations are consistent with multiple neural mechanisms. Here we used a crossmodal adaptation paradigm, which separated auditory and tactile stimulation in time, to test the hypothesis that tactile frequency perception depends on neural circuits that also process auditory frequency. We reasoned that auditory adaptation effects would transfer to touch only if signals from both senses converge on common representations. We found that auditory adaptation can improve tactile frequency discrimination thresholds. This occurred only when adaptor and test frequencies overlapped. In contrast, auditory adaptation did not influence tactile intensity judgments. Thus, auditory adaptation enhances touch in a frequency- and feature-specific manner. A simple network model in which tactile frequency information is decoded from sensory neurons that are susceptible to auditory adaptation recapitulates these behavioral results. Our results imply that the neural circuits supporting tactile frequency perception also process auditory signals. This finding is consistent with the notion of supramodal operators performing canonical operations, like temporal frequency processing, regardless of input modality.

  15. Only signaling modules that discriminate sharply between stimulatory and nonstimulatory inputs require basal signaling for fast cellular responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artomov, Mykyta; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2010-09-01

    In many types of cells, binding of molecules to their receptors enables cascades of intracellular chemical reactions to take place (signaling). However, a low level of signaling also occurs in most unstimulated cells. Such basal signaling in resting cells can have many functions, one of which is that it is thought to be required for fast cellular responses to external stimuli. A mechanistic understanding of why this is true and which features of cellular signaling networks make basal signaling necessary for fast responses is unknown. We address this issue by obtaining the time required for activation of common types of cell signaling modules with and without basal signaling. Our results show that the absence of basal signaling does not have any dramatic effects on the response time for signaling modules that exhibit a graded response to increasing stimulus levels. In sharp contrast, signaling modules that exhibit sharp dose-response curves which discriminate sensitively between stimuli to which the cell needs to respond and low-grade inputs (or stochastic noise) require basal signaling for fast cellular responses. In such cases, we find that an optimal level of basal signaling balances the requirements for fast cellular responses while minimizing spurious activation without appropriate stimulation.

  16. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  17. Auditory Processing Disorder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other speech-language difficulties? Are verbal (word) math problems difficult for your child? Is your child ... inferences from conversations, understanding riddles, or comprehending verbal math problems — require heightened auditory processing and language levels. ...

  18. Spatiotemporal Relationships among Audiovisual Stimuli Modulate Auditory Facilitation of Visual Target Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Yang, Huamin; Sun, Fang; Wu, Jinglong

    2015-03-01

    Sensory information is multimodal; through audiovisual interaction, task-irrelevant auditory stimuli tend to speed response times and increase visual perception accuracy. However, mechanisms underlying these performance enhancements have remained unclear. We hypothesize that task-irrelevant auditory stimuli might provide reliable temporal and spatial cues for visual target discrimination and behavioral response enhancement. Using signal detection theory, the present study investigated the effects of spatiotemporal relationships on auditory facilitation of visual target discrimination. Three experiments were conducted where an auditory stimulus maintained reliable temporal and/or spatial relationships with visual target stimuli. Results showed that perception sensitivity (d') to visual target stimuli was enhanced only when a task-irrelevant auditory stimulus maintained reliable spatiotemporal relationships with a visual target stimulus. When only reliable spatial or temporal information was contained, perception sensitivity was not enhanced. These results suggest that reliable spatiotemporal relationships between visual and auditory signals are required for audiovisual integration during a visual discrimination task, most likely due to a spread of attention. These results also indicate that auditory facilitation of visual target discrimination follows from late-stage cognitive processes rather than early stage sensory processes.

  19. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Taiwo, Rukayat; Stufkens, Afke; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-05-01

    effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly defined. Effector N-termini are thought to contain the signal, but they lack homology, possess no identifiable motif, and adopt intrinsically disordered structures. We identified a panel of RNA secretion signals that facilitated reporter translocation into host cells via a mechanism dependent upon the RNA chaperone Hfq. Each of these signals was localized to an RNA leader sequence preceding the translational start codon. To obtain this panel of RNA signals, we fused untranslated leader sequences from 42 different Salmonella effector proteins to the adenylate cyclase reporter (CyaA'), and tested each of them for translocation into J774 macrophages. RNA sequences derived from five effectors, gtgA, cigR, gogB, sseL, and steD were sufficient for CyaA' injection into host cells. The gtgA RNA also directed translocation of the β-lactamase reporter. To determine the mechanism of signal recognition, we identified proteins that bound specifically to the gtgA RNA. One of the unique proteins identified was Hfq. Translocation of all five UTR fusions was abolished in the Hfq mutant, confirming the importance of Hfq. Our results suggest that Hfq may direct a subset of RNA transcripts to the T3S apparatus for translation and secretion. Signal diversity may explain why the T3S signal has been difficult to define.

  20. Lexical Influences on Auditory Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Billig, Alexander J.; Davis, Matthew H.; Deeks, John M.; Monstrey, Jolijn; Carlyon, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biologically salient sounds, including speech, are rarely heard in isolation. Our brains must therefore organize the input arising from multiple sources into separate “streams” and, in the case of speech, map the acoustic components of the target signal onto meaning. These auditory and linguistic processes have traditionally been considered to occur sequentially and are typically studied independently [1, 2]. However, evidence that streaming is modified or reset by attention [3], and that lexical knowledge can affect reports of speech sound identity [4, 5], suggests that higher-level factors may influence perceptual organization. In two experiments, listeners heard sequences of repeated words or acoustically matched nonwords. After several presentations, they reported that the initial /s/ sound in each syllable formed a separate stream; the percept then fluctuated between the streamed and fused states in a bistable manner. In addition to measuring these verbal transformations, we assessed streaming objectively by requiring listeners to detect occasional targets—syllables containing a gap after the initial /s/. Performance was better when streaming caused the syllables preceding the target to transform from words into nonwords, rather than from nonwords into words. Our results show that auditory stream formation is influenced not only by the acoustic properties of speech sounds, but also by higher-level processes involved in recognizing familiar words. PMID:23891107

  1. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  2. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  3. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  4. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring... SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.52 EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements. (a) EAS Participants must be capable of receiving the Attention Signal required by § 11.32(a)(9) and emergency...

  5. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  6. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  7. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  8. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  9. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  10. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  11. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  12. Auditory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ades, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    The physical correlations of hearing, i.e. the acoustic stimuli, are reported. The auditory system, consisting of external ear, middle ear, inner ear, organ of Corti, basilar membrane, hair cells, inner hair cells, outer hair cells, innervation of hair cells, and transducer mechanisms, is discussed. Both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses are also examined.

  13. Sensory Processing of Backward-Masking Signals in Children with Language-Learning Impairment as Assessed with the Auditory Brainstem Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marler, Jeffrey A.; Champlin, Craig A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the possible contribution of sensory mechanisms to an auditory processing deficit shown by some children with language-learning impairment (LLI). Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were measured from 2 groups of school-aged (8-10 years) children. One group consisted of 10 children with LLI, and the other…

  14. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a) The requirements for reception by a marine VHF shipboard receiver are satisfied if the field strength from...

  15. Auditory orientation in crickets: Pattern recognition controls reactive steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2005-10-01

    Many groups of insects are specialists in exploiting sensory cues to locate food resources or conspecifics. To achieve orientation, bees and ants analyze the polarization pattern of the sky, male moths orient along the females' odor plume, and cicadas, grasshoppers, and crickets use acoustic signals to locate singing conspecifics. In comparison with olfactory and visual orientation, where learning is involved, auditory processing underlying orientation in insects appears to be more hardwired and genetically determined. In each of these examples, however, orientation requires a recognition process identifying the crucial sensory pattern to interact with a localization process directing the animal's locomotor activity. Here, we characterize this interaction. Using a sensitive trackball system, we show that, during cricket auditory behavior, the recognition process that is tuned toward the species-specific song pattern controls the amplitude of auditory evoked steering responses. Females perform small reactive steering movements toward any sound patterns. Hearing the male's calling song increases the gain of auditory steering within 2-5 s, and the animals even steer toward nonattractive sound patterns inserted into the speciesspecific pattern. This gain control mechanism in the auditory-to-motor pathway allows crickets to pursue species-specific sound patterns temporarily corrupted by environmental factors and may reflect the organization of recognition and localization networks in insects. localization | phonotaxis

  16. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  17. Brain Dynamics of Aging: Multiscale Variability of EEG Signals at Rest and during an Auditory Oddball Task1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Perdikis, Dionysios; Müller, Viktor; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Huys, Raoul; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present work focused on the study of fluctuations of cortical activity across time scales in young and older healthy adults. The main objective was to offer a comprehensive characterization of the changes of brain (cortical) signal variability during aging, and to make the link with known underlying structural, neurophysiological, and functional modifications, as well as aging theories. We analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data of young and elderly adults, which were collected at resting state and during an auditory oddball task. We used a wide battery of metrics that typically are separately applied in the literature, and we compared them with more specific ones that address their limits. Our procedure aimed to overcome some of the methodological limitations of earlier studies and verify whether previous findings can be reproduced and extended to different experimental conditions. In both rest and task conditions, our results mainly revealed that EEG signals presented systematic age-related changes that were time-scale-dependent with regard to the structure of fluctuations (complexity) but not with regard to their magnitude. Namely, compared with young adults, the cortical fluctuations of the elderly were more complex at shorter time scales, but less complex at longer scales, although always showing a lower variance. Additionally, the elderly showed signs of spatial, as well as between, experimental conditions dedifferentiation. By integrating these so far isolated findings across time scales, metrics, and conditions, the present study offers an overview of age-related changes in the fluctuation electrocortical activity while making the link with underlying brain dynamics. PMID:26464983

  18. Assessing effectiveness of various auditory warning signals in maintaining drivers' attention in virtual reality-based driving environments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Chiu, Tien-Ting; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chao, Chih-Feng; Liang, Wen-Chieh; Hsu, Shang-Hwa; Ko, Li-Wei

    2009-06-01

    Drivers' fatigue contributes to traffic accidents, so drivers must maintain adequate alertness. The effectiveness of audio alarms in maintaining driving performance and characteristics of alarms was studied in a virtural reality-based driving environment. Response time to the car's drifting was measured under seven conditions: with no warnings and with continuous warning tones (500 Hz, 1750 Hz, and 3000 Hz), and with tone bursts at 500 Hz, 1750 Hz, and 3000 Hz. Analyses showed the audio warning signals significantly improved driving. Further, the tones' spectral characteristics significantly influenced the effectiveness of the warning.

  19. Auditory short-term memory in the primate auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brian H; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2016-06-01

    Sounds are fleeting, and assembling the sequence of inputs at the ear into a coherent percept requires auditory memory across various time scales. Auditory short-term memory comprises at least two components: an active ׳working memory' bolstered by rehearsal, and a sensory trace that may be passively retained. Working memory relies on representations recalled from long-term memory, and their rehearsal may require phonological mechanisms unique to humans. The sensory component, passive short-term memory (pSTM), is tractable to study in nonhuman primates, whose brain architecture and behavioral repertoire are comparable to our own. This review discusses recent advances in the behavioral and neurophysiological study of auditory memory with a focus on single-unit recordings from macaque monkeys performing delayed-match-to-sample (DMS) tasks. Monkeys appear to employ pSTM to solve these tasks, as evidenced by the impact of interfering stimuli on memory performance. In several regards, pSTM in monkeys resembles pitch memory in humans, and may engage similar neural mechanisms. Neural correlates of DMS performance have been observed throughout the auditory and prefrontal cortex, defining a network of areas supporting auditory STM with parallels to that supporting visual STM. These correlates include persistent neural firing, or a suppression of firing, during the delay period of the memory task, as well as suppression or (less commonly) enhancement of sensory responses when a sound is repeated as a ׳match' stimulus. Auditory STM is supported by a distributed temporo-frontal network in which sensitivity to stimulus history is an intrinsic feature of auditory processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory.

  20. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  1. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  2. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  3. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  4. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  5. A Model of Auditory-Cognitive Processing and Relevance to Clinical Applicability.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss and cognitive function interact in both a bottom-up and top-down relationship. Listening effort is tied to these interactions, and models have been developed to explain their relationship. The Ease of Language Understanding model in particular has gained considerable attention in its explanation of the effect of signal distortion on speech understanding. Signal distortion can also affect auditory scene analysis ability, however, resulting in a distorted auditory scene that can affect cognitive function, listening effort, and the allocation of cognitive resources. These effects are explained through an addition to the Ease of Language Understanding model. This model can be generalized to apply to all sounds, not only speech, representing the increased effort required for auditory environmental awareness and other nonspeech auditory tasks. While the authors have measures of speech understanding and cognitive load to quantify these interactions, they are lacking measures of the effect of hearing aid technology on auditory scene analysis ability and how effort and attention varies with the quality of an auditory scene. Additionally, the clinical relevance of hearing aid technology on cognitive function and the application of cognitive measures in hearing aid fittings will be limited until effectiveness is demonstrated in real-world situations.

  6. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  7. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  8. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  9. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  10. 46 CFR 161.013-7 - Signal requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements. (a) An electric light must have a flash characteristic of the International Morse Code for S-O-S and, under design conditions, (1) Each short flash must have a duration of 1/3 second; (2) Each long flash must have a duration of 1 second; (3) The dark period between each short flash must have...

  11. Nematode CLE signaling in Arabidopsis requires CLAVATA2 and CORYNE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/ESR(CLE)-like effector proteins. These proteins have been shown to act as ligand mimics of plant CLE peptides and are required for successful nematode infection; however, the receptors for nematode CLE-like peptides have not been identified. Her...

  12. Functional Organization of the Ventral Auditory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yale E; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Gifford, Adam M; Tsunada, Joji

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental problem in audition is determining the mechanisms required by the brain to transform an unlabelled mixture of auditory stimuli into coherent perceptual representations. This process is called auditory-scene analysis. The perceptual representations that result from auditory-scene analysis are formed through a complex interaction of perceptual grouping, attention, categorization and decision-making. Despite a great deal of scientific energy devoted to understanding these aspects of hearing, we still do not understand (1) how sound perception arises from neural activity and (2) the causal relationship between neural activity and sound perception. Here, we review the role of the "ventral" auditory pathway in sound perception. We hypothesize that, in the early parts of the auditory cortex, neural activity reflects the auditory properties of a stimulus. However, in latter parts of the auditory cortex, neurons encode the sensory evidence that forms an auditory decision and are causally involved in the decision process. Finally, in the prefrontal cortex, which receives input from the auditory cortex, neural activity reflects the actual perceptual decision. Together, these studies indicate that the ventral pathway contains hierarchical circuits that are specialized for auditory perception and scene analysis.

  13. Copper is required for oncogenic BRAF signaling and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Donita C.; Crowe, Matthew S.; Turski, Michelle L.; Hobbs, G. Aaron; Yao, Xiaojie; Chaikuad, Apirat; Knapp, Stefan; Xiao, Kunhong; Campbell, Sharon L.; Thiele, Dennis J.; Counter, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The BRAF kinase is mutated, typically V600E, to induce an active oncogenic state in a large fraction of melanoma, thyroid, hairy cell leukemia, and to a lesser extent, a wide spectrum of other cancers1,2. BRAFV600E phosphorylates and activates the kinases MEK1 and MEK2, which in turn phosphorylate and activate the kinases ERK1 and ERK2, stimulating the MAPK pathway to promote cancer3. Targeting MEK1/2 is proving to be an important therapeutic strategy, as a MEK1/2 inhibitor provides a survival advantage in metastatic melanoma4, which is increased when co-administered with a BRAFV600E inhibitor5. In this regard, we previously found that copper (Cu) influx enhances MEK1 phosphorylation of ERK1/2 through a Cu-MEK1 interaction6. We now show that genetic loss of the high affinity Cu transporter Ctr1 or mutations in MEK1 that disrupt Cu binding reduced BRAFV600E-driven signaling and tumorigenesis. Conversely, a MEK1-MEK5 chimera that phosphorylates ERK1/2 independent of Cu or an active ERK2 restored tumor growth to cells lacking Ctr1. Importantly, Cu chelators used in the treatment of Wilson disease7 reduced tumor growth of both BRAFV600E-transformed cells and cells resistant to BRAF inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that Cu-chelation therapy could be repurposed to treat BRAFV600E mutation-positive cancers. PMID:24717435

  14. Sustainable Land Use Requires Attention to Ecological Signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halvorson, W.L.; Castellanos, A.E.; Murrieta-Saldivar, J.

    2003-01-01

    This case study details the difficulties of landscape management, highlighting the challenges inherent in managing natural resources when multiple agencies are involved, when the land users have no incentive for conservation, and when government agencies have too few resources for effective management. Pumping of groundwater from the aquifer of La Costa de Hermosillo in the state of Sonora, Mexico, began in 1945 and developed so quickly that by the late 1950s salinity intrusion from the Gulf of California was occurring in the wells. In the 1970s, the irrigatable land in La Costa peaked at 132,516 ha and the extracted volume of water from the aquifer peaked at around 1.14 billion cubic meters annually. By the 1980s, 105 wells of the total of 498 were contaminated with seawater and, therefore, identified for closure. At present La Costa de Hermosillo still represents 15% of the total harvested land, 16% of the total annual production, and 23% of the gross agricultural production of the state of Sonora. However, there are approximately 80,000 ha of abandoned fields due to salt water intension, lack of water and/or lack of credit available to individual farmers. This unstable situation resulted from the interplay of water management policies and practices, and farm-land policies and practices. While government agencies have been able to enforce better water use for agricultural production, there remains a significant area that requires restoration from its degraded state. For this piece of the ecosystem management puzzle, government agencies have thus far been unable to affect a solution.

  15. Benign lesions of the external auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Tran, L P; Grundfast, K M; Selesnick, S H

    1996-10-01

    Benign mass lesions of the external auditory canal, such as exostoses and osteomas, are common findings on physical examination but most often do not require treatment. The differential diagnosis of lesions in the external auditory canal, however, should not be limited to those benign processes discussed here, but should also include infectious, dermatologic, congenital, and malignant processes.

  16. Low Power Adder Based Auditory Filter Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Cochlea devices are powered up with the help of batteries and they should possess long working life to avoid replacing of devices at regular interval of years. Hence the devices with low power consumptions are required. In cochlea devices there are numerous filters, each responsible for frequency variant signals, which helps in identifying speech signals of different audible range. In this paper, multiplierless lookup table (LUT) based auditory filter is implemented. Power aware adder architectures are utilized to add the output samples of the LUT, available at every clock cycle. The design is developed and modeled using Verilog HDL, simulated using Mentor Graphics Model-Sim Simulator, and synthesized using Synopsys Design Compiler tool. The design was mapped to TSMC 65 nm technological node. The standard ASIC design methodology has been adapted to carry out the power analysis. The proposed FIR filter architecture has reduced the leakage power by 15% and increased its performance by 2.76%. PMID:25506073

  17. Low power adder based auditory filter architecture.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, P F Khaleelur; Jayanthi, V S

    2014-01-01

    Cochlea devices are powered up with the help of batteries and they should possess long working life to avoid replacing of devices at regular interval of years. Hence the devices with low power consumptions are required. In cochlea devices there are numerous filters, each responsible for frequency variant signals, which helps in identifying speech signals of different audible range. In this paper, multiplierless lookup table (LUT) based auditory filter is implemented. Power aware adder architectures are utilized to add the output samples of the LUT, available at every clock cycle. The design is developed and modeled using Verilog HDL, simulated using Mentor Graphics Model-Sim Simulator, and synthesized using Synopsys Design Compiler tool. The design was mapped to TSMC 65 nm technological node. The standard ASIC design methodology has been adapted to carry out the power analysis. The proposed FIR filter architecture has reduced the leakage power by 15% and increased its performance by 2.76%.

  18. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... section on at least one channel. The Attention signal may be produced from a storage device. Additionally... Attention signal may be produced from a storage device. Additionally, these analog cable systems, digital... deployed an Intermediary Device to meet its CAP-related obligations, this requirement shall be...

  19. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section on at least one channel. The Attention signal may be produced from a storage device. Additionally... Attention signal may be produced from a storage device. Additionally, these analog cable systems, digital... deployed an Intermediary Device to meet its CAP-related obligations, this requirement shall be...

  20. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    PubMed

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices.

  1. How Does Auditory Training Work? Joined-Up Thinking and Listening.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melanie; Henshaw, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Auditory training aims to compensate for degradation in the auditory signal and is offered as an intervention to help alleviate the most common complaint in people with hearing loss, understanding speech in a background noise. Yet there remain many unanswered questions. This article reviews some of the key pieces of evidence that assess the evidence for whether, and how, auditory training benefits adults with hearing loss. The evidence supports that improvements occur on the trained task; however, transfer of that learning to generalized real-world benefit is much less robust. For more than a decade, there has been an increasing awareness of the role that cognition plays in listening. But more recently in the auditory training literature, there has been an increased focus on assessing how cognitive performance relevant for listening may improve with training. We argue that this is specifically the case for measures that index executive processes, such as monitoring, attention switching, and updating of working memory, all of which are required for successful listening and communication in challenging or adverse listening conditions. We propose combined auditory-cognitive training approaches, where training interventions develop cognition embedded within auditory tasks, which are most likely to offer generalized benefits to the real-world listening abilities of people with hearing loss.

  2. Auditory processing efficiency deficits in children with developmental language impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Douglas E. H.; Moore, David R.

    2002-12-01

    The ``temporal processing hypothesis'' suggests that individuals with specific language impairments (SLIs) and dyslexia have severe deficits in processing rapidly presented or brief sensory information, both within the auditory and visual domains. This hypothesis has been supported through evidence that language-impaired individuals have excess auditory backward masking. This paper presents an analysis of masking results from several studies in terms of a model of temporal resolution. Results from this modeling suggest that the masking results can be better explained by an ``auditory efficiency'' hypothesis. If impaired or immature listeners have a normal temporal window, but require a higher signal-to-noise level (poor processing efficiency), this hypothesis predicts the observed small deficits in the simultaneous masking task, and the much larger deficits in backward and forward masking tasks amongst those listeners. The difference in performance on these masking tasks is predictable from the compressive nonlinearity of the basilar membrane. The model also correctly predicts that backward masking (i) is more prone to training effects, (ii) has greater inter- and intrasubject variability, and (iii) increases less with masker level than do other masking tasks. These findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms underlying communication disorders and auditory masking.

  3. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the R7 photoreceptor cell. Components of the signal transduction pathway activated by Sev in the R7 precursor include proteins encoded by the gap1, drk, Sos, ras1 and raf loci. In this report we present evidence that a Drosophila MAP kinase, ERK-A, is encoded by the rolled locus and is required downstream of raf in the Sev signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:8157002

  4. Auditory imagery and the poor-pitch singer.

    PubMed

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Halpern, Andrea R

    2013-08-01

    The vocal imitation of pitch by singing requires one to plan laryngeal movements on the basis of anticipated target pitch events. This process may rely on auditory imagery, which has been shown to activate motor planning areas. As such, we hypothesized that poor-pitch singing, although not typically associated with deficient pitch perception, may be associated with deficient auditory imagery. Participants vocally imitated simple pitch sequences by singing, discriminated pitch pairs on the basis of pitch height, and completed an auditory imagery self-report questionnaire (the Bucknell Auditory Imagery Scale). The percentage of trials participants sung in tune correlated significantly with self-reports of vividness for auditory imagery, although not with the ability to control auditory imagery. Pitch discrimination was not predicted by auditory imagery scores. The results thus support a link between auditory imagery and vocal imitation.

  5. Ageing and the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, A; Shone, G R

    2006-01-01

    There are a number of pathophysiological processes underlying age related changes in the auditory system. The effects of hearing loss can have consequences beyond the immediate loss of hearing, and may have profound effects on the functioning of the person. While a deficit in hearing can be corrected to some degree by a hearing aid, auditory rehabilitation requires much more than simply amplifying external sound. It is important that those dealing with elderly people are aware of all the issues involved in age related hearing loss. PMID:16517797

  6. Two Adjacent Trimeric Fas Ligands Are Required for Fas Signaling and Formation of a Death-Inducing Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Nils; Tardivel, Aubry; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Hertig, Sylvie; Gaide, Olivier; Martinon, Fabio; Tinel, Antoine; Deperthes, David; Calderara, Silvio; Schulthess, Therese; Engel, Jürgen; Schneider, Pascal; Tschopp, Jürg

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound form of Fas ligand (FasL) signals apoptosis in target cells through engagement of the death receptor Fas, whereas the proteolytically processed, soluble form of FasL does not induce cell death. However, soluble FasL can be rendered active upon cross-linking. Since the minimal extent of oligomerization of FasL that exerts cytotoxicity is unknown, we engineered hexameric proteins containing two trimers of FasL within the same molecule. This was achieved by fusing FasL to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G1 or to the collagen domain of ACRP30/adiponectin. Trimeric FasL and hexameric FasL both bound to Fas, but only the hexameric forms were highly cytotoxic and competent to signal apoptosis via formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Three sequential early events in Fas-mediated apoptosis could be dissected, namely, receptor binding, receptor activation, and recruitment of intracellular signaling molecules, each of which occurred independently of the subsequent one. These results demonstrate that the limited oligomerization of FasL, and most likely of some other tumor necrosis factor family ligands such as CD40L, is required for triggering of the signaling pathways. PMID:12556501

  7. Perception of stochastically undersampled sound waveforms: a model of auditory deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A.; Barrios, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Auditory deafferentation, or permanent loss of auditory nerve afferent terminals, occurs after noise overexposure and aging and may accompany many forms of hearing loss. It could cause significant auditory impairment but is undetected by regular clinical tests and so its effects on perception are poorly understood. Here, we hypothesize and test a neural mechanism by which deafferentation could deteriorate perception. The basic idea is that the spike train produced by each auditory afferent resembles a stochastically digitized version of the sound waveform and that the quality of the waveform representation in the whole nerve depends on the number of aggregated spike trains or auditory afferents. We reason that because spikes occur stochastically in time with a higher probability for high- than for low-intensity sounds, more afferents would be required for the nerve to faithfully encode high-frequency or low-intensity waveform features than low-frequency or high-intensity features. Deafferentation would thus degrade the encoding of these features. We further reason that due to the stochastic nature of nerve firing, the degradation would be greater in noise than in quiet. This hypothesis is tested using a vocoder. Sounds were filtered through ten adjacent frequency bands. For the signal in each band, multiple stochastically subsampled copies were obtained to roughly mimic different stochastic representations of that signal conveyed by different auditory afferents innervating a given cochlear region. These copies were then aggregated to obtain an acoustic stimulus. Tone detection and speech identification tests were performed by young, normal-hearing listeners using different numbers of stochastic samplers per frequency band in the vocoder. Results support the hypothesis that stochastic undersampling of the sound waveform, inspired by deafferentation, impairs speech perception in noise more than in quiet, consistent with auditory aging effects. PMID:23882176

  8. Early neural crest induction requires an initial inhibition of Wnt signals.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Ben; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Neural crest (NC) induction is a long process that continues through gastrula and neurula stages. In order to reveal additional stages of NC induction we performed a series of explants where different known inducing tissues were taken along with the prospective NC. Interestingly the dorso-lateral marginal zone (DLMZ) is only able to promote the expression of a subset of neural plate border (NPB) makers without the presence of specific NC markers. We then analysed the temporal requirement for BMP and Wnt signals for the NPB genes Hairy2a and Dlx5, compared to the expression of neural plate (NP) and NC genes. Although the NP is sensitive to BMP levels at early gastrula stages, Hairy2a/Dlx5 expression is unaffected. Later, the NP becomes insensitive to BMP levels at late gastrulation when NC markers require an inhibition. The NP requires an inhibition of Wnt signals prior to gastrulation, but becomes insensitive during early gastrula stages when Hairy2a/Dlx5 requires an inhibition of Wnt signalling. An increase in Wnt signalling is then important for the switch from NPB to NC at late gastrula stages. In addition to revealing an additional distinct signalling event in NC induction, this work emphasizes the importance of integrating both timing and levels of signalling activity during the patterning of complex tissues such as the vertebrate ectoderm.

  9. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  10. Improved Long-Term Memory via Enhancing cGMP-PKG Signaling Requires cAMP-PKA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Eva; Puzzo, Daniela; Rutten, Kris; Privitera, Lucia; De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Kenis, Gunter; Palmeri, Agostino; D'Hooge, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef; Steinbusch, Harry MW; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation is defined by the stabilization of a memory trace after acquisition, and consists of numerous molecular cascades that mediate synaptic plasticity. Commonly, a distinction is made between an early and a late consolidation phase, in which early refers to the first hours in which labile synaptic changes occur, whereas late consolidation relates to stable and long-lasting synaptic changes induced by de novo protein synthesis. How these phases are linked at a molecular level is not yet clear. Here we studied the interaction of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated pathways during the different phases of memory consolidation in rodents. In addition, the same pathways were studied in a model of neuronal plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP). We demonstrated that cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling mediates early memory consolidation as well as early-phase LTP, whereas cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling mediates late consolidation and late-phase-like LTP. In addition, we show for the first time that early-phase cGMP/PKG signaling requires late-phase cAMP/PKA-signaling in both LTP and long-term memory formation. PMID:24813825

  11. Signaling required for blood vessel maintenance: molecular basis and pathological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    As our understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to vascular formation increases, vessel maintenance including stabilization of new vessels and prevention of vessel regression began to be considered as an active process that requires specific cellular signaling. While signaling pathways such as VEGF, FGF, and angiopoietin-Tie2 are important for endothelial cell survival and junction stabilization, PDGF and TGF-β signaling modify mural cell (vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes) functions, thus they fortify vessel integrity. Breakdown of these signaling systems results in pathological hyperpermeability and/or genetic vascular abnormalities such as vascular malformations, ultimately progressing to hemorrhage and edema. Hence, blood vessel maintenance is fundamental to controlling vascular homeostasis and tissue functions. This paper discusses signaling pathways essential for vascular maintenance and clinical conditions caused by deterioration of vessel integrity.

  12. DNA sequence and structure requirements for cleavage of V(D)J recombination signal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, C A; Mundy, C L; Oettinger, M A

    1996-01-01

    Purified RAG1 and RAG2 proteins can cleave DNA at V(D)J recombination signals. In dissecting the DNA sequence and structural requirements for cleavage, we find that the heptamer and nonamer motifs of the recombination signal sequence can independently direct both steps of the cleavage reaction. Proper helical spacing between these two elements greatly enhances the efficiency of cleavage, whereas improper spacing can lead to interference between the two elements. The signal sequences are surprisingly tolerant of structural variation and function efficiently when nicks, gaps, and mismatched bases are introduced or even when the signal sequence is completely single stranded. Sequence alterations that facilitate unpairing of the bases at the signal/coding border activate the cleavage reaction, suggesting that DNA distortion is critical for V(D)J recombination. PMID:8816481

  13. Auditory Training for Central Auditory Processing Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Weihing, Jeffrey; Chermak, Gail D.; Musiek, Frank E.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory training (AT) is an important component of rehabilitation for patients with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD). The present article identifies and describes aspects of AT as they relate to applications in this population. A description of the types of auditory processes along with information on relevant AT protocols that can be used to address these specific deficits is included. Characteristics and principles of effective AT procedures also are detailed in light of research that reflects on their value. Finally, research investigating AT in populations who show CAPD or present with auditory complaints is reported. Although efficacy data in this area are still emerging, current findings support the use of AT for treatment of auditory difficulties. PMID:27587909

  14. Representation of speech in human auditory cortex: is it special?

    PubMed

    Steinschneider, Mitchell; Nourski, Kirill V; Fishman, Yonatan I

    2013-11-01

    Successful categorization of phonemes in speech requires that the brain analyze the acoustic signal along both spectral and temporal dimensions. Neural encoding of the stimulus amplitude envelope is critical for parsing the speech stream into syllabic units. Encoding of voice onset time (VOT) and place of articulation (POA), cues necessary for determining phonemic identity, occurs within shorter time frames. An unresolved question is whether the neural representation of speech is based on processing mechanisms that are unique to humans and shaped by learning and experience, or is based on rules governing general auditory processing that are also present in non-human animals. This question was examined by comparing the neural activity elicited by speech and other complex vocalizations in primary auditory cortex of macaques, who are limited vocal learners, with that in Heschl's gyrus, the putative location of primary auditory cortex in humans. Entrainment to the amplitude envelope is neither specific to humans nor to human speech. VOT is represented by responses time-locked to consonant release and voicing onset in both humans and monkeys. Temporal representation of VOT is observed both for isolated syllables and for syllables embedded in the more naturalistic context of running speech. The fundamental frequency of male speakers is represented by more rapid neural activity phase-locked to the glottal pulsation rate in both humans and monkeys. In both species, the differential representation of stop consonants varying in their POA can be predicted by the relationship between the frequency selectivity of neurons and the onset spectra of the speech sounds. These findings indicate that the neurophysiology of primary auditory cortex is similar in monkeys and humans despite their vastly different experience with human speech, and that Heschl's gyrus is engaged in general auditory, and not language-specific, processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  15. Hippocampal long-term depression is facilitated by the acquisition and updating of memory of spatial auditory content and requires mGlu5 activation.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Birte; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-03-15

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are key cellular processes that support memory formation. Whereas increases of synaptic strength by means of LTP may support the creation of a spatial memory 'engram', LTD appears to play an important role in refining and optimising experience-dependent encoding. A differentiation in the role of hippocampal subfields is apparent. For example, LTD in the dentate gyrus (DG) is enabled by novel learning about large visuospatial features, whereas in area CA1, it is enabled by learning about discrete aspects of spatial content, whereby, both discrete visuospatial and olfactospatial cues trigger LTD in CA1. Here, we explored to what extent local audiospatial cues facilitate information encoding in the form of LTD in these subfields. Coupling of low frequency afferent stimulation (LFS) with discretely localised, novel auditory tones in the sonic hearing, or ultrasonic range, facilitated short-term depression (STD) into LTD (>24 h) in CA1, but not DG. Re-exposure to the now familiar audiospatial configuration ca. 1 week later failed to enhance STD. Reconfiguration of the same audiospatial cues resulted anew in LTD when ultrasound, but not non-ultrasound cues were used. LTD facilitation that was triggered by novel exposure to spatially arranged tones, or to spatial reconfiguration of the same tones were both prevented by an antagonism of the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5. These data indicate that, if behaviourally salient enough, the hippocampus can use audiospatial cues to facilitate LTD that contributes to the encoding and updating of spatial representations. Effects are subfield-specific, and require mGlu5 activation, as is the case for visuospatial information processing. These data reinforce the likelihood that LTD supports the encoding of spatial features, and that this occurs in a qualitative and subfield-specific manner. They also support that mGlu5 is essential for synaptic encoding of spatial

  16. Mesenchymal Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Is Required for Normal Pancreas Development

    PubMed Central

    Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Ravassard, Philippe; Pardanaud-Glavieux, Corinne; Scharfmann, Raphaél; Serup, Palle

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pancreas organogenesis is orchestrated by interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme, but these interactions are not completely understood. Here we investigated a role for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling within the pancreas mesenchyme and found it to be required for the normal development of the mesenchyme as well as for the pancreatic epithelium. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed active BMP signaling by immunostaining for phospho-Smad1,5,8 and tested whether pancreas development was affected by BMP inhibition after expression of Noggin and dominant negative BMP receptors in chicken and mouse pancreas. RESULTS Endogenous BMP signaling is confined to the mesenchyme in the early pancreas and inhibition of BMP signaling results in severe pancreatic hypoplasia with reduced epithelial branching. Notably, we also observed an excessive endocrine differentiation when mesenchymal BMP signaling is blocked, presumably secondary to defective mesenchyme to epithelium signaling. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that BMP signaling plays a previously unsuspected role in the mesenchyme, required for normal development of the mesenchyme as well as for the epithelium. PMID:20522595

  17. Neuroglobin Expression in the Mammalian Auditory System.

    PubMed

    Reuss, Stefan; Banica, Ovidiu; Elgurt, Mirra; Mitz, Stephanie; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Riemann, Randolf; Hill, Marco; Jaquish, Dawn V; Koehrn, Fred J; Burmester, Thorsten; Hankeln, Thomas; Woolf, Nigel K

    2016-04-01

    The energy-yielding pathways that provide the large amounts of metabolic energy required by inner ear sensorineural cells are poorly understood. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a neuron-specific hemoprotein of the globin family, which is suggested to be involved in oxidative energy metabolism. Here, we present quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical, and Western blot evidence that neuroglobin is highly expressed in the mouse and rat cochlea. For primary cochlea neurons, Ngb expression is limited to the subpopulation of type I spiral ganglion cells, those which innervate inner hair cells, while the subpopulation of type II spiral ganglion cells which innervate the outer hair cells do not express Ngb. We further investigated Ngb distribution in rat, mouse, and human auditory brainstem centers, and found that the cochlear nuclei and superior olivary complex (SOC) also express considerable amounts of Ngb. Notably, the majority of olivocochlear neurons, those which provide efferent innervation of outer hair cells as identified by neuronal tract tracing, were Ngb-immunoreactive. We also observed that neuroglobin in the SOC frequently co-localized with neuronal nitric oxide synthase, the enzyme responsible for nitric oxide production. Our findings suggest that neuroglobin is well positioned to play an important physiologic role in the oxygen homeostasis of the peripheral and central auditory nervous system, and provides the first evidence that Ngb signal differentiates the central projections of the inner and outer hair cells.

  18. FGF signaling is required for brain left-right asymmetry and brain midline formation.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Judith M; Yost, H Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Early disruption of FGF signaling alters left-right (LR) asymmetry throughout the embryo. Here we uncover a role for FGF signaling that specifically disrupts brain asymmetry, independent of normal lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) asymmetry. When FGF signaling is inhibited during mid-somitogenesis, asymmetrically expressed LPM markers southpaw and lefty2 are not affected. However, asymmetrically expressed brain markers lefty1 and cyclops become bilateral. We show that FGF signaling controls expression of six3b and six7, two transcription factors required for repression of asymmetric lefty1 in the brain. We found that Z0-1, atypical PKC (aPKC) and β-catenin protein distribution revealed a midline structure in the forebrain that is dependent on a balance of FGF signaling. Ectopic activation of FGF signaling leads to overexpression of six3b, loss of organized midline adherins junctions and bilateral loss of lefty1 expression. Reducing FGF signaling leads to a reduction in six3b and six7 expression, an increase in cell boundary formation in the brain midline, and bilateral expression of lefty1. Together, these results suggest a novel role for FGF signaling in the brain to control LR asymmetry, six transcription factor expressions, and a midline barrier structure.

  19. Murine Polyomavirus Cell Surface Receptors Activate Distinct Signaling Pathways Required for Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Samantha D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus binding to the cell surface triggers an array of host responses, including activation of specific signaling pathways that facilitate steps in virus entry. Using mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV), we identified host signaling pathways activated upon virus binding to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Pathways activated by MuPyV included the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), FAK/SRC, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Gangliosides and α4-integrin are required receptors for MuPyV infection. MuPyV binding to both gangliosides and the α4-integrin receptors was required for activation of the PI3K pathway; however, either receptor interaction alone was sufficient for activation of the MAPK pathway. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we confirmed that the PI3K and FAK/SRC pathways were required for MuPyV infection, while the MAPK pathway was dispensable. Mechanistically, the PI3K pathway was required for MuPyV endocytosis, while the FAK/SRC pathway enabled trafficking of MuPyV along microtubules. Thus, MuPyV interactions with specific cell surface receptors facilitate activation of signaling pathways required for virus entry and trafficking. Understanding how different viruses manipulate cell signaling pathways through interactions with host receptors could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:27803182

  20. Spacecraft-spacecraft radio-metric tracking: Signal acquisition requirements and application to Mars approach navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, R. D.; Thurman, S.; Edwards, C.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler and ranging measurements between spacecraft can be obtained only when the ratio of the total received signal power to noise power density (P(sub t)/N(sub 0)) at the receiving spacecraft is sufficiently large that reliable signal detection can be achieved within a reasonable time period. In this article, the requirement on P(sub t)/N(sub 0) for reliable carrier signal detection is calculated as a function of various system parameters, including characteristics of the spacecraft computing hardware and a priori uncertainty in spacecraft-spacecraft relative velocity and acceleration. Also calculated is the P(sub t)/N(sub 0) requirements for reliable detection of a ranging signal, consisting of a carrier with pseudonoise (PN) phase modulation. Once the P(sub t)/N(sub 0) requirement is determined, then for a given set of assumed spacecraft telecommunication characteristics (transmitted signal power, antenna gains, and receiver noise temperatures) it is possible to calculate the maximum range at which a carrier signal or ranging signal may be acquired. For example, if a Mars lander and a spacecraft approaching Mars are each equipped with 1-m-diameter antennas, the transmitted power is 5 W, and the receiver noise temperatures are 350 K, then S-band carrier signal acquisition can be achieved at ranges exceeding 10 million km. An error covariance analysis illustrates the utility of in situ Doppler and ranging measurements for Mars approach navigation. Covariance analysis results indicate that navigation accuracies of a few km can be achieved with either data type. The analysis also illustrates dependency of the achievable accuracy on the approach trajectory velocity.

  1. Functional imaging of auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Dykstra, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Our auditory system is constantly faced with the task of decomposing the complex mixture of sound arriving at the ears into perceptually independent streams constituting accurate representations of individual sound sources. This decomposition, termed auditory scene analysis, is critical for both survival and communication, and is thought to underlie both speech and music perception. The neural underpinnings of auditory scene analysis have been studied utilizing invasive experiments with animal models as well as non-invasive (MEG, EEG, and fMRI) and invasive (intracranial EEG) studies conducted with human listeners. The present article reviews human neurophysiological research investigating the neural basis of auditory scene analysis, with emphasis on two classical paradigms termed streaming and informational masking. Other paradigms - such as the continuity illusion, mistuned harmonics, and multi-speaker environments - are briefly addressed thereafter. We conclude by discussing the emerging evidence for the role of auditory cortex in remapping incoming acoustic signals into a perceptual representation of auditory streams, which are then available for selective attention and further conscious processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Human Auditory Neuroimaging.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory canal

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Koehler, P.R.; Millen, S.J.; Shaffer, K.A.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-04-01

    Three patients with exclusively or predominantly intracanalicular neuromas and 5 with presumably normal internal auditory canals were examined with prototype 1.4- or 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. MR images showed the 7th and 8th cranial nerves in the internal auditory canal. The intracanalicular neuromas had larger diameter and slightly greater signal strength than the nerves. Early results suggest that minimal enlargement of the nerves can be detected even in the internal auditory canal.

  3. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  4. Loss of Kv3.1 tonotopicity and alterations in cAMP response element-binding protein signaling in central auditory neurons of hearing impaired mice.

    PubMed

    von Hehn, Christian A A; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2004-02-25

    The promoter for the kv3.1 potassium channel gene is regulated by a Ca2+-cAMP responsive element, which binds the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Kv3.1 is expressed in a tonotopic gradient within the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) of the auditory brainstem, where Kv3.1 levels are highest at the medial end, which corresponds to high auditory frequencies. We have compared the levels of Kv3.1, CREB, and the phosphorylated form of CREB (pCREB) in a mouse strain that maintains good hearing throughout life, CBA/J (CBA), with one that suffers early cochlear hair cell loss, C57BL/6 (BL/6). A gradient of Kv3.1 immunoreactivity in the MNTB was detected in both young (6 week) and older (8 month) CBA mice. Although no gradient of CREB was detected, pCREB-immunopositive cells were grouped together in distinct clusters along the tonotopic axis. The same pattern of Kv3.1, CREB, and pCREB localization was also found in young BL/6 mice at a time (6 weeks) when hearing is normal. In contrast, at 8 months, when hearing is impaired, the gradient of Kv3.1 was abolished. Moreover, in the older BL/6 mice there was a decrease in CREB expression along the tonotopic axis, and the pattern of pCREB labeling appeared random, with no discrete clusters of pCREB-positive cells along the tonotopic axis. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that ongoing activity in auditory brainstem neurons is necessary for the maintenance of Kv3.1 tonotopicity through the CREB pathway.

  5. Auditory scene analysis and sensory memory: the role of the auditory N100m.

    PubMed

    May, P J C; Tiitinen, H

    2004-11-30

    We consider the neural dynamics underlying auditory streaming, the perceptual grouping of transient auditory events, by using neural modeling and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements in humans. We demonstrate that spatial variations in the strength of feedback inhibition leads to differential amplitude modulation (AM) tuning resembling that found in animal models. In our model, neurons respond selectively to stimuli presented at different onset-to-onset interstimulus intervals (ISIs), and their summed activity (corresponding to the MEG signal) exhibits both transient and sustained responses (SRs) at fast ISIs. In MEG measurements utilizing 2-s trains of 50-ms stimuli presented at 0-1950 ms ISIs, we observed the transient N100m and SRs predicted by the model, with a prominent SR emerging for discrete stimuli at ISIs below 200 ms. Our results explain why, at fast stimulus rates, the amplitude of the auditory N100m appears to be strongly attenuated even though auditory cortex continues to respond vigorously to the stimuli. The results suggest that the longer and shorter forms of auditory sensory memory may be reflected in the N100m and the SR, respectively. As the emergence of the SR coincides with the stimuli being perceived as auditory streams, our study suggests that auditory sensory memory as indexed by transient and sustained cortical activity might underlie auditory scene analysis.

  6. Does the whistling thorn acacia (Acacia drepanolobium) use auditory aposematism to deter mammalian herbivores?

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2016-08-02

    Auditory signaling including aposematism characterizes many terrestrial animals. Auditory aposematism by which certain animals use auditory aposematic signals to fend off enemies is well known for instance in rattlesnakes. Auditory signaling by plants toward animals and other plants is an emerging area of plant biology that still suffers from limited amount of solid data. Here I propose that auditory aposematism operates in the African whistling thorn acacia (Acacia drepanolobium = Vachellia drepanolobium). In this tree, the large and hollow thorn bases whistle when wind blows. This type of aposematism compliments the well-known conspicuous thorn and mutualistic ant based aposematism during day and may operate during night when the conspicuous thorns are invisible.

  7. Activation of Heschl's gyrus during auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Dierks, T; Linden, D E; Jandl, M; Formisano, E; Goebel, R; Lanfermann, H; Singer, W

    1999-03-01

    Apart from being a common feature of mental illness, auditory hallucinations provide an intriguing model for the study of internally generated sensory perceptions that are attributed to external sources. Until now, the knowledge about the cortical network that supports such hallucinations has been restricted by methodological limitations. Here, we describe an experiment with paranoid schizophrenic patients whose on- and offset of auditory hallucinations could be monitored within one functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. We demonstrate an increase of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in Heschl's gyrus during the patients' hallucinations. Our results provide direct evidence of the involvement of primary auditory areas in auditory verbal hallucinations and establish novel constraints for psychopathological models.

  8. Controlled levels of canonical Wnt signaling are required for neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Maj, Ewa; Künneke, Lutz; Loresch, Elisabeth; Grund, Anita; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Aspelmeier, Timo; Borchers, Annette

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays a dominant role in the development of the neural crest (NC), a highly migratory cell population that generates a vast array of cell types. Canonical Wnt signaling is required for NC induction as well as differentiation, however its role in NC migration remains largely unknown. Analyzing nuclear localization of β-catenin as readout for canonical Wnt activity, we detect nuclear β-catenin in premigratory but not migratory Xenopus NC cells suggesting that canonical Wnt activity has to decrease to basal levels to enable NC migration. To define a possible function of canonical Wnt signaling in Xenopus NC migration, canonical Wnt signaling was modulated at different time points after NC induction. This was accomplished using either chemical modulators affecting β-catenin stability or inducible glucocorticoid fusion constructs of Lef/Tcf transcription factors. In vivo analysis of NC migration by whole mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that ectopic activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits cranial NC migration. Further, NC transplantation experiments confirm that this effect is tissue-autonomous. In addition, live-cell imaging in combination with biophysical data analysis of explanted NC cells confirms the in vivo findings and demonstrates that modulation of canonical Wnt signaling affects the ability of NC cells to perform single cell migration. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that canonical Wnt signaling needs to be tightly controlled to enable migration of NC cells.

  9. ABC Transporter Required for Intercellular Transfer of Developmental Signals in a Heterocystous Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Videau, Patrick; Rivers, Orion S.; Higa, Kelly C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena, patS and hetN encode peptide-derived signals with many of the properties of morphogens. These signals regulate the formation of a periodic pattern of heterocysts by lateral inhibition of differentiation. Here we show that intercellular transfer of the patS- and hetN-dependent developmental signals from heterocysts to vegetative cells requires HetC, a predicted ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC transporter). Relative to the wild type, in a hetC mutant differentiation resulted in a reduced number of heterocysts that were incapable of nitrogen fixation, but deletion of patS or hetN restored heterocyst number and function in a hetC background. These epistasis results suggest that HetC is necessary for conferring self-immunity to the inhibitors on differentiating cells. Nine hours after induction of differentiation, HetC was required for neither induction of transcription of patS nor intercellular transfer of the patS-encoded signal to neighboring cells. Conversely, in strains lacking HetC, the patS- and hetN-encoded signals were not transferred from heterocyst cells to adjacent vegetative cells. The results support a model in which the patS-dependent signal is initially transferred between vegetative cells in a HetC-independent fashion, but some time before morphological differentiation of heterocysts is complete, transfer of both signals transitions to a HetC-dependent process. IMPORTANCE How chemical cues that regulate pattern formation in multicellular organisms move from one cell to another is a central question in developmental biology. In this study, we show that an ABC transporter, HetC, is necessary for transport of two developmental signals between different types of cells in a filamentous cyanobacterium. ABC transporters are found in organisms as diverse as bacteria and humans and, as the name implies, are often involved in the transport of molecules across a cellular membrane. The activity of HetC was

  10. Gated auditory speech perception: effects of listening conditions and cognitive capacity.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Shahram; Lidestam, Björn; Saremi, Amin; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the initial portion of signal required for the correct identification of auditory speech stimuli (or isolation points, IPs) in silence and noise, and to investigate the relationships between auditory and cognitive functions in silence and noise. Twenty-one university students were presented with auditory stimuli in a gating paradigm for the identification of consonants, words, and final words in highly predictable and low predictable sentences. The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT), the reading span test, and the Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test were also administered to measure speech-in-noise ability, working memory and attentional capacities of the participants, respectively. The results showed that noise delayed the identification of consonants, words, and final words in highly predictable and low predictable sentences. HINT performance correlated with working memory and attentional capacities. In the noise condition, there were correlations between HINT performance, cognitive task performance, and the IPs of consonants and words. In the silent condition, there were no correlations between auditory and cognitive tasks. In conclusion, a combination of hearing-in-noise ability, working memory capacity, and attention capacity is needed for the early identification of consonants and words in noise.

  11. Gated auditory speech perception: effects of listening conditions and cognitive capacity

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Shahram; Lidestam, Björn; Saremi, Amin; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the initial portion of signal required for the correct identification of auditory speech stimuli (or isolation points, IPs) in silence and noise, and to investigate the relationships between auditory and cognitive functions in silence and noise. Twenty-one university students were presented with auditory stimuli in a gating paradigm for the identification of consonants, words, and final words in highly predictable and low predictable sentences. The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT), the reading span test, and the Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test were also administered to measure speech-in-noise ability, working memory and attentional capacities of the participants, respectively. The results showed that noise delayed the identification of consonants, words, and final words in highly predictable and low predictable sentences. HINT performance correlated with working memory and attentional capacities. In the noise condition, there were correlations between HINT performance, cognitive task performance, and the IPs of consonants and words. In the silent condition, there were no correlations between auditory and cognitive tasks. In conclusion, a combination of hearing-in-noise ability, working memory capacity, and attention capacity is needed for the early identification of consonants and words in noise. PMID:24926274

  12. SNMP is a signaling component required for pheromone sensitivity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Ha, Tal Soo; Smith, Dean P

    2008-08-05

    The only known volatile pheromone in Drosophila, 11-cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA), mediates a variety of behaviors including aggregation, mate recognition, and sexual behavior. cVA is detected by a small set of olfactory neurons located in T1 trichoid sensilla on the antennae of males and females. Two components known to be required for cVA reception are the odorant receptor Or67d and the extracellular pheromone-binding protein LUSH. Using a genetic screen for cVA-insensitive mutants, we have identified a third component required for cVA reception: sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMP). SNMP is a homolog of CD36, a scavenger receptor important for lipoprotein binding and uptake of cholesterol and lipids in vertebrates. In humans, loss of CD36 is linked to a wide range of disorders including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis, but how CD36 functions in lipid transport and signal transduction is poorly understood. We show that SNMP is required in pheromone-sensitive neurons for cVA sensitivity but is not required for sensitivity to general odorants. Using antiserum to SNMP infused directly into the sensillum lymph, we show that SNMP function is required on the dendrites of cVA-sensitive neurons; this finding is consistent with a direct role in cVA signal transduction. Therefore, pheromone perception in Drosophila should serve as an excellent model to elucidate the role of CD36 members in transmembrane signaling.

  13. Layer specific and general requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lei; Larsen, Rylan S; Bjorklund, George Reed; Li, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaohong; Philpot, Benjamin D; Snider, William D; Newbern, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through the Raf/MEK/ERK (ERK/MAPK) pathway causes pathology in a family of neurodevelopmental disorders known as 'RASopathies' and is implicated in autism pathogenesis. Here, we have determined the functions of ERK/MAPK signaling in developing neocortical excitatory neurons. Our data reveal a critical requirement for ERK/MAPK signaling in the morphological development and survival of large Ctip2+ neurons in layer 5. Loss of Map2k1/2 (Mek1/2) led to deficits in corticospinal tract formation and subsequent corticospinal neuron apoptosis. ERK/MAPK hyperactivation also led to reduced corticospinal axon elongation, but was associated with enhanced arborization. ERK/MAPK signaling was dispensable for axonal outgrowth of layer 2/3 callosal neurons. However, Map2k1/2 deletion led to reduced expression of Arc and enhanced intrinsic excitability in both layers 2/3 and 5, in addition to imbalanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. These data demonstrate selective requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in layer 5 circuit development and general effects on cortical pyramidal neuron excitability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11123.001 PMID:26848828

  14. Cooperativity between MAPK and PI3K signaling activation is required for glioblastoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vitucci, Mark; Karpinich, Natalie O.; Bash, Ryan E.; Werneke, Andrea M.; Schmid, Ralf S.; White, Kristen K.; McNeill, Robert S.; Huff, Byron; Wang, Sophie; Van Dyke, Terry; Miller, C. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) genomes feature recurrent genetic alterations that dysregulate core intracellular signaling pathways, including the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint and the MAPK and PI3K effector arms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Elucidation of the phenotypic consequences of activated RTK effectors is required for the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Methods Genetically defined, G1/S checkpoint-defective cortical murine astrocytes with constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations were used to systematically investigate the individual and combined roles of these 2 RTK signaling effectors in phenotypic hallmarks of glioblastoma pathogenesis, including growth, migration, and invasion in vitro. A novel syngeneic orthotopic allograft model system was used to examine in vivo tumorigenesis. Results Constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations activated both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Their combination led to maximal growth, migration, and invasion of G1/S-defective astrocytes in vitro and produced progenitor-like transcriptomal profiles that mimic human proneural GBM. Activation of both RTK effector arms was required for in vivo tumorigenesis and produced highly invasive, proneural-like GBM. Conclusions These results suggest that cortical astrocytes can be transformed into GBM and that combined dysregulation of MAPK and PI3K signaling revert G1/S-defective astrocytes to a primitive gene expression state. This genetically-defined, immunocompetent model of proneural GBM will be useful for preclinical development of MAPK/PI3K-targeted, subtype-specific therapies. PMID:23814263

  15. Mode-locking neurodynamics predict human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals.

    PubMed

    Lerud, Karl D; Almonte, Felix V; Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    The auditory nervous system is highly nonlinear. Some nonlinear responses arise through active processes in the cochlea, while others may arise in neural populations of the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and higher auditory areas. In humans, auditory brainstem recordings reveal nonlinear population responses to combinations of pure tones, and to musical intervals composed of complex tones. Yet the biophysical origin of central auditory nonlinearities, their signal processing properties, and their relationship to auditory perception remain largely unknown. Both stimulus components and nonlinear resonances are well represented in auditory brainstem nuclei due to neural phase-locking. Recently mode-locking, a generalization of phase-locking that implies an intrinsically nonlinear processing of sound, has been observed in mammalian auditory brainstem nuclei. Here we show that a canonical model of mode-locked neural oscillation predicts the complex nonlinear population responses to musical intervals that have been observed in the human brainstem. The model makes predictions about auditory signal processing and perception that are different from traditional delay-based models, and may provide insight into the nature of auditory population responses. We anticipate that the application of dynamical systems analysis will provide the starting point for generic models of auditory population dynamics, and lead to a deeper understanding of nonlinear auditory signal processing possibly arising in excitatory-inhibitory networks of the central auditory nervous system. This approach has the potential to link neural dynamics with the perception of pitch, music, and speech, and lead to dynamical models of auditory system development.

  16. Presenilin-mediated transmembrane cleavage is required for Notch signal transduction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Gary; Greenwald, Iva

    2001-01-01

    The cleavage model for signal transduction by receptors of the LIN-12/Notch family posits that ligand binding leads to cleavage within the transmembrane domain, so that the intracellular domain is released to translocate to the nucleus and activate target gene expression. The familial Alzheimer's disease-associated protein Presenilin is required for LIN-12/Notch signaling, and several lines of evidence suggest that Presenilin mediates the transmembrane cleavage event that releases the LIN-12/Notch intracellular domain. However, doubt was cast on this possibility by a report that Presenilin is not required for the transducing activity of NECN, a constitutively active transmembrane form of Notch, in Drosophila. Here, we have reassessed this finding and show instead that Presenilin is required for activity of NECN for all cell fate decisions examined. Our results indicate that transmembrane cleavage and signal transduction are strictly correlated, supporting the cleavage model for signal transduction by LIN-12/Notch and a role for Presenilin in mediating the ligand-induced transmembrane cleavage. PMID:11134525

  17. Summary statistics in auditory perception.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Josh H; Schemitsch, Michael; Simoncelli, Eero P

    2013-04-01

    Sensory signals are transduced at high resolution, but their structure must be stored in a more compact format. Here we provide evidence that the auditory system summarizes the temporal details of sounds using time-averaged statistics. We measured discrimination of 'sound textures' that were characterized by particular statistical properties, as normally result from the superposition of many acoustic features in auditory scenes. When listeners discriminated examples of different textures, performance improved with excerpt duration. In contrast, when listeners discriminated different examples of the same texture, performance declined with duration, a paradoxical result given that the information available for discrimination grows with duration. These results indicate that once these sounds are of moderate length, the brain's representation is limited to time-averaged statistics, which, for different examples of the same texture, converge to the same values with increasing duration. Such statistical representations produce good categorical discrimination, but limit the ability to discern temporal detail.

  18. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  19. Auditory Temporal Processing Deficits in Children with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mimran, Ravit; Sapir, Shimon

    2007-01-01

    The role of central auditory processing in reading skill development and reading disorders is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals with specific reading disabilities (SRD) have deficits in processing rapidly presented, serially ordered non-speech auditory signals. To this end, we compared 12 children with SRD and…

  20. Intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Ogawa, Taisuke; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujii, Hiroaki; Ando, Masaki

    2014-11-01

    The role of perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses in cognitive behavior was examined focusing on synaptic Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired when extracellular Zn(2+) levels were decreased by injection of clioquinol and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylendediamine. To pursue the effect of the loss and/or blockade of Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells, ZnAF-2DA (100 pmol, 0.1 mM/1 µl), an intracellular Zn(2+) chelator, was locally injected into the dentate molecular layer of rats. ZnAF-2DA injection, which was estimated to chelate intracellular Zn(2+) signaling only in the dentate gyrus, affected object recognition memory 1 h after training without affecting intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in the dentate molecular layer. In vivo dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) was affected under the local perfusion of the recording region (the dentate granule cell layer) with 0.1 mM ZnAF-2DA, but not with 1-10 mM CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator, suggesting that the blockade of intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells affects dentate gyrus LTP. The present study demonstrates that intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory, probably via dentate gyrus LTP expression.

  1. Scribble participates in Hippo signaling and is required for normal zebrafish pronephros development

    PubMed Central

    Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Puetz, Michael; Simons, Matias; Courbard, Jean-Remy; Boehlke, Christopher; Hartleben, Björn; Engel, Christina; Moeller, Marcus J.; Englert, Christoph; Bollig, Frank; Schäfer, Tobias; Ramachandran, Haribaskar; Mlodzik, Marek; Huber, Tobias B.; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang; Kim, Emily; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Walz, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Spatial organization of cells and their appendages is controlled by the planar cell polarity pathway, a signaling cascade initiated by the protocadherin Fat in Drosophila. Vertebrates express 4 Fat molecules, Fat1–4. We found that depletion of Fat1 caused cyst formation in the zebrafish pronephros. Knockdown of the PDZ domain containing the adaptor protein Scribble intensified the cyst-promoting phenotype of Fat1 depletion, suggesting that Fat1 and Scribble act in overlapping signaling cascades during zebrafish pronephros development. Supporting the genetic interaction with Fat1, Scribble recognized the PDZ-binding site of Fat1. Depletion of Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a transcriptional co-activator inhibited by Hippo signaling, ameliorated the cyst formation in Fat1-deficient zebrafish, whereas Scribble inhibited the YAP1-induced cyst formation. Thus, reduced Hippo signaling and subsequent YAP1 disinhibition seem to play a role in the development of pronephric cysts after depletion of Fat1 or Scribble. We hypothesize that Hippo signaling is required for normal pronephros development in zebrafish and that Scribble is a candidate link between Fat and the Hippo signaling cascade in vertebrates. PMID:19439659

  2. Neural dynamics of attending and ignoring in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Chait, Maria; de Cheveigné, Alain; Poeppel, David; Simon, Jonathan Z

    2010-09-01

    Studies in all sensory modalities have demonstrated amplification of early brain responses to attended signals, but less is known about the processes by which listeners selectively ignore stimuli. Here we use MEG and a new paradigm to dissociate the effects of selectively attending, and ignoring in time. Two different tasks were performed successively on the same acoustic stimuli: triplets of tones (A, B, C) with noise-bursts interspersed between the triplets. In the COMPARE task subjects were instructed to respond when tones A and C were of same frequency. In the PASSIVE task they were instructed to respond as fast as possible to noise-bursts. COMPARE requires attending to A and C and actively ignoring tone B, but PASSIVE involves neither attending to nor ignoring the tones. The data were analyzed separately for frontal and auditory-cortical channels to independently address attentional effects on low-level sensory versus putative control processing. We observe the earliest attend/ignore effects as early as 100 ms post-stimulus onset in auditory cortex. These appear to be generated by modulation of exogenous (stimulus-driven) sensory evoked activity. Specifically related to ignoring, we demonstrate that active-ignoring-induced input inhibition involves early selection. We identified a sequence of early (<200 ms post-onset) auditory cortical effects, comprised of onset response attenuation and the emergence of an inhibitory response, and provide new, direct evidence that listeners actively ignoring a sound can reduce their stimulus related activity in auditory cortex by 100 ms after onset when this is required to execute specific behavioral objectives.

  3. Dicer is Required for the Maintenance of Notch Signaling and Gliogenic Competence During Mouse Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Sean A.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19–25 nucleotide RNAs that regulate messenger RNA translation and stability. Recently, we performed a conditional knockout (CKO) of the miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer during mouse retinal development and showed an essential role for miRNAs in the transition of retinal progenitors from an early to a late competence state (Georgi and Reh [2010]: J Neurosci 30:4048–4061). Notably, Dicer CKO progenitors failed to express Ascl1 and generated ganglion cells beyond their normal competence window. Because Ascl1 regulates multiple Notch signaling components, we hypothesized that Notch signaling is downregulated in Dicer CKO retinas. We show here that Notch signaling is severely reduced in Dicer CKO retinas, but that retinal progenitors still retain a low level of Notch signaling. By increasing Notch signaling in Dicer CKO progenitors through constitutive expression of the Notch intra-cellular domain (NICD), we show that transgenic rescue of Notch signaling has little effect on the competence of retinal progenitors or the enhanced generation of ganglion cells, suggesting that loss of Notch signaling is not a major determinant of these phenotypes. Nevertheless, transgenic NICD expression restored horizontal cells, suggesting an interaction between miRNAs and Notch signaling in the development of this cell type. Furthermore, while NICD overexpression leads to robust glial induction in control retinas, NICD overexpression was insufficient to drive Dicer-null retinal progenitors to a glial fate. Surprisingly, the presence of transgenic NICD expression did not prevent the differentiation of some types of retinal neurons, suggesting that Notch inactivation is not an absolute requirement for the initial stages of neuronal differentiation. PMID:21542136

  4. The Contribution of Brainstem and Cerebellar Pathways to Auditory Recognition

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Neil M.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum has been known to play an important role in motor functions for many years. More recently its role has been expanded to include a range of cognitive and sensory-motor processes, and substantial neuroimaging and clinical evidence now points to cerebellar involvement in most auditory processing tasks. In particular, an increase in the size of the cerebellum over recent human evolution has been attributed in part to the development of speech. Despite this, the auditory cognition literature has largely overlooked afferent auditory connections to the cerebellum that have been implicated in acoustically conditioned reflexes in animals, and could subserve speech and other auditory processing in humans. This review expands our understanding of auditory processing by incorporating cerebellar pathways into the anatomy and functions of the human auditory system. We reason that plasticity in the cerebellar pathways underpins implicit learning of spectrotemporal information necessary for sound and speech recognition. Once learnt, this information automatically recognizes incoming auditory signals and predicts likely subsequent information based on previous experience. Since sound recognition processes involving the brainstem and cerebellum initiate early in auditory processing, learnt information stored in cerebellar memory templates could then support a range of auditory processing functions such as streaming, habituation, the integration of auditory feature information such as pitch, and the recognition of vocal communications. PMID:28373850

  5. The Contribution of Brainstem and Cerebellar Pathways to Auditory Recognition.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Neil M; Wilson, Sarah J

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum has been known to play an important role in motor functions for many years. More recently its role has been expanded to include a range of cognitive and sensory-motor processes, and substantial neuroimaging and clinical evidence now points to cerebellar involvement in most auditory processing tasks. In particular, an increase in the size of the cerebellum over recent human evolution has been attributed in part to the development of speech. Despite this, the auditory cognition literature has largely overlooked afferent auditory connections to the cerebellum that have been implicated in acoustically conditioned reflexes in animals, and could subserve speech and other auditory processing in humans. This review expands our understanding of auditory processing by incorporating cerebellar pathways into the anatomy and functions of the human auditory system. We reason that plasticity in the cerebellar pathways underpins implicit learning of spectrotemporal information necessary for sound and speech recognition. Once learnt, this information automatically recognizes incoming auditory signals and predicts likely subsequent information based on previous experience. Since sound recognition processes involving the brainstem and cerebellum initiate early in auditory processing, learnt information stored in cerebellar memory templates could then support a range of auditory processing functions such as streaming, habituation, the integration of auditory feature information such as pitch, and the recognition of vocal communications.

  6. Effects of an Auditory Lateralization Training in Children Suspected to Central Auditory Processing Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Yones; Moosavi, Abdollah; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Sadjedi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Central auditory processing disorder [(C)APD] refers to a deficit in auditory stimuli processing in nervous system that is not due to higher-order language or cognitive factors. One of the problems in children with (C)APD is spatial difficulties which have been overlooked despite their significance. Localization is an auditory ability to detect sound sources in space and can help to differentiate between the desired speech from other simultaneous sound sources. Aim of this research was investigating effects of an auditory lateralization training on speech perception in presence of noise/competing signals in children suspected to (C)APD. Subjects and Methods In this analytical interventional study, 60 children suspected to (C)APD were selected based on multiple auditory processing assessment subtests. They were randomly divided into two groups: control (mean age 9.07) and training groups (mean age 9.00). Training program consisted of detection and pointing to sound sources delivered with interaural time differences under headphones for 12 formal sessions (6 weeks). Spatial word recognition score (WRS) and monaural selective auditory attention test (mSAAT) were used to follow the auditory lateralization training effects. Results This study showed that in the training group, mSAAT score and spatial WRS in noise (p value≤0.001) improved significantly after the auditory lateralization training. Conclusions We used auditory lateralization training for 6 weeks and showed that auditory lateralization can improve speech understanding in noise significantly. The generalization of this results needs further researches. PMID:27626084

  7. Orthogonal acoustic dimensions define auditory field maps in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Barton, Brian; Venezia, Jonathan H; Saberi, Kourosh; Hickok, Gregory; Brewer, Alyssa A

    2012-12-11

    The functional organization of human auditory cortex has not yet been characterized beyond a rudimentary level of detail. Here, we use functional MRI to measure the microstructure of orthogonal tonotopic and periodotopic gradients forming complete auditory field maps (AFMs) in human core and belt auditory cortex. These AFMs show clear homologies to subfields of auditory cortex identified in nonhuman primates and in human cytoarchitectural studies. In addition, we present measurements of the macrostructural organization of these AFMs into "clover leaf" clusters, consistent with the macrostructural organization seen across human visual cortex. As auditory cortex is at the interface between peripheral hearing and central processes, improved understanding of the organization of this system could open the door to a better understanding of the transformation from auditory spectrotemporal signals to higher-order information such as speech categories.

  8. Absence of both auditory evoked potentials and auditory percepts dependent on timing cues.

    PubMed

    Starr, A; McPherson, D; Patterson, J; Don, M; Luxford, W; Shannon, R; Sininger, Y; Tonakawa, L; Waring, M

    1991-06-01

    An 11-yr-old girl had an absence of sensory components of auditory evoked potentials (brainstem, middle and long-latency) to click and tone burst stimuli that she could clearly hear. Psychoacoustic tests revealed a marked impairment of those auditory perceptions dependent on temporal cues, that is, lateralization of binaural clicks, change of binaural masked threshold with changes in signal phase, binaural beats, detection of paired monaural clicks, monaural detection of a silent gap in a sound, and monaural threshold elevation for short duration tones. In contrast, auditory functions reflecting intensity or frequency discriminations (difference limens) were only minimally impaired. Pure tone audiometry showed a moderate (50 dB) bilateral hearing loss with a disproportionate severe loss of word intelligibility. Those auditory evoked potentials that were preserved included (1) cochlear microphonics reflecting hair cell activity; (2) cortical sustained potentials reflecting processing of slowly changing signals; and (3) long-latency cognitive components (P300, processing negativity) reflecting endogenous auditory cognitive processes. Both the evoked potential and perceptual deficits are attributed to changes in temporal encoding of acoustic signals perhaps occurring at the synapse between hair cell and eighth nerve dendrites. The results from this patient are discussed in relation to previously published cases with absent auditory evoked potentials and preserved hearing.

  9. Effects of multitasking on operator performance using computational and auditory tasks.

    PubMed

    Fasanya, Bankole K

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of multiple cognitive tasks on human performance. Twenty-four students at North Carolina A&T State University participated in the study. The primary task was auditory signal change perception and the secondary task was a computational task. Results showed that participants' performance in a single task was statistically significantly different from their performance in combined tasks: (a) algebra problems (algebra problem primary and auditory perception secondary); (b) auditory perception tasks (auditory perception primary and algebra problems secondary); and (c) mean false-alarm score in auditory perception (auditory detection primary and algebra problems secondary). Using signal detection theory (SDT), participants' performance measured in terms of sensitivity was calculated as -0.54 for combined tasks (algebra problems the primary task) and -0.53 auditory perceptions the primary task. During auditory perception tasks alone, SDT was found to be 2.51. Performance was 83% in a single task compared to 17% when combined tasks.

  10. Antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation require astrocyte-dependent adenosine mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hines, D J; Schmitt, L I; Hines, R M; Moss, S J; Haydon, P G

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a debilitating condition with a lifetime risk of ten percent. Most treatments take several weeks to achieve clinical efficacy, limiting the ability to bring instant relief needed in psychiatric emergencies. One intervention that rapidly alleviates depressive symptoms is sleep deprivation; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. Astrocytes regulate responses to sleep deprivation, raising the possibility that glial signaling mediates antidepressive-like actions of sleep deprivation. Here, we found that astrocytic signaling to adenosine (A1) receptors was required for the robust reduction of depressive-like behaviors following 12 hours of sleep deprivation. As sleep deprivation activates synaptic A1 receptors, we mimicked the effect of sleep deprivation on depression phenotypes by administration of the A1 agonist CCPA. These results provide the first mechanistic insight into how sleep deprivation impacts mood, and provide a novel pathway for rapid antidepressant development by modulation of glial signaling in the brain. PMID:23321809

  11. Cell-Specific Activity-Dependent Fractionation of Layer 2/3→5B Excitatory Signaling in Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ankur; Middleton, Jason W.; Anderson, Charles T.; Borges, Katharine; Suter, Benjamin A.; Shepherd, Gordon M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory cortex (AC) layer 5B (L5B) contains both corticocollicular neurons, a type of pyramidal-tract neuron projecting to the inferior colliculus, and corticocallosal neurons, a type of intratelencephalic neuron projecting to contralateral AC. Although it is known that these neuronal types have distinct roles in auditory processing and different response properties to sound, the synaptic and intrinsic mechanisms shaping their input–output functions remain less understood. Here, we recorded in brain slices of mouse AC from retrogradely labeled corticocollicular and neighboring corticocallosal neurons in L5B. Corticocollicular neurons had, on average, lower input resistance, greater hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih), depolarized resting membrane potential, faster action potentials, initial spike doublets, and less spike-frequency adaptation. In paired recordings between single L2/3 and labeled L5B neurons, the probabilities of connection, amplitude, latency, rise time, and decay time constant of the unitary EPSC were not different for L2/3→corticocollicular and L2/3→corticocallosal connections. However, short trains of unitary EPSCs showed no synaptic depression in L2/3→corticocollicular connections, but substantial depression in L2/3→corticocallosal connections. Synaptic potentials in L2/3→corticocollicular connections decayed faster and showed less temporal summation, consistent with increased Ih in corticocollicular neurons, whereas synaptic potentials in L2/3→corticocallosal connections showed more temporal summation. Extracellular L2/3 stimulation at two different rates resulted in spiking in L5B neurons; for corticocallosal neurons the spike rate was frequency dependent, but for corticocollicular neurons it was not. Together, these findings identify cell-specific intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms that divide intracortical synaptic excitation from L2/3 to L5B into two functionally distinct pathways with different input–output functions

  12. Phospholipid flippase ATP8A2 is required for normal visual and auditory function and photoreceptor and spiral ganglion cell survival.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jonathan A; Zhu, Xianjun; Djajadi, Hidayat R; Molday, Laurie L; Smith, Richard S; Libby, Richard T; John, Simon W M; Molday, Robert S

    2014-03-01

    ATP8A2 is a P4-ATPase that is highly expressed in the retina, brain, spinal cord and testes. In the retina, ATP8A2 is localized in photoreceptors where it uses ATP to transport phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet of membranes. Although mutations in ATP8A2 have been reported to cause mental retardation in humans and degeneration of spinal motor neurons in mice, the role of ATP8A2 in sensory systems has not been investigated. We have analyzed the retina and cochlea of ATP8A2-deficient mice to determine the role of ATP8A2 in visual and auditory systems. ATP8A2-deficient mice have shortened photoreceptor outer segments, a reduction in photoresponses and decreased photoreceptor viability. The ultrastructure and phagocytosis of the photoreceptor outer segment appeared normal, but the PS and PE compositions were altered and the rhodopsin content was decreased. The auditory brainstem response threshold was significantly higher and degeneration of spiral ganglion cells was apparent. Our studies indicate that ATP8A2 plays a crucial role in photoreceptor and spiral ganglion cell function and survival by maintaining phospholipid composition and contributing to vesicle trafficking.

  13. In the newborn hippocampus, neurotrophin-dependent survival requires spontaneous activity and integrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Sachiko; Owens, David F.; McKay, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    The nervous system develops through a program that first produces neurons in excess and then eliminates as many as half in a specific period of early post-natal life. Neurotrophins are widely thought to regulate neuronal survival but this role has not been clearly defined in the central nervous system. Here we show that neurotrophins promote survival of young neurons by promoting spontaneous activity. Survival of hippocampal neurons in neonatal rat requires spontaneous activity that depends on the excitatory action of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Neurotrophins facilitate recruitment of cultured neurons into active networks, and it is this activity, combined with integrin receptor signaling, that controls neuronal survival. In vivo, neurotrophins require integrin signaling to control neuron number. These data are the first to link the early excitatory action of GABA to the developmental death period and to assign an essential role for activity in neurotrophin-mediated survival that establishes appropriate networks. PMID:21613492

  14. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis.

  15. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28123053

  16. Electromagnetic recording of the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Poeppel, David; Hickok, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Auditory processing is remarkably fast and sensitive to the precise temporal structure of acoustic signals over a range of scales, from submillisecond phenomena such as localization to the construction of elementary auditory attributes at tens of milliseconds to basic properties of speech and music at hundreds of milliseconds. In light of the rapid (and often transitory) nature of auditory phenomena, in order to investigate the neurocomputational basis of auditory perception and cognition, a technique with high temporal resolution is appropriate. Here we briefly outline the utility of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for the study of the neural basis of audition. The basics of MEG are outlined in brief, and some of the most-used neural responses are described. We discuss the classic transient evoked fields (e.g., M100), responses elicited by change in a stimulus (e.g., pitch-onset response), the auditory steady-state response, and neural oscillations (e.g., theta-phase tracking). Because of the high temporal resolution and the good spatial resolution of MEG, paired with the convenient location of human auditory cortex for MEG-based recording, electromagnetic recording of this type is well suited to investigate various aspects from audition, from crafted laboratory experiments on pitch perception or scene analysis to naturalistic speech and music tasks.

  17. A Circuit for Motor Cortical Modulation of Auditory Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M.; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity. PMID:24005287

  18. A circuit for motor cortical modulation of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan; Mooney, Richard

    2013-09-04

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity.

  19. Cardiomyocyte FGF signaling is required for Cx43 phosphorylation and cardiac gap junction maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takashi; Tsuchida, Mariko; Lampe, Paul D; Murakami, Masahiro

    2013-08-15

    Cardiac remodeling resulting from impairment of myocardial integrity leads to heart failure, through still incompletely understood mechanisms. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system has been implicated in tissue maintenance, but its role in the adult heart is not well defined. We hypothesized that the FGF system plays a role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis, and the impairment of cardiomyocyte FGF signaling leads to pathological cardiac remodeling. We showed that FGF signaling is required for connexin 43 (Cx43) localization at cell-cell contacts in isolated cardiomyocytes and COS7 cells. Lack of FGF signaling led to decreased Cx43 phosphorylation at serines 325/328/330 (S325/328/330), sites known to be important for assembly of gap junctions. Cx43 instability induced by FGF inhibition was restored by the Cx43 S325/328/330 phospho-mimetic mutant, suggesting FGF-dependent phosphorylation of these sites. Consistent with these in vitro findings, cardiomyocyte-specific inhibition of FGF signaling in adult mice demonstrated mislocalization of Cx43 at intercalated discs, whereas localization of N-cadherin and desmoplakin was not affected. This led to premature death resulting from impaired cardiac remodeling. We conclude that cardiomyocyte FGF signaling is essential for cardiomyocyte homeostasis through phosphorylation of Cx43 at S325/328/330 residues which are important for the maintenance of gap junction.

  20. Tomato susceptibility to root-knot nematodes requires an intact jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Kishor K; Xie, Qi-Guang; Mantelin, Sophie; Bishnoi, Usha; Girke, Thomas; Navarre, Duroy A; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2008-09-01

    Responses of resistant (Mi-1/Mi-1) and susceptible (mi-1/ mi-1) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to root-knot nematodes (RKNs; Meloidogyne spp.) infection were monitored using cDNA microarrays, and the roles of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense signaling were evaluated in these interactions. Array analysis was used to compare transcript profiles in incompatible and compatible interactions of tomato roots 24 h after RKN infestation. The jai1 and def1 tomato mutant, altered in JA signaling, and tomato transgenic line NahG, altered in SA signaling, in the presence or absence of the RKN resistance gene Mi-1, were evaluated. The array analysis identified 1,497 and 750 genes differentially regulated in the incompatible and compatible interactions, respectively. Of the differentially regulated genes, 37% were specific to the incompatible interactions. NahG affected neither Mi-1 resistance nor basal defenses to RKNs. However, jai1 reduced tomato susceptibility to RKNs while not affecting Mi-1 resistance. In contrast, the def1 mutant did not affect RKN susceptibility. These results indicate that JA-dependent signaling does not play a role in Mi-1-mediated defense; however, an intact JA signaling pathway is required for tomato susceptibility to RKNs. In addition, low levels of SA might be sufficient for basal and Mi-1 resistance to RKNs.

  1. Electrophysiological measurement of human auditory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the human auditory evoked response is reviewed, including methods of determining this response, the way particular changes in the stimulus are coupled to specific changes in the response, and how the state of mind of the listener will influence the response. Important practical applications of this basic knowledge are discussed. Measurement of the brainstem evoked response, for instance, can state unequivocally how well the peripheral auditory apparatus functions. It might then be developed into a useful hearing test, especially for infants and preverbal or nonverbal children. Clinical applications of measuring the brain waves evoked 100 msec and later after the auditory stimulus are undetermined. These waves are clearly related to brain events associated with cognitive processing of acoustic signals, since their properties depend upon where the listener directs his attention and whether how long he expects the signal.

  2. Quantitative proteomics of auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ingie; Kang, Taewook; Yun, Ki Na; Yoo, YongCheol; Park, Sungmo; Kim, Jihye; An, Bobae; Song, Sukwoon; Lee, Sukwon; Kim, Jeongyeon; Song, Beomjong; Kwon, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Young Mok; Choi, Sukwoo

    2013-04-26

    Auditory fear conditioning is a well-characterized rodent learning model where a neutral auditory cue is paired with an aversive outcome to induce associative fear memory. The storage of long-term auditory fear memory requires long-term potentiation (LTP) in the lateral amygdala and de novo protein synthesis. Although many studies focused on individual proteins have shown their contribution to LTP and fear conditioning, non-biased genome-wide studies have only recently been possible with microarrays, which nevertheless fall short of measuring changes at the level of proteins. Here we employed quantitative proteomics to examine the expression of hundreds of proteins in the lateral amygdala in response to auditory fear conditioning. We found that various proteins previously implicated in LTP, learning and axon/dendrite growth were regulated by fear conditioning. A substantial number of proteins that were regulated by fear conditioning have not yet been studied specifically in learning or synaptic plasticity.

  3. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  4. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory D; Karns, Christina M; Dow, Mark W; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl's gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity), a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case), as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual stimulation (11-15° vs. 2-7°) in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl's gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory, and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex (PPC), frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal, and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in congenitally deaf adults.

  5. The human brain maintains contradictory and redundant auditory sensory predictions.

    PubMed

    Pieszek, Marika; Widmann, Andreas; Gruber, Thomas; Schröger, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Computational and experimental research has revealed that auditory sensory predictions are derived from regularities of the current environment by using internal generative models. However, so far, what has not been addressed is how the auditory system handles situations giving rise to redundant or even contradictory predictions derived from different sources of information. To this end, we measured error signals in the event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in response to violations of auditory predictions. Sounds could be predicted on the basis of overall probability, i.e., one sound was presented frequently and another sound rarely. Furthermore, each sound was predicted by an informative visual cue. Participants' task was to use the cue and to discriminate the two sounds as fast as possible. Violations of the probability based prediction (i.e., a rare sound) as well as violations of the visual-auditory prediction (i.e., an incongruent sound) elicited error signals in the ERPs (Mismatch Negativity [MMN] and Incongruency Response [IR]). Particular error signals were observed even in case the overall probability and the visual symbol predicted different sounds. That is, the auditory system concurrently maintains and tests contradictory predictions. Moreover, if the same sound was predicted, we observed an additive error signal (scalp potential and primary current density) equaling the sum of the specific error signals. Thus, the auditory system maintains and tolerates functionally independently represented redundant and contradictory predictions. We argue that the auditory system exploits all currently active regularities in order to optimally prepare for future events.

  6. Blindness and auditory impairment caused by loss of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBC3.

    PubMed

    Bok, Dean; Galbraith, Gary; Lopez, Ivan; Woodruff, Michael; Nusinowitz, Steven; BeltrandelRio, Hector; Huang, Wenhu; Zhao, Shulei; Geske, Robert; Montgomery, Charles; Van Sligtenhorst, Isaac; Friddle, Carl; Platt, Kenneth; Sparks, Mary Jean; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Ishiyama, Akira; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Liu, Weixin; Kurtz, Ira

    2003-07-01

    Normal sensory transduction requires the efficient disposal of acid (H+) generated by neuronal and sensory receptor activity. Multiple highly sensitive transport mechanisms have evolved in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms to maintain acidity within strict limits. It is currently assumed that the multiplicity of these processes provides a biological robustness. Here we report that the visual and auditory systems have a specific requirement for H+ disposal mediated by the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBC3 (refs. 7,8). Mice lacking NBC3 develop blindness and auditory impairment because of degeneration of sensory receptors in the eye and inner ear as in Usher syndrome. Our results indicate that in certain sensory organs, in which the requirement to transduce specific environmental signals with speed, sensitivity and reliability is paramount, the choice of the H+ disposal mechanism used is limited.

  7. Requirement for non-regulated, constitutive calcium influx in macrophage survival signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tano, Jean-Yves; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the role of constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx in macrophage survival. {yields} Survival signaling exhibits a mandatory requirement for constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx. {yields} CAM/CAMKII couples constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx to survival signaling. -- Abstract: The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT axis and the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) pathway play critical roles in macrophage survival. In cells other than macrophages proper operation of those two pathways requires Ca{sup 2+} influx into the cell, but if that is the case in macrophages remains unexplored. In the present work we used THP-1-derived macrophages and a pharmacological approach to examine for the first time the role of constitutive, non-regulated Ca{sup 2+} influx in PI3K/AKT and NF{kappa}B signaling. Blocking constitutive function of Ca{sup 2+}-permeable channels with the organic channel blocker SKF96365 completely prevented phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, AKT and its downstream target BAD in TNF{alpha}-treated macrophages. A similar effect was observed upon treating macrophages with the calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor W-7 or the calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor KN-62. In addition, pre-treating macrophages with SKF96365 significantly enhanced TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that in THP-1-derived macrophages survival signaling depends, to a significant extent, on constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx presumably through a mechanism that involves the CAM/CAMKII axis as a coupling component between constitutive Ca{sup 2+} influx and activation of survival signaling.

  8. Auditory perceptual restoration and illusory continuity correlates in the human brainstem.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Patro, Chhayakanta

    2016-09-01

    When noise obstructs portions of target sounds the auditory system fills in missing information, a phenomenon known as auditory restoration or induction. Previous work in animal models demonstrates that neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1) are capable of restoring occluded target signals suggesting that early auditory cortex is capable of inducing continuity in discontinuous signals (i.e., endogenous restoration). Current consensus is that the neural correlates of auditory induction and perceptual restoration emerge no earlier than A1. Moreover, the neural mechanisms supporting induction in humans are poorly understood. Here, we show that in human listeners, auditory brainstem nuclei support illusory auditory continuity well before engagement of cerebral cortex. We recorded brainstem responses to modulated target tones that did or did not promote illusory auditory percepts. Auditory continuity was manipulated by introducing masking noise or brief temporal interruptions in otherwise continuous tones. We found that auditory brainstem responses paralleled illusory continuity by tagging target sounds even when they were occluded by the auditory scene. Our results reveal (i) a pre-attentive, subcortical origin to a presumed cortical function and (ii) that brainstem signal processing helps partially cancel the negative effects of masking by restoring missing portions of auditory objects that are fragmented in the soundscape.

  9. Facilitated auditory detection for speech sounds.

    PubMed

    Signoret, Carine; Gaudrain, Etienne; Tillmann, Barbara; Grimault, Nicolas; Perrin, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    If it is well known that knowledge facilitates higher cognitive functions, such as visual and auditory word recognition, little is known about the influence of knowledge on detection, particularly in the auditory modality. Our study tested the influence of phonological and lexical knowledge on auditory detection. Words, pseudo-words, and complex non-phonological sounds, energetically matched as closely as possible, were presented at a range of presentation levels from sub-threshold to clearly audible. The participants performed a detection task (Experiments 1 and 2) that was followed by a two alternative forced-choice recognition task in Experiment 2. The results of this second task in Experiment 2 suggest a correct recognition of words in the absence of detection with a subjective threshold approach. In the detection task of both experiments, phonological stimuli (words and pseudo-words) were better detected than non-phonological stimuli (complex sounds), presented close to the auditory threshold. This finding suggests an advantage of speech for signal detection. An additional advantage of words over pseudo-words was observed in Experiment 2, suggesting that lexical knowledge could also improve auditory detection when listeners had to recognize the stimulus in a subsequent task. Two simulations of detection performance performed on the sound signals confirmed that the advantage of speech over non-speech processing could not be attributed to energetic differences in the stimuli.

  10. Filamin and Phospholipase C-ε Are Required for Calcium Signaling in the Caenorhabditis elegans Spermatheca

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, Ismar; Orozco, Jose M.; Cram, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans spermatheca is a myoepithelial tube that stores sperm and undergoes cycles of stretching and constriction as oocytes enter, are fertilized, and exit into the uterus. FLN-1/filamin, a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold, and PLC-1/phospholipase C-ε, an enzyme that generates the second messenger IP3, are required for embryos to exit normally after fertilization. Using GCaMP, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, we show that entry of an oocyte into the spermatheca initiates a distinctive series of IP3-dependent calcium oscillations that propagate across the tissue via gap junctions and lead to constriction of the spermatheca. PLC-1 is required for the calcium release mechanism triggered by oocyte entry, and FLN-1 is required for timely initiation of the calcium oscillations. INX-12, a gap junction subunit, coordinates propagation of the calcium transients across the spermatheca. Gain-of-function mutations in ITR-1/IP3R, an IP3-dependent calcium channel, and loss-of-function mutations in LFE-2, a negative regulator of IP3 signaling, increase calcium release and suppress the exit defect in filamin-deficient animals. We further demonstrate that a regulatory cassette consisting of MEL-11/myosin phosphatase and NMY-1/non-muscle myosin is required for coordinated contraction of the spermatheca. In summary, this study answers long-standing questions concerning calcium signaling dynamics in the C. elegans spermatheca and suggests FLN-1 is needed in response to oocyte entry to trigger calcium release and coordinated contraction of the spermathecal tissue. PMID:23671426

  11. Requirement for Pathogenic IL-23 Signaling Is Restricted to Initiation of Autoimmune Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Diny, Nicola L.; Ong, SuFey; Barin, Jobert G.; Hou, Xuezhou; Rose, Noel R.; Talor, Monica V.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Using a mouse model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), we showed for the first time that IL-23 stimulation of CD4+ T cells is required only briefly at the initiation of GM-CFS-dependent cardiac autoimmunity. IL-23 signal, acting as a switch, turns on pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells, and becomes dispensable once autoreactivity is established. Il23a−/− mice failed to mount an efficient Th17 response to immunization, and were protected from myocarditis. However, remarkably, transient IL-23 stimulation ex vivo fully restored pathogenicity in otherwise nonpathogenic CD4+ T cells raised from Il23a−/− donors. Thus, IL-23 may no longer be necessary to uphold inflammation in established autoimmune diseases. In addition, we demonstrated that IL-23 induced GM-CSF mediates the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells in EAM. The neutralization of GM-CSF abrogated cardiac inflammation. However, sustained IL-23 signaling is required to maintain IL-17A production in CD4+ T cells. Despite inducing inflammation in Il23a−/− recipients comparable to WT, autoreactive CD4+ T cells downregulated IL-17A production without persistent IL-23 signaling. This divergence on the controls of GM-CSF-dependent pathogenicity on one side and IL-17A production on the other side may contribute to the discrepant efficacies of anti-IL-23 therapy in different autoimmune diseases. PMID:26660726

  12. GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for trichome branching through gibberellic acid signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    An, Lijun; Zhou, Zhongjing; Su, Sha; Yan, An; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-02-01

    Cell differentiation generally corresponds to the cell cycle, typically forming a non-dividing cell with a unique differentiated morphology, and Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model system to study all aspects of cell differentiation. Although gibberellic acid is reported to be involved in trichome branching in Arabidopsis, the mechanism for such signaling is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for the control of trichome branching through gibberellic acid signaling. The phenotypes of a loss-of-function gis mutant and an overexpressor showed that GIS acted as a repressor to control trichome branching. Our results also show that GIS is not required for cell endoreduplication, and our molecular and genetic study results have shown that GIS functions downstream of the key regulator of trichome branching, STICHEL (STI), to control trichome branching through the endoreduplication-independent pathway. Furthermore, our results also suggest that GIS controls trichome branching in Arabidopsis through two different pathways and acts either upstream or downstream of the negative regulator of gibbellic acid signaling SPINDLY (SPY).

  13. Fgf19 regulated by Hh signaling is required for zebrafish forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayumi; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling plays important roles in brain development. Fgf3 and Fgf8 are crucial for the formation of the forebrain and hindbrain. Fgf8 is also required for the midbrain to form. Here, we identified zebrafish Fgf19 and examined its roles in brain development by knocking down Fgf19 function. We found that Fgf19 expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain was involved in cell proliferation and cell survival during embryonic brain development. Fgf19 was also essential for development of the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. Regional specification is linked to cell type specification. Fgf19 was also essential for the specification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and oligodendrocytes generated in the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. The cross talk between Fgf and Hh signaling is critical for brain development. In the forebrain, Fgf19 expression was down-regulated on inhibition of Hh but not of Fgf3/Fgf8, and overexpression of Fgf19 rescued partially the phenotype on inhibition of Hh. The present findings indicate that Fgf19 signaling is crucial for forebrain development by interacting with Hh and provide new insights into the roles of Fgf signaling in brain development.

  14. Tankyrase Sterile α Motif Domain Polymerization Is Required for Its Role in Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Amanda A; McCauley, Michael; Langelier, Marie-France; Pascal, John M

    2016-09-06

    Tankyrase-1 (TNKS1/PARP-5a) is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme that regulates multiple cellular processes creating a poly(ADP-ribose) posttranslational modification that can lead to target protein turnover. TNKS1 thereby controls protein levels of key components of signaling pathways, including Axin1, the limiting component of the destruction complex in canonical Wnt signaling that degrades β-catenin to prevent its coactivator function in gene expression. There are limited molecular level insights into TNKS1 regulation in cell signaling pathways. TNKS1 has a sterile α motif (SAM) domain that is known to mediate polymerization, but the functional requirement for SAM polymerization has not been assessed. We have determined the crystal structure of wild-type human TNKS1 SAM domain and used structure-based mutagenesis to disrupt polymer formation and assess the consequences on TNKS1 regulation of β-catenin-dependent transcription. Our data indicate the SAM polymer is critical for TNKS1 catalytic activity and allows TNKS1 to efficiently access cytoplasmic signaling complexes.

  15. Differential Requirements of TCR Signaling in Homeostatic Maintenance and Function of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baojun; Wu, Jianxuan; Jiao, Yiqun; Bock, Cheryl; Dai, Meifang; Chen, Benny; Chao, Nelson; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are generated exclusively in the fetal thymus and maintained in the skin epithelium throughout postnatal life of the mouse. DETCs have restricted antigenic specificity as a result of their exclusive usage of a canonical TCR. Although the importance of the TCR in DETC development has been well established, the exact role of TCR signaling in DETC homeostasis and function remains incompletely defined. In this study, we investigated TCR signaling in fully matured DETCs by lineage-restricted deletion of the Lat gene, an essential signaling molecule downstream of the TCR. We found that Lat deletion impaired TCR-dependent cytokine gene activation and the ability of DETCs to undergo proliferative expansion. However, linker for activation of T cells-deficient DETCs were able to maintain long-term population homeostasis, although with a reduced proliferation rate. Mice with Lat deletion in DETCs exhibited delayed wound healing accompanied by impaired clonal expansion within the wound area. Our study revealed differential requirements for TCR signaling in homeostatic maintenance of DETCs and in their effector function during wound healing.

  16. The Auditory-Evoked N2 and P3 Components in the Stop-Signal Task: Indices of Inhibition, Response-Conflict or Error-Detection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimoska, Aneta; Johnstone, Stuart J.; Barry, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The N2 and P3 components have been separately associated with response inhibition in the stop-signal task, and more recently, the N2 has been implicated in the detection of response-conflict. To isolate response inhibition activity from early sensory processing, the present study compared processing of the stop-signal with that of a…

  17. Biological impact of music and software-based auditory training.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Auditory-based communication skills are developed at a young age and are maintained throughout our lives. However, some individuals - both young and old - encounter difficulties in achieving or maintaining communication proficiency. Biological signals arising from hearing sounds relate to real-life communication skills such as listening to speech in noisy environments and reading, pointing to an intersection between hearing and cognition. Musical experience, amplification, and software-based training can improve these biological signals. These findings of biological plasticity, in a variety of subject populations, relate to attention and auditory memory, and represent an integrated auditory system influenced by both sensation and cognition.

  18. Optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Victor H.; Gehrt, Anna; Reuter, Kirsten; Jing, Zhizi; Jeschke, Marcus; Mendoza Schulz, Alejandro; Hoch, Gerhard; Bartels, Matthias; Vogt, Gerhard; Garnham, Carolyn W.; Yawo, Hiromu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Augustine, George J.; Bamberg, Ernst; Kügler, Sebastian; Salditt, Tim; de Hoz, Livia; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory prostheses can partially restore speech comprehension when hearing fails. Sound coding with current prostheses is based on electrical stimulation of auditory neurons and has limited frequency resolution due to broad current spread within the cochlea. In contrast, optical stimulation can be spatially confined, which may improve frequency resolution. Here, we used animal models to characterize optogenetic stimulation, which is the optical stimulation of neurons genetically engineered to express the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Optogenetic stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) activated the auditory pathway, as demonstrated by recordings of single neuron and neuronal population responses. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of SGNs restored auditory activity in deaf mice. Approximation of the spatial spread of cochlear excitation by recording local field potentials (LFPs) in the inferior colliculus in response to suprathreshold optical, acoustic, and electrical stimuli indicated that optogenetic stimulation achieves better frequency resolution than monopolar electrical stimulation. Virus-mediated expression of a ChR2 variant with greater light sensitivity in SGNs reduced the amount of light required for responses and allowed neuronal spiking following stimulation up to 60 Hz. Our study demonstrates a strategy for optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway in rodents and lays the groundwork for future applications of cochlear optogenetics in auditory research and prosthetics. PMID:24509078

  19. Glial Cell Contributions to Auditory Brainstem Development

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits. PMID:27818624

  20. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution. PMID:21118524

  1. Dll1- and Dll4-mediated Notch signaling is required for homeostasis of intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrinet, Luca; Rodilla, Veronica; Liu, Zhenyi; Chen, Shuang; Koch, Ute; Espinosa, Lluis; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Kopan, Raphael; Lewis, Julian; Radtke, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Ablation of Notch signaling within the intestinal epithelium results in loss of proliferating crypt progenitors, due to their conversion into post-mitotic secretory cells. We aimed to confirm that Notch was active in stem cells (SC), investigate consequences of loss of Notch signaling within the intestinal SC compartment, and identify the physiological ligands of Notch in mouse intestine. Furthermore, we investigated whether the induction of goblet cell differentiation that results from loss of Notch requires the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4). Methods Trasgenic mice that carried a reporter of Notch1 activation were used for lineage tracing experiments. The in vivo functions of the Notch ligands Jagged1 (Jag1), Delta-like1 (Dll1), Delta-like4 (Dll4), and the transcription factor Klf4 were assessed in mice with inducible, gut-specific gene targeting (Vil-Cre-ERT2). Results Notch1 signaling was found to be activated in intestinal SC. Although deletion of Jag1 or Dll4 did not perturb the intestinal epithelium, inactivation of Dll1 resulted in a moderate increase in number of goblet cells without noticeable effects of progenitor proliferation. However, simultaneous inactivation of Dll1 and Dll4 resulted in the complete conversion of proliferating progenitors into post-mitotic goblet cells, concomitant with loss of SC (Olfm4+, Lgr5+ and Ascl2+). Klf4 inactivation did not interfere with goblet cell differentiation in adult wild-type or in Notch pathway-deficient gut. Conclusions Notch signaling in SC and progenitors is activated by Dll1 and Dll4 ligands and is required for maintenance of intestinal progenitor and SC. Klf4 is dispensable for goblet cell differentiation in intestines of adult Notch-deficient mice. PMID:21238454

  2. Gibberellin Signaling Requires Chromatin Remodeler PICKLE to Promote Vegetative Growth and Phase Transitions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa Thi; Ogas, Joe; Choi, Giltsu

    2017-01-01

    PICKLE (PKL) is an ATP-dependent chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD3) chromatin remodeling enzyme in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Previous studies showed that PKL promotes embryonic-to-vegetative transition by inhibiting expression of seed-specific genes during seed germination. The pkl mutants display a low penetrance of the “pickle root” phenotype, with a thick and green primary root that retains embryonic characteristics. The penetrance of this pickle root phenotype in pkl is dramatically increased in gibberellin (GA)-deficient conditions. At adult stages, the pkl mutants are semidwarfs with delayed flowering time, which resemble reduced GA-signaling mutants. These findings suggest that PKL may play a positive role in regulating GA signaling. A recent biochemical analysis further showed that PKL and GA signaling repressors DELLAs antagonistically regulate hypocotyl cell elongation genes by direct protein-protein interaction. To elucidate further the role of PKL in GA signaling and plant development, we studied the genetic interaction between PKL and DELLAs using the hextuple mutant containing pkl and della pentuple (dP) mutations. Here, we show that PKL is required for most of GA-promoted developmental processes, including vegetative growth such as hypocotyl, leaf, and inflorescence stem elongation, and phase transitions such as juvenile-to-adult leaf and vegetative-to-reproductive phase. The removal of all DELLA functions (in the dP background) cannot rescue these phenotypes in pkl. RNA-sequencing analysis using the ga1 (a GA-deficient mutant), pkl, and the ga1 pkl double mutant further shows that expression of 80% of GA-responsive genes in seedlings is PKL dependent, including genes that function in cell elongation, cell division, and phase transitions. These results indicate that the CHD3 chromatin remodeler PKL is required for regulating gene expression during most of GA-regulated developmental processes. PMID:28057895

  3. Gibberellin Signaling Requires Chromatin Remodeler PICKLE to Promote Vegetative Growth and Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongmoo; Oh, Dong-Ha; Dassanayake, Maheshi; Nguyen, Khoa Thi; Ogas, Joe; Choi, Giltsu; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    PICKLE (PKL) is an ATP-dependent chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD3) chromatin remodeling enzyme in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Previous studies showed that PKL promotes embryonic-to-vegetative transition by inhibiting expression of seed-specific genes during seed germination. The pkl mutants display a low penetrance of the "pickle root" phenotype, with a thick and green primary root that retains embryonic characteristics. The penetrance of this pickle root phenotype in pkl is dramatically increased in gibberellin (GA)-deficient conditions. At adult stages, the pkl mutants are semidwarfs with delayed flowering time, which resemble reduced GA-signaling mutants. These findings suggest that PKL may play a positive role in regulating GA signaling. A recent biochemical analysis further showed that PKL and GA signaling repressors DELLAs antagonistically regulate hypocotyl cell elongation genes by direct protein-protein interaction. To elucidate further the role of PKL in GA signaling and plant development, we studied the genetic interaction between PKL and DELLAs using the hextuple mutant containing pkl and della pentuple (dP) mutations. Here, we show that PKL is required for most of GA-promoted developmental processes, including vegetative growth such as hypocotyl, leaf, and inflorescence stem elongation, and phase transitions such as juvenile-to-adult leaf and vegetative-to-reproductive phase. The removal of all DELLA functions (in the dP background) cannot rescue these phenotypes in pkl RNA-sequencing analysis using the ga1 (a GA-deficient mutant), pkl, and the ga1 pkl double mutant further shows that expression of 80% of GA-responsive genes in seedlings is PKL dependent, including genes that function in cell elongation, cell division, and phase transitions. These results indicate that the CHD3 chromatin remodeler PKL is required for regulating gene expression during most of GA-regulated developmental processes.

  4. Perineurial glia require Notch signaling during motor nerve development but not regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Binari, Laura A.; Lewis, Gwendolyn M.; Kucenas, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Motor nerves play the critical role of shunting information out of the CNS to targets in the periphery. Their formation requires the coordinated development of distinct cellular components, including motor axons and the Schwann cells and perineurial glia that ensheath them. During nervous system assembly, these glial cells must migrate long distances and terminally differentiate, ensuring the efficient propagation of action potentials. Although we know quite a bit about the mechanisms that control Schwann cell development during this process, nothing is known about the mechanisms that mediate the migration and differentiation of perineurial glia. Using in vivo imaging in zebrafish, we demonstrate that Notch signaling is required for both perineurial migration and differentiation during nerve formation, but not regeneration. Interestingly, loss of Notch signaling in perineurial cells also causes a failure of Schwann cell differentiation, demonstrating that Schwann cells require perineurial glia for aspects of their own development. These studies describe a novel mechanism that mediates multiple aspects of perineurial development and reveal the critical importance of perineurial glia for Schwann cell maturation and nerve formation. PMID:23467342

  5. Attenuation of IL-7 receptor signaling is not required for allelic exclusion.

    PubMed

    Will, Wynette M; Aaker, Joshua D; Burchill, Matthew A; Harmon, Ian R; O'Neil, Jennifer J; Goetz, Christine A; Hippen, Keli L; Farrar, Michael A

    2006-03-15

    Allelic exclusion prevents pre-B cells from generating more than one functional H chain, thereby ensuring the formation of a unique pre-BCR. The signaling processes underlying allelic exclusion are not clearly understood. IL-7R-dependent signals have been clearly shown to regulate the accessibility of the Ig H chain locus. More recent work has suggested that pre-BCR-dependent attenuation of IL-7R signaling returns the H chain loci to an inaccessible state; this process has been proposed to underlie allelic exclusion. Importantly, this model predicts that preventing pre-BCR-dependent down-regulation of IL-7R signaling should interfere with allelic exclusion. To test this hypothesis, we made use of transgenic mice that express a constitutively active form of STAT5b (STAT5b-CA). STAT5b-CA expression restores V(D)J recombination in IL-7R(-/-) B cells, demonstrating that IL-7 regulates H chain locus accessibility and V(D)J recombination via STAT5 activation. To examine the effects of constitutively active STAT5b on allelic exclusion, we crossed STAT5b-CA mice (which express the IgM(b) allotype) to IgM(a) allotype congenic mice. We found no difference in the percentage of IgM(a)/IgM(b)-coexpressing B cells in STAT5b-CA vs littermate control mice; identical results were observed when crossing STAT5b-CA mice with hen egg lysozyme (HEL) H chain transgenic mice. The HEL transgene enforces allelic exclusion, preventing rearrangement of endogenous H chain genes; importantly, rearrangement of endogenous H chain genes was suppressed to a similar degree in STAT5b-CA vs HEL mice. Thus, attenuation of IL-7R/STAT5 signaling is not required for allelic exclusion.

  6. Auditory Processing Disorder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Auditory Processing Disorder KidsHealth > For Parents > Auditory Processing Disorder Print A A A What's in this ... Speech Symptoms Causes Diagnosis Helping Your Child Auditory processing disorder (APD), also known as central auditory processing ...

  7. [Auditory perception and language: functional imaging of speech sensitive auditory cortex].

    PubMed

    Samson, Y; Belin, P; Thivard, L; Boddaert, N; Crozier, S; Zilbovicius, M

    2001-09-01

    Since the description of cortical deafness, it has been known that the superior temporal cortex is bilaterally involved in the initial stages of language auditory perception but the precise anatomical limits and the function of this area remain debated. Here we reviewed more than 40 recent papers of positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging related to language auditory perception, and we performed a meta-analysis of the localization of the peaks of activation in the Talairach's space. We found 8 studies reporting word versus non-word listening contrasts with 54 activation peaks in the temporal lobes. These peaks clustered in a bilateral and well-limited area of the temporal superior cortex, which is here operationally defined as the speech sensitive auditory cortex. This area is more than 4cm long, located in the superior temporal gyrus and the superior temporal sulcus, both anterior and posterior to Heschl's gyrus. It do not include the primary auditory cortex nor the ascending part of the planum temporale. The speech sensitive auditory cortex is not activated by pure tones, environmental sounds, or attention directed toward elementary components of a sound such as intensity, pitch, or duration, and thus has some specificity for speech signals. The specificity is not perfect, since we found a number of non-speech auditory stimuli activating the speech sensitive auditory cortex. Yet the latter studies always involve auditory perception mechanisms which are also relevant to speech perception either at the level of primitive auditory scene analysis processes, or at the level of specific schema-based recognition processes. The dorsal part of the speech sensitive auditory cortex may be involved in primitive scene analysis processes, whereas distributed activation of this area may contribute to the emergence of a broad class of "voice" schemas and of more specific "speech schemas/phonetic modules" related to different languages. In addition

  8. Electrophysiological measurement of human auditory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Contingent negative variations in the presence and amplitudes of brain potentials evoked by sound are considered. Evidence is produced that the evoked brain stem response to auditory stimuli is clearly related to brain events associated with cognitive processing of acoustic signals since their properties depend upon where the listener directs his attention, whether the signal is an expected event or a surprise, and when sound that is listened-for is heard at last.

  9. Conserved mechanisms of vocalization coding in mammalian and songbird auditory midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Portfors, Christine V.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of social vocalization among animals provides the opportunity to identify conserved mechanisms of auditory processing that subserve vocal communication. Identifying auditory coding properties that are shared across vocal communicators will provide insight into how human auditory processing leads to speech perception. Here, we compare auditory response properties and neural coding of social vocalizations in auditory midbrain neurons of mammalian and avian vocal communicators. The auditory midbrain is a nexus of auditory processing because it receives and integrates information from multiple parallel pathways and provides the ascending auditory input to the thalamus. The auditory midbrain is also the first region in the ascending auditory system where neurons show complex tuning properties that are correlated with the acoustics of social vocalizations. Single unit studies in mice, bats and zebra finches reveal shared principles of auditory coding including tonotopy, excitatory and inhibitory interactions that shape responses to vocal signals, nonlinear response properties that are important for auditory coding of social vocalizations and modulation tuning. Additionally, single neuron responses in the mouse and songbird midbrain are reliable, selective for specific syllables, and rely on spike timing for neural discrimination of distinct vocalizations. We propose that future research on auditory coding of vocalizations in mouse and songbird midbrain neurons adopt similar experimental and analytical approaches so that conserved principles of vocalization coding may be distinguished from those that are specialized for each species. PMID:23726970

  10. Conserved mechanisms of vocalization coding in mammalian and songbird auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Sarah M N; Portfors, Christine V

    2013-11-01

    The ubiquity of social vocalizations among animals provides the opportunity to identify conserved mechanisms of auditory processing that subserve communication. Identifying auditory coding properties that are shared across vocal communicators will provide insight into how human auditory processing leads to speech perception. Here, we compare auditory response properties and neural coding of social vocalizations in auditory midbrain neurons of mammalian and avian vocal communicators. The auditory midbrain is a nexus of auditory processing because it receives and integrates information from multiple parallel pathways and provides the ascending auditory input to the thalamus. The auditory midbrain is also the first region in the ascending auditory system where neurons show complex tuning properties that are correlated with the acoustics of social vocalizations. Single unit studies in mice, bats and zebra finches reveal shared principles of auditory coding including tonotopy, excitatory and inhibitory interactions that shape responses to vocal signals, nonlinear response properties that are important for auditory coding of social vocalizations and modulation tuning. Additionally, single neuron responses in the mouse and songbird midbrain are reliable, selective for specific syllables, and rely on spike timing for neural discrimination of distinct vocalizations. We propose that future research on auditory coding of vocalizations in mouse and songbird midbrain neurons adopt similar experimental and analytical approaches so that conserved principles of vocalization coding may be distinguished from those that are specialized for each species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Communication Sounds and the Brain: New Directions and Perspectives".

  11. PB1 Domain-Dependent Signaling Complex Is Required for Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Uhlik, Mark T.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Johnson, Gary L.

    2006-01-01

    MEKK2, MEK5, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) are members of a three-kinase cascade for the activation of ERK5. MEK5 is the only MAP2K to express a PB1 domain, and we have shown that it heterodimerizes with the PB1 domain of MEKK2. Here we demonstrate the MEK5 PB1 domain is a scaffold that also binds ERK5, functionally forming a MEKK2-MEK5-ERK5 complex. Reconstitution assays and CFP/YFP imaging (fluorescence resonance energy transfer [FRET]) measuring YFP-MEKK2/CFP-MEK5 and CFP-MEK5/YFP-ERK5 interactions define distinct MEK5 PB1 domain binding sites for MEKK2 and ERK5, with a C-terminal extension of the PB1 domain contributing to ERK5 binding. Stimulus-dependent CFP/YFP FRET in combination with mutational analysis was used to define MEK5 PB1 domain residues critical for the interaction of MEKK2/MEK5 and MEK5/ERK5 required for activation of the ERK5 pathway in living cells. Fusion of the MEK5 PB1 domain to the N terminus of MEK1 confers ERK5 regulation by a MAP2K normally regulating only ERK1/2. The MEK5 PB1 domain confers stringent MAP3K regulation of ERK5 relative to more promiscuous MAP3K control of ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. PMID:16507987

  12. Auditory Brainstem Implant: Electrophysiologic Responses and Subject Perception

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Barbara S.; Brown, M Christian; Eddington, Donald K; Hancock, Kenneth E; Lee, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to compare the perceptual sensation produced by bipolar electrical stimulation of auditory brainstem implant (ABI) electrodes to the morphology of electrically–evoked responses elicited by the same bipolar stimulus in the same unanesthetized, post-surgical state. Secondary aims were to 1) examine the relationships between sensations elicited by the bipolar stimulation used for evoked potential recording and the sensations elicited by the monopolar pulse-train stimulation used by the implant processor and 2) to examine the relationships between evoked-potential morphology (elicited by bipolar stimulation) to the sensations elicited by monopolar stimulation. Design Electrically-evoked early latency and middle-latency responses to bipolar, biphasic low-rate pulses were recorded post-operatively in four adults with auditory brainstem implants. Prior to recording, the perceptual sensations elicited by these bipolar stimuli were obtained and categorized as: 1) Auditory sensations only, 2) Mixed sensations (both auditory and non-auditory), 3) Side Effect (non-auditory sensations) or 4) No Sensation. In addition, the sensations elicited by monopolar higher-rate pulse-train stimuli similar to that used in processor programming were also measured for all electrodes in the ABI array and classified using the same categories. Comparisons were made between evoked response morphology, bipolar stimulation sensation and monopolar stimulation sensation. Results Sensations were classified for 33 bipolar pairs as follows: 21 pairs were Auditory, 6 were Mixed, 5 were Side Effect and 1 was No Sensation. When these sensations were compared to the electrically-evoked response morphology for these signals, P3 of the electrically-evoked auditory brainstem response (eABR) and the presence of a middle-latency positive wave, usually between 15 and 25 ms (eMLR), were only present when the perceptual sensation had an auditory component (either

  13. Notch signaling is required for normal prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-De; Leow, Ching Ching; Zha, Jiping; Tang, Zhijun; Modrusan, Zora; Radtke, Freddy; Aguet, Michel; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Notch pathway is crucial for stem/progenitor cell maintenance, growth and differentiation in a variety of tissues. Using a transgenic cell ablation approach, we found in our previous study that cells expressing Notch1 are crucial for prostate early development and re-growth. Here, we further define the role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic epithelial cell growth and differentiation using biochemical and genetic approaches in ex vivo or in vivo systems. Treatment of developing prostate grown in culture with inhibitors of gamma-secretase/presenilin, which is required for Notch cleavage and activation, caused a robust increase in proliferation of epithelial cells co-expressing cytokeratin 8 and 14, lack of luminal/basal layer segregation and dramatically reduced branching morphogenesis. Using conditional Notch1 gene deletion mouse models, we found that inactivation of Notch1 signaling resulted in profound prostatic alterations, including increased tufting, bridging and enhanced epithelial proliferation. Cells within these lesions co-expressed both luminal and basal cell markers, a feature of prostatic epithelial cells in predifferentiation developmental stages. Microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression in a number of genetic networks was altered following Notch1 gene deletion in prostate. Furthermore, expression of Notch1 and its effector Hey-1 gene in human prostate adenocarcinomas were found significantly down-regulated compared to normal control tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Notch signaling is critical for normal cell proliferation and differentiation in the prostate, and deregulation of this pathway may facilitate prostatic tumorigenesis.

  14. A CRISPR screen defines a signal peptide processing pathway required by flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Miner, Jonathan J; Gorman, Matthew J; Rausch, Keiko; Ramage, Holly; White, James P; Zuiani, Adam; Zhang, Ping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhang, Qiang; Dowd, Kimberly A; Pierson, Theodore C; Cherry, Sara; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-07-07

    Flaviviruses infect hundreds of millions of people annually, and no antiviral therapy is available. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based screen to identify host genes that, when edited, resulted in reduced flavivirus infection. Here, we validated nine human genes required for flavivirus infectivity, and these were associated with endoplasmic reticulum functions including translocation, protein degradation, and N-linked glycosylation. In particular, a subset of endoplasmic reticulum-associated signal peptidase complex (SPCS) proteins was necessary for proper cleavage of the flavivirus structural proteins (prM and E) and secretion of viral particles. Loss of SPCS1 expression resulted in markedly reduced yield of all Flaviviridae family members tested (West Nile, Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis C viruses), but had little impact on alphavirus, bunyavirus, or rhabdovirus infection or the surface expression or secretion of diverse host proteins. We found that SPCS1 dependence could be bypassed by replacing the native prM protein leader sequences with a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen leader sequence. Thus, SPCS1, either directly or indirectly via its interactions with unknown host proteins, preferentially promotes the processing of specific protein cargo, and Flaviviridae have a unique dependence on this signal peptide processing pathway. SPCS1 and other signal processing pathway members could represent pharmacological targets for inhibiting infection by the expanding number of flaviviruses of medical concern.

  15. Lhx9 gene expression during early limb development in mice requires the FGF signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisheng; Wilson, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Lhx9 is a member of the LIM-homeodomain gene family necessary for the correct development of many organs including gonads, limbs, heart and the nervous system. In the context of limb development, Lhx9 has been implicated as an integrator for Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling required for proximal-distal (PD) and anterior-posterior (AP) development of the limb. Three splice variants of the Lhx9 transcript are expressed during development, two of which are predicted to act in a dominant negative fashion, competing with the DNA binding version of Lhx9 for binding to cofactors via the LIM-domain. We examined the expression pattern for the three alternative splice forms of Lhx9; Lhx9α, Lhx9β and Lhx9c during early limb development. We have found that of the three Lhx9 isoforms, only Lhx9α and Lhx9c (intact homeodomain) are expressed during early limb development, each with their own distinct expression pattern. Additionally we determined that Lhx9 expression overlaps with FGF10 expression in the developing limb bud mesenchyme. Limb bud explant cultures, in the presence of signalling pathway inhibitors, also indicated that Lhx9 mRNA expression in the limb bud was dependent on FGF signalling.

  16. Autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling is required for conidiogenous cell development in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bo; Xu, Xiaojin; Chen, Guoqing; Zhang, Dandan; Tang, Mingzhi; Xu, Fei; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Conidiation patterning is evolutionarily complex and mechanism concerning conidiogenous cell differentiation remains largely unknown. Magnaporthe oryzae conidiates in a sympodial way and uses its conidia to infect host and disseminate blast disease. Arrestins are multifunctional proteins that modulate receptor down-regulation and scaffold components of intracellular trafficking routes. We here report an alpha-arrestin that regulates patterns of conidiation and contributes to pathogenicity in M. oryzae. We show that disruption of ARRDC1 generates mutants which produce conidia in an acropetal array and ARRDC1 significantly affects expression profile of CCA1, a virulence-related transcription factor required for conidiogenous cell differentiation. Although germ tubes normally develop appressoria, penetration peg formation is dramatically impaired and Δarrdc1 mutants are mostly nonpathogenic. Fluorescent analysis indicates that EGFP-ARRDC1 puncta are well colocalized with DsRed2-Atg8, and this distribution profile could not be altered in Δatg9 mutants, suggesting ARRDC1 enters into autophagic flux before autophagosome maturation. We propose that M. oryzae employs ARRDC1 to regulate specific receptors in response to conidiation-related signals for conidiogenous cell differentiation and utilize autophagosomes for desensitization of conidiogenous receptor, which transmits extracellular signal to the downstream elements of transcription factors. Our investigation extends novel significance of autophagy-associated alpha-arrestin signaling to fungal parasites. PMID:27498554

  17. A CRISPR screen defines a signal peptide processing pathway required by flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Miner, Jonathan J.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Rausch, Keiko; Ramage, Holly; White, James P.; Zuiani, Adam; Zhang, Ping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhang, Qiang; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Cherry, Sara; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses infect hundreds of millions of people annually, with no antiviral therapy available1,2. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based screen to identify host genes that when edited resulted in reduced flavivirus infection. We validated nine human genes required for flavivirus infectivity, and these were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions including translocation, protein degradation, and N-linked glycosylation. In particular, a subset of ER-associated signal peptidase complex (SPCS) proteins was necessary for the proper cleavage of the flavivirus structural proteins (prM and E) and secretion of viral particles. Loss of SPCS1 expression resulted in markedly reduced yield of all Flaviviridae family members tested (West Nile, Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis C viruses), yet had little impact on alphavirus, bunyavirus, or rhabdovirus infection or the surface expression or secretion of diverse host proteins. We found that SPCS1 dependence could be bypassed by replacing the native prM protein leader sequences with a class I MHC antigen leader sequence. Thus, SPCS1, either directly or indirectly via its interactions with unknown host proteins, preferentially promotes the processing of specific protein cargo, and Flaviviridae have a unique dependence on this signal peptide processing pathway. SPCS1 and other signal processing pathway members could represent pharmacological targets for inhibiting infection of the expanding number of flaviviruses of medical concern. PMID:27383988

  18. Dynamin II is required for 17β-estradiol signaling and autophagy-based ERα degradation

    PubMed Central

    Totta, Pierangela; Busonero, Claudia; Leone, Stefano; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates diverse physiological effects, including cell proliferation, by binding to estrogen receptor α (ERα). ERα is both a transcription factor that drives E2-sensitive gene expression and an extra-nuclear localized receptor that triggers the activation of diverse kinase cascades. While E2 triggers cell proliferation, it also induces ERα degradation in a typical hormone-dependent feedback loop. Although ERα breakdown proceeds through the 26S proteasome, a role for lysosomes and for some endocytic proteins in controlling ERα degradation has been reported. Here, we studied the role of the endocytic protein dynamin II in E2-dependent ERα signaling and degradation. The results indicate that dynamin II siRNA-mediated knock-down partially prevents E2-induced ERα degradation through the inhibition of an autophagy-based pathway and impairs E2-induced cell proliferation signaling. Altogether, these data demonstrate that dynamin II is required for the E2:ERα signaling of physiological functions and uncovers a role for autophagy in the control of ERα turnover. PMID:27009360

  19. Radial glia require PDGFD-PDGFRβ signalling in human but not mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Lui, Jan H; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Pollen, Alex A; Javaherian, Ashkan; Kriegstein, Arnold R; Oldham, Michael C

    2014-11-13

    Evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex underlies many of our unique mental abilities. This expansion has been attributed to the increased proliferative potential of radial glia (RG; neural stem cells) and their subventricular dispersion from the periventricular niche during neocortical development. Such adaptations may have evolved through gene expression changes in RG. However, whether or how RG gene expression varies between humans and other species is unknown. Here we show that the transcriptional profiles of human and mouse neocortical RG are broadly conserved during neurogenesis, yet diverge for specific signalling pathways. By analysing differential gene co-expression relationships between the species, we demonstrate that the growth factor PDGFD is specifically expressed by RG in human, but not mouse, corticogenesis. We also show that the expression domain of PDGFRβ, the cognate receptor for PDGFD, is evolutionarily divergent, with high expression in the germinal region of dorsal human neocortex but not in the mouse. Pharmacological inhibition of PDGFD-PDGFRβ signalling in slice culture prevents normal cell cycle progression of neocortical RG in human, but not mouse. Conversely, injection of recombinant PDGFD or ectopic expression of constitutively active PDGFRβ in developing mouse neocortex increases the proportion of RG and their subventricular dispersion. These findings highlight the requirement of PDGFD-PDGFRβ signalling for human neocortical development and suggest that local production of growth factors by RG supports the expanded germinal region and progenitor heterogeneity of species with large brains.

  20. Lunatic Fringe-mediated Notch signaling is required for lung alveogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Keli; Nieuwenhuis, Erica; Cohen, Brenda L; Wang, Wei; Canty, Angelo J; Danska, Jayne S; Coultas, Leigh; Rossant, Janet; Wu, Megan Y J; Piscione, Tino D; Nagy, Andras; Gossler, Achim; Hicks, Geoff G; Hui, Chi-Chung; Henkelman, R Mark; Yu, Lisa X; Sled, John G; Gridley, Thomas; Egan, Sean E

    2010-01-01

    Distal lung development occurs through coordinated induction of myofibroblasts, epithelial cells, and capillaries. Lunatic Fringe (Lfng) is a beta(1-3) N-acetylglucosamine transferase that modifies Notch receptors to facilitate their activation by Delta-like (Dll1/4) ligands. Lfng is expressed in the distal lung during saccular development, and deletion of this gene impairs myofibroblast differentiation and alveogenesis in this context. A similar defect was observed in Notch2(beta-geo/+)Notch3(beta-geo/beta-geo) compound mutant mice but not in Notch2(beta-geo/+) or Notch3(beta-geo/beta-geo) single mutants. Finally, to directly test for the role of Notch signaling in myofibroblast differentiation in vivo, we used ROSA26-rtTA(/+);tetO-CRE(/+);RBPJkappa(flox/flox) inducible mutant mice to show that disruption of canonical Notch signaling during late embryonic development prevents induction of smooth muscle actin in mesenchymal cells of the distal lung. In sum, these results demonstrate that Lfng functions to enhance Notch signaling in myofibroblast precursor cells and thereby to coordinate differentiation and mobilization of myofibroblasts required for alveolar septation.

  1. Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is required for neurotrophin-induced potentiation in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Schuman, E M

    2000-03-24

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of neurotrophin function in adult synaptic plasticity. In an effort to characterize the intracellular signaling pathways that couple Trk receptor activation to the final physiological effects of neurotrophins, we have examined the role of intracellular calcium rises in neurotrophin-induced synaptic enhancement in hippocampal slices. Using pharmacological blockers to two different calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sources, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) stores, we show that the potentiating effects of neurotrophins in hippocampal slices are mediated by intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Although basal synaptic transmission between hippocampal CA3 and CA1 neurons was not affected by nifedipine or thapsigargin, both drugs significantly attenuated brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3-induced synaptic enhancement. The pharmacological blockade of Ca(2+) signaling is effective only during the initial period of neurotrophin-induced potentiation. These data suggest that the minimal requirements for inducing potentiation by neurotrophins involve a transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, via voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and/or intracellular Ca(2+) stores.

  2. Applied research in auditory data representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frysinger, Steve P.

    1990-08-01

    A class of data displays, characterized generally as Auditory Data Representation, is described and motivated. This type of data representation takes advantage of the tremendous pattern recognition capability of the human auditory channel. Audible displays offer an alternative means of conveying quantitative data to the analyst to facilitate information extraction, and are successfully used alone and in conjunction with visual displays. The Auditory Data Representation literature is reviewed, along with elements of the allied fields of investigation, Psychoacoustics and Musical Perception. A methodology for applied research in this field, based upon the well-developed discipline of psychophysics, is elaborated using a recent experiment as a case study. This method permits objective estimation of a data representation technique by comparing it to alternative displays for the pattern recognition task at hand. The psychophysical threshold of signal to noise level, for constant pattern recognition performance, is the measure of display effectiveness.

  3. The importance of laughing in your face: influences of visual laughter on auditory laughter perception.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Timothy R; Abedipour, Lily

    2010-01-01

    Hearing the sound of laughter is important for social communication, but processes contributing to the audibility of laughter remain to be determined. Production of laughter resembles production of speech in that both involve visible facial movements accompanying socially significant auditory signals. However, while it is known that speech is more audible when the facial movements producing the speech sound can be seen, similar visual enhancement of the audibility of laughter remains unknown. To address this issue, spontaneously occurring laughter was edited to produce stimuli comprising visual laughter, auditory laughter, visual and auditory laughter combined, and no laughter at all (either visual or auditory), all presented in four levels of background noise. Visual laughter and no-laughter stimuli produced very few reports of auditory laughter. However, visual laughter consistently made auditory laughter more audible, compared to the same auditory signal presented without visual laughter, resembling findings reported previously for speech.

  4. 76 FR 51914 - Duty-Free Treatment of Certain Visual and Auditory Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ...-AD75 Duty-Free Treatment of Certain Visual and Auditory Materials AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... applicant to file the documentation required for duty-free treatment of certain visual and auditory... Facilitating the International Circulation of Visual and Auditory Materials of an Educational, Scientific,...

  5. Insulin signaling is acutely required for long-term memory in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Daniel B.; Androschuk, Alaura; Rosenfelt, Cory; Langer, Steven; Harding, Mark; Bolduc, Francois V.

    2015-01-01

    Memory formation has been shown recently to be dependent on energy status in Drosophila. A well-established energy sensor is the insulin signaling (InS) pathway. Previous studies in various animal models including human have revealed the role of insulin levels in short-term memory but its role in long-term memory remains less clear. We therefore investigated genetically the spatial and temporal role of InS using the olfactory learning and long-term memory model in Drosophila. We found that InS is involved in both learning and memory. InS in the mushroom body is required for learning and long-term memory whereas long-term memory specifically is impaired after InS signaling disruption in the ellipsoid body, where it regulates the level of p70s6k, a downstream target of InS and a marker of protein synthesis. Finally, we show also that InS is acutely required for long-term memory formation in adult flies. PMID:25805973

  6. Gpr177-mediated Wnt Signaling is Required for Fungiform Placode Initiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Liu, Y; Zhao, P; Dai, Z; Yang, X; Li, Y; Qiu, M; Zhang, Z

    2014-06-01

    Fungiform papillae are formed as patterned rows on the surface of the anterior tongue at early organogenesis and contain one taste bud in each papilla to form one of the important sensory organs. Despite the essential role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in controlling the development of fungiform taste papillae, the universal function of Wnt ligands in the initiation of the fungiform placode has not been completely elucidated. Here, by Shh (Cre) -mediated oral epithelial deletion of Wntless (Gpr177), a regulator essential for intracellular Wnt trafficking, we demonstrate that an overall function of Wnts is required for initiation of the fungiform placode. Multiple Wnts are expressed in the tongue epithelium at E11.5 before initiation of the fungiform placodes. Epithelial Gpr177 loss-of-function, associated with reduction of canonical Wnt signaling in lingual epithelium as exhibited by a loss of TopGal activity and Axin2 expression, results in the failure of fungiform placode initiation, as assessed by diminished expression of several taste placode molecular markers. Moreover, LiCl treatment of Gpr177 epithelial-deficient tongue explants at E11.5, but not at E12.5, restores tongue placode formation, demonstrating that Wnt ligands in the tongue surface prior to but not after fungiform placode initiation are responsible for fungiform papilla initiation. Epithelium-specific expression of an active β-catenin in the Gpr177-deficient tongue leads to fungiform papillae generation, suggesting that an intra-epithelial response to Wnts is required for placode initiation. Together, these results suggest that Gpr177 controls epithelial initiation of the fungiform placode through signaling via epithelial Wnt ligands.

  7. Gpr177-mediated Wnt Signaling Is Required for Secondary Palate Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Wang, M; Zhao, W; Yuan, X; Yang, X; Li, Y; Qiu, M; Zhu, X-J; Zhang, Z

    2015-07-01

    Cleft palate represents one of the major congenital birth defects in humans. Despite the essential roles of ectodermal canonical Wnt and mesenchymal Wnt signaling in the secondary palate development, the function of mesenchymal canonical Wnt activity in secondary palate development remains elusive. Here we show that Gpr177, a highly conserved transmembrane protein essential for Wnt trafficking, is required for secondary palate development. Gpr177 is expressed in both epithelium and mesenchyme of palatal shelves during mouse development. Wnt1(Cre)-mediated deletion of Gpr177 in craniofacial neural crest cells leads to a complete cleft secondary palate, which is formed mainly due to aberrant cell proliferation and increased cell death in palatal shelves. By BATGAL staining, we reveal an intense canonical Wnt activity in the anterior palate mesenchyme of E12.5 wild-type embryos but not in Gpr177(Wnt1-Cre) embryos, suggesting that mesenchymal canonical Wnt signaling activated by Gpr177-mediated mesenchymal Wnts is critical for secondary palate development. Moreover, phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun is impaired in the Gpr177(Wnt1-Cre) palate and is restored by implantation of Wnt5a-soaked beads in the in vitro palate explants, suggesting that Gpr177 probably regulates palate development via the Wnt5a-mediated noncanonical Wnt pathway in which c-Jun and JNK are involved. Importantly, certain cellular processes and the altered gene expression in palates lacking Gpr177 are distinct from that of the Wnt5a mutant, further demonstrating involvement of other mesenchymal Wnts in the process of palate development. Together, these results suggest that mesenchymal Gpr177 is required for secondary palate development by regulating and integrating mesenchymal canonical and noncanonical Wnt signals.

  8. Syd/JIP3 and JNK Signaling Are Required for Myonuclear Positioning and Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Victoria K.; Folker, Eric S.; Rosen, Jonathan N.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the importance of proper intracellular organization, many muscle diseases are characterized by mispositioned myonuclei. Proper positioning of myonuclei is dependent upon the microtubule motor proteins, Kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic Dynein, and there are at least two distinct mechanisms by which Kinesin and Dynein move myonuclei. The motors exert forces both directly on the nuclear surface and from the cell cortex via microtubules. How these activities are spatially segregated yet coordinated to position myonuclei is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster, we identified that Sunday Driver (Syd), a homolog of mammalian JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3), specifically regulates Kinesin- and Dynein-dependent cortical pulling of myonuclei without affecting motor activity near the nucleus. Specifically, Syd mediates Kinesin-dependent localization of Dynein to the muscle ends, where cortically anchored Dynein then pulls microtubules and the attached myonuclei into place. Proper localization of Dynein also requires activation of the JNK signaling cascade. Furthermore, Syd functions downstream of JNK signaling because without Syd, JNK signaling is insufficient to promote Kinesin-dependent localization of Dynein to the muscle ends. The significance of Syd-dependent myonuclear positioning is illustrated by muscle-specific depletion of Syd, which impairs muscle function. Moreover, both myonuclear spacing and locomotive defects in syd mutants can be rescued by expression of mammalian JIP3 in Drosophila muscle tissue, indicating an evolutionarily conserved role for JIP3 in myonuclear movement and highlighting the utility of Drosophila as a model for studying mammalian development. Collectively, we implicate Syd/JIP3 as a novel regulator of myogenesis that is required for proper intracellular organization and tissue function. PMID:25522254

  9. Calcium influx-mediated signaling is required for complete mouse egg activation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yi-Liang; Stein, Paula; Jefferson, Wendy N; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Williams, Carmen J

    2012-03-13

    Mammalian fertilization is accompanied by oscillations in egg cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations that are critical for completion of egg activation. These oscillations are initiated by Ca(2+) release from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular stores. We tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane was a requisite component of egg activation signaling, and not simply a Ca(2+) source for store repletion. Using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and standard in vitro fertilization (IVF), we found that Ca(2+) influx was not required to initiate resumption of meiosis II. However, even if multiple oscillations in intracellular Ca(2+) occurred, in the absence of Ca(2+) influx, the fertilized eggs failed to emit the second polar body, resulting in formation of three pronuclei. Additional experiments using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA/AM, demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx is sufficient to support polar body emission and pronucleus formation after only a single sperm-induced Ca(2+) transient, whereas BAPTA/AM-treated ICSI or fertilized eggs cultured in Ca(2+)-free medium remained arrested in metaphase II. Inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry had no effect on ICSI-induced egg activation, so Ca(2+) influx through alternative channels must participate in egg activation signaling. Ca(2+) influx appears to be upstream of CaMKIIγ activity because eggs can be parthenogenetically activated with a constitutively active form of CaMKIIγ in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). These results suggest that Ca(2+) influx at fertilization not only maintains Ca(2+) oscillations by replenishing Ca(2+) stores, but also activates critical signaling pathways upstream of CaMKIIγ that are required for second polar body emission.

  10. Sox11 Is Required to Maintain Proper Levels of Hedgehog Signaling during Vertebrate Ocular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai-Kastoori, Lakshmi; Wen, Wen; Wilson, Stephen G.; Strachan, Erin; Lo-Castro, Adriana; Fichera, Marco; Musumeci, Sebastiano A.; Lehmann, Ordan J.; Morris, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular coloboma is a sight-threatening malformation caused by failure of the choroid fissure to close during morphogenesis of the eye, and is frequently associated with additional anomalies, including microphthalmia and cataracts. Although Hedgehog signaling is known to play a critical role in choroid fissure closure, genetic regulation of this pathway remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor Sox11 is required to maintain specific levels of Hedgehog signaling during ocular development. Sox11-deficient zebrafish embryos displayed delayed and abnormal lens formation, coloboma, and a specific reduction in rod photoreceptors, all of which could be rescued by treatment with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor cyclopamine. We further demonstrate that the elevated Hedgehog signaling in Sox11-deficient zebrafish was caused by a large increase in shha transcription; indeed, suppressing Shha expression rescued the ocular phenotypes of sox11 morphants. Conversely, over-expression of sox11 induced cyclopia, a phenotype consistent with reduced levels of Sonic hedgehog. We screened DNA samples from 79 patients with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, or coloboma (MAC) and identified two novel heterozygous SOX11 variants in individuals with coloboma. In contrast to wild type human SOX11 mRNA, mRNA containing either variant failed to rescue the lens and coloboma phenotypes of Sox11-deficient zebrafish, and both exhibited significantly reduced transactivation ability in a luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, decreased gene dosage from a segmental deletion encompassing the SOX11 locus resulted in microphthalmia and related ocular phenotypes. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role for Sox11 in controlling Hedgehog signaling, and suggests that SOX11 variants contribute to pediatric eye disorders. PMID:25010521

  11. Spectrotemporal resolution tradeoff in auditory processing as revealed by human auditory brainstem responses and psychophysical indices.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Syed Khaja, Ameenuddin

    2014-06-20

    Auditory filter theory dictates a physiological compromise between frequency and temporal resolution of cochlear signal processing. We examined neurophysiological correlates of these spectrotemporal tradeoffs in the human auditory system using auditory evoked brain potentials and psychophysical responses. Temporal resolution was assessed using scalp-recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by paired clicks. The inter-click interval (ICI) between successive pulses was parameterized from 0.7 to 25 ms to map ABR amplitude recovery as a function of stimulus spacing. Behavioral frequency difference limens (FDLs) and auditory filter selectivity (Q10 of psychophysical tuning curves) were obtained to assess relations between behavioral spectral acuity and electrophysiological estimates of temporal resolvability. Neural responses increased monotonically in amplitude with increasing ICI, ranging from total suppression (0.7 ms) to full recovery (25 ms) with a temporal resolution of ∼3-4 ms. ABR temporal thresholds were correlated with behavioral Q10 (frequency selectivity) but not FDLs (frequency discrimination); no correspondence was observed between Q10 and FDLs. Results suggest that finer frequency selectivity, but not discrimination, is associated with poorer temporal resolution. The inverse relation between ABR recovery and perceptual frequency tuning demonstrates a time-frequency tradeoff between the temporal and spectral resolving power of the human auditory system.

  12. The auditory system of non-calling grasshoppers (Melanoplinae: Podismini) and the evolutionary regression of their tympanal ears.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Gerlind U C; Berger, Sandra; Strauss, Johannes; Lehmann, Arne W; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Reduction of tympanal hearing organs is repeatedly found amongst insects and is associated with weakened selection for hearing. There is also an associated wing reduction, since flight is no longer required to evade bats. Wing reduction may also affect sound production. Here, the auditory system in four silent grasshopper species belonging to the Podismini is investigated. In this group, tympanal ears occur but sound signalling does not. The tympanal organs range from fully developed to remarkably reduced tympana. To evaluate the effects of tympanal regression on neuronal organisation and auditory sensitivity, the size of wings and tympana, sensory thresholds and sensory central projections are compared. Reduced tympanal size correlates with a higher auditory threshold. The threshold curves of all four species are tuned to low frequencies with a maximal sensitivity at 3-5 kHz. Central projections of the tympanal nerve show characteristics known from fully tympanate acridid species, so neural elements for tympanal hearing have been strongly conserved across these species. The results also confirm the correlation between reduction in auditory sensitivity and wing reduction. It is concluded that the auditory sensitivity of all four species may be maintained by stabilising selective forces, such as predation.

  13. Altered auditory function in rats exposed to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Hoffman, L.; Horowitz, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of an orthodynamic hypergravic field of 6 G on the brainstem auditory projections was studied in rats. The brain temperature and EEG activity were recorded in the rats during 6 G orthodynamic acceleration and auditory brainstem responses were used to monitor auditory function. Results show that all animals exhibited auditory brainstem responses which indicated impaired conduction and transmission of brainstem auditory signals during the exposure to the 6 G acceleration field. Significant increases in central conduction time were observed for peaks 3N, 4P, 4N, and 5P (N = negative, P = positive), while the absolute latency values for these same peaks were also significantly increased. It is concluded that these results, along with those for fields below 4 G (Jones and Horowitz, 1981), indicate that impaired function proceeds in a rostro-caudal progression as field strength is increased.

  14. Cortical auditory evoked potentials in the assessment of auditory neuropathy: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Wendy; Golding, Maryanne; Dillon, Harvey

    2007-05-01

    Infants with auditory neuropathy and possible hearing impairment are being identified at very young ages through the implementation of hearing screening programs. The diagnosis is commonly based on evidence of normal cochlear function but abnormal brainstem function. This lack of normal brainstem function is highly problematic when prescribing amplification in young infants because prescriptive formulae require the input of hearing thresholds that are normally estimated from auditory brainstem responses to tonal stimuli. Without this information, there is great uncertainty surrounding the final fitting. Cortical auditory evoked potentials may, however, still be evident and reliably recorded to speech stimuli presented at conversational levels. The case studies of two infants are presented that demonstrate how these higher order electrophysiological responses may be utilized in the audiological management of some infants with auditory neuropathy.

  15. Synchronous auditory nerve activity in the carboplatin-chinchilla model of auditory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cowper-Smith, C. D.; Dingle, R. N.; Guo, Y.; Burkard, R.; Phillips, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Two hallmark features of auditory neuropathy (AN) are normal outer hair cell function in the presence of an absent∕abnormal auditory brainstem response (ABR). Studies of human AN patients are unable to determine whether disruption of the ABR is the result of a reduction of neural input, a loss of auditory nerve fiber (ANF) synchrony, or both. Neurophysiological data from the carboplatin model of AN reveal intact neural synchrony in the auditory nerve and inferior colliculus, despite significant reductions in neural input. These data suggest that (1), intact neural synchrony is available to support an ABR following carboplatin treatment and, (2), impaired spike timing intrinsic to neurons is required for the disruption of the ABR observed in human AN. PMID:20649190

  16. Differential requirements of BMP and Wnt signalling during gastrulation and neurulation define two steps in neural crest induction.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Ben; Araya, Claudio; Linker, Claudia; Kuriyama, Sei; Mayor, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The neural crest is induced by a combination of secreted signals. Although previous models of neural crest induction have proposed a step-wise activation of these signals, the actual spatial and temporal requirement has not been analysed. Through analysing the role of the mesoderm we show for the first time that specification of neural crest requires two temporally and chemically different steps: first, an induction at the gastrula stage dependent on signals arising from the dorsolateral mesoderm; and second, a maintenance step at the neurula stage dependent on signals from tissues adjacent to the neural crest. By performing tissue recombination experiments and using specific inhibitors of different inductive signals, we show that the first inductive step requires Wnt activation and BMP inhibition, whereas the later maintenance step requires activation of both pathways. This change in BMP necessity from BMP inhibition at gastrula to BMP activation at neurula stages is further supported by the dynamic expression of BMP4 and its antagonists, and is confirmed by direct measurements of BMP activity in the neural crest cells. The differential requirements of BMP activity allow us to propose an explanation for apparently discrepant results between chick and frog experiments. The demonstration that Wnt signals are required for neural crest induction by mesoderm solves an additional long-standing controversy. Finally, our results emphasise the importance of considering the order of exposure to signals during an inductive event.

  17. Embryonic requirements for ErbB signaling in neural crest development and adult pigment pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Budi, Erine H.; Patterson, Larissa B.; Parichy, David M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate pigment cells are derived from neural crest cells and are a useful system for studying neural crest-derived traits during post-embryonic development. In zebrafish, neural crest-derived melanophores differentiate during embryogenesis to produce stripes in the early larva. Dramatic changes to the pigment pattern occur subsequently during the larva-to-adult transformation, or metamorphosis. At this time, embryonic melanophores are replaced by newly differentiating metamorphic melanophores that form the adult stripes. Mutants with normal embryonic/early larval pigment patterns but defective adult patterns identify factors required uniquely to establish, maintain, or recruit the latent precursors to metamorphic melanophores. We show that one such mutant, picasso, lacks most metamorphic melanophores and results from mutations in the ErbB gene erbb3b, encoding an EGFR-like receptor tyrosine kinase. To identify critical periods for ErbB activities, we treated fish with pharmacological ErbB inhibitors and also knocked-down erbb3b by morpholino injection. These analyses reveal an embryonic critical period for ErbB signaling in promoting later pigment pattern metamorphosis, despite the normal patterning of embryonic/early larval melanophores. We further demonstrate a peak requirement during neural crest migration that correlates with early defects in neural crest pathfinding and peripheral ganglion formation. Finally, we show that erbb3b activities are both autonomous and non-autonomous to the metamorphic melanophore lineage. These data identify a very early, embryonic, requirement for erbb3b in the development of much later metamorphic melanophores, and suggest complex modes by which ErbB signals promote adult pigment pattern development. PMID:18508863

  18. Auditory Spatial Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Jenison, Rick

    1995-01-01

    All auditory sensory information is packaged in a pair of acoustical pressure waveforms, one at each ear. While there is obvious structure in these waveforms, that structure (temporal and spectral patterns) bears no simple relationship to the structure of the environmental objects that produced them. The properties of auditory objects and their layout in space must be derived completely from higher level processing of the peripheral input. This chapter begins with a discussion of the peculiarities of acoustical stimuli and how they are received by the human auditory system. A distinction is made between the ambient sound field and the effective stimulus to differentiate the perceptual distinctions among various simple classes of sound sources (ambient field) from the known perceptual consequences of the linear transformations of the sound wave from source to receiver (effective stimulus). Next, the definition of an auditory object is dealt with, specifically the question of how the various components of a sound stream become segregated into distinct auditory objects. The remainder of the chapter focuses on issues related to the spatial layout of auditory objects, both stationary and moving.

  19. Review of weapon noise measurement and damage risk criteria: considerations for auditory protection and performance.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ann; Farinaccio, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss resulting from weapon noise exposure has been studied for decades. A summary of recent work in weapon noise signal analysis, current knowledge of hearing damage risk criteria, and auditory performance in impulse noise is presented. Most of the currently used damage risk criteria are based on data that cannot be replicated or verified. There is a need to address the effects of combined noise exposures, from similar or different weapons and continuous background noise, in future noise exposure regulations. Advancements in hearing protection technology have expanded the options available to soldiers. Individual selection of hearing protection devices that are best suited to the type of exposure, the auditory task requirements, and hearing status of the user could help to facilitate their use. However, hearing protection devices affect auditory performance, which in turn affects situational awareness in the field. This includes communication capability and the localization and identification of threats. Laboratory training using high-fidelity weapon noise recordings has the potential to improve the auditory performance of soldiers in the field, providing a low-cost tool to enhance readiness for combat.

  20. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  1. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  2. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  3. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  4. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by...

  5. Auditory processing deficits in reading disabled adults.

    PubMed

    Amitay, Sygal; Ahissar, Meray; Nelken, Israel

    2002-09-01

    The nature of the auditory processing deficit of disabled readers is still an unresolved issue. The quest for a fundamental, nonlinguistic, perceptual impairment has been dominated by the hypothesis that the difficulty lies in processing sequences of stimuli at presentation rates of tens of milliseconds. The present study examined this hypothesis using tasks that require processing of a wide range of stimulus time constants. About a third of the sampled population of disabled readers (classified as "poor auditory processors") had difficulties in most of the tasks tested: detection of frequency differences, detection of tones in narrowband noise, detection of amplitude modulation, detection of the direction of sound sources moving in virtual space, and perception of the lateralized position of tones based on their interaural phase differences. Nevertheless, across-channel integration was intact in these poor auditory processors since comodulation masking release was not reduced. Furthermore, phase locking was presumably intact since binaural masking level differences were normal. In a further examination of temporal processing, participants were asked to discriminate two tones at various intervals where the frequency difference was ten times each individual's frequency just noticeable difference (JND). Under these conditions, poor auditory processors showed no specific difficulty at brief intervals, contrary to predictions under a fast temporal processing deficit assumption. The complementary subgroup of disabled readers who were not poor auditory processors showed some difficulty in this condition when compared with their direct controls. However, they had no difficulty on auditory tasks such as amplitude modulation detection, which presumably taps processing of similar time scales. These two subgroups of disabled readers had similar reading performance but those with a generally poor auditory performance scored lower on some cognitive tests. Taken together, these

  6. ErbB2-dependent chemotaxis requires microtubule capture and stabilization coordinated by distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Benseddik, Khedidja; Sen Nkwe, Nadine; Daou, Pascale; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Badache, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase stimulates breast cancer cell migration. Cell migration is a complex process that requires the synchronized reorganization of numerous subcellular structures including cell-to-matrix adhesions, the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules. How the multiple signaling pathways triggered by ErbB2 coordinate, in time and space, the various processes involved in cell motility, is poorly defined. We investigated the mechanism whereby ErbB2 controls microtubules and chemotaxis. We report that activation of ErbB2 increased both cell velocity and directed migration. Impairment of the Cdc42 and RhoA GTPases, but not of Rac1, prevented the chemotactic response. RhoA is a key component of the Memo/ACF7 pathway whereby ErbB2 controls microtubule capture at the leading edge. Upon Memo or ACF7 depletion, microtubules failed to reach the leading edge and cells lost their ability to follow the chemotactic gradient. Constitutive ACF7 targeting to the membrane in Memo-depleted cells reestablished directed migration. ErbB2-mediated activation of phospholipase C gamma (PLCγ) also contributed to cell guidance. We further showed that PLCγ signaling, via classical protein kinases C, and Memo signaling converged towards a single pathway controlling the microtubule capture complex. Finally, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway did not affect microtubule capture, but disturbed microtubule stability, which also resulted in defective chemotaxis. PI3K/Akt-dependent stabilization of microtubules involved repression of GSK3 activity on the one hand and inhibition of the microtubule destabilizing protein, Stathmin, on the other hand. Thus, ErbB2 triggers distinct and complementary pathways that tightly coordinate microtubule capture and microtubule stability to control chemotaxis.

  7. Endogenous BMPR-IB signaling is required for early osteoblast differentiation of human bone cells.

    PubMed

    Singhatanadgit, Weerachai; Olsen, Irwin

    2011-03-01

    Osteoblast differentiation is tightly regulated by a number of cytokines and growth factors, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) which stimulate osteoblast differentiation by signal transduction via three BMP receptors (BMPR-IA, -IB and -II). Although the mechanisms which regulate osteoblast differentiation are not fully understood, it is possible that endogenous BMPR signaling could play an important part in this process. To test this hypothesis, we have examined the expression and the functional significance of BMPR during osteoblast differentiation of primary human bone cells. The results showed that although the expression of BMPR-IA and -II transcripts were constantly expressed while the bone cells underwent osteoblast differentiation, the level of BMPR-IB mRNA was transiently, but significantly, up-regulated by threefold on day 3. This increase in BMPR-IB expression was found to be associated with the significant up-regulation of core binding factor alpha 1 (Cbfa1) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) transcripts as well as the ALP activity, the well-established early markers of osteoblast differentiation. Transfection of bone cells with BMPR-IB small interfering RNA (siRNA) was found to significantly ablate the expression of BMPR-IB which subsequently resulted in reduction of Cbfa1 and ALP mRNA as well as the ALP activity. Moreover, exogenously added BMP-2 failed to rescue osteoblast differentiation of BMPR-IB siRNA-transfected bone cells. In conclusion, the present study has shown that endogenous BMPR-IB signaling is required for early phase of osteoblast differentiation of human bone cells in vitro, suggesting that BMPR-IB could be a therapeutic target for initiating bone healing in vivo.

  8. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling through the Lysophosphatidic Acid-1 Receptor Is Required for Alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Funke, Manuela; Knudsen, Lars; Lagares, David; Ebener, Simone; Probst, Clemens K; Fontaine, Benjamin A; Franklin, Alicia; Kellner, Manuela; Kühnel, Mark; Matthieu, Stephanie; Grothausmann, Roman; Chun, Jerold; Roberts, Jesse D; Ochs, Matthias; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, contributes to both the development and the pathological remodeling after injury of many organs. Because we found previously that LPA-LPA1 signaling contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, here we investigated whether this pathway is also involved in lung development. Quantitative assessment of lung architecture of LPA1-deficient knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of age using design-based stereology suggested the presence of an alveolarization defect in LPA1 KO mice at 3 weeks, which persisted as alveolar numbers increased in WT mice into adulthood. Across the ages examined, the lungs of LPA1 KO mice exhibited decreased alveolar numbers, septal tissue volumes, and surface areas, and increased volumes of the distal airspaces. Elastic fibers, critical to the development of alveolar septa, appeared less organized and condensed and more discontinuous in KO alveoli starting at P4. Tropoelastin messenger RNA expression was decreased in KO lungs, whereas expression of matrix metalloproteinases degrading elastic fibers was either decreased or unchanged. These results are consistent with the abnormal lung phenotype of LPA1 KO mice, being attributable to reduced alveolar septal formation during development, rather than to increased septal destruction as occurs in the emphysema of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Peripheral septal fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, which direct septation in late alveolarization, demonstrated reduced production of tropoelastin and matrix metalloproteinases, and diminished LPA-induced migration, when isolated from LPA1 KO mice. Taken together, our data suggest that LPA-LPA1 signaling is critically required for septation during alveolarization.

  9. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-06-30

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wntless), which is required for the secretion of various WNTs, makes it possible to genetically dissect the overall effect of WNTs in testis development. In this study, the Gpr177 gene was conditionally depleted in germ cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Mvh-Cre; Gpr177(flox/flox), Stra8-Cre) and Sertoli cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre). No obvious defects in fertility and spermatogenesis were observed in these three Gpr177 conditional knockout (cKO) mice at 8 weeks. However, late-onset testicular atrophy and fertility decline in two germ cell-specific Gpr177 deletion mice were noted at 8 months. In contrast, we did not observe any abnormalities of spermatogenesis and fertility, even in 8-month-old Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre mice. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in Gpr177 cKO germ cells and Sertoli cells and exhibited an age-dependent manner. However, significant increase in the activity of Caspase 3 was only observed in germ cells from 8-month-old germ cell-specific Gpr177 knockout mice. In conclusion, GPR177 in Sertoli cells had no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, whereas loss of GPR177 in germ cells disrupted spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner via elevating ROS levels and triggering germ cell apoptosis.

  10. Aspergillus nidulans Ambient pH Signaling Does Not Require Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucena-Agell, Daniel; Galindo, Antonio; Arst, Herbert N.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans (Pal) ambient pH signaling takes place in cortical structures containing components of the ESCRT pathway, which are hijacked by the alkaline pH-activated, ubiquitin-modified version of the arrestin-like protein PalF and taken to the plasma membrane. There, ESCRTs scaffold the assembly of dedicated Pal proteins acting downstream. The molecular details of this pathway, which results in the two-step proteolytic processing of the transcription factor PacC, have received considerable attention due to the key role that it plays in fungal pathogenicity. While current evidence strongly indicates that the pH signaling role of ESCRT complexes is limited to plasma membrane-associated structures where PacC proteolysis would take place, the localization of the PalB protease, which almost certainly catalyzes the first and only pH-regulated proteolytic step, had not been investigated. In view of ESCRT participation, this formally leaves open the possibility that PalB activation requires endocytic internalization. As endocytosis is essential for hyphal growth, nonlethal endocytic mutations are predicted to cause an incomplete block. We used a SynA internalization assay to measure the extent to which any given mutation prevents endocytosis. We show that none of the tested mutations impairing endocytosis to different degrees, including slaB1, conditionally causing a complete block, have any effect on the activation of the pathway. We further show that PalB, like PalA and PalC, localizes to cortical structures in an alkaline pH-dependent manner. Therefore, signaling through the Pal pathway does not involve endocytosis. PMID:25841020

  11. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wntless), which is required for the secretion of various WNTs, makes it possible to genetically dissect the overall effect of WNTs in testis development. In this study, the Gpr177 gene was conditionally depleted in germ cells (Gpr177flox/flox, Mvh-Cre; Gpr177flox/flox, Stra8-Cre) and Sertoli cells (Gpr177flox/flox, Amh-Cre). No obvious defects in fertility and spermatogenesis were observed in these three Gpr177 conditional knockout (cKO) mice at 8 weeks. However, late-onset testicular atrophy and fertility decline in two germ cell-specific Gpr177 deletion mice were noted at 8 months. In contrast, we did not observe any abnormalities of spermatogenesis and fertility, even in 8-month-old Gpr177flox/flox, Amh-Cre mice. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in Gpr177 cKO germ cells and Sertoli cells and exhibited an age-dependent manner. However, significant increase in the activity of Caspase 3 was only observed in germ cells from 8-month-old germ cell-specific Gpr177 knockout mice. In conclusion, GPR177 in Sertoli cells had no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, whereas loss of GPR177 in germ cells disrupted spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner via elevating ROS levels and triggering germ cell apoptosis. PMID:27362799

  12. Requirement of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor–Associated Factor (Traf)6 in Interleukin 17 Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Schwandner, Ralf; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Cao, Zhaodan

    2000-01-01

    Signaling through its widely distributed cell surface receptor, interleukin (IL)-17 enhances the transcription of genes encoding proinflammatory molecules. Although it has been well documented that IL-17 activates the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream signaling events are largely unknown. Here we report the requirement of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor (TRAF)6 in IL-17–induced NF-κB and JNK activation. In embryonic fibroblasts (EFs) derived from TRAF6 knockout mice, IL-17 failed to activate the IκB kinases (IKKs) and JNK. Consequently, IL-17–induced IL-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in the TRAF6-deficient cells was abolished. Lack of TRAF6 appeared to be the sole defect responsible for the observed failure to respond to IL-17, because transient transfection of TRAF6 expression plasmid into the TRAF6-deficient cells restored IL-17–induced NF-κB activation in a luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, the levels of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) on the TRAF6-deficient EFs were comparable to those on the wild-type control cells. Defect in IL-17 response was not observed in TRAF2-deficient EFs. Moreover, when TRAF6 and IL-17R were coexpressed in 293 cells, TRAF6 coimmunoprecipitated with IL-17R. Together, these results indicate that TRAF6, but not TRAF2, is a crucial component in the IL-17 signaling pathway leading to proinflammatory responses. PMID:10748240

  13. Analysis of satellite altimeter signal characteristics and investigation of sea-truth data requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of analysis of satellite signal characteristics as influenced by ocean surface roughness and an investigation of sea truth data requirements. The first subject treated is that of postflight waveform reconstruction for the Skylab S-193 radar altimeter. Sea state estimation accuracies are derived based on analytical and hybrid computer simulation techniques. An analysis of near-normal incidence, microwave backscattering from the ocean's surface is accomplished in order to obtain the minimum sea truth data necessary for good agreement between theoretical and experimental scattering results. Sea state bias is examined from the point of view of designing an experiment which will lead to a resolution of the problem. A discussion is given of some deficiencies which were found in the theory underlying the Stilwell technique for spectral measurements.

  14. Ethylene signaling is required for synergid degeneration and the establishment of a pollen tube block.

    PubMed

    Völz, Ronny; Heydlauff, Juliane; Ripper, Dagmar; von Lyncker, Ludwig; Groß-Hardt, Rita

    2013-05-13

    In flowering plants, sperm cells are delivered by pollen tubes, which are attracted by two egg-cell-adjoining synergids. Successful fertilization terminates pollen tube attraction; however, the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Here, we show that the process of fertilization activates an EIN3- and EIN2-dependent ethylene-response cascade necessary for synergid cell death and the concomitant establishment of a pollen tube block. Microinjection of the ethylene precursor ACC into the female gametophyte or constitutive ethylene response results in premature synergid disintegration. This indicates that the requirement of fertilization for synergid degeneration and associated establishment of a pollen tube block can be bypassed by mimicking a postfertilization ethylene burst. Surprisingly, the persistent synergid in ethylene-hyposensitive plants adopts the molecular profile and cell-cycle regime of the biparental embryo-nourishing tissue, suggesting that ethylene signaling prevents the formation of an asexual maternal endosperm fraction.

  15. Serotonin signaling in the brain of adult female mice is required for sexual preference

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shasha; Liu, Yan; Rao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    A role for serotonin in male sexual preference was recently uncovered by our finding that male mutant mice lacking serotonin have lost sexual preference. Here we show that female mouse mutants lacking either central serotonergic neurons or serotonin prefer female over male genital odors when given a choice, and displayed increased female–female mounting when presented either with a choice of a male and a female target or only with a female target. Pharmacological manipulations and genetic rescue experiments showed that serotonin is required in adults. Behavioral changes caused by deficient serotonergic signaling were not due to changes in plasma concentrations of sex hormones. We demonstrate that a genetic manipulation reverses sexual preference without involving sex hormones. Our results indicate that serotonin controls sexual preference. PMID:23716677

  16. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone.

    PubMed

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-04-03

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients.

  17. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone

    PubMed Central

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients. PMID:24700048

  18. Auditory models for speech analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maybury, Mark T.

    This paper reviews the psychophysical basis for auditory models and discusses their application to automatic speech recognition. First an overview of the human auditory system is presented, followed by a review of current knowledge gleaned from neurological and psychoacoustic experimentation. Next, a general framework describes established peripheral auditory models which are based on well-understood properties of the peripheral auditory system. This is followed by a discussion of current enhancements to that models to include nonlinearities and synchrony information as well as other higher auditory functions. Finally, the initial performance of auditory models in the task of speech recognition is examined and additional applications are mentioned.

  19. Ethylene signaling pathway and MAPK cascades are required for AAL toxin-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Mase, Keisuke; Mizuno, Takahito; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Fujii, Takayuki; Mori, Hitoshi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD), known as hypersensitive response cell death, has an important role in plant defense response. The signaling pathway of PCD remains unknown. We employed AAL toxin and Nicotiana umbratica to analysis plant PCD. AAL toxin is a pathogenicity factor of the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici. N. umbratica is sensitive to AAL toxin, susceptible to pathogens, and effective in Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS analyses indicated that AAL toxin-triggered cell death (ACD) is dependent upon the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase MEK2, which is upstream of both salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) responsible for ethylene (ET) synthesis. ET treatment of MEK2-silenced N. umbratica re-established ACD. In SIPK- and WIPK-silenced N. umbratica, ACD was compromised and ET accumulation was not observed. However, in contrast to the case of MEK2-silenced plants, ET treatment did not induce cell death in SIPK- and WIPK-silenced plants. This work showed that ET-dependent pathway and MAP kinase cascades are required in ACD. Our results suggested that MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascades have roles in ET biosynthesis; however, SIPK and WIPK have other roles in ET signaling or another pathway leading to cell death by AAL toxin.

  20. Molecular signals required for the establishment and maintenance of ectomycorrhizal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kevin; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Cope, Kevin R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses are among the most widespread associations between roots of woody plants and soil fungi in forest ecosystems. These associations contribute significantly to the sustainability and sustainagility of these ecosystems through nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms controlling the mutual recognition between both partners are still poorly understood. Elegant work has demonstrated that effector proteins from ECM and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi regulate host defenses by manipulating plant hormonal pathways. In parallel, genetic and evolutionary studies in legumes showed that a 'common symbiosis pathway' is required for the establishment of the ancient AM symbiosis and has been recruited for the rhizobia-legume association. Given that genes of this pathway are present in many angiosperm trees that develop ectomycorrhizas, we propose their potential involvement in some but not all ECM associations. The maintenance of a successful long-term relationship seems strongly regulated by resource allocation between symbiotic partners, suggesting that nutrients themselves may serve as signals. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the early and late signal exchanges between woody plants and ECM fungi, and we suggest future directions for decoding the molecular basis of the underground dance between trees and their favorite fungal partners.

  1. Spatial auditory processing in pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.

    Given the biological importance of sound for a variety of activities, pinnipeds must be able to obtain spatial information about their surroundings thorough acoustic input in the absence of other sensory cues. The three chapters of this dissertation address spatial auditory processing capabilities of pinnipeds in air given that these amphibious animals use acoustic signals for reproduction and survival on land. Two chapters are comparative lab-based studies that utilized psychophysical approaches conducted in an acoustic chamber. Chapter 1 addressed the frequency-dependent sound localization abilities at azimuth of three pinniped species (the harbor seal, Phoca vitulina, the California sea lion, Zalophus californianus, and the northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris). While performances of the sea lion and harbor seal were consistent with the duplex theory of sound localization, the elephant seal, a low-frequency hearing specialist, showed a decreased ability to localize the highest frequencies tested. In Chapter 2 spatial release from masking (SRM), which occurs when a signal and masker are spatially separated resulting in improvement in signal detectability relative to conditions in which they are co-located, was determined in a harbor seal and sea lion. Absolute and masked thresholds were measured at three frequencies and azimuths to determine the detection advantages afforded by this type of spatial auditory processing. Results showed that hearing sensitivity was enhanced by up to 19 and 12 dB in the harbor seal and sea lion, respectively, when the signal and masker were spatially separated. Chapter 3 was a field-based study that quantified both sender and receiver variables of the directional properties of male northern elephant seal calls produce within communication system that serves to delineate dominance status. This included measuring call directivity patterns, observing male-male vocally-mediated interactions, and an acoustic playback study

  2. Biological impact of music and software-based auditory training

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Auditory-based communication skills are developed at a young age and are maintained throughout our lives. However, some individuals – both young and old – encounter difficulties in achieving or maintaining communication proficiency. Biological signals arising from hearing sounds relate to real-life communication skills such as listening to speech in noisy environments and reading, pointing to an intersection between hearing and cognition. Musical experience, amplification, and software-based training can improve these biological signals. These findings of biological plasticity, in a variety of subject populations, relate to attention and auditory memory, and represent an integrated auditory system influenced by both sensation and cognition. Learning outcomes The reader will (1) understand that the auditory system is malleable to experience and training, (2) learn the ingredients necessary for auditory learning to successfully be applied to communication, (3) learn that the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR) is a window into the integrated auditory system, and (4) see examples of how cABR can be used to track the outcome of experience and training. PMID:22789822

  3. CD25 and CD69 induction by α4β1 outside-in signalling requires TCR early signalling complex proteins.

    PubMed

    Cimo, Ann-Marie; Ahmed, Zamal; McIntyre, Bradley W; Lewis, Dorothy E; Ladbury, John E

    2013-08-15

    Distinct signalling pathways producing diverse cellular outcomes can utilize similar subsets of proteins. For example, proteins from the TCR (T-cell receptor) ESC (early signalling complex) are also involved in interferon-α receptor signalling. Defining the mechanism for how these proteins function within a given pathway is important in understanding the integration and communication of signalling networks with one another. We investigated the contributions of the TCR ESC proteins Lck (lymphocyte-specific kinase), ZAP-70 (ζ-chain-associated protein of 70 kDa), Vav1, SLP-76 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa] and LAT (linker for activation of T-cells) to integrin outside-in signalling in human T-cells. Lck, ZAP-70, SLP-76, Vav1 and LAT were activated by α4β1 outside-in signalling, but in a manner different from TCR signalling. TCR stimulation recruits ESC proteins to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase). α4β1 outside-in-mediated ERK activation did not require TCR ESC proteins. However, α4β1 outside-in signalling induced CD25 and co-stimulated CD69 and this was dependent on TCR ESC proteins. TCR and α4β1 outside-in signalling are integrated through the common use of TCR ESC proteins; however, these proteins display functionally distinct roles in these pathways. These novel insights into the cross-talk between integrin outside-in and TCR signalling pathways are highly relevant to the development of therapeutic strategies to overcome disease associated with T-cell deregulation.

  4. Reciprocal requirements for Eda/Edar/NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in hair follicle induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhang; Tomann, Philip; Andl, Thomas; Gallant, Natalie M.; Huelsken, Joerg; Jerchow, Boris; Birchmeier, Walter; Paus, Ralf; Piccolo, Stefano; Mikkola, Marja L.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Scheidereit, Claus; Millar, Sarah E.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB signaling mechanisms provide central controls in development and disease, but how these pathways intersect is unclear. Using hair follicle induction as a model system, we show that patterning of dermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling requires epithelial β-catenin activity. We find that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is absolutely required for NF-κB activation, and that Edar is a direct Wnt target gene. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is initially activated independently of Eda/Edar/NF-κB activity in primary hair follicle primordia. However, Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling is required to refine the pattern of Wnt/β-catenin activity, and to maintain this activity at later stages of placode development. We show that maintenance of localized expression of Wnt10b and Wnt10a requires NF-κB signaling, providing a molecular explanation for the latter observation, and identify Wnt10b as a direct NF-κB target. These data reveal a complex interplay and inter-dependence of Wnt/β-catenin and Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling pathways in initiation and maintenance of primary hair follicle placodes. PMID:19619491

  5. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  6. Porcupine homolog is required for canonical Wnt signaling and gastrulation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Biechele, Steffen; Cox, Brian J; Rossant, Janet

    2011-07-15

    Wnt signaling plays important roles in development and disease. The X-chromosomal Porcupine homolog gene (Porcn) encodes an evolutionary conserved member of the membrane bound O-acyl transferase (MBOAT) superfamily that has been shown to be required for the palmitoylation and secretion of Wnt3a, a mechanism that has been suggested to be conserved for all mammalian Wnt ligands. PORCN mutations in humans cause Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), a disorder causing developmental defects in heterozygous females and embryonic lethality in hemizygous males. In this study, Porcn mutant mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were used to analyze the role of Porcn in mammalian embryonic development. In vitro, we show an exclusive requirement for Porcn in Wnt secreting cells and further, that any of the four Porcn isoforms is sufficient to allow for the secretion of functional Wnt3a. Embryos generated by aggregation of Porcn mutant ES cells with wildtype embryos fail to complete gastrulation in vivo, but remain in an epiblast-like state, similar to Wnt3 and Gpr177/Wls mutants. Consistent with this phenotype, in vitro differentiated mutant ES cells fail to generate endoderm and mesoderm derivatives. Taken together, these data confirm the importance of Porcn for Wnt secretion and gastrulation and suggest that disruption of early development underlies the male lethality of human PORCN mutants.

  7. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  8. Auditory perception bias in speech imitation.

    PubMed

    Postma-Nilsenová, Marie; Postma, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In an experimental study, we explored the role of auditory perception bias in vocal pitch imitation. Psychoacoustic tasks involving a missing fundamental indicate that some listeners are attuned to the relationship between all the higher harmonics present in the signal, which supports their perception of the fundamental frequency (the primary acoustic correlate of pitch). Other listeners focus on the lowest harmonic constituents of the complex sound signal which may hamper the perception of the fundamental. These two listener types are referred to as fundamental and spectral listeners, respectively. We hypothesized that the individual differences in speakers' capacity to imitate F 0 found in earlier studies, may at least partly be due to the capacity to extract information about F 0 from the speech signal. Participants' auditory perception bias was determined with a standard missing fundamental perceptual test. Subsequently, speech data were collected in a shadowing task with two conditions, one with a full speech signal and one with high-pass filtered speech above 300 Hz. The results showed that perception bias toward fundamental frequency was related to the degree of F 0 imitation. The effect was stronger in the condition with high-pass filtered speech. The experimental outcomes suggest advantages for fundamental listeners in communicative situations where F 0 imitation is used as a behavioral cue. Future research needs to determine to what extent auditory perception bias may be related to other individual properties known to improve imitation, such as phonetic talent.

  9. The role of the superior temporal lobe in auditory false perceptions: A transcranial direct current stimulation study

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Fernyhough, Charles; Ellison, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging has shown that a network of cortical areas, which includes the superior temporal gyrus, is active during auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs). In the present study, healthy, non-hallucinating participants (N=30) completed an auditory signal detection task, in which participants were required to detect a voice in short bursts of white noise, with the variable of interest being the rate of false auditory verbal perceptions. This paradigm was coupled with transcranial direct current stimulation, a noninvasive brain stimulation technique, to test the involvement of the left posterior superior temporal gyrus in the creation of auditory false perceptions. The results showed that increasing the levels of excitability in this region led to a higher rate of ‘false alarm’ responses than when levels of excitability were decreased, with false alarm responses under a sham stimulation condition lying at a mid-point between anodal and cathodal stimulation conditions. There were also corresponding changes in signal detection parameters. These results are discussed in terms of prominent cognitive neuroscientific theories of AVHs, and potential future directions for research are outlined. PMID:25107678

  10. Ror2 signaling is required for local upregulation of GDF6 and activation of BMP signaling at the neural plate border.

    PubMed

    Schille, Carolin; Bayerlová, Michaela; Bleckmann, Annalen; Schambony, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 is a major Wnt receptor that activates β-catenin-independent signaling and plays a conserved role in the regulation of convergent extension movements and planar cell polarity in vertebrates. Mutations in the ROR2 gene cause recessive Robinow syndrome in humans, a short-limbed dwarfism associated with craniofacial malformations. Here, we show that Ror2 is required for local upregulation of gdf6 at the neural plate border in Xenopus embryos. Ror2 morphant embryos fail to upregulate neural plate border genes and show defects in the induction of neural crest cell fate. These embryos lack the spatially restricted activation of BMP signaling at the neural plate border at early neurula stages, which is required for neural crest induction. Ror2-dependent planar cell polarity signaling is required in the dorsolateral marginal zone during gastrulation indirectly to upregulate the BMP ligand Gdf6 at the neural plate border and Gdf6 is sufficient to rescue neural plate border specification in Ror2 morphant embryos. Thereby, Ror2 links Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling to BMP signaling in neural plate border specification and neural crest induction.

  11. Central auditory imperception.

    PubMed

    Snow, J B; Rintelmann, W F; Miller, J M; Konkle, D F

    1977-09-01

    The development of clinically applicable techniques for the evaluation of hearing impairment caused by lesions of the central auditory pathways has increased clinical interest in the anatomy and physiology of these pathways. A conceptualization of present understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the central auditory pathways is presented. Clinical tests based on reduction of redundancy of the speech message, degradation of speech and binaural interations are presented. Specifically performance-intensity functions, filtered speech tests, competing message tests and time-compressed speech tests are presented with the emphasis on our experience with time-compressed speech tests. With proper use of these tests not only can central auditory impairments by detected, but brain stem lesions can be distinguished from cortical lesions.

  12. GLP-1 receptor signaling is not required for reduced body weight after RYGB in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianping; Hao, Zheng; Mumphrey, Michael B; Townsend, R Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M; Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Münzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher D; Drucker, Daniel J; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Exaggerated GLP-1 and PYY secretion is thought to be a major mechanism in the reduced food intake and body weight after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Here, we use complementary pharmacological and genetic loss-of-function approaches to test the role of increased signaling by these gut hormones in high-fat diet-induced obese rodents. Chronic brain infusion of a supramaximal dose of the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-9-39 into the lateral cerebral ventricle significantly increased food intake and body weight in both RYGB and sham-operated rats, suggesting that, while contributing to the physiological control of food intake and body weight, central GLP-1 receptor signaling tone is not the critical mechanism uniquely responsible for the body weight-lowering effects of RYGB. Central infusion of the selective Y2R-antagonist BIIE0246 had no effect in either group, suggesting that it is not critical for the effects of RYGB on body weight under the conditions tested. In a recently established mouse model of RYGB that closely mimics surgery and weight loss dynamics in humans, obese GLP-1R-deficient mice lost the same amount of body weight and fat mass and maintained similarly lower body weight compared with wild-type mice. Together, the results surprisingly provide no support for important individual roles of either gut hormone in the specific mechanisms by which RYGB rats settle at a lower body weight. It is likely that the beneficial effects of bariatric surgeries are expressed through complex mechanisms that require combination approaches for their identification.

  13. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Andrei S.; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2016-01-01

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes. PMID:26787894

  14. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Cristina F. B.; Rabelo, Camila M.; Silagi, Marcela L.; Mansur, Letícia L.; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor “years of schooling” was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills. PMID:27013958

  15. Effects of sequential streaming on auditory masking using psychoacoustics and auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Jesko L; Ernst, Stephan M A; Yasin, Ifat

    2012-03-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the relationship between the mismatch negativity (MMN) and psychoacoustical effects of sequential streaming on comodulation masking release (CMR). The influence of sequential streaming on CMR was investigated using a psychoacoustical alternative forced-choice procedure and electroencephalography (EEG) for the same group of subjects. The psychoacoustical data showed, that adding precursors comprising of only off-signal-frequency maskers abolished the CMR. Complementary EEG data showed an MMN irrespective of the masker envelope correlation across frequency when only the off-signal-frequency masker components were present. The addition of such precursors promotes a separation of the on- and off-frequency masker components into distinct auditory objects preventing the auditory system from using comodulation as an additional cue. A frequency-specific adaptation changing the representation of the flanking bands in the streaming conditions may also contribute to the reduction of CMR in the stream conditions, however, it is unlikely that adaptation is the primary reason for the streaming effect. A neurophysiological correlate of sequential streaming was found in EEG data using MMN, but the magnitude of the MMN was not correlated with the audibility of the signal in CMR experiments. Dipole source analysis indicated different cortical regions involved in processing auditory streaming and modulation detection. In particular, neural sources for processing auditory streaming include cortical regions involved in decision-making.

  16. Distinct effectors of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α signaling are required for cell survival during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Van Stry, Melanie; Kazlauskas, Andrius; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Symes, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling is essential for normal embryonic development in many organisms, including frog, mouse, zebrafish, and sea urchin. The mode of action of PDGFR signaling during early development is poorly understood, however, mostly because inhibition of signaling through either the PDGFRα or PDGFRβ is embryonic lethal. In Xenopus embryos, disruption of PDGFRα signaling causes migrating anterior mesoderm cells to lose direction and undergo apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway. To understand the mechanism of PDGFRα function in this process, we have analyzed all known effector-binding sites in vivo. By using a chemical inducer of dimerization to activate chimera PDGFRαs, we have identified a role for phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) in protecting cells from death. PDGFRα-mediated cell survival requires PLCγ and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, and that PDGFRα with binding sites for these two signaling factors is sufficient for this activity. Other effectors of PDGFRα signaling, Shf, SHP-2, and Crk, are not required for this process. Thus, our findings show that PDGFRα signaling through PLCγ and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase has a protective role in preventing apoptosis in early development. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small molecule inducers of dimerization provide a powerful system to manipulate receptor function in developing embryos. PMID:15919820

  17. Interface Design Implications for Recalling the Spatial Configuration of Virtual Auditory Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Kyla A.

    Although the concept of virtual spatial audio has existed for almost twenty-five years, only in the past fifteen years has modern computing technology enabled the real-time processing needed to deliver high-precision spatial audio. Furthermore, the concept of virtually walking through an auditory environment did not exist. The applications of such an interface have numerous potential uses. Spatial audio has the potential to be used in various manners ranging from enhancing sounds delivered in virtual gaming worlds to conveying spatial locations in real-time emergency response systems. To incorporate this technology in real-world systems, various concerns should be addressed. First, to widely incorporate spatial audio into real-world systems, head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) must be inexpensively created for each user. The present study further investigated an HRTF subjective selection procedure previously developed within our research group. Users discriminated auditory cues to subjectively select their preferred HRTF from a publicly available database. Next, the issue of training to find virtual sources was addressed. Listeners participated in a localization training experiment using their selected HRTFs. The training procedure was created from the characterization of successful search strategies in prior auditory search experiments. Search accuracy significantly improved after listeners performed the training procedure. Next, in the investigation of auditory spatial memory, listeners completed three search and recall tasks with differing recall methods. Recall accuracy significantly decreased in tasks that required the storage of sound source configurations in memory. To assess the impacts of practical scenarios, the present work assessed the performance effects of: signal uncertainty, visual augmentation, and different attenuation modeling. Fortunately, source uncertainty did not affect listeners' ability to recall or identify sound sources. The present

  18. Psychophysics of Complex Auditory and Speech Stimuli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    it more distinctive (i.e. in a different instrument timbre than the other musical voices) and less distinctive (i.e. presenting the musical pieces in...complex acoustic signals, including speech and music . Traditional, solid psycho- ,physical procedures were employed to systematically investigate...result in the perception of classes of complex auditory i stimuli, including speech and music . In health, industry, and human factors, the M.. SUBJECT

  19. Visual and Auditory Sensitivities and Discriminations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    scene. The visual scene was rendered and updated by an Octane workstation (Silicon Graphics Inc.). It was projected onto a wall 3.5 m in front of the...represent driving in the left lane and positive positions represent driving in the right lane. A negative time headway indicates that the front bumpr of...accelerator or turning the steering wheel did not alter the visual display. A brief auditory tone signaled the end of the 5-min period after which observers

  20. Efficient endocytosis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator requires a tyrosine-based signal.

    PubMed

    Prince, L S; Peter, K; Hatton, S R; Zaliauskiene, L; Cotlin, L F; Clancy, J P; Marchase, R B; Collawn, J F

    1999-02-05

    We previously demonstrated that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is rapidly endocytosed in epithelial cells (Prince, L. S., Workman, R. B., Jr., and Marchase, R. B. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 91, 5192-5196). To determine the structural features of CFTR required for endocytosis, we prepared chimeric molecules consisting of the amino-terminal (residues 2-78) and carboxyl-terminal tail regions (residues 1391-1476) of CFTR, each fused to the transmembrane and extracellular domains of the transferrin receptor. Functional analysis of the CFTR-(2-78) and CFTR-(1391-1476) indicated that both chimeras were rapidly internalized. Deletion of residues 1440-1476 had no effect on chimera internalization. Mutations of potential internalization signals in both cytoplasmic domains reveal that only one mutation inhibits internalization, Y1424A. Using a surface biotinylation reaction, we also examined internalization rates of wild type and mutant CFTRs expressed in COS-7 cells. We found that both wild type and A1440X CFTR were rapidly internalized, whereas the Y1424A CFTR mutant, like the chimeric protein, had approximately 40% reduced internalization activity. Deletions in the amino-terminal tail region of CFTR resulted in defective trafficking of CFTR out of the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface, suggesting that an intact amino terminus is critical for biosynthesis. In summary, our results suggest that both tail regions of CFTR are sufficient to promote rapid internalization of a reporter molecule and that tyrosine 1424 is required for efficient CFTR endocytosis.

  1. Physiological Measures of Auditory Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmeier, Birger; Riedel, Helmut; Mauermann, Manfred; Uppenkamp, Stefan

    When acoustic signals enter the ears, they pass several processing stages of various complexities before they will be perceived. The auditory pathway can be separated into structures dealing with sound transmission in air (i.e. the outer ear, ear canal, and the vibration of tympanic membrane), structures dealing with the transformation of sound pressure waves into mechanical vibrations of the inner ear fluids (i.e. the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and the oval window), structures carrying mechanical vibrations in the fluid-filled inner ear (i.e. the cochlea with basilar membrane, tectorial membrane, and hair cells), structures that transform mechanical oscillations into a neural code, and finally several stages of neural processing in the brain along the pathway from the brainstem to the cortex.

  2. The influence of auditory-motor coupling on fractal dynamics in human gait.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nathaniel; McGrath, Denise; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-08-01

    Humans exhibit an innate ability to synchronize their movements to music. The field of gait rehabilitation has sought to capitalize on this phenomenon by invoking patients to walk in time to rhythmic auditory cues with a view to improving pathological gait. However, the temporal structure of the auditory cue, and hence the temporal structure of the target behavior has not been sufficiently explored. This study reveals the plasticity of auditory-motor coupling in human walking in relation to 'complex' auditory cues. The authors demonstrate that auditory-motor coupling can be driven by different coloured auditory noise signals (e.g. white, brown), shifting the fractal temporal structure of gait dynamics towards the statistical properties of the signals used. This adaptive capability observed in whole-body movement, could potentially be harnessed for targeted neuromuscular rehabilitation in patient groups, depending on the specific treatment goal.

  3. The influence of auditory-motor coupling on fractal dynamics in human gait

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nathaniel; McGrath, Denise; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit an innate ability to synchronize their movements to music. The field of gait rehabilitation has sought to capitalize on this phenomenon by invoking patients to walk in time to rhythmic auditory cues with a view to improving pathological gait. However, the temporal structure of the auditory cue, and hence the temporal structure of the target behavior has not been sufficiently explored. This study reveals the plasticity of auditory-motor coupling in human walking in relation to ‘complex' auditory cues. The authors demonstrate that auditory-motor coupling can be driven by different coloured auditory noise signals (e.g. white, brown), shifting the fractal temporal structure of gait dynamics towards the statistical properties of the signals used. This adaptive capability observed in whole-body movement, could potentially be harnessed for targeted neuromuscular rehabilitation in patient groups, depending on the specific treatment goal. PMID:25080936

  4. Multivariate sensitivity to voice during auditory categorization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yune Sang; Peelle, Jonathan E; Kraemer, David; Lloyd, Samuel; Granger, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Past neuroimaging studies have documented discrete regions of human temporal cortex that are more strongly activated by conspecific voice sounds than by nonvoice sounds. However, the mechanisms underlying this voice sensitivity remain unclear. In the present functional MRI study, we took a novel approach to examining voice sensitivity, in which we applied a signal detection paradigm to the assessment of multivariate pattern classification among several living and nonliving categories of auditory stimuli. Within this framework, voice sensitivity can be interpreted as a distinct neural representation of brain activity that correctly distinguishes human vocalizations from other auditory object categories. Across a series of auditory categorization tests, we found that bilateral superior and middle temporal cortex consistently exhibited robust sensitivity to human vocal sounds. Although the strongest categorization was in distinguishing human voice from other categories, subsets of these regions were also able to distinguish reliably between nonhuman categories, suggesting a general role in auditory object categorization. Our findings complement the current evidence of cortical sensitivity to human vocal sounds by revealing that the greatest sensitivity during categorization tasks is devoted to distinguishing voice from nonvoice categories within human temporal cortex.

  5. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO.

  6. Signal-Induced Transcriptional Activation by Dif Requires the dTRAP80 Mediator Module

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Mo; Kim, Jung Mo; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Se Nyun; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Hoe Kim, Jung; Kim, Young-Joon

    2003-01-01

    The Mediator complex is the major multiprotein transcriptional coactivator complex in Drosophila melanogaster. Mediator components interact with diverse sets of transcriptional activator proteins to elicit the sophisticated regulation of gene expression. The distinct phenotypes associated with certain mutations in some of the Mediator genes and the specific in vitro interactions of Mediator gene products with transcriptional activator proteins suggest the presence of activator-specific binding subunits within the Mediator complex. However, the physiological relevance of these selective in vitro interactions has not been addressed. Therefore, we analyzed dTRAP80, one of the putative activator-binding subunits of the Mediator, for specificity of binding to a number of natural transcriptional activators from Drosophila. Among the group of activator proteins that requires the Mediator complex for transcriptional activation, only a subset of these proteins interacted with dTRAP80 in vitro and only these dTRAP80-interacting activators were defective for activation under dTRAP80-deficient in vivo conditions. In particular, activation of Drosophila antimicrobial peptide drosomycin gene expression by the NF-κB-like transcription factor Dif during induction of the Toll signaling pathway was dependent on the dTRAP80 module. These results, and the indirect support from the dTRAP80 artificial recruitment assay, indicate that dTRAP80 serves as a genuine activator-binding target responsible for a distinct group of activators. PMID:12556495

  7. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  8. A clinically relevant model of osteoinduction: a process requiring calcium phosphate and BMP/Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Eyckmans, J; Roberts, S J; Schrooten, J; Luyten, F P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated a clinically relevant model of in vivo ectopic bone formation utilizing human periosteum derived cells (HPDCs) seeded in a Collagraft™ carrier and explored the mechanisms by which this process is driven. Bone formation occurred after eight weeks when a minimum of one million HPDCs was loaded on Collagraft™ carriers and implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nu/nu mice. De novo bone matrix, mainly secreted by the HPDCs, was found juxta-proximal of the calcium phosphate (CaP) granules suggesting that CaP may have triggered the ‘osteoinductive program’. Indeed, removal of the CaP granules by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decalcification prior to cell seeding and implantation resulted in loss of bone formation. In addition, inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt signalling by overexpression of the secreted antagonists Noggin and Frzb, respectively, also abrogated osteoinduction. Proliferation of the engrafted HPDCs was strongly reduced in the decalcified scaffolds or when seeded with adenovirus-Noggin/Frzb transduced HPDCs indicating that cell division of the engrafted HPDCs is required for the direct bone formation cascade. These data suggest that this model of bone formation is similar to that observed during physiological intramembranous bone development and may be of importance when investigating tissue engineering strategies. PMID:19538476

  9. Mammary Branching Morphogenesis Requires Reciprocal Signaling by Heparanase and MMP-14.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Angélica Maciel; Bhat, Ramray; Correia, Ana Luísa; Mott, Joni D; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Pavão, Mauro S G; Bissell, Mina

    2015-08-01

    The development of the mammary gland involves formation of a branched arboreal structure resulting from the penetration and proliferation of epithelial cells into the fat pad. The mammary cells invade by remodeling their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), which are rich in proteins, and glycans such as heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). There is increasing literature on how the interaction between signaling by ECM and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is relevant to morphogenetic and physiological contexts. Here we sought to understand how heparanase, the sole mammalian heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase may regulate mammary gland development. We found a robust localization of heparanase within growing end buds during branching in vivo. Using three-dimensional (3D) organotypic cultures, we showed that heparanase expression and activity are required for mammary epithelial invasion/branching within dense collagen I gels. Morphometric analysis of glands from both heparanase-overexpressing and knockout mice showed a direct correlation between degree of branching and the heparanase levels, confirming our 3D organotypic culture observations. Finally, we uncovered a reciprocal association between levels of heparanase and MMP14, a membrane-bound MMP, shedding further light on how branching occurs within developing mammary glands.

  10. Phospholipase Cγ1 is required for pre-TCR signal transduction and pre-T cell development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoping; Yu, Mei; Chen, Yuhong; Zheng, Yongwei; Zhu, Wen; Newman, Debra K; Wang, Demin; Wen, Renren

    2017-01-01

    Pre-T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is required for pre-T cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation from the CD4 and CD8 double negative (DN) to the double positive (DP) stage. However, the pre-TCR signal transduction pathway is not fully understood and the signaling molecules involved have not been completely identified. Phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) 1 is an important signaling molecule that generates two second messengers, diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, that are important to mediate PKC activation and intracellular Ca(2+) flux in many signaling pathways. Previously, we have shown that PLCγ1 is important for TCR-mediated signaling, development and T-cell activation, but the role of PLCγ1 in pre-TCR signal transduction and pre-T cell development is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that PLCγ1 expression level in pre-T cells was comparable to that in mature T cells. Deletion of PLCγ1 prior to the pre-TCR signaling stage partially blocked the DN3 to DN4 transition and reduced thymic cellularity. We also demonstrated that deletion of PLCγ1 impaired pre-T cell proliferation without affecting cell survival. Further study showed that deficiency of PLCγ1 impaired pre-TCR mediated Ca(2+) flux and Erk activation. Thus our studies demonstrate that PLCγ1 is important for pre-TCR mediated signal transduction and pre-T cell development.

  11. Wingless/Wnt signal transduction requires distinct initiation and amplification steps that both depend on Arrow/LRP

    PubMed Central

    Baig-Lewis, Shahana; Peterson-Nedry, Wynne; Wehrli, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Members of the Wg/Wnt family provide key intercellular signals during embryonic development and in the maintenance of homeostatic processes, but critical aspects of their signal transduction pathways remain controversial. We have found that canonical Wg signaling in Drosophila involves distinct initiation and amplification steps, both of which require Arrow/LRP. Expressing a chimeric Frizzled2-Arrow protein in flies that lack endogenous Wg or Arrow showed that this construct functions as an activated Wg receptor but is deficient in signal amplification. In contrast, a chimeric Arrow protein containing the dimerization domain of Torso acted as a potent amplifier of Wg signaling but could not initiate Wg signaling on its own. The two chimeric proteins synergized, so that their co-expression largely reconstituted the signaling levels achieved by expressing Wg itself. The amplification function of Arrow/LRP appears to be particularly important for long-range signaling, and may reflect a general mechanism for potentiating signals in the shallow part of a morphogen gradient. PMID:17433287

  12. Using a Function Generator to Produce Auditory and Visual Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Charles B.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies a function generator as an instrument that produces time-varying electrical signals of frequency, wavelength, and amplitude. Sending these signals to a speaker or a light-emitting diode can demonstrate how specific characteristics of auditory or visual stimuli relate to perceptual experiences. Provides specific instructions for using…

  13. A corollary discharge maintains auditory sensitivity during sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2002-08-01

    Speaking and singing present the auditory system of the caller with two fundamental problems: discriminating between self-generated and external auditory signals and preventing desensitization. In humans and many other vertebrates, auditory neurons in the brain are inhibited during vocalization but little is known about the nature of the inhibition. Here we show, using intracellular recordings of auditory neurons in the singing cricket, that presynaptic inhibition of auditory afferents and postsynaptic inhibition of an identified auditory interneuron occur in phase with the song pattern. Presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition persist in a fictively singing, isolated cricket central nervous system and are therefore the result of a corollary discharge from the singing motor network. Mimicking inhibition in the interneuron by injecting hyperpolarizing current suppresses its spiking response to a 100-dB sound pressure level (SPL) acoustic stimulus and maintains its response to subsequent, quieter stimuli. Inhibition by the corollary discharge reduces the neural response to self-generated sound and protects the cricket's auditory pathway from self-induced desensitization.

  14. Integration and segregation in auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Elyse S

    2005-03-01

    Assessment of the neural correlates of auditory scene analysis, using an index of sound change detection that does not require the listener to attend to the sounds [a component of event-related brain potentials called the mismatch negativity (MMN)], has previously demonstrated that segregation processes can occur without attention focused on the sounds and that within-stream contextual factors influence how sound elements are integrated and represented in auditory memory. The current study investigated the relationship between the segregation and integration processes when they were called upon to function together. The pattern of MMN results showed that the integration of sound elements within a sound stream occurred after the segregation of sounds into independent streams and, further, that the individual streams were subject to contextual effects. These results are consistent with a view of auditory processing that suggests that the auditory scene is rapidly organized into distinct streams and the integration of sequential elements to perceptual units takes place on the already formed streams. This would allow for the flexibility required to identify changing within-stream sound patterns, needed to appreciate music or comprehend speech.

  15. Integration and segregation in auditory scene analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Elyse S.

    2005-03-01

    Assessment of the neural correlates of auditory scene analysis, using an index of sound change detection that does not require the listener to attend to the sounds [a component of event-related brain potentials called the mismatch negativity (MMN)], has previously demonstrated that segregation processes can occur without attention focused on the sounds and that within-stream contextual factors influence how sound elements are integrated and represented in auditory memory. The current study investigated the relationship between the segregation and integration processes when they were called upon to function together. The pattern of MMN results showed that the integration of sound elements within a sound stream occurred after the segregation of sounds into independent streams and, further, that the individual streams were subject to contextual effects. These results are consistent with a view of auditory processing that suggests that the auditory scene is rapidly organized into distinct streams and the integration of sequential elements to perceptual units takes place on the already formed streams. This would allow for the flexibility required to identify changing within-stream sound patterns, needed to appreciate music or comprehend speech..

  16. Virtual Auditory Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    timbre , intensity, distance, room modeling, radio communication Virtual Environments Handbook Chapter 4 Virtual Auditory Displays Russell D... musical note “A” as a pure sinusoid, there will be 440 condensations and rarefactions per second. The distance between two adjacent condensations or...and complexity are pitch, loudness, and timbre respectively. This distinction between physical and perceptual measures of sound properties is an

  17. Modelling auditory attention.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Emine Merve; Elhilali, Mounya

    2017-02-19

    Sounds in everyday life seldom appear in isolation. Both humans and machines are constantly flooded with a cacophony of sounds that need to be sorted through and scoured for relevant information-a phenomenon referred to as the 'cocktail party problem'. A key component in parsing acoustic scenes is the role of attention, which mediates perception and behaviour by focusing both sensory and cognitive resources on pertinent information in the stimulus space. The current article provides a review of modelling studies of auditory attention. The review highlights how the term attention refers to a multitude of behavioural and cognitive processes that can shape sensory processing. Attention can be modulated by 'bottom-up' sensory-driven factors, as well as 'top-down' task-specific goals, expectations and learned schemas. Essentially, it acts as a selection process or processes that focus both sensory and cognitive resources on the most relevant events in the soundscape; with relevance being dictated by the stimulus itself (e.g. a loud explosion) or by a task at hand (e.g. listen to announcements in a busy airport). Recent computational models of auditory attention provide key insights into its role in facilitating perception in cluttered auditory scenes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  18. Modelling auditory attention

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Emine Merve

    2017-01-01

    Sounds in everyday life seldom appear in isolation. Both humans and machines are constantly flooded with a cacophony of sounds that need to be sorted through and scoured for relevant information—a phenomenon referred to as the ‘cocktail party problem’. A key component in parsing acoustic scenes is the role of attention, which mediates perception and behaviour by focusing both sensory and cognitive resources on pertinent information in the stimulus space. The current article provides a review of modelling studies of auditory attention. The review highlights how the term attention refers to a multitude of behavioural and cognitive processes that can shape sensory processing. Attention can be modulated by ‘bottom-up’ sensory-driven factors, as well as ‘top-down’ task-specific goals, expectations and learned schemas. Essentially, it acts as a selection process or processes that focus both sensory and cognitive resources on the most relevant events in the soundscape; with relevance being dictated by the stimulus itself (e.g. a loud explosion) or by a task at hand (e.g. listen to announcements in a busy airport). Recent computational models of auditory attention provide key insights into its role in facilitating perception in cluttered auditory scenes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Auditory and visual scene analysis’. PMID:28044012

  19. Auditory Fusion in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sylvia M.; McCroskey, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on auditory fusion (defined in terms of a listerner's ability to distinguish paired acoustic events from single acoustic events) in 3- to 12-year-old children. The subjects listened to 270 pairs of tones controlled for frequency, intensity, and duration. (CM)

  20. Incidental Auditory Category Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, Yafit; Dick, Frederic K.; Zevin, Jason D.; Holt, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about how auditory categories are learned incidentally, without instructions to search for category-diagnostic dimensions, overt category decisions, or experimenter-provided feedback. This is an important gap because learning in the natural environment does not arise from explicit feedback and there is evidence that the learning systems engaged by traditional tasks are distinct from those recruited by incidental category learning. We examined incidental auditory category learning with a novel paradigm, the Systematic Multimodal Associations Reaction Time (SMART) task, in which participants rapidly detect and report the appearance of a visual target in one of four possible screen locations. Although the overt task is rapid visual detection, a brief sequence of sounds precedes each visual target. These sounds are drawn from one of four distinct sound categories that predict the location of the upcoming visual target. These many-to-one auditory-to-visuomotor correspondences support incidental auditory category learning. Participants incidentally learn categories of complex acoustic exemplars and generalize this learning to novel exemplars and tasks. Further, learning is facilitated when category exemplar variability is more tightly coupled to the visuomotor associations than when the same stimulus variability is experienced across trials. We relate these findings to phonetic category learning. PMID:26010588

  1. Tuning shifts of the auditory system by corticocortical and corticofugal projections and conditioning.

    PubMed

    Suga, Nobuo

    2012-02-01

    The central auditory system consists of the lemniscal and nonlemniscal systems. The thalamic lemniscal and nonlemniscal auditory nuclei are different from each other in response properties and neural connectivities. The cortical auditory areas receiving the projections from these thalamic nuclei interact with each other through corticocortical projections and project down to the subcortical auditory nuclei. This corticofugal (descending) system forms multiple feedback loops with the ascending system. The corticocortical and corticofugal projections modulate auditory signal processing and play an essential role in the plasticity of the auditory system. Focal electric stimulation - comparable to repetitive tonal stimulation - of the lemniscal system evokes three major types of changes in the physiological properties, such as the tuning to specific values of acoustic parameters of cortical and subcortical auditory neurons through different combinations of facilitation and inhibition. For such changes, a neuromodulator, acetylcholine, plays an essential role. Electric stimulation of the nonlemniscal system evokes changes in the lemniscal system that is different from those evoked by the lemniscal stimulation. Auditory signals ascending from the lemniscal and nonlemniscal thalamic nuclei to the cortical auditory areas appear to be selected or adjusted by a "differential" gating mechanism. Conditioning for associative learning and pseudo-conditioning for nonassociative learning respectively elicit tone-specific and nonspecific plastic changes. The lemniscal, corticofugal and cholinergic systems are involved in eliciting the former, but not the latter. The current article reviews the recent progress in the research of corticocortical and corticofugal modulations of the auditory system and its plasticity elicited by conditioning and pseudo-conditioning.

  2. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated intestinal epithelial cell migration requires Src family kinase-dependent p38 MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Frey, Mark R; Golovin, Anastasia; Polk, D Brent

    2004-10-22

    Members of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of ligands and their receptors regulate migration and growth of intestinal epithelial cells. However, our understanding of the signal transduction pathways determining these responses is incomplete. In this study we tested the hypothesis that p38 is required for EGF-stimulated intestinal epithelial monolayer restitution. EGF-stimulated migration in a wound closure model required continuous presence of ligand for several hours for maximal response, suggesting a requirement for sustained signal transduction pathway activation. In this regard, prolonged exposure of cells to EGF activated p38 for up to 5 h. Furthermore genetic or pharmacological blockade of p38 signaling inhibited the ability of EGF to accelerate wound closure. Interestingly p38 inhibition was associated with increased EGF-stimulated ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, suggesting that p38 regulates the balance of proliferation/migration signaling in response to EGF receptor activity. Activation of p38 in intestinal epithelial cells through EGF receptor was abolished by blockade of Src family tyrosine kinase signaling but not inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or protein kinase C. Taken together, these data suggest that Src family kinase-dependent p38 activation is a key component of a signaling switch routing EGF-stimulated responses to epithelial cell migration/restitution rather than proliferation during wound closure.

  3. PSYCHOACOUSTICS: a comprehensive MATLAB toolbox for auditory testing.

    PubMed

    Soranzo, Alessandro; Grassi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    PSYCHOACOUSTICS is a new MATLAB toolbox which implements three classic adaptive procedures for auditory threshold estimation. The first includes those of the Staircase family (method of limits, simple up-down and transformed up-down); the second is the Parameter Estimation by Sequential Testing (PEST); and the third is the Maximum Likelihood Procedure (MLP). The toolbox comes with more than twenty built-in experiments each provided with the recommended (default) parameters. However, if desired, these parameters can be modified through an intuitive and user friendly graphical interface and stored for future use (no programming skills are required). Finally, PSYCHOACOUSTICS is very flexible as it comes with several signal generators and can be easily extended for any experiment.

  4. PSYCHOACOUSTICS: a comprehensive MATLAB toolbox for auditory testing

    PubMed Central

    Soranzo, Alessandro; Grassi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    PSYCHOACOUSTICS is a new MATLAB toolbox which implements three classic adaptive procedures for auditory threshold estimation. The first includes those of the Staircase family (method of limits, simple up-down and transformed up-down); the second is the Parameter Estimation by Sequential Testing (PEST); and the third is the Maximum Likelihood Procedure (MLP). The toolbox comes with more than twenty built-in experiments each provided with the recommended (default) parameters. However, if desired, these parameters can be modified through an intuitive and user friendly graphical interface and stored for future use (no programming skills are required). Finally, PSYCHOACOUSTICS is very flexible as it comes with several signal generators and can be easily extended for any experiment. PMID:25101013

  5. T-type Ca2+ channels are required for enhanced sympathetic axon growth by TNFα reverse signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kisiswa, Lilian; Erice, Clara; Ferron, Laurent; Wyatt, Sean; Osório, Catarina; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2017-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1)-activated TNFα reverse signalling, in which membrane-integrated TNFα functions as a receptor for TNFR1, enhances axon growth from developing sympathetic neurons and plays a crucial role in establishing sympathetic innervation. Here, we have investigated the link between TNFα reverse signalling and axon growth in cultured sympathetic neurons. TNFR1-activated TNFα reverse signalling promotes Ca2+ influx, and highly selective T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors, but not pharmacological inhibitors of L-type, N-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, prevented enhanced axon growth. T-type Ca2+ channel-specific inhibitors eliminated Ca2+ spikes promoted by TNFα reverse signalling in axons and prevented enhanced axon growth when applied locally to axons, but not when applied to cell somata. Blocking action potential generation did not affect the effect of TNFα reverse signalling on axon growth, suggesting that propagated action potentials are not required for enhanced axon growth. TNFα reverse signalling enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and pharmacological inhibition of PKC prevented the axon growth response. These results suggest that TNFα reverse signalling promotes opening of T-type Ca2+ channels along sympathetic axons, which is required for enhanced axon growth. PMID:28100666

  6. Auditory Midbrain Implant: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  7. Cranial Nerve Development Requires Co-Ordinated Shh and Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A.; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cells is coordinated during cranial ganglia morphogenesis is poorly understood. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is one key pathway that regulates multiple aspects of craniofacial development, but whether it co-ordinates cranial neural crest cell and placodal cell interactions during cranial ganglia formation remains unclear. In this study we examined a new Patched1 (Ptch1) loss-of-function mouse mutant and characterized the role of Ptch1 in regulating Shh signaling during cranial ganglia development. Ptch1Wig/ Wig mutants exhibit elevated Shh signaling in concert with disorganization of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Importantly, we discovered that enhanced Shh signaling suppressed canonical Wnt signaling in the cranial nerve region. This critically affected the survival and migration of cranial neural crest cells and the development of placodal cells as well as the integration between neural crest and placodes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel and critical role for Shh signaling in cranial nerve development via the cross regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25799573

  8. TGF-β signaling is required for multiple processes during Xenopus tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Diana M.; Whitman, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Xenopus tadpoles can fully regenerate all major tissue types following tail amputation. TGF-β signaling plays essential roles in growth, repair, specification, and differentiation of tissues throughout development and adulthood. We examined the localization of key components of the TGF-β signaling pathway during regeneration and characterized the effects of loss of TGF-β signaling on multiple regenerative events. Phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) is initially restricted to the p63+ basal layer of the regenerative epithelium shortly after amputation, and is later found in multiple tissue types in the regeneration bud. TGF-β ligands are also upregulated throughout regeneration. Treatment of amputated tails with SB-431542, a specific and reversible inhibitor of TGF-β signaling, blocks tail regeneration at multiple points. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling immediately following tail amputation reversibly prevents formation of a wound epithelium over the future regeneration bud. Even brief inhibition immediately following amputation is sufficient, however, to irreversibly block the establishment of structures and cell types that characterize regenerating tissue and to prevent the proper activation of BMP and ERK signaling pathways. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling after regeneration has already commenced blocks cell proliferation in the regeneration bud. These data reveal several spatially and temporally distinct roles for TGF-β signaling during regeneration: 1) wound epithelium formation, 2) establishment of regeneration bud structures and signaling cascades, and 3) regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:18234181

  9. The extracellular domain of Smoothened regulates ciliary localization and is required for high-level Hh signaling.

    PubMed

    Aanstad, Pia; Santos, Nicole; Corbit, Kevin C; Scherz, Paul J; Trinh, Le A; Salvenmoser, Willi; Huisken, Jan; Reiter, Jeremy F; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2009-06-23

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins function as morphogens to pattern developing tissues and control cell proliferation. The seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for the activation of all levels of Hh signaling. However, the mechanisms by which Smo differentially activates low- or high-level Hh signaling are not known. Here we show that a newly identified mutation in the extracellular domain (ECD) of zebrafish Smo attenuates Smo signaling. The Smo agonist purmorphamine induces the stabilization, ciliary translocation, and high-level signaling of wild-type Smo. In contrast, purmorphamine induces the stabilization but not the ciliary translocation or high-level signaling of the Smo ECD mutant protein. Surprisingly, a truncated form of Smo that lacks the cysteine-rich domain of the ECD localizes to the cilium but is unable to activate high-level Hh signaling. We also present evidence that cilia may be required for Hh signaling in early zebrafish embryos. These data indicate that the ECD, previously thought to be dispensable for vertebrate Smo function, both regulates Smo ciliary localization and is essential for high-level Hh signaling.

  10. TLR2 Signaling is Required for the Innate, but Not Adaptive Response to LVS clpB

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lydia M.; Ledvina, Hannah E.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is the best-characterized pattern-recognition receptor for the highly pathogenic intracellular bacterium, Francisella tularensis. We previously identified a mutant in the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella, LVS clpB, which is attenuated, but induces a protective immune response. We sought to determine whether TLR2 signaling was required during the immune response to LVS clpB. TLR2 knock-out (TLR2 KO) mice previously infected with LVS clpB are completely protected during a lethal challenge with LVS. Furthermore, the kinetics and magnitude of the primary T-cell response in B6 and TLR2 KO mice are similar indicating that TLR2 signaling is dispensable for the adaptive immune response to LVS clpB. TLR2 signaling was important, however, for the innate immune response to LVS clpB. We identified three classes of cytokines/chemokines that differ in their dependence on TLR2 signaling for production on day 3 post-inoculation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-17, MIP-1α, and TNF-α production depended on TLR2 signaling, while GM-CSF, IFN-γ, and VEGF production were completely independent of TLR2 signaling. IL-6, IL-12, IP-10, KC, and MIG production were partially dependent on TLR2 signaling. Together our data indicate that the innate immune response to LVS clpB requires TLR2 signaling for the maximal innate response, whereas TLR2 is not required for the adaptive immune response. PMID:25250027

  11. TLR2 Signaling is Required for the Innate, but Not Adaptive Response to LVS clpB.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is the best-characterized pattern-recognition receptor for the highly pathogenic intracellular bacterium, Francisella tularensis. We previously identified a mutant in the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella, LVS clpB, which is attenuated, but induces a protective immune response. We sought to determine whether TLR2 signaling was required during the immune response to LVS clpB. TLR2 knock-out (TLR2 KO) mice previously infected with LVS clpB are completely protected during a lethal challenge with LVS. Furthermore, the kinetics and magnitude of the primary T-cell response in B6 and TLR2 KO mice are similar indicating that TLR2 signaling is dispensable for the adaptive immune response to LVS clpB. TLR2 signaling was important, however, for the innate immune response to LVS clpB. We identified three classes of cytokines/chemokines that differ in their dependence on TLR2 signaling for production on day 3 post-inoculation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-17, MIP-1α, and TNF-α production depended on TLR2 signaling, while GM-CSF, IFN-γ, and VEGF production were completely independent of TLR2 signaling. IL-6, IL-12, IP-10, KC, and MIG production were partially dependent on TLR2 signaling. Together our data indicate that the innate immune response to LVS clpB requires TLR2 signaling for the maximal innate response, whereas TLR2 is not required for the adaptive immune response.

  12. Membrane-Initiated Estradiol Signaling Induces Spinogenesis Required for Female Sexual Receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Amy; Dewing, Phoebe

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens have profound actions on the structure of the nervous system during development and in adulthood. One of the signature actions of estradiol is to alter the morphology of neural processes. In the hippocampus, estradiol modulates spines and cellular excitability that affect cognitive behaviors. In the hypothalamus, estradiol increases spine density in mediobasal hypothalamic nuclei that regulate reproduction. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH), an important site for modulation of female sexual receptivity, has a sexual dimorphism in dendritic spine density that favors females. In the present study, we used both β-actin immunostaining and Golgi staining to visualize estradiol-induced changes in spine density in Long–Evans rats. Golgi impregnation was used to visualize spine shape, and then β-actin immunoreactivity was used as a semiquantitative measure of spine plasticity since actin forms the core of dendritic spines. At 4 h after estradiol treatment, both β-actin immunofluorescence and filopodial spines were increased (from 70.57 ± 1.09% to 78.01 ± 1.05%, p < 0.05). Disruption of estradiol-induced β-actin polymerization with cytochalasin D attenuated lordosis behavior, indicating the importance of estradiol-mediated spinogenesis for female sexual receptivity (81.43 ± 7.05 to 35.00 ± 11.76, p < 0.05). Deactivation of cofilin, an actin depolymerizing factor is required for spinogenesis. Membrane-initiated estradiol signaling involving the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a was responsible for the phosphorylation and thereby deactivation of cofilin. These data demonstrate that estradiol-induced spinogenesis in the ARH is an important cellular mechanism for the regulation of female sexual behavior. PMID:22131419

  13. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    PubMed

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-09

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  14. Coil-dependent signaling pathway is not required for Mi-1-mediated potato aphid resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Kishor K; Xie, Qi-Guang; Pourshalimi, Daniel; Younglove, Ted; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2007-03-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has a unique resistance gene, Mi-1, that confers resistance to animals from distinct taxa, nematodes, and piercing and sucking insects. Mi-1 encodes a protein with a nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat motifs. Early in the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae)--tomato interactions, aphid feeding induces the expression of the jasmonic acid (JA)-regulated proteinase inhibitor genes, Pin1 and Pin2. The jail-1 (jasmonic acid insensitive 1) tomato mutant, which is impaired in JA perception, was used to gain additional insight into the JA signaling pathway and its role in the Mi-1-mediated aphid resistance. The jail-1 mutant has a deletion in the Coil gene that encodes a putative F-box protein. In this study, aphid colonization, survival, and fecundity were compared on wild-type tomato and jail-1 mutant. In choice assays, the jail-1 mutant showed higher colonization by potato aphids compared with wild-type tomato. In contrast, no-choice assays showed no difference in potato aphid survival or fecundity between jail-1 and the wild-type parent. Plants homozygous for Mi-1 and for the jail mutation were not compromised in resistance to potato aphids, using either choice or no-choice assays. In addition, the accumulation of JA-regulated Pin1 transcripts after aphid feeding was Coil dependent. Taken together, these data indicate that, although potato aphids activate Coil-dependent defense response in tomato, this response is not required for Mi-1-mediated resistance to aphids.

  15. Rice Rab11 is required for JA-mediated defense signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Min Ji; Lee, Yun mi; Son, Young Sim; Im, Chak Han; Yi, Young Byung; Rim, Yeong Gil; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Heo, Jae Bok

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •OsRab11 interacts with OsOPR8. •OsOPR8 is localized in the cytosol and peroxisome. •OsRab11 enhances the NADPH consumption by OsOPR8. •Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing OsRab11 represents a pathogen-resistant phenotype. -- Abstract: Rab proteins play an essential role in regulating vesicular transport in eukaryotic cells. Previously, we characterized OsRab11, which in concert with OsGAP1 and OsGDI3 regulates vesicular trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane or vacuole. To further elucidate the physiological function of OsRab11 in plants, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens using OsRab11 as bait. OsOPR8 was isolated and shown to interact with OsRab11. A co-immunoprecipitation assay confirmed this interaction. The green fluorescent protein-OsOPR8 fusion product was targeted to the cytoplasm and peroxisomes of protoplasts from Arabidopsis thaliana. OsOPR8 exhibited NADPH-dependent reduction activity when 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CyHE) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) were supplied as possible substrates. Interestingly, NADPH oxidation by OsOPR8 was increased when wild-type OsRab11 or the constitutively active form of OsRab11 (Q78L) were included in the reaction mix, but not when the dominant negative form of OsRab11 (S28N) was included. OsRab11 was expressed broadly in plants and both OsRab11 and OsOPR8 were induced by jasmonic acid (JA) and elicitor treatments. Overexpressed OsRab11 transgenic plants showed resistance to pathogens through induced expression of JA-responsive genes. In conclusion, OsRab11 may be required for JA-mediated defense signaling by activating the reducing activity of OsOPR8.

  16. Psychophysical and Neural Correlates of Auditory Attraction and Aversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, Kristopher Jakob

    This study explores the psychophysical and neural processes associated with the perception of sounds as either pleasant or aversive. The underlying psychophysical theory is based on auditory scene analysis, the process through which listeners parse auditory signals into individual acoustic sources. The first experiment tests and confirms that a self-rated pleasantness continuum reliably exists for 20 various stimuli (r = .48). In addition, the pleasantness continuum correlated with the physical acoustic characteristics of consonance/dissonance (r = .78), which can facilitate auditory parsing processes. The second experiment uses an fMRI block design to test blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) changes elicited by a subset of 5 exemplar stimuli chosen from Experiment 1 that are evenly distributed over the pleasantness continuum. Specifically, it tests and confirms that the pleasantness continuum produces systematic changes in brain activity for unpleasant acoustic stimuli beyond what occurs with pleasant auditory stimuli. Results revealed that the combination of two positively and two negatively valenced experimental sounds compared to one neutral baseline control elicited BOLD increases in the primary auditory cortex, specifically the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, and left dorsomedial prefrontal cortex; the latter being consistent with a frontal decision-making process common in identification tasks. The negatively-valenced stimuli yielded additional BOLD increases in the left insula, which typically indicates processing of visceral emotions. The positively-valenced stimuli did not yield any significant BOLD activation, consistent with consonant, harmonic stimuli being the prototypical acoustic pattern of auditory objects that is optimal for auditory scene analysis. Both the psychophysical findings of Experiment 1 and the neural processing findings of Experiment 2 support that consonance is an important dimension of sound that is processed in a manner that aids

  17. Animal models for auditory streaming.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Naoya; Klump, Georg M

    2017-02-19

    Sounds in the natural environment need to be assigned to acoustic sources to evaluate complex auditory scenes. Separating sources will affect the analysis of auditory features of sounds. As the benefits of assigning sounds to specific sources accrue to all species communicating acoustically, the ability for auditory scene analysis is widespread among different animals. Animal studies allow for a deeper insight into the neuronal mechanisms underlying auditory scene analysis. Here, we will review the paradigms applied in the study of auditory scene analysis and streaming of sequential sounds in animal models. We will compare the psychophysical results from the animal studies to the evidence obtained in human psychophysics of auditory streaming, i.e. in a task commonly used for measuring the capability for auditory scene analysis. Furthermore, the neuronal correlates of auditory streaming will be reviewed in different animal models and the observations of the neurons' response measures will be related to perception. The across-species comparison will reveal whether similar demands in the analysis of acoustic scenes have resulted in similar perceptual and neuronal processing mechanisms in the wide range of species being capable of auditory scene analysis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  18. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  19. Audiovisual training is better than auditory-only training for auditory-only speech-in-noise identification.

    PubMed

    Lidestam, Björn; Moradi, Shahram; Pettersson, Rasmus; Ricklefs, Theodor

    2014-08-01

    The effects of audiovisual versus auditory training for speech-in-noise identification were examined in 60 young participants. The training conditions were audiovisual training, auditory-only training, and no training (n = 20 each). In the training groups, gated consonants and words were presented at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio; stimuli were either audiovisual or auditory-only. The no-training group watched a movie clip without performing a speech identification task. Speech-in-noise identification was measured before and after the training (or control activity). Results showed that only audiovisual training improved speech-in-noise identification, demonstrating superiority over auditory-only training.

  20. Auditory alert systems with enhanced detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and systems for distinguishing an auditory alert signal from a background of one or more non-alert signals. In a first embodiment, a prefix signal, associated with an existing alert signal, is provided that has a signal component in each of three or more selected frequency ranges, with each signal component in each of three or more selected level at least 3-10 dB above an estimated background (non-alert) level in that frequency range. The alert signal may be chirped within one or more frequency bands. In another embodiment, an alert signal moves, continuously or discontinuously, from one location to another over a short time interval, introducing a perceived spatial modulation or jitter. In another embodiment, a weighted sum of background signals adjacent to each ear is formed, and the weighted sum is delivered to each ear as a uniform background; a distinguishable alert signal is presented on top of this weighted sum signal at one ear, or distinguishable first and second alert signals are presented at two ears of a subject.

  1. Bayesian adaptive estimation of the auditory filter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Richards, Virginia M

    2013-08-01

    A Bayesian adaptive procedure for estimating the auditory-filter shape was proposed and evaluated using young, normal-hearing listeners at moderate stimulus levels. The resulting quick-auditory-filter (qAF) procedure assumed the power spectrum model of masking with the auditory-filter shape being modeled using a spectrally symmetric, two-parameter rounded-exponential (roex) function. During data collection using the qAF procedure, listeners detected the presence of a pure-tone signal presented in the spectral notch of a noise masker. Dependent on the listener's response on each trial, the posterior probability distributions of the model parameters were updated, and the resulting parameter estimates were then used to optimize the choice of stimulus parameters for the subsequent trials. Results showed that the qAF procedure gave similar parameter estimates to the traditional threshold-based procedure in many cases and was able to reasonably predict the masked signal thresholds. Additional measurements suggested that occasional failures of the qAF procedure to reliably converge could be a consequence of incorrect responses early in a qAF track. The addition of a parameter describing lapses of attention reduced the likelihood of such failures.

  2. Context effects in auditory implicit memory.

    PubMed

    Besken, Miri; Mulligan, Neil W

    2010-10-01

    The context effect in implicit memory is the finding that presentation of words in meaningful context reduces or eliminates repetition priming compared to words presented in isolation. Virtually all of the research on the context effect has been conducted in the visual modality but preliminary results raise the question of whether context effects are less likely in auditory priming. Context effects in the auditory modality were systematically examined in five experiments using the auditory implicit tests of word-fragment and word-stem completion. The first three experiments revealed the classical context effect in auditory priming: Words heard in isolation produced substantial priming, whereas there was little priming for the words heard in meaningful passages. Experiments 4 and 5 revealed that a meaningful context is not required for the context effect to be obtained: Words presented in an unrelated audio stream produced less priming than words presented individually and no more priming than words presented in meaningful passages. Although context effects are often explained in terms of the transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) framework, the present results are better explained by Masson and MacLeod's (2000) reduced-individuation hypothesis.

  3. Auditory Learning. Dimensions in Early Learning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigmond, Naomi K.; Cicci, Regina

    The monograph discusses the psycho-physiological operations for processing of auditory information, the structure and function of the ear, the development of auditory processes from fetal responses through discrimination, language comprehension, auditory memory, and auditory processes related to written language. Disorders of auditory learning…

  4. Auditory Processing Disorders. Revised. Technical Assistance Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services.

    Designed to assist audiologists in the educational setting in responding to frequently asked questions concerning audiological auditory processing disorder (APD) evaluations, this paper addresses: (1) auditory processes; (2) auditory processing skills; (3) characteristics of auditory processing disorders; (4) causes of auditory overload; (5) why…

  5. Mucosal clearance of capsule-expressing bacteria requires both TLR and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zola, Tracey A; Lysenko, Elena S; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2008-12-01

    Expression of capsular polysaccharide by bacterial pathogens is associated with increased resistance to host clearance mechanisms, in particular by evading opsonization and uptake by professional phagocytes. The potential for rapid progression of disease caused by encapsulated bacteria points to the importance of innate immunity at the mucosal surface where infection is initiated. Using a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization, host immune components that contribute to the mucosal clearance of capsule-expressing bacteria were investigated. Clearance of encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) required both TLR and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) signaling pathways, whereas individual deficiencies in each of these signaling cascades did not affect clearance of nonencapsulated strains. Moreover, clearance of Hi-expressing capsular polysaccharide required the recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection, and ex vivo phagocytic bacterial killing required expression of the NOD1 signaling pathway. Conversely, redundancies within these innate immune pathways of non-neutrophil cells were sufficient to promote mucosal clearance of nonencapsulated Hi. Our findings reveal a role for NOD1 in protection from encapsulated pathogens. In addition, this study provides an example of a microbial virulence determinant that alters the requirements for host signaling to provide effective protection.

  6. ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES SRC-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES Src-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)
    Weidong Wu1, Lee M. Graves2, Gordon N. Gill3 and James M. Samet4 1Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology; 2Department of Pharmacology, University o...

  7. Neural responses in songbird forebrain reflect learning rates, acquired salience, and stimulus novelty after auditory discrimination training.

    PubMed

    Bell, Brittany A; Phan, Mimi L; Vicario, David S

    2015-03-01

    How do social interactions form and modulate the neural representations of specific complex signals? This question can be addressed in the songbird auditory system. Like humans, songbirds learn to vocalize by imitating tutors heard during development. These learned vocalizations are important in reproductive and social interactions and in individual recognition. As a model for the social reinforcement of particular songs, male zebra finches were trained to peck for a food reward in response to one song stimulus (GO) and to withhold responding for another (NoGO). After performance reached criterion, single and multiunit neural responses to both trained and novel stimuli were obtained from multiple electrodes inserted bilaterally into two songbird auditory processing areas [caudomedial mesopallium (CMM) and caudomedial nidopallium (NCM)] of awake, restrained birds. Neurons in these areas undergo stimulus-specific adaptation to repeated song stimuli, and responses to familiar stimuli adapt more slowly than to novel stimuli. The results show that auditory responses differed in NCM and CMM for trained (GO and NoGO) stimuli vs. novel song stimuli. When subjects were grouped by the number of training days required to reach criterion, fast learners showed larger neural responses and faster stimulus-specific adaptation to all stimuli than slow learners in both areas. Furthermore, responses in NCM of fast learners were more strongly left-lateralized than in slow learners. Thus auditory responses in these sensory areas not only encode stimulus familiarity, but also reflect behavioral reinforcement in our paradigm, and can potentially be modulated by social interactions.

  8. A Novel Mode for Integrin-mediated Signaling: Tethering Is Required for Phosphorylation of FAK Y397

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Boettiger, David

    2003-01-01

    The common model for integrin mediated signaling is based on integrin clustering and the potential for that clustering to recruit signaling molecules including FAK and src. The clustering model for transmembrane signaling originated with the analysis of the EGF receptor signaling and remains the predominant model. The roles for substrate-bound ligand and ligand occupancy in integrin-mediated signaling are less clear. A kinetic model was established using HT1080 cells in which there was a linear relationship between the strength of adhesion, the proportion of α5β1 integrin that could be chemically cross-linked, and the number of receptor-ligand bonds. This graded signal produced a similarly graded response measured by the level of specific phosphorylation of FAK Y397. FAK Y397 phosphorylation could also be induced by antibody bound to the substrate. In contrast, clustering of α5β1 on suspended cells with either antibody to β1 or by clustering of soluble ligand bound to α5β1 induced the phosphorylation of FAK Y861 but not Y397. There were no differences in signaling when activating antibodies were compared with blocking antibodies, presence or absence of ligand. Only tethering of α5β1 to the substrate was required for induction of FAK Y397 phosphorylation. PMID:12960434

  9. Hearing it right: Evidence of hemispheric lateralization in auditory imagery.

    PubMed

    Prete, Giulia; Marzoli, Daniele; Brancucci, Alfredo; Tommasi, Luca

    2016-02-01

    An advantage of the right ear (REA) in auditory processing (especially for verbal content) has been firmly established in decades of behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging research. The laterality of auditory imagery, however, has received little attention, despite its potential relevance for the understanding of auditory hallucinations and related phenomena. In Experiments 1-4 we find that right-handed participants required to imagine hearing a voice or a sound unilaterally show a strong population bias to localize the self-generated auditory image at their right ear, likely the result of left-hemispheric dominance in auditory processing. In Experiments 5-8 - by means of the same paradigm - it was also ascertained that the right-ear bias for hearing imagined voices depends just on auditory attention mechanisms, as biases due to other factors (i.e., lateralized movements) were controlled. These results, suggesting a central role of the left hemisphere in auditory imagery, demonstrate that brain asymmetries can drive strong lateral biases in mental imagery.

  10. Impaired Vibration of Auditory Ossicles in Osteopetrotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Sho; Takada, Yasunari; Niida, Shumpei; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru; Nango, Nobuhito; Momose, Atsushi; Matsuo, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    In the middle ear, a chain of three tiny bones (ie, malleus, incus, and stapes) vibrates to transmit sound from the tympanic membrane to the inner ear. Little is known about whether and how bone-resorbing osteoclasts play a role in the vibration of auditory ossicles. We analyzed hearing function and morphological features of auditory ossicles in osteopetrotic mice, which lack osteoclasts because of the deficiency of either cytokine RANKL or transcription factor c-Fos. The auditory brainstem response showed that mice of both genotypes experienced hearing loss, and laser Doppler vibrometry revealed that the malleus behind the tympanic membrane failed to vibrate. Histological analysis and X-ray tomographic microscopy using synchrotron radiation showed that auditory ossicles in osteopetrotic mice were thicker and more cartilaginous than those in control mice. Most interestingly, the malleal processus brevis touched the medial wall of the tympanic cavity in osteopetrotic mice, which was also the case for c-Src kinase–deficient mice (with normal numbers of nonresorbing osteoclasts). Osteopetrotic mice showed a smaller volume of the tympanic cavity but had larger auditory ossicles compared with controls. These data suggest that osteoclastic bone resorption is required for thinning of auditory ossicles and enlargement of the tympanic cavity so that auditory ossicles vibrate freely. PMID:21356377

  11. Localized Cell and Drug Delivery for Auditory Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Jeffrey L.; Chikar, Jennifer A.; Crumling, Mark A.; Raphael, Yehoash; Martin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Localized cell and drug delivery to the cochlea and central auditory pathway can improve the safety and performance of implanted auditory prostheses (APs). While generally successful, these devices have a number of limitations and adverse effects including limited tonal and dynamic ranges, channel interactions, unwanted stimulation of non-auditory nerves, immune rejection, and infections including meningitis. Many of these limitations are associated with the tissue reactions to implanted auditory prosthetic devices and the gradual degeneration of the auditory system following deafness. Strategies to reduce the insertion trauma, degeneration of target neurons, fibrous and bony tissue encapsulation, and immune activation can improve the viability of tissue required for AP function as well as improve the resolution of stimulation for reduced channel interaction and improved place-pitch and level discrimination. Many pharmaceutical compounds have been identified that promote the viability of auditory tissue and prevent inflammation and infection. Cell delivery and gene therapy have provided promising results for treating hearing loss and reversing degeneration. Currently, many clinical and experimental methods can produce extremely localized and sustained drug delivery to address AP limitations. These methods provide better control over drug concentrations while eliminating the adverse effects of systemic delivery. Many of these drug delivery techniques can be integrated into modern auditory prosthetic devices to optimize the tissue response to the implanted device and reduce the risk of infection or rejection. Together, these methods and pharmaceutical agents can be used to optimize the tissue-device interface for improved AP safety and effectiveness. PMID:18573323

  12. Call sign intelligibility improvement using a spatial auditory display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    1993-01-01

    A spatial auditory display was used to convolve speech stimuli, consisting of 130 different call signs used in the communications protocol of NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, to different virtual auditory positions. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of the signal against diotic speech babble, with spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments. Non-individualized, minimum-phase approximations of head-related transfer functions were used. The results showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  13. Call sign intelligibility improvement using a spatial auditory display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    1993-04-01

    A spatial auditory display was used to convolve speech stimuli, consisting of 130 different call signs used in the communications protocol of NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, to different virtual auditory positions. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of the signal against diotic speech babble, with spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments. Non-individualized, minimum-phase approximations of head-related transfer functions were used. The results showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  14. Auditory and Visual Differences in Time Perception? An Investigation from a Developmental Perspective with Neuropsychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelanti, Pierre S.; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Adults and children (5- and 8-year-olds) performed a temporal bisection task with either auditory or visual signals and either a short (0.5-1.0s) or long (4.0-8.0s) duration range. Their working memory and attentional capacities were assessed by a series of neuropsychological tests administered in both the auditory and visual modalities. Results…

  15. Hippo Signaling Mediators Yap and Taz Are Required in the Epicardium for Coronary Vasculature Development.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anamika; Ramesh, Sindhu; Cibi, Dasan Mary; Yun, Lim Sze; Li, Jun; Li, Li; Manderfield, Lauren J; Olson, Eric N; Epstein, Jonathan A; Singh, Manvendra K

    2016-05-17

    Formation of the coronary vasculature is a complex and precisely coordinated morphogenetic process that begins with the formation of epicardium. The epicardium gives rise to many components of the coronary vasculature, including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelium. Hippo signaling components have been implicated in cardiac development and regeneration. However, a role of Hippo signaling in the epicardium has not been explored. Employing a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of Hippo signaling mediators Yap and Taz leads to impaired epicardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a reduction in epicardial cell proliferation and differentiation into coronary endothelial cells. We provide evidence that Yap and Taz control epicardial cell behavior, in part by regulating Tbx18 and Wt1 expression. Our findings show a role for Hippo signaling in epicardial cell proliferation, EMT, and cell fate specification during cardiac organogenesis.

  16. Hippo signaling mediators Yap and Taz are required in the epicardium for coronary vasculature development

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anamika; Ramesh, Sindhu; Cibi, Dasan Mary; Yun, Lim Sze; Li, Jun; Li, Li; Manderfield, Lauren J.; Olson, Eric N.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Singh, Manvendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Formation of the coronary vasculature is a complex and precisely coordinated morphogenetic process that begins with the formation of epicardium. The epicardium gives rise to many components of the coronary vasculature, including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells and endothelium. Hippo signaling components have been implicated in cardiac development and regeneration. However a role of Hippo signaling in the epicardium has not been explored. Employing a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of Hippo signaling mediators Yap and Taz leads to impaired epicardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a reduction in epicardial cell proliferation and differentiation into coronary endothelial cells. We provide evidence that Yap and Taz control epicardial cell behavior, in part by regulating Tbx18 and Wt1 expression. Our findings show a role for Hippo signaling in epicardial cell proliferation, EMT and cell fate specification during cardiac organogenesis. PMID:27160901

  17. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... section on at least one channel. The Attention signal may be produced from a storage device. Additionally... from a storage device. Additionally, these analog cable systems, digital cable systems, and...

  18. Heparan sulfate biosynthetic gene Ndst1 is required for FGF signaling in early lens development.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Woodbury, Andrea; Esko, Jeffrey D; Grobe, Kay; Zhang, Xin

    2006-12-01

    Multiple signaling molecules, including bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) and fibroblast growth factors (FGF), play important roles in early lens development. However, how these morphogens are regulated is still largely unknown. Heparan sulfate participates in both morphogen transport and morphogen-receptor interaction. In this study, we demonstrate that inactivation of the heparan sulfate biosynthetic gene Ndst1 resulted in invagination defects of the early lens and in the disruption of lens-determination gene expression, leading to severe lens hypoplasia or anophthalmia. Ndst1 mutants exhibited reduced sulfation of heparan sulfate, but both BMP- and Wnt-signaling remained unchanged. Instead, these embryos showed diminished binding of a subset of FGF proteins to FGF receptors. Consistent with disruption of FGF signaling, expression of phospho-Erk and ERM were also downregulated in Ndst1-mutant lenses. Taken together, these results establish an important role of Ndst1 function in FGF signaling during lens development.

  19. The Development of Performance-Based Auditory Aviation Classification Standards in the U.S. Navy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    included perception of degraded speech, response time to auditory signals, auditory short-term memory , and auditory selective attention. A battery of...2 ~W1.PUVX ~XP~~fI,.X~iUI ’~\\N ^.V"II An ?W I PwI IV I Mduv I A .I~ Auditory Short-Term Memory Memory has also been mentioned as an age. sensitive...function that is related to pilot performance (23, 24). While d.3bate continues regarding whether age-related memory decline results from deficient

  20. Early hominin auditory capacities

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J.; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G.; Thackeray, J. Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats. PMID:26601261

  1. Early hominin auditory capacities.

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G; Thackeray, J Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-09-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats.

  2. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  3. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders.

  4. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders. PMID:25485589

  5. Synaptic generation of an intracellular retrograde signal requires activation of the tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Stough, Shara; Kopec, Ashley M; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Cellular changes underlying memory formation can be generated in an activity-dependent manner at specific synapses. Thus an important question concerns the mechanisms by which synaptic signals communicate with the cell body to mediate these cellular changes. A monosynaptic circuit that is enhanced by sensitization in Aplysia is well-suited to study this question because three different subcellular compartments: (i) the sensorimotor SN-MN synapses, (ii) the SN projections to MNs via axonal connections, (iii) the SN cell bodies, can all be manipulated and studied independently. Here, we report that activity-dependent (AD) training in either the entire SN-MN circuit or in only the synaptic compartment, activates MAPK in a temporally and spatially specific pattern. Specifically, we find (i) MAPK activation is first transiently generated at SN-MN synapses during training, (ii) immediately after training MAPK is transiently activated in SN-MN axonal connections and persistently activated in SN cell bodies, and finally, (iii) MAPK is activated in SN cell bodies and SN-MN synapses 1h after training. These data suggest that there is an intracellularly transported retrograde signal generated at the synapse which is later responsible for delayed MAPK activation at SN somata. Finally, we find that this retrograde signal requires activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) and MEK signaling cascades at the synapses.

  6. Auditory interfaces: The human perceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, H. Steven

    1991-01-01

    A brief introduction to the basic auditory abilities of the human perceiver with particular attention toward issues that may be important for the design of auditory interfaces is presented. The importance of appropriate auditory inputs to observers with normal hearing is probably related to the role of hearing as an omnidirectional, early warning system and to its role as the primary vehicle for communication of strong personal feelings.

  7. Mouse nasal epithelial innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules require taste signaling components.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Chen, Bei; Redding, Kevin M; Margolskee, Robert F; Cohen, Noam A

    2014-08-01

    We previously observed that the human bitter taste receptor T2R38 is an important component of upper respiratory innate defense because it detects acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules secreted by Gram-negative bacteria. T2R38 activation in human sinonasal epithelial cells stimulates calcium and NO signals that increase mucociliary clearance, the major physical respiratory defense against inhaled pathogens. While mice do not have a clear T2R38 ortholog, they do have bitter taste receptors capable of responding to T2R38 agonists, suggesting that T2R-mediated innate immune mechanisms may be conserved in mice. We examined whether AHLs activate calcium and NO signaling in mouse nasal epithelial cells, and utilized pharmacology, as well as cells from knockout mice lacking important components of canonical taste signal transduction pathways, to determine if AHL-stimulated responses require taste signaling molecules. We found that AHLs stimulate calcium-dependent NO production that increases mucociliary clearance and thus likely serves an innate immune role against Gram-negative bacteria. These responses require PLCβ2 and TRPM5 taste signaling components, but not α-gustducin. These data suggest the mouse may be a useful model for further studies of T2R-mediated innate immunity.

  8. Extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activated in the hippocampal CA1 neurons is critical for retrieval of auditory trace fear memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hsun; Chiang, Yu-Wei; Liang, Keng-Chen; Thompson, Richard F; Liu, Ingrid Y

    2010-04-22

    The brain regions involved with trace fear conditioning (TFC) and delayed fear conditioning (DFC) are well-characterized, but little is known about the cellular representation subsuming these types of classical conditioning. Previous evidence has shown that activation of the amygdala is required for both TFC and DFC, while TFC also involves the hippocampus for forming conditioned response to tone. Lesions of the hippocampus did not affect tone learning in DFC, but it impaired learning in TFC. Synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, underlying a cellular representation subsuming learning and memory, is in part modulated by extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. ERK1/2 activation is required for both TFC and DFC during memory formation, but whether this pathway is involved in memory retrieval of TFC is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated changes in ERK1/2 phosphorylation after memory retrieval in groups of mice that received TFC, DFC, tone-shock un-paired conditioning, and naïve control. Our results showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was elevated in the hippocampal CA1 region after retrieval of all conditioned fear responses. In particular, in the TFC group, immunohistochemistry indicated higher level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons 30min after tone testing. Inhibition of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway diminished fear memory elicited by a tone in TFC. Together these results suggest that the memory retrieval process in TFC is more dependent on ERK1/2 signaling pathway than that in DFC. ERK1/2 signaling is critical for retrieval associative memory of temporally noncontiguous stimuli.

  9. Yap1, transcription regulator in the Hippo signaling pathway, is required for Xenopus limb bud regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Tamura, Koji; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is conserved from insects to mammals and is important for multiple processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and tissue homeostasis. Hippo signaling is also crucial for regeneration, including intercalary regeneration, of the whole body in the flatworm and of the leg in the cricket. However, its role in vertebrate epimorphic regeneration is unknown. Therefore, to identify principles of regeneration that are conserved among bilaterians, we investigated the role of Hippo signaling in the limb bud regeneration of an anuran amphibian, Xenopus laevis. We found that a transcription factor, Yap1, an important downstream effector of Hippo signaling, is upregulated in the regenerating limb bud. To evaluate Yap1׳s function in limb bud regeneration, we made transgenic animals that expressed a dominant-negative form of Yap under a heat-shock promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Yap in tadpoles reduced cell proliferation, induced ectopic apoptosis, perturbed the expression domains of limb-patterning genes including hoxa13, hoxa11, and shh in the regenerating limb bud. Transient expression of a dominant-negative Yap in transgenic tadpoles also caused limb bud regeneration defects, and reduced intercalary regeneration. These results indicate that Yap1 has a crucial role in controlling the limb regenerative capacity in Xenopus, and suggest that the involvement of Hippo signaling in regeneration is conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates. This finding provides molecular evidence that common principles underlie regeneration across phyla, and may contribute to the development of new therapies in regenerative medicine.

  10. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for CNS, but not non-CNS, angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daneman, Richard; Agalliu, Dritan; Zhou, Lu; Kuhnert, Frank; Kuo, Calvin J.; Barres, Ben A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of CNS blood vessels, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CNS angiogenesis and blood−brain barrier (BBB) formation are largely unknown. Here we analyze the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in regulating the formation of CNS blood vessels. First, through the analysis of TOP-Gal Wnt reporter mice, we identify that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is specifically activated in CNS, but not non-CNS, blood vessels during development. This activation correlates with the expression of different Wnt ligands by neural progenitor cells in distinct locations throughout the CNS, including Wnt7a and Wnt7b in ventral regions and Wnt1, Wnt3, Wnt3a, and Wnt4 in dorsal regions. Blockade of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vivo specifically disrupts CNS, but not non-CNS, angiogenesis. These defects include reduction in vessel number, loss of capillary beds, and the formation of hemorrhagic vascular malformations that remain adherent to the meninges. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates the expression of the BBB-specific glucose transporter glut-1. Taken together these experiments reveal an essential role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in driving CNS-specific angiogenesis and provide molecular evidence that angiogenesis and BBB formation are in part linked. PMID:19129494

  11. Hippo signaling is required for Notch-dependent smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest

    PubMed Central

    Manderfield, Lauren J.; Aghajanian, Haig; Engleka, Kurt A.; Lim, Lillian Y.; Liu, Feiyan; Jain, Rajan; Li, Li; Olson, Eric N.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling has well-defined roles in the assembly of arterial walls and in the development of the endothelium and smooth muscle of the vasculature. Hippo signaling regulates cellular growth in many tissues, and contributes to regulation of organ size, in addition to other functions. Here, we show that the Notch and Hippo pathways converge to regulate smooth muscle differentiation of the neural crest, which is crucial for normal development of the aortic arch arteries and cranial vasculature during embryonic development. Neural crest-specific deletion of the Hippo effectors Yap and Taz produces neural crest precursors that migrate normally, but fail to produce vascular smooth muscle, and Notch target genes such as Jagged1 fail to activate normally. We show that Yap is normally recruited to a tissue-specific Jagged1 enhancer by directly interacting with the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). The Yap-NICD complex is recruited to chromatin by the DNA-binding protein Rbp-J in a Tead-independent fashion. Thus, Hippo signaling can modulate Notch signaling outputs, and components of the Hippo and Notch pathways physically interact. Convergence of Hippo and Notch pathways by the mechanisms described here might be relevant for the function of these signaling cascades in many tissues and in diseases such as cancer. PMID:26253400

  12. The effects of an auditory startle on obstacle avoidance during walking

    PubMed Central

    Queralt, Ana; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; van Duijnhoven, Hanneke J R; Castellote, Juan M; Valls-Solé, Josep; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Movement execution is speeded up when a startle auditory stimulus is applied with an imperative signal in a simple reaction time task experiment, a phenomenon described as StartReact. The effect has been recently observed in a step adjustment task requiring fast selection of specific movements in a choice reaction time task. Therefore, we hypothesized that inducing a StartReact effect may be beneficial in obstacle avoidance under time pressure, when subjects have to perform fast gait adjustments. Twelve healthy young adults walked on a treadmill and obstacles were released in specific moments of the step cycle. On average the EMG onset latency in the biceps femoris shortened by 20% while amplitude increased by 50%, in trials in which an auditory startle accompanied obstacle avoidance. The presentation of a startle increased the probability of using a long step strategy, enlarged stride length modifications and resulted in higher success rates, to avoid the obstacle. We also examined the effects of the startle in a condition in which the obstacle was not present in comparison to a condition in which the obstacle was visibly present but it did not fall. In the latter condition, the obstacle avoidance reaction occurred with a similar latency but smaller amplitude as in trials in which the obstacle was actually released. Our results suggest that the motor programmes used for obstacle avoidance are probably stored at subcortical structures. The release of these motor programmes by a startling auditory stimulus may combine intersensory facilitation and the StartReact effect. PMID:18653659

  13. Late Alk4/5/7 signaling is required for anterior skeletal patterning in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Piacentino, Michael L; Ramachandran, Janani; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal patterning in the sea urchin embryo requires a conversation between the skeletogenic primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) and the overlying pattern-dictating ectoderm; however, our understanding of the molecular basis for this process remains incomplete. Here, we show that TGF-β-receptor signaling is required during gastrulation to pattern the anterior skeleton. To block TGF-β signaling, we used SB431542 (SB43), a specific inhibitor of the TGF-β type I receptor Alk4/5/7. Treatment with SB43 during gastrulation blocks anterior PMC positioning and the formation of the anterior skeleton, but does not perturb general ectoderm specification or development. This is the first example of a signaling event required for patterning of a specific part of the skeleton. Alk4/5/7 inhibition does not prevent the formation of a mouth, although SB43-treated plutei display reduced feeding ability, presumably due to the loss of the structural support for the mouth conferred by the anterior skeleton. Both Univin and Nodal are potential ligands for Alk4/5/7; however, Nodal is unilaterally expressed on only the right side, whereas Univin is bilaterally expressed in the ectoderm adjacent to the anterior skeleton during the relevant time period. Our results demonstrate that Univin is both necessary and sufficient for secondary skeletal development in a control background, consistent with the hypothesis that Univin is a relevant Alk4/5/7 ligand for anterior skeletal patterning. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Alk4/5/7 signaling during gastrulation is required to direct PMCs to the oral hood, and suggest that Univin is a relevant ligand for this signaling event.

  14. Tomato Pto encodes a functional N-myristoylation motif that is required for signal transduction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jeroen S; Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Wu, Ai-Jiuan; Rathjen, John P

    2006-01-01

    Pto kinase of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato expressing avrPto or avrPtoB. Pto interacts directly with these type-III secreted effectors, leading to induction of defence responses including the hypersensitive response (HR). Signalling by Pto requires the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) protein Prf. Little is known of how Pto is controlled prior to or during stimulation, although kinase activity is required for Avr-dependent activation. Here we demonstrate a role for the N-terminus in signalling by Pto. N-terminal residues outside the kinase domain were required for induction of the HR in Nicotiana benthamiana. The N-terminus also contributed to both AvrPto-binding and phosphorylation abilities. Pto residues 1-10 comprise a consensus motif for covalent attachment of myristate, a hydrophobic 14-carbon saturated fatty acid, to the Gly-2 residue. Several lines of evidence indicate that this motif is important for Pto function. A heterologous N-myristoylation motif complemented N-terminal deletion mutants of Pto for Prf-dependent signalling. Signalling by wild-type and mutant forms of Pto was strictly dependent on the Gly-2 residue. The N-myristoylation motif of Pto complemented the cognate motif of AvrPto for avirulence function and membrane association. Furthermore, Pto was myristoylated in vivo dependent on the presence of Gly-2. The subcellular localization of Pto was independent of N-myristoylation, indicating that N-myristoylation is required for some function other than membrane affinity. Consistent with this idea, AvrPtoB was also found to be a soluble protein. The data indicate an important role(s) for the myristoylated N-terminus in Pto signalling.

  15. Growth differentiation factor 9 signaling requires ERK1/2 activity in mouse granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Ritter, Lesley J; Nguyen, Thao M; Liu, Fang; Mottershead, David G; Russell, Darryl L; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2010-09-15

    Ovarian folliculogenesis is driven by the combined action of endocrine cues and paracrine factors. The oocyte secretes powerful mitogens, such as growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), that regulate granulosa cell proliferation, metabolism, steroidogenesis and differentiation. This study investigated the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2; also known as MAPK3/1) signaling pathway on GDF9 action on granulosa cells. Results show that mitogenic action of the oocyte is prevented by pharmacological inhibition of the EGFR-ERK1/2 pathway. Importantly, EGFR-ERK1/2 activity as well as rous sarcoma oncogene family kinases (SFK) are required for signaling through SMADs, mediating GDF9, activin A and TGFbeta1 mitogenic action in granulosa cells. GDF9 could not activate ERK1/2 or affect EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 in granulosa cells. However, induction of the SMAD3-specific CAGA reporter by GDF9 in granulosa cells required active EGFR, SFKs and ERK1/2 as did GDF9-responsive gene expression. Finally, the EGFR-SFKs-ERK1/2 pathway was shown to be required for the maintenance of phosphorylation of the SMAD3 linker region. Together our results suggest that receptivity of granulosa cells to oocyte-secreted factors, including GDF9, is regulated by the level of activation of the EGFR and resulting ERK1/2 activity, through the requisite permissive phosphorylation of SMAD3 in the linker region. Our results indicate that oocyte-secreted TGFbeta-like ligands and EGFR-ERK1/2 signaling are cooperatively required for the unique granulosa cell response to the signal from oocytes mediating granulosa cell survival and proliferation and hence the promotion of follicle growth and ovulation.

  16. DAT isn’t all that: cocaine reward and reinforcement requires Toll Like Receptor 4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Northcutt, A.L.; Hutchinson, M.R.; Wang, X.; Baratta, M.V.; Hiranita, T.; Cochran, T.A.; Pomrenze, M.B.; Galer, E.L.; Kopajtic, T.A.; Li, C.M.; Amat, J.; Larson, G.; Cooper, D.C.; Huang, Y.; O’Neill, C.E.; Yin, H.; Zahniser, N.R.; Katz, J.L.; Rice, K.C.; Maier, S.F.; Bachtell, R.K.; Watkins, L.R.

    2014-01-01

    The initial reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, are largely attributed to their ability to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. Resulting increases in extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) are traditionally thought to result from cocaine’s ability to block dopamine transporters (DATs). Here we demonstrate that cocaine also interacts with the immunosurveillance receptor complex, Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4), on microglial cells to initiate central innate immune signaling. Disruption of cocaine signaling at TLR4 suppresses cocaine-induced extracellular dopamine in the NAc, as well as cocaine conditioned place preference and cocaine self-administration. These results provide a novel understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying cocaine reward/reinforcement that includes a critical role for central immune signaling, and offer a new target for medication development for cocaine abuse treatment. PMID:25644383

  17. [Analysis of auditory information in the brain of the cetacean].

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2006-01-01

    The cetacean brain specifics involve an exceptional development of the auditory neural centres. The place of projection sensory areas including the auditory that in the cetacean brain cortex is essentially different from that in other mammals. The EP characteristics indicated presence of several functional divisions in the auditory cortex. Physiological studies of the cetacean auditory centres were mainly performed using the EP technique. Of several types of the EPs, the short-latency auditory EP was most thoroughly studied. In cetacean, it is characterised by exceptionally high temporal resolution with the integration time about 0.3 ms which corresponds to the cut-off frequency 1700 Hz. This much exceeds the temporal resolution of the hearing in terranstrial mammals. The frequency selectivity of hearing in cetacean was measured using a number of variants of the masking technique. The hearing frequency selectivity acuity in cetacean exceeds that of most terraneous mammals (excepting the bats). This acute frequency selectivity provides the differentiation among the finest spectral patterns of auditory signals.

  18. Heritability of Non-Speech Auditory Processing Skills

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher K.; King, Kelly A.; Zobay, Oliver; Riley, Alison; Ferguson, Melanie A.; Bird, Jonathan E.; McCabe, Margaret M.; Hood, Linda J.; Drayna, Dennis; Griffith, Andrew J.; Morell, Robert J.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Moore, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent insight into the genetic bases for autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, stuttering and language disorders suggest that neurogenetic approaches may also reveal at least one etiology of auditory processing disorder (APD). A person with an APD typically has difficulty understanding speech in background noise despite having normal pure-tone hearing sensitivity. The estimated prevalence of APD may be as high as 10% in the pediatric population, yet the causes are unknown and have not been explored by molecular or genetic approaches. The aim of our study was to determine the heritability of frequency and temporal resolution for auditory signals and speech recognition in noise in 96 identical or fraternal twin-pairs, aged 6-11 years. Measures of auditory processing of non-speech sounds included backward masking (temporal resolution), notched noise masking (spectral resolution), pure-tone frequency discrimination (temporal fine structure sensitivity), and nonsense syllable recognition in noise. We provide evidence of significant heritability, ranging from 0.32-0.74, for individual measures of these non-speech based auditory processing skills that are crucial for understanding of spoken language. Identification of specific heritable auditory processing traits such as these serve as a basis to pursue the genetic underpinnings of APD by identifying genetic variants associated with common auditory processing disorders in children and adults. PMID:26883091

  19. Listening to another sense: somatosensory integration in the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Calvin; Stefanescu, Roxana A; Martel, David T; Shore, Susan E

    2015-07-01

    Conventionally, sensory systems are viewed as separate entities, each with its own physiological process serving a different purpose. However, many functions require integrative inputs from multiple sensory systems and sensory intersection and convergence occur throughout the central nervous system. The neural processes for hearing perception undergo significant modulation by the two other major sensory systems, vision and somatosensation. This synthesis occurs at every level of the ascending auditory pathway: the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus, medial geniculate body and the auditory cortex. In this review, we explore the process of multisensory integration from (1) anatomical (inputs and connections), (2) physiological (cellular responses), (3) functional and (4) pathological aspects. We focus on the convergence between auditory and somatosensory inputs in each ascending auditory station. This review highlights the intricacy of sensory processing and offers a multisensory perspective regarding the understanding of sensory disorders.

  20. The Central Auditory Processing Kit[TM]. Book 1: Auditory Memory [and] Book 2: Auditory Discrimination, Auditory Closure, and Auditory Synthesis [and] Book 3: Auditory Figure-Ground, Auditory Cohesion, Auditory Binaural Integration, and Compensatory Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokhemar, Mary Ann

    This kit for assessing central auditory processing disorders (CAPD), in children in grades 1 through 8 includes 3 books, 14 full-color cards with picture scenes, and a card depicting a phone key pad, all contained in a sturdy carrying case. The units in each of the three books correspond with auditory skill areas most commonly addressed in…

  1. Auditory Discrimination and Auditory Sensory Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Catherine R. G.; Happe, Francesca; Baird, Gillian; Simonoff, Emily; Marsden, Anita J. S.; Tregay, Jenifer; Phillips, Rebecca J.; Goswami, Usha; Thomson, Jennifer M.; Charman, Tony

    2009-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that auditory processing may be enhanced in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We tested auditory discrimination ability in 72 adolescents with ASD (39 childhood autism; 33 other ASD) and 57 IQ and age-matched controls, assessing their capacity for successful discrimination of the frequency, intensity and duration…

  2. Development of auditory localization accuracy and auditory spatial discrimination in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kühnle, S; Ludwig, A A; Meuret, S; Küttner, C; Witte, C; Scholbach, J; Fuchs, M; Rübsamen, R

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the development of two parameters of spatial acoustic perception in children and adolescents with normal hearing, aged 6-18 years. Auditory localization accuracy was quantified by means of a sound source identification task and auditory spatial discrimination acuity by measuring minimum audible angles (MAA). Both low- and high-frequency noise bursts were employed in the tests, thereby separately addressing auditory processing based on interaural time and intensity differences. Setup consisted of 47 loudspeakers mounted in the frontal azimuthal hemifield, ranging from 90° left to 90° right (-90°, +90°). Target signals were presented from 8 loudspeaker positions in the left and right hemifields (±4°, ±30°, ±60° and ±90°). Localization accuracy and spatial discrimination acuity showed different developmental courses. Localization accuracy remained stable from the age of 6 onwards. In contrast, MAA thresholds and interindividual variability of spatial discrimination decreased significantly with increasing age. Across all age groups, localization was most accurate and MAA thresholds were lower for frontal than for lateral sound sources, and for low-frequency compared to high-frequency noise bursts. The study also shows better performance in spatial hearing based on interaural time differences rather than on intensity differences throughout development. These findings confirm that specific aspects of central auditory processing show continuous development during childhood up to adolescence.

  3. The plastic ear and perceptual relearning in auditory spatial perception

    PubMed Central

    Carlile, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The auditory system of adult listeners has been shown to accommodate to altered spectral cues to sound location which presumably provides the basis for recalibration to changes in the shape of the ear over a life time. Here we review the role of auditory and non-auditory inputs to the perception of sound location and consider a range of recent experiments looking at the role of non-auditory inputs in the process of accommodation to these altered spectral cues. A number of studies have used small ear molds to modify the spectral cues that result in significant degradation in localization performance. Following chronic exposure (10–60 days) performance recovers to some extent and recent work has demonstrated that this occurs for both audio-visual and audio-only regions of space. This begs the questions as to the teacher signal for this remarkable functional plasticity in the adult nervous system. Following a brief review of influence of the motor state in auditory localization, we consider the potential role of auditory-motor learning in the perceptual recalibration of the spectral cues. Several recent studies have considered how multi-modal and sensory-motor feedback might influence accommodation to altered spectral cues produced by ear molds or through virtual auditory space stimulation using non-individualized spectral cues. The work with ear molds demonstrates that a relatively short period of training involving audio-motor feedback (5–10 days) significantly improved both the rate and extent of accommodation to altered spectral cues. This has significant implications not only for the mechanisms by which this complex sensory information is encoded to provide spatial cues but also for adaptive training to altered auditory inputs. The review concludes by considering the implications for rehabilitative training with hearing aids and cochlear prosthesis. PMID:25147497

  4. Male germline stem cell division and spermatocyte growth require insulin signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ueishi, Satoru; Shimizu, Hanako; H Inoue, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in Drosophila commences with cell division of germline stem cells (GSCs) to produce male germline cells at the tip of the testis. However, molecular mechanisms inducing division of male GSCs have not been reported. Insulin-like peptides are known to play an essential role in stimulation of proliferation and growth of somatic cells, and it has recently been reported that such peptides promote cell division in female Drosophila GSCs. However, their effects on male germline cells have not been characterized. We found that inhibition of insulin production and insulin signaling mutations resulted in decreased numbers of germline cells in Drosophila testes. GSC numbers were maintained in young mutant males, with a gradual decrease in abundance of GSCs with age. Furthermore, in mutants, fewer germline cysts originated from GSCs and a lower frequency of GSC division was seen. Insulin signaling was found to promote cell cycle progression of the male GSCs at the G(2)/M phase. The cell volume of spermatocytes increases up to 25 times before initiation of meiosis in Drosophila. We examined whether insulin signaling extrinsically induces the greatest cell growth in Drosophila diploid cells and found that spermatocyte growth was affected in mutants. The results indicate that in addition to its function in somatic cells, insulin signaling plays an essential role in cell proliferation and growth during male Drosophila gametogenesis and that sperm production is regulated by hormonal control via insulin-like peptides.

  5. A Requirement for ZAK Kinase Activity in Canonical TGF-β Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nyati, Shyam; Chator, Areeb; Schinske, Katerina; Gregg, Brandon S; Ross, Brian Dale; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2016-12-01

    The sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper containing kinase ZAK (AZK, MLT, MLK7), is a MAPK-kinase kinase (MKKK). Like most MAPKKKs which are known to activate the c-Jun. amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, ZAK has been shown to participate in the transduction of Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated non-canonical signaling. A role for ZAK in SMAD-dependent, canonical TGF-β signaling has not been previously appreciated. Using a combination of functional genomics and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that ZAK regulates canonical TGFβRI/II signaling in lung and breast cancer cell lines and may serve as a key node in the regulation of TGFBR kinase activity. Remarkably, we demonstrate that siRNA mediated depletion of ZAK strongly inhibited TGF-β dependent SMAD2/3 activation and subsequent promoter activation (SMAD binding element driven luciferase expression; SBE4-Luc). A ZAK specific inhibitor (DHP-2), dose-dependently activated the bioluminescent TGFBR-kinase activity reporter (BTR), blocked TGF-β induced SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and SBE4-Luc activation and cancer cell-invasion. In aggregate, these findings identify a novel role for the ZAK kinase in canonical TGF-β signaling and an invasive cancer cell phenotype thus providing a novel target for TGF-β inhibition.

  6. Epsin is required for Dishevelled stability and Wnt signalling activation in colon cancer development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Baojun; Tessneer, Kandice L; McManus, John; Liu, Xiaolei; Hahn, Scott; Pasula, Satish; Wu, Hao; Song, Hoogeun; Chen, Yiyuan; Cai, Xiaofeng; Dong, Yunzhou; Brophy, Megan L; Rahman, Ruby; Ma, Jian-Xing; Xia, Lijun; Chen, Hong

    2015-03-16

    Uncontrolled canonical Wnt signalling supports colon epithelial tumour expansion and malignant transformation. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms involved is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of and will provide new therapeutic targets for colon cancer. Epsins are ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins upregulated in several human cancers; however, the involvement of epsins in colon cancer is unknown. Here we show that loss of intestinal epithelial epsins protects against colon cancer by significantly reducing the stability of the crucial Wnt signalling effector, dishevelled (Dvl2), and impairing Wnt signalling. Consistently, epsins and Dvl2 are correspondingly upregulated in colon cancer. Mechanistically, epsin binds Dvl2 via its epsin N-terminal homology domain and ubiquitin-interacting motifs and prohibits Dvl2 polyubiquitination and degradation. Our findings reveal an unconventional role for epsins in stabilizing Dvl2 and potentiating Wnt signalling in colon cancer cells to ensure robust colon cancer progression. The pro-carcinogenic role of Epsins suggests that they are potential therapeutic targets to combat colon cancer.

  7. Norepinephrine Modulates Coding of Complex Vocalizations in the Songbird Auditory Cortex Independent of Local Neuroestrogen Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Maaya Z; Jeon, Sung David; Cowell, Rosemary A; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-06-24

    The catecholamine norepinephrine plays a significant role in auditory processing. Most studies to date have examined the effects of norepinephrine on the neuronal response to relatively simple stimuli, such as tones and calls. It is less clear how norepinephrine shapes the detection of complex syntactical sounds, as well as the coding properties of sensory neurons. Songbirds provide an opportunity to understand how auditory neurons encode complex, learned vocalizations, and the potential role of norepinephrine in modulating the neuronal computations for acoustic communication. Here, we infused norepinephrine into the zebra finch auditory cortex and performed extracellular recordings to study the modulation of song representations in single neurons. Consistent with its proposed role in enhancing signal detection, norepinephrine decreased spontaneous activity and firing during stimuli, yet it significantly enhanced the auditory signal-to-noise ratio. These effects were all mimicked by clonidine, an α-2 receptor agonist. Moreover, a pattern classifier analysis indicated that norepinephrine enhanced the ability of single neurons to accurately encode complex auditory stimuli. Because neuroestrogens are also known to enhance auditory processing in the songbird brain, we tested the hypothesis that norepinephrine actions depend on local estrogen synthesis. Neither norepinephrine nor adrenergic receptor antagonist infusion into the auditory cortex had detectable effects on local estradiol levels. Moreover, pretreatment with fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, did not block norepinephrine's neuromodulatory effects. Together, these findings indicate that norepinephrine enhances signal detection and information encoding for complex auditory stimuli by suppressing spontaneous "noise" activity and that these actions are independent of local neuroestrogen synthesis.

  8. Auditory Reserve and the Legacy of Auditory Experience

    PubMed Central

    Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Musical training during childhood has been linked to more robust encoding of sound later in life. We take this as evidence for an auditory reserve: a mechanism by which individuals capitalize on earlier life experiences to promote auditory processing. We assert that early auditory experiences guide how the reserve develops and is maintained over the lifetime. Experiences that occur after childhood, or which are limited in nature, are theorized to affect the reserve, although their influence on sensory processing may be less long-lasting and may potentially fade over time if not repeated. This auditory reserve may help to explain individual differences in how individuals cope with auditory impoverishment or loss of sensorineural function. PMID:25405381

  9. B-cell homeostasis requires complementary CD22 and BLyS/BR3 survival signals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan H.; Haas, Karen M.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Yanaba, Koichi; Ward, Christopher D.; Migone, Thi-Sau

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral B-cell numbers are tightly regulated by homeostatic mechanisms that influence the transitional and mature B-cell compartments and dictate the size and clonotypic diversity of the B-cell repertoire. B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS, a trademark of Human Genome Sciences, Inc.) plays a key role in regulating peripheral B-cell homeostasis. CD22 also promotes peripheral B-cell survival through ligand-dependent mechanisms. The B-cell subsets affected by the absence of BLyS and CD22 signals overlap, suggesting that BLyS- and CD22-mediated survival are intertwined. To examine this, the effects of BLyS insufficiency following neutralizing BLyS mAb treatment in mice also treated with CD22 ligand-blocking mAb were examined. Combined targeting of the BLyS and CD22 survival pathways led to significantly greater clearance of recirculating bone marrow, blood, marginal zone and follicular B cells than either treatment alone. Likewise, BLyS blockade further reduced bone marrow, blood and spleen B-cell numbers in CD22−/− mice. Notably, BLyS receptor expression and downstream signaling were normal in CD22−/− B cells, suggesting that CD22 does not directly alter BLyS responsiveness. CD22 survival signals were likewise intact in the absence of BLyS, as CD22 mAb treatment depleted blood B cells from mice with impaired BLyS receptor 3 (BR3) signaling. Finally, enforced BclxL expression, which rescues BR3 impairment, did not affect B-cell depletion following CD22 mAb treatment. Thus, the current studies support a model whereby CD22 and BLyS promote the survival of overlapping B-cell subsets but contribute to their maintenance through independent and complementary signaling pathways. PMID:20513733

  10. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  11. Auditory short-term memory activation during score reading.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Veerle L; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Performing music on the basis of reading a score requires reading ahead of what is being played in order to anticipate the necessary actions to produce the notes. Score reading thus not only involves the decoding of a visual score and the comparison to the auditory feedback, but also short-term storage of the musical information due to the delay of the auditory feedback during reading ahead. This study investigates the mechanisms of encoding of musical information in short-term memory during such a complicated procedure. There were three parts in this study. First, professional musicians participated in an electroencephalographic (EEG) experiment to study the slow wave potentials during a time interval of short-term memory storage in a situation that requires cross-modal translation and short-term storage of visual material to be compared with delayed auditory material, as it is the case in music score reading. This delayed visual-to-auditory matching task was compared with delayed visual-visual and auditory-auditory matching tasks in terms of EEG topography and voltage amplitudes. Second, an additional behavioural experiment was performed to determine which type of distractor would be the most interfering with the score reading-like task. Third, the self-reported strategies of the participants were also analyzed. All three parts of this study point towards the same conclusion according to which during music score reading, the musician most likely first translates the visual score into an auditory cue, probably starting around 700 or 1300 ms, ready for storage and delayed comparison with the auditory feedback.

  12. Auditory Short-Term Memory Activation during Score Reading

    PubMed Central

    Simoens, Veerle L.; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Performing music on the basis of reading a score requires reading ahead of what is being played in order to anticipate the necessary actions to produce the notes. Score reading thus not only involves the decoding of a visual score and the comparison to the auditory feedback, but also short-term storage of the musical information due to the delay of the auditory feedback during reading ahead. This study investigates the mechanisms of encoding of musical information in short-term memory during such a complicated procedure. There were three parts in this study. First, professional musicians participated in an electroencephalographic (EEG) experiment to study the slow wave potentials during a time interval of short-term memory storage in a situation that requires cross-modal translation and short-term storage of visual material to be compared with delayed auditory material, as it is the case in music score reading. This delayed visual-to-auditory matching task was compared with delayed visual-visual and auditory-auditory matching tasks in terms of EEG topography and voltage amplitudes. Second, an additional behavioural experiment was performed to determine which type of distractor would be the most interfering with the score reading-like task. Third, the self-reported strategies of the participants were also analyzed. All three parts of this study point towards the same conclusion according to which during music score reading, the musician most likely first translates the visual score into an auditory cue, probably starting around 700 or 1300 ms, ready for storage and delayed comparison with the auditory feedback. PMID:23326487

  13. BMP2 signals loss of epithelial character in epicardial cells but requires the Type III TGFβ receptor to promote invasion.

    PubMed

    Hill, Cynthia R; Sanchez, Nora S; Love, Joseph D; Arrieta, Julian A; Hong, Charles C; Brown, Christopher B; Austin, Anita F; Barnett, Joey V

    2012-05-01

    Coronary vessel development depends on a subpopulation of epicardial cells that undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and invade the subepicardial space and myocardium. These cells form the smooth muscle of the vessels and fibroblasts, but the mechanisms that regulate these processes are poorly understood. Mice lacking the Type III Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor (TGFβR3) die by E14.5 due to failed coronary vessel development accompanied by reduced epicardial cell invasion. BMP2 signals via TGFβR3 emphasizing the importance of determining the relative contributions of the canonical BMP signaling pathway and TGFβR3-dependent signaling to BMP2 responsiveness. Here we examined the role of TGFβR3 in BMP2 signaling in epicardial cells. Whereas TGFβ induced loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle differentiation, BMP2 induced an ALK3-dependent loss of epithelial character and modestly inhibited TGFβ-stimulated differentiation. Tgfbr3(-/-) cells respond to BMP2 indicating that TGFβR3 is not required. However, Tgfbr3(-/-) cells show decreased invasion in response to BMP2 and overexpression of TGFβR3 in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells rescued invasion. Invasion was dependent on ALK5, ALK2, ALK3, and Smad4. Expression of TGFβR3 lacking the 3 C-terminal amino acids required to interact with the scaffolding protein GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) did not rescue. Knockdown of GIPC in Tgfbr3(+/+) or Tgfbr3(-/-) cells rescued with TGFβR3 decreased BMP2-stimulated invasion confirming a requirement for TGFβR3/GIPC interaction. Our results reveal the relative roles of TGFβR3-dependent and TGFβR3-independent signaling in the actions of BMP2 on epicardial cell behavior and demonstrate the critical role of TGFβR3 in mediating BMP2-stimulated invasion.

  14. Disheveled mediated planar cell polarity signaling is required in the second heart field lineage for outflow tract morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Tanvi; Wang, Bing; Evans, Sylvia; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-10-01

    Disheveled (Dvl) is a key regulator of both the canonical Wnt and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Previous genetic studies in mice indicated that outflow tract (OFT) formation requires Dvl1 and 2, but it was unclear which pathway was involved and whether Dvl1/2-mediated signaling was required in the second heart field (SHF) or the cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineage, both of which are critical for OFT development. In this study, we used Dvl1/2 null mice and a set of Dvl2 BAC transgenes that function in a pathway-specific fashion to demonstrate that Dvl1/2-mediated PCP signaling is essential for OFT formation. Lineage-specific gene-ablation further indicated that Dvl1/2 function is dispensable in the CNC, but required in the SHF for OFT lengthening to promote cardiac looping. Mutating the core PCP gene Vangl2 and non-canonical Wnt gene Wnt5a recapitulated the OFT morphogenesis defects observed in Dvl1/2 mutants. Consistent with genetic interaction studies suggesting that Wnt5a signals through the PCP pathway, Dvl1/2 and Wnt5a mutants display aberrant cell packing and defective actin polymerization and filopodia formation specifically in SHF cells in the caudal splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), where Wnt5a and Dvl2 are co-expressed specifically. Our results reveal a critical role of PCP signaling in the SHF during early OFT lengthening and cardiac looping and suggest that a Wnt5a→ Dvl PCP signaling cascade may regulate actin polymerization and protrusive cell behavior in the caudal SpM to promote SHF deployment, OFT lengthening and cardiac looping.

  15. Disheveled Mediated Planar Cell Polarity Signaling is Required in the Second Heart Field Lineage for Outflow Tract Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Tanvi; Wang, Bing; Evans, Sylvia; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    Disheveled (Dvl) is a key regulator of both the canonical Wnt and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Previous genetic studies in mice indicated that outflow tract (OFT) formation requires Dvl1 and 2, but it was unclear which pathway was involved and whether Dvl1/2-mediated signaling was required in the second heart field (SHF) or the cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineage, both of which are critical for OFT development. In this study, we used Dvl1/2 null mice and a set of Dvl2 BAC transgenes that function in a pathway-specific fashion to demonstrate that Dvl1/2-mediated PCP signaling is essential for OFT formation. Lineage-specific gene ablation further indicated that Dvl1/2 function is dispensable in the CNC, but required in the SHF for OFT lengthening to promote cardiac looping. Mutating the core PCP gene Vangl2 and non-canonical Wnt gene Wnt5a recapitulated the OFT morphogenesis defects observed in Dvl1/2 mutants. Consistent with genetic interaction studies suggesting that Wnt5a signals through the PCP pathway, Dvl1/2 and Wnt5a mutants display aberrant cell packing and defective actin polymerization and filopodia formation specifically in SHF cells in the caudal splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), where Wnt5a and Dvl2 are co-expressed specifically. Our results reveal a critical role of PCP signaling in the SHF during early OFT lengthening and cardiac looping and suggest that a Wnt5a→ Dvl PCP signaling cascade may regulate actin polymerization and protrusive cell behavior in the caudal SpM to promote SHF deployment, OFT lengthening and cardiac looping. PMID:22841628

  16. Auditory, visual, and auditory-visual perception of emotions by individuals with cochlear implants, hearing AIDS, and normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Most, Tova; Aviner, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of cochlear implant (CI) with regard to emotion perception of participants differing in their age of implantation, in comparison to hearing aid users and adolescents with normal hearing (NH). Emotion perception was examined by having the participants identify happiness, anger, surprise, sadness, fear, and disgust. The emotional content was placed upon the same neutral sentence. The stimuli were presented in auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual modes. The results revealed better auditory identification by the participants with NH in comparison to all groups of participants with hearing loss (HL). No differences were found among the groups with HL in each of the 3 modes. Although auditory-visual perception was better than visual-only perception for the participants with NH, no such differentiation was found among the participants with HL. The results question the efficiency of some currently used CIs in providing the acoustic cues required to identify the speaker's emotional state.

  17. Auditory spectro-temporal pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Joseph W.

    1992-05-01

    The long-term aim of this project is a better understanding of auditory processes which use across frequency or across-ear temporal envelope difference cues to aid performance. Specific areas of investigation include comodulation masking release (CMR), the masking-level difference (MLD), temporal resolution, and the processing of amplitude and frequency modulation. The goal of the first proposed experiment is to examine the possible relation between CMR and auditory phenomena related to auditory scene analysis; the goal of the second experiment is to examine the possible relation between CMR and the MLD for narrowband noise maskers; the goal of the third experiment is to determine the extent to which across-frequency correlation of temporal envelope may influence gap detection for wideband stimuli; the goal of the fourth experiment is to determine whether masking release can be derived from cues based upon across-frequency coherence of frequency modulation; and the goal of the fifth experiment is to examine a modulation masking phenomenon related to frequency modulation. The tasks will be signal detection in masking noise, temporal gap detection, and the detection of frequency modulation. Testing will be performed in a sound-treated room, using a 3AFC adaptive procedure.

  18. Issues in Human Auditory Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Lynne A.

    2007-01-01

    The human auditory system is often portrayed as precocious in its development. In fact, many aspects of basic auditory processing appear to be adult-like by the middle of the first year of postnatal life. However, processes such as attention and sound source determination take much longer to develop. Immaturity of higher-level processes limits the…

  19. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  20. Auditory neglect and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Dykstra, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Neglect is a neurologic disorder, typically associated with lesions of the right hemisphere, in which patients are biased towards their ipsilesional - usually right - side of space while awareness for their contralesional - usually left - side is reduced or absent. Neglect is a multimodal disorder that often includes deficits in the auditory domain. Classically, auditory extinction, in which left-sided sounds that are correctly perceived in isolation are not detected in the presence of synchronous right-sided stimulation, has been considered the primary sign of auditory neglect. However, auditory extinction can also be observed after unilateral auditory cortex lesions and is thus not specific for neglect. Recent research has shown that patients with neglect are also impaired in maintaining sustained attention, on both sides, a fact that is reflected by an impairment of auditory target detection in continuous stimulation conditions. Perhaps the most impressive auditory symptom in full-blown neglect is alloacusis, in which patients mislocalize left-sided sound sources to their right, although even patients with less severe neglect still often show disturbance of auditory spatial perception, most commonly a lateralization bias towards the right. We discuss how these various disorders may be explained by a single model of neglect and review emerging interventions for patient rehabilitation.

  1. Integration of hormonal signaling networks and mobile microRNAs is required for vascular patterning in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Daniele; Mellor, Nathan; Pound, Michael P.; Help, Hanna; Lucas, Mikaël; Chopard, Jérôme; Byrne, Helen M.; Godin, Christophe; Hodgman, T. Charlie; King, John R.; Pridmore, Tony P.; Helariutta, Ykä; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Bishopp, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    As multicellular organisms grow, positional information is continually needed to regulate the pattern in which cells are arranged. In the Arabidopsis root, most cell types are organized in a radially symmetric pattern; however, a symmetry-breaking event generates bisymmetric auxin and cytokinin signaling domains in the stele. Bidirectional cross-talk between the stele and the surrounding tissues involving a mobile transcription factor, SHORT ROOT (SHR), and mobile microRNA species also determines vascular pattern, but it is currently unclear how these signals integrate. We use a multicellular model to determine a minimal set of components necessary for maintaining a stable vascular pattern. Simulations perturbing the signaling network show that, in addition to the mutually inhibitory interaction between auxin and cytokinin, signaling through SHR, microRNA165/6, and PHABULOSA is required to maintain a stable bisymmetric pattern. We have verified this prediction by observing loss of bisymmetry in shr mutants. The model reveals the importance of several features of the network, namely the mutual degradation of microRNA165/6 and PHABULOSA and the existence of an additional negative regulator of cytokinin signaling. These components form a plausible mechanism capable of patterning vascular tissues in the absence of positional inputs provided by the transport of hormones from the shoot. PMID:24381155

  2. Gonocytes-to-spermatogonia transition initiates prior to birth in murine testes and it requires FGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Pui, Han Pin; Saga, Yumiko

    2017-03-21

    Spermatogenesis is a continuous and highly coordinated process of spermatozoa production. In mice, this process is believed to initiate shortly after birth with the emergence of nascent spermatogonia in the testes. However, because the nascent spermatogonia originated from the gonocytes are morphologically indistinguishable from their predecessors and there is no clear definition for the gonocytes-to-spermatogonia transition (GST), it remains unclear when and how spermatogenesis is initiated in the mouse testes. To address these questions, we characterized the emergence of nascent spermatogonia in ICR mice. We found that GST is initiated in a subset of gonocytes as early as E18.5. These nascent spermatogonia express markers typical of undifferentiated spermatogonia residing in testes of adult mice. In addition to markers expression, we identified FOXO1 nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation as a novel feature of GST distinguishing nascent spermatogonia from the gonocytes. Using those criteria, we demonstrated that GST requires FGF signaling. When FGF signaling was inhibited pharmacologically, gonocytes retained nuclear FOXO1 expression, did not express spermatogonial markers and failed to proliferate. We found that FGF signaling acts upstream of GDNF and RA signalings for the activation of the MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways in germ cells during GST. Taken together, we defined the precise timing of GST and revealed FGF signaling as a master regulator of GST in the perinatal mouse testes.

  3. Effects of the audiovisual conflict on auditory early processes.

    PubMed

    Scannella, Sébastien; Causse, Mickaël; Chauveau, Nicolas; Pastor, Josette; Dehais, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Auditory alarm misperception is one of the critical events that lead aircraft pilots to an erroneous flying decision. The rarity of these alarms associated with their possible unreliability may play a role in this misperception. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we manipulated both audiovisual conflict and sound rarity in a simplified landing task. Behavioral data and event related potentials (ERPs) of thirteen healthy participants were analyzed. We found that the presentation of a rare auditory signal (i.e., an alarm), incongruent with visual information, led to a smaller amplitude of the auditory N100 (i.e., less negative) compared to the condition in which both signals were congruent. Moreover, the incongruity between the visual information and the rare sound did not significantly affect reaction times, suggesting that the rare sound was neglected. We propose that the lower N100 amplitude reflects an early visual-to-auditory gating that depends on the rarity of the sound. In complex aircraft environments, this early effect might be partly responsible for auditory alarm insensitivity. Our results provide a new basis for future aeronautic studies and the development of countermeasures.

  4. Auditory selective attention to speech modulates activity in the visual word form area.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Yuliya N; Zevin, Jason D; Maurer, Urs; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2010-03-01

    Selective attention to speech versus nonspeech signals in complex auditory input could produce top-down modulation of cortical regions previously linked to perception of spoken, and even visual, words. To isolate such top-down attentional effects, we contrasted 2 equally challenging active listening tasks, performed on the same complex auditory stimuli (words overlaid with a series of 3 tones). Instructions required selectively attending to either the speech signals (in service of rhyme judgment) or the melodic signals (tone-triplet matching). Selective attention to speech, relative to attention to melody, was associated with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) increases during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in left inferior frontal gyrus, temporal regions, and the visual word form area (VWFA). Further investigation of the activity in visual regions revealed overall deactivation relative to baseline rest for both attention conditions. Topographic analysis demonstrated that while attending to melody drove deactivation equivalently across all fusiform regions of interest examined, attending to speech produced a regionally specific modulation: deactivation of all fusiform regions, except the VWFA. Results indicate that selective attention to speech can topographically tune extrastriate cortex, leading to increased activity in VWFA relative to surrounding regions, in line with the well-established connectivity between areas related to spoken and visual word perception in skilled readers.

  5. Is silence golden? Effects of auditory stimuli and their absence on adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kirste, Imke; Nicola, Zeina; Kronenberg, Golo; Walker, Tara L; Liu, Robert C; Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    We have previously hypothesized that the reason why physical activity increases precursor cell proliferation in adult neurogenesis is that movement serves as non-specific signal to evoke the alertness required to meet cognitive demands. Thereby a pool of immature neurons is generated that are potentially recruitable by subsequent cognitive stimuli. Along these lines, we here tested whether auditory stimuli might exert a similar non-specific effect on adult neurogenesis in mice. We used the standard noise level in the animal facility as baseline and compared this condition to white noise, pup calls, and silence. In addition, as patterned auditory stimulus without ethological relevance to mice we used piano music by Mozart (KV 448). All stimuli were transposed to the frequency range of C57BL/6 and hearing was objectified with acoustic evoked potentials. We found that except for white noise all stimuli, including silence, increased precursor cell proliferation (assessed 24 h after labeling with bromodeoxyuridine, BrdU). This could be explained by significant increases in BrdU-labeled Sox2-positive cells (type-1/2a). But after 7 days, only silence remained associated with increased numbers of BrdU-labeled cells. Compared to controls at this stage, exposure to silence had generated significantly increased numbers of BrdU/NeuN-labeled neurons. Our results indicate that the unnatural absence of auditory input as well as spectrotemporally rich albeit ethological irrelevant stimuli activate precursor cells-in the case of silence also leading to greater numbers of newborn immature neurons-whereas ambient and unstructured background auditory stimuli do not.

  6. Attentional modulation and domain-specificity underlying the neural organization of auditory categorical perception.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Walker, Breya S

    2017-03-01

    Categorical perception (CP) is highly evident in audition when listeners' perception of speech sounds abruptly shifts identity despite equidistant changes in stimulus acoustics. While CP is an inherent property of speech perception, how (if) it is expressed in other auditory modalities (e.g., music) is less clear. Moreover, prior neuroimaging studies have been equivocal on whether attentional engagement is necessary for the brain to categorically organize sound. To address these questions, we recorded neuroelectric brain responses [event-related potentials (ERPs)] from listeners as they rapidly categorized sounds along a speech and music continuum (active task) or during passive listening. Behaviorally, listeners' achieved sharper psychometric functions and faster identification for speech than musical stimuli, which was perceived in a continuous mode. Behavioral results coincided with stronger ERP differentiation between prototypical and ambiguous tokens (i.e., categorical processing) for speech but not for music. Neural correlates of CP were only observed when listeners actively attended to the auditory signal. These findings were corroborated by brain-behavior associations; changes in neural activity predicted more successful CP (psychometric slopes) for active but not passively evoked ERPs. Our results demonstrate auditory categorization is influenced by attention (active > passive) and is stronger for more familiar/overlearned stimulus domains (speech > music). In contrast to previous studies examining highly trained listeners (i.e., musicians), we infer that (i) CP skills are largely domain-specific and do not generalize to stimuli for which a listener has no immediate experience and (ii) categorical neural processing requires active engagement with the auditory stimulus.

  7. Distinct Signaling Requirements for the Establishment of ESC Pluripotency in Late-Stage EpiSCs

    PubMed Central

    Illich, Damir Jacob; Zhang, Miao; Ursu, Andrei; Osorno, Rodrigo; Kim, Kee-Pyo; Yoon, Juyong; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Wu, Guangming; Esch, Daniel; Sabour, Davood; Colby, Douglas; Grassme, Kathrin S.; Chen, Jiayu; Greber, Boris; Höing, Susanne; Herzog, Wiebke; Ziegler, Slava; Chambers, Ian; Gao, Shaorong; Waldmann, Herbert; Schöler, Hans R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary It has previously been reported that mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) lines comprise heterogeneous cell populations that are functionally equivalent to cells of either early- or late-stage postimplantation development. So far, the establishment of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency gene regulatory network through the widely known chemical inhibition of MEK and GSK3beta has been impractical in late-stage EpiSCs. Here, we show that chemical inhibition of casein kinase 1alpha (CK1alpha) induces the conversion of recalcitrant late-stage EpiSCs into ESC pluripotency. CK1alpha inhibition directly results in the simultaneous activation of the WNT signaling pathway, together with inhibition of the TGFbeta/SMAD2 signaling pathway, mediating the rewiring of the gene regulatory network in favor of an ESC-like state. Our findings uncover a molecular mechanism that links CK1alpha to ESC pluripotency through the direct modulation of WNT and TGFbeta signaling. PMID:27149845

  8. Intra-epithelial requirement of canonical Wnt signaling for tooth morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, XiaoJing; Zhao, Pan; Liu, YuDong; Zhang, XiaoYun; Fu, Jiang; Ivy Yu, H-M; Qiu, Mengsheng; Chen, YiPing; Hsu, Wei; Zhang, Zunyi

    2013-04-26

    Multiple Wnt ligands are expressed in the developing tooth and play important and redundant functions during odontogenesis. However, the source of Wnt ligands and their targeting cells and action mechanism in tooth organogenesis remain largely elusive. Here we show that epithelial inactivation of Gpr177, the mouse Wntless (Wls) whose product regulates Wnt sorting and secretion, leads to arrest of tooth development at the early cap stage and abrogates tooth-forming capability of the dental epithelium. Gpr177 in the epithelium is necessary for the activation of canonical Wnt signaling in the dental epithelium and formation of a functional enamel knot. Epithelial deletion of Gpr177 results in defective gene expression and cellular behavior in the dental epithelium but does not alter odontogenic program in the mesenchyme. Furthermore, deletion of Axin2, a negative intracellular regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, rescues the tooth defects in mice carrying Gpr177 mutation in the dental epithelium. Together with the fact that active Wnt canonical signaling is present predominantly in the dental epithelium during tooth development, our results demonstrate that Gpr177-mediated Wnt ligands in the dental epithelium act primarily in an intra-epithelial context to regulate enamel knot formation and subsequent tooth development.

  9. 'In parallel' interconnectivity of the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessels requires both VEGF signaling and circulatory flow.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Tomasz; Trzaska, Sean; Edelstein, Laura; Walls, Johnathon; Rajamani, Saathyaki; Gale, Nicholas; Daroles, Laura; Ramírez, Craig; Ulrich, Florian; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús

    2012-11-01

    Blood vessels deliver oxygen, nutrients, hormones and immunity factors throughout the body. To perform these vital functions, vascular cords branch, lumenize and interconnect. Yet, little is known about the cellular, molecular and physiological mechanisms that control how circulatory networks form and interconnect. Specifically, how circulatory networks merge by interconnecting 'in parallel' along their boundaries remains unexplored. To examine this process we studied the formation and functional maturation of the plexus that forms between the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessels (DLAVs) in the zebrafish. We find that the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells within the DLAVs and their segmental (Se) vessel precursors drives DLAV plexus formation. Remarkably, the presence of Se vessels containing only endothelial cells of the arterial lineage is sufficient for DLAV plexus morphogenesis, suggesting that endothelial cells from the venous lineage make a dispensable or null contribution to this process. The discovery of a circuit that integrates the inputs of circulatory flow and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling to modulate aortic arch angiogenesis, together with the expression of components of this circuit in the trunk vasculature, prompted us to investigate the role of these inputs and their relationship during DLAV plexus formation. We find that circulatory flow and VEGF signaling make additive contributions to DLAV plexus morphogenesis, rather than acting as essential inputs with equivalent contributions as they do during aortic arch angiogenesis. Our observations underscore the existence of context-dependent differences in the integration of physiological stimuli and signaling cascades during vascular development.

  10. Smad4 signalling in T cells is required for suppression of gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Gyu; Li, Cuiling; Qiao, Wenhui; Mamura, Mizuko; Kasprzak, Barbara; Kasperczak, Barbara; Anver, Miriam; Wolfraim, Lawrence; Hong, Suntaek; Mushinski, Elizabeth; Potter, Michael; Kim, Seong-Jin; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Deng, Chuxia; Letterio, John J

    2006-06-22

    SMAD4 (MAD homologue 4 (Drosophila)), also known as DPC4 (deleted in pancreatic cancer), is a tumour suppressor gene that encodes a central mediator of transforming growth factor-beta signalling. Germline mutations in SMAD4 are found in over 50% of patients with familial juvenile polyposis, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by predisposition to hamartomatous polyps and gastrointestinal cancer. Dense inflammatory cell infiltrates underlay grossly normal appearing, non-polypoid colonic and gastric mucosa of patients with familial juvenile polyposis. This prominent stromal component suggests that loss of SMAD4-dependent signalling in cells within the epithelial microenvironment has an important role in the evolution of intestinal tumorigenesis in this syndrome. Here we show that selective loss of Smad4-dependent signalling in T cells leads to spontaneous epithelial cancers throughout the gastrointestinal tract in mice, whereas epithelial-specific deletion of the Smad4 gene does not. Tumours arising within the colon, rectum, duodenum, stomach and oral cavity are stroma-rich with dense plasma cell infiltrates. Smad4(-/-) T cells produce abundant T(H)2-type cytokines including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6 and IL-13, known mediators of plasma cell and stromal expansion. The results support the concept that cancer, as an outcome, reflects the loss of the normal communication between the cellular constituents of a given organ, and indicate that Smad4-deficient T cells ultimately send the wrong message to their stromal and epithelial neighbours.

  11. Specification of osteoblast cell fate by canonical Wnt signaling requires Bmp2.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Valerie S; Ohte, Satoshi; Capelo, Luciane P; Gamer, Laura; Rosen, Vicki

    2016-12-01

    Enhanced BMP or canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling are therapeutic strategies employed to enhance bone formation and fracture repair, but the mechanisms each pathway utilizes to specify cell fate of bone-forming osteoblasts remain poorly understood. Among all BMPs expressed in bone, we find that singular deficiency of Bmp2 blocks the ability of cWnt signaling to specify osteoblasts from limb bud or bone marrow progenitors. When exposed to cWnts, Bmp2-deficient cells fail to progress through the Runx2/Osx1 checkpoint and thus do not upregulate multiple genes controlling mineral metabolism in osteoblasts. Cells lacking Bmp2 after induction of Osx1 differentiate normally in response to cWnts, suggesting that pre-Osx1(+) osteoprogenitors are an essential source and a target of BMP2. Our analysis furthermore reveals Grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) as a transcription factor in the osteoblast gene regulatory network induced during bone development and bone repair, which acts upstream of Osx1 in a BMP2-dependent manner. The Runx2/Osx1 transition therefore receives crucial regulatory inputs from BMP2 that are not compensated for by cWnt signaling, and this is mediated at least in part by induction and activation of Grhl3.

  12. Vangl-dependent planar cell polarity signalling is not required for neural crest migration in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Sophie E.; Massa, Valentina; Savery, Dawn; Andre, Philipp; Yang, Yingzi; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling in neural crest (NC) development is unclear. The PCP dependence of NC cell migration has been reported in Xenopus and zebrafish, but NC migration has not been studied in mammalian PCP mutants. Vangl2Lp/Lp mouse embryos lack PCP signalling and undergo almost complete failure of neural tube closure. Here we show, however, that NC specification, migration and derivative formation occur normally in Vangl2Lp/Lp embryos. The gene family member Vangl1 was not expressed in NC nor ectopically expressed in Vangl2Lp/Lp embryos, and doubly homozygous Vangl1/Vangl2 mutants exhibited normal NC migration. Acute downregulation of Vangl2 in the NC lineage did not prevent NC migration. In vitro, Vangl2Lp/Lp neural tube explants generated emigrating NC cells, as in wild type. Hence, PCP signalling is not essential for NC migration in mammals, in contrast to its essential role in neural tube closure. PCP mutations are thus unlikely to mediate NC-related birth defects in humans. PMID:25038043

  13. Human neural stem cell-induced endothelial morphogenesis requires autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chung-Hsing; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Transplanted neural stem cells (NSC) interact with the host brain microenvironment. A neovascularization is commonly observed in the vicinity of the cell deposit, which is correlated with behavioral improvements. To elucidate the signaling mechanisms between human NSCs and endothelial cells (ECs), these were cocultured in an in vitro model in which NSC-induced endothelial morphogenesis produced a neurovascular environment. Soluble (autocrine/paracrine) and contact–mediated (juxtacrine) signaling molecules were evaluated for two conditionally immortalized fetal NSC lines derived from the cortical anlage (CTXOE03) and ganglionic eminence (STROC05), as well as an adult EC line (D3) derived from the cerebral microvasculature of a hippocampal biopsy. STROC05 were 4 times as efficient to induce endothelial morphogenesis compared to CTXOE03. The cascade of reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs in this process was determined by quantifying soluble factors, receptor mapping, and immunocytochemistry for extracellular matrix molecules. The mechanistic significance of these was further evaluated by pharmacological blockade. The sequential cell-specific regulation of autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling accounted for the differential efficiency of NSCs to induce endothelial morphogenesis. These in vitro studies shed new light on the reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs, which are pivotal for our mechanistic understanding of the efficacy of NSC transplantation. PMID:27374240

  14. Type I interferon signalling is not required for the induction of endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Yalda; Poznanski, Sophie M; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Chen, Branson; Chew, Marianne V; Lee, Amanda J; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-02-08

    Endotoxin, or LPS tolerance, is an immunomodulatory mechanism that results in a significantly diminished response to secondary LPS exposure, which may serve to protect the host against endotoxic shock. Type I interferons (IFNs) are cytokines released upon LPS binding to TLR4 and have been shown to have immunomodulatory properties. Due to this regulatory function of type I IFN, we aimed to investigate the role of type I IFN signalling in LPS tolerance. Our data suggests that type I IFN does not play a role in LPS tolerance in vitro, as both wild type and IFNAR1(-/-) peritoneal macrophages showed reduced cytokine production after secondary LPS exposure. Furthermore, both wild type and IFNAR1(-/-) mice were protected from a lethal dose of LPS after receiving three small doses to induce tolerance. However, IFNAR(-/-) mice seemed to recover faster than wild type mice, suggesting type I IFN signalling plays a detrimental role in LPS-induced sepsis. Although type I IFN may have a regulatory function in microbial infections, it does not seem to play a role in endotoxin tolerance. Type I IFN involvement in bacterial infection remains complex and further studies are needed to define the regulatory function of type I IFN signalling.

  15. Treg-mediated suppression of atherosclerosis requires MYD88 signaling in DCs

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Thorp, Edward; Hansson, Goran K.; Tabas, Ira

    2012-01-01

    TLR activation on CD11c+ DCs triggers DC maturation, which is critical for T cell activation. Given the expansion of CD11c+ DCs during the progression of atherosclerosis and the key role of T cell activation in atherogenesis, we sought to understand the role of TLR signaling in CD11c+ DCs in atherosclerosis. To this end, we used a mouse model in which a key TLR adaptor involved in DC maturation, MYD88, is deleted in CD11c+ DCs. We transplanted bone marrow containing Myd88-deficient CD11c+ DCs into Western diet–fed LDL receptor knockout mice and found that the transplanted mice had decreased activation of effector T cells in the periphery as well as decreased infiltration of both effector T cells and Tregs in atherosclerotic lesions. Surprisingly, the net effect was an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size due to an increase in the content of myeloid-derived inflammatory cells. The mechanism involves increased lesional monocyte recruitment associated with loss of Treg-mediated suppression of MCP-1. Thus, the dominant effect of MYD88 signaling in CD11c+ DCs in the setting of atherosclerosis is to promote the development of atheroprotective Tregs. In the absence of MYD88 signaling in CD11c+ DCs, the loss of this protective Treg response trumps the loss of proatherogenic T effector cell activation. PMID:23257360

  16. Auditory Spatial Recalibration in Congenital Blind Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Finocchietti, Sara; Cappagli, Giulia; Gori, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Blind individuals show impairments for auditory spatial skills that require complex spatial representation of the environment. We suggest that this is partially due to the egocentric frame of reference used by blind individuals. Here we investigate the possibility of reducing the mentioned auditory spatial impairments with an audio-motor training. Our hypothesis is that the association between a motor command and the corresponding movement's sensory feedback can provide an allocentric frame of reference and consequently help blind individuals in understanding complex spatial relationships. Subjects were required to localize the end point of a moving sound before and after either 2-min of audio-motor training or a complete rest. During the training, subjects were asked to move their hand, and consequently the sound source, to freely explore the space around the setup and the body. Both congenital blind (N = 20) and blindfolded healthy controls (N = 28) participated in the study. Results suggest that the audio-motor training was effective in improving space perception of blind individuals. The improvement was not observed in those subjects that did not perform the training. This study demonstrates that it is possible to recalibrate the auditory spatial representation in congenital blind individuals with a short audio-motor training and provides new insights for rehabilitation protocols in blind people. PMID:28261053

  17. Polyclonal activation of rat B cells. I. A single mitogenic signal can stimulate proliferation, but three signals are required for differentiation. [Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Stunz, L.L.; Feldbush, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    A water-soluble, proteinaceous preparation derived from the cell walls of Salmonella typhimurium Re mutants has recently been tested in this laboratory for its ability to act as a mitogen for rat lymphocytes. This preparation (STM) has been found to be a potent simulator of B lymphocyte proliferation, as measured both by /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation and by cell cycle analysis performed with flow cytofluorometry. STM stimulates approximately 50% of rat B cells to enter cycle. Previous investigations by others have shown that at least two sets of signals are required for B cell differentiation; (a) proliferation signals that may consist of both a stimulator of B cell conversion from G/sub 0/ to G/sub 1/ and growth factors, and (b) differentiation signals that probably include at least two B cell differentiation factors (BCDF). When STM was tested in a differentiation system it did not drive purified B cells to differentiate to PFC, either alone or when supplemented with a supernatant from concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells (CAS). However, when both CAS and dextran sulfate (DXS) were supplied to the STM-stimulated cells, a large number of PFC resulted. DXT does not act by stimulating an additional, CAS-responsive B cell subset, since it has only a marginal effect upon /sup 3/H-TdR uptake and does not increase the number of B cells in cycle when used together with STM. The authors that the two agents may be acting sequentially: STM stimulates the B cells to proliferate, and DXS drives the proliferating cells to become responsive to CAS. This suggests that the signals for B cell differentiation must consist of at least three activities: a trigger to stimulate the cells to proliferate, a factor to drive the cells to a BCDF-responsive state, and a BCDF that can drive the cells to secrete antibody.

  18. The Perception of Auditory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  19. Idealized Computational Models for Auditory Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lindeberg, Tony; Friberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory by which idealized models of auditory receptive fields can be derived in a principled axiomatic manner, from a set of structural properties to (i) enable invariance of receptive field responses under natural sound transformations and (ii) ensure internal consistency between spectro-temporal receptive fields at different temporal and spectral scales. For defining a time-frequency transformation of a purely temporal sound signal, it is shown that the framework allows for a new way of deriving the Gabor and Gammatone filters as well as a novel family of generalized Gammatone filters, with additional degrees of freedom to obtain different trade-offs between the spectral selectivity and the temporal delay of time-causal temporal window functions. When applied to the definition of a second-layer of receptive fields from a spectrogram, it is shown that the framework leads to two canonical families of spectro-temporal receptive fields, in terms of spectro-temporal derivatives of either spectro-temporal Gaussian kernels for non-causal time or a cascade of time-causal first-order integrators over the temporal domain and a Gaussian filter over the logspectral domain. For each filter family, the spectro-temporal receptive fields can be either separable over the time-frequency domain or be adapted to local glissando transformations that represent variations in logarithmic frequencies over time. Within each domain of either non-causal or time-causal time, these receptive field families are derived by uniqueness from the assumptions. It is demonstrated how the presented framework allows for computation of basic auditory features for audio processing and that it leads to predictions about auditory receptive fields with good qualitative similarity to biological receptive fields measured in the inferior colliculus (ICC) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of mammals. PMID:25822973

  20. Response recovery in the locust auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Temporal resolution and the time courses of recovery from acute adaptation of neurons in the auditory pathway of the grasshopper Locusta migratoria were investigated with a response recovery paradigm. We stimulated with a series of single click and click pair stimuli while performing intracellular recordings from neurons at three processing stages: receptors and first and second order interneurons. The response to the second click was expressed relative to the single click response. This allowed the uncovering of the basic temporal resolution in these neurons. The effect of adaptation increased with processing layer. While neurons in the auditory periphery displayed a steady response recovery after a short initial adaptation, many interneurons showed nonlinear effects: most prominent a long-lasting suppression of the response to the second click in a pair, as well as a gain in response if a click was preceded by a click a few milliseconds before. Our results reveal a distributed temporal filtering of input at an early auditory processing stage. This set of specified filters is very likely homologous across grasshopper species and thus forms the neurophysiological basis for extracting relevant information from a variety of different temporal signals. Interestingly, in terms of spike timing precision neurons at all three processing layers recovered very fast, within 20 ms. Spike waveform analysis of several neuron types did not sufficiently explain the response recovery profiles implemented in these neurons, indicating that temporal resolution in neurons located at several processing layers of the auditory pathway is not necessarily limited by the spike duration and refractory period. PMID:26609115

  1. Biological Impact of Music and Software-Based Auditory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Auditory-based communication skills are developed at a young age and are maintained throughout our lives. However, some individuals--both young and old--encounter difficulties in achieving or maintaining communication proficiency. Biological signals arising from hearing sounds relate to real-life communication skills such as listening to speech in…

  2. Stuttering Inhibition via Altered Auditory Feedback during Scripted Telephone Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudock, Daniel; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Overt stuttering is inhibited by approximately 80% when people who stutter read aloud as they hear an altered form of their speech feedback to them. However, levels of stuttering inhibition vary from 60% to 100% depending on speaking situation and signal presentation. For example, binaural presentations of delayed auditory feedback…

  3. Are you listening? Brain activation associated with sustained nonspatial auditory attention in the presence and absence of stimulation.

    PubMed

    Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Greenberg, Adam S; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2014-05-01

    Neuroimaging studies investigating the voluntary (top-down) control of attention largely agree that this process recruits several frontal and parietal brain regions. Since most studies used attention tasks requiring several higher-order cognitive functions (e.g. working memory, semantic processing, temporal integration, spatial orienting) as well as different attentional mechanisms (attention shifting, distractor filtering), it is unclear what exactly the observed frontoparietal activations reflect. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated, within the same participants, signal changes in (1) a "Simple Attention" task in which participants attended to a single melody, (2) a "Selective Attention" task in which they simultaneously ignored another melody, and (3) a "Beep Monitoring" task in which participants listened in silence for a faint beep. Compared to resting conditions with identical stimulation, all tasks produced robust activation increases in auditory cortex, cross-modal inhibition in visual and somatosensory cortex, and decreases in the default mode network, indicating that participants were indeed focusing their attention on the auditory domain. However, signal increases in frontal and parietal brain areas were only observed for tasks 1 and 2, but completely absent for task 3. These results lead to the following conclusions: under most conditions, frontoparietal activations are crucial for attention since they subserve higher-order cognitive functions inherently related to attention. However, under circumstances that minimize other demands, nonspatial auditory attention in the absence of stimulation can be maintained without concurrent frontal or parietal activations.

  4. AtLAZY1 is a signaling component required for gravitropism of the Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Takeshi; Spalding, Edgar P; Iino, Moritoshi

    2013-04-01

    The present study identified a family of six A. thaliana genes that share five limited regions of sequence similarity with LAZY1, a gene in Oryza sativa (rice) shown to participate in the early gravity signaling for shoot gravitropism. A T-DNA insertion into the Arabidopsis gene (At5g14090) most similar to LAZY1 increased the inflorescence branch angle to 81° from the wild type value of 42°. RNA interference lines and molecular rescue experiments confirmed the linkage between the branch-angle phenotype and the gene consequently named AtLAZY1. Time-resolved gravitropism measurements of atlazy1 hypocotyls and primary inflorescence stems showed a significantly reduced bending rate during the first hour of response. The subcellular localization of AtLAZY1 protein was investigated to determine if the nuclear localization predicted from the gene sequence was observable and important to its function in shoot gravity responses. AtLAZY1 fused to green fluorescent protein largely rescued the branch-angle phenotype of atlazy1, and was observed by confocal microscopy at the cell periphery and within the nucleus. Mutation of the nuclear localization signal prevented detectable levels of AtLAZY1 in the nucleus without affecting the ability of the gene to rescue the atlazy1 branch-angle phenotype. These results indicate that AtLAZY1 functions in gravity signaling during shoot gravitropism, being a functional ortholog of rice LAZY1. The nuclear pool of the protein appears to be unnecessary for this function, which instead relies on a pool that appears to reside at the cell periphery.

  5. Intratympanic manganese administration revealed sound intensity and frequency dependent functional activity in rat auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seong-Uk; Lee, Jae-Jun; Hong, Kwan Soo; Han, Mun; Park, Jang-Woo; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Sangheun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Shin, Kyung Min; Cho, Jin Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon; Chang, Yongmin

    2013-09-01

    The cochlear plays a vital role in the sense and sensitivity of hearing; however, there is currently a lack of knowledge regarding the relationships between mechanical transduction of sound at different intensities and frequencies in the cochlear and the neurochemical processes that lead to neuronal responses in the central auditory system. In the current study, we introduced manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI), a convenient in vivo imaging method, for investigation of how sound, at different intensities and frequencies, is propagated from the cochlear to the central auditory system. Using MEMRI with intratympanic administration, we demonstrated differential manganese signal enhancements according to sound intensity and frequencies in the ascending auditory pathway of the rat after administration of intratympanic MnCl2.Compared to signal enhancement without explicit sound stimuli, auditory structures in the ascending auditory pathway showed stronger signal enhancement in rats who received sound stimuli of 10 and 40 kHz. In addition, signal enhancement with a stimulation frequency of 40 kHz was stronger than that with 10 kHz. Therefore, the results of this study seem to suggest that, in order to achieve an effective response to high sound intensity or frequency, more firing of auditory neurons, or firing of many auditory neurons together for the pooled neural activity is needed.

  6. CGRP-RCP, a novel protein required for signal transduction at calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin receptors.

    PubMed

    Evans, B N; Rosenblatt, M I; Mnayer, L O; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2000-10-06

    It is becoming clear that receptors that initiate signal transduction by interacting with G-proteins do not function as monomers, but often require accessory proteins for function. Some of these accessory proteins are chaperones, required for correct transport of the receptor to the cell surface, but the function of many accessory proteins remains unknown. We determined the role of an accessory protein for the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We have previously shown that this accessory protein, the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP), is expressed in CGRP responsive tissues and that RCP protein expression correlates with the biological efficacy of CGRP in vivo. However, the function of RCP has remained elusive. In this study stable cell lines were made that express antisense RCP RNA, and CGRP- and adrenomedullin-mediated signal transduction were greatly reduced. However, the loss of RCP did not effect CGRP binding or receptor density, indicating that RCP did not behave as a chaperone but was instead coupling the CGRP receptor to downstream effectors. A candidate CGRP receptor named calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been identified, and in this study RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR indicating that these two proteins interact directly. Since CGRP and adrenomedullin can both signal through CRLR, which has been previously shown to require a chaperone protein for function, we now propose that a functional CGRP or adrenomedullin receptor consists of at least three proteins: the receptor (CRLR), the chaperone protein (RAMP), and RCP that couples the receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway.

  7. Impairments in musical abilities reflected in the auditory brainstem: evidence from congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Skoe, Erika; Moreau, Patricia; Peretz, Isabelle; Kraus, Nina

    2015-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic condition, characterized by a deficit in music perception and production, not explained by hearing loss, brain damage or lack of exposure to music. Despite inferior musical performance, amusics exhibit normal auditory cortical responses, with abnormal neural correlates suggested to lie beyond auditory cortices. Here we show, using auditory brainstem responses to complex sounds in humans, that fine-grained automatic processing of sounds is impoverished in amusia. Compared with matched non-musician controls, spectral amplitude was decreased in amusics for higher harmonic components of the auditory brainstem response. We also found a delayed response to the early transient aspects of the auditory stimulus in amusics. Neural measures of spectral amplitude and response timing correlated with participants' behavioral assessments of music processing. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amusia affects how complex acoustic signals are processed in the auditory brainstem. This neural signature of amusia mirrors what is observed in musicians, such that the aspects of the auditory brainstem responses that are enhanced in musicians are degraded in amusics. By showing that gradients of music abilities are reflected in the auditory brainstem, our findings have implications not only for current models of amusia but also for auditory functioning in general.

  8. A unique cellular scaling rule in the avian auditory system.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Long, Brendan; Krilow, Justin M; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2016-06-01

    Although it is clear that neural structures scale with body size, the mechanisms of this relationship are not well understood. Several recent studies have shown that the relationship between neuron numbers and brain (or brain region) size are not only different across mammalian orders, but also across auditory and visual regions within the same brains. Among birds, similar cellular scaling rules have not been examined in any detail. Here, we examine the scaling of auditory structures in birds and show that the scaling rules that have been established in the mammalian auditory pathway do not necessarily apply to birds. In galliforms, neuronal densities decrease with increasing brain size, suggesting that auditory brainstem structures increase in size faster than neurons are added; smaller brains have relatively more neurons than larger brains. The cellular scaling rules that apply to auditory brainstem structures in galliforms are, therefore, different to that found in primate auditory pathway. It is likely that the factors driving this difference are associated with the anatomical specializations required for sound perception in birds, although there is a decoupling of neuron numbers in brain structures and hair cell numbers in the basilar papilla. This study provides significant insight into the allometric scaling of neural structures in birds and improves our understanding of the rules that govern neural scaling across vertebrates.

  9. ASSESSING AUDITORY CAPABILITIES IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Martinez, Amy S.; Boothroyd, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    years of age. Continued development will be required to fill this gap and to separate auditory from non-auditory influences in performance. PMID:17604127

  10. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    PubMed Central

    van Wassenhove, Virginie; Grzeczkowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al., 2010). Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient color changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the “where” and the “when” of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or center of the screen. Participants counted color changes of the fixation cross while neglecting sounds which could be presented to the left, right, or both ears. First, clear alpha power increases were observed in auditory cortices, consistent with participants' attention directed to visual inputs. Second, color changes elicited robust modulations of auditory cortex responses (“when” prediction) seen as ramping activity, early alpha phase-locked responses, and enhanced high-gamma band responses in the contralateral side of sound presentation. Third, no modulations of auditory evoked or oscillatory activity were found to be specific to eye position. Altogether, our results suggest that visual transience can automatically elicit a prediction of “when” a sound will occur by changing the excitability of auditory cortices irrespective of the attended modality, eye position or spatial congruency of auditory and visual events. To the contrary, auditory cortical responses were not significantly affected by eye position suggesting that “where” predictions may require active sensing or saccadic reset to modulate auditory cortex responses, notably in the absence of spatial orientation to sounds. PMID:25705174

  11. TIM-1 signaling is required for maintenance and induction of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, M Y; Ding, Q; Brooks, C R; Xiao, S; Workman, C J; Vignali, D A A; Ueno, T; Padera, R F; Kuchroo, V K; Najafian, N; Rothstein, D M

    2015-04-01

    Apart from their role in humoral immunity, B cells can exhibit IL-10-dependent regulatory activity (Bregs). These regulatory subpopulations have been shown to inhibit inflammation and allograft rejection. However, our understanding of Bregs has been hampered by their rarity, lack of a specific marker, and poor insight into their induction and maintenance. We previously demonstrated that T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-1 (TIM-1) identifies over 70% of IL-10-producing B cells, irrespective of other markers. We now show that TIM-1 is the primary receptor responsible for Breg induction by apoptotic cells (ACs). However, B cells that express a mutant form of TIM-1 lacking the mucin domain (TIM-1(Δmucin) ) exhibit decreased phosphatidylserine binding and are unable to produce IL-10 in response to ACs or by specific ligation with anti-TIM-1. TIM-1(Δmucin) mice also exhibit accelerated allograft rejection, which appears to be due in part to their defect in both baseline and induced IL-10(+) Bregs, since a single transfer of WT TIM-1(+) B cells can restore long-term graft survival. These data suggest that TIM-1 signaling plays a direct role in Breg maintenance and induction both under physiological conditions (in response to ACs) and in response to therapy through TIM-1 ligation. Moreover, they directly demonstrate that the mucin domain regulates TIM-1 signaling.

  12. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Michelle L.; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A.; Schnell, Santiago; Kulesa, Paul M.

    2013-06-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent-based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns.

  13. cAMP-Signalling Regulates Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte Deformability Required for Malaria Parasite Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Eloise; Breil, Florence; Lorthiois, Audrey; Dupuy, Florian; Cummings, Ross; Duffier, Yoann; Corbett, Yolanda; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Vernick, Kenneth; Taramelli, Donatella; Baker, David A.; Langsley, Gordon; Lavazec, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Blocking Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes has been designated a strategic objective in the global agenda of malaria elimination. Transmission is ensured by gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (GIE) that sequester in the bone marrow and at maturation are released into peripheral blood from where they are taken up during a mosquito blood meal. Release into the blood circulation is accompanied by an increase in GIE deformability that allows them to pass through the spleen. Here, we used a microsphere matrix to mimic splenic filtration and investigated the role of cAMP-signalling in regulating GIE deformability. We demonstrated that mature GIE deformability is dependent on reduced cAMP-signalling and on increased phosphodiesterase expression in stage V gametocytes, and that parasite cAMP-dependent kinase activity contributes to the stiffness of immature gametocytes. Importantly, pharmacological agents that raise cAMP levels in transmissible stage V gametocytes render them less deformable and hence less likely to circulate through the spleen. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors that raise cAMP levels in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, such as sildenafil, represent new candidate drugs to block transmission of malaria parasites. PMID:25951195

  14. Vitamin D signaling in the bovine immune system: A model for understanding human vitamin D requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endocrine physiology of vitamin D in cattle has been rigorously investigated and has yielded information on vitamin D requirements, endocrine function in health and disease, general metabolism, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis in cattle. These results are relevant to human vitamin D endocr...

  15. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... include the location codes for the State and counties in its service area. When transmitting the required..., Event, Location and the valid time period of an EAS message. Effective June 30, 2012, visual messages derived from CAP-formatted EAS messages shall contain the Originator, Event, Location and the valid...

  16. A mechanism regulating G protein-coupled receptor signaling that requires cycles of protein palmitoylation and depalmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lixia; Chisari, Mariangela; Maktabi, Mohammad H; Sobieski, Courtney; Zhou, Hao; Konopko, Aaron M; Martin, Brent R; Mennerick, Steven J; Blumer, Kendall J

    2014-02-28

    Reversible attachment and removal of palmitate or other long-chain fatty acids on proteins has been hypothesized, like phosphorylation, to control diverse biological processes. Indeed, palmitate turnover regulates Ras trafficking and signaling. Beyond this example, however, the functions of palmitate turnover on specific proteins remain poorly understood. Here, we show that a mechanism regulating G protein-coupled receptor signaling in neuronal cells requires palmitate turnover. We used hexadecyl fluorophosphonate or palmostatin B to inhibit enzymes in the serine hydrolase family that depalmitoylate proteins, and we studied R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-binding protein (R7BP), a palmitoylated allosteric modulator of R7 RGS proteins that accelerate deactivation of Gi/o class G proteins. Depalmitoylation inhibition caused R7BP to redistribute from the plasma membrane to endomembrane compartments, dissociated R7BP-bound R7 RGS complexes from Gi/o-gated G protein-regulated inwardly rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels and delayed GIRK channel closure. In contrast, targeting R7BP to the plasma membrane with a polybasic domain and an irreversibly attached lipid instead of palmitate rendered GIRK channel closure insensitive to depalmitoylation inhibitors. Palmitate turnover therefore is required for localizing R7BP to the plasma membrane and facilitating Gi/o deactivation by R7 RGS proteins on GIRK channels. Our findings broaden the scope of biological processes regulated by palmitate turnover on specific target proteins. Inhibiting R7BP depalmitoylation may provide a means of enhancing GIRK activity in neurological disorders.

  17. Extracellular matrix-dependent tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelial cells requires both physical and biochemical signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Roskelley, C.D.; Desprez, P.Y.; Bissell, M.J. )

    1994-12-20

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) profoundly influences the growth and differentiation of the mammary gland epithelium, both in culture and in vivo. Utilizing a clonal population of mouse mammary epithelial cells that absolutely requires an exogenous ECM for function, we developed a rapid assay to study signal transduction by ECM. Two components of the cellular response to a basement membrane overlay that result in the expression of the milk protein [beta]-casein were defined. The first component of this response involves a rounding and clustering of the cells that can be physically mimicked by plating the cells on a nonadhesive substratum. The second component is biochemical in nature, and it is associated with [beta][sub 1] integrin clustering and increased tyrosine phosphorylation. The second component is initiated in a morphology-independent manner, but the proper translation of this biochemical signal into a functional response requires cell rounding and cell clustering. Thus, physical and biochemical signal transduction events contribute to the ECM-dependent regulation of tissue-specific gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cells. 44 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Prkci is required for a non-autonomous signal that coordinates cell polarity during cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Izuhara, Audrey K; Lakeland, Daniel L; Wang, Charles; Mariani, Francesca V

    2016-08-01

    Polarized epithelia define boundaries, spaces, and cavities within organisms. Cavitation, a process by which multicellular hollow balls or tubes are produced, is typically associated with the formation of organized epithelia. In order for these epithelial layers to form, cells must ultimately establish a distinct apical-basal polarity. Atypical PKCs have been proposed to be required for apical-basal polarity in diverse species. Here we show that while cells null for the Prkci isozyme exhibit some polarity characteristics, they fail to properly segregate apical-basal proteins, form a coordinated ectodermal epithelium, or participate in normal cavitation. A failure to cavitate could be due to an overgrowth of interior cells or to an inability of interior cells to die. Null cells however, do not have a marked change in proliferation rate and are still capable of undergoing cell death, suggesting that alterations in these processes are not the predominant cause of the failed cavitation. Overexpression of BMP4 or EZRIN can partially rescue the phenotype possibly by promoting cell death, polarity, and differentiation. However, neither is sufficient to provide the required cues to generate a polarized epithelium and fully rescue cavitation. Interestingly, when wildtype and Prkci(-/-) ES cells are mixed together, a polarized ectodermal epithelium forms and cavitation is rescued, likely due to the ability of wildtype cells to produce non-autonomous polarity cues. We conclude that Prkci is not required for cells to respond to these cues, though it is required to produce them. Together these findings indicate that environmental cues can facilitate the formation of polarized epithelia and that cavitation requires the proper coordination of multiple basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and apical-basal polarization.

  19. The ubiquitin ligase PDZRN3 is required for vascular morphogenesis through Wnt/planar cell polarity signalling.

    PubMed

    Sewduth, Raj N; Jaspard-Vinassa, Béatrice; Peghaire, Claire; Guillabert, Aude; Franzl, Nathalie; Larrieu-Lahargue, Frederic; Moreau, Catherine; Fruttiger, Marcus; Dufourcq, Pascale; Couffinhal, Thierry; Duplàa, Cécile

    2014-09-08

    Development and stabilization of a vascular plexus requires the coordination of multiple signalling processes. Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling is critical in vertebrates for diverse morphogenesis events, which coordinate cell orientation within a tissue-specific plane. However, its functional role in vascular morphogenesis is not well understood. Here we identify PDZRN3, an ubiquitin ligase, and report that Pdzrn3 deficiency impairs embryonic angiogenic remodelling and postnatal retinal vascular patterning, with a loss of two-dimensional polarized orientation of the intermediate retinal plexus. Using in vitro and ex vivo Pdzrn3 loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments, we demonstrate a key role of PDZRN3 in endothelial cell directional and coordinated extension. PDZRN3 ubiquitinates Dishevelled 3 (Dvl3), to promote endocytosis of the Frizzled/Dvl3 complex, for PCP signal transduction. These results highlight the role of PDZRN3 to direct Wnt PCP signalling, and broadly implicate this pathway in the planar orientation and highly branched organization of vascular plexuses.

  20. Flower development in the passion fruit Passiflora edulis requires a photoperiod-induced systemic graft-transmissible signal.

    PubMed

    Nave, Nahum; Katz, Ehud; Chayut, Noam; Gazit, Shmuel; Samach, Alon

    2010-12-01

    Different organisms use gradual seasonal changes in photoperiod to correctly time diverse developmental processes, such as transition to flowering in plants. Florigen is a systemic signal formed in leaves exposed to specific environmental cues, mainly photoperiodic, and capable of triggering flower induction in several species. Here we show that in Passiflora edulis, a perennial climbing vine, flower initiation occurs throughout the year; however, without long photoperiods, flower primordia show arrested growth and differentiation at an early stage. Our results support the existence of a positive, systemic, graft-transmissible signal, produced in mature leaves under LDs, that is required for normal flower development beyond sepal formation. Our results also suggest that Gibberellin acts to inhibit flower development. We provide evidence for genetic variation in the response to short photoperiods. A genotype capable of forming developed flowers under short photoperiods produces a positive graft transmissible signal allowing normal flower development under short days in a cultivar which normally aborts flower development under these conditions. We believe these findings contribute towards discovering the chemical nature of this interesting mobile signal involved in flower development.

  1. Activated Notch signaling is required for hepatitis B virus X protein to promote proliferation and survival of human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Zhou, Haiyan; Xia, Xiumei; Sun, Qian; Wang, Ying; Cheng, Bin

    2010-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is a multifunctional oncoprotein which plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the exact mechanisms remain controversial. Here we show that HBx strongly stimulated cell growth, promoted cell cycle progression and inhibited apoptosis of human non-tumor hepatic cell line L02 cells. It also accelerated tumor formation of L02 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Furthermore, Notch signaling components were upregulated in HBx-expressing L02 cells compared to normal L02 cells. However, blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) attenuated cell growth, shortened the S phase of cell cycle and promoted apoptosis of HBx-expressing L02 cell in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but normal L02 cells were not significantly affected by Notch signaling blocking. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that HBx could promote the growth of human non-tumor hepatic cell line L02 cells both in vitro and in vivo, which may require the activation of Notch signaling pathway.

  2. Neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells require Wnt signaling for their development and drive invagination of the telencephalic midline.

    PubMed

    Choe, Youngshik; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric regi