Science.gov

Sample records for auditory steady-state response

  1. [On the terminology of auditory steady-state responses. What differentiates steady-state and transient potentials?].

    PubMed

    Mühler, R

    2012-05-01

    Recording human auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) at different frequencies allows objective assessment of auditory thresholds. Common practice has been to record ASSR to pure tones that are sinusoidally modulated in amplitude and frequency. Recently, optimized chirp stimuli have been proposed to evoke transient as well as steady-state responses. Because of the resulting uncertainty about the different methods, this paper aims to reconsider the terminology of transient and steady-state responses. Two experiments demonstrate the smooth transition between transient and steady-state responses. In experiment 1, click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded over a wide range of stimulus repetition rates (24/s to 72/s). In experiment 2, auditory steady-state responses were recorded for the same stimulus repetition rates, using three different stimulus types: an amplitude modulated 1-kHz tone (AM), a 1-kHz tone-burst (TB) and a flat-spectrum chirp. Experiment 1 demonstrates the merging of the typical ABR wave complexes at higher repetition rates, forming a steady-state response. This effect can only be observed if the time window is extended far beyond the window traditionally used for clinical ABR recordings. Experiment 2 reveals similar ASSR amplitude spectra regardless of the stimulus type and repetition rate used. Steady-state responses can be evoked for a large variety of stimulus types and repetition rates. Thus, from a clinician's point of view, steady-state responses cannot be considered a new type of evoked responses. They differ from transient responses primarily in the frequency response method and the longer timeframe required.

  2. [Auditory steady-state responses--the state of art].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Anna; Gryczyński, Maciej; Pajor, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) is quite a new method of electrophysiological threshold estimation with no clinical standards. It was the aim of this study to review practical and theoretical thesis of ASSR and mention recent recommendations and achievements of this technique. The most common application of ASSR is diagnosis of hearing loss in children together with ABR test. In this paper we mentioned information about influence of physiological factors (age, sex, state of arousal, handedness) and type of recording technique (electrodes placement, air and bone stimulation, occlusion effect, amplitude and frequency stimulation, multiple or single frequency stimulation, dichotic and monotic recording technique and type of hearing loss) on ASSR. We conclude that putting ASSR in clinical use as an standardized method it is necessary to do research with numerous groups of patients using the same equipment and parameters of tests.

  3. Attentional Modulation of Auditory Steady-State Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Yatin; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

    2014-01-01

    Auditory selective attention enables task-relevant auditory events to be enhanced and irrelevant ones suppressed. In the present study we used a frequency tagging paradigm to investigate the effects of attention on auditory steady state responses (ASSR). The ASSR was elicited by simultaneously presenting two different streams of white noise, amplitude modulated at either 16 and 23.5 Hz or 32.5 and 40 Hz. The two different frequencies were presented to each ear and participants were instructed to selectively attend to one ear or the other (confirmed by behavioral evidence). The results revealed that modulation of ASSR by selective attention depended on the modulation frequencies used and whether the activation was contralateral or ipsilateral. Attention enhanced the ASSR for contralateral activation from either ear for 16 Hz and suppressed the ASSR for ipsilateral activation for 16 Hz and 23.5 Hz. For modulation frequencies of 32.5 or 40 Hz attention did not affect the ASSR. We propose that the pattern of enhancement and inhibition may be due to binaural suppressive effects on ipsilateral stimulation and the dominance of contralateral hemisphere during dichotic listening. In addition to the influence of cortical processing asymmetries, these results may also reflect a bias towards inhibitory ipsilateral and excitatory contralateral activation present at the level of inferior colliculus. That the effect of attention was clearest for the lower modulation frequencies suggests that such effects are likely mediated by cortical brain structures or by those in close proximity to cortex. PMID:25334021

  4. Phencyclidine Disrupts the Auditory Steady State Response in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Emma; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Millward, James B.; Vohs, Jenifer L.; Rass, Olga; Krishnan, Giri P.; Bolbecker, Amanda R.; Morzorati, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The Auditory Steady-State Response (ASSR) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is usually reduced in schizophrenia (SZ), particularly to 40 Hz stimulation. The gamma frequency ASSR deficit has been attributed to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction. We tested whether the NMDAR antagonist, phencyclidine (PCP), produced similar ASSR deficits in rats. EEG was recorded from awake rats via intracranial electrodes overlaying the auditory cortex and at the vertex of the skull. ASSRs to click trains were recorded at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 55 Hz and measured by ASSR Mean Power (MP) and Phase Locking Factor (PLF). In Experiment 1, the effect of different subcutaneous doses of PCP (1.0, 2.5 and 4.0 mg/kg) on the ASSR in 12 rats was assessed. In Experiment 2, ASSRs were compared in PCP treated rats and control rats at baseline, after acute injection (5 mg/kg), following two weeks of subchronic, continuous administration (5 mg/kg/day), and one week after drug cessation. Acute administration of PCP increased PLF and MP at frequencies of stimulation below 50 Hz, and decreased responses at higher frequencies at the auditory cortex site. Acute administration had a less pronounced effect at the vertex site, with a reduction of either PLF or MP observed at frequencies above 20 Hz. Acute effects increased in magnitude with higher doses of PCP. Consistent effects were not observed after subchronic PCP administration. These data indicate that acute administration of PCP, a NMDAR antagonist, produces an increase in ASSR synchrony and power at low frequencies of stimulation and a reduction of high frequency (> 40 Hz) ASSR activity in rats. Subchronic, continuous administration of PCP, on the other hand, has little impact on ASSRs. Thus, while ASSRs are highly sensitive to NMDAR antagonists, their translational utility as a cross-species biomarker for NMDAR hypofunction in SZ and other disorders may be dependent on dose and schedule. PMID:26258486

  5. Stability of Auditory Steady State Responses Over Time.

    PubMed

    Van Eeckhoutte, Maaike; Luke, Robert; Wouters, Jan; Francart, Tom

    2017-08-26

    Auditory steady state responses (ASSRs) are used in clinical practice for objective hearing assessments. The response is called steady state because it is assumed to be stable over time, and because it is evoked by a stimulus with a certain periodicity, which will lead to discrete frequency components that are stable in amplitude and phase over time. However, the stimuli commonly used to evoke ASSRs are also known to be able to induce loudness adaptation behaviorally. Researchers and clinicians using ASSRs assume that the response remains stable over time. This study investigates (1) the stability of ASSR amplitudes over time, within one recording, and (2) whether loudness adaptation can be reflected in ASSRs. ASSRs were measured from 14 normal-hearing participants. The ASSRs were evoked by the stimuli that caused the most loudness adaptation in a previous behavioral study, that is, mixed-modulated sinusoids with carrier frequencies of either 500 or 2000 Hz, a modulation frequency of 40 Hz, and a low sensation level of 30 dB SL. For each carrier frequency and participant, 40 repetitions of 92 sec recordings were made. Two types of analyses were used to investigate the ASSR amplitudes over time: with the more traditionally used Fast Fourier Transform and with a novel Kalman filtering approach. Robust correlations between the ASSR amplitudes and behavioral loudness adaptation ratings were also calculated. Overall, ASSR amplitudes were stable. Over all individual recordings, the median change of the amplitudes over time was -0.0001 μV/s. Based on group analysis, a significant but very weak decrease in amplitude over time was found, with the decrease in amplitude over time around -0.0002 μV/s. Correlation coefficients between ASSR amplitudes and behavioral loudness adaptation ratings were significant but low to moderate, with r = 0.27 and r = 0.39 for the 500 and 2000 Hz carrier frequency, respectively. The decrease in amplitude of ASSRs over time (92 sec) is small

  6. Human auditory steady state responses to binaural and monaural beats.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, D W F; Taylor, P

    2005-03-01

    Binaural beat sensations depend upon a central combination of two different temporally encoded tones, separately presented to the two ears. We tested the feasibility to record an auditory steady state evoked response (ASSR) at the binaural beat frequency in order to find a measure for temporal coding of sound in the human EEG. We stimulated each ear with a distinct tone, both differing in frequency by 40Hz, to record a binaural beat ASSR. As control, we evoked a beat ASSR in response to both tones in the same ear. We band-pass filtered the EEG at 40Hz, averaged with respect to stimulus onset and compared ASSR amplitudes and phases, extracted from a sinusoidal non-linear regression fit to a 40Hz period average. A 40Hz binaural beat ASSR was evoked at a low mean stimulus frequency (400Hz) but became undetectable beyond 3kHz. Its amplitude was smaller than that of the acoustic beat ASSR, which was evoked at low and high frequencies. Both ASSR types had maxima at fronto-central leads and displayed a fronto-occipital phase delay of several ms. The dependence of the 40Hz binaural beat ASSR on stimuli at low, temporally coded tone frequencies suggests that it may objectively assess temporal sound coding ability. The phase shift across the electrode array is evidence for more than one origin of the 40Hz oscillations. The binaural beat ASSR is an evoked response, with novel diagnostic potential, to a signal that is not present in the stimulus, but generated within the brain.

  7. 40 Hz auditory steady state response to linguistic features of stimuli during auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Yan, Zheng; Gao, Xiao-rong

    2013-10-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain, depending on the modulation frequency used. In general, responses induced by low rates (≤40 Hz) emanate mostly from central structures of the brain, and responses from high rates (≥80 Hz) emanate mostly from the peripheral auditory nerve or brainstem structures. Besides, it was reported that the gamma band ASSR (30-90 Hz) played an important role in working memory, speech understanding and recognition. This paper investigated the 40 Hz ASSR evoked by modulated speech and reversed speech. The speech was Chinese phrase voice, and the noise-like reversed speech was obtained by temporally reversing the speech. Both auditory stimuli were modulated with a frequency of 40 Hz. Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with hallucination symptom participated in the experiment. Results showed reduction in left auditory cortex response when healthy subjects listened to the reversed speech compared with the speech. In contrast, when the patients who experienced auditory hallucinations listened to the reversed speech, the auditory cortex of left hemispheric responded more actively. The ASSR results were consistent with the behavior results of patients. Therefore, the gamma band ASSR is expected to be helpful for rapid and objective diagnosis of hallucination in clinic.

  8. Chirp and Click Evoked Auditory Steady State Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    state evoked potentials: A new tool for the accurate assessment of hearing in cochlear implant candidates. Advances in Otorhinolaryngology, 1993. 48...State Responses (ASSR) to 100 µsec clicks and 4 msec cochlear chirps are recorded in adult subjects at repetition rates of 20 to 100 Hz in 10 Hz...differences in the cochlea according to the DeBoer’s cochlear model [14] in order to determine if it will generate better ASSR. We also attempted to

  9. Dynamic crossmodal links revealed by steady-state responses in auditory-visual divided attention.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ritske; Toffanin, Paolo; Harbers, Marten

    2010-01-01

    Frequency tagging has been often used to study intramodal attention but not intermodal attention. We used EEG and simultaneous frequency tagging of auditory and visual sources to study intermodal focused and divided attention in detection and discrimination performance. Divided-attention costs were smaller, but still significant, in detection than in discrimination. The auditory steady-state response (SSR) showed no effects of attention at frontocentral locations, but did so at occipital locations where it was evident only when attention was divided between audition and vision. Similarly, the visual SSR at occipital locations was substantially enhanced when attention was divided across modalities. Both effects were equally present in detection and discrimination. We suggest that both effects reflect a common cause: An attention-dependent influence of auditory information processing on early cortical stages of visual information processing, mediated by enhanced effective connectivity between the two modalities under conditions of divided attention.

  10. Analysis of auditory function using brainstem auditory evoked potentials and auditory steady state responses in infants with perinatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Aguirre, Alma Janeth; Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Porras-Kattz, Eneida

    2010-02-01

    Approximately 2-4 % of newborns with perinatal risk factors present hearing loss. The aim of this study was to analyse the auditory function in infants with perinatal brain injury (PBI). Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), auditory steady state responses (ASSRs), and tympanometry studies were carried out in 294 infants with PBI (586 ears, two infants had unilateral microtia-atresia). BAEPs were abnormal in 158 (27%) ears, ASSRs in 227 (39%), and tympanometry anomalies were present in 131 (22%) ears. When ASSR thresholds were compared with BAEPs, the assessment yielded 92% sensitivity and 68% specificity. When ASSR thresholds were compared with tympanometry results as an indicator of middle-ear pathology, the assessment gave 96% sensitivity and 77% specificity. When BAEP thresholds were compared with tympanometry results, sensitivity was 35% and specificity 95%. In conclusion, BAEPs are useful test for neonatal auditory screening; they identify with more accuracy sensorineural hearing losses. ASSRs are more pertinent for identifying conductive hearing loss associated with middle-ear pathology. The consistency and accuracy of these results could be considered in additional studies.

  11. The 40-Hz Auditory Steady-State Response in Patients With Schizophrenia: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Thuné, Hanna; Recasens, Marc; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying circuit dysfunctions in schizophrenia remain poorly understood. The 40-Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR) has been suggested as a potential biomarker for schizophrenia. To provide a meta-analytical insight into the presence of 40-Hz ASSR impairments in patients with schizophrenia and to examine the effects of the participant group, stimulus parameters, and analysis and recording techniques. Searches were conducted in PubMed and reference lists of appropriate publications to identify relevant studies published from November 1999 to March 2016. Initial literature searches were performed with combinations of the following search terms: (1) auditory steady state response, (2) schizophrenia, (3) 40 Hz, (4) EEG, (5) MEG, and (6) steady state response. Original articles reporting 40-Hz ASSR data on patients with schizophrenia (chronic or first episode) compared with healthy controls using electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings. Hedges g effect sizes were calculated using sample sizes, P values, and/or Cohen d effect sizes from 20 studies. Effect size data were pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was corrected for using funnel plots, the Egger regression test, and a trim and fill test. The contributions of study design parameters and participant characteristics were assessed using a mixed linear model approach and subsequent post hoc t tests. The present analysis was performed during the period from November 2015 to March 2016. Random model Hedges g effect sizes for auditory steady-state amplitude and phase-locking measures from sensor/electrode and sources-space responses in EEG and MEG studies. Of the 20 studies analyzed (representing a total of 590 healthy controls and 606 patients with schizophrenia), 17 reported significant reductions in 40-Hz ASSR spectral power and/or phase locking in patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls (Hedges g effect: -0

  12. The effect of the transducers on paediatric thresholds estimated with auditory steady-state responses.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, D; Vitaux, H; Villeneuve, A; Kim, S; Lescanne, E; Pigeon, V; Aoustin, J M; Bordure, P; Galvin, J

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) for estimating hearing thresholds in young children, compared with behavioural thresholds. The second objective was to investigate ASSR thresholds obtained with insert earphones versus supra-aural headphones to determine which transducer produces ASSR thresholds most similar to behavioural thresholds measured with supra-aural headphones. This retrospective study included 29 participants (58 ears): 12 children (24 ears) in the insert group and 17 children (34 ears) in the supra-aural group. No general anaesthesia was used. For both groups, there was a strong correlation between behavioural and ASSR thresholds, with a stronger correlation for the insert group. When behavioural thresholds are difficult to obtain, ASSR may be a useful objective measure that can be combined with other audiometric procedures to estimate hearing thresholds and to determine appropriate auditory rehabilitation approaches.

  13. Auditory steady-state responses reveal amplitude modulation gap detection thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Bernhard; Pantev, Christo

    2004-05-01

    Auditory evoked magnetic fields were recorded from the left hemisphere of healthy subjects using a 37-channel magnetometer while stimulating the right ear with 40-Hz amplitude modulated (AM) tone-bursts with 500-Hz carrier frequency in order to study the time-courses of amplitude and phase of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs). The stimulus duration of 300 ms and the duration of the silent periods (3-300 ms) between succeeding stimuli were chosen to address the question whether the time-course of the ASSR can reflect both temporal integration and temporal resolution in the central auditory processing. Long lasting perturbations of the ASSR were found after gaps in the AM sound, even for gaps of short duration. These were interpreted as evidences for an auditory reset mechanism. Concomitant psycho-acoustical tests corroborated that gap durations perturbing the ASSR were in the same range as the threshold for AM gap detection. Magnetic source localizations estimated the ASSR sources in the primary auditory cortex, suggesting that the processing of temporal structures in the sound is performed at or below the cortical level.

  14. [Stopping criteria for averaging the multiple auditory steady-state response].

    PubMed

    Torres Fortuny, Alejandro; Pérez Abalo, María C; Sotero Díaz, Roberto C; Rioja Rodríguez, Lilliam; Rodríguez Dávila, Ernesto; Galán García, Lidice; Eimil Suarez, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficiency of the averaging technique for estimating multiple auditory steady state responses in normal hearing subjects and to provide quantifiable stopping criteria at near-threshold intensities. Multiple amplitude-modulated (89-115 Hz) tones (500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz) were simultaneously presented to both ears at a fixed intensity of 40 dB HL. A total of 128 data epochs were averaged (23.9 minutes). The results showed that "classic" ensemble averaging, although accurate and time-efficient in most cases, could not extract all near-threshold MSSR from noise, even after recording a considerable number of sweeps. The present study also proposed a different approach to evaluate the background noise based on evaluating the mean of the variance close to the signal. The study proposed quantitative parameters to establish stopping criteria during auditory steady-state recordings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Hearing screening using auditory steady state responses obtained by simultaneous air- and bone-conduction stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mijares, Eleina; Báez, Lidia; Cabrera, Licer; Pérez-Abalo, María C; Torres-Fortuny, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Minimising false positives rates is an important goal of universal newborn hearing screening programmes. An adequate way for reaching that goal could be differentiating between transient conductive hearing losses (false positives) and permanent sensorineural hearing impairments (true positives) by means of a methodology that studies electrophysiological responses obtained using both air- and bone-conduction stimuli. Our objective was to evaluate the efficiency of an automated hearing screening test based on auditory steady state responses obtained using simultaneous air- and bone-conduction stimuli. A sample of 80 high risk babies lees than 2 months of born were screened using the automatic screening test. A confirmatory clinical and electrophysiological evaluation was used as the gold standard. The estimated diagnostic efficiency of this screening test was equivalent (100% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity) to the efficiency reported for otoacoustic emissions and automated auditory brainstem responses. The introduction of bone conduction in the screening reduced the false positive rate from 13.3% to 2.2%. The test duration was 5.3 (± 1.9)min. In 34% of babies only one repetition of the test was needed to raising the result. The screening test performed quite well in this initial clinical trial, differentiating transient conductive hearing losses from permanent neurosensory impairments and improving the diagnostic efficiency of auditory steady state responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  16. The modulatory influence of a predictive cue on the auditory steady-state response.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Nathan; Lecaignard, Françoise; Müller, Nadia; Bertrand, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Whether attention exerts its impact already on primary sensory levels is still a matter of debate. Particularly in the auditory domain the amount of empirical evidence is scarce. Recently noninvasive and invasive studies have shown attentional modulations of the auditory Steady-State Response (aSSR). This evoked oscillatory brain response is of importance to the issue, because the main generators have been shown to be located in primary auditory cortex. So far, the issue whether the aSSR is sensitive to the predictive value of a cue preceding a target has not been investigated. Participants in the present study had to indicate on which ear the faster amplitude modulated (AM) sound of a compound sound (42 and 19 Hz AM frequencies) was presented. A preceding auditory cue was either informative (75%) or uninformative (50%) with regards to the location of the target. Behaviorally we could confirm that typical attentional modulations of performance were present in case of a preceding informative cue. With regards to the aSSR we found differences between the informative and uninformative condition only when the cue/target combination was presented to the right ear. Source analysis indicated this difference to be generated by a reduced 42 Hz aSSR in right primary auditory cortex. Our and previous data by others show a default tendency of "40 Hz" AM sounds to be processed by the right auditory cortex. We interpret our results as active suppression of this automatic response pattern, when attention needs to be allocated to right ear input. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Source analysis of auditory steady-state responses in acoustic and electric hearing.

    PubMed

    Luke, Robert; De Vos, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2017-02-15

    Speech is a complex signal containing a broad variety of acoustic information. For accurate speech reception, the listener must perceive modulations over a range of envelope frequencies. Perception of these modulations is particularly important for cochlear implant (CI) users, as all commercial devices use envelope coding strategies. Prolonged deafness affects the auditory pathway. However, little is known of how cochlear implantation affects the neural processing of modulated stimuli. This study investigates and contrasts the neural processing of envelope rate modulated signals in acoustic and CI listeners. Auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are used to study the neural processing of amplitude modulated (AM) signals. A beamforming technique is applied to determine the increase in neural activity relative to a control condition, with particular attention paid to defining the accuracy and precision of this technique relative to other tomographies. In a cohort of 44 acoustic listeners, the location, activity and hemispheric lateralisation of ASSRs is characterised while systematically varying the modulation rate (4, 10, 20, 40 and 80Hz) and stimulation ear (right, left and bilateral). We demonstrate a complex pattern of laterality depending on both modulation rate and stimulation ear that is consistent with, and extends, existing literature. We present a novel extension to the beamforming method which facilitates source analysis of electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs). In a cohort of 5 right implanted unilateral CI users, the neural activity is determined for the 40Hz rate and compared to the acoustic cohort. Results indicate that CI users activate typical thalamic locations for 40Hz stimuli. However, complementary to studies of transient stimuli, the CI population has atypical hemispheric laterality, preferentially activating the contralateral hemisphere.

  18. Objective evaluation of aided thresholds using auditory steady-state responses.

    PubMed

    Picton, T W; Durieux-Smith, A; Champagne, S C; Whittingham, J; Moran, L M; Giguère, C; Beauregard, Y

    1998-10-01

    Auditory steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated tones with modulation frequencies between 80 and 105 Hz can be recorded when multiple stimuli are presented simultaneously through a soundfield speaker and amplified using a hearing aid. Responses were recorded at carrier frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz in a group of 35 hearing-impaired children using hearing aids. The physiologic responses were recorded at intensities close to the behavioral thresholds for sounds in the aided condition, with average differences between the physiologic and behavioral thresholds of 17, 13, 13, and 16 dB for carrier frequencies 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. The technique shows great promise as a way to assess aided thresholds objectively in subjects who cannot reliably respond on behavioral testing.

  19. Stimulus Variability Affects the Amplitude of the Auditory Steady-State Response

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Michael I. G.; Woods, William P.; Prendergast, Garreth; Johnson, Sam R.; Green, Gary G. R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate whether stimulus variability affects the auditory steady-state response (ASSR). We present cosinusoidal AM pulses as stimuli where we are able to manipulate waveform shape independently of the fixed repetition rate of 4 Hz. We either present sounds in which the waveform shape, the pulse-width, is fixed throughout the presentation or where it varies pseudo-randomly. Importantly, the average spectra of all the fixed-width AM stimuli are equal to the spectra of the mixed-width AM. Our null hypothesis is that the average ASSR to the fixed-width AM will not be significantly different from the ASSR to the mixed-width AM. In a region of interest beamformer analysis of MEG data, we compare the 4 Hz component of the ASSR to the mixed-width AM with the 4 Hz component of the ASSR to the pooled fixed-width AM. We find that at the group level, there is a significantly greater response to the variable mixed-width AM at the medial boundary of the Middle and Superior Temporal Gyri. Hence, we find that adding variability into AM stimuli increases the amplitude of the ASSR. This observation is important, as it provides evidence that analysis of the modulation waveform shape is an integral part of AM processing. Therefore, standard steady-state studies in audition, using sinusoidal AM, may not be sensitive to a key feature of acoustic processing. PMID:22509343

  20. Auditory-steady-state response reliability in the audiological diagnosis after neonatal hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Batalla, Faustino; Noriega-Iglesias, Sabel; Guntín-García, Maite; Carro-Fernández, Pilar; Llorente-Pendás, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Conventional audiometry is the gold standard for quantifying and describing hearing loss. Alternative methods become necessary to assess subjects who are too young to respond reliably. Auditory evoked potentials constitute the most widely used method for determining hearing thresholds objectively; however, this stimulus is not frequency specific. The advent of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) leads to more specific threshold determination. The current study describes and compares ASSR, auditory brainstem response (ABR) and conventional behavioural tone audiometry thresholds in a group of infants with various degrees of hearing loss. A comparison was made between ASSR, ABR and behavioural hearing thresholds in 35 infants detected in the neonatal hearing screening program. Mean difference scores (±SD) between ABR and high frequency ABR thresholds were 11.2 dB (±13) and 10.2 dB (±11). Pearson correlations between the ASSR and audiometry thresholds were 0.80 and 0.91 (500Hz); 0.84 and 0.82 (1000Hz); 0.85 and 0.84 (2000Hz); and 0.83 and 0.82 (4000Hz). The ASSR technique is a valuable extension of the clinical test battery for hearing-impaired children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  1. Auditory steady state response in the schizophrenia, first-degree relatives, and schizotypal personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rass, Olga; Forsyth, Jennifer K; Krishnan, Giri P; Hetrick, William P; Klaunig, Mallory J; Breier, Alan; O'Donnell, Brian F; Brenner, Colleen A

    2012-04-01

    The power and phase synchronization of the auditory steady state response (ASSR) at 40 Hz stimulation is usually reduced in schizophrenia (SZ). The sensitivity of the 40 Hz ASSR to schizophrenia spectrum phenotypes, such as schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), or to familial risk has been less well characterized. We compared the ASSR of patients with SZ, persons with schizotypal personality disorder, first degree relatives of patients with SZ, and healthy control participants. ASSRs were obtained to 20, 30, 40 and 50 Hz click trains, and assessed using measures of power (mean trial power or MTP) and phase consistency (phase locking factor or PLF). The MTP to 40 Hz stimulation was reduced in relatives, and there was a trend for MTP reduction in SZ. The 40 Hz ASSR was not reduced in SPD participants. PLF did not differ among groups. These data suggest the 40 Hz ASSR is sensitive to familial risk factors associated with schizophrenia.

  2. Augmented gamma band auditory steady-state responses: support for NMDA hypofunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Gilmore, Casey S; Clementz, Brett A

    2012-06-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia (SZ) have deviations in auditory perception perhaps attributable to altered neural oscillatory response properties in thalamo-cortical and/or local cortico-cortical circuits. Previous EEG studies of auditory steady-state responses (aSSRs; a measure of sustained neuronal entrainment to repetitive stimulation) in SZ have indicated attenuated gamma range (≈40 Hz) neural entrainment. Stimuli in most such studies have been relatively brief (500-1000 ms) trains of 1 ms clicks or amplitude modulated pure tones (1000 Hz) with short, fixed interstimulus intervals (200-1000 ms). The current study used extended (1500 ms), more aurally dense broadband stimuli (500-4000 Hz noise; previously demonstrated to elicit larger aSSRs) with longer, variable interstimulus intervals (2700-3300 ms). Dense array EEG (256 sensor) was collected while 17 SZ and 16 healthy subjects passively listed to stimuli modulated at 15 different frequencies spanning beta and gamma ranges (16-44 Hz in 2 Hz steps). Results indicate that SZ have augmented aSSRs that were most extreme in the gamma range. Results also constructively replicate previous findings of attenuated low frequency auditory evoked responses (2-8 Hz) in SZ. These findings (i) highlight differential characteristics of low versus high frequency and induced versus entrained oscillatory auditory responses in both SZ and healthy stimulus processing, (ii) provide support for an NMDA-receptor hypofunction-based pharmacological model of SZ, and (iii) report a novel pattern of aSSR abnormalities suggesting that gamma band neural entrainment deviations among SZ may be more complex than previously supposed, including possibly being substantially influenced by physical stimulus properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Steady state responses to temporally congruent and incongruent auditory and vibrotactile amplitude modulated stimulation.

    PubMed

    Budd, Timothy W; Timora, Justin R

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that multisensory integration may occur at an early phase in sensory processing and within cortical regions traditionally though to be exclusively unisensory. Evidence from perceptual and electrophysiological studies indicate that the cross modal temporal correspondence of multisensory stimuli plays a fundamental role in the cortical integration of information across separate sensory modalities. Further, oscillatory neural activity in sensory cortices may provide the principle mechanism whereby sensory information from separate modalities is integrated. In the present study we aimed to extend this prior research by using the steady-state EEG response (SSR) to examine whether variations in the cross-modality temporal correspondence of amplitude modulated auditory and vibrotactile stimulation are apparent in SSR activity to multisensory stimulation. To achieve this we varied the cross-modal congruence of modulation rate for passively and simultaneously presented amplitude modulated auditory and vibrotactile stimuli. In order to maximise the SSR response in both modalities 21 and 40 Hz modulation rates were selected. Consistent with prior SSR studies, the present results showed clear evidence of phase-locking for EEG frequencies corresponding to the modulation rate of auditory and vibrotactile stimulation. As also found previously, the optimal modulation rate for SSR activity differed according to the modality, being greater at 40 Hz for auditory responses and greater at 21 Hz for vibrotactile responses. Despite consistent and reliable changes in SSR activity with manipulations of modulation rate within modality, the present study failed to provide strong evidence of multisensory interactions in SSR activity for temporally congruent, relative to incongruent, cross modal conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the role of attention as a possible factor in reconciling inconsistencies in SSR studies of multisensory integration. Crown

  4. [Newborn hearing screening test with multiple auditory steady-state responses].

    PubMed

    Mijares Nodarse, Eleina; Herrera Alonso, Didiesle; Gaya Vázquez, José; Santos Febles, Elsa; Pérez Abalo, María Cecilia; Mendez Alarcón, Leonel; Robertson Terry, Regla

    2011-01-01

    The techniques most frequently used within a screening context (otoacoustic emissions and click auditory brainstem response) have well-known limitations in hearing loss detection. This study examines the feasibility of a semi-automated multiple auditory steady-state responses (MSSR) system designed for neonatal hearing screening. A sample of 50 newborns without risk factors (well-babies) was tested within two weeks of birth. All had detectable auditory brainstem responses to clicks down to 40dB nHL in both ears. Two amplitude modulated carrier tones of 500 and 2,000Hz were mixed together and presented simultaneously. Each infant (and ear) was screened with the MSSR system; to simulate a hearing loss, a recording without stimulation was also obtained. Mean auditory thresholds were 42.5±7dB HL at 500Hz and 35.5±6dB HL at 2,000Hz. The average duration of the MSSR recording was 2.6±1.6 minutes for each tested ear and the overall duration of the screening procedure (including electrode fitting and infant preparation) was 17.8±3.7 minutes. The diagnostic sensibility and the positive predictive values of the MSSR semi-automatic screening system was 100% and 96% respectively, with specificity of 96% and negative predictive values of 100%. Although the diagnostic efficiency of the semi-automated MSSR system was found adequate, further technological improvements are still necessary to facilitate its use in the context of universal newborn hearing screening program. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain-computer interfaces using capacitive measurement of visual or auditory steady-state responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyun Jae; Kim, Hyun Seok; Heo, Jeong; Lim, Yong Gyu; Park, Kwang Suk

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have been intensely studied to provide alternative communication tools entirely independent of neuromuscular activities. Current BCI technologies use electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition methods that require unpleasant gel injections, impractical preparations and clean-up procedures. The next generation of BCI technologies requires practical, user-friendly, nonintrusive EEG platforms in order to facilitate the application of laboratory work in real-world settings. Approach. A capacitive electrode that does not require an electrolytic gel or direct electrode-scalp contact is a potential alternative to the conventional wet electrode in future BCI systems. We have proposed a new capacitive EEG electrode that contains a conductive polymer-sensing surface, which enhances electrode performance. This paper presents results from five subjects who exhibited visual or auditory steady-state responses according to BCI using these new capacitive electrodes. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) spelling system and the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) binary decision system were employed. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated BCI performance high enough to be used in a BCI system (accuracy: 95.2%, ITR: 19.91 bpm for SSVEP BCI (6 s), accuracy: 82.6%, ITR: 1.48 bpm for ASSR BCI (14 s)) with the analysis time being slightly longer than that when wet electrodes were employed with the same BCI system (accuracy: 91.2%, ITR: 25.79 bpm for SSVEP BCI (4 s), accuracy: 81.3%, ITR: 1.57 bpm for ASSR BCI (12 s)). Subjects performed online BCI under the SSVEP paradigm in copy spelling mode and under the ASSR paradigm in selective attention mode with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 17.78 ± 2.08 and 0.7 ± 0.24 bpm, respectively. Significance. The results of these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using our capacitive EEG electrode in BCI systems. This capacitive electrode may become a flexible and

  6. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  7. Auditory steady state response in hearing assessment in infants with cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela Polo C.; Lopez, Priscila Suman; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus and progressive sensorineural hearing loss, who was assessed by three methods of hearing evaluation. CASE DESCRIPTION: In the first audiometry, at four months of age, the infant showed abnormal response in Otoacoustic Emissions and normal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR), with electrophysiological threshold in 30dBnHL, in both ears. With six months of age, he showed bilateral absence of the ABR at 100dBnHL. The behavioral observational audiometry was impaired due to the delay in neuropsychomotor development. At eight months of age, he was submitted to Auditory Steady State Response (ASSR) and the thresholds were 50, 70, absent in 110 and in 100dB, respectively for 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000Hz in the right ear, and 70, 90, 90 and absent in 100dB, respectively for 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000Hz in the left ear. COMMENTS: In the first evaluation, the infant had abnormal Otoacoustic Emission and normal ABR, which became altered at six months of age. The hearing loss severity could be identified only by the ASSR, which allowed the best procedure for hearing aids adaptation. The case description highlights the importance of the hearing status follow-up for children with congenital cytomegalovirus. PMID:24473963

  8. Neuromagnetic auditory steady state response to chords: effect of frequency ratio.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Asuka; Yumoto, Masato; Kuriki, Shinya; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual degree of consonance or dissonance of a chord is known to be varied as a function of frequency ratio between tones composing the chord. It has been indicated that generation of a sense of dissonance is associated with the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) phase-locked to difference frequencies which are salient in the chords with complex frequency ratios. This study further investigated how the neuromagnetic ASSR would be modulated as a function of the frequency ratio when the acoustic properties of the difference frequency, to which the ASSR was synchronized, was identical in terms of its number, energy and frequency. Neuronal frequency characteristics intrinsic to the ASSR were compensated by utilizing responses to a SAM (Sinusoidally Amplitude Modulated) chirp tone sweeping through the corresponding frequency range. The results showed that ASSR was significantly smaller for the chords with simple frequency ratios than for those with complex frequency ratios. It indicates that the basic neuronal correlates underlying the sensation of consonance/dissonance might be associated with the attenuation rate applied to encode the input information through the afferent auditory pathway. Attentional gating of the thalamo-cortical function might also be one of the factors.

  9. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of auditory steady-state responses to acoustic amplitude modulations: Potential sources beyond the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ehsan Darestani; Goossens, Tine; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2017-03-01

    Investigating the neural generators of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), i.e., auditory evoked brain responses, with a wide range of screening and diagnostic applications, has been the focus of various studies for many years. Most of these studies employed a priori assumptions regarding the number and location of neural generators. The aim of this study is to reconstruct ASSR sources with minimal assumptions in order to gain in-depth insight into the number and location of brain regions that are activated in response to low- as well as high-frequency acoustically amplitude modulated signals. In order to reconstruct ASSR sources, we applied independent component analysis with subsequent equivalent dipole modeling to single-subject EEG data (young adults, 20-30 years of age). These data were based on white noise stimuli, amplitude modulated at 4, 20, 40, or 80Hz. The independent components that exhibited a significant ASSR were clustered among all participants by means of a probabilistic clustering method based on a Gaussian mixture model. Results suggest that a widely distributed network of sources, located in cortical as well as subcortical regions, is active in response to 4, 20, 40, and 80Hz amplitude modulated noises. Some of these sources are located beyond the central auditory pathway. Comparison of brain sources in response to different modulation frequencies suggested that the identified brain sources in the brainstem, the left and the right auditory cortex show a higher responsiveness to 40Hz than to the other modulation frequencies.

  10. Amplitude modulation rate dependent topographic organization of the auditory steady-state response in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Nathan; Lithari, Chrysoula

    2017-10-01

    Periodic modulations of an acoustic feature, such as amplitude over a certain frequency range, leads to phase locking of neural responses to the envelope of the modulation. Using electrophysiological methods this neural activity pattern, also called the auditory steady-state response (aSSR), is visible following frequency transformation of the evoked response as a clear spectral peak at the modulation frequency. Despite several studies employing the aSSR that show, for example, strongest responses for ∼40 Hz and an overall right-hemispheric dominance, it has not been investigated so far to what extent within auditory cortex different modulation frequencies elicit aSSRs at a homogenous source or whether the localization of the aSSR is topographically organized in a systematic manner. The latter would be suggested by previous neuroimaging works in monkeys and humans showing a periodotopic organization within and across distinct auditory fields. However, the sluggishness of the signal from these neuroimaging works prohibit inferences with regards to the fine-temporal features of the neural response. In the present study, we employed amplitude-modulated (AM) sounds over a range between 4 and 85 Hz to elicit aSSRs while recording brain activity via magnetoencephalography (MEG). Using beamforming and a fine spatially resolved grid restricted to auditory cortical processing regions, our study revealed a topographic representation of the aSSR that depends on AM rate, in particular in the medial-lateral (bilateral) and posterior-anterior (right auditory cortex) direction. In summary, our findings confirm previous studies that showing different AM rates to elicit maximal response in distinct neural populations. They extend these findings however by also showing that these respective neural ensembles in auditory cortex actually phase lock their activity over a wide modulation frequency range. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Contralateral Noise on the 20-Hz Auditory Steady State Response - Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Usubuchi, Hajime; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years). The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation) applied to the contralateral ear. PMID:24915061

  12. Effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz auditory steady state response--magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Usubuchi, Hajime; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years). The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation) applied to the contralateral ear.

  13. Auditory steady-state responses in cochlear implant users: Effect of modulation frequency and stimulation artifacts.

    PubMed

    Gransier, Robin; Deprez, Hanne; Hofmann, Michael; Moonen, Marc; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that objective measures based on stimulation with low-rate pulse trains fail to predict the threshold levels of cochlear implant (CI) users for high-rate pulse trains, as used in clinical devices. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) can be elicited by modulated high-rate pulse trains, and can potentially be used to objectively determine threshold levels of CI users. The responsiveness of the auditory pathway of profoundly hearing-impaired CI users to modulation frequencies is, however, not known. In the present study we investigated the responsiveness of the auditory pathway of CI users to a monopolar 500 pulses per second (pps) pulse train modulated between 1 and 100 Hz. EASSRs to forty-three modulation frequencies, elicited at the subject's maximum comfort level, were recorded by means of electroencephalography. Stimulation artifacts were removed by a linear interpolation between a pre- and post-stimulus sample (i.e., blanking). The phase delay across modulation frequencies was used to differentiate between the neural response and a possible residual stimulation artifact after blanking. Stimulation artifacts were longer than the inter-pulse interval of the 500pps pulse train for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. As a result the stimulation artifacts could not be removed by artifact removal on the bases of linear interpolation for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. However, artifact-free responses could be obtained in all subjects from recording electrodes contralateral to the CI, when subject specific reference electrodes (Cz or Fpz) were used. EASSRs to modulation frequencies within the 30-50 Hz range resulted in significant responses in all subjects. Only a small number of significant responses could be obtained, during a measurement period of 5 min, that originate from the brain stem (i.e., modulation frequencies in the 80-100 Hz range). This reduced synchronized activity of brain stem

  14. Association of Auditory Steady State Responses with Perception of Temporal Modulations and Speech in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Manju, Venugopal; Gopika, Kizhakke Kodiyath; Arivudai Nambi, Pitchai Muthu

    2014-01-01

    Amplitude modulations in the speech convey important acoustic information for speech perception. Auditory steady state response (ASSR) is thought to be physiological correlate of amplitude modulation perception. Limited research is available exploring association between ASSR and modulation detection ability as well as speech perception. Correlation of modulation detection thresholds (MDT) and speech perception in noise with ASSR was investigated in twofold experiments. 30 normal hearing individuals and 11 normal hearing individuals within age range of 18–24 years participated in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. MDTs were measured using ASSR and behavioral method at 60 Hz, 80 Hz, and 120 Hz modulation frequencies in the first experiment. ASSR threshold was obtained by estimating the minimum modulation depth required to elicit ASSR (ASSR-MDT). There was a positive correlation between behavioral MDT and ASSR-MDT at all modulation frequencies. In the second experiment, ASSR for amplitude modulation (AM) sweeps at four different frequency ranges (30–40 Hz, 40–50 Hz, 50–60 Hz, and 60–70 Hz) was recorded. Speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTn) was estimated using staircase procedure. There was a positive correlation between amplitude of ASSR for AM sweep with frequency range of 30–40 Hz and SRTn. Results of the current study suggest that ASSR provides substantial information about temporal modulation and speech perception. PMID:25006511

  15. Is the effect of tinnitus on auditory steady-state response amplitude mediated by attention?

    PubMed Central

    Diesch, Eugen; Andermann, Martin; Rupp, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory steady-state response (ASSR) amplitude enhancement effects have been reported in tinnitus patients. As ASSR amplitude is also enhanced by attention, the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude could be interpreted as an effect of attention mediated by tinnitus. As N1 attention effects are significantly larger than those on the ASSR, if the effect of tinnitus on ASSR amplitude were due to attention, there should be similar amplitude enhancement effects in tinnitus for the N1 component of the auditory-evoked response. Methods: MEG recordings which were previously examined for the ASSR (Diesch et al., 2010a) were analyzed with respect to the N1m component. Like the ASSR previously, the N1m was analyzed in the source domain (source space projection). Stimuli were amplitude-modulated (AM) tones with one of three carrier frequencies matching the tinnitus frequency or a surrogate frequency 1½ octave above the audiometric edge frequency in controls, the audiometric edge frequency, and a frequency below the audiometric edge. Single AM-tones were presented in a single condition and superpositions of three AM-tones differing in carrier and modulation frequency in a composite condition. Results: In the earlier ASSR study (Diesch et al., 2010a), the ASSR amplitude in tinnitus patients, but not in controls, was significantly larger in the (surrogate) tinnitus condition than in the edge condition. Patients showed less evidence than controls of reciprocal inhibition of component ASSR responses in the composite condition. In the present study, N1m amplitudes elicited by stimuli located at the audiometric edge and at the (surrogate) tinnitus frequency were smaller than N1m amplitudes elicited by sub-edge tones both in patients and controls. The relationship of the N1m response in the composite condition to the N1m response in the single condition indicated that reciprocal inhibition among component N1m responses was reduced in patients compared against controls

  16. Network Analysis of Functional Brain Connectivity Driven by Gamma-Band Auditory Steady-State Response in Auditory Hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Zhou, Dan; Lin, Ke; Gao, Xiaorong

    The auditory steady-state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain. Particularly, it was reported that the gamma-band ASSR plays an important role in working memory, speech understanding, and recognition. Traditionally, the ASSR has been determined by power spectral density analysis, which cannot detect the exact overall distributed properties of the ASSR. Functional network analysis has recently been applied in electroencephalography studies. Previous studies on resting or working state found a small-world organization of the brain network. Some researchers have studied dysfunctional networks caused by diseases. The present study investigates the brain connection networks of schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations during an ASSR task. A directed transfer function is utilized to estimate the brain connectivity patterns. Moreover, the structures of brain networks are analyzed by converting the connectivity matrices into graphs. It is found that for normal subjects, network connections are mainly distributed at the central and frontal-temporal regions. This indicates that the central regions act as transmission hubs of information under ASSR stimulation. For patients, network connections seem unordered. The finding that the path length was larger in patients compared to that in normal subjects under most thresholds provides insight into the structures of connectivity patterns. The results suggest that there are more synchronous oscillations that cover a long distance on the cortex but a less efficient network for patients with auditory hallucinations.

  17. Hearing aid validation based on 40 Hz auditory steady-state response thresholds.

    PubMed

    Sardari, Sara; Jafari, Zahra; Haghani, Hamid; Talebi, Hossain

    2015-12-01

    Aided thresholds can be used for prediction of success of hearing aids and to choose between hearing aids and cochlear implants. This study aimed to compare characteristics of aided and unaided auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs). A total of 30 moderate to profoundly hearing-impaired subjects participated in this study. The subjects underwent acoustic immittance, behavioral audiometry, and ASSR with the modulation rate of 40 Hz, first without a hearing aid and then with a hearing aid. Sixteen people with normal hearing and 17 people with severe hearing loss were included in biological calibration of the sound field. There was a significant difference between unaided behavioral and ASSR thresholds in all test frequencies (mean difference of unaided behavioral ASSR thresholds: 6.19 dB; P = 0.02 at 500 Hz, P < 0.001 at 1000 and 2000 Hz, and P = 0.02 for 4000 Hz). There was also a significant difference between aided behavioral and ASSR thresholds at 1000 and 2000 Hz (P < 0.001) but not at 500 (P = 0.14) and 4000 (P = 0.23) Hz (mean difference of behavioral ASSR thresholds was 4.33 dB). Despite observing any unaided responses, aided thresholds could be recorded in some severe to profoundly hearing-impaired subjects. The number of recordable thresholds was directly related to speech clarity and speech-reading ability. Multi-frequency stimulation elevated the ASSR threshold, especially for the higher frequencies and in the aided condition. Functional and ASSR gains show less difference than threshold data. Therefore, comparing gains instead of thresholds is more accurate for validation of hearing aids. The probability of success of hearing aids appears to be poor if ASSRs (especially aided ones) cannot be recorded. If special care is taken in the fitting of hearing aids and the testing conditions, aided ASSR testing could be a useful tool for validation of hearing aids and the cochlear implant decision-making process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  18. Auditory steady state responses and cochlear implants: Modeling the artifact-response mixture in the perspective of denoising

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Faten; Attina, Virginie; Duroc, Yvan; Veuillet, Evelyne; Truy, Eric; Thai-Van, Hung

    2017-01-01

    Auditory steady state responses (ASSRs) in cochlear implant (CI) patients are contaminated by the spread of a continuous CI electrical stimulation artifact. The aim of this work was to model the electrophysiological mixture of the CI artifact and the corresponding evoked potentials on scalp electrodes in order to evaluate the performance of denoising algorithms in eliminating the CI artifact in a controlled environment. The basis of the proposed computational framework is a neural mass model representing the nodes of the auditory pathways. Six main contributors to auditory evoked potentials from the cochlear level and up to the auditory cortex were taken into consideration. The simulated dynamics were then projected into a 3-layer realistic head model. 32-channel scalp recordings of the CI artifact-response were then generated by solving the electromagnetic forward problem. As an application, the framework’s simulated 32-channel datasets were used to compare the performance of 4 commonly used Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithms: infomax, extended infomax, jade and fastICA in eliminating the CI artifact. As expected, two major components were detectable in the simulated datasets, a low frequency component at the modulation frequency and a pulsatile high frequency component related to the stimulation frequency. The first can be attributed to the phase-locked ASSR and the second to the stimulation artifact. Among the ICA algorithms tested, simulations showed that infomax was the most efficient and reliable in denoising the CI artifact-response mixture. Denoising algorithms can induce undesirable deformation of the signal of interest in real CI patient recordings. The proposed framework is a valuable tool for evaluating these algorithms in a controllable environment ahead of experimental or clinical applications. PMID:28350887

  19. Music and natural sounds in an auditory steady-state response based brain-computer interface to increase user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeong; Baek, Hyun Jae; Hong, Seunghyeok; Chang, Min Hye; Lee, Jeong Su; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-05-01

    Patients with total locked-in syndrome are conscious; however, they cannot express themselves because most of their voluntary muscles are paralyzed, and many of these patients have lost their eyesight. To improve the quality of life of these patients, there is an increasing need for communication-supporting technologies that leverage the remaining senses of the patient along with physiological signals. The auditory steady-state response (ASSR) is an electro-physiologic response to auditory stimulation that is amplitude-modulated by a specific frequency. By leveraging the phenomenon whereby ASSR is modulated by mind concentration, a brain-computer interface paradigm was proposed to classify the selective attention of the patient. In this paper, we propose an auditory stimulation method to minimize auditory stress by replacing the monotone carrier with familiar music and natural sounds for an ergonomic system. Piano and violin instrumentals were employed in the music sessions; the sounds of water streaming and cicadas singing were used in the natural sound sessions. Six healthy subjects participated in the experiment. Electroencephalograms were recorded using four electrodes (Cz, Oz, T7 and T8). Seven sessions were performed using different stimuli. The spectral power at 38 and 42Hz and their ratio for each electrode were extracted as features. Linear discriminant analysis was utilized to classify the selections for each subject. In offline analysis, the average classification accuracies with a modulation index of 1.0 were 89.67% and 87.67% using music and natural sounds, respectively. In online experiments, the average classification accuracies were 88.3% and 80.0% using music and natural sounds, respectively. Using the proposed method, we obtained significantly higher user-acceptance scores, while maintaining a high average classification accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Are Auditory Steady-State Responses Useful to Evaluate Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Grasel, Signe Schuster; de Almeida, Edigar Rezende; Beck, Roberto Miquelino de Oliveira; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Ramos, Henrique Faria; Rossi, Amanda Costa; Koji Tsuji, Robinson; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Brito, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR) at high intensities in pediatric cochlear implant candidates and to compare the results to behavioral tests responses. Methods. This prospective study evaluated 42 children with suspected severe-to-profound hearing loss, aged from 3 to 72 months. All had absent ABR and OAE responses. ASSR were evoked using binaural single frequency stimuli at 110 dB HL with a 10 dB down-seeking procedure. ASSR and behavioral test results were compared. Results. Forty-two subjects completed both ASSR and behavioral evaluation. Eleven children (26.2%) had bilateral responses. Four (9.5%) showed unilateral responses in at least two frequencies, all confirmed by behavioral results. Overall 61 ASSR responses were obtained, most (37.7%) in 500 Hz. Mean thresholds were between 101.3 and 104.2 dB HL. Among 27 subjects with absent ASSR, fifteen had no behavioral responses. Seven subjects showed behavioral responses with absent ASSR responses. No spurious ASSR responses were observed at 100 or 110 dB HL. Conclusion. ASSR is a valuable tool to detect residual hearing. No false-positive ASSR results were observed among 42 children, but in seven cases with absent ASSR, the test underestimated residual hearing as compared to the behavioral responses. PMID:26557677

  1. Estimation of Human Workload from the Auditory Steady-State Response Recorded via a Wearable Electroencephalography System during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Yusuke; Tanaka, Shingo; Miyamoto, Akihiro; Naruse, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Workload in the human brain can be a useful marker of internal brain state. However, due to technical limitations, previous workload studies have been unable to record brain activity via conventional electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) devices in mobile participants. In this study, we used a wearable EEG system to estimate workload while participants walked in a naturalistic environment. Specifically, we used the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) which is an oscillatory brain activity evoked by repetitive auditory stimuli, as an estimation index of workload. Participants performed three types of N-back tasks, which were expected to command different workloads, while walking at a constant speed. We used a binaural 500 Hz pure tone with amplitude modulation at 40 Hz to evoke the ASSR. We found that the phase-locking index (PLI) of ASSR activity was significantly correlated with the degree of task difficulty, even for EEG data from few electrodes. Thus, ASSR appears to be an effective indicator of workload during walking in an ecologically valid environment. PMID:28659780

  2. [Audiometric thresholds estimated by auditory steady-state responses. Influence of EEG amplitude and test duration on accuracy].

    PubMed

    Mühler, R; Rahne, T

    2009-01-01

    To examine the influence of electroencephalogram (EEG) amplitude, test duration, and residual noise on the definition of threshold criteria for auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) in three representative populations. EEG recordings from 61 patients, 11 sedated babies, and 53 relaxed volunteers were used in an offline analysis that calculated the mean EEG amplitude and the time course of residual noise. Additionally, the time course of residual noise and the test duration for a fixed level of residual noise were estimated from the mean EEG amplitude using the "square root of N" law of averaging. A strong correlation between measured and predicted residual noise was found in all three groups. The mean EEG amplitude as well as the predicted test duration for a fixed residual noise level differed significantly among the three groups, with EEG amplitudes in clinical patients being four times greater than in relaxed volunteers. The strong correlation between EEG amplitude, test duration, and residual noise in ASSR recordings allows for the prediction of individual test duration or residual noise levels in advanced testing algorithms. This study found that high mean EEG amplitudes in awake patients considerably reduce the accuracy of hearing thresholds estimated by ASSR.

  3. MEG and EEG demonstrate similar test-retest reliability of the 40Hz auditory steady-state response.

    PubMed

    Legget, Kristina T; Hild, Allison K; Steinmetz, Sarah E; Simon, Steven T; Rojas, Donald C

    2017-04-01

    The auditory steady-state response (ASSR) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders, but research investigating the test-retest reliability of this measure is needed. We previously reported ASSR reliability, measured by electroencephalography (EEG), to 40Hz amplitude-modulated white noise and click train stimuli. The purpose of the current study was to (a) assess the reliability of the MEG-measured ASSR to 40Hz amplitude-modulated white noise and click train stimuli, and (b) compare test-retest reliability between MEG and EEG measures of ASSR, which has not previously been investigated. Additionally, impact of stimulus parameter choice on reliability was assessed, by comparing responses to white noise and click train stimuli. Test-retest reliability, across sessions approximately one week apart, was assessed in 17 healthy adults. On each study day, participants completed two passive listening tasks (white noise and click train stimuli) during separate MEG and EEG recordings. Between-session correlations for evoked power and inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) were assessed following source-space projection. Overall, the MEG-measured ASSR was significantly correlated between sessions (p<0.05, FDR corrected), suggesting acceptable test-retest reliability. Results suggest greater response reproducibility for ITPC compared to evoked responses and for click train compared to white noise stimuli, although further study is warranted. No significant differences in reliability were observed between MEG and EEG measures, suggesting they are similarly reliable. This work supports use of the ASSR as a biomarker in clinical interventions with repeated measures.

  4. Assessment of low-frequency hearing with narrow-band chirp-evoked 40-Hz sinusoidal auditory steady-state response.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Uzma S; Kaf, Wafaa A; Danesh, Ali A; Lichtenhan, Jeffery T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical utility of narrow-band chirp-evoked 40-Hz sinusoidal auditory steady state responses (s-ASSR) in the assessment of low-frequency hearing in noisy participants. Design Tone bursts and narrow-band chirps were used to respectively evoke auditory brainstem responses (tb-ABR) and 40-Hz s-ASSR thresholds with the Kalman-weighted filtering technique and were compared to behavioral thresholds at 500, 2000, and 4000 Hz. A repeated measure ANOVA and post-hoc t-tests, and simple regression analyses were performed for each of the three stimulus frequencies. Study sample Thirty young adults aged 18-25 with normal hearing participated in this study. Results When 4000 equivalent response averages were used, the range of mean s-ASSR thresholds from 500, 2000, and 4000 Hz were 17-22 dB lower (better) than when 2000 averages were used. The range of mean tb-ABR thresholds were lower by 11-15 dB for 2000 and 4000 Hz when twice as many equivalent response averages were used, while mean tb-ABR thresholds for 500 Hz were indistinguishable regardless of additional response averaging. Conclusion Narrow-band chirp-evoked 40-Hz s-ASSR requires a ∼15 dB smaller correction factor than tb-ABR for estimating low-frequency auditory threshold in noisy participants when adequate response averaging is used.

  5. Hearing threshold estimation by auditory steady-state responses with narrow-band chirps and adaptive stimulus patterns: implementation in clinical routine.

    PubMed

    Seidel, David Ulrich; Flemming, Tobias Angelo; Park, Jonas Jae-Hyun; Remmert, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective hearing threshold estimation by auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) can be accelerated by the use of narrow-band chirps and adaptive stimulus patterns. This modification has been examined in only a few clinical studies. In this study, clinical data is validated and extended, and the applicability of the method in audiological diagnostics routine is examined. In 60 patients (normal hearing and hearing impaired), ASSR and pure tone audiometry (PTA) thresholds were compared. ASSR were evoked by binaural multi-frequent narrow-band chirps with adaptive stimulus patterns. The precision and required testing time for hearing threshold estimation were determined. The average differences between ASSR and PTA thresholds were 18, 12, 17 and 19 dB for normal hearing (PTA ≤ 20 dB) and 5, 9, 9 and 11 dB for hearing impaired (PTA > 20 dB) at the frequencies of 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, respectively, and the differences were significant in all frequencies with the exception of 1 kHz. Correlation coefficients between ASSR and PTA thresholds were 0.36, 0.47, 0.54 and 0.51 for normal hearing and 0.73, 0.74, 0.72 and 0.71 for hearing impaired at 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, respectively. Mean ASSR testing time was 33 ± 8 min. In conclusion, auditory steady-state responses with narrow-band-chirps and adaptive stimulus patterns is an efficient method for objective frequency-specific hearing threshold estimation. Precision of threshold estimation is most limited for slighter hearing loss at 500 Hz. The required testing time is acceptable for the application in everyday clinical routine.

  6. Translating adult electrophysiology findings to younger patient populations: difficulty measuring 40 Hz auditory steady-state responses in typically developing children and children with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, J. Christopher; Fisk, Charles L.; Liu, Song; Pandey, Juhi; Herrington, John D.; Schultz, Robert T.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gamma (~30 to 80 Hz) brain rhythms are thought to be abnormal in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In adult populations, auditory 40 Hz click trains or 40 Hz amplitude-modulated tones are used to assess the integrity of superior temporal gyrus (STG) 40 Hz gamma-band circuits. As STG 40 Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are not fully developed in children, tasks using these stimuli may not be optimal in younger patient populations. The present study examined this issue in typically developing (TD) children as well as in children with ASD, using source localization to directly assess activity in the principal generators of the 40 Hz ASSR - left and right primary/secondary auditory cortex. Methods 40 Hz amplitude-modulated tones of 1sec duration were binaurally presented while magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were obtained from forty-eight TD children (45 males; 7- to 14-years-old) and forty-two children with ASD (38 males; 8- to 14-years-old). T1-weighted structural MRI was obtained. Using single dipoles anatomically constrained to each participant's left and right Heschl's Gyrus, left and right 40 Hz ASSR total power (TP) and inter-trial coherence (ITC) measures were obtained. Associations between 40 Hz ASSR TP, ITC and age as well as superior temporal gyrus (STG) gray matter cortical thickness were measured. Group STG function and structure differences were also examined. Results TD and ASD groups did not differ on 40 Hz ASSR TP or ITC. In TD and ASD, age was associated with left and right 40 Hz ASSR ITC (p < 0.01). The interaction term was not significant, indicating in both groups a ~0.01/year increase in ITC. 40 Hz ASSR TP and ITC were greater in the right than left STG. Groups did not differ in STG cortical thickness, and no associations were observed between 40 Hz ASSR activity and STG cortical thickness. Finally, right STG transient gamma (50 to 100 ms and 30 to 50 Hz) was greater

  7. The Effect of Advancing Age on Auditory Middle- and Long-Latency Evoked Potentials Using a Steady-State-Response Approach.

    PubMed

    Tlumak, Abreena I; Durrant, John D; Delgado, Rafael E

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to objectively detect age-specific changes that occur in equivalent auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), corresponding to transient middle- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials as a function of repetition rate and advancing age. The study included 48 healthy hearing adults who were equally divided into 3 groups by age: 20-39, 40-59, and 60-79 years. ASSRs were recorded at 7 repetition rates from 40 down to 0.75 Hz, elicited by trains of repeated tone burst stimuli. Temporal analysis of middle- and long-latency equivalent ASSRs revealed no appreciable changes in the magnitudes of the response across the age groups. Likewise, the spectral analysis revealed that advancing age did not substantially affect the spectral content of the response at each repetition rate. Furthermore, the harmonic sum was not significantly different across the 3 age groups, between the younger adults versus the combined Older Group Sample 1 and Sample 2, and between the two extreme age groups (i.e., 20-39 vs. 60-79) for the middle- and long-latency equivalent ASSRs. Advancing age has no effect on the long-latency equivalent ASSRs; however, aging does affect the middle-latency equivalent ASSRs when the mean age difference is ≥ 40 years.

  8. Steady state response of unsymmetrically laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Kenji; Kawashima, Katsuya; Sakata, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A numerical approach for analyzing the forced vibration problem of a symmetrically laminated FRP (fiber reinforced plastic) composite plate was proposed by the authors. In the present paper, this approach is modified for application to an unsymmetrically laminated FRP composite plate. Numerical calculations are carried out for the clamped antisymmetrically laminated rectangular and elliptical plates which are a kind of unsymmetrically laminated plate. Then,, the effects of the lamina material and the fiber orientation angle on the steady state response are discussed. Furthermore, it is investigated that what structural damping factor is most influenced on the steady state response of an antisymmetrically laminated plate.

  9. Aerial audiograms of several California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) measured using single and multiple simultaneous auditory steady-state response methods.

    PubMed

    Mulsow, Jason; Reichmuth, Colleen; Gulland, Frances; Rosen, David A S; Finneran, James J

    2011-04-01

    Measurements of the electrophysiological auditory steady-state response (ASSR) have proven to be efficient for evaluating hearing sensitivity in odontocete cetaceans. In an effort to expand these methods to pinnipeds, ASSRs elicited by single and multiple simultaneous tones were used to measure aerial hearing thresholds in several California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). There were no significant differences between thresholds measured using the single and multiple ASSR methods, despite the more rapid nature of data collection using the multiple ASSR method. There was a high degree of variability in ASSR thresholds among subjects; thresholds covered a range of ∼40 dB at each tested frequency. As expected, ASSR thresholds were elevated relative to previously reported psychophysical thresholds for California and Steller sea lions. The features of high-frequency hearing limit and relative sensitivity of most ASSR audiograms were, however, similar to those of psychophysical audiograms, suggesting that ASSR methods can be used to improve understanding of hearing demographics in sea lions, especially with respect to high-frequency hearing. Thresholds for one Steller sea lion were substantially elevated relative to all other subjects, demonstrating that ASSR methods can be used to detect hearing loss in sea lions.

  10. Phase-locking index and power of 40-Hz auditory steady-state response are not related to major personality trait dimensions.

    PubMed

    Korostenskaja, Milena; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Pipinis, Evaldas; Griskova-Bulanova, Inga

    2016-03-01

    Although a number of studies have demonstrated state-related dependence of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), the investigations assessing trait-related ASSR changes are limited. Five consistently identified major trait dimensions, also referred to as "big five" (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness), are considered to account for virtually all personality variances in both healthy people and those with psychiatric disorders. The purpose of the present study was, for the first time, to establish the link between 40-Hz ASSR and "big five" major personality trait dimensions in young healthy adults. Ninety-four young healthy volunteers participated (38 males and 56 females; mean age ± SD 22.180 ± 2.75). The 40-Hz click trains were presented for each subject 30 times with an inter-train interval of 1-1.5 s. The EEG responses were recorded from F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, P3, Pz and P4 locations according to 10/20 electrode placement system. Phase-locking index (PLI) and event-related power perturbation (ERSP) were calculated, each providing the following characteristics: peak time, entrainment frequency, peak value and mean value. For assessing "big five" personality traits, NEO Personality Inventory Revised (NEO-PI-R) was used. No significant correlation between 40-Hz ASSR PLI or ERSP and "big five" personality traits was observed. Our results indicate that there is no dependence between 40-Hz ASSR entrainment and personality traits, demonstrating low individual 40-Hz variability in this domain. Our results support further development of 40-Hz ASSR as a neurophysiological marker allowing distinguishing between healthy population and patients with psychiatric disorders.

  11. Comparisons of auditory steady state response and behavioral air conduction and bone conduction thresholds for infants and adults with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Casey, Kelly-Ann; Small, Susan A

    2014-01-01

    To improve understanding of normal responses in infants by comparing air conduction (AC) and bone conduction (BC) auditory thresholds using both the auditory steady state response (ASSR) and behavioral testing methods in normal-hearing infants (6 to 18 months of age) and adults. At present, there are no correction factors available for estimating BC behavioral thresholds from BC ASSR thresholds, which is a barrier to clinical implementation of the ASSR. In addition, previous studies have reported infant-adult differences in AC and BC sensitivity, which suggest a "maturational" air-bone gap (ABG) that is not attributable to a conductive pathology; no study has yet compared AC and BC thresholds for either ASSR or behavioral methods in the same individuals. The objectives of the present study are: (1) to compare BC thresholds between methods and provide the initial step toward positing correction factors to predict BC behavioral thresholds, (2) to directly compare AC and BC thresholds to provide an accurate estimate of the maturational ABG, (3) to determine preliminary normal levels for BC and AC ASSRs to exponentially amplitude modulated stimuli, and (4) to investigate infant-adult differences in AC and BC thresholds using ASSRs and behavioral assessment tools. Participants were 23 infants (6.5 to 19.0 months of age) and 12 adults (17 to 50 years of age) with normal hearing. Thresholds were estimated at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz using air- and bone-conducted stimuli for ASSRs and behavioral testing. The ASSR stimuli were exponential envelope modulated (amplitude modulation [AM]) at modulation frequencies of 78, 85, 93, and 101 Hz for 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz, respectively, presented simultaneously. Frequency-modulated (warble tone) stimuli were used for behavioral testing for both infants and adults, respectively. All stimuli were calibrated in dB HL. Thresholds were compared across frequency and between stimulus presentation modes, between age groups and

  12. Accuracy of auditory steady state and auditory brainstem responses to detect the preventive effect of polyphenols on age-related hearing loss in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Fernández, Ricardo; Sánchez-Rodriguez, Carolina; Granizo, José Juan; Durio-Calero, Enrique; Martín-Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Aging causes histological, electrophysiological and molecular changes in the cochlea. The free radical theory of aging, has obtained consensus, and the mitochondrion is reported to play a key role in aging as a major source of reactive oxygen species. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the interest in polyphenols because of the antioxidant properties and their role in the prevention of various diseases associated with oxidative stress, including aging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preventive effect of different polyphenols on ARHL with auditory-evoked potentials. 100 Healthy female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used for this study. Five groups were created based on the age of the rats, in months: 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months old. Two additional groups were created based on the treatment received. In the control group, 50 animals were assigned to no treatment. In the treated group, 50 animals were given a vehicle mixture of polyphenols for the half of the life before euthanization. Nine frequencies were tested (0.5-16 kHz) with ASSR and tone-burst ABR, performed on all of the rats prior to sacrifice. 100-μs auditory clicks ABRs were also recorded. A significant decrease in the audition was detected with ABR and ASSR in both treated and non-treated groups, as the different groups became older. This deterioration was more accurately measured at acute frequencies. Significantly lower thresholds were observed in the treated rats in the 6, 12 and 18-month-old group in the treated rats compared with the control group. All of the thresholds elicited using the ASSR technique were lower than the thresholds obtained using the ABR, regardless of the stimulus type. The present study demonstrated the benefits of the polyphenols, which generated a significant protection against ARHL, with significantly improved ASSR and tone-burst ABR auditory thresholds in rats receiving treatment with polyphenols.

  13. Detection efficiency of auditory steady state evoked by modulated noise.

    PubMed

    Santos, T S; Silva, J J; Lins, O G; Melges, D B; Tierra-Criollo, C J

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficiency of Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC) and Spectral F test (SFT) for the detection of auditory steady state responses (ASSR) obtained by amplitude-modulated noises. Twenty individuals (12 women) without any history of neurological or audiological diseases, aged from 18 to 59 years (mean ± standard deviation = 26.45 ± 3.9 years), who provided written informed consent, participated in the study. The Audiostim system was used for stimulating and ASSR recording. The tested stimuli were amplitude-modulated Wide-band noise (WBN), Low-band noise (LBN), High-band noise (HBN), Two-band noise (TBN) between 77 and 110 Hz, applied in intensity levels of 55, 45, and 25 dB sound pressure level (SPL). MSC and SFT, two statistical-based detection techniques, were applied with a significance level of 5%. Detection times and rates were compared using the Friedman test and Tukey-Kramer as post hoc analysis. Also based on the stimulation parameters (stimuli types and intensity levels) and detection techniques (MSC or SFT), 16 different pass/fail protocols, for which the true negatives (TN) were calculated. The median detection times ranged from 68 to 157s for 55 dB SPL, 68-99s for 45 dB SPL, and 84-118s for 25 dB SPL. No statistical difference was found between MSC and STF considering the median detection times (p > 0.05). The detection rates ranged from 100% to 55.6% in 55 dB SPL, 97.2%-38.9% in 45 dB SPL and 66.7%-8.3% in 25 dB SPL. Also for detection rates, no statistical difference was observed between MSC and STF (p > 0.05). True negatives (TN) above 90% were found for Protocols that employed WBN or HBN, at 55 dB SPL or that used WBN or HBN, at 45 dB SPL. For Protocols employing TBN, at 55 dB SPL or 45 dB SPL TN below 60% were found due to the low detection rates of stimuli that included low-band frequencies. The stimuli that include high-frequency content showed higher detection rates (>90%) and lower detection

  14. Decoding of the sound frequency from the steady-state neural activities in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I; Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    In the auditory cortex, onset activities have been extensively investigated as a cortical representation of sound information such as sound frequency. Yet, less attention has been paid to date to steady-state activities following the onset activities. In this study, we used machine learning to investigate whether steady-state activities in the presence of continuous sounds represent the sound frequency. Sparse Logistic Regression (SLR) decoded the sound frequency from band specific power or phase locking value (PLV) of local field potentials (LFP) from the fourth layer of the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats. Consequently, we found that SLR was able to decode the sound frequency from steady-state neural activities as well as onset activities. This result demonstrates that the steady-state activities contain information about the sound such as sound frequency.

  15. Auditory fear conditioning modifies steady-state evoked potentials in the rat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Lockmann, André Luiz Vieira; Mourão, Flávio Afonso Gonçalves; Moraes, Marcio Flávio Dutra

    2017-08-01

    The rat inferior colliculus (IC) is a major midbrain relay for ascending inputs from the auditory brain stem and has been suggested to play a key role in the processing of aversive sounds. Previous studies have demonstrated that auditory fear conditioning (AFC) potentiates transient responses to brief tones in the IC, but it remains unexplored whether AFC modifies responses to sustained periodic acoustic stimulation-a type of response called the steady-state evoked potential (SSEP). Here we used an amplitude-modulated tone-a 10-kHz tone with a sinusoidal amplitude modulation of 53.7 Hz-as the conditioning stimulus (CS) in an AFC protocol (5 CSs per day in 3 consecutive days) while recording local field potentials (LFPs) from the IC. In the preconditioning session (day 1), the CS elicited prominent 53.7-Hz SSEPs. In the training session (day 2), foot shocks occurred at the end of each CS (paired group) or randomized in the inter-CS interval (unpaired group). In the test session (day 3), SSEPs markedly differed from preconditioning in the paired group: in the first two trials the phase to which the SSEP coupled to the CS amplitude envelope shifted ~90°; in the last two trials the SSEP power and the coherence of SSEP with the CS amplitude envelope increased. LFP power decreased in frequency bands other than 53.7 Hz. In the unpaired group, SSEPs did not change in the test compared with preconditioning. Our results show that AFC causes dissociated changes in the phase and power of SSEP in the IC.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Local field potential oscillations in the inferior colliculus follow the amplitude envelope of an amplitude-modulated tone, originating a neural response called the steady-state evoked potential. We show that auditory fear conditioning of an amplitude-modulated tone modifies two parameters of the steady-state evoked potentials in the inferior colliculus: first the phase to which the evoked oscillation couples to the amplitude-modulated tone shifts; subsequently

  16. [Fitting hearing aids in early childhood based on auditory evoked potentials in steady states].

    PubMed

    Zenker Castro, F; Fernández Belda, R; Barajas de Prat, J J

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of the Newborn Hearing Screening Program is to achieve early. Identification and appropriate intervention for hearing loss. Hearing aids are the most frequent intervention for deafness. Paediatric specific clinical protocols for fitting hearing aids always recommend accurate characterisation of hearing thresholds in newborns. In this sense, electrophysiological procedures are specially indicated in determined hearing sensibility from the first age of life since it is an objective and reliable procedure. 20 normal hearing subject and 17 hearing loss subjects participated in this study. Auditory Steady State Responses (ASSR) were obtained from all of them. Hearing aid fitting was established from the electrophysiological responses. Dynamic range, gain, compression ratio and maximum output of the hearing aid were obtained from the intensity amplitude function of the ASSR. The procedure discussed in this study is specially indicated in newborns and very young children in which other test are not suitable.

  17. Descriptive Linear modeling of steady-state visual evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study is being conducted to explore use of the steady state visual-evoke electrocortical response as an indicator of cognitive task loading. Application of linear descriptive modeling to steady state Visual Evoked Response (VER) data is summarized. Two aspects of linear modeling are reviewed: (1) unwrapping the phase-shift portion of the frequency response, and (2) parsimonious characterization of task-loading effects in terms of changes in model parameters. Model-based phase unwrapping appears to be most reliable in applications, such as manual control, where theoretical models are available. Linear descriptive modeling of the VER has not yet been shown to provide consistent and readily interpretable results.

  18. Contralateral white noise attenuates 40-Hz auditory steady-state fields but not N100m in auditory evoked fields.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tetsuaki; Maki, Atsuko; Kanno, Akitake; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Sato, Mika; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2012-01-16

    The different response characteristics of the different auditory cortical responses under conventional central masking conditions were examined by comparing the effects of contralateral white noise on the cortical component of 40-Hz auditory steady state fields (ASSFs) and the N100 m component in auditory evoked fields (AEFs) for tone bursts using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 8 healthy volunteers (7 males, mean age 32.6 years). The ASSFs were elicited by monaural 1000 Hz amplitude modulation tones at 80 dB SPL, with the amplitude modulated at 39 Hz. The AEFs were elicited by monaural 1000 Hz tone bursts of 60 ms duration (rise and fall times of 10 ms, plateau time of 40 ms) at 80 dB SPL. The results indicated that continuous white noise at 70 dB SPL presented to the contralateral ear did not suppress the N100 m response in either hemisphere, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the 40-Hz ASSF in both hemispheres with asymmetry in that suppression of the 40-Hz ASSF was greater in the right hemisphere. Different effects of contralateral white noise on these two responses may reflect different functional auditory processes in the cortices.

  19. Thermodynamic formalism and linear response theory for nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study the linear response in systems driven away from thermal equilibrium into a nonequilibrium steady state with nonvanishing entropy production rate. A simple derivation of a general response formula is presented under the condition that the generating function describes a transformation that (to lowest order) preserves normalization and thus describes a physical stochastic process. For Markov processes we explicitly construct the conjugate quantities and discuss their relation with known response formulas. Emphasis is put on the formal analogy with thermodynamic potentials and some consequences are discussed.

  20. Dynamic causal models of steady-state responses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, R.J.; Stephan, K.E.; Seidenbecher, T.; Pape, H.-C.; Dolan, R.J.; Friston, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a dynamic causal model (DCM) of steady-state responses in electrophysiological data that are summarised in terms of their cross-spectral density. These spectral data-features are generated by a biologically plausible, neural-mass model of coupled electromagnetic sources; where each source comprises three sub-populations. Under linearity and stationarity assumptions, the model's biophysical parameters (e.g., post-synaptic receptor density and time constants) prescribe the cross-spectral density of responses measured directly (e.g., local field potentials) or indirectly through some lead-field (e.g., electroencephalographic and magnetoencephalographic data). Inversion of the ensuing DCM provides conditional probabilities on the synaptic parameters of intrinsic and extrinsic connections in the underlying neuronal network. This means we can make inferences about synaptic physiology, as well as changes induced by pharmacological or behavioural manipulations, using the cross-spectral density of invasive or non-invasive electrophysiological recordings. In this paper, we focus on the form of the model, its inversion and validation using synthetic and real data. We conclude with an illustrative application to multi-channel local field potential data acquired during a learning experiment in mice. PMID:19000769

  1. Vocal sequences suppress spiking in the bat auditory cortex while evoking concomitant steady-state local field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechavarría, Julio C.; Beetz, M. Jerome; Macias, Silvio; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms by which the mammalian brain copes with information from natural vocalization streams remain poorly understood. This article shows that in highly vocal animals, such as the bat species Carollia perspicillata, the spike activity of auditory cortex neurons does not track the temporal information flow enclosed in fast time-varying vocalization streams emitted by conspecifics. For example, leading syllables of so-called distress sequences (produced by bats subjected to duress) suppress cortical spiking to lagging syllables. Local fields potentials (LFPs) recorded simultaneously to cortical spiking evoked by distress sequences carry multiplexed information, with response suppression occurring in low frequency LFPs (i.e. 2-15 Hz) and steady-state LFPs occurring at frequencies that match the rate of energy fluctuations in the incoming sound streams (i.e. >50 Hz). Such steady-state LFPs could reflect underlying synaptic activity that does not necessarily lead to cortical spiking in response to natural fast time-varying vocal sequences.

  2. Vocal sequences suppress spiking in the bat auditory cortex while evoking concomitant steady-state local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hechavarría, Julio C.; Beetz, M. Jerome; Macias, Silvio; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the mammalian brain copes with information from natural vocalization streams remain poorly understood. This article shows that in highly vocal animals, such as the bat species Carollia perspicillata, the spike activity of auditory cortex neurons does not track the temporal information flow enclosed in fast time-varying vocalization streams emitted by conspecifics. For example, leading syllables of so-called distress sequences (produced by bats subjected to duress) suppress cortical spiking to lagging syllables. Local fields potentials (LFPs) recorded simultaneously to cortical spiking evoked by distress sequences carry multiplexed information, with response suppression occurring in low frequency LFPs (i.e. 2–15 Hz) and steady-state LFPs occurring at frequencies that match the rate of energy fluctuations in the incoming sound streams (i.e. >50 Hz). Such steady-state LFPs could reflect underlying synaptic activity that does not necessarily lead to cortical spiking in response to natural fast time-varying vocal sequences. PMID:27976691

  3. Human Neuromagnetic Steady-State Responses to Amplitude-Modulated Tones, Speech, and Music

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory steady-state responses that can be elicited by various periodic sounds inform about subcortical and early cortical auditory processing. Steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated pure tones have been used to scrutinize binaural interaction by frequency-tagging the two ears’ inputs at different frequencies. Unlike pure tones, speech and music are physically very complex, as they include many frequency components, pauses, and large temporal variations. To examine the utility of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) steady-state fields (SSFs) in the study of early cortical processing of complex natural sounds, the authors tested the extent to which amplitude-modulated speech and music can elicit reliable SSFs. Design: MEG responses were recorded to 90-s-long binaural tones, speech, and music, amplitude-modulated at 41.1 Hz at four different depths (25, 50, 75, and 100%). The subjects were 11 healthy, normal-hearing adults. MEG signals were averaged in phase with the modulation frequency, and the sources of the resulting SSFs were modeled by current dipoles. After the MEG recording, intelligibility of the speech, musical quality of the music stimuli, naturalness of music and speech stimuli, and the perceived deterioration caused by the modulation were evaluated on visual analog scales. Results: The perceived quality of the stimuli decreased as a function of increasing modulation depth, more strongly for music than speech; yet, all subjects considered the speech intelligible even at the 100% modulation. SSFs were the strongest to tones and the weakest to speech stimuli; the amplitudes increased with increasing modulation depth for all stimuli. SSFs to tones were reliably detectable at all modulation depths (in all subjects in the right hemisphere, in 9 subjects in the left hemisphere) and to music stimuli at 50 to 100% depths, whereas speech usually elicited clear SSFs only at 100% depth. The hemispheric balance of SSFs was toward the right hemisphere

  4. Human neuromagnetic steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated tones, speech, and music.

    PubMed

    Lamminmäki, Satu; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Auditory steady-state responses that can be elicited by various periodic sounds inform about subcortical and early cortical auditory processing. Steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated pure tones have been used to scrutinize binaural interaction by frequency-tagging the two ears' inputs at different frequencies. Unlike pure tones, speech and music are physically very complex, as they include many frequency components, pauses, and large temporal variations. To examine the utility of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) steady-state fields (SSFs) in the study of early cortical processing of complex natural sounds, the authors tested the extent to which amplitude-modulated speech and music can elicit reliable SSFs. MEG responses were recorded to 90-s-long binaural tones, speech, and music, amplitude-modulated at 41.1 Hz at four different depths (25, 50, 75, and 100%). The subjects were 11 healthy, normal-hearing adults. MEG signals were averaged in phase with the modulation frequency, and the sources of the resulting SSFs were modeled by current dipoles. After the MEG recording, intelligibility of the speech, musical quality of the music stimuli, naturalness of music and speech stimuli, and the perceived deterioration caused by the modulation were evaluated on visual analog scales. The perceived quality of the stimuli decreased as a function of increasing modulation depth, more strongly for music than speech; yet, all subjects considered the speech intelligible even at the 100% modulation. SSFs were the strongest to tones and the weakest to speech stimuli; the amplitudes increased with increasing modulation depth for all stimuli. SSFs to tones were reliably detectable at all modulation depths (in all subjects in the right hemisphere, in 9 subjects in the left hemisphere) and to music stimuli at 50 to 100% depths, whereas speech usually elicited clear SSFs only at 100% depth.The hemispheric balance of SSFs was toward the right hemisphere for tones and speech, whereas

  5. Development of an annoyance model based upon elementary auditory sensations for steady-state aircraft interior noise containing tonal components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angerer, James R.; Mccurdy, David A.; Erickson, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a noise annoyance model, superior to those already in use, for evaluating passenger response to sounds containing tonal components which may be heard within current and future commercial aircraft. The sound spectra investigated ranged from those being experienced by passengers on board turbofan powered aircraft now in service to those cabin noise spectra passengers may experience within advanced propeller-driven aircraft of the future. A total of 240 sounds were tested in this experiment. Sixty-six of these 240 sounds were steady state, while the other 174 varied temporally due to tonal beating. Here, the entire experiment is described, but the analysis is limited to those responses elicited by the 66 steady-state sounds.

  6. Proteome analysis of the Escherichia coli heat shock response under steady-state conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Svenja; Fallet, Claas; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    In this study a proteomic approach was used to investigate the steady-state response of Escherichia coli to temperature up-shifts in a cascade of two continuously operated bioreactors. The first reactor served as cell source with optimal settings for microbial growth, while in the second chemostat the cells were exposed to elevated temperatures. By using this reactor configuration, which has not been reported to be used for the study of bacterial stress responses so far, it is possible to study temperature stress under well-defined, steady-state conditions. Specifically the effect on the cellular adaption to temperature stress using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was examined and compared at the cultivation temperatures of 37°C and 47.5°C. As expected, the steady-state study with the double bioreactor configuration delivered a different protein spectrum compared to that obtained with standard batch experiments in shaking flasks and bioreactors. Setting a high cut-out spot-to-spot size ratio of 5, proteins involved in defence against oxygen stress, functional cell envelope proteins, chaperones and proteins involved in protein biosynthesis, the energy metabolism and the amino acid biosynthesis were found to be differently expressed at high cultivation temperatures. The results demonstrate the complexity of the stress response in a steady-state culture not reported elsewhere to date. PMID:19772559

  7. Children and Adolescents with Autism Exhibit Reduced MEG Steady-State Gamma Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Rojas, Donald C.; Reite, Martin L.; Teale, Peter D.; Rogers, Sally J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent neuroimaging studies of autism have indicated reduced functional connectivity during both cognitive tasks and rest. These data suggest long-range connectivity may be compromised in this disorder, and current neurological theories of autism contend disrupted inter-regional interactions may be an underlying mechanism explaining behavioral symptomatology. However, it is unclear whether deficient neuronal communication is attributable to fewer long-range tracts or more of a local deficit in neural circuitry. This study examines the integrity of local circuitry by focusing on gamma band activity in auditory cortices of children and adolescents with autism. Methods Ten children and adolescents with autism and 10 matched controls participated. Both groups listened to 500 ms duration monaural click trains with a 25 ms inter-click interval, as magnetoencephalography was acquired from the contralateral hemisphere. To estimate 40 Hz spectral power density, we performed time-frequency decomposition of the single-trial magnetic steady-state response data using complex demodulation. Results Children and adolescents with autism exhibited significantly reduced left hemispheric 40 Hz power from 200–500 ms post-stimulus onset. In contrast, no significant between group differences were observed for right hemispheric cortices. Conclusions The production and/or maintenance of left hemispheric gamma oscillations appeared abnormal in participants with autism. We interpret these data as indicating that in autism, particular brain regions may be unable to generate the high-frequency activity likely necessary for binding and other forms of inter-regional interactions. These findings augment connectivity theories of autism with novel evidence that aberrations in local circuitry could underlie putative deficiencies in long-range neural communication. PMID:16950225

  8. VIBRA: An interactive computer program for steady-state vibration response analysis of linear damped structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive steady state frequency response computer program with graphics is documented. Single or multiple forces may be applied to the structure using a modal superposition approach to calculate response. The method can be reapplied to linear, proportionally damped structures in which the damping may be viscous or structural. The theoretical approach and program organization are described. Example problems, user instructions, and a sample interactive session are given to demonstate the program's capability in solving a variety of problems.

  9. The VERRUN and VERNAL software systems for steady-state visual evoked response experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Zacharias, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Two digital computer programs were developed for use in experiments involving steady-state visual evoked response (VER): VERRUN, whose primary functions are to generate a sum-of-sines (SOS) stimulus and to digitize and store electro-cortical response; and VERNAL, which provides both time- and frequency-domain metrics of the evoked response. These programs were coded in FORTRAN for operation on the PDP-11/34, using the RSX-11 Operating System, and the PDP-11/23, using the RT-11 Operating System. Users' and programmers' guides to these programs are provided, and guidelines for model analysis of VER data are suggested.

  10. On the enhancement of training session performance via attention for single-frequency/multi-commands based steady state auditory evoked potential BCI.

    PubMed

    Punsawad, Yunyong; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2012-01-01

    To solve the eye fatigue problem on using the well known steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) system, the steady state auditory evoked potential (SSAEP) becomes one of the promising BCI modalities. However, SSAEP-based BCI system still suffers from the low accuracy. To increase the accuracy, in this paper, we propose the new training method to enhance the SSAEP training session. The training process is enhanced by making the users control their attention levels simultaneously with the detected auditory stimulus frequency. Furthermore, with the proposed training method, we also propose the corresponding single-frequency/multi-commands BCI paradigm. With the proposed paradigm, four commands can be detected by using only one auditory stimulus frequency. The proposed training system yields approximately 81% accuracy compared with 66% of the session without performing the proposed training.

  11. Steady-state responses of a belt-drive dynamical system under dual excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hu

    2016-02-01

    The stable steady-state periodic responses of a belt-drive system with a one-way clutch are studied. For the first time, the dynamical system is investigated under dual excitations. The system is simultaneously excited by the firing pulsations of the engine and the harmonic motion of the foundation. Nonlinear discrete-continuous equations are derived for coupling the transverse vibration of the belt spans and the rotations of the driving and driven pulleys and the accessory pulley. The nonlinear dynamics is studied under equal and multiple relations between the frequency of the firing pulsations and the frequency of the foundation motion. Furthermore, translating belt spans are modeled as axially moving strings. A set of nonlinear piecewise ordinary differential equations is achieved by using the Galerkin truncation. Under various relations between the excitation frequencies, the time histories of the dynamical system are numerically simulated based on the time discretization method. Furthermore, the stable steady-state periodic response curves are calculated based on the frequency sweep. Moreover, the convergence of the Galerkin truncation is examined. Numerical results demonstrate that the one-way clutch reduces the resonance amplitude of the rotations of the driven pulley and the accessory pulley. On the other hand, numerical examples prove that the resonance areas of the belt spans are decreased by eliminating the torque-transmitting in the opposite direction. With the increasing amplitude of the foundation excitation, the damping effect of the one-way clutch will be reduced. Furthermore, as the amplitude of the firing pulsations of the engine increases, the jumping phenomena in steady-state response curves of the belt-drive system with or without a one-way clutch both occur.

  12. Steady-State and Frequency Response of a Thin-Film Heat Flux Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Bhatt, Hemanshu D.; Cho, Chistopher S.

    1997-01-01

    A new and simpler design of thin-film heat flux gauge has been developed for use In high-heat-flux environments. Heat flux gauges of the same design were fabricated on three different substrates and tested. The heat flux gauge comprises a thermopile and a thermocouple junction, which measures the surface temperature. The thermopile has 40 pairs of S-type thermocouples and is covered by two thermal resistance layers. Calibration and testing of these gauges were first carried out in an arc-lamp calibration facility. Sensitivity of the gauge was discussed in terms of the relative conductivity and surface temperature. The heat flux calculated from the gauge output was In good agreement with the precalibrated standard sensor. The steady-state and the transient response characteristics of the heat flux gauge were also investigated using a carbon dioxide pulse laser as a heat source. The dynamic frequency response was evaluated in terms of the nondimensional amplitude ratio with respect to the frequency spectrum of a chopped laser bcam. The frequency response of the gauge was determined to be about 3 kHz. The temperature profiles in the thin-film heat flux gauge were obtained numerically in steady-state conditions using FLUENT and compared with the experimental results.

  13. From arteries to boreholes: steady-state response of a poroelastic cylinder to fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, L. C.; MacMinn, C. W.

    2017-05-01

    The radially outward flow of fluid into a porous medium occurs in many practical problems, from transport across vascular walls to the pressurization of boreholes. As the driving pressure becomes non-negligible relative to the stiffness of the solid structure, the poromechanical coupling between the fluid and the solid has an increasingly strong impact on the flow. For very large pressures or very soft materials, as is the case for hydraulic fracturing and arterial flows, this coupling can lead to large deformations and, hence, to strong deviations from a classical, linear-poroelastic response. Here, we study this problem by analysing the steady-state response of a poroelastic cylinder to fluid injection. We consider the qualitative and quantitative impacts of kinematic and constitutive nonlinearity, highlighting the strong impact of deformation-dependent permeability. We show that the wall thickness (thick versus thin) and the outer boundary condition (free versus constrained) play a central role in controlling the mechanics.

  14. Correlation of the findings of auditory steady-state evoked potential and of behavioral hearing assessment in infants with sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Farias, Vanessa Barcelos de; Sleifer, Pricila; Pauletti, Luciane Ferreira; Krimberg, Cristiane Fernandes Diehl

    2014-01-01

    To correlate the findings of an open-field audiometry with the thresholds of steady-state auditory-evoked potentials (SSAEPs) found in infants of up to 6 months of age with sensorineural hearing loss. This study included 19 infants with sensorineural hearing loss (8 males and 11 females), with minimum age of 2 months and maximum age of 6 months. The SSAEPs were assessed at 500 and 2000 Hz, and the audiometry was performed in open field through observation of behavioral responses to sound stimuli, at the same frequencies. We observed a significant correlation between the findings of both tests conducted at 500 and 2000 Hz, with p-values of 0.002 and 0.013, respectively. There was no statistical difference between ears (p=0.532) and genders (p=0.615). We conclude that there was a significant correlation between the SSAEP thresholds and the findings of the open-field audiometry. Therefore, we can affirm that the SSAEPs are a viable examination, able to predict the degree and configuration of hearing loss in infants of up to 6 months of age, and that they can be included in the clinical routine of hearing assessments conducted in children.

  15. The effect of ocular aberrations on steady-state errors of accommodative response.

    PubMed

    Plainis, Sotiris; Ginis, Harilaos S; Pallikaris, Aristophanis

    2005-05-23

    It is well accepted that the accommodation system is characterized by steady-state errors in focus. The purpose of this study was to correlate these errors with changes in ocular wavefront aberration and corresponding image quality when accommodating. A wavefront analyzing system, the Complete Ophthalmic Analysis System (COAS), was used in conjunction with a Badal optometer to allow continuous recording of the aberration structure of the eye for a range of accommodative demands (up to 8 D). Fifty consecutive recordings from seven subjects were taken. Monocular accommodative response was calculated as (i) the equivalent refraction minimizing wavefront error and (ii) the defocus needed to optimize the modulation transfer function at high spatial frequencies. Previously reported changes in ocular aberrations with accommodation (e.g., the shift of spherical aberration to negative values) were confirmed. Increased accommodation errors for near targets (lags) were evident for all subjects, although their magnitude showed a significant intersubject variability. It is concluded that the one-to-one stimulus/response slope in accommodation function should not always be considered as ideal, because higher order aberrations, especially changes of spherical aberration, may influence the actual accommodative demand. Fluctuations may serve to preserve image quality when errors of accommodation are moderate, by temporarily searching for the best focus.

  16. Steady-State Contrast Response Functions Provide a Sensitive and Objective Index of Amblyopic Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Daniel H.; Simard, Mathieu; Saint-Amour, Dave; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Visual deficits in amblyopia are neural in origin, yet are difficult to characterize with functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI). Our aim was to develop an objective electroencephalography (EEG) paradigm that can be used to provide a clinically useful index of amblyopic deficits. Methods. We used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) to measure full contrast response functions in both amblyopic (n = 10, strabismic or mixed amblyopia, mean age: 44 years) and control (n = 5, mean age: 31 years) observers, both with and without a dichoptic mask. Results. At the highest target contrast, the ratio of amplitudes across the weaker and stronger eyes was highly correlated (r = 0.76) with the acuity ratio between the eyes. We also found that the contrast response function in the amblyopic eye had both a greatly reduced amplitude and a shallower slope, but that surprisingly dichoptic masking was weaker than in controls. The results were compared with the predictions of a computational model of amblyopia and suggest a modification to the model whereby excitatory (but not suppressive) signals are attenuated in the amblyopic eye. Conclusions. We suggest that SSVEPs offer a sensitive and objective measure of the ocular imbalance in amblyopia and could be used to assess the efficacy of amblyopia therapies currently under development. PMID:25634977

  17. Precise mapping of the somatotopic hand area using neuromagnetic steady-state responses.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Shahab; Ross, Bernhard

    2012-05-21

    The body surface is represented in somatotopically organized maps in the primary somatosensory cortex. Estimating the size of the hand area with neuromagnetic source analysis has been used as a metric for monitoring neuroplastic changes related to training, learning, and brain injury. Commonly, results were significant as group statistics only because source localization accuracy was limited by factors such as residual noise and head motion. In this study we aimed to develop a robust method for obtaining the somatotopic map of the hand area in individuals using the bootstrap framework. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of the different factors affecting the accuracy of the obtained maps was provided. We applied vibrotactile touch stimuli to the tip of the index finger or the ring finger of the right hand and recorded the 22-Hz steady-state response using MEG. Single equivalent dipole sources were localized in contralateral left somatosensory cortex. Bootstrap resampling revealed the confidence intervals for the source coordinates using a single block of 5 min MEG recording. Residual noise in the averaged evoked response predominantly affected source localization, and the related confidence interval was reciprocally related to the signal-to-noise ratio. Apparently, head movements within a block of MEG recording contributed less to the variability of source localization in cooperative volunteers. The results of the current study indicate that significant separations of index finger and ring finger representations along the somatotopic map can be revealed in an individual using bootstrap framework. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A multi-signature brain-computer interface: use of transient and steady-state responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severens, Marianne; Farquhar, Jason; Duysens, Jacques; Desain, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper was to increase the information transfer in brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Therefore, a multi-signature BCI was developed and investigated. Stimuli were designed to simultaneously evoke transient somatosensory event-related potentials (ERPs) and steady-state somatosensory potentials (SSSEPs) and the ERPs and SSSEPs in isolation. Approach. Twelve subjects participated in two sessions. In the first session, the single and combined stimulation conditions were compared on these somatosensory responses and on the classification performance. In the second session the on-line performance with the combined stimulation was evaluated while subjects received feedback. Furthermore, in both sessions, the performance based on ERP and SSSEP features was compared. Main results. No difference was found in the ERPs and SSSEPs between stimulation conditions. The combination of ERP and SSSEP features did not perform better than with ERP features only. In both sessions, the classification performances based on ERP and combined features were higher than the classification based on SSSEP features. Significance. Although the multi-signature BCI did not increase performance, it also did not negatively impact it. Therefore, such stimuli could be used and the best performing feature set could then be chosen individually.

  19. The influence of visual perspective on the somatosensory steady-state response during pain observation

    PubMed Central

    Canizales, Dora L.; Voisin, Julien I. A.; Michon, Pierre-Emmanuel; Roy, Marc-André; Jackson, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    The observation and evaluation of other’s pain activate part of the neuronal network involved in the actual experience of pain, including those regions subserving the sensori-discriminative dimension of pain. This was largely interpreted as evidence showing that part of the painful experience can be shared vicariously. Here, we investigated the effect of the visual perspective from which other people’s pain is seen on the cortical response to continuous 25 Hz non-painful somatosensory stimulation (somatosensory steady-state response: SSSR). Based on the shared representation framework, we expected first-person visual perspective (1PP) to yield more changes in cortical activity than third-person visual perspective (3PP) during pain observation. Twenty healthy adults were instructed to rate a series of pseudo-dynamic pictures depicting hands in either painful or non-painful scenarios, presented either in 1PP (0–45° angle) or 3PP (180° angle), while changes in brain activity was measured with a 128-electode EEG system. The ratings demonstrated that the same scenarios were rated on average as more painful when observed from the 1PP than from the 3PP. As expected from previous works, the SSSR response was decreased after stimulus onset over the left caudal part of the parieto-central cortex, contralateral to the stimulation side. Moreover, the difference between the SSSR was of greater amplitude when the painful situations were presented from the 1PP compared to the 3PP. Together, these results suggest that a visuospatial congruence between the viewer and the observed scenarios is associated with both a higher subjective evaluation of pain and an increased modulation in the somatosensory representation of observed pain. These findings are discussed with regards to the potential role of visual perspective in pain communication and empathy. PMID:24367323

  20. The steady-state response of the cerebral cortex to the beat of music reflects both the comprehension of music and attention

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Benjamin; Reichenbach, Chagit S.; Braiman, Chananel; Schiff, Nicholas D.; Hudspeth, A. J.; Reichenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The brain’s analyses of speech and music share a range of neural resources and mechanisms. Music displays a temporal structure of complexity similar to that of speech, unfolds over comparable timescales, and elicits cognitive demands in tasks involving comprehension and attention. During speech processing, synchronized neural activity of the cerebral cortex in the delta and theta frequency bands tracks the envelope of a speech signal, and this neural activity is modulated by high-level cortical functions such as speech comprehension and attention. It remains unclear, however, whether the cortex also responds to the natural rhythmic structure of music and how the response, if present, is influenced by higher cognitive processes. Here we employ electroencephalography to show that the cortex responds to the beat of music and that this steady-state response reflects musical comprehension and attention. We show that the cortical response to the beat is weaker when subjects listen to a familiar tune than when they listen to an unfamiliar, non-sensical musical piece. Furthermore, we show that in a task of intermodal attention there is a larger neural response at the beat frequency when subjects attend to a musical stimulus than when they ignore the auditory signal and instead focus on a visual one. Our findings may be applied in clinical assessments of auditory processing and music cognition as well as in the construction of auditory brain-machine interfaces. PMID:26300760

  1. The steady-state response of the cerebral cortex to the beat of music reflects both the comprehension of music and attention.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Benjamin; Reichenbach, Chagit S; Braiman, Chananel; Schiff, Nicholas D; Hudspeth, A J; Reichenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The brain's analyses of speech and music share a range of neural resources and mechanisms. Music displays a temporal structure of complexity similar to that of speech, unfolds over comparable timescales, and elicits cognitive demands in tasks involving comprehension and attention. During speech processing, synchronized neural activity of the cerebral cortex in the delta and theta frequency bands tracks the envelope of a speech signal, and this neural activity is modulated by high-level cortical functions such as speech comprehension and attention. It remains unclear, however, whether the cortex also responds to the natural rhythmic structure of music and how the response, if present, is influenced by higher cognitive processes. Here we employ electroencephalography to show that the cortex responds to the beat of music and that this steady-state response reflects musical comprehension and attention. We show that the cortical response to the beat is weaker when subjects listen to a familiar tune than when they listen to an unfamiliar, non-sensical musical piece. Furthermore, we show that in a task of intermodal attention there is a larger neural response at the beat frequency when subjects attend to a musical stimulus than when they ignore the auditory signal and instead focus on a visual one. Our findings may be applied in clinical assessments of auditory processing and music cognition as well as in the construction of auditory brain-machine interfaces.

  2. Steady-State Adaptation of Mechanotransduction Modulates the Resting Potential of Auditory Hair Cells, Providing an Assay for Endolymph [Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Hamilton E.; Wells, Gregg B.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    The auditory hair cell resting potential is critical for proper translation of acoustic signals to the CNS, because it determines their filtering properties, their ability to respond to stimuli of both polarities, and, because the hair cell drives afferent firing rates, the resting potential dictates spontaneous transmitter release. In turtle auditory hair cells, the filtering properties are established by the interactions between BK calcium-activated potassium channels and an L-type calcium channel (electrical resonance). However, both theoretical and in vitro recordings indicate that a third conductance is required to set the resting potential to a point on the ICa and IBK activation curves in which filtering is optimized like that found in vivo. Present data elucidate a novel mechanism, likely universal among hair cells, in which mechanoelectric transduction (MET) and its calcium-dependent adaptation provide the depolarizing current to establish the hair cell resting potential. First, mechanical block of the MET current hyperpolarized the membrane potential, resulting in broadband asymmetrical resonance. Second, altering steady-state adaptation by altering the [Ca2+] bathing the hair bundle changed the MET current at rest, the magnitude of which resulted in membrane potential changes that encompassed the best resonant voltage. The Ca2+ sensitivity of adaptation allowed for the first physiological estimate of endolymphatic Ca2+ near the MET channel (56 ±11μM), a value similar to bulk endolymph levels. These effects of MET current on resting potential were independently confirmed using a theoretical model of electrical resonance that included the steady-state MET conductance. PMID:17135414

  3. Steady-state response of a charcoal bed to radon in flowing air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    Previously we have developed a mathematical model of radon adsorption in active air with water vapor on small U.S. Environmental Protection Agency charcoal canisters that are used for environmental measurements of radon. The purpose of this paper is to extend this mathematical model to describe the adsorption of radon by large charcoal beds with radon-laden air flowing through them. The resulting model equations are solved analytically to predict the steady-state adsorption of radon by such beds. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Cooper, Reid F.; Goldsby, David L.; Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-04-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 • 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ≤ 0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ˜6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates.

  5. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Entrainment of visual steady-state responses is modulated by global spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thomas; Kuntzelman, Karl; Miskovic, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    The rhythmic delivery of visual stimuli evokes large-scale neuronal entrainment in the form of steady-state oscillatory field potentials. The spatiotemporal properties of stimulus drive appear to constrain the relative degrees of neuronal entrainment. Specific frequency ranges, for example, are uniquely suited for enhancing the strength of stimulus-driven brain oscillations. When it comes to the nature of the visual stimulus itself, studies have used a plethora of inputs ranging from spatially unstructured empty fields to simple contrast patterns (checkerboards, gratings, stripes) and complex arrays (human faces, houses, natural scenes). At present, little is known about how the global spatial statistics of the input stimulus influence entrainment of scalp-recorded electrophysiological signals. In this study, we used rhythmic entrainment source separation of scalp EEG to compare stimulus-driven phase alignment for distinct classes of visual inputs, including broadband spatial noise ensembles with varying second-order statistics, natural scenes, and narrowband sine-wave gratings delivered at a constant flicker frequency. The relative magnitude of visual entrainment was modulated by the global properties of the driving stimulus. Entrainment was strongest for pseudo-naturalistic broadband visual noise patterns in which luminance contrast is greatest at low spatial frequencies (a power spectrum slope characterized by 1/ƒ(-2)).NEW & NOTEWORTHY Rhythmically modulated visual stimuli entrain the activity of neuronal populations, but the effect of global stimulus statistics on this entrainment is unknown. We assessed entrainment evoked by 1) visual noise ensembles with different spectral slopes, 2) complex natural scenes, and 3) narrowband sinusoidal gratings. Entrainment was most effective for broadband noise with naturalistic luminance contrast. This reveals some global properties shaping stimulus-driven brain oscillations in the human visual system. Copyright © 2017

  7. Frequency analysis of the visual steady-state response measured with the fast optical signal in younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Gordon, Brian A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high frequency activity (>4 Hz) carries important information about the state of the brain or its response to high frequency events. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly used to study these changes because it possesses high temporal resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio. However, it provides limited spatial information. Non-invasive fast optical signals (FOS) have been proposed as a neuroimaging tool combining spatial and temporal resolution. Yet, this technique has not been applied to study high frequency brain oscillations because of its relatively low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we investigate the sensitivity of FOS to relatively high-frequency brain oscillations. We measured the steady-state optical response elicited in medial and lateral occipital cortex by checkerboard reversals occurring at 4, 6, and 8 Hz in younger and older adults. Stimulus-dependent oscillations were observed at the predicted stimulation frequency. In addition, in the younger adults the FOS steady-state response was smaller in lateral than medial areas, whereas in the older adults it was reversed in these two cortical regions. This may reflect diminished top-down inhibitory control in the older adults. The results indicate that FOS can be used to study the modulation of relatively high-frequency brain oscillations in adjacent cortical regions. PMID:20566389

  8. Determination of maximal lactate steady state response in selected sports events.

    PubMed

    Beneke, R; von Duvillard, S P

    1996-02-01

    Maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) refers to the upper limit of blood lactate concentration indicating an equilibrium between lactate production and lactate elimination during constant workload. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether different levels of MLSS may explain different blood lactate concentration (BLC) levels at submaximal workload in the sports events of rowing, cycling, and speed skating. Eleven rowers (mean +/- SD, age 20.1 +/- 1.5 yr, height 188.7 +/- 6.2 cm, weight 82.7 +/- 8.0 kg), 16 cyclists and triathletes (age 23.6 +/- 3.0 yr, height 181.4 +/- 5.6 cm, weight 72.5 +/- 6.2 kg), and 6 speed skaters (age 23.3 +/- 6.6 yr, height 179.5 +/- 7.5 cm, weight 73.2 +/- 5.6 kg) performed an incremental load test to determine maximal workload and several submaximal 30-min constant workloads for MLSS measurement on a rowing ergometer, a cycle ergometer, and on a speed-skating track. Maximal workload was higher (P < or = 0.05) in rowing (416.8 +/- 46.2 W) than in cling (358.6 +/- 34.4 W) and speed skating (383.5 +/- 40.9 W). The level of MLSS differed (P < or = 0.001) in rowing (3.1 +/- 0.5 mmol.l-1), cycling (5.4 +/- 1.0 mmol.l-1), and in speed skating (6.6 +/- 0.9 mmol.l-1). MLSS workload was higher (P < or = 0.05) in rowing (316.2 +/- 29.9 W) and speed skating (300.5 +/- 43.8 W) than in cycling (257.8 +/- 34.6 W). No differences (P > 0.05) in MLSS workload were found between speed skating and rowing. MLSS workload intensity as related to maximal workload was independent (P > 0.05) of the sports event: 76.2% +/- 5.7% in rowing, 71.8% +/- 4.1% in cycling, and 78.1% +/- 4.4% in speed skating. Changes in MLSS do not respond with MLSS workload, the MLSS workload intensity, or with the metabolic profile of the sports event. The observed differences in MLSS and MLSS workload may correspond to the sport-specific mass of working muscle.

  9. A new method for predicting response in complex linear systems. II. [under random or deterministic steady state excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, J. L.; Kayser, K.; Krieger, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes convergence and response studies in the low frequency range of complex systems, particularly with low values of damping of different distributions, and reports on the modification of the relaxation procedure required under these conditions. A new method is presented for response estimation in complex lumped parameter linear systems under random or deterministic steady state excitation. The essence of the method is the use of relaxation procedures with a suitable error function to find the estimated response; natural frequencies and normal modes are not computed. For a 45 degree of freedom system, and two relaxation procedures, convergence studies and frequency response estimates were performed. The low frequency studies are considered in the framework of earlier studies (Kayser and Bogdanoff, 1975) involving the mid to high frequency range.

  10. Independent control of natural killer cell responsiveness and homeostasis at steady-state by CD11c+ dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Thuy Thanh; Ganesan, Sridharan; Wagner, Arnika Kathleen; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Meinke, Stephan; Garbi, Natalio; Hämmerling, Günter; Alici, Evren; Kärre, Klas; Chambers, Benedict J.; Höglund, Petter; Kadri, Nadir

    2016-01-01

    During infection and inflammation, dendritic cells (DC) provide priming signals for natural killer (NK) cells via mechanisms distinct from their antigen processing and presentation functions. The influence of DC on resting NK cells, i.e. at steady-state, is less well studied. We here demonstrate that as early as 1 day after DC depletion, NK cells in naïve mice downregulated the NKG2D receptor and showed decreased constitutive phosphorylation of AKT and mTOR. Subsequently, apoptotic NK cells appeared in the spleen concomitant with reduced NK cell numbers. At 4 days after the onset of DC depletion, increased NK cell proliferation was seen in the spleen resulting in an accumulation of Ly49 receptor-negative NK cells. In parallel, NK cell responsiveness to ITAM-mediated triggering and cytokine stimulation dropped across maturation stages, suggestive of a functional deficiency independent from the homeostatic effect. A role for IL-15 in maintaining NK cell function was supported by a gene signature analysis of NK cell from DC-depleted mice as well as by in vivo DC transfer experiments. We propose that DC, by means of IL-15 transpresentation, are required to maintain not only homeostasis, but also function, at steady-state. These processes appear to be regulated independently from each other. PMID:27905484

  11. Habituation of steady-state visual evoked potentials in response to high-frequency polychromatic foveal visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Heng-Yuan; Chiu, George C; Zao, John K; Lai, Kuan-Lin; Gruber, Allen; Chien, Yu-Yi; Chou, Ching-Chi; Lu, Chih-Kai; Liu, Wen-Hao; Huang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Albert C; Wang, Yijun; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to develop safe and robust methods for monitoring migraineurs' brain states, we explores the feasibility of using white, red, green and blue LED lights flickering around their critical flicker fusion (CFF) frequencies as foveal visual stimuli for inducing steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) and causing discernible habituation trends. After comparing the habituation indices, the multi-scale entropies and the time dependent intrinsic correlations of their SSVEP signals, we reached a tentative conclusion that sharp red and white light pulses flickering barely above their CFF frequencies can replace commonly used 13Hz stimuli to effectively cause SSVEP habituation among normal subjects. Empirical results showed that consecutive short bursts of light can produce more consistent responses than a single prolonged stimulation. Since these high frequency stimuli do not run the risk of triggering migraine or seizure attacks, further tests of these stimuli on migraine patients are warranted in order to verify their effectiveness.

  12. Steady-state unbalance response of a three-disk flexible rotor on flexible, damped supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the unbalance response of a flexible, ball bearing supported rotor to speeds above the third lateral bending critical. Values of squeeze film damping coefficients obtained from measured data are compared to theoretical values obtained from short bearing approximation over a frequency range from 5000 to 31 000 cycles/min. Experimental response for an undamped rotor is compared to that of one having oil squeeze film dampers at the bearings. Unbalance applied varied from 0.62 to 15.1 gm-cm.

  13. Steady State Ocean Response to Wind Forcing in Extratropical Frontal Regions.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Meghan F; Tozuka, Tomoki

    2016-06-29

    In regions of strong sea surface temperature (SST) gradients, the surface "geostrophic" currents have a vertical shear aligned with the surface density front defined by the temperature. This surface geostrophic ("thermal wind") shear can balance a portion of the surface wind stress, altering the classic Ekman response to wind forcing. Here we show that these frontal effects cannot be ignored in the Tropics or in strong frontal regions in the extratropics, such as found in coastal regions and in western boundary currents of all basins. Frontal effects also dominate the classic Ekman response in the regions of both hemispheres where Trade winds change to westerlies. Implications for vertical motion and global heat transport are discussed.

  14. Steady State Ocean Response to Wind Forcing in Extratropical Frontal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Meghan F.; Tozuka, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    In regions of strong sea surface temperature (SST) gradients, the surface “geostrophic” currents have a vertical shear aligned with the surface density front defined by the temperature. This surface geostrophic (“thermal wind”) shear can balance a portion of the surface wind stress, altering the classic Ekman response to wind forcing. Here we show that these frontal effects cannot be ignored in the Tropics or in strong frontal regions in the extratropics, such as found in coastal regions and in western boundary currents of all basins. Frontal effects also dominate the classic Ekman response in the regions of both hemispheres where Trade winds change to westerlies. Implications for vertical motion and global heat transport are discussed. PMID:27354231

  15. Steady-state response of a geared rotor system with slant cracked shaft and time-varying mesh stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Zhao, Jingshan; Lu, Wenxiu; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2014-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of geared rotor system with defects is helpful for the failure diagnosis and state detecting of the system. Extensive efforts have been devoted to study the dynamic behaviors of geared systems with tooth root cracks. When surface cracks (especially for slant cracks) appear on the transmission shaft, the dynamic characteristics of the system have not gained sufficient attentions. Due to the parametric excitations induced by slant crack breathing and time-varying mesh stiffness, the steady-state response of the cracked geared rotor system differs distinctly from that of the uncracked system. Thus, utilizing the direct spectral method (DSM), the forced response spectra of a geared rotor system with slant cracked shaft and time-varying mesh stiffness under transmission error, unbalance force and torsional excitations are, respectively, obtained and discussed in detail. The effects of crack types (straight or slant crack) and crack depth on the forced response spectra of the system without and with torsional excitation are considered in the analysis. In addition, how the frequency response characteristics change after considering the crack is also investigated. It is shown that the torsional excitations have significant influence on the forced response spectra of slant cracked system. Sub-critical resonances are also found in the frequency response curves. The results could be used for shaft crack detection in geared rotor system.

  16. Material Response of One-Dimensional, Steady-State Transpiration Cooling in Radiative and Convective Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Hirotoshi

    1975-01-01

    A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a transpiration-cooled porous heat-shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. Essential features of this approach are "two-flux method" for radiative transfer process and "two-temperature" assumption for solid and gas temperatures. Incident radiative-convective heatings are specified as boundary conditions. Sample results are shown using porous silica with CO2 transpiration and some parameters quantitatively show the effect on this transpiration cooling system. Summarized maps for mass injection rate, porosity and blowing correction factor for radiation are obtained in order to realize such a cooling system.

  17. Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials Can Be Explained by Temporal Superposition of Transient Event-Related Responses

    PubMed Central

    Capilla, Almudena; Pazo-Alvarez, Paula; Darriba, Alvaro; Campo, Pablo; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Background One common criterion for classifying electrophysiological brain responses is based on the distinction between transient (i.e. event-related potentials, ERPs) and steady-state responses (SSRs). The generation of SSRs is usually attributed to the entrainment of a neural rhythm driven by the stimulus train. However, a more parsimonious account suggests that SSRs might result from the linear addition of the transient responses elicited by each stimulus. This study aimed to investigate this possibility. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded brain potentials elicited by a checkerboard stimulus reversing at different rates. We modeled SSRs by sequentially shifting and linearly adding rate-specific ERPs. Our results show a strong resemblance between recorded and synthetic SSRs, supporting the superposition hypothesis. Furthermore, we did not find evidence of entrainment of a neural oscillation at the stimulation frequency. Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that visual SSRs can be explained as a superposition of transient ERPs. These findings have critical implications in our current understanding of brain oscillations. Contrary to the idea that neural networks can be tuned to a wide range of frequencies, our findings rather suggest that the oscillatory response of a given neural network is constrained within its natural frequency range. PMID:21267081

  18. Response of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation to steady-state oxygen tension: implications for hypoxic cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Salter, Jason D; Brookes, Paul S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are proposed to play an important role in hypoxic cell signaling. One currently accepted signaling paradigm is that the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases in hypoxia. This is paradoxical, because oxygen is a substrate for ROS generation. Although the response of isolated mitochondrial ROS generation to [O(2)] has been examined previously, such investigations did not apply rigorous control over [O(2)] within the hypoxic signaling range. With the use of open-flow respirometry and fluorimetry, the current study determined the response of isolated rat liver mitochondrial ROS generation to defined steady-state [O(2)] as low as 0.1 microM. In mitochondria respiring under state 4 (quiescent) or state 3 (ATP turnover) conditions, decreased ROS generation was always observed at low [O(2)]. It is concluded that the biochemical mechanism to facilitate increased ROS generation in response to hypoxia in cells is not intrinsic to the mitochondrial respiratory chain alone but may involve other factors. The implications for hypoxic cell signaling are discussed.

  19. Auditory evoked responses to rhythmic sound pulses in dolphins.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y

    1998-10-01

    The ability of auditory evoked potentials to follow sound pulse (click or pip) rate was studied in bottlenosed dolphins. Sound pulses were presented in 20-ms rhythmic trains separated by 80-ms pauses. Rhythmic click or pip trains evoked a quasi-sustained response consisting of a sequence of auditory brainstem responses. This was designated as the rate-following response. Rate following response peak-to-peak amplitude dependence on sound pulse rate was almost flat up to 200 s-1, then displayed a few peaks and valleys superimposed on a low-pass filtering function with a cut-off frequency of 1700 s-1 at a 0.1-amplitude level. Peaks and valleys of the function corresponded to the pattern of the single auditory brain stem response spectrum; the low-pass cut-off frequency was below the auditory brain stem response spectrum bandwidth. Rate-following response frequency composition (magnitudes of the fundamental and harmonics) corresponded to the auditory brain stem response frequency spectrum except for lower fundamental magnitudes at frequencies above 1700 Hz. These regularities were similar for both click and pip trains. The rate-following response to steady-state rhythmic stimulation was similar to the rate-following response evoked by short trains except for a slight amplitude decrease with the rate increase above 10 s-1. The latter effect is attributed to a long-term rate-dependent adaptation in conditions of the steady-state pulse stimulation.

  20. Closed eyes condition increases auditory brain responses in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Griskova-Bulanova, Inga; Dapsys, Kastytis; Maciulis, Valentinas; Arnfred, Sidse M

    2013-02-28

    The 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) of 14 medicated schizophrenic patients were recorded in eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions as previously done in healthy volunteers. Patients show significantly increased precision of the evoked response with eyes closed, and a significant increase of broad-band noise activity when eyes are open. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Steady-state bedrock river response to tectonic and lithologic variations across active folds at the northwest Himalayan front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Barnes, J. B.; Kirby, E.; Pavelsky, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines the response of bedrock channel gradient and width to differences in substrate erodibility and uplift rate along the flanks of active folds in the northwestern Himalaya foreland. Bedrock rivers are a principle driver of topographic evolution in tectonically active landscapes. Several stream power models have been proposed which equate bedrock river incision (E) to a product of channel gradient (S) and upstream drainage area (A) such that, E=KSmAn, where K, m, and n are constants which depend on dominant erosional processes. These models account for changes in channel width (W, a key influence on river incision) by assuming width scales predictably with upstream drainage area such that, W=kwAb, where kw and b are empirical constants. This relationship is often not valid in areas with varying lithology because channel morphology depends in part on the underlying rock strength. Furthermore, the degree to which steady-state channels respond to changes in substrate erodibility has yet to be well tested. In this study, we explicitly account for channel width variations using new quantitative methods to more accurately constrain river incision potential and its relationship to changes in bedrock erodibility and uplift rate in an active steady-state landscape. We focus on the Chandigarh and Mohand anticlines, two active fault-bend folds in the Siwalik Hills in northwestern India. We use digital topography and high resolution (5 m) satellite images to measure channel widths and gradients over ~100 channels draining both flanks resulting in >100,000 width measurements. We then normalize channel widths and slopes to upstream drainage area yielding two sensitive channel morphometrics: normalized width index (kwn) and normalized steepness index (ksn). Our observations show that both kwn and ksn vary systematically with changes in uplift rate and lithology. For example, at locations where channels cross into an erosionally resistant bedrock lithology, mean

  2. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  3. Simulation of steady state and transient cardiac muscle response experiments with a Huxley-based contraction model.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C

    2008-08-01

    A cardiac muscle model is presented with the purpose of representing a wide range of mechanical experiments at constant and transient Ca(2+) concentration. Modifications of a previous model were: weak and power attached crossbridge states, a troponin system involving three consecutive regulatory troponin-tropomyosin units acting together in Ca(2+) kinetics and detachment constants depending on crossbridge length. This model improved cooperativity (Hill coefficient close to 4) and the force-velocity relationship, and incorporated the representation of the four phases of muscle response to length and force steps, isotonic shortening and isosarcometric contractions, preserving previous satisfactory results. Moreover, experimentally reported effects, such as length dependence on Ca(2+) affinity, the decreased cooperativity at higher Ca(2+) concentrations, temperature effects on the stiffness-frequency relationship and the isometric internal shortening due to series elasticity, were obtained. In conclusion, the model is more comprehensive than a previous version because it is able to represent a wider variety of steady state experiments, the mechanical variables in twitches can be adequately related to intracellular Ca(2+), and all the simulations were performed with the same set of parameters.

  4. Coupled bending-torsion steady-state response of pretwisted, nonuniform rotating beams using a transfer-matrix method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Carl E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Using the Newtonian method, the equations of motion are developed for the coupled bending-torsion steady-state response of beams rotating at constant angular velocity in a fixed plane. The resulting equations are valid to first order strain-displacement relationships for a long beam with all other nonlinear terms retained. In addition, the equations are valid for beams with the mass centroidal axis offset (eccentric) from the elastic axis, nonuniform mass and section properties, and variable twist. The solution of these coupled, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous, differential equations is obtained by modifying a Hunter linear second-order transfer-matrix solution procedure to solve the nonlinear differential equations and programming the solution for a desk-top personal computer. The modified transfer-matrix method was verified by comparing the solution for a rotating beam with a geometric, nonlinear, finite-element computer code solution; and for a simple rotating beam problem, the modified method demonstrated a significant advantage over the finite-element solution in accuracy, ease of solution, and actual computer processing time required to effect a solution.

  5. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (<1 Hz). However, it is difficult to determine the frequency characteristics of brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  6. Cell yields and fermentation responses of a Salmonella Typhimurium poultry isolate at different dilution rates in an anaerobic steady state continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of these studies were to determine cell yield and fermentation responses of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium poultry isolate using various dilution rates in steady state continuous culture incubations. S. enterica Typhimurium cells were propagated in continuous cultures with ...

  7. An objective method for measuring face detection thresholds using the sweep steady-state visual evoked response

    PubMed Central

    Ales, Justin M.; Farzin, Faraz; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a sensitive method for measuring face detection thresholds rapidly, objectively, and independently of low-level visual cues. The method is based on the swept parameter steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP), in which a stimulus is presented at a specific temporal frequency while parametrically varying (“sweeping”) the detectability of the stimulus. Here, the visibility of a face image was increased by progressive derandomization of the phase spectra of the image in a series of equally spaced steps. Alternations between face and fully randomized images at a constant rate (3/s) elicit a robust first harmonic response at 3 Hz specific to the structure of the face. High-density EEG was recorded from 10 human adult participants, who were asked to respond with a button-press as soon as they detected a face. The majority of participants produced an evoked response at the first harmonic (3 Hz) that emerged abruptly between 30% and 35% phase-coherence of the face, which was most prominent on right occipito-temporal sites. Thresholds for face detection were estimated reliably in single participants from 15 trials, or on each of the 15 individual face trials. The ssVEP-derived thresholds correlated with the concurrently measured perceptual face detection thresholds. This first application of the sweep VEP approach to high-level vision provides a sensitive and objective method that could be used to measure and compare visual perception thresholds for various object shapes and levels of categorization in different human populations, including infants and individuals with developmental delay. PMID:23024355

  8. Topographic deficits in alpha-range resting EEG activity and steady state visual evoked responses in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Michael R; Peterson, Michael J; Sanguinetti, Joseph L; Tononi, Giulio; Ferrarelli, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Deficits in both resting alpha-range (8-12Hz) electroencephalogram (EEG) activity and steady state evoked potential (SSVEP) responses have been reported in schizophrenia. However, the topographic specificity of these effects, the relationship between resting EEG and SSVEP, as well as the impact of antipsychotic medication on these effects, have not been clearly delineated. The present study sought to address these questions with 256 channel high-density EEG recordings in a group of 13 schizophrenia patients, 13 healthy controls, and 10 non-schizophrenia patients with psychiatric diagnoses currently taking antipsychotic medication. At rest, the schizophrenia group demonstrated decreased alpha EEG power in frontal and occipital areas relative to healthy controls. With SSVEP stimulation centered in the alpha band (10Hz), but not with stimulation above (15Hz) or below (7Hz) this range, the occipital deficit in alpha power was partially reverted. However, the frontal deficit persisted and contributed to a significantly reduced topographic relationship between occipital and frontal alpha activity for resting EEG and 10Hz SSVEP alpha power in schizophrenia patients. No significant differences were observed between healthy and medicated controls or between medicated controls and schizophrenia. These findings suggest a potential intrinsic deficit in frontal eyes-closed EEG alpha oscillations in schizophrenia, whereby potent visual stimulation centered in that frequency range results in an increase in the occipital alpha power of these patients, which however does not extend to frontal regions. Future research to evaluate the cortical and subcortical mechanisms of these effects is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tracking of proton flow during transition from anaerobiosis to steady state. 1. Response of matrix pH indicators.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, S; Schmehl, I; Cola, C; Azzone, G F

    1991-11-15

    1. The kinetics of acidification and realkalinization of the matrix after addition of nigericin to respiring and non-respiring mitochondria, recorded by intramitochondrial pH indicators such as neutral red and 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), is complementary to that recorded by extramitochondrial pH indicators. The extent of acidification decreases with the logarithm of the KCl concentration and is inhibited by Pi and ammonium ions. 2. Proton translocation during respiration has been compared with proton extraction from matrix bulk water. During oxygen pulses to EGTA-untreated mitochondria, BCECF records an extraction of protons from matrix bulk water of about 2-3 nmol H+/mg, reduced to 1-2 nmol H+/mg in EGTA-treated mitochondria. Since the amount of proton translocation required to achieve steady state is of the order of 6-7 nmol H+/mg, it appears that 75-90% of the protons are not extracted from matrix bulk water. Only a slight response is recorded by neutral red. 3. The effect of permeant cations and of uncouplers on the distribution of proton extraction between membrane and matrix bulk water has been studied in presteady state. During Sr2+ uptake, proton extrusion into cytosolic bulk water, as well as proton extraction from matrix bulk water, corresponds almost to 100% of the protons translocated by the redox proton pumps. In the absence of Sr2+, parallel to the disappearance of the proton extrusion in cytosolic bulk water, the proton extraction from matrix bulk water diminishes to about 20% of the proton translocation. 4. The mechanism by which divalent cation uptake and protonophoric uncouplers affect the distribution of proton extraction between matrix bulk water and membrane domains and the nature of the membrane domains are discussed.

  10. Monocular and binocular steady-state flicker VEPs: frequency-response functions to sinusoidal and square-wave luminance modulation.

    PubMed

    Nicol, David S; Hamilton, Ruth; Shahani, Uma; McCulloch, Daphne L

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state VEPs to full-field flicker (FFF) using sinusoidally modulated light were compared with those elicited by square-wave modulated light across a wide range of stimulus frequencies with monocular and binocular FFF stimulation. Binocular and monocular VEPs were elicited in 12 adult volunteers to FFF with two modes of temporal modulation: sinusoidal or square-wave (abrupt onset and offset, 50% duty cycle) at ten temporal frequencies ranging from 2.83 to 58.8 Hz. All stimuli had a mean luminance of 100 cd/m(2) with an 80% modulation depth (20-180 cd/m(2)). Response magnitudes at the stimulus frequency (F1) and at the double and triple harmonics (F2 and F3) were compared. For both sinusoidal and square-wave flicker, the FFF-VEP magnitudes at F1 were maximal for 7.52 Hz flicker. F2 was maximal for 5.29 Hz flicker, and F3 magnitudes are largest for flicker stimulation from 3.75 to 7.52 Hz. Square-wave flicker produced significantly larger F1 and F2 magnitudes for slow flicker rates (up to 5.29 Hz for F1; at 2.83 and 3.75 Hz for F2). The F3 magnitudes were larger overall for square-wave flicker. Binocular FFF-VEP magnitudes are larger than those of monocular FFF-VEPs, and the amount of this binocular enhancement is not dependant on the mode of flicker stimulation (mean binocular: monocular ratio 1.41, 95% CI: 1.2-1.6). Binocular enhancement of F1 for 21.3 Hz flicker was increased to a factor of 2.5 (95% CI: 1.8-3.5). In the healthy adult visual system, FFF-VEP magnitudes can be characterized by the frequency-response functions of F1, F2 and F3. Low-frequency roll-off in the FFF-VEP magnitudes is greater for sinusoidal flicker than for square-wave flicker for rates ≤ 5.29 Hz; magnitudes for higher-frequency flicker are similar for the two types of flicker. Binocular FFF-VEPs are larger overall than those recorded monocularly, and this binocular summation is enhanced at 21.3 Hz in the mid-frequency range.

  11. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth rate is regulated in response to the abundance and molecular form of essential nutrients. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), the molecular form of environmental nitrogen is a major determinant of cell growth rate, supporting growth rates that vary at least threefold. Transcriptional control of nitrogen use is mediated in large part by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which results in the repression of specific transcripts in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source that supports a fast growth rate, such as glutamine, that are otherwise expressed in the presence of a nonpreferred nitrogen source, such as proline, which supports a slower growth rate. Differential expression of the NCR regulon and additional nitrogen-responsive genes results in >500 transcripts that are differentially expressed in cells growing in the presence of different nitrogen sources in batch cultures. Here we find that in growth rate–controlled cultures using nitrogen-limited chemostats, gene expression programs are strikingly similar regardless of nitrogen source. NCR expression is derepressed in all nitrogen-limiting chemostat conditions regardless of nitrogen source, and in these conditions, only 34 transcripts exhibit nitrogen source–specific differential gene expression. Addition of either the preferred nitrogen source, glutamine, or the nonpreferred nitrogen source, proline, to cells growing in nitrogen-limited chemostats results in rapid, dose-dependent repression of the NCR regulon. Using a novel means of computational normalization to compare global gene expression programs in steady-state and dynamic conditions, we find evidence that the addition of nitrogen to nitrogen-limited cells results in the transient overproduction of transcripts required for protein translation. Simultaneously, we find that that accelerated mRNA degradation underlies the rapid clearing of a subset of transcripts, which is most pronounced for the highly expressed NCR

  12. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-04-15

    Cell growth rate is regulated in response to the abundance and molecular form of essential nutrients. InSaccharomyces cerevisiae(budding yeast), the molecular form of environmental nitrogen is a major determinant of cell growth rate, supporting growth rates that vary at least threefold. Transcriptional control of nitrogen use is mediated in large part by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which results in the repression of specific transcripts in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source that supports a fast growth rate, such as glutamine, that are otherwise expressed in the presence of a nonpreferred nitrogen source, such as proline, which supports a slower growth rate. Differential expression of the NCR regulon and additional nitrogen-responsive genes results in >500 transcripts that are differentially expressed in cells growing in the presence of different nitrogen sources in batch cultures. Here we find that in growth rate-controlled cultures using nitrogen-limited chemostats, gene expression programs are strikingly similar regardless of nitrogen source. NCR expression is derepressed in all nitrogen-limiting chemostat conditions regardless of nitrogen source, and in these conditions, only 34 transcripts exhibit nitrogen source-specific differential gene expression. Addition of either the preferred nitrogen source, glutamine, or the nonpreferred nitrogen source, proline, to cells growing in nitrogen-limited chemostats results in rapid, dose-dependent repression of the NCR regulon. Using a novel means of computational normalization to compare global gene expression programs in steady-state and dynamic conditions, we find evidence that the addition of nitrogen to nitrogen-limited cells results in the transient overproduction of transcripts required for protein translation. Simultaneously, we find that that accelerated mRNA degradation underlies the rapid clearing of a subset of transcripts, which is most pronounced for the highly expressed NCR

  13. Steady state thermal radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loose, J. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A radiometer is described operating in a vacuum under steady state conditions. The front element is an aluminum sheet painted on the outer side with black or other absorptive material of selected characteristics. A thermocouple is bonded to the inner side of the aluminum sheet. That is backed by highly insulative layers of glass fiber and crinkled, aluminized Mylar polyester. Those layers are backed with a sturdy, polyester sheet, and the entire lamination is laced together by nylon cords. The device is highly reliable in that it does not drift out of calibration, and is significantly inexpensive.

  14. Extrasolar Giant Magnetospheric Response to Steady-state Stellar Wind Pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Matt A.; Harnett, Erika M.; Winglee, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet’s magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semimajor axes—10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semimajor axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass-loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 and 5 au cases, which reach a state of mass-loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 or 0.2 au cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 and 0.2 au cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents, associated with auroral radio emissions, is shown to increase in magnitude and latitudinal coverage with a corresponding shift equatorward from increased dynamic ram pressure experienced in the hotter orbits. Similar to observed hot Jovian planets, the warm exo-Saturn simulated in the current work shows enhanced ion density in the magnetosheath and magnetopause regions, as well as the plasma torus, which could contribute to altered transit signals, suggesting that for planets in warmer (>0.1 au) orbits, planetary magnetic field strengths and possibly exomoons—via the plasma torus—could be observable with future missions.

  15. Extrasolar giant magnetospheric response to steady-state stellar wind pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Matt; Harnett, Erika; Winglee, Robert

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet's magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semi-major axes - 10, 5, 1 and 0.2 AU. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semi-major axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 AU and 5 AU cases which reach a state of mass loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 AU or 0.2 AU cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 AU and 0.2 AU cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents (FAC), associated with auroral radio emissions, are shown to increase in magnitude and latitudinal coverage with a corresponding shift equatorward from increased dynamic ram pressure experienced in the hotter orbits. Similar to observed hot Jovian planets, the warm exo-Saturn simulated in the current work shows enhanced ion density in the magnetosheath and magnetopause regions, as well as the plasma torus which could contribute to altered transit signals, suggesting that for planets in warmer (> 0.1 AU) orbits, planetary magnetic field strengths and possibly exomoons - via the plasma torus - could be observable with future missions.

  16. Compensatory mechanisms in below-knee amputee gait in response to increasing steady-state walking speeds.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Anne K; Fey, Nicholas P; Portillo, Albert; Walden, Judith G; Bosker, Gordon; Neptune, Richard R

    2008-11-01

    Compensatory mechanisms in below-knee amputee gait are necessary due to the functional loss of the ankle muscles, especially at higher walking speeds when the mechanical energetic demands of walking are greater. The objective of this study was to examine amputee anterior/posterior (A/P) ground reaction force (GRF) impulses and joint kinetics across a wide range of steady-state walking speeds to further understand the compensatory mechanisms used by below-knee amputees. We hypothesized that amputees would rely more on their intact leg to generate greater propulsion relative to the residual leg, which would result in greater GRF asymmetry between legs as walking speed increased. Amputee and control subject kinematic and kinetic data were collected during overground walking at four different speeds. Group (n=14) average amputee data showed no significant differences in braking or propulsive GRF impulse ratios, except the propulsive ratio at 0.9 m/s, indicating that the subjects maintained their initial levels of GRF asymmetry when walking faster. Therefore, our hypothesis was not supported (i.e., walking faster does not increase GRF loading asymmetry). The primary compensatory mechanism was greater positive residual leg hip joint power and work in early stance, which led to increased propulsion from the residual leg as walking speed increased. In addition, amputees had reduced residual leg positive knee work in early stance, suggesting increased output from the biarticular hamstrings. Thus, increasing residual leg hip extensor strength and output may be a useful mechanism to reduce GRF loading asymmetry between the intact and residual legs.

  17. Steady-state characteristics and transient response of MgZnO-based metal-semiconductor-metal solar-blind ultraviolet photodetector with three types of electrode structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Zhen, Qinghong; Tang, Qing; Yang, Yintang; Guo, Lixin; Ding, Kai; Huang, Feng

    2013-07-29

    Detailed studies of MgZnO-based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) solar-blind ultraviolet photodetector with different electrode structures are performed. A two-dimensional physical model is established based on the Poisson's equation and time-dependent continuity equations, which is verified by our experimental data of conventional electrode MSM detector. The steady-state characteristics and transient response of semicircular and triangular electrode MSM detectors are also investigated by this model. Compared with the conventional electrode, semicircular and triangular electrode devices exhibit a substantial improvement on the photocurrent. At a bias of 10 V, the steady-state saturated photocurrents for semicircular and triangular electrode devices are 14.69 nA and 24.37 nA respectively, corresponding to a 20.5% and 100% increase over the conventional electrode detector. Meanwhile, the transient peak photocurrents reach 31.38 nA and 52.09 nA respectively, both of which are notably larger than that of conventional device.

  18. Peak and submaximal steady-state metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses during arm-powered and arm-trunk-powered handbike ergometry in able-bodied participants.

    PubMed

    Verellen, Joeri; Meyer, Christophe; Janssens, Luc; Vanlandewijck, Yves

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peak and submaximal metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses during steady-state arm-powered (AP) and arm-trunk-powered (ATP) handbike ergometry. Twelve male able-bodied participants with no prior experience in handcycling completed a maximal progressive incremental test and a series of 6-minute submaximal tests at 130 W with various cadences in a custom-designed handbike ergometer that allowed a realistic simulation of AP and ATP handcycling. Peak power output, peak oxygen uptake, and peak ventilation were significantly lower, whereas peak blood lactate concentration was significantly higher during AP handcycling. Mean gross mechanical efficiency was significantly higher during AP handcycling (range 16.7 to 20.5%) compared with ATP handcycling (range 15.8 to 17.6%). These results suggest that AP handcycling is advantageous during submaximal steady-state handcycling, whereas ATP handcycling allows for a higher peak power output generation. However, it remains unclear which handbike configuration would be favorable during competition.

  19. The effects of boundary conditions on the steady-state response of three hypothetical ground-water systems; results and implications of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O. Lehn; Reilly, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    The most critical and difficult aspect of defining a groundwater system or problem for conceptual analysis or numerical simulation is the selection of boundary conditions . This report demonstrates the effects of different boundary conditions on the steady-state response of otherwise similar ground-water systems to a pumping stress. Three series of numerical experiments illustrate the behavior of three hypothetical groundwater systems that are rectangular sand prisms with the same dimensions but with different combinations of constant-head, specified-head, no-flow, and constant-flux boundary conditions. In the first series of numerical experiments, the heads and flows in all three systems are identical, as are the hydraulic conductivity and system geometry . However, when the systems are subjected to an equal stress by a pumping well in the third series, each differs significantly in its response . The highest heads (smallest drawdowns) and flows occur in the systems most constrained by constant- or specified-head boundaries. These and other observations described herein are important in steady-state calibration, which is an integral part of simulating many ground-water systems. Because the effects of boundary conditions on model response often become evident only when the system is stressed, a close match between the potential distribution in the model and that in the unstressed natural system does not guarantee that the model boundary conditions correctly represent those in the natural system . In conclusion, the boundary conditions that are selected for simulation of a ground-water system are fundamentally important to groundwater systems analysis and warrant continual reevaluation and modification as investigation proceeds and new information and understanding are acquired.

  20. Einstein's steady-state cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2014-09-01

    Last year, a team of Irish scientists discovered an unpublished manuscript by Einstein in which he attempted to construct a "steady-state" model of the universe. Cormac O'Raifeartaigh describes the excitement of finding this previously unknown work.

  1. Dynamic and steady-state responses of inorganic nitrogen pools and NH(3) exchange in leaves of Lolium perenne and Bromus erectus to changes in root nitrogen supply.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Marie; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2002-02-01

    Short- and long-term responses of inorganic N pools and plant-atmosphere NH(3) exchange to changes in external N supply were investigated in 11-week-old plants of two grass species, Lolium perenne and Bromus erectus, characteristic of N-rich and N-poor grassland ecosystems, respectively. A switch of root N source from NO(-)(3)to NH(4)(+) caused within 3 h a 3- to 6-fold increase in leaf apoplastic NH(4)(+) concentration and a simultaneous decrease in apoplastic pH of about 0.4 pH units in both species. The concentration of total extractable leaf tissue NH(4)(+) also increased two to three times within 3 h after the switch. Removal of exogenous NH(4)(+) caused the apoplastic NH(4)(+) concentration to decline back to the original level within 24 h, whereas the leaf tissue NH(4)(+)concentration decreased more slowly and did not reach the original level in 48 h. After growing for 5 weeks with a steady-state supply of NO(-)(3)or NH(4)(+), L. perenne were in all cases larger, contained more N, and utilized the absorbed N more efficiently for growth than B. erectus, whereas the two species behaved oppositely with respect to tissue concentrations of NO(-)(3), NH(4)(+), and total N. Ammonia compensation points were higher for B. erectus than for L. perenne and were in both species higher for NH(4)(+)- than for NO(-)(3)-grown plants. Steady-state levels of apoplastic NH(4)(+), tissue NH(4)(+), and NH(3) emission were significantly correlated. It is concluded that leaf apoplastic NH(4)(+) is a highly dynamic pool, closely reflecting changes in the external N supply. This rapid response may constitute a signaling system coordinating leaf N metabolism with the actual N uptake by the roots and the external N availability.

  2. Mouse Auditory Brainstem Response Testing

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Oursler, A. E.; Fan, Kevin; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR) test provides information about the inner ear (cochlea) and the central pathways for hearing. The ABR reflects the electrical responses of both the cochlear ganglion neurons and the nuclei of the central auditory pathway to sound stimulation (Zhou et al., 2006; Burkard et al., 2007). The ABR contains 5 identifiable wave forms, labeled as I-V. Wave I represents the summated response from the spiral ganglion and auditory nerve while waves II-V represent responses from the ascending auditory pathway. The ABR is recorded via electrodes placed on the scalp of an anesthetized animal. ABR thresholds refer to the lowest sound pressure level (SPL) that can generate identifiable electrical response waves. This protocol describes the process of measuring the ABR of small rodents (mouse, rat, guinea pig, etc.), including anesthetizing the mouse, placing the electrodes on the scalp, recording click and tone burst stimuli and reading the obtained waveforms for ABR threshold values. As technology continues to evolve, ABR will likely provide more qualitative and quantitative information regarding the function of the auditory nerve and brainstem pathways involved in hearing.

  3. Influence of oil-squeeze-film damping on steady-state response of flexible rotor operating to supercritical speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained for the unbalance response of a flexible rotor to speeds above the third lateral bending critical. Squeeze-film damping coefficients calculated from measured data showed good agreement with short-journal-bearing approximations over a frequency range from 5000 to 31,000 cmp. Response of a rotor to varying amounts of unbalance was investigated. A very lightly damped rotor was compared with one where oil-squeeze dampers were applied.

  4. Human Sensitivity to High Frequency Sine Wave and Pulsed Light Stimulation as Measured by the Steady State Cortical Evoked Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    depth ( Tweel and Lunel, 1965; Spekreijse, 1966) and color (Regan, 1970 and Regan, 1973). It has been suggested (O’Donnell, 1979) that the demonstrated...Publishers, 1966. Van der Tweel , L.H., and Verduyn Lunel, H.F.E. Human visual responses to sinusoidally modulated light. Electroencephalography and Clinical

  5. VIBRA--An Interactive Computer Program for Steady-State Vibration Response Analysis of Linear Damped Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    LOCATION. RESPONSE NODE 10 i DIRECTION 0.7S R / A LERA A 0 C 92 C L E RI A T -4.5S ... 10 a10 2O 230 240 FREQUENCY, HER TZ Figure 8.- Expanded plot of...APPENDIX C - COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS ........................................ 30 Memory Allocation and Auxiliary Storage Files...APPENDIX C - TABLES.................................................................. 34 REFE ENC S

  6. Disruption of the auditory response to a regular click train by a single, extra click.

    PubMed

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Patterson, Roy D

    2015-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that the steady-state response to a periodic sequence of clicks can be modeled as the superposition of responses to single clicks. Here, this hypothesis is challenged by presenting an extra click halfway between two consecutive clicks of a regular series, while measuring the auditory evoked field. After a solitary click at time zero, the click series sounded from 100 to 900 ms, with the extra click presented around 500 ms. The silent period between two stimulus sequences was 310-390 ms (uniformly distributed) so that one stimulation cycle lasted, on average, 1250 ms. Five different click rates between 20 and 60 Hz were examined. The disturbance caused by the extra click was revealed by subtracting the estimated steady-state response from the joint response to the click series and the extra click. The early peaks of the single-click response effectively coincide with same-polarity peaks of the 20-Hz steady-state response. Nevertheless, prediction of the latter from the former proved impossible. However, the 40-Hz steady-state response can be predicted reasonably well from the 20-Hz steady-state response. Somewhat surprisingly, the amplitude of the evoked response to the extra click grew when the click rate of the train was increased from 20 to 30 Hz; the opposite effect would have been expected from research on adaptation. The smaller amplitude at lower click rates might be explained by forward suppression. In this case, the apparent escape from suppression at higher rates might indicate that the clicks belonging to the periodic train are being integrated into an auditory stream, possibly in much the same manner as in classical stream segregation experiments.

  7. Seeking the mechanism responsible for fluoroquinolone photomutagenicity: a pulse radiolysis, steady-state, and laser flash photolysis study.

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Sonia; Consuelo Cuquerella, M; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Edge, Ruth; Bosca, Francisco

    2014-02-01

    The mechanism responsible for the remarkable photomutagenicity of fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics remains unknown. For this reason, it was considered worthwhile to study in detail the interactions between DNA and a dihalogenated FQ such as lomefloxacin (LFX; one of the most photomutagenic FQs) and its N-acetyl derivative ALFX. Studies of photosensitized DNA damage by (A)LFX, such as formation of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), together with pulse radiolysis, laser flash photolysis, and absorption and fluorescence measurements, have shown the important effects of the cationic character of the piperazinyl ring on the affinity of this type of drug for DNA. Hence, the formation of SSBs was detected for LFX, whereas ALFX and ciprofloxacin (a monofluorated FQ) needed a considerably larger dose of light to produce some damage. In this context, it was determined that the association constant (Ka) for the binding of LFX to DNA is ca. 2×10(3)M(-1), whereas in the case of ALFX it is only ca. 0.5×10(3)M(-1). This important difference is attributed to an association between the cationic peripheral ring of LFX and the phosphate moieties of DNA and justifies the DNA SSB results. The analysis of the transient species detected and the photomixtures has allowed us to establish the intermolecular processes involved in the photolysis of FQ in the presence of DNA and 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo). Interestingly, although a covalent binding of the dihalogenated FQ to dGuo occurs, the photodegradation of FQ…DNA complexes did not reveal any significant covalent attachment. Another remarkable outcome of this study was that (A)LFX radical anions, intermediates required for the onset of DNA damage, were detected by pulse radiolysis but not by laser flash photolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of large variation in the photosynthetic induction response among 37 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes that is not correlated with steady-state photosynthetic capacity.

    PubMed

    Soleh, M A; Tanaka, Y; Kim, S Y; Huber, S C; Sakoda, K; Shiraiwa, T

    2017-03-01

    Irradiance continuously fluctuates during the day in the field. The speed of the induction response of photosynthesis in high light affects the cumulative carbon gain of the plant and could impact growth and yield. The photosynthetic induction response and its relationship with the photosynthetic capacity under steady-state conditions (P max) were evaluated in 37 diverse soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes. The induction response of leaf photosynthesis showed large variation among the soybean genotypes. After 5 min illumination with strong light, genotype NAM23 had the highest leaf photosynthetic rate of 33.8 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1), while genotype NAM12 showed the lowest rate at 4.7 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1). Cumulative CO2 fixation (CCF) during the first 5 min of high light exposure ranged from 5.5 mmol CO2 m(-2) for NAM23 to 0.81 mmol CO2 m(-2) for NAM12. The difference in the induction response among genotypes was consistent throughout the growth season. However, there was no significant correlation between CCF and P max among genotypes suggesting that different mechanisms regulate P max and the induction response. The observed variation in the induction response was mainly attributed to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activation, but soybean lines differing in the induction response did not differ in the leaf content of Rubisco activase α- and β-proteins. Future studies will be focused on identifying molecular determinants of the photosynthetic induction response and determining whether this trait could be an important breeding target to achieve improved growth of soybeans in the field.

  9. Dissociation of psychophysical and EEG steady-state response measures of cross-modal temporal correspondence for amplitude modulated acoustic and vibrotactile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Timora, Justin R; Budd, Timothy W

    2013-09-01

    Research examining multisensory integration suggests that the correspondence of stimulus characteristics across modalities (cross-modal correspondence) can have a dramatic influence on both neurophysiological and perceptual responses to multimodal stimulation. The current study extends prior research by examining the cross-modal correspondence of amplitude modulation rate for simultaneous acoustic and vibrotactile stimulation using EEG and perceptual measures of sensitivity to amplitude modulation. To achieve this, psychophysical thresholds and steady-state responses (SSRs) were measured for acoustic and vibrotactile amplitude modulated (AM) stimulation for 21 and 40 Hz AM rates as a function of the cross-modal correspondence. The study design included three primary conditions to determine whether the changes in the SSR and psychophysical thresholds were due to the cross-modal temporal correspondence of amplitude modulated stimuli: NONE (AM in one modality only), SAME (the same AM rate for each modality) and DIFF (different AM rates for each modality). The results of the psychophysical analysis showed that AM detection thresholds for the simultaneous AM conditions (i.e., SAME and DIFF) were significantly higher (i.e., lower sensitivity) than AM detection thresholds for the stimulation of a single modality (i.e., NONE). SSR results showed significant effects of SAME and DIFF conditions on SSR activity. The different pattern of results for perceptual and SSR measures of cross-modal correspondence of AM rate indicates a dissociation between entrained cortical activity (i.e., SSR) and perception. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Staffing in a Steady State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Options for faculty utilization in a steady state are examined, with consideration for their economy or ability to increase turnover or flexibility: early retirement, part retirement, retraining, exchange with other institutions or industry, and fixed-term appointments or lecturer positions. (MSE)

  11. The human auditory evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Figures are presented of computer-averaged auditory evoked responses (AERs) that point to the existence of a completely endogenous brain event. A series of regular clicks or tones was administered to the ear, and 'odd-balls' of different intensity or frequency respectively were included. Subjects were asked either to ignore the sounds (to read or do something else) or to attend to the stimuli. When they listened and counted the odd-balls, a P3 wave occurred at 300msec after stimulus. When the odd-balls consisted of omitted clicks or tone bursts, a similar response was observed. This could not have come from auditory nerve, but only from cortex. It is evidence of recognition, a conscious process.

  12. Distinctive Steady-State Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Passive Robotic Leg Exercise during Head-Up Tilt: A Pilot Study in Neurological Patients.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani Tafreshi, Amirehsan; Riener, Robert; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena

    2017-01-01

    experience orthostatic hypotension. (d) The measurement day was not a statistically significant factor regarding the effects of verticalization and PE on the cardiovascular response. Conclusion: We provide evidence that PE can increase steady-state values of sBP and dBP in neurological patients during head-up tilt. Similar to healthy subjects the effect on sBP depends on the verticalization angle of the robot-assisted tilt table. PE might have the potential to prevent orthostatic hypotension, but as the amount of drop in BP in response to head-up tilting was not leading to orthostatic hypotension in our patients, we could neither conclude nor reject such a preventive compensatory effect. Furthermore, we found that changing the PE speed does not influence the steady-state cardiovascular response.

  13. On Typicality in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Denis J.; Williams, Stephen R.; Searles, Debra J.; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-08-01

    From the statistical mechanical viewpoint, relaxation of macroscopic systems and response theory rest on a notion of typicality, according to which the behavior of single macroscopic objects is given by appropriate ensembles: ensemble averages of observable quantities represent the measurements performed on single objects, because " almost all" objects share the same fate. In the case of non-dissipative dynamics and relaxation toward equilibrium states, " almost all" is referred to invariant probability distributions that are absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure. In other words, the collection of initial micro-states (single systems) that do not follow the ensemble is supposed to constitute a set of vanishing, phase space volume. This approach is problematic in the case of dissipative dynamics and relaxation to nonequilibrium steady states, because the relevant invariant distributions attribute probability 1 to sets of zero volume, while evolution commonly begins in equilibrium states, i.e., in sets of full phase space volume. We consider the relaxation of classical, thermostatted particle systems to nonequilibrium steady states. We show that the dynamical condition known as Ω T-mixing is necessary and sufficient for relaxation of ensemble averages to steady state values. Moreover, we find that the condition known as weak T-mixing applied to smooth observables is sufficient for ensemble relaxation to be independent of the initial ensemble. Lastly, we show that weak T-mixing provides a notion of typicality for dissipative dynamics that is based on the (non-invariant) Lebesgue measure, and that we call physical ergodicity.

  14. Study on steady-state response of a vertical axis automatic washing machine with a hydraulic balancer using a new approach and a method for getting a smaller deflection angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wei; Zhang, Qiu-Ju; Fan, Sheng-Yao

    2011-04-01

    A new approach is used in this paper to analyze steady-state response of a vertical axis automatic washing machine with a hydraulic balancer and a method for getting a smaller deflection angle of the washing/drying assembly is presented. First, a mathematical model of the vertical axis washing machine and a numerical description of the hydraulic balancer are described and a vibration model for the vertical axis washing machine with a hydraulic balancer is built. Second, the vibration model is transformed into an autonomous form whose equilibrium point can be used to analyze dynamics of the washing machine at the steady state. Because the autonomous form can be solved by the Newton-Raphson method which requires only a few iterations, it provides a much faster approach for analyzing steady-state response of the spin drying process than traditional numerical integration methods. Five parameters influencing the spin drying process are considered, and the balancer's importance in reducing vibrations at the steady state is illustrated. Third, the equilibrium conditions of the centrifugal forces acting on the clothes, the washing/drying assembly and the balancer are considered, and a governing equation for getting a smaller deflection angle of the washing/drying assembly is derived. At last, parameters in the governing equation, especially those related to the hydraulic balancer, are discussed.

  15. Inconsistencies in steady state thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald; Motai, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    We address the issue of extending thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Using driven stochastic lattice gases, we ask whether consistent definitions of an effective chemical potential μ, and an effective temperature Te, are possible. These quantities are determined via zero-flux conditions of particles and energy between the driven system and a reservoir. For the models considered here, the fluxes are given in terms of certain stationary average densities, eliminating the need to perturb the system by actually exchanging particles; μ and Te are thereby obtained via open-circuit measurements, using a virtual reservoir. In the lattice gas with nearest-neighbor exclusion, temperature is not relevant, and we find that the effective chemical potential, a function of density and drive strength, satisfies the zeroth law, and correctly predicts the densities of coexisting systems. In the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn driven lattice gas, both μ and Te need to be defined. We show analytically that the zeroth law is violated, and determine the size of the violations numerically. Our results highlight a fundamental inconsistency in the extension of thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Research supported by CNPq, Brazil.

  16. Auditory brainstem responses and auditory thresholds in woodpeckers.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Bernard; Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Dooling, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Auditory sensitivity in three species of woodpeckers was estimated using the auditory brainstem response (ABR), a measure of the summed electrical activity of auditory neurons. For all species, the ABR waveform showed at least two, and sometimes three prominent peaks occurring within 10 ms of stimulus onset. Also ABR peak amplitude increased and latency decreased as a function of increasing sound pressure levels. Results showed no significant differences in overall auditory abilities between the three species of woodpeckers. The average ABR audiogram showed that woodpeckers have lowest thresholds between 1.5 and 5.7 kHz. The shape of the average woodpecker ABR audiogram was similar to the shape of the ABR-measured audiograms of other small birds at most frequencies, but at the highest frequency data suggest that woodpecker thresholds may be lower than those of domesticated birds, while similar to those of wild birds.

  17. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  18. Irreversible processes at nonequilibrium steady states

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ronald Forrest

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that a Liapunov criterion exists for the stability of nonequilibrium steady states. This criterion is based upon the fluctuation-dissipation relation, as was first pointed out by Keizer. At steady states, the Liapunov function is constructed from the covariance matrix for the thermodynamic variables. Unlike the situation around equilibrium, at steady states the covariance matrix and the “excess entropy” matrix are not equivalent. The excess entropy, which serves as the Liapunov function around equilibrium, does not work in this capacity at steady states. Keizer's Liapunov function must be viewed as the first correct candidate for a proper Liapunov function for steady states. PMID:16592649

  19. Venusian hydrology: Steady state reconsidered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinspoon, David H.

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, Grinspoon proposed that the data on hydrogen abundance, isotopic composition, and escape rate were consistent with the hypothesis that water on Venus might be in steady state rather than monotonic decline since the dawn of time. This conclusion was partially based on a derived water lifetime against nonthermal escape of approximately 10(exp 8) yr. De Bergh et al., preferring the earlier Pioneer Venus value of 200 ppm water to the significantly lower value detected by Bezard et al., found H2O lifetimes of greater than 10(exp 9) yr. Donahue and Hodges derived H2O lifetimes of 0.4-5 x 10 (exp 9) yr. Both these analyses used estimates of H escape flux between 0.4 x 10(exp 7) and 1 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) from Rodriguez et al. Yet in more recent Monte Carlo modeling, Hodges and Tinsley found an escape flux due to charge exchange with hot H(+) of 2.8 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). McElroy et al. estimated an escape flux of 8 x 10(exp 6) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) from collisions with hot O produced by dissociative recombination of O2(+). Brace et al. estimated an escape flux of 5 x 10(exp 6) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) from ion escape from the ionotail of Venus. The combined estimated escape flux from all these processes is approximately 4 x 10(exp 7) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). The most sophisticated analysis to date of near-IR radiation from Venus' nightside reveals a water mixing ratio of approximately 30 ppm, suggesting a lifetime against escape for water of less than 10(exp 8) yr. Large uncertainties remain in these quantities, yet the data point toward a steady state. Further evaluation of these uncertainties, and new evolutionary modeling incorporating estimates of the outgassing rate from post-Magellan estimates of the volcanic resurfacing rate are presented.

  20. Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses in children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Koravand, Amineh; Al Osman, Rida; Rivest, Véronique; Poulin, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate subcortical auditory processing in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABRs) were recorded using click and speech/da/stimuli. Twenty-five children, aged 6-14 years old, participated in the study: 13 with normal hearing acuity and 12 with sensorineural hearing loss. No significant differences were observed for the click-evoked ABRs between normal hearing and hearing-impaired groups. For the speech-evoked ABRs, no significant differences were found for the latencies of the following responses between the two groups: onset (V and A), transition (C), one of the steady-state wave (F), and offset (O). However, the latency of the steady-state waves (D and E) was significantly longer for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Furthermore, the amplitude of the offset wave O and of the envelope frequency response (EFR) of the speech-evoked ABRs was significantly larger for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Results obtained from the speech-evoked ABRs suggest that children with a mild to moderately-severe sensorineural hearing loss have a specific pattern of subcortical auditory processing. Our results show differences for the speech-evoked ABRs in normal hearing children compared to hearing-impaired children. These results add to the body of the literature on how children with hearing loss process speech at the brainstem level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Auditory Detection of the Human Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Gerald, Jr.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study evaluated whether listeners can distinguish human brainstem auditory evoked responses elicited by acoustic clicks from control waveforms obtained with no acoustic stimulus when the waveforms are presented auditorily. Detection performance for stimuli presented visually was slightly, but consistently, superior to that which occurred for…

  2. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response through hearing aid stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Ludovic; Veuillet, Evelyne; Vesson, Jean-François; Bouchet, Patrick; Caclin, Anne; Thai-Van, Hung

    2015-07-01

    Millions of people across the world are hearing impaired, and rely on hearing aids to improve their everyday life. Objective audiometry could optimize hearing aid fitting, and is of particular interest for non-communicative patients. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response (speech ABR), a fine electrophysiological marker of speech encoding, is presently seen as a promising candidate for implementing objective audiometry; yet, unlike lower-frequency auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) such as cortical AEPs or auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), aided-speech ABRs (i.e., speech ABRs through hearing aid stimulation) have almost never been recorded. This may be due to their high-frequency components requesting a high temporal precision of the stimulation. We assess here a new approach to record high-quality and artifact-free speech ABR while stimulating directly through hearing aids. In 4 normal-hearing adults, we recorded speech ABR evoked by a /ba/ syllable binaurally delivered through insert earphones for quality control or through hearing aids. To assess the presence of a potential stimulus artifact, recordings were also done in mute conditions with the exact same potential sources of stimulus artifacts as in the main runs. Hearing aid stimulation led to artifact-free speech ABR in each participant, with the same quality as when using insert earphones, as shown with signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements. Our new approach consisting in directly transmitting speech stimuli through hearing aids allowed for a perfect temporal precision mandatory in speech ABR recordings, and could thus constitute a decisive step in hearing impairment investigation and in hearing aid fitting improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Corticofugal modulation of peripheral auditory responses

    PubMed Central

    Terreros, Gonzalo; Delano, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory efferent system originates in the auditory cortex and projects to the medial geniculate body (MGB), inferior colliculus (IC), cochlear nucleus (CN) and superior olivary complex (SOC) reaching the cochlea through olivocochlear (OC) fibers. This unique neuronal network is organized in several afferent-efferent feedback loops including: the (i) colliculo-thalamic-cortico-collicular; (ii) cortico-(collicular)-OC; and (iii) cortico-(collicular)-CN pathways. Recent experiments demonstrate that blocking ongoing auditory-cortex activity with pharmacological and physical methods modulates the amplitude of cochlear potentials. In addition, auditory-cortex microstimulation independently modulates cochlear sensitivity and the strength of the OC reflex. In this mini-review, anatomical and physiological evidence supporting the presence of a functional efferent network from the auditory cortex to the cochlear receptor is presented. Special emphasis is given to the corticofugal effects on initial auditory processing, that is, on CN, auditory nerve and cochlear responses. A working model of three parallel pathways from the auditory cortex to the cochlea and auditory nerve is proposed. PMID:26483647

  4. On the time to steady state: insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, L.; Willett, S.; McCoy, S. W.; Perron, J.

    2013-12-01

    How fast do fluvial landscapes approach steady state after an application of tectonic or climatic perturbation? While theory and some numerical models predict that the celerity of the advective wave (knickpoint) controls the response time for perturbations, experiments and other landscape evolution models demonstrate that the time to steady state is much longer than the theoretically predicted response time. We posit that the longevity of transient features and the time to steady state are controlled by the stability of the topology and geometry of channel networks. Evolution of a channel network occurs by a combination of discrete capture events and continuous migration of water divides, processes, which are difficult to represent accurately in landscape evolution models. We therefore address the question of the time to steady state using the DAC landscape evolution model that solves accurately for the location of water divides, using a combination of analytical solution for hillslopes and low-order channels together with a numerical solution for higher order channels. DAC also includes an explicit capture criterion. We have tested fundamental predictions from DAC and show that modeled networks reproduce natural network characteristics such as the Hack's exponent and coefficient and the fractal dimension. We define two steady-state criteria: a topographic steady state, defined by global, pointwise steady elevation, and a topological steady state defined as the state in which no further reorganization of the drainage network takes place. Analyzing block uplift simulations, we find that the time to achieve either topographic or topological steady state exceeds by an order of magnitude the theoretical response time of the fluvial network. The longevity of the transient state is the result of the area feedback, by which, migration of a divide changes the local contributing area. This change propagates downstream as a slope adjustment, forcing further divide migrations

  5. The influence of visuospatial attention on unattended auditory 40 Hz responses.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cullen; Gupta, Cota Navin; Plis, Sergey M; Damaraju, Eswar; Khullar, Siddharth; Calhoun, Vince D; Bridwell, David A

    2013-01-01

    Information must integrate from multiple brain areas in healthy cognition and perception. The present study examined the extent to which cortical responses within one sensory modality are modulated by a complex task conducted within another sensory modality. Electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured to a 40 Hz auditory stimulus while individuals attended to modulations in the amplitude of the 40 Hz stimulus, and as a function of the difficulty of the popular computer game Tetris. The steady-state response to the 40 Hz stimulus was isolated by Fourier analysis of the EEG. The response at the stimulus frequency was normalized by the response within the surrounding frequencies, generating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Seven out of eight individuals demonstrate a monotonic increase in the log SNR of the 40 Hz responses going from the difficult visuospatial task to the easy visuospatial task to attending to the auditory stimuli. This pattern is represented statistically by a One-Way ANOVA, indicating significant differences in log SNR across the three tasks. The sensitivity of 40 Hz auditory responses to the visuospatial load was further demonstrated by a significant correlation between log SNR and the difficulty (i.e., speed) of the Tetris task. Thus, the results demonstrate that 40 Hz auditory cortical responses are influenced by an individual's goal-directed attention to the stimulus, and by the degree of difficulty of a complex visuospatial task.

  6. Repression of formate dehydrogenase in Solanum tuberosum increases steady-state levels of formate and accelerates the accumulation of proline in response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Ambard-Bretteville, Françoise; Sorin, Céline; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Hourton-Cabassa, Cécile; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine

    2003-08-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2.) is a soluble mitochondrial enzyme capable of oxidizing formate into CO2 in the presence of NAD+. It is abundant in non-green tissues and scarce in photosynthetic tissues. Under stress, FDH transcripts (and protein) accumulate in leaves, and leaf mitochondria acquire the ability to use formate as a respiratory substrate. In this paper, we describe the analysis of transgenic potato plants under-expressing FDH, obtained in order to understand the physiological function of FDH. Plants expressing low FDH activities were selected and the study was focused on a line (AS23) showing no detectable FDH activity. AS23 plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control plants, and grew normally under standard conditions. However, mitochondria isolated from AS23 tubers could not use formate as a respiratory substrate. Steady-state levels of formate were higher in AS23 leaves and tubers than in control plants. Tubers of untransformed plants oxidized 14C formate into 14CO2 but AS23 tubers accumulated it. In order to reveal a possible phenotype under stress conditions, control and AS23 plants were submitted to drought and cold. These treatments dramatically induced FDH transcripts in control plants but, whatever the growth conditions, no 1.4 kb FDH transcripts were detected in leaves of AS23 plants. Amongst various biochemical and molecular differences between stressed AS23 and control plants, the most striking was a dramatically faster accumulation of proline in the leaves of drought-stressed plants under-expressing FDH.

  7. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Tahaei, Ali Akbar; Ashayeri, Hassan; Pourbakht, Akram; Kamali, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency. PMID:25215262

  8. Speech evoked auditory brainstem response in stuttering.

    PubMed

    Tahaei, Ali Akbar; Ashayeri, Hassan; Pourbakht, Akram; Kamali, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  9. Non-Markovianity-assisted steady state entanglement.

    PubMed

    Huelga, Susana F; Rivas, Ángel; Plenio, Martin B

    2012-04-20

    We analyze the steady state entanglement generated in a coherently coupled dimer system subject to dephasing noise as a function of the degree of Markovianity of the evolution. By keeping fixed the effective noise strength while varying the memory time of the environment, we demonstrate that non-Markovianity is an essential, quantifiable resource that may support the formation of steady state entanglement whereas purely Markovian dynamics governed by Lindblad master equations lead to separable steady states. This result illustrates possible mechanisms leading to long-lived entanglement in purely decohering, possibly local, environments. We present a feasible experimental demonstration of this noise assisted phenomenon using a system of trapped ions.

  10. Efficient steady-state solver for hierarchical quantum master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Qiao, Qin; Xu, Rui-Xue; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2017-07-01

    Steady states play pivotal roles in many equilibrium and non-equilibrium open system studies. Their accurate evaluations call for exact theories with rigorous treatment of system-bath interactions. Therein, the hierarchical equations-of-motion (HEOM) formalism is a nonperturbative and non-Markovian quantum dissipation theory, which can faithfully describe the dissipative dynamics and nonlinear response of open systems. Nevertheless, solving the steady states of open quantum systems via HEOM is often a challenging task, due to the vast number of dynamical quantities involved. In this work, we propose a self-consistent iteration approach that quickly solves the HEOM steady states. We demonstrate its high efficiency with accurate and fast evaluations of low-temperature thermal equilibrium of a model Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex. Numerically exact evaluation of thermal equilibrium Rényi entropies and stationary emission line shapes is presented with detailed discussion.

  11. Fractality in nonequilibrium steady states of quasiperiodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vipin Kerala; de Mulatier, Clélia; Žnidarič, Marko

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium response of quasiperiodic systems to boundary driving. In particular, we focus on the Aubry-André-Harper model at its metal-insulator transition and the diagonal Fibonacci model. We find that opening the system at the boundaries provides a viable experimental technique to probe its underlying fractality, which is reflected in the fractal spatial dependence of simple observables (such as magnetization) in the nonequilibrium steady state. We also find that the dynamics in the nonequilibrium steady state depends on the length of the chain chosen: generic length chains harbour qualitatively slower transport (different scaling exponent) than Fibonacci length chains, which is in turn slower than in the closed system. We conjecture that such fractal nonequilibrium steady states should arise in generic driven critical systems that have fractal properties.

  12. Steady state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of linear multivariable systems is developed. The criterion consists of n(n-1) inequalities with the type numbers of the compensator transfer functions as the unknowns. These unknowns can be chosen to satisfy the inequalities and hence achieve a steady state decoupling scheme. It turns out that pure integrators in the loops play an important role. An extended root locus design method is then developed to take care of the stability and transient response. The overall procedure is applied to the compensation design for STOL C-8A aircraft in the approach mode.

  13. Flexibility in a Steady State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Richard

    1977-01-01

    Problems posed by abrupt transition to a steady state following rapid expansion in Australian universities are reviewed. Focus is on demography of departments, new developments in academic disciplines, tenure, and early retirement. (LBH)

  14. Steady-state permanent magnet MPD thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Y.; Sasoh, A.

    1987-01-01

    A steady-state MPD arc thruster with permanent magnets has been made. The effect of the permanent magnets on thruster performance and the plasma acceleration mechanism was examined through measurements of thrust, chamber pressure, current densities, and plasma properties in the exhaust plume. Experimental results show that the use of the permanent magnets is desirable in steady-state MPD thrusters of the greater than 10 kW power range. 7 references.

  15. Relationships of body mass index with serum carotenoids, tocopherols and retinol at steady-state and in response to a carotenoid-rich vegetable diet intervention in Filipino schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D; Maramag, Cherry C; Tengco, Lorena W; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Solon, Florentino S

    2008-04-01

    In marginally nourished children, information is scarce regarding the circulating concentrations of carotenoids and tocopherols, and physiological factors influencing their circulating levels. We determined the serum concentrations of carotenoids, tocopherols and retinol at steady state and in response to a 9-week vegetable diet intervention in 9-12-year-old girls (n=54) and boys (n=65) in rural Philippines. We determined cross-sectional relationships of BMI (body mass index) with serum micronutrient levels, and whether BMI is a determinant of serum carotenoid responses to the ingestion of carotenoid-rich vegetables. We measured dietary nutrient intakes and assessed inflammation by measurement of serum C-reactive protein levels. The children had low serum concentrations of carotenoids, tocopherols and retinol as compared with published values for similar-aged children in the U.S.A. The low serum retinol levels can be ascribed to inadequate diets and were not the result of confounding due to inflammation. Significant inverse correlations of BMI and serum all-trans-beta-carotene, 13-cis-beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol (but not beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene and retinol) were observed among girls at baseline. The dietary intervention markedly enhanced the serum concentrations of all carotenoids. Changes in serum all-trans-beta-carotene and alpha-carotene (but not changes in lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin) in response to the dietary intervention were inversely associated with BMI in girls and boys. Thus, in Filipino school-aged children, BMI is inversely related to the steady-state serum concentrations of certain carotenoids and vitamin E, but not vitamin A, and is a determinant of serum beta- and alpha-carotene responses, but not xanthophyll responses, to the ingestion of carotenoid-rich vegetable meals.

  16. The binaural click-evoked auditory brainstem response of the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Mulsow, Jason; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by high-amplitude [100 dB re 20 μPa, peak-to-peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL)] aerial broadband clicks were collected from seven California sea lions in order to provide a basic description of short-latency auditory evoked potentials in this species. The waveform of the ABR was similar to that of other mammals, comprising seven positive and six negative characteristic waves. Variability in the amplitudes and latencies of waves was higher among subjects than the variability in within-subject repeated measurements. ABRs to progressively attenuated clicks were collected for three additional sea lions. Wave amplitudes decreased and latencies increased with decreasing stimulus level, with only the sixth positive wave visible near threshold (35-40 dB peSPL). Based on observations of wave latency as a function of stimulus amplitude, the sixth positive wave of the ABR is equivalent to the clinically important "wave V" identified in studies with humans. The current results provide information on the basic electrophysiology of the pinniped auditory system, including the processes that underlie brainstem auditory steady-state responses used to measure frequency-specific hearing sensitivity.

  17. Central auditory onset responses, and temporal asymmetries in auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D P; Hall, S E; Boehnke, S E

    2002-05-01

    Historically, central auditory responses have been studied for their sensitivity to various parameters of tone and noise burst stimulation, with response rate plotted as a function of the stimulus variable. The responses themselves are often quite brief, and locked in time to stimulus onset. In the stimulus amplitude domain, it has recently become clear that these responses are actually driven by properties of the stimulus' onset transient, and this has had important implications for how we interpret responses to manipulations of tone (or noise) burst plateau level. That finding was important in its own right, but a more general scrutiny of the available neurophysiological and psychophysical evidence reveals that there is a significant asymmetry in the neurophysiological and perceptual processing of stimulus onsets and offsets: sound onsets have a more elaborate neurophysiological representation, and receive a greater perceptual weighting. Hypotheses about origins of the asymmetries, derived independently from psychophysics and from neurophysiology, have in common a response threshold mechanism which adaptively tracks the ongoing level of stimulation.

  18. Network inference in the nonequilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Nguyen, H. Chau; Berg, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    Nonequilibrium systems lack an explicit characterization of their steady state like the Boltzmann distribution for equilibrium systems. This has drastic consequences for the inference of the parameters of a model when its dynamics lacks detailed balance. Such nonequilibrium systems occur naturally in applications like neural networks and gene regulatory networks. Here, we focus on the paradigmatic asymmetric Ising model and show that we can learn its parameters from independent samples of the nonequilibrium steady state. We present both an exact inference algorithm and a computationally more efficient, approximate algorithm for weak interactions based on a systematic expansion around mean-field theory. Obtaining expressions for magnetizations and two- and three-point spin correlations, we establish that these observables are sufficient to infer the model parameters. Further, we discuss the symmetries characterizing the different orders of the expansion around the mean field and show how different types of dynamics can be distinguished on the basis of samples from the nonequilibrium steady state.

  19. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre-Steady-State Decoding of the Bicoid Morphogen Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Sven; Sandler, Oded; Sberro, Hila; Shnider, Sara; Schejter, Eyal; Shilo, Ben-Zion; Barkai, Naama

    2007-01-01

    Morphogen gradients are established by the localized production and subsequent diffusion of signaling molecules. It is generally assumed that cell fates are induced only after morphogen profiles have reached their steady state. Yet, patterning processes during early development occur rapidly, and tissue patterning may precede the convergence of the gradient to its steady state. Here we consider the implications of pre-steady-state decoding of the Bicoid morphogen gradient for patterning of the anterior–posterior axis of the Drosophila embryo. Quantitative analysis of the shift in the expression domains of several Bicoid targets (gap genes) upon alteration of bcd dosage, as well as a temporal analysis of a reporter for Bicoid activity, suggest that a transient decoding mechanism is employed in this setting. We show that decoding the pre-steady-state morphogen profile can reduce patterning errors caused by fluctuations in the rate of morphogen production. This can explain the surprisingly small shifts in gap and pair-rule gene expression domains observed in response to alterations in bcd dosage. PMID:17298180

  1. Differential responses of primary auditory cortex in autistic spectrum disorder with auditory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Goto, Tetsu; Sanefuji, Wakako; Yamamoto, Tomoka; Sakai, Saeko; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Masayuki; Mohri, Ikuko; Yorifuji, Shiro; Taniike, Masako

    2012-01-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential responses of the primary auditory cortex to auditory stimuli in autistic spectrum disorder with or without auditory hypersensitivity. Auditory-evoked field values were obtained from 18 boys (nine with and nine without auditory hypersensitivity) with autistic spectrum disorder and 12 age-matched controls. Autistic disorder with hypersensitivity showed significantly more delayed M50/M100 peak latencies than autistic disorder without hypersensitivity or the control. M50 dipole moments in the hypersensitivity group were larger than those in the other two groups [corrected]. M50/M100 peak latencies were correlated with the severity of auditory hypersensitivity; furthermore, severe hypersensitivity induced more behavioral problems. This study indicates auditory hypersensitivity in autistic spectrum disorder as a characteristic response of the primary auditory cortex, possibly resulting from neurological immaturity or functional abnormalities in it.

  2. Neurodynamics, tonality, and the auditory brainstem response.

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Almonte, Felix V

    2012-04-01

    Tonal relationships are foundational in music, providing the basis upon which musical structures, such as melodies, are constructed and perceived. A recent dynamic theory of musical tonality predicts that networks of auditory neurons resonate nonlinearly to musical stimuli. Nonlinear resonance leads to stability and attraction relationships among neural frequencies, and these neural dynamics give rise to the perception of relationships among tones that we collectively refer to as tonal cognition. Because this model describes the dynamics of neural populations, it makes specific predictions about human auditory neurophysiology. Here, we show how predictions about the auditory brainstem response (ABR) are derived from the model. To illustrate, we derive a prediction about population responses to musical intervals that has been observed in the human brainstem. Our modeled ABR shows qualitative agreement with important features of the human ABR. This provides a source of evidence that fundamental principles of auditory neurodynamics might underlie the perception of tonal relationships, and forces reevaluation of the role of learning and enculturation in tonal cognition.

  3. Identification of large variation in the photosynthetic induction response among 37 soybean genotypes that is not correlated with steady-state photosynthetic capacity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irradiance continuously fluctuates during the day in the field, potentially resulting in photosynthetic induction of leaves as they transition from low to high light. The speed of the induction response affects the cumulative carbon gain of the plants and could impact growth and yield. The photosynt...

  4. A High-Density EEG Investigation into Steady State Binaural Beat Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  5. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carey, Anne-Marie; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others.

  6. Response recovery in the locust auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Temporal resolution and the time courses of recovery from acute adaptation of neurons in the auditory pathway of the grasshopper Locusta migratoria were investigated with a response recovery paradigm. We stimulated with a series of single click and click pair stimuli while performing intracellular recordings from neurons at three processing stages: receptors and first and second order interneurons. The response to the second click was expressed relative to the single click response. This allowed the uncovering of the basic temporal resolution in these neurons. The effect of adaptation increased with processing layer. While neurons in the auditory periphery displayed a steady response recovery after a short initial adaptation, many interneurons showed nonlinear effects: most prominent a long-lasting suppression of the response to the second click in a pair, as well as a gain in response if a click was preceded by a click a few milliseconds before. Our results reveal a distributed temporal filtering of input at an early auditory processing stage. This set of specified filters is very likely homologous across grasshopper species and thus forms the neurophysiological basis for extracting relevant information from a variety of different temporal signals. Interestingly, in terms of spike timing precision neurons at all three processing layers recovered very fast, within 20 ms. Spike waveform analysis of several neuron types did not sufficiently explain the response recovery profiles implemented in these neurons, indicating that temporal resolution in neurons located at several processing layers of the auditory pathway is not necessarily limited by the spike duration and refractory period. PMID:26609115

  7. Investigation of the steady state measurement process

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, J. L.; Leisztner, L.; Hangos, K. M.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the role of steady state concept in the model of analytical chemical measurement and deduction, the definition of ‘practically sleady slate’ (PSS) has been inlroduced. The defnition does not require the process to be in steady state in a strictly mathematical sense. In order to fulfil the requiremenls of ‘practically steady state’ the random error and the syslematic error must vary within a suitable limit, and the expected fgure for the measured value must be within a specified range. The goal of the present investigation was to detect the steady state of the measurement process with respect to the analytical information (peak area ratio) based on the measured values. The method proposed proved to be useful for the determination of the simultaneously present systematic error and random error. Control based on the measured values of the internal standard is useful, but additional information is necessary. There are several advantages to the method described: the results for the internal standard indicate possible sources of disturbances and allow the end of the steady state measurement process to be predicted. PMID:18925195

  8. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    DOEpatents

    Janos, Alan C.; Jardin, Stephen C.; Yamada, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The inductively formed spheromak plasma can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. Steady-state operation is obtained by forming the plasma in the linked mode, then oscillating the poloidal and toroidal fields such that they have different phases. Preferably, the poloidal and magnetic fields are 90.degree. out of phase.

  9. Thermodynamics of Stability of Nonequilibrium Steady States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastogi, R. P.; Shabd, Ram

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a concise and critical account of developments in nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion for stability of nonequilibrium steady states is critically examined for consecutive and monomolecular triangular reactions, autocatalytic reactions, auto-inhibited reactions, and the Lotka-Volterra model. (JN)

  10. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    DOEpatents

    Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Yamada, M.

    1985-02-20

    The inductively formed spheromak configuration (S-1) can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. The method described eliminates the restriction to pulsed spheromak plasmas or the use of electrodes for steady-state operation, and, therefore, is a reactor-relevant formation and sustainment method.

  11. Steady-State Staffing: A Second Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furniss, W. Todd

    This is a folow-up report on developments in long-range faculty personnel planning since the publication of "Steady-State Staffing in Tenure-Granting Institutions and Related Papers," covering the period from March through December 1973. Following references to newly available data, the paper deals first with work done at SUNY-Buffalo, Stanford,…

  12. The Politics of the Steady State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Charles

    1978-01-01

    A steady state society has limits pertaining to population size, non-renewable resources, and production which emits heat or substances into soil, water, or the atmosphere. Respecting these limits means renouncing exponential quantitative growth and accepting a universally available consumption standard. (SW)

  13. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design point is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported.

  14. A simplified analytical solution for thermal response of a one-dimensional, steady state transpiration cooling system in radiative and convective environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, H.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified analytical method for calculation of thermal response within a transpiration-cooled porous heat shield material in an intense radiative-convective heating environment is presented. The essential assumptions of the radiative and convective transfer processes in the heat shield matrix are the two-temperature approximation and the specified radiative-convective heatings of the front surface. Sample calculations for porous silica with CO2 injection are presented for some typical parameters of mass injection rate, porosity, and material thickness. The effect of these parameters on the cooling system is discussed.

  15. Spectral response of steady-state photoluminescence from GaAs1-xPx layers grown on a SiGe/Si system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Pollard, Michael E.; Klaus Juhl, Mattias; Conrad, Brianna; Soeriyadi, Anastasia; Li, Dun; Lochtefeld, Anthony; Gerger, Andrew; Bagnall, Darren M.; Barnett, Allen; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the spectral response of photoluminescence (SRPL) in solar cells has recently attracted attention as it can be used as a contactless relative measure of external quantum efficiency (EQE) prior to full device fabrication. However, this technique requires that the monitored PL spectrum originates mainly from a region in the solar cell with uniformly distributed majority carriers. For a stack of thin films with a similar material composition, the slightly different emission spectrum from each layer may lead to the superposition of several luminescence peaks. This letter presents the measurement of the SRPL from GaAsP tandem solar cells and outlines a method for separating the individual layer contributions. Good agreement between measured SRPL and EQE at short wavelengths has been achieved, and the deviations at longer wavelengths have been analyzed. This study also reveals unexpected bandgap narrowing resulting from a variable material composition within the active region.

  16. Steady-state linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response of a four-level quantum dot with phonon-assisted transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Chao, She; Ting-Ting, Luo; Wei-Xi, Zhang; Mao-Wu, Ran; Deng-Long, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response in a four-level loop configuration GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor quantum dot are analytically studied with the phonon-assisted transition (PAT). It is shown that the changes among a single electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window, a double EIT window and the amplification of the probe field in the absorption curves can be controlled by varying the strength of PAT κ. Meanwhile, double switching from the anomalous dispersion regime to the normal dispersion regime can likely be achieved by increasing the Rabi energy of the external optical control field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the group velocity of the probe field can be practically regulated by varying the PAT and the intensity of the optical control field. In the nonlinear case, it is shown that the large SPM and XPM can be achieved as linear absorption vanishes simultaneously, and the PAT can suppress both third-order self-Kerr and the cross-Kerr nonlinear effect of the QD. Our study is much more practical than its atomic counterpart due to its flexible design and the controllable interference strength, and may provide some new possibilities for technological applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61367003), the Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 12A140), and the Scientific Research Fund of Guizhou Provincial Education Department, China (Grant Nos. KY[2015]384 and KY[2015]446).

  17. Steady state statistical correlations predict bistability in reaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Suchana; Barik, Debashis

    2017-03-01

    Various cellular decision making processes are regulated by bistable switches that take graded input signals and convert them to binary all-or-none responses. Traditionally, a bistable switch generated by a positive feedback loop is characterized either by a hysteretic signal response curve with two distinct signaling thresholds or by characterizing the bimodality of the response distribution in the bistable region. To identify the intrinsic bistability of a feedback regulated network, here we propose that bistability can be determined by correlating higher order moments and cumulants (≥2) of the joint steady state distributions of two components connected in a positive feedback loop. We performed stochastic simulations of four feedback regulated models with intrinsic bistability and we show that for a bistable switch with variation of the signal dose, the steady state variance vs. covariance adopts a signatory cusp-shaped curve. Further, we find that the (n + 1)th order cross-cumulant vs. nth order cross-cumulant adopts a closed loop structure for at least n = 3. We also propose that our method is capable of identifying systems without intrinsic bistability even though the system may show bimodality in the marginal response distribution. The proposed method can be used to analyze single cell protein data measured at steady state from experiments such as flow cytometry.

  18. Auditory response to pulsed radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Elder, J A; Chou, C K

    2003-01-01

    The human auditory response to pulses of radiofrequency (RF) energy, commonly called RF hearing, is a well established phenomenon. RF induced sounds can be characterized as low intensity sounds because, in general, a quiet environment is required for the auditory response. The sound is similar to other common sounds such as a click, buzz, hiss, knock, or chirp. Effective radiofrequencies range from 2.4 to 10000 MHz, but an individual's ability to hear RF induced sounds is dependent upon high frequency acoustic hearing in the kHz range above about 5 kHz. The site of conversion of RF energy to acoustic energy is within or peripheral to the cochlea, and once the cochlea is stimulated, the detection of RF induced sounds in humans and RF induced auditory responses in animals is similar to acoustic sound detection. The fundamental frequency of RF induced sounds is independent of the frequency of the radiowaves but dependent upon head dimensions. The auditory response has been shown to be dependent upon the energy in a single pulse and not on average power density. The weight of evidence of the results of human, animal, and modeling studies supports the thermoelastic expansion theory as the explanation for the RF hearing phenomenon. RF induced sounds involve the perception via bone conduction of thermally generated sound transients, that is, audible sounds are produced by rapid thermal expansion resulting from a calculated temperature rise of only 5 x 10(-6) degrees C in tissue at the threshold level due to absorption of the energy in the RF pulse. The hearing of RF induced sounds at exposure levels many orders of magnitude greater than the hearing threshold is considered to be a biological effect without an accompanying health effect. This conclusion is supported by a comparison of pressure induced in the body by RF pulses to pressure associated with hazardous acoustic energy and clinical ultrasound procedures.

  19. Distinctive Steady-State Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Passive Robotic Leg Exercise and Functional Electrical Stimulation during Head-Up Tilt

    PubMed Central

    Sarabadani Tafreshi, Amirehsan; Riener, Robert; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tilt tables enable early mobilization of patients by providing verticalization. But there is a high risk of orthostatic hypotension provoked by verticalization, especially after neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury. Robot-assisted tilt tables might be an alternative as they add passive robotic leg exercise (PE) that can be enhanced with functional electrical stimulation (FES) to the verticalization, thus reducing the risk of orthostatic hypotension. We hypothesized that the influence of PE on the cardiovascular system during verticalization (i.e., head-up tilt) depends on the verticalization angle, and FES strengthens the PE influence. To test our hypotheses, we investigated the PE effects on the cardiovascular parameters heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) at different angles of verticalization in a healthy population. Methods: Ten healthy subjects on a robot-assisted tilt table underwent four different study protocols while HR, sBP, and dBP were measured: (1) head-up tilt to 60° and 71° without PE; (2) PE at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (3) PE while constant FES intensity was applied to the leg muscles, at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (4) PE with variation of the applied FES intensity at 0°, 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt. Linear mixed models were used to model changes in HR, sBP, and dBP responses. Results: The models show that: (1) head-up tilt alone resulted in statistically significant increases in HR and dBP, but no change in sBP. (2) PE during head-up tilt resulted in statistically significant changes in HR, sBP, and dBP, but not at each angle and not always in the same direction (i.e., increase or decrease of cardiovascular parameters). Neither adding (3) FES at constant intensity to PE nor (4) variation of FES intensity during PE had any statistically significant effects on the cardiovascular parameters. Conclusion: The effect of PE on the cardiovascular system during

  20. Distinctive Steady-State Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Responses to Passive Robotic Leg Exercise and Functional Electrical Stimulation during Head-Up Tilt.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani Tafreshi, Amirehsan; Riener, Robert; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tilt tables enable early mobilization of patients by providing verticalization. But there is a high risk of orthostatic hypotension provoked by verticalization, especially after neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury. Robot-assisted tilt tables might be an alternative as they add passive robotic leg exercise (PE) that can be enhanced with functional electrical stimulation (FES) to the verticalization, thus reducing the risk of orthostatic hypotension. We hypothesized that the influence of PE on the cardiovascular system during verticalization (i.e., head-up tilt) depends on the verticalization angle, and FES strengthens the PE influence. To test our hypotheses, we investigated the PE effects on the cardiovascular parameters heart rate (HR), and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (sBP, dBP) at different angles of verticalization in a healthy population. Methods: Ten healthy subjects on a robot-assisted tilt table underwent four different study protocols while HR, sBP, and dBP were measured: (1) head-up tilt to 60° and 71° without PE; (2) PE at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (3) PE while constant FES intensity was applied to the leg muscles, at 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt; (4) PE with variation of the applied FES intensity at 0°, 20°, 40°, and 60° of head-up tilt. Linear mixed models were used to model changes in HR, sBP, and dBP responses. Results: The models show that: (1) head-up tilt alone resulted in statistically significant increases in HR and dBP, but no change in sBP. (2) PE during head-up tilt resulted in statistically significant changes in HR, sBP, and dBP, but not at each angle and not always in the same direction (i.e., increase or decrease of cardiovascular parameters). Neither adding (3) FES at constant intensity to PE nor (4) variation of FES intensity during PE had any statistically significant effects on the cardiovascular parameters. Conclusion: The effect of PE on the cardiovascular system during

  1. Intense steady state neutron source. The CNR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.; Moon, R.M.; Gambill, W.R.; Moon, R.M.; Primm, R.T. III; West, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Neutron Research (CNR) has been proposed in response to the needs - neutron flux, spectrum, and experimental facilities - that have been identified through workshops, studies, and discussions by the neutron-scattering, isotope, and materials irradiation research communities. The CNR is a major new experimental facility consisting of a reactor-based steady state neutron source of unprecedented flux, together with extensive facilities and instruments for neutron scattering, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other areas of research.

  2. Multiple Color Stimulus Induced Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    MULTIPLE COLOR STIMULUS INDUCED STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS M. Cheng, X. Gao, S. Gao, D. Xu Institute of Biomedical Engineering...characteristics of high SNR and effectiveness in short-term identification of evoked responses. In most of the SSVEP experiments, single high...frequency stimuli are used. To characterize the complex rhythms in SSVEP, a new multiple color stimulus pattern is proposed in this paper. FFT and

  3. Steady- and non-steady-state carbonate-silicate controls on atmospheric CO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundquist, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Two contrasting hypotheses have recently been proposed for the past long-term relation between atmospheric CO2 and the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle. One approach (Berner, 1990) suggests that CO2 levels have varied in a manner that has maintained chemical weathering and carbonate sedimentation at a steady state with respect to tectonically controlled decarbonation reactions. A second approach (Raymo et al., 1988), applied specificlly to the late Cenozoic, suggests a decrease in CO2 caused by an uplift-induced increase in chemical weathering, without regard to the rate of decarbonation. According to the steady-state (first) hypothesis, increased weathering and carbonate sedimentation are generally associated with increasing atmospheric CO2, whereas the uplift (second) hypothesis implies decreasing CO2 under the same conditions. An ocean-atmosphere-sediment model has been used to assess the response of atmospheric CO2 and carbonate sedimentation to global perturbations in chemical weathering and decarbonation reactions. Although this assessment is theoretical and cannot yet be related to the geologic record, the model simulations compare steady-state and non-steady-state carbonate-silicate cycle response. The e-fold response time of the 'CO2-weathering' feedback mechanism is between 300 and 400 ka. The response of carbonate sedimentation is much more rapid. These response times provide a measure of the strength of steady-state assumptions, and imply that certain systematic relations are sustained throughout steady-state and non-steady-state scenarios for the carbonate-silicate cycle. The simulations suggest that feedbacks can maintain the system near a steady state, but that non-steady-state effects may contribute to long-term trends. The steady-state and uplift hypotheses are not necessarily incompatible over time scales of a few million years. ?? 1991.

  4. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  5. On Steady-State Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    temperature, Te, in analogy to the model for the Hadley circulation of Schneider (1977) and Held and Hou (1980). The model is nearly inviscid in the flow...tangential wind speed is approximately constant. However, in many of our own calculations the upper and outer circulations are by no means steady at... circulation (Ooyama, 1969; Shapiro and Willoughby, 1982). Above the frictional boundary layer, this steady-state circulation must be along absolute angular

  6. Variational methods in steady state diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.E.; Fan, W.C.P.; Bratton, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Classical variational techniques are used to obtain accurate solutions to the multigroup multiregion one dimensional steady state neutron diffusion equation. Analytic solutions are constructed for benchmark verification. Functionals with cubic trial functions and conservational lagrangian constraints are exhibited and compared with nonconservational functionals with respect to neutron balance and to relative flux and current at interfaces. Excellent agreement of the conservational functionals using cubic trial functions is obtained in comparison with analytic solutions.

  7. Non-equilibrium steady states in supramolecular polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Sato, Akihiro; Hermans, Thomas M.

    2017-06-01

    Living systems use fuel-driven supramolecular polymers such as actin to control important cell functions. Fuel molecules like ATP are used to control when and where such polymers should assemble and disassemble. The cell supplies fresh ATP to the cytosol and removes waste products to sustain steady states. Artificial fuel-driven polymers have been developed recently, but keeping them in sustained non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) has proven challenging. Here we show a supramolecular polymer that can be kept in NESS, inside a membrane reactor where ATP is added and waste removed continuously. Assembly and disassembly of our polymer is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Waste products lead to inhibition, causing the reaction cycle to stop. Inside the membrane reactor, however, waste can be removed leading to long-lived NESS conditions. We anticipate that our approach to obtain NESS can be applied to other stimuli-responsive materials to achieve more life-like behaviour.

  8. Theory of Steady-State Superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui

    In this thesis, I describe the theoretical development of the superradiant laser, or laser in the extreme bad-cavity regime. In this regime, the cavity decay rate is much greater than the atomic dynamics. The atoms emit photons into the cavity mode superradiantly in steady state. We develop group-theoretic methods that enable us to exactly solve mesoscopic systems with hundreds of atoms. We demonstrate the synchronization of atomic dipoles in steady-state superradiance. With this synchronized system, we propose conditional Ramsey spectroscopy which allows us to observe Ramsey fringes indefinitely, even in the presence of atomic decoherence. Furthermore, we explore manifestations of synchronization in the quantum realm with two superradiant atomic ensembles. We show that two such ensembles exhibit a dynamical phase transition from two disparate oscillators to quantum phase-locked dynamics. Finally, we study the mechanical eect of the light-atom interaction in the steady-state superradiance. We find efficient many-body cooling of atoms. The work described in this thesis lays the theoretical foundation for the superradiant laser and for a potential future of active optical frequency standards.

  9. The steady-state phase distribution of the motor switch complex model of Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Diener, Francine; Diener, Marc; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Steady-state analysis is performed on the kinetic model for the switch complex of the flagellar motor of Halobacterium salinarum (Nutsch et al.). The existence and uniqueness of a positive steady-state of the system is established and it is demonstrated why the steady-state is centered around the competent phase, a state of the motor in which it is able to respond to light stimuli. It is also demonstrated why the steady-state shifts to the refractory phase when the steady-state value of the response regulator CheYP increases. This work is one aspect of modeling in systems biology wherein the mathematical properties of a model are established.

  10. Frequency-specific disruptions of neuronal oscillations reveal aberrant auditory processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hayrynen, Lauren K; Hamm, Jordan P; Sponheim, Scott R; Clementz, Brett A

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit abnormalities in evoked brain responses in oddball paradigms. These could result from (a) insufficient salience-related cortical signaling (P300), (b) insufficient suppression of irrelevant aspects of the auditory environment, or (c) excessive neural noise. We tested whether disruption of ongoing auditory steady-state responses at predetermined frequencies informed which of these issues contribute to auditory stimulus relevance processing abnormalities in schizophrenia. Magnetoencephalography data were collected for 15 schizophrenia and 15 healthy subjects during an auditory oddball paradigm (25% targets; 1-s interstimulus interval). Auditory stimuli (pure tones: 1 kHz standards, 2 kHz targets) were administered during four continuous background (auditory steady-state) stimulation conditions: (1) no stimulation, (2) 24 Hz, (3) 40 Hz, and (4) 88 Hz. The modulation of the auditory steady-state response (aSSR) and the evoked responses to the transient stimuli were quantified and compared across groups. In comparison to healthy participants, the schizophrenia group showed greater disruption of the ongoing aSSR by targets regardless of steady-state frequency, and reduced amplitude of both M100 and M300 event-related field components. During the no-stimulation condition, schizophrenia patients showed accentuation of left hemisphere 40 Hz response to both standard and target stimuli, indicating an effort to enhance local stimulus processing. Together, these findings suggest abnormalities in auditory stimulus relevance processing in schizophrenia patients stem from insufficient amplification of salient stimuli. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  11. Relationship between Sympathetic Skin Responses and Auditory Hypersensitivity to Different Auditory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumi; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Chono, Mami; Fujihara, Saori; Tokunaga, Akiko; Murata, Jun; Tanaka, Koji; Nakane, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Goro

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] Auditory hypersensitivity has been widely reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders. However, the neurological background of auditory hypersensitivity is currently not clear. The present study examined the relationship between sympathetic nervous system responses and auditory hypersensitivity induced by different types of auditory stimuli. [Methods] We exposed 20 healthy young adults to six different types of auditory stimuli. The amounts of palmar sweating resulting from the auditory stimuli were compared between groups with (hypersensitive) and without (non-hypersensitive) auditory hypersensitivity. [Results] Although no group × type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was observed for the extent of reaction, significant type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was noted for the extent of reaction. For an 80 dB-6,000 Hz stimulus, the trends for palmar sweating differed between the groups. For the first stimulus, the variance became larger in the hypersensitive group than in the non-hypersensitive group. [Conclusion] Subjects who regularly felt excessive reactions to auditory stimuli tended to have excessive sympathetic responses to repeated loud noises compared with subjects who did not feel excessive reactions. People with auditory hypersensitivity may be classified into several subtypes depending on their reaction patterns to auditory stimuli.

  12. Energy repartition in the nonequilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Zhang, Huaiwu

    2017-01-01

    The concept of temperature in nonequilibrium thermodynamics is an outstanding theoretical issue. We propose an energy repartition principle that leads to a spectral (mode-dependent) temperature in steady-state nonequilibrium systems. The general concepts are illustrated by analytic solutions of the classical Heisenberg spin chain connected to Langevin heat reservoirs with arbitrary temperature profiles. Gradients of external magnetic fields are shown to localize spin waves in a Wannier-Zeemann fashion, while magnon interactions renormalize the spectral temperature. Our generic results are applicable to other thermodynamic systems such as Newtonian liquids, elastic solids, and Josephson junctions.

  13. Enceladus is not in Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunchitra, T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Libration data tell us there is a global ocean. Topography and gravity tell us that there is substantial compensation at degree 2, meaning that the underside of the ice shell must have topography. This topography will decay, typically on a timescale of order a million years (fortuitously similar to thermal diffusion times through the ice shell), by viscous lateral flow of the ice. This could in principle be compensated in steady state by net melting beneath the poles and a compensating net freezing at the equator. In that model, the ice shell beneath the poles is partially melted with water being continuously produced and percolating to the base (or expelled if there are cracks, as at the South Pole). We have modeled this without an a priori assumption about the strength of tidal heating. We find that even if the tidal heating is zero on average around the equator, then the latent heat release from the required freezing can only be accommodated in steady state if the ice shell is 18km. The ice thickness must be even less at the poles in order to satisfy gravity and topography. Moreover, there must then be substantial tidal heating at the poles and it is physically unreasonable to have the volumetric tidal heating at the equator be enormously less than at the North Pole. For example, if the volumetric tidal heating at the equator is on average one quarter of that at the North Pole then marginal consistency with gravity and topography may be possible for a mean ice thickness at the equator of 12km. The global heat flow may exceed 40GW, much higher than the detectable IR excess (the observed south polar tiger stripe heat flow). Recent work (Fuller et al.) admits orbital evolutions with large heat flow at least for a recent part of the orbital history. However, this thin shell steady state model has difficulty reconciling observed gravity and topography as well as the libration data. We conclude that it is unlikely that Enceladus has no net melting or freezing. The ice

  14. Steady state stresses in ribbon parachute canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, W. L.; Wu, K. Y.; Muramoto, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of the steady state stresses in model ribbon parachute canopies is presented. The distribution of circumferential stress was measured in the horizontal ribbons of two parachutes using Omega sensors. Canopy pressure distributions and overall drag were also measured. Testing was conducted in the University of Minnesota Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at dynamic pressures ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 inches of water. The stresses in the parachute canopies were calculated using the parachute structural analysis code, CANO. It was found that the general shape of the measured and calculated stress distributions was fairly similar; however, the measured stresses were somewhat less than the calculated stresses.

  15. Gravitational steady states of solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Coronal loops on the surface of the sun appear to consist of curved, plasma-confining magnetic flux tubes or "ropes," anchored at both ends in the photosphere. Toroidal loops carrying current are inherently unstable to expansion in the major radius due to toroidal-curvature-induced imbalances in the magnetic and plasma pressures. An ideal MHD analysis of a simple isolated loop with density and pressure higher than the surrounding corona, based on the theory of magnetically confined toroidal plasmas, shows that the radial force balance depends on the loop internal structure and varies over parameter space. It provides a unified picture of simple loop steady states in terms of the plasma beta βo, the inverse aspect ratio ɛ =a /Ro , and the MHD gravitational parameter G ̂≡g a /vA2 , all at the top of the loop, where g is the acceleration due to gravity, a the average minor radius, and vA the shear Alfvén velocity. In the high and low beta tokamak orderings, βo=2 noT /(Bo2/2 μo)˜ɛ1 and ɛ2 , that fit many loops, the solar gravity can sustain nonaxisymmetric steady states at G ̂˜ɛ βo that represent the maximum stable height. At smaller G ̂≤ɛ2βo , the loop is axisymmetric to leading order and stabilized primarily by the two fixed loop ends. Very low beta, nearly force-free, steady states with βo˜ɛ3 may also exist, with or without gravity, depending on higher order effects. The thin coronal loops commonly observed in solar active regions have ɛ ≃0.02 and fit the high beta steady states. G ̂ increases with loop height. Fatter loops in active regions that form along magnetic neutral lines and may lead to solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections have ɛ ≃0.1 -0.2 and may fit the low beta ordering. Larger loops tend to have G ̂>ɛ βo and be unstable to radial expansion because the exponential hydrostatic reduction in the density at the loop-top reduces the gravitational force -ρG ̂ R ̂ below the level that balances expansion, in agreement with

  16. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  17. Intensity fluctuations in steady-state superradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-06-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow optical transitions enable superradiance in steady state. The emitted light promises to have an unprecedented stability with a linewidth as narrow as a few millihertz. In order to evaluate the potential usefulness of this light source as an ultrastable oscillator in clock and precision metrology applications, it is crucial to understand the noise properties of this device. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the intensity fluctuations by means of Monte Carlo simulations and semiclassical approximations. We find that the light exhibits bunching below threshold, is to a good approximation coherent in the superradiant regime, and is chaotic above the second threshold.

  18. An Intuitive Approach to Steady-State Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raines, Ronald T.; Hansen, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to provide an intuitive understanding of steady state kinetics. Discusses the meaning of steady state and uses free energy profiles to illustrate and follow complex kinetic and thermodynamic relationships. Provides examples with explanations. (MVL)

  19. An Intuitive Approach to Steady-State Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raines, Ronald T.; Hansen, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to provide an intuitive understanding of steady state kinetics. Discusses the meaning of steady state and uses free energy profiles to illustrate and follow complex kinetic and thermodynamic relationships. Provides examples with explanations. (MVL)

  20. Statistical steady state in turbulent droplet condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Christoph; Bec, Jérémie; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by systems in which droplets grow and shrink in a turbulence-driven supersaturation field, we investigate the problem of turbulent condensation in a general manner. Using direct numerical simulations we show that the turbulent fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. Based on that, we propose a Lagrangian stochastic model for condensation and evaporation of small droplets in turbulent flows. It consists of a set of stochastic integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along the droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is that, after a stage where the squared radius simply diffuses, the system converges exponentially fast to a statistical steady state independent of the initial conditions. The main mechanism involved in this convergence is a loss of memory induced by a significant number of droplets undergoing a complete evaporation before growing again. The statistical steady state is characterised by an exponential tail in the droplet mass distribution. These results reconcile those of earlier numerical studies, once these various regimes are considered.

  1. Attenuated Fast Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials During Human Sleep.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Omer; Nir, Yuval

    2017-02-25

    During sleep, external sensory events rarely elicit a behavioral response or affect perception. However, how sensory processing differs between wakefulness and sleep remains unclear. A major difficulty in this field stems from using brief auditory stimuli that often trigger nonspecific high-amplitude "K-complex" responses and complicate interpretation. To overcome this challenge, here we delivered periodic visual flicker stimulation across sleep and wakefulness while recording high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in humans. We found that onset responses can be separated from frequency-specific steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) selectively observed over visual cortex. Sustained SSVEPs in response to fast (8/10 Hz) stimulation are substantially stronger in wakefulness than in both nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep, whereas SSVEP responses to slow (3/5 Hz) stimulation are stronger in both NREM and REM sleep than in wakefulness. Despite wake-like spontaneous activity, responses in REM sleep were similar to those in NREM sleep and different than wakefulness, in accordance with perceptual disconnection during REM sleep. Finally, analysis of amplitude and phase in single trials revealed that stronger fast SSVEPs in wakefulness are driven by more consistent phase locking and increased induced power. These results suggest that the sleeping brain is unable to effectively synchronize large neuronal populations in response to rapid sensory stimulation.

  2. Steady State Growth of Continental Crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, S. A.; Bauer, A.; Dudas, F. O.; Schoene, B.; McLean, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    any age. If one accepts that the probability of preserving old crust decreases with increasing age, the few exposures of rocks older than 3.5 Ga should not be surprising. The thickness and compositional differences between Archean and younger lithospheric mantle are not fully understood nor is the role of thicker buoyant mantle in preserving continental crust; these lead to the question of whether the preserved rock record is representative of what formed. It is notable that the oldest known rocks, the ca. 4.0 Ga Acasta Gneisses, are tonalities-granodiorites-granites with evidence for the involvement of even older crust and that the oldest detrital zircons from Australia (ca. 4.0-4.4 Ga) are thought to have been derived from granitoid sources. The global Hf and Nd isotope databases are compatible with both depleted and enriched sources being present from at least 4.0 Ga to the present and that the lack of evolution of the MORB source or depleted mantle is due to recycling of continental crust throughout earth history. Using examples from the Slave Province and southern Africa, we argue that Armstrong's concept of steady state crustal growth and recycling via plate tectonics still best explains the modern geological and geochemical data.

  3. Electrical Brain Responses to an Auditory Illusion and the Impact of Musical Expertise.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Christos I; Pereda, Ernesto; Lindsen, Job P; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    The presentation of two sinusoidal tones, one to each ear, with a slight frequency mismatch yields an auditory illusion of a beating frequency equal to the frequency difference between the two tones; this is known as binaural beat (BB). The effect of brief BB stimulation on scalp EEG is not conclusively demonstrated. Further, no studies have examined the impact of musical training associated with BB stimulation, yet musicians' brains are often associated with enhanced auditory processing. In this study, we analysed EEG brain responses from two groups, musicians and non-musicians, when stimulated by short presentation (1 min) of binaural beats with beat frequency varying from 1 Hz to 48 Hz. We focused our analysis on alpha and gamma band EEG signals, and they were analysed in terms of spectral power, and functional connectivity as measured by two phase synchrony based measures, phase locking value and phase lag index. Finally, these measures were used to characterize the degree of centrality, segregation and integration of the functional brain network. We found that beat frequencies belonging to alpha band produced the most significant steady-state responses across groups. Further, processing of low frequency (delta, theta, alpha) binaural beats had significant impact on cortical network patterns in the alpha band oscillations. Altogether these results provide a neurophysiological account of cortical responses to BB stimulation at varying frequencies, and demonstrate a modulation of cortico-cortical connectivity in musicians' brains, and further suggest a kind of neuronal entrainment of a linear and nonlinear relationship to the beating frequencies.

  4. STEADY-STATE SOLUTIONS TO PBPK MODELS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS TO RISK ASSESSMENT I: ROUTE-TO-ROUTE EXTRAPOLATION OF VOLATILE CHEMICALS - AUTHORS' RESPONSE TO LETTER BY DR. KENNETH BOGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are disappointed that Dr. Bogen felt our paper(1) “adds little new” to previously published work utilizing steady state solutions to PBPK models. Moreover, it was not our intention to be either “dismissive” or “misleading” in our admittedly brief citation of the...

  5. STEADY-STATE SOLUTIONS TO PBPK MODELS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS TO RISK ASSESSMENT I: ROUTE-TO-ROUTE EXTRAPOLATION OF VOLATILE CHEMICALS - AUTHORS' RESPONSE TO LETTER BY DR. KENNETH BOGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are disappointed that Dr. Bogen felt our paper(1) “adds little new” to previously published work utilizing steady state solutions to PBPK models. Moreover, it was not our intention to be either “dismissive” or “misleading” in our admittedly brief citation of the...

  6. Steady-state properties of a nonequilibrium Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    The current-carrying steady state that arises in the middle of a metallic wire connected to macroscopic leads is characterized regarding its response functions, correlations, and entanglement entropy. The spectral function and the dynamical structure factor show clear nonequilibrium signatures accessible by state-of-the-art techniques. In contrast with the equilibrium case, the entanglement entropy is extensive with logarithmic corrections at zero temperature that depend on the lead-wire coupling and, in a nonanalytic way, on voltage. This shows that some robust universal quantities found in gapless equilibrium phases do not persist away from equilibrium.

  7. Steady-state models of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2013-09-01

    In the challenge to increase photosynthetic rate per leaf area mathematical models of photosynthesis can be used to help interpret gas exchange measurements made under different environmental conditions and predict underlying photosynthetic biochemistry. To do this successfully it is important to improve the modelling of temperature dependencies of CO₂ assimilation and gain better understanding of internal CO₂ diffusion limitations. Despite these shortcomings steady-state models of photosynthesis provide simple easy to use tools for thought experiments to explore photosynthetic pathway changes such as redirecting photorespiratory CO₂, inserting bicarbonate pumps into C₃ chloroplasts or inserting C₄ photosynthesis into rice. Here a number of models derived from the C₃ model by Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry are discussed and compared.

  8. Steady-State Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafri, Yariv; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo

    2008-06-01

    The bacterium E. coli maneuvers itself to regions with high chemoattractant concentrations by performing two stereotypical moves: “runs,” in which it moves in near-straight lines, and “tumbles,” in which it does not advance but changes direction randomly. The duration of each move is stochastic and depends upon the chemoattractant concentration experienced in the recent past. We relate this stochastic behavior to the steady-state density of a bacterium population, and we derive the latter as a function of chemoattractant concentration. In contrast to earlier treatments, here we account for the effects of temporal correlations and variable tumbling durations. A range of behaviors is obtained that depends subtly upon several aspects of the system—memory, correlation, and tumbling stochasticity, in particular.

  9. High power steady state MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Habiger, Harald; Kurtz, Helmut; Schrade, Herbert; Sleziona, Cristian

    1993-04-01

    At the Institut fuer Raumfahrtsysteme (IRS) rotation symmetric magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters with self induced magnetic fields are investigated at high current levels in a steady state operation mode. MPD thrusters with different geometrics were compared, and the influence of mass flow rate and power input on the operating conditions of the thrusters explored. By optical and probe measurements, a systematic investigation of the plasma plume has been started. The investigation of the various instabilities of the arc and the plasma flow appearing at high power levels was continued. The computer code development for the geometry optimization of continuous self-field MPD thrusters, running with argon, was modified by considering higher degrees of ionization, which showed better agreement with the experiment.

  10. Auditory Brainstem Implant: Electrophysiologic Responses and Subject Perception

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Barbara S.; Brown, M Christian; Eddington, Donald K; Hancock, Kenneth E; Lee, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to compare the perceptual sensation produced by bipolar electrical stimulation of auditory brainstem implant (ABI) electrodes to the morphology of electrically–evoked responses elicited by the same bipolar stimulus in the same unanesthetized, post-surgical state. Secondary aims were to 1) examine the relationships between sensations elicited by the bipolar stimulation used for evoked potential recording and the sensations elicited by the monopolar pulse-train stimulation used by the implant processor and 2) to examine the relationships between evoked-potential morphology (elicited by bipolar stimulation) to the sensations elicited by monopolar stimulation. Design Electrically-evoked early latency and middle-latency responses to bipolar, biphasic low-rate pulses were recorded post-operatively in four adults with auditory brainstem implants. Prior to recording, the perceptual sensations elicited by these bipolar stimuli were obtained and categorized as: 1) Auditory sensations only, 2) Mixed sensations (both auditory and non-auditory), 3) Side Effect (non-auditory sensations) or 4) No Sensation. In addition, the sensations elicited by monopolar higher-rate pulse-train stimuli similar to that used in processor programming were also measured for all electrodes in the ABI array and classified using the same categories. Comparisons were made between evoked response morphology, bipolar stimulation sensation and monopolar stimulation sensation. Results Sensations were classified for 33 bipolar pairs as follows: 21 pairs were Auditory, 6 were Mixed, 5 were Side Effect and 1 was No Sensation. When these sensations were compared to the electrically-evoked response morphology for these signals, P3 of the electrically-evoked auditory brainstem response (eABR) and the presence of a middle-latency positive wave, usually between 15 and 25 ms (eMLR), were only present when the perceptual sensation had an auditory component (either

  11. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. Methodology/Principal Findings Cochlear microphonics (CM), auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP) were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments) and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments). We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the obtained effects

  12. Cortical, auditory, evoked potentials in response to changes of spectrum and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Martin, B A; Boothroyd, A

    2000-04-01

    The acoustic change complex (ACC) is a scalp-recorded negative-positive voltage swing elicited by a change during an otherwise steady-state sound. The ACC was obtained from eight adults in response to changes of amplitude and/or spectral envelope at the temporal center of a three-formant synthetic vowel lasting 800 ms. In the absence of spectral change, the group mean waveforms showed a clear ACC to amplitude increments of 2 dB or more and decrements of 3 dB or more. In the presence of a change of second formant frequency (from perceived /u/ to perceived /i/), amplitude increments increased the magnitude of the ACC but amplitude decrements had little or no effect. The fact that the just detectable amplitude change is close to the psychoacoustic limits of the auditory system augurs well for the clinical application of the ACC. The failure to find a condition under which the spectrally elicited ACC is diminished by a small change of amplitude supports the conclusion that the observed ACC to a change of spectral envelope reflects some aspect of cortical frequency coding. Taken together, these findings support the potential value of the ACC as an objective index of auditory discrimination capacity.

  13. Steady-state and non-steady state operation of counter-current chromatography devices.

    PubMed

    Kostanyan, Artak E; Ignatova, Svetlana N; Sutherland, Ian A; Hewitson, Peter; Zakhodjaeva, Yulya A; Erastov, Andrey A

    2013-11-01

    Different variants of separation processes based on steady-state (continuous sample loading) and non-steady state (batch) operating modes of CCC columns have been analyzed and compared. The analysis is carried out on the basis of the modified equilibrium cell model, which takes into account both mechanisms of band broadening - interphase mass transfer and axial mixing. A full theoretical treatment of the intermittent counter-current chromatography with short sample loading time is performed. Analytical expressions are presented allowing the simulation of the intermittent counter-current chromatography separations for various experimental conditions. Chromatographic and extraction separations have been compared and advantages and disadvantages of the two methods have been evaluated. Further technical development of the CCC machines to implement counter-current extraction separations is considered.

  14. Maximal lactate steady state in Judo

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Paulo Henrique Silva Marques; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Oliveira, João; Perez, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the purpose of this study was to verify the validity of respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) measured during a new single judo specific incremental test (JSIT) for aerobic demand evaluation. Methods: to test the validity of the new test, the JSIT was compared with Maximal Lactate Steady State (MLSS), which is the gold standard procedure for aerobic demand measuring. Eight well-trained male competitive judo players (24.3 ± 7.9 years; height of 169.3 ± 6.7cm; fat mass of 12.7 ± 3.9%) performed a maximal incremental specific test for judo to assess the RCT and performed on 30-minute MLSS test, where both tests were performed mimicking the UchiKomi drills. Results: the intensity at RCT measured on JSIT was not significantly different compared to MLSS (p=0.40). In addition, it was observed high and significant correlation between MLSS and RCT (r=0.90, p=0.002), as well as a high agreement. Conclusions: RCT measured during JSIT is a valid procedure to measure the aerobic demand, respecting the ecological validity of Judo. PMID:25332923

  15. Inconsistencies in steady-state thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald; Motai, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    We address the issue of extending thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states. Using driven stochastic lattice gases, we ask whether consistent definitions of an effective chemical potential μ, and an effective temperature Te, are possible. μ and Te are determined via coexistence, i.e., zero flux of particles and energy between the driven system and a reservoir. In the lattice gas with nearest-neighbor exclusion, temperature is not relevant, and we find that the effective chemical potential, a function of density and drive strength, satisfies the zeroth law, and correctly predicts the densities of coexisting systems. In the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn driven lattice gas both μ and Te need to be defined. We show analytically that in this case the zeroth law is violated for Metropolis exchange rates, and determine the size of the violations numerically. The zeroth law appears to be violated for generic exchange rates. Remarkably, the system-reservoir coupling proposed by Sasa and Tasaki [J. Stat. Phys. 125, 125 (2006), 10.1007/s10955-005-9021-7] is free of inconsistencies, and the zeroth law holds. This is because the rate depends only on the state of the donor system, and is independent of that of the acceptor.

  16. Fluctuations When Driving Between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-06-01

    Maintained by environmental fluxes, biological systems are thermodynamic processes that operate far from equilibrium without detailed-balanced dynamics. Yet, they often exhibit well defined nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). More importantly, critical thermodynamic functionality arises directly from transitions among their NESSs, driven by environmental switching. Here, we identify the constraints on excess heat and dissipated work necessary to control a system that is kept far from equilibrium by background, uncontrolled "housekeeping" forces. We do this by extending the Crooks fluctuation theorem to transitions among NESSs, without invoking an unphysical dual dynamics. This and corresponding integral fluctuation theorems determine how much work must be expended when controlling systems maintained far from equilibrium. This generalizes thermodynamic feedback control theory, showing that Maxwellian Demons can leverage mesoscopic-state information to take advantage of the excess energetics in NESS transitions. We also generalize an approach recently used to determine the work dissipated when driving between functionally relevant configurations of an active energy-consuming complex system. Altogether, these results highlight universal thermodynamic laws that apply to the accessible degrees of freedom within the effective dynamic at any emergent level of hierarchical organization. By way of illustration, we analyze a voltage-gated sodium ion channel whose molecular conformational dynamics play a critical functional role in propagating action potentials in mammalian neuronal membranes.

  17. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  18. Fluctuations When Driving Between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-08-01

    Maintained by environmental fluxes, biological systems are thermodynamic processes that operate far from equilibrium without detailed-balanced dynamics. Yet, they often exhibit well defined nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). More importantly, critical thermodynamic functionality arises directly from transitions among their NESSs, driven by environmental switching. Here, we identify the constraints on excess heat and dissipated work necessary to control a system that is kept far from equilibrium by background, uncontrolled "housekeeping" forces. We do this by extending the Crooks fluctuation theorem to transitions among NESSs, without invoking an unphysical dual dynamics. This and corresponding integral fluctuation theorems determine how much work must be expended when controlling systems maintained far from equilibrium. This generalizes thermodynamic feedback control theory, showing that Maxwellian Demons can leverage mesoscopic-state information to take advantage of the excess energetics in NESS transitions. We also generalize an approach recently used to determine the work dissipated when driving between functionally relevant configurations of an active energy-consuming complex system. Altogether, these results highlight universal thermodynamic laws that apply to the accessible degrees of freedom within the effective dynamic at any emergent level of hierarchical organization. By way of illustration, we analyze a voltage-gated sodium ion channel whose molecular conformational dynamics play a critical functional role in propagating action potentials in mammalian neuronal membranes.

  19. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  20. Mechanisms of steady-state nucleate pool boiling in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sung

    2002-10-01

    Research on nucleate pool boiling in microgravity using R-113 as a working fluid was conducted using a five-second drop tower and five space flights at a/g approximately 10(-4). A 19 x 38-mm flat gold film heater was used that allowed cine camera viewing both from the side and the bottom of the heater. It was concluded that for both subcooled and saturated liquids long-term steady-state pool boiling can take place in reduced gravity, but the effectiveness of the boiling heat transfer appears to depend on the heater geometry and on the size and the properties of fluids. Heat transfer is enhanced at lower heat flux levels and the CHF increases as the subcooling increases. It was found that several mechanisms are responsible for the steady-state nucleate pool boiling in the absence of buoyancy. The mechanisms considered here are defined and summarized as bubble removal, bubble coalescence, thermocapillary flow, bubble migration, and latent heat transport.

  1. Steady state volcanism - Evidence from eruption histories of polygenetic volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.

    1982-01-01

    Cumulative volcano volume curves are presented as evidence for steady-state behavior at certain volcanoes and to develop a model of steady-state volcanism. A minimum criteria of five eruptions over a year was chosen to characterize a steady-state volcano. The subsequent model features a constant head of magmatic pressure from a reservoir supplied from depth, a sawtooth curve produced by the magma arrivals or discharge from the subvolcanic reservoir, large volume eruptions with long repose periods, and conditions of nonsupply of magma. The behavior of Mts. Etna, Nyamuragira, and Kilauea are described and show continuous levels of plasma output resulting in cumulative volume increases. Further discussion is made of steady-state andesitic and dacitic volcanism, long term patterns of the steady state, and magma storage, and the lack of a sufficient number of steady-state volcanoes in the world is taken as evidence that further data is required for a comprehensive model.

  2. Spectrotemporal resolution tradeoff in auditory processing as revealed by human auditory brainstem responses and psychophysical indices.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Syed Khaja, Ameenuddin

    2014-06-20

    Auditory filter theory dictates a physiological compromise between frequency and temporal resolution of cochlear signal processing. We examined neurophysiological correlates of these spectrotemporal tradeoffs in the human auditory system using auditory evoked brain potentials and psychophysical responses. Temporal resolution was assessed using scalp-recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by paired clicks. The inter-click interval (ICI) between successive pulses was parameterized from 0.7 to 25 ms to map ABR amplitude recovery as a function of stimulus spacing. Behavioral frequency difference limens (FDLs) and auditory filter selectivity (Q10 of psychophysical tuning curves) were obtained to assess relations between behavioral spectral acuity and electrophysiological estimates of temporal resolvability. Neural responses increased monotonically in amplitude with increasing ICI, ranging from total suppression (0.7 ms) to full recovery (25 ms) with a temporal resolution of ∼3-4 ms. ABR temporal thresholds were correlated with behavioral Q10 (frequency selectivity) but not FDLs (frequency discrimination); no correspondence was observed between Q10 and FDLs. Results suggest that finer frequency selectivity, but not discrimination, is associated with poorer temporal resolution. The inverse relation between ABR recovery and perceptual frequency tuning demonstrates a time-frequency tradeoff between the temporal and spectral resolving power of the human auditory system.

  3. Temporal envelope processing in the human auditory cortex: response and interconnections of auditory cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Gourévitch, Boris; Le Bouquin Jeannès, Régine; Faucon, Gérard; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2008-03-01

    Temporal envelope processing in the human auditory cortex has an important role in language analysis. In this paper, depth recordings of local field potentials in response to amplitude modulated white noises were used to design maps of activation in primary, secondary and associative auditory areas and to study the propagation of the cortical activity between them. The comparison of activations between auditory areas was based on a signal-to-noise ratio associated with the response to amplitude modulation (AM). The functional connectivity between cortical areas was quantified by the directed coherence (DCOH) applied to auditory evoked potentials. This study shows the following reproducible results on twenty subjects: (1) the primary auditory cortex (PAC), the secondary cortices (secondary auditory cortex (SAC) and planum temporale (PT)), the insular gyrus, the Brodmann area (BA) 22 and the posterior part of T1 gyrus (T1Post) respond to AM in both hemispheres. (2) A stronger response to AM was observed in SAC and T1Post of the left hemisphere independent of the modulation frequency (MF), and in the left BA22 for MFs 8 and 16Hz, compared to those in the right. (3) The activation and propagation features emphasized at least four different types of temporal processing. (4) A sequential activation of PAC, SAC and BA22 areas was clearly visible at all MFs, while other auditory areas may be more involved in parallel processing upon a stream originating from primary auditory area, which thus acts as a distribution hub. These results suggest that different psychological information is carried by the temporal envelope of sounds relative to the rate of amplitude modulation.

  4. Auditory brain stem response to complex sounds: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2010-06-01

    This tutorial provides a comprehensive overview of the methodological approach to collecting and analyzing auditory brain stem responses to complex sounds (cABRs). cABRs provide a window into how behaviorally relevant sounds such as speech and music are processed in the brain. Because temporal and spectral characteristics of sounds are preserved in this subcortical response, cABRs can be used to assess specific impairments and enhancements in auditory processing. Notably, subcortical auditory function is neither passive nor hardwired but dynamically interacts with higher-level cognitive processes to refine how sounds are transcribed into neural code. This experience-dependent plasticity, which can occur on a number of time scales (e.g., life-long experience with speech or music, short-term auditory training, on-line auditory processing), helps shape sensory perception. Thus, by being an objective and noninvasive means for examining cognitive function and experience-dependent processes in sensory activity, cABRs have considerable utility in the study of populations where auditory function is of interest (e.g., auditory experts such as musicians, and persons with hearing loss, auditory processing, and language disorders). This tutorial is intended for clinicians and researchers seeking to integrate cABRs into their clinical or research programs.

  5. Exploring the temporal dynamics of sustained and transient spatial attention using steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai; Röder, Brigitte

    2017-03-03

    While the behavioral dynamics as well as the functional network of sustained and transient attention have extensively been studied, their underlying neural mechanisms have most often been investigated in separate experiments. In the present study, participants were instructed to perform an audio-visual spatial attention task. They were asked to attend to either the left or the right hemifield and to respond to deviant transient either auditory or visual stimuli. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) elicited by two task irrelevant pattern reversing checkerboards flickering at 10 and 15 Hz in the left and the right hemifields, respectively, were used to continuously monitor the locus of spatial attention. The amplitude and phase of the SSVEPs were extracted for single trials and were separately analyzed. Sustained attention to one hemifield (spatial attention) as well as to the auditory modality (intermodal attention) increased the inter-trial phase locking of the SSVEP responses, whereas briefly presented visual and auditory stimuli decreased the single-trial SSVEP amplitude between 200 and 500 ms post-stimulus. This transient change of the single-trial amplitude was restricted to the SSVEPs elicited by the reversing checkerboard in the spatially attended hemifield and thus might reflect a transient re-orienting of attention towards the brief stimuli. Thus, the present results demonstrate independent, but interacting neural mechanisms of sustained and transient attentional orienting.

  6. Representation of the vowel /epsilon/ in normal and impaired auditory nerve fibers: model predictions of responses in cats.

    PubMed

    Zilany, Muhammad S A; Bruce, Ian C

    2007-07-01

    The temporal response of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers to a steady-state vowel is investigated using a computational auditory-periphery model. The model predictions are validated against a wide range of physiological data for both normal and impaired fibers in cats. The model incorporates two parallel filter paths, component 1 (C1) and component 2 (C2), which correspond to the active and passive modes of basilar membrane vibration, respectively, in the cochlea. The outputs of the two filters are subsequently transduced by two separate functions, added together, and then low-pass filtered by the inner hair cell (IHC) membrane, which is followed by the IHC-AN synapse and discharge generator. The C1 response dominates at low and moderate levels and is responsible for synchrony capture and multiformant responses seen in the vowel responses. The C2 response dominates at high levels and contributes to the loss of synchrony capture observed in normal and impaired fibers. The interaction between C1 and C2 responses explains the behavior of AN fibers in the transition region, which is characterized by two important observations in the vowel responses: First, all components of the vowel undergo the C1/C2 transition simultaneously, and second, the responses to the nonformant components of the vowel become substantial.

  7. CA_OPPUSST - Cantera OPUS Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.

    2005-03-01

    The Cantera Opus Steady State (ca-opusst) applications solves steady reacting flow problems in opposed-flow geometries. It is a 1-0 application that represents axisymmetnc 3-0 physical systems that can be reduced via a similarity transformation to a 1-0 mathematical representation. The code contain solutions of the general dynamic equations for the particle distribution functions using a sectional model to describe the particle distribution function. Operators for particle nucleation, coagulation, condensation (i.e., growth/etching via reactions with the gas ambient), internal particle reactions. particle transport due to convection and due to molecular transport, are included in the particle general dynamics equation. Heat transport due to radiation exchange of the environment with particles in local thermal equilibrium to the surrounding gas will be included in the enthalpy conservation equation that is solved for the coupled gas! particle system in an upcoming version of the code due in June 2005. The codes use Cantera , a C++ Cal Tech code, for determination of gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics physical properties and source terms. The Codes use the Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package, a general library for aerosol modeling, to calculate properties and source terms for the aerosol general dynamics equation, including particle formation from gas phase reactions, particle surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, particle transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis, and thermal radiative transport involving particles. Also included are post-processing programs, cajost and cajrof, to extract ascii data from binary output files to produce plots.

  8. Clinical applications of the human brainstem responses to auditory stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.; Hecox, K.

    1975-01-01

    A technique utilizing the frequency following response (FFR) (obtained by auditory stimulation, whereby the stimulus frequency and duration are mirror-imaged in the resulting brainwaves) as a clinical tool for hearing disorders in humans of all ages is presented. Various medical studies are discussed to support the clinical value of the technique. The discovery and origin of the FFR and another significant brainstem auditory response involved in studying the eighth nerve is also discussed.

  9. Nutritional Homeostasis in Batch and Steady-State Culture of YeastD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Alok J.; Brauer, Matthew J.; Botstein, David

    2004-01-01

    We studied the physiological response to limitation by diverse nutrients in batch and steady-state (chemostat) cultures of S. cerevisiae. We found that the global pattern of transcription in steady-state cultures in limiting phosphate or sulfate is essentially identical to that of batch cultures growing in the same medium just before the limiting nutrient is completely exhausted. The massive stress response and complete arrest of the cell cycle that occurs when nutrients are fully exhausted in batch cultures is not observed in the chemostat, indicating that the cells in the chemostat are “poor, not starving.” Similar comparisons using leucine or uracil auxotrophs limited on leucine or uracil again showed patterns of gene expression in steady-state closely resembling those of corresponding batch cultures just before they exhaust the nutrient. Although there is also a strong stress response in the auxotrophic batch cultures, cell cycle arrest, if it occurs at all, is much less uniform. Many of the differences among the patterns of gene expression between the four nutrient limitations are interpretable in light of known involvement of the genes in stress responses or in the regulation or execution of particular metabolic pathways appropriate to the limiting nutrient. We conclude that cells adjust their growth rate to nutrient availability and maintain homeostasis in the same way in batch and steady state conditions; cells in steady-state cultures are in a physiological condition normally encountered in batch cultures. PMID:15240820

  10. Rapid measurement of auditory filter shape in mice using the auditory brainstem response and notched noise.

    PubMed

    Lina, Ioan A; Lauer, Amanda M

    2013-04-01

    The notched noise method is an effective procedure for measuring frequency resolution and auditory filter shapes in both human and animal models of hearing. Briefly, auditory filter shape and bandwidth estimates are derived from masked thresholds for tones presented in noise containing widening spectral notches. As the spectral notch widens, increasingly less of the noise falls within the auditory filter and the tone becomes more detectible until the notch width exceeds the filter bandwidth. Behavioral procedures have been used for the derivation of notched noise auditory filter shapes in mice; however, the time and effort needed to train and test animals on these tasks renders a constraint on the widespread application of this testing method. As an alternative procedure, we combined relatively non-invasive auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements and the notched noise method to estimate auditory filters in normal-hearing mice at center frequencies of 8, 11.2, and 16 kHz. A complete set of simultaneous masked thresholds for a particular tone frequency were obtained in about an hour. ABR-derived filter bandwidths broadened with increasing frequency, consistent with previous studies. The ABR notched noise procedure provides a fast alternative to estimating frequency selectivity in mice that is well-suited to high through-put or time-sensitive screening.

  11. Defining Features of Steady-State Timbres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to define steady -state features of timbre for a group of well-trained musicians. Experiment 1 evaluated whether or not pairs of three critical dimensions of timbre--spectral slope (6 or 12 dB/octave), formant structure (/a/ or /i/ vowel), and inharmonicity of partials (harmonic or inharmonic)--were processed in a separable or integral fashion. Accuracy and speed for classification of values along one dimension were examined under different conditions of variability along a second dimension (fixed, correlated, or orthogonal). Spectral slope and formant structure were integral, with classification speed for the target dimension depending upon variability along the orthogonal dimension. In contrast, evidence of asymmetric separability was obtained for inharmonicity. Classification speed for slope and formant structure did not depend on inharmonicity, whereas RT for the target dimension of inharmonicity was strongly influenced by variability along either slope or formant structure. Since the results of Experiment 1 provided a basis for manipulating spectral slope and formant structure as a single feature, these dimensions were correlated in Experiment 2. Subjects searched for targets containing potential features of timbre within arrays of 1-4 inharmonic distractor pitches. Distractors were homogeneous with respect to the dimensions of timbre. When targets had /a/ formants with shallow spectral slopes, search time increased nonlinearly with array size in a manner consistent with the parallel processing of items, and thus feature search. Feature search was not obtained for targets with /i/ formants and steep slopes. Thus, the feature was coded as the presence or absence of /a/ formants with shallow spectral slopes. A search task using heterogeneous distractor values along slope/formant structure was used in Experiment 3 to evaluate whether or not the feature of timbre and pitch were automatically conjoined (integral). Search times for

  12. Investigation of auditory processing disorder and language impairment using the speech-evoked auditory brainstem response.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Muniz, Caroline N; Befi-Lopes, Debora M; Schochat, Eliane

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether there are differences in the Speech-Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response among children with Typical Development (TD), (Central) Auditory Processing Disorder (C)APD, and Language Impairment (LI). The speech-evoked Auditory Brainstem Response was tested in 57 children (ages 6-12). The children were placed into three groups: TD (n = 18), (C)APD (n = 18) and LI (n = 21). Speech-evoked ABR were elicited using the five-formant syllable/da/. Three dimensions were defined for analysis, including timing, harmonics, and pitch. A comparative analysis of the responses between the typical development children and children with (C)APD and LI revealed abnormal encoding of the speech acoustic features that are characteristics of speech perception in children with (C)APD and LI, although the two groups differed in their abnormalities. While the children with (C)APD might had a greater difficulty distinguishing stimuli based on timing cues, the children with LI had the additional difficulty of distinguishing speech harmonics, which are important to the identification of speech sounds. These data suggested that an inefficient representation of crucial components of speech sounds may contribute to the difficulties with language processing found in children with LI. Furthermore, these findings may indicate that the neural processes mediated by the auditory brainstem differ among children with auditory processing and speech-language disorders.

  13. The steady-state assumption in oscillating and growing systems.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Alexandra-M; Reimers, Arne C

    2016-10-07

    The steady-state assumption, which states that the production and consumption of metabolites inside the cell are balanced, is one of the key aspects that makes an efficient analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks possible. It can be motivated from two different perspectives. In the time-scales perspective, we use the fact that metabolism is much faster than other cellular processes such as gene expression. Hence, the steady-state assumption is derived as a quasi-steady-state approximation of the metabolism that adapts to the changing cellular conditions. In this article we focus on the second perspective, stating that on the long run no metabolite can accumulate or deplete. In contrast to the first perspective it is not immediately clear how this perspective can be captured mathematically and what assumptions are required to obtain the steady-state condition. By presenting a mathematical framework based on the second perspective we demonstrate that the assumption of steady-state also applies to oscillating and growing systems without requiring quasi-steady-state at any time point. However, we also show that the average concentrations may not be compatible with the average fluxes. In summary, we establish a mathematical foundation for the steady-state assumption for long time periods that justifies its successful use in many applications. Furthermore, this mathematical foundation also pinpoints unintuitive effects in the integration of metabolite concentrations using nonlinear constraints into steady-state models for long time periods.

  14. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  15. Extending the definition of entropy to nonequilibrium steady states

    PubMed Central

    Ruelle, David P.

    2003-01-01

    We study the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a finite classical system subjected to nongradient forces ξ and maintained at fixed kinetic energy (Hoover–Evans isokinetic thermostat). We assume that the microscopic dynamics is sufficiently chaotic (Gallavotti–Cohen chaotic hypothesis) and that there is a natural nonequilibrium steady-state ρξ. When ξ is replaced by ξ + δξ, one can compute the change δρ of ρξ (linear response) and define an entropy change δS based on energy considerations. When ξ is varied around a loop, the total change of S need not vanish: Outside of equilibrium the entropy has curvature. However, at equilibrium (i.e., if ξ is a gradient) we show that the curvature is zero, and that the entropy S(ξ + δξ) near equilibrium is well defined to second order in δξ. PMID:12629215

  16. Extending the definition of entropy to nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Ruelle, David P

    2003-03-18

    We study the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a finite classical system subjected to nongradient forces xi and maintained at fixed kinetic energy (Hoover-Evans isokinetic thermostat). We assume that the microscopic dynamics is sufficiently chaotic (Gallavotti-Cohen chaotic hypothesis) and that there is a natural nonequilibrium steady-state rho(xi). When xi is replaced by xi + deltaxi, one can compute the change deltarho of rho(xi) (linear response) and define an entropy change deltaS based on energy considerations. When xi is varied around a loop, the total change of S need not vanish: Outside of equilibrium the entropy has curvature. However, at equilibrium (i.e., if xi is a gradient) we show that the curvature is zero, and that the entropy S(xi + deltaxi) near equilibrium is well defined to second order in deltaxi.

  17. Auditory brainstem response to complex sounds: a tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial provides a comprehensive overview of the methodological approach to collecting and analyzing auditory brainstem responses to complex sounds (cABRs). cABRs provide a window into how behaviorally relevant sounds such as speech and music are processed in the brain. Because temporal and spectral characteristics of sounds are preserved in this subcortical response, cABRs can be used to assess specific impairments and enhancements in auditory processing. Notably, subcortical function is neither passive nor hardwired but dynamically interacts with higher-level cognitive processes to refine how sounds are transcribed into neural code. This experience-dependent plasticity, which can occur on a number of time scales (e.g., life-long experience with speech or music, short-term auditory training, online auditory processing), helps shape sensory perception. Thus, by being an objective and non-invasive means for examining cognitive function and experience-dependent processes in sensory activity, cABRs have considerable utility in the study of populations where auditory function is of interest (e.g., auditory experts such as musicians, persons with hearing loss, auditory processing and language disorders). This tutorial is intended for clinicians and researchers seeking to integrate cABRs into their clinical and/or research programs. PMID:20084007

  18. Electrical Brain Responses to an Auditory Illusion and the Impact of Musical Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Christos I.; Pereda, Ernesto; Lindsen, Job P.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    The presentation of two sinusoidal tones, one to each ear, with a slight frequency mismatch yields an auditory illusion of a beating frequency equal to the frequency difference between the two tones; this is known as binaural beat (BB). The effect of brief BB stimulation on scalp EEG is not conclusively demonstrated. Further, no studies have examined the impact of musical training associated with BB stimulation, yet musicians' brains are often associated with enhanced auditory processing. In this study, we analysed EEG brain responses from two groups, musicians and non-musicians, when stimulated by short presentation (1 min) of binaural beats with beat frequency varying from 1 Hz to 48 Hz. We focused our analysis on alpha and gamma band EEG signals, and they were analysed in terms of spectral power, and functional connectivity as measured by two phase synchrony based measures, phase locking value and phase lag index. Finally, these measures were used to characterize the degree of centrality, segregation and integration of the functional brain network. We found that beat frequencies belonging to alpha band produced the most significant steady-state responses across groups. Further, processing of low frequency (delta, theta, alpha) binaural beats had significant impact on cortical network patterns in the alpha band oscillations. Altogether these results provide a neurophysiological account of cortical responses to BB stimulation at varying frequencies, and demonstrate a modulation of cortico-cortical connectivity in musicians' brains, and further suggest a kind of neuronal entrainment of a linear and nonlinear relationship to the beating frequencies. PMID:26065708

  19. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    PubMed Central

    van Wassenhove, Virginie; Grzeczkowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al., 2010). Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient color changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the “where” and the “when” of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or center of the screen. Participants counted color changes of the fixation cross while neglecting sounds which could be presented to the left, right, or both ears. First, clear alpha power increases were observed in auditory cortices, consistent with participants' attention directed to visual inputs. Second, color changes elicited robust modulations of auditory cortex responses (“when” prediction) seen as ramping activity, early alpha phase-locked responses, and enhanced high-gamma band responses in the contralateral side of sound presentation. Third, no modulations of auditory evoked or oscillatory activity were found to be specific to eye position. Altogether, our results suggest that visual transience can automatically elicit a prediction of “when” a sound will occur by changing the excitability of auditory cortices irrespective of the attended modality, eye position or spatial congruency of auditory and visual events. To the contrary, auditory cortical responses were not significantly affected by eye position suggesting that “where” predictions may require active sensing or saccadic reset to modulate auditory cortex responses, notably in the absence of spatial orientation to sounds. PMID:25705174

  20. Steady states and stability in metabolic networks without regulation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Oleksandr; van der Schaft, Arjan; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-07-21

    Metabolic networks are often extremely complex. Despite intensive efforts many details of these networks, e.g., exact kinetic rates and parameters of metabolic reactions, are not known, making it difficult to derive their properties. Considerable effort has been made to develop theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks that are valid for any values of parameters. General results on uniqueness of steady states and their stability have been derived with specific assumptions on reaction kinetics, stoichiometry and network topology. For example, deep results have been obtained under the assumptions of mass-action reaction kinetics, continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR), concordant reaction networks and others. Nevertheless, a general theory about properties of steady states in metabolic networks is still missing. Here we make a step further in the quest for such a theory. Specifically, we study properties of steady states in metabolic networks with monotonic kinetics in relation to their stoichiometry (simple and general) and the number of metabolites participating in every reaction (single or many). Our approach is based on the investigation of properties of the Jacobian matrix. We show that stoichiometry, network topology, and the number of metabolites that participate in every reaction have a large influence on the number of steady states and their stability in metabolic networks. Specifically, metabolic networks with single-substrate-single-product reactions have disconnected steady states, whereas in metabolic networks with multiple-substrates-multiple-product reactions manifolds of steady states arise. Metabolic networks with simple stoichiometry have either a unique globally asymptotically stable steady state or asymptotically stable manifolds of steady states. In metabolic networks with general stoichiometry the steady states are not always stable and we provide conditions for their stability. In order to demonstrate the biological

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of auditory steady‐state response testing

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Camila Maia; Schochat, Eliane

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The ASSR test is an electrophysiological test that evaluates, among other aspects, neural synchrony, based on the frequency or amplitude modulation of tones. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of auditory steady‐state response testing in detecting lesions and dysfunctions of the central auditory nervous system. METHODS: Seventy volunteers were divided into three groups: those with normal hearing; those with mesial temporal sclerosis; and those with central auditory processing disorder. All subjects underwent auditory steady‐state response testing of both ears at 500 Hz and 2000 Hz (frequency modulation, 46 Hz). The difference between auditory steady‐state response‐estimated thresholds and behavioral thresholds (audiometric evaluation) was calculated. RESULTS: Estimated thresholds were significantly higher in the mesial temporal sclerosis group than in the normal and central auditory processing disorder groups. In addition, the difference between auditory steady‐state response‐estimated and behavioral thresholds was greatest in the mesial temporal sclerosis group when compared to the normal group than in the central auditory processing disorder group compared to the normal group. DISCUSSION: Research focusing on central auditory nervous system (CANS) lesions has shown that individuals with CANS lesions present a greater difference between ASSR‐estimated thresholds and actual behavioral thresholds; ASSR‐estimated thresholds being significantly worse than behavioral thresholds in subjects with CANS insults. This is most likely because the disorder prevents the transmission of the sound stimulus from being in phase with the received stimulus, resulting in asynchronous transmitter release. Another possible cause of the greater difference between the ASSR‐estimated thresholds and the behavioral thresholds is impaired temporal resolution. CONCLUSIONS: The overall sensitivity of auditory

  2. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  3. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-11

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  4. Steady-state decoupling and design of linear multivariable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaler, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    A constructive criterion for decoupling the steady states of a linear time-invariant multivariable system is presented. This criterion consists of a set of inequalities which, when satisfied, will cause the steady states of a system to be decoupled. Stability analysis and a new design technique for such systems are given. A new and simple connection between single-loop and multivariable cases is found. These results are then applied to the compensation design for NASA STOL C-8A aircraft. Both steady-state decoupling and stability are justified through computer simulations.

  5. A Note on Equations for Steady-State Optimal Landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2010-06-15

    Based on the optimality principle (that the global energy expenditure rate is at its minimum for a given landscape under steady state conditions) and calculus of variations, we have derived a group of partial differential equations for describing steady-state optimal landscapes without explicitly distinguishing between hillslopes and channel networks. Other than building on the well-established Mining's equation, this work does not rely on any empirical relationships (such as those relating hydraulic parameters to local slopes). Using additional constraints, we also theoretically demonstrate that steady-state water depth is a power function of local slope, which is consistent with field data.

  6. Evoked response study tool: a portable, rugged system for single and multiple auditory evoked potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J

    2009-07-01

    Although the potential of using portable auditory evoked potential systems for field testing of stranded cetaceans has been long recognized, commercial systems for evoked potential measurements generally do not possess the bandwidth required for testing odontocete cetaceans and are not suitable for field use. As a result, there have been a number of efforts to develop portable evoked potential systems for field testing of cetaceans. This paper presents another such system, called the evoked response study tool (EVREST). EVREST is a Windows-based hardware/software system designed for calibrating sound stimuli and recording and analyzing transient and steady-state evoked potentials. The EVREST software features a graphical user interface, real-time analysis and visualization of recorded data, a variety of stimulus options, and a high level of automation. The system hardware is portable, rugged, battery-powered, and possesses a bandwidth that encompasses the audible range of echolocating odontocetes, making the system suitable for field testing of stranded or rehabilitating cetaceans.

  7. The steady-state visual evoked potential in vision research: A review

    PubMed Central

    Norcia, Anthony M.; Appelbaum, L. Gregory; Ales, Justin M.; Cottereau, Benoit R.; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Periodic visual stimulation and analysis of the resulting steady-state visual evoked potentials were first introduced over 80 years ago as a means to study visual sensation and perception. From the first single-channel recording of responses to modulated light to the present use of sophisticated digital displays composed of complex visual stimuli and high-density recording arrays, steady-state methods have been applied in a broad range of scientific and applied settings.The purpose of this article is to describe the fundamental stimulation paradigms for steady-state visual evoked potentials and to illustrate these principles through research findings across a range of applications in vision science. PMID:26024451

  8. Auditory Evoked Potential Response and Hearing Loss: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paulraj, M. P; Subramaniam, Kamalraj; Yaccob, Sazali Bin; Adom, Abdul H. Bin; Hema, C. R

    2015-01-01

    Hypoacusis is the most prevalent sensory disability in the world and consequently, it can lead to impede speech in human beings. One best approach to tackle this issue is to conduct early and effective hearing screening test using Electroencephalogram (EEG). EEG based hearing threshold level determination is most suitable for persons who lack verbal communication and behavioral response to sound stimulation. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a type of EEG signal emanated from the brain scalp by an acoustical stimulus. The goal of this review is to assess the current state of knowledge in estimating the hearing threshold levels based on AEP response. AEP response reflects the auditory ability level of an individual. An intelligent hearing perception level system enables to examine and determine the functional integrity of the auditory system. Systematic evaluation of EEG based hearing perception level system predicting the hearing loss in newborns, infants and multiple handicaps will be a priority of interest for future research. PMID:25893012

  9. An Operational Definition of the Steady State in Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnsley, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Briggs-Haldane assumption is used as the basis for the development of a kinetic model for enzyme catalysis. An alternative definition of the steady state and examples of realistic mechanisms are provided. (KR)

  10. An Operational Definition of the Steady State in Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnsley, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Briggs-Haldane assumption is used as the basis for the development of a kinetic model for enzyme catalysis. An alternative definition of the steady state and examples of realistic mechanisms are provided. (KR)

  11. The Enlisted Steady State-Simulation (ESS-SIM) Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    The Enlisted Steady State-Simulation ( ESS -SIM) Tool David M. Rodney • Peggy A. Golfin • Molly F. McIntosh DIM-2014-U-007587-Final July 2014 This...situation. We built and made use of a simulation model, ESS -Sim (Enlisted Steady- State Simulation), to obtain insights into attainable levels of...fleet manning and estimate the impact of policy changes on fleet man- ning. This information memorandum describes this model. Model overview We built ESS

  12. Steady-state and dynamic network modes for perceptual expectation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2017-01-12

    Perceptual expectation can attenuate repetition suppression, the stimulus-induced neuronal response generated by repeated stimulation, suggesting that repetition suppression is a top-down modulatory phenomenon. However, it is still unclear which high-level brain areas are involved and how they interact with low-level brain areas. Further, the temporal range over which perceptual expectation can effectively attenuate repetition suppression effects remains unclear. To elucidate the details of this top-down modulatory process, we used two short and long inter-stimulus intervals for a perceptual expectation paradigm of paired stimulation. We found that top-down modulation enhanced the response to the unexpected stimulus when repetition suppression was weak and that the effect disappeared at 1,000 ms prior to stimulus exposure. The high-level areas involved in this process included the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG_L) and left parietal lobule (IPL_L). We also found two systems providing modulatory input to the right fusiform face area (FFA_R): one from IFG_L and the other from IPL_L. Most importantly, we identified two states of networks through which perceptual expectation modulates sensory responses: one is a dynamic state and the other is a steady state. Our results provide the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evidence of temporally nested networks in brain processing.

  13. Steady-state and dynamic network modes for perceptual expectation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Perceptual expectation can attenuate repetition suppression, the stimulus-induced neuronal response generated by repeated stimulation, suggesting that repetition suppression is a top-down modulatory phenomenon. However, it is still unclear which high-level brain areas are involved and how they interact with low-level brain areas. Further, the temporal range over which perceptual expectation can effectively attenuate repetition suppression effects remains unclear. To elucidate the details of this top-down modulatory process, we used two short and long inter-stimulus intervals for a perceptual expectation paradigm of paired stimulation. We found that top-down modulation enhanced the response to the unexpected stimulus when repetition suppression was weak and that the effect disappeared at 1,000 ms prior to stimulus exposure. The high-level areas involved in this process included the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG_L) and left parietal lobule (IPL_L). We also found two systems providing modulatory input to the right fusiform face area (FFA_R): one from IFG_L and the other from IPL_L. Most importantly, we identified two states of networks through which perceptual expectation modulates sensory responses: one is a dynamic state and the other is a steady state. Our results provide the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evidence of temporally nested networks in brain processing. PMID:28079163

  14. Measuring the steady state of pedestrian flow in bottleneck experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Weichen; Tordeux, Antoine; Seyfried, Armin; Chraibi, Mohcine; Drzycimski, Kevin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhao, Ying

    2016-11-01

    Experiments with pedestrians could depend strongly on initial conditions. Comparisons of the results of such experiments require to distinguish carefully between transient state and steady state. Thus a modified version of the Cumulative Sum Control Chart algorithm is proposed to robustly detect steady states from density and speed time series of bottleneck experiments. The threshold of the detection parameter in the algorithm is calibrated using an autoregressive model. Comparing the detected steady states with manually selected ones, the modified algorithm gives robust and reproducible results. For the applications, three groups of bottleneck experiments are analysed and the steady states are detected. The results reconfirm that the specific flow is constant as bottleneck width changes. Moreover, we proposed a criterion to judge the difference between the flows in all states and in steady states, which is the ratio of pedestrian number to bottleneck width. The critical value of the ratio is found to be approximately 115 persons/m. This conclusion applies not only for the analysis of existing bottleneck experiments but also for the design of new bottleneck experiments and the validation of evacuation models. Furthermore, the range of steady state in time series of pedestrian characteristics could be effectively controlled by adjusting the value of the ratio.

  15. Steady state and a general scale law of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Steady state deformation has been characterized based on the experimental results for dilute single-phase aluminium alloys. It was found that although characteristic properties such as flow stress and grain size remained constant with time, a continuous loss of grain boundaries occurred as an essential feature at steady state. A physical model, which takes into account the activity of grain boundary dislocations, was developed to describe the kinetics of steady state deformation. According to this model, the steady state as a function of strain rate and temperature defines the limit of the conventional grain size and strength relationship, i.e., the Hall-Petch relation holds when the grain size is larger than that at the steady state, and an inverse Hall-Petch relation takes over if grain size is smaller than the steady state value. The transition between the two relationships relating grain size and strength is a phenomenon that depends on deformation conditions, rather than an intrinsic property as generally perceived. A general scale law of deformation is established accordingly.

  16. Weak Responses to Auditory Feedback Perturbation during Articulation in Persons Who Stutter: Evidence for Abnormal Auditory-Motor Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shanqing; Beal, Deryk S.; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Tiede, Mark K.; Guenther, Frank H.; Perkell, Joseph S.

    2012-01-01

    Previous empirical observations have led researchers to propose that auditory feedback (the auditory perception of self-produced sounds when speaking) functions abnormally in the speech motor systems of persons who stutter (PWS). Researchers have theorized that an important neural basis of stuttering is the aberrant integration of auditory information into incipient speech motor commands. Because of the circumstantial support for these hypotheses and the differences and contradictions between them, there is a need for carefully designed experiments that directly examine auditory-motor integration during speech production in PWS. In the current study, we used real-time manipulation of auditory feedback to directly investigate whether the speech motor system of PWS utilizes auditory feedback abnormally during articulation and to characterize potential deficits of this auditory-motor integration. Twenty-one PWS and 18 fluent control participants were recruited. Using a short-latency formant-perturbation system, we examined participants’ compensatory responses to unanticipated perturbation of auditory feedback of the first formant frequency during the production of the monophthong [ε]. The PWS showed compensatory responses that were qualitatively similar to the controls’ and had close-to-normal latencies (∼150 ms), but the magnitudes of their responses were substantially and significantly smaller than those of the control participants (by 47% on average, p<0.05). Measurements of auditory acuity indicate that the weaker-than-normal compensatory responses in PWS were not attributable to a deficit in low-level auditory processing. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that stuttering is associated with functional defects in the inverse models responsible for the transformation from the domain of auditory targets and auditory error information into the domain of speech motor commands. PMID:22911857

  17. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  18. Abnormal Attention in Autism Shown by Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belmonte, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Eight males with autism were required to shift attention between rapidly flashed targets alternating between left and right visual hemifields. When targets were separated by less than 700 ms, steady-state brain electrical response in both hemispheres was augmented and background EEG decreased for rightward shifts as compared with leftward shifts.…

  19. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  20. Comparing Steady State to Time Interval and Non-Steady State Measurements of Resting Metabolic Rate.

    PubMed

    Irving, Chelsea Jayne; Eggett, Dennis L; Fullmer, Susan

    2017-02-01

    The 2 most common methods to determine resting metabolic rate (RMR) with indirect calorimetry are steady state (SS) and time intervals. Studies have suggested SS more accurately reflects RMR, but further research is needed. Our objective was to compare the bias, precision, and accuracy of SS to time intervals and non-SS measurements in a healthy adult population. Seventy-seven participants were measured for 45 minutes using a Quark RMR. Inclusion criteria included healthy participants aged 18-65 years. Pregnant and lactating women were excluded. Paired t tests compared differences between measures. Bland-Altman plots were used to determine precision. Bias occurred if there was a significant difference between the means. Accuracy was determined by counting the number of absolute differences between SS compared with non-SS and time intervals that were <75 calories. Of 77 participants, 84% achieved SS, and 95% achieved SS by minute 30. Most differences between SS and time intervals were statistically but not practically significant. Bland-Altman plots showed SS measurements were generally lower than any time interval, suggesting SS is more indicative of RMR. Non-SS was significantly more biased ( P = .0005), less precise (spread of limits of agreement was 269 calories), and less accurate (65%) than SS. We conclude that non-SS is not equivalent to SS. We also conclude that using 5-minute SS is more indicative of RMR than any time interval that was tested in healthy populations. If SS cannot be achieved, we recommend repeating the measurement.

  1. Temporal integration reflected by frequency following response in auditory brainstem.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Ye, Datian

    2015-01-01

    Auditory temporal integration (ATI) has been widely described in psychoacoustic studies, especially for loudness perception. Loudness increases with increasing sound duration for durations up to a time constant about 100 ~ 200 ms, and then loudness becomes saturated with more duration increase. However, the electrophysiological mechanism underlying the ATI phenomenon has not been well understood. To investigate ATI at the brainstem level of auditory system and its relationship to cortical and behavioral ATI, frequency follow response (FFR) was acquired in our study. Simultaneously, ATI in auditory cortex was evaluated by cortical response P1. Behavioral loudness and electrophysiological measures were estimated from normal-hearing young adults for vowel /a/ whose durations varied from 50 ms to 175 ms. Significant effects of stimulus duration were found both on FFR and P1 amplitudes. Linear regression analysis revealed that as stimulus duration increased, brainstem FFR amplitude was significantly associated with cortical P1 amplitude and behavioral loudness, which confirmed the existence of temporal integration in auditory brainstem. Moreover, behavioral loudness ATI was better predicted using brainstem and cortical measures together than merely using each one separately, indicating an interplay and coordination for ATI across the three levels along auditory pathway.

  2. Mechanism of Non-Steady State Dissolution of Goethite in the Presence of Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    reproducible and the magnitude of dissolved iron corresponds to the reaction time of goethite with oxalate. Analogous non-steady state experiments were conducted, but with two other siderophores or citrate to induce non-steady state conditions: 40 microM of the bacterial siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), 40 microM of the fungal siderophore Ferrichrome, and 3 mM of citrate. Fast dissolution of iron was observed as a response to non-steady state. We also substituted the non-siderophore ligand oxalate by 500 microM citrate or 750 microM malonate and again observed fast dissolution after the non-steady state siderophore additions. Independent of the type of the ligands, a reproducible fast dissolution of iron followed by steady state dissolution was observed after the addition of the non-steady state ligand concentrations. Thus it can be said that the reproducible fast dissolution of iron under non-steady state conditions represents a general geochemical mechanism and an important process in the context of biological iron acquisition in natural systems. References Marschner, H., Roemheld, V. et al. (1986). "Different Strategies in Higher-Plants in Mobilization and Uptake of Iron". Journal of Plant Nutrition 9(3-7): 695-713. Roemheld, V. and Marschner, H. (1986)." Evidence for a Specific Uptake System for Iron Phytosiderophore in Roots of Grasses". Plant Physiology 80(1): 175-180.

  3. Multiple steady states in coupled flow tank reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Katharine L. C.; Kottalam, J.; Hatlee, Michael D.; Ross, John

    1992-05-01

    Coupling between continuous-flow, stirred tank reactors (CSTR's), each having multiple steady states, can produce new steady states with different concentrations of the chemical species in each of the coupled tanks. In this work, we identify a kinetic potential ψ that governs the deterministic time evolution of coupled tank reactors, when the reaction mechanism permits a single-variable description of the states of the individual tanks; examples include the iodate-arsenous acid reaction, a cubic model suggested by Noyes, and two quintic models. Stable steady states correspond to minima of ψ, and unstable steady states to maxima or saddle points; marginally stable states typically correspond to saddle-node points. We illustrate the variation in ψ due to changes in the rate constant for external material intake (k0) and for exchange between tanks (kx). For fixed k0 values, we analyze the changes in numbers and types of steady states as kx increases from zero. We show that steady states disappear by pairwise coalescence; we also show that new steady states may appear with increasing kx, when the reaction mechanism is sufficiently complex. For fixed initial conditions, the steady state ultimately reached in a mixing experiment may depend on the exchange rate constant as a function of time, kx(t) : Adiabatic mixing is obtained in the limit of slow changes in kx(t) and instantaneous mixing in the limit as kx(t)→∞ while t remains small. Analyses based on the potential ψ predict the outcome of mixing experiments for arbitrary kx(t). We show by explicit counterexamples that a prior theory developed by Noyes does not correctly predict the instability points or the transitions between steady states of coupled tanks, to be expected in mixing experiments. We further show that the outcome of such experiments is not connected to the relative stability of steady states in individual tank reactors. We find that coupling may effectively stabilize the tanks. We provide

  4. A case study of the changes in the speech-evoked auditory brainstem response associated with auditory training in children with auditory processing disorders.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar; Forrester, Jennifer; Rutledge, Casey; Holmes, Georgia W

    2013-04-01

    Studies related to plasticity and learning-related phenomena have primarily focused on higher-order processes of the auditory system, such as those in the auditory cortex and limited information is available on learning- and plasticity-related processes in the auditory brainstem. A clinical electrophysiological test of speech-evoked ABR known as BioMARK has been developed to evaluate brainstem responses to speech sounds in children with language learning disorders. Fast ForWord (FFW) was used as an auditory intervention program in the current study and pre- intervention and post-intervention speech-evoked ABR (BioMARK) measures were compared in 2 school-aged children with auditory processing disorders (APD). Significant changes were noted from pre-intervention to post-intervention and reflect plasticity in the auditory brainstem's neural activity to speech stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Geomorphic and Thermal Steady State Regimes: Reality or Wishful Thinking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, J.; Furlong, K.

    2003-04-01

    In many tectonic geomorphic studies, it is assumed that rates of uplift within an orogen are matched by rates of exhumation producing a steady-state orogen. However, the tools used to determine exhumation are thermally driven (e.g. Fission Track, U-Th/He) and exhumation can substantially perturb the crustal thermal regime. Since knowing the thermal regime is key to determining exhumation from thermochronology, problems arise. In order to interpret a rate of exhumation we make the assumption that an area is in thermal 'steady state', which in young active orogens unlikely exists. Taiwan, the Southern Alps, Fiordland, and Nanga Parbat are relatively young mountain belts that have begun to uplift or have experienced increased rates of uplift during the past 5-10 Ma. As there is a time lag between the onset of uplift and achieving geomorphic steady state and again between reaching geomorphic steady state and thermal steady state, these orogens may be too young to have achieved this final stage. Additionally, young orogens may not have experienced a constant rate of uplift and denudation in the time over which the thermochronometers average. Certainly, in the case of the Southern Alps, present uplift rates can not have existed since uplift begun. Therefore, an apparent age is recording a transient thermal state. Even in a case where geomorphic steady state exists i.e. exhumation balances uplift, it is unlikely that a thermal steady state has been reached. This precludes the simple interpretation of exhumation rates often made. When multiple thermochronometers are used, inconsistencies can arise. For example, an increase in the rate of uplift is often observed when comparing the rates of exhumation using different thermochronometers. Our modeling shows that in some cases this phenomena is actually eliminated by considering the transient nature of the thermal regime following the onset of uplift and exhumation of an active orogen. To accurately determine exhumation rate

  6. Occipital γ response to auditory stimulation in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Basar-Eroglu, Canan; Mathes, Birgit; Brand, Andreas; Schmiedt-Fehr, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated changes in gamma oscillations during auditory sensory processing (auditory-evoked gamma responses, AEGR) and target detection (auditory event-related gamma responses, AERGR) in healthy controls (n=10) and patients with schizophrenia (n=10) using both single-trial and averaged time-frequency data analysis. The results show that single-trial gamma responses in patients were altered in magnitude and topographic pattern for both the AEGR and the AERGR experimental conditions, whereas no differences were found for the averaged evoked gamma response. At the single-trial level, auditory stimuli elicited higher gamma responses at both anterior and occipital sites in patients with schizophrenia compared to controls. Furthermore, in patients with schizophrenia target detection compared to passive listening to stimuli was related to increased single-trial gamma power at frontal sites. In controls enhancement of the gamma response was only apparent for the averaged gamma response, with a distribution largely restricted to anterior sites. The differences in oscillatory activity between healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia were not reflected in the behavioral measure (i.e., counting targets). We conclude that gamma activity triggered by auditory stimuli in schizophrenic patients might have less selectivity in timing and alterations in topography and may show changes in amplitude modulation with task demands. The present study may indicate that in patients with schizophrenia neuronal information is not adequately transferred, possibly due to an over-excitability of neuronal networks and excessive pruning of local connections in association cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Responses Recorded from Four Electrode Montages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Andrew; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to click stimuli at 30 and 60 decibels were recorded from 16 full-term neonates with 4 different electrode arrays. Results indicated that ABR waveforms were morphologically similar to those recorded in adults. Waveform expression was variable with different electrode recording montages. (Author/DB)

  8. Auditory Brainstem Evoked Responses in Newborns with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Phan, Ha T. T.; Gardner, Judith M.; Miroshnichenko, Inna; Gordon, Anne; Karmel, Bernard Z.

    2009-01-01

    Auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs) were compared in 15 newborns with Down syndrome and 15 sex-, age-, and weight-matched control newborns. Participants had normal ABRs based upon values specific to 32- to 42-weeks postconceptional age. Although Wave III and Wave V component latencies and the Wave I-III interpeak latency (IPL) were shorter…

  9. 21 CFR 882.1900 - Evoked response auditory stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evoked response auditory stimulator. 882.1900 Section 882.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1900 Evoked...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1900 - Evoked response auditory stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evoked response auditory stimulator. 882.1900 Section 882.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1900 Evoked...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1900 - Evoked response auditory stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evoked response auditory stimulator. 882.1900 Section 882.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1900 Evoked...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1900 - Evoked response auditory stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evoked response auditory stimulator. 882.1900 Section 882.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1900 Evoked...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1900 - Evoked response auditory stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evoked response auditory stimulator. 882.1900 Section 882.1900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1900 Evoked...

  14. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response in Children with Central Language Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggott, Leonard R.; Anderson, Theodora

    1983-01-01

    Two groups of 10 children between the ages of 94 and 165 months were paired for age (wthin 6 months) and sex and were compared for Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response patterns. One child in each pair showed evidence of central language disturbance as determined by neuropsychological testing. The other did not. All had normal hearing and IQs of 80…

  15. Auditory Brainstem Evoked Responses in Newborns with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Phan, Ha T. T.; Gardner, Judith M.; Miroshnichenko, Inna; Gordon, Anne; Karmel, Bernard Z.

    2009-01-01

    Auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABRs) were compared in 15 newborns with Down syndrome and 15 sex-, age-, and weight-matched control newborns. Participants had normal ABRs based upon values specific to 32- to 42-weeks postconceptional age. Although Wave III and Wave V component latencies and the Wave I-III interpeak latency (IPL) were shorter…

  16. Specialization of Binaural Responses in Ventral Auditory Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Nathan C.; Storace, Douglas A.; Escabí, Monty A.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate orientation to sound under challenging conditions requires auditory cortex, but it is unclear how spatial attributes of the auditory scene are represented at this level. Current organization schemes follow a functional division whereby dorsal and ventral auditory cortices specialize to encode spatial and object features of sound source, respectively. However, few studies have examined spatial cue sensitivities in ventral cortices to support or reject such schemes. Here Fourier optical imaging was used to quantify best frequency responses and corresponding gradient organization in primary (A1), anterior, posterior, ventral (VAF), and suprarhinal (SRAF) auditory fields of the rat. Spike rate sensitivities to binaural interaural level difference (ILD) and average binaural level cues were probed in A1 and two ventral cortices, VAF and SRAF. Continuous distributions of best ILDs and ILD tuning metrics were observed in all cortices, suggesting this horizontal position cue is well covered. VAF and caudal SRAF in the right cerebral hemisphere responded maximally to midline horizontal position cues, whereas A1 and rostral SRAF responded maximally to ILD cues favoring more eccentric positions in the contralateral sound hemifield. SRAF had the highest incidence of binaural facilitation for ILD cues corresponding to midline positions, supporting current theories that auditory cortices have specialized and hierarchical functional organization. PMID:20980610

  17. Steady state solutions to dynamically loaded periodic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The general problem of solving for the steady state (time domain) dynamic response (i.e., NASTRAN rigid format-8) of a general elastic periodic structure subject to a phase difference loading of the type encountered in traveling wave propagation problems was studied. Two types of structural configurations were considered; in the first type, the structure has a repeating pattern over a span that is long enough to be considered, for all practical purposes, as infinite; in the second type, the structure has structural rotational symmetry in the circumferential direction. The theory and a corresponding set of DMAP instructions which permits the NASTRAN user to automatically alter the rigid format-8 sequence to solve the intended class of problems are presented. Final results are recovered as with any ordinary rigid format-8 solution, except that the results are only printed for the typical periodic segment of the structure. A simple demonstration problem having a known exact solution is used to illustrate the implementation of the procedure.

  18. Visual steady state in relation to age and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Anna; Dyhr Thomsen, Mia; Wiegand, Iris; Horwitz, Henrik; Klemp, Marc; Nikolic, Miki; Rask, Lene; Lauritzen, Martin; Benedek, Krisztina

    2017-01-01

    Neocortical gamma activity is crucial for sensory perception and cognition. This study examines the value of using non-task stimulation-induced EEG oscillations to predict cognitive status in a birth cohort of healthy Danish males (Metropolit) with varying cognitive ability. In particular, we examine the steady-state VEP power response (SSVEP-PR) in the alpha (8Hz) and gamma (36Hz) bands in 54 males (avg. age: 62.0 years) and compare these with 10 young healthy participants (avg. age 27.6 years). Furthermore, we correlate the individual alpha-to-gamma difference in relative visual-area power (ΔRV) with cognitive scores for the older adults. We find that ΔRV decrease with age by just over one standard deviation when comparing young with old participants (p<0.01). Furthermore, intelligence is significantly negatively correlated with ΔRV in the older adult cohort, even when processing speed, global cognition, executive function, memory, and education (p<0.05). In our preferred specification, an increase in ΔRV of one standard deviation is associated with a reduction in intelligence of 48% of a standard deviation (p<0.01). Finally, we conclude that the difference in cerebral rhythmic activity between the alpha and gamma bands is associated with age and cognitive status, and that ΔRV therefore provide a non-subjective clinical tool with which to examine cognitive status in old age.

  19. Maximally reliable spatial filtering of steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Greaves, Alex S; Norcia, Anthony M

    2015-04-01

    Due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and robustness to artifacts, steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are a popular technique for studying neural processing in the human visual system. SSVEPs are conventionally analyzed at individual electrodes or linear combinations of electrodes which maximize some variant of the SNR. Here we exploit the fundamental assumption of evoked responses--reproducibility across trials--to develop a technique that extracts a small number of high SNR, maximally reliable SSVEP components. This novel spatial filtering method operates on an array of Fourier coefficients and projects the data into a low-dimensional space in which the trial-to-trial spectral covariance is maximized. When applied to two sample data sets, the resulting technique recovers physiologically plausible components (i.e., the recovered topographies match the lead fields of the underlying sources) while drastically reducing the dimensionality of the data (i.e., more than 90% of the trial-to-trial reliability is captured in the first four components). Moreover, the proposed technique achieves a higher SNR than that of the single-best electrode or the Principal Components. We provide a freely-available MATLAB implementation of the proposed technique, herein termed "Reliable Components Analysis".

  20. Visual steady state in relation to age and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Dyhr Thomsen, Mia; Wiegand, Iris; Horwitz, Henrik; Klemp, Marc; Nikolic, Miki; Rask, Lene; Lauritzen, Martin; Benedek, Krisztina

    2017-01-01

    Neocortical gamma activity is crucial for sensory perception and cognition. This study examines the value of using non-task stimulation-induced EEG oscillations to predict cognitive status in a birth cohort of healthy Danish males (Metropolit) with varying cognitive ability. In particular, we examine the steady-state VEP power response (SSVEP-PR) in the alpha (8Hz) and gamma (36Hz) bands in 54 males (avg. age: 62.0 years) and compare these with 10 young healthy participants (avg. age 27.6 years). Furthermore, we correlate the individual alpha-to-gamma difference in relative visual-area power (ΔRV) with cognitive scores for the older adults. We find that ΔRV decrease with age by just over one standard deviation when comparing young with old participants (p<0.01). Furthermore, intelligence is significantly negatively correlated with ΔRV in the older adult cohort, even when processing speed, global cognition, executive function, memory, and education (p<0.05). In our preferred specification, an increase in ΔRV of one standard deviation is associated with a reduction in intelligence of 48% of a standard deviation (p<0.01). Finally, we conclude that the difference in cerebral rhythmic activity between the alpha and gamma bands is associated with age and cognitive status, and that ΔRV therefore provide a non-subjective clinical tool with which to examine cognitive status in old age. PMID:28245274

  1. Steady-state compartmentalization of lipid membranes by active proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sabra, M C; Mouritsen, O G

    1998-01-01

    Using a simple microscopic model of lipid-protein interactions, based on the hydrophobic matching principle, we study some generic aspects of lipid-membrane compartmentalization controlled by a dispersion of active integral membrane proteins. The activity of the proteins is simulated by conformational excitations governed by an external drive, and the deexcitation is controlled by interaction of the protein with its lipid surroundings. In response to the flux of energy into the proteins from the environment and the subsequent dissipation of energy into the lipid bilayer, the lipid-protein assembly reorganizes into a steady-state structure with a typical length scale determined by the strength of the external drive. In the specific case of a mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the gel-fluid coexistence region, it is shown explicitly by computer simulation that the activity of an integral membrane protein can lead to a compartmentalization of the lipid-bilayer membrane. The compartmentalization is related to the dynamical process of phase separation and lipid domain formation. PMID:9533687

  2. The stability of steady state accommodation in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Candy, T. Rowan; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal image quality in infants is largely determined by the accuracy and the stability of their accommodative responses. Although the accuracy of infants’ accommodation has been investigated previously, little is known about the stability of their responses. We performed two experiments that characterized the stability of infants’ steady state accommodation. Analyses were performed in the time domain (root mean square [RMS] deviation) and in the frequency domain (spectral analysis). In Experiment 1, accommodation responses were recorded for a period of 3 s from the left eye of four groups of infants (8–10, 11–13, 14–19, and 20–30 weeks of age) and eight prepresbyopic adults while they focused on a small toy placed at a dioptric viewing distance of 1.0 D (at 1 m). In Experiment 2, accommodation responses were recorded for a period of 14 s from the left eye of a group of 8- to 12-week-old infants and six prepresbyopic adults while they focused on a cartoon image placed at three different dioptric viewing distances (1.25, 2.0, and 3.0 D). The data, collected using a photorefractor sampling at 25 Hz, showed two important characteristics. First, the RMS deviations and the power were quantitatively similar across different infant age groups, and they were significantly larger in infants than in adults. Second, the overall and relative power also increased with the dioptric viewing distance both in infants and adults. At all three dioptric viewing distances, the measures of power were larger in infants than in adults. These data demonstrate that infants’ accommodative responses contain instabilities that are qualitatively very similar to those observed in adults. However, the larger RMS deviations suggest that infants are likely to experience larger fluctuations in retinal image quality than adults. PMID:17997659

  3. Invertase activity of intact cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on sugar cane molasses. 1. Steady-state continuous culture tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vitolo, M.; Vairo, M.L.R.; Borzani, W.

    1985-08-01

    During the steady-state continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on sugar cane blackstrap molasses under different experimental conditions, oscillatory variations of the invertase activity of the intact yeast cells were observed. The continuous morphological changes of the cells wall and of the periplasmic space affecting the interaction between invertase and sucrose molecules could be responsible by the observed oscillatory phenomena. The average invertase activity at the steady state is linearly correlated to the cell's growth rate.

  4. Soluble CD163 is associated with CD163 mRNA expression in adipose tissue and with insulin sensitivity in steady-state condition but not in response to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Kračmerová, Jana; Rossmeislová, Lenka; Kováčová, Zuzana; Klimčáková, Eva; Polák, Jan; Tencerová, Michaela; Mališová, Lucia; Štich, Vladimír; Langin, Dominique; Šiklová, Michaela

    2014-03-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was suggested as a biomarker of insulin sensitivity and CD163 mRNA expression representing macrophage content in adipose tissue (AT). The aim of this study was to investigate, in cross-sectional and prospective design, the relationship between sCD163 circulating levels and CD163 mRNA expression in adipose tissue and insulin sensitivity assessed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Two cohorts of subjects were examined in the study. Cohort 1 included 42 women with a wide range of body mass index (17-48 kg/m(2)); cohort 2 included 27 obese women who followed a dietary intervention consisting of 1 month of a very low-calorie diet and 5 months of a weight-stabilization period. Serum levels of CD163 and mRNA expression of CD163 and CD68 in sc and visceral (visc) AT were determined, and insulin sensitivity [expressed as glucose disposal rate (GDR)] was measured in cohort 1. In cohort 2, serum levels of CD163, mRNA expressions of CD163, CD68, and CD163-shedding factors [TNF-α-converting enzyme (TACE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP3)] in sc AT were examined and GDR was measured before and during dietary intervention. In cohort 1, circulating sCD163 correlated with CD163 mRNA levels in both sc and visc AT. sCD163 and CD163 mRNA expression in both fat depots correlated with GDR. In cohort 2, the diet-induced changes of sCD163 levels did not correlate with those of CD163, CD68, TACE, and TIMP3 mRNA levels. Although the pattern of the diet-induced change of sCD163 paralleled that of GDR, there was no correlation between the changes of these two variables. sCD163 correlates with CD163 mRNA expression in sc and visc AT and with whole-body insulin sensitivity in the steady-state condition. These associations are not observed with respect to the diet-induced changes during a weight-reducing hypocaloric diet.

  5. Evaluation of a steady state MPD thruster test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.; Doss, E.D.; Kilgore, O.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of multimegawatt MPD thrusters depends, to a great extent, on testing them under steady state high altitude space conditions. Steady state testing is required to provide thermal characteristics, life cycle, erosion, and other essential data. the major technical obstacle for ground testing of MPD thrusters in a space simulation facility is the inability of state-of-the-art vacuum systems to handle the tremendous pumping speeds required for multimegawatt MPD thrusters. This is true for other types of electric propulsion devices as well. This paper discusses the results of the first phase of an evaluation of steady state MPD thruster test facilities. The first phase addresses the conceptual design of vacuum systems required to support multimegawatt MPD thruster testing. Three advanced pumping system concepts were evaluated and are presented here.

  6. Poissonian steady states: from stationary densities to stationary intensities.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-10-01

    Markov dynamics are the most elemental and omnipresent form of stochastic dynamics in the sciences, with applications ranging from physics to chemistry, from biology to evolution, and from economics to finance. Markov dynamics can be either stationary or nonstationary. Stationary Markov dynamics represent statistical steady states and are quantified by stationary densities. In this paper, we generalize the notion of steady state to the case of general Markov dynamics. Considering an ensemble of independent motions governed by common Markov dynamics, we establish that the entire ensemble attains Poissonian steady states which are quantified by stationary Poissonian intensities and which hold valid also in the case of nonstationary Markov dynamics. The methodology is applied to a host of Markov dynamics, including Brownian motion, birth-death processes, random walks, geometric random walks, renewal processes, growth-collapse dynamics, decay-surge dynamics, Ito diffusions, and Langevin dynamics.

  7. Quantum quasi-steady states in current transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; Zwolak, Michael; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    We investigate quasi-steady state solutions to transport in quantum systems by finding states which at some time minimize the change in density throughout all space and have a given current density flowing from one part of the system to another [1]. Contrary to classical dynamics, in a quantum mechanical system there are many states with a given energy and particle number which satisfy this minimization criterion. Taking as an example spinless fermions on a one-dimensional lattice, we explicitly show the phase space of a class of quasi-steady states. We also discuss the possibility of coherent and incoherent mixing of these steady state solutions leading to a new type of noise in quantum transport. [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004).

  8. Structural simplification of chemical reaction networks in partial steady states.

    PubMed

    Madelaine, Guillaume; Lhoussaine, Cédric; Niehren, Joachim; Tonello, Elisa

    2016-11-01

    We study the structural simplification of chemical reaction networks with partial steady state semantics assuming that the concentrations of some but not all species are constant. We present a simplification rule that can eliminate intermediate species that are in partial steady state, while preserving the dynamics of all other species. Our simplification rule can be applied to general reaction networks with some but few restrictions on the possible kinetic laws. We can also simplify reaction networks subject to conservation laws. We prove that our simplification rule is correct when applied to a module of a reaction network, as long as the partial steady state is assumed with respect to the complete network. Michaelis-Menten's simplification rule for enzymatic reactions falls out as a special case. We have implemented an algorithm that applies our simplification rules repeatedly and applied it to reaction networks from systems biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A simplified approach to estimating the maximal lactate steady state.

    PubMed

    Snyder, A C; Woulfe, T; Welsh, R; Foster, C

    1994-01-01

    The exercise intensity associated with an elevated but stable blood lactate (HLa) concentration during constant load work (the maximal steady state, MSS) has received attention as a candidate for the "optimal" exercise intensity for endurance training. Identification of MSS ordinarily demands direct measurement of HLa or respiratory metabolism. The purpose of this study was to test the ability of heart rate (HR) to identify MSS during steady state exercise, similar to that used in conventional exercise prescription. Trained runners (n = 9) and cyclists (n = 12) performed incremental and steady state exercise. MSS was defined as the highest intensity in which blood lactate concentration increased < 1.0 mM from minutes 10 to 30. The next higher intensity workbout completed was defined as > MSS. HR models related to the presence or absence of steady state conditions were developed from the upper 95% confidence interval of MSS and the lower 95% confidence interval of > MSS. Cross validation of the model to predict MSS was performed using 21 running and 45 cycling exercise bouts in a separate group. Using the MSS upper 95% confidence interval model 84% and 76% of workbouts were correctly predicted in cyclists and runners, respectively. Using the > MSS lower 95% confidence interval model, 76% and 81% of workbouts were correctly predicted in cyclists and runners, respectively. Prediction errors tended to incorrectly predict non-steady state conditions when steady state had occurred (16/26) (62%). We conclude that use of these simple HR models may predict MSS with sufficient accuracy to be useful when direct HLa measurement is not available.

  10. Current Pressure Transducer Application of Model-based Prognostics Using Steady State Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teubert, Christopher; Daigle, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prognostics is the process of predicting a system's future states, health degradation/wear, and remaining useful life (RUL). This information plays an important role in preventing failure, reducing downtime, scheduling maintenance, and improving system utility. Prognostics relies heavily on wear estimation. In some components, the sensors used to estimate wear may not be fast enough to capture brief transient states that are indicative of wear. For this reason it is beneficial to be capable of detecting and estimating the extent of component wear using steady-state measurements. This paper details a method for estimating component wear using steady-state measurements, describes how this is used to predict future states, and presents a case study of a current/pressure (I/P) Transducer. I/P Transducer nominal and off-nominal behaviors are characterized using a physics-based model, and validated against expected and observed component behavior. This model is used to map observed steady-state responses to corresponding fault parameter values in the form of a lookup table. This method was chosen because of its fast, efficient nature, and its ability to be applied to both linear and non-linear systems. Using measurements of the steady state output, and the lookup table, wear is estimated. A regression is used to estimate the wear propagation parameter and characterize the damage progression function, which are used to predict future states and the remaining useful life of the system.

  11. Visual distance cues modulate neuromagnetic auditory N1m responses.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Christian F; Matsuhashi, Masao; Votinov, Mikhail; Goto, Kazuhiro; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2012-11-01

    Auditory distance judgment relies on several acoustic cues and can be modulated by visual information. Sound intensity serves as one such cue as it decreases with increasing distance. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment, we tested whether N1m MEG responses, previously described to scale with sound intensity, are modulated by visual distance cues. We recorded behavioral and MEG data from 15 healthy normal hearing participants. Noise bursts at different sound pressure levels were paired with synchronous visual cues at different distances. We hypothesized that noise paired with far visual cues will be represented louder and result in increased N1m amplitudes compared to a pairing with close visual cues. This might be based on a compensation of visually induced distance when processing loudness. Psychophysically, we observed no significant modulation of loudness judgments by visual cues. However, N1m MEG responses at about 100ms after stimulus onset were significantly stronger with distal compared to proximal visual cues in the left auditory cortex. Our results suggest an audio-visual interaction at an early stage in the left auditory cortex, possibly related to cue integration for auditory distance processing. Sound distance processing could prove itself as a promising model system for the investigation of intra-modal and cross-modal integration principles. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Steady-state error of a system with fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, B S

    1998-01-01

    We consider the problem of control error of a fuzzy system with feedback. The system consists of a plant, linear or nonlinear, fuzzy controller, and feedback loop. As controller we use both PD and PI fuzzy type controllers. We apply different t-norm and co-norm: logic, algebraic, Yager, Hamacher, bounded, drastic, etc. in the process of fuzzy reasoning. Triangular shape of membership functions is supposed, but we generalize the results obtained. Steady-state error of a system is calculated. We have obtained very interesting results. The steady-state error is identical for pairs of triangular t- and co-norms.

  13. Steady-state coherent transfer by adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Huneke, Jan; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2013-01-18

    We propose steady-state electron transport based on coherent transfer by adiabatic passage (CTAP) in a linearly arranged triple quantum dot with leads attached to the outer dots. Its main feature is repeated steering of single electrons from the first dot to the last dot without relevant occupation of the middle dot. The coupling to leads enables a steady-state current, whose shot noise is significantly suppressed provided that the CTAP protocol performs properly. This represents an indication for the direct transfer between spatially separated dots and, thus, may resolve the problem of finding experimental evidence for the nonoccupation of the middle dot.

  14. Adaptive steady-state stabilization for nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.

    2008-07-01

    By means of LaSalle’s invariance principle, we propose an adaptive controller with the aim of stabilizing an unstable steady state for a wide class of nonlinear dynamical systems. The control technique does not require analytical knowledge of the system dynamics and operates without any explicit knowledge of the desired steady-state position. The control input is achieved using only system states with no computer analysis of the dynamics. The proposed strategy is tested on Lorentz, van der Pol, and pendulum equations.

  15. Mapping current fluctuations of stochastic pumps to nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotskoff, Grant M.

    2017-03-01

    We show that current fluctuations in a stochastic pump can be robustly mapped to fluctuations in a corresponding time-independent nonequilibrium steady state. We thus refine a recently proposed mapping so that it ensures equivalence of not only the averages, but also optimal representation of fluctuations in currents and density. Our mapping leads to a natural decomposition of the entropy production in stochastic pumps similar to the "housekeeping" heat. As a consequence of the decomposition of entropy production, the current fluctuations in weakly perturbed stochastic pumps are shown to satisfy a universal bound determined by the steady state entropy production.

  16. Mean field treatment of heterogeneous steady state kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geva, Nadav; Vaissier, Valerie; Shepherd, James; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2017-10-01

    We propose a method to quickly compute steady state populations of species undergoing a set of chemical reactions whose rate constants are heterogeneous. Using an average environment in place of an explicit nearest neighbor configuration, we obtain a set of equations describing a single fluctuating active site in the presence of an averaged bath. We apply this Mean Field Steady State (MFSS) method to a model of H2 production on a disordered surface for which the activation energy for the reaction varies from site to site. The MFSS populations quantitatively reproduce the KMC results across the range of rate parameters considered.

  17. Auditory brainstem responses in the Eastern Screech Owl: An estimate of auditory thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F.; Lohr, Bernard; Hahn, D. Caldwell; Dooling, Robert J.

    2005-07-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a measure of neural synchrony, was used to estimate auditory sensitivity in the eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). The typical screech owl ABR waveform showed two to three prominent peaks occurring within 5 ms of stimulus onset. As sound pressure levels increased, the ABR peak amplitude increased and latency decreased. With an increasing stimulus presentation rate, ABR peak amplitude decreased and latency increased. Generally, changes in the ABR waveform to stimulus intensity and repetition rate are consistent with the pattern found in several avian families. The ABR audiogram shows that screech owls hear best between 1.5 and 6.4 kHz with the most acute sensitivity between 4-5.7 kHz. The shape of the average screech owl ABR audiogram is similar to the shape of the behaviorally measured audiogram of the barn owl, except at the highest frequencies. Our data also show differences in overall auditory sensitivity between the color morphs of screech owls.

  18. Auditory brainstem responses in the Eastern Screech Owl: an estimate of auditory thresholds.

    PubMed

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Lohr, Bernard; Hahn, D Caldwell; Dooling, Robert J

    2005-07-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a measure of neural synchrony, was used to estimate auditory sensitivity in the eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). The typical screech owl ABR waveform showed two to three prominent peaks occurring within 5 ms of stimulus onset. As sound pressure levels increased, the ABR peak amplitude increased and latency decreased. With an increasing stimulus presentation rate, ABR peak amplitude decreased and latency increased. Generally, changes in the ABR waveform to stimulus intensity and repetition rate are consistent with the pattern found in several avian families. The ABR audiogram shows that screech owls hear best between 1.5 and 6.4 kHz with the most acute sensitivity between 4-5.7 kHz. The shape of the average screech owl ABR audiogram is similar to the shape of the behaviorally measured audiogram of the barn owl, except at the highest frequencies. Our data also show differences in overall auditory sensitivity between the color morphs of screech owls.

  19. Auditory brainstem responses in the Eastern Screech Owl: An estimate of auditory thresholds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brittan-Powell, E.F.; Lohr, B.; Hahn, D.C.; Dooling, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a measure of neural synchrony, was used to estimate auditory sensitivity in the eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). The typical screech owl ABR waveform showed two to three prominent peaks occurring within 5 ms of stimulus onset. As sound pressure levels increased, the ABR peak amplitude increased and latency decreased. With an increasing stimulus presentation rate, ABR peak amplitude decreased and latency increased. Generally, changes in the ABR waveform to stimulus intensity and repetition rate are consistent with the pattern found in several avian families. The ABR audiogram shows that screech owls hear best between 1.5 and 6.4 kHz with the most acute sensitivity between 4?5.7 kHz. The shape of the average screech owl ABR audiogram is similar to the shape of the behaviorally measured audiogram of the barn owl, except at the highest frequencies. Our data also show differences in overall auditory sensitivity between the color morphs of screech owls.

  20. Tactile stimulation and hemispheric asymmetries modulate auditory perception and neural responses in primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, M; Tyll, S; Kanowski, M; Brosch, M; Schoenfeld, M A; Heinze, H-J; Noesselt, T

    2013-10-01

    Although multisensory integration has been an important area of recent research, most studies focused on audiovisual integration. Importantly, however, the combination of audition and touch can guide our behavior as effectively which we studied here using psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We tested whether task-irrelevant tactile stimuli would enhance auditory detection, and whether hemispheric asymmetries would modulate these audiotactile benefits using lateralized sounds. Spatially aligned task-irrelevant tactile stimuli could occur either synchronously or asynchronously with the sounds. Auditory detection was enhanced by non-informative synchronous and asynchronous tactile stimuli, if presented on the left side. Elevated fMRI-signals to left-sided synchronous bimodal stimulation were found in primary auditory cortex (A1). Adjacent regions (planum temporale, PT) expressed enhanced BOLD-responses for synchronous and asynchronous left-sided bimodal conditions. Additional connectivity analyses seeded in right-hemispheric A1 and PT for both bimodal conditions showed enhanced connectivity with right-hemispheric thalamic, somatosensory and multisensory areas that scaled with subjects' performance. Our results indicate that functional asymmetries interact with audiotactile interplay which can be observed for left-lateralized stimulation in the right hemisphere. There, audiotactile interplay recruits a functional network of unisensory cortices, and the strength of these functional network connections is directly related to subjects' perceptual sensitivity.

  1. Modeling binaural responses in the auditory brainstem to electric stimulation of the auditory nerve.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand; Colburn, H Steven

    2015-02-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) provide improvements in sound localization and speech perception in noise over unilateral CIs. However, the benefits arise mainly from the perception of interaural level differences, while bilateral CI listeners' sensitivity to interaural time difference (ITD) is poorer than normal. To help understand this limitation, a set of ITD-sensitive neural models was developed to study binaural responses to electric stimulation. Our working hypothesis was that central auditory processing is normal with bilateral CIs so that the abnormality in the response to electric stimulation at the level of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) is the source of the limited ITD sensitivity. A descriptive model of ANF response to both acoustic and electric stimulation was implemented and used to drive a simplified biophysical model of neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO). The model's ITD sensitivity was found to depend strongly on the specific configurations of membrane and synaptic parameters for different stimulation rates. Specifically, stronger excitatory synaptic inputs and faster membrane responses were required for the model neurons to be ITD-sensitive at high stimulation rates, whereas weaker excitatory synaptic input and slower membrane responses were necessary at low stimulation rates, for both electric and acoustic stimulation. This finding raises the possibility of frequency-dependent differences in neural mechanisms of binaural processing; limitations in ITD sensitivity with bilateral CIs may be due to a mismatch between stimulation rate and cell parameters in ITD-sensitive neurons.

  2. Auditory brainstem responses in 10 inbred strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Jen, Philip H.-S.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Frankel, Wayne N.; Zheng, Qing Y.

    2010-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR) is an evoked potential response of auditory activity in the auditory nerve and subsequent fiber tracts and nuclei within the auditory brainstem pathways. The threshold, amplitude, and latency analysis of the ABR provides information on the peripheral hearing status and the integrity of brainstem pathways. In this study, we compared the threshold, amplitude, and latency of ABRs recorded from 149 mice of 10 commonly used inbred strains (BALB/cJ, C3HeB/FeJ, C3H/HeJ, CAST/EiJ, CBA/CaJ, CBA/J, FVB/ NJ, MRL/MpJ, NZB/BlNJ, and SJL/J) using clicks of different intensities. The ABR thresholds of these strains ranged from 32 to 43 dB SPL. The amplitude of both waves I and IV of ABRs, which increased monotonically with click intensity in most strains, differed significantly among different strains at each intensity tested. Moreover, the amplitude of both waves was inversely correlated with the body weight of each strain at most intensities tested. In general, the amplitude of wave IV was smaller than that of wave I resulting in the IV/I amplitude ratio of <1.0 in all strains. The peak latency of both waves I and IV decreased significantly with click intensity in each strain. However, this intensity-dependent decrease was greater for wave IV than for wave I such that the wave I–IV inter-peak latency also decreased significantly with increasing intensity. I–IV inter-peak latencies for MRL/MpJ, C3HeB/FeJ, NZB/BlNJ, and C3H/HeJ strains are longer than FVB/NJ, SJL/J, or CAST/EiJ. This work is the first step to study the genetic basis underlying strain-related differences in auditory pathway. PMID:16516865

  3. Steady State Load Characterization Fact Sheet: 2012 Chevy Volt

    SciTech Connect

    Scoffield, Don

    2015-03-01

    This fact sheet characterizes the steady state charging behavior of a 2012 Chevy Volt. Both level 1 charging (120 volt) and level 2 charging (208 volts) is investigated. This fact sheet contains plots of efficiency, power factor, and current harmonics as vehicle charging is curtailed. Prominent current harmonics are also displayed in a histogram for various charge rates.

  4. Steady States of the Parametric Rotator and Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouzas, Antonio O.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the…

  5. Density Functional Theory for Steady-State Nonequilibrium Molecular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuanglong; Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) for steady-state nonequilibrium quantum systems such as molecular junctions under a finite bias. Based on the steady-state nonequilibrium statistics that maps nonequilibrium to an effective equilibrium, we show that ground-state DFT (GS-DFT) is not applicable in this case and two densities, the total electron density and the density of current-carrying electrons, are needed to uniquely determine the properties of the corresponding nonequilibrium system. A self-consistent mean-field approach based on two densities is then derived. The theory is implemented into SIESTA computational package and applied to study nonequilibrium electronic/transport properties of a realistic carbon-nanotube (CNT)/Benzene junction. Results obtained from our steady-state DFT (SS-DFT) are compared with those of conventional GS-DFT based transport calculations. We show that SS-DFT yields energetically more stable nonequilibrium steady state, predicts significantly lower electric current, and is able to produce correct electronic structures in local equilibrium under a limiting case. PMID:26472080

  6. Equilibrium Binding and Steady-State Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, H. Brian

    1984-01-01

    Points out that equilibrium binding and steady-state enzyme kinetics have a great deal in common and that related equations and error analysis can be cast in identical forms. Emphasizes that if one type of problem solution is taught, the other is also taught. Various methods of data analysis are evaluated. (JM)

  7. Comment on ``Dynamically maintained steady-state pressure gradients''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Todd L.

    2000-04-01

    Sheehan [Phys. Rev. E 57, 6660 (1998)] recently discussed the possibility of establishing a dynamically maintained, steady-state pressure gradient in a gas filling a cavity. In this Comment it is pointed out that the pressure gradients in such a system, if attainable in the laboratory, could be used to violate the second law of thermodynamics.

  8. Aperiodically Driven Integrable Systems and Their Emergent Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Sourav; Sen, Arnab; Sen, Diptiman

    2017-07-01

    Does a closed quantum many-body system that is continually driven with a time-dependent Hamiltonian finally reach a steady state? This question has only recently been answered for driving protocols that are periodic in time, where the long-time behavior of the local properties synchronizes with the drive and can be described by an appropriate periodic ensemble. Here, we explore the consequences of breaking the time-periodic structure of the drive with additional aperiodic noise in a class of integrable systems. We show that the resulting unitary dynamics leads to new emergent steady states in at least two cases. While any typical realization of random noise causes eventual heating to an infinite-temperature ensemble for all local properties in spite of the system being integrable, noise that is self-similar in time leads to an entirely different steady state (which we dub the "geometric generalized Gibbs ensemble") that emerges only after an astronomically large time scale. To understand the approach to the steady state, we study the temporal behavior of certain coarse-grained quantities in momentum space that fully determine the reduced density matrix for a subsystem with size much smaller than the total system. Such quantities provide a concise description for any drive protocol in integrable systems that are reducible to a free-fermion representation.

  9. Steady-State Squeezing in the Micromaser Cavity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayak, N.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the radiation field in the presently operated micromaser cavity may be squeezed when pumped with polarized atoms. The squeezing is in the steady state field corresponding to the action similar to that of the conventional micromaser, with the effect of cavity dissipation during entire t(sub c) = tau + t(sub cav).

  10. Effects of curvature on asymmetric steady states in catalyst particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lucier, B J

    1981-02-01

    The effects of curvature on steady states of chemical catalytic reactions are investigated by studying the cases of the catalytic particle being a spherical or cylindrical shell. Existence and stability of solutions are studied. It is shown that the solutions converge to the solutions for the catalytic slab when the curvature goes to 0 in each case.

  11. Equilibrium Binding and Steady-State Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, H. Brian

    1984-01-01

    Points out that equilibrium binding and steady-state enzyme kinetics have a great deal in common and that related equations and error analysis can be cast in identical forms. Emphasizes that if one type of problem solution is taught, the other is also taught. Various methods of data analysis are evaluated. (JM)

  12. Identification of enzyme inhibitory mechanisms from steady-state kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fange, David; Lovmar, Martin; Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-09-01

    Enzyme inhibitors are used in many areas of the life sciences, ranging from basic research to the combat of disease in the clinic. Inhibitors are traditionally characterized by how they affect the steady-state kinetics of enzymes, commonly analyzed on the assumption that enzyme-bound and free substrate molecules are in equilibrium. This assumption, implying that an enzyme-bound substrate molecule has near zero probability to form a product rather than dissociate, is valid only for very inefficient enzymes. When it is relaxed, more complex but also more information-rich steady-state kinetics emerges. Although solutions to the general steady-state kinetics problem exist, they are opaque and have been of limited help to experimentalists. Here we reformulate the steady-state kinetics of enzyme inhibition in terms of new parameters. These allow for assessment of ambiguities of interpretation due to kinetic scheme degeneracy and provide an intuitively simple way to analyze experimental data. We illustrate the method by concrete examples of how to assess scheme degeneracy and obtain experimental estimates of all available rate and equilibrium constants. We suggest simple, complementary experiments that can remove ambiguities and greatly enhance the accuracy of parameter estimation.

  13. Identifiability of steady-state chemical kinetic models

    SciTech Connect

    Shvetsova-Shilovskaya, T.N.; Gorskii, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The methodology for the local and global identifiability analysis of steady-state kinetic models of catalytic reactions is discussed. This methodology is based on the prior transformation of the model into the linear form so that the coefficients of the linear form are uniquely identifiable combinations of constants (observed parameters). Identifiability analysis is applied to several particular models.

  14. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  15. Pressure updating methods for the steady-state fluid equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiterman, A.; Turkel, E.; Vatsa, V.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the steady state equations for a compressible fluid. Since we wish to solve for a range of speeds we must consider the equations in conservation form. For transonic speeds these equations are of mixed type. Hence, the usual approach is to add time derivatives to the steady state equations and then march these equations in time. One then adds a time derivative of the density to the continuity equation, a derivative of the momentum to the momentum equation and a derivative of the total energy to the energy equation. This choice is dictated by the time consistent equations. However, since we are only interested in the steady state this is not necessary. Thus we shall consider the possibility of adding a time derivative of the pressure to the continuity equation and similar modifications for the energy equation. This can then be generalized to adding combinations of time derivatives to each equation since these vanish in the steady state. When using acceleration techniques such as residual smoothing, multigrid, etc. these are applied to the pressure rather than the density. Hence, the code duplicates the behavior of the incompressible equations for low speeds.

  16. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  17. CONTROL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY STEADY-STATE CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale experiments have been performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment to control Cryptosporidium oocysts under steady-state conditions. The work was performed with a pilot plant that was designed to minimize flow rates and, as a result, the number of oocyst...

  18. Steady-State Multiplicity Features of Chemically Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luss, Dan

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes steady-state multiplicity in chemical reactors, focusing on the use of two mathematical tools, namely, the catastrophe theory and the singularity theory with a distinguished parameter. These tools can be used to determine the maximum number of possible solutions and the different types of bifurcation diagrams. (JN)

  19. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  20. Acceleration to a steady state for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-stage Runge-Kutta method is analyzed for solving the Euler equations exterior to an airfoil. Highly subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows are evaluated. Various techniques for accelerating the convergence to a steady state are introduced and analyzed.

  1. CONTROL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY STEADY-STATE CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale experiments have been performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment to control Cryptosporidium oocysts under steady-state conditions. The work was performed with a pilot plant that was designed to minimize flow rates and, as a result, the number of oocyst...

  2. Steady-State Multiplicity Features of Chemically Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luss, Dan

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes steady-state multiplicity in chemical reactors, focusing on the use of two mathematical tools, namely, the catastrophe theory and the singularity theory with a distinguished parameter. These tools can be used to determine the maximum number of possible solutions and the different types of bifurcation diagrams. (JN)

  3. The concave river long profile: a morphodynamic steady state?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, A.

    2011-12-01

    By definition, a morphodynamic steady state is governed by a spatially constant sediment transport rate. As the sediment transport rate is a function of shear stress associated with skin friction, the morphodynamic steady state has been considered to be governed by a spatially constant bed slope. For this reason, the typical concave river long profile has been considered to be a quasi-steady state. The river's steady state has been considered to be one with a spatially constant bed slope, with tributaries inducing a stepwise decrease in bed slope in streamwise direction. Yet, for the sediment transport rate to be spatially constant, it rather is the product of water surface slope and water depth associated with skin friction that needs to be constant. This implies that physical mechanisms that induce streamwise variation in the sediment transport rate can be compensated by a streamwise variation in bed slope so as to guarantee a spatially constant sediment transport rate. Following the river course, such physical mechanisms can be bedrock exposure, partial transport, and a spatially lagging bedform growth. At locations where tributaries increase the water discharge, the above mechanisms cause the river bed profile to be upward concave over a significant reach. At bifucations or at locations where river widening prevails, the river bed profile is upward convex.

  4. Steady States of the Parametric Rotator and Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouzas, Antonio O.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss several steady-state rotation and oscillation modes of the planar parametric rotator and pendulum with damping. We consider a general elliptic trajectory of the suspension point for both rotator and pendulum, for the latter at an arbitrary angle with gravity, with linear and circular trajectories as particular cases. We treat the…

  5. Nonlinear elements in the EMTP: Steady-state initialization

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B.K.; Marti, J.R.; Dommel, H.W.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology is presented for the formulation and solution of networks containing a class of nonlinear elements within the framework of electromagnetic transient programs. The method facilitates steady-state initialization formulated in the time-domain as a two-point boundary value problem. The techniques developed are applied to a simple network exhibiting harmonics due to transformer saturation.

  6. Kinematic Cosmology & a new ``Steady State'' Model of Continued Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Mogens

    2006-03-01

    Only a new "steady state" model justifies the observations of fully mature galaxies at ever increasing distances. The basic idea behind the world model presented here, which is a synthesis of the cosmologies of Parmenides and Herakleitos, is that the invariant structure of the infinite contents of a universe in flux may be depicted as a finite hyperbolic pseudo-sphere.

  7. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  8. Auditory-visual integration modulates location-specific repetition suppression of auditory responses.

    PubMed

    Shrem, Talia; Murray, Micah M; Deouell, Leon Y

    2017-07-28

    Space is a dimension shared by different modalities, but at what stage spatial encoding is affected by multisensory processes is unclear. Early studies observed attenuation of N1/P2 auditory evoked responses following repetition of sounds from the same location. Here, we asked whether this effect is modulated by audiovisual interactions. In two experiments, using a repetition-suppression paradigm, we presented pairs of tones in free field, where the test stimulus was a tone presented at a fixed lateral location. Experiment 1 established a neural index of auditory spatial sensitivity, by comparing the degree of attenuation of the response to test stimuli when they were preceded by an adapter sound at the same location versus 30° or 60° away. We found that the degree of attenuation at the P2 latency was inversely related to the spatial distance between the test stimulus and the adapter stimulus. In Experiment 2, the adapter stimulus was a tone presented from the same location or a more medial location than the test stimulus. The adapter stimulus was accompanied by a simultaneous flash displayed orthogonally from one of the two locations. Sound-flash incongruence reduced accuracy in a same-different location discrimination task (i.e., the ventriloquism effect) and reduced the location-specific repetition-suppression at the P2 latency. Importantly, this multisensory effect included topographic modulations, indicative of changes in the relative contribution of underlying sources across conditions. Our findings suggest that the auditory response at the P2 latency is affected by spatially selective brain activity, which is affected crossmodally by visual information. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. Phase dependent and independent responses in auditory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depireux, Didier; Shechter, Barak

    2009-03-01

    Responses of auditory neurons are often characterized by their spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF). This linear measure has been shown to capture the overall trend of the response, but by its nature, it does not reflect any nonlinear processing. We have recently shown that neurons in primary auditory cortex (AI) of the awake ferret respond with non-trivial nonlinearities (not solely the result of rectifying or saturating nonlinearities). We developed new techniques to reveal additional phase independent (DC) and dependent (quadratic) tuning in the tuning of single neurons. One of the assumptions in the STRF model is that the mean firing rate (averaged over any single period of the stimulus) does not depend on the spectro-temporal modulations, but rather on the overall level of the stimulus. The phase-independent tuning to the spectro-temporal envelope is analogous to complex visual neural responses, in which responses to an auditory grating stimulus do not depend on its spatial phase. We show the existence of neurons tuned in 1) a phase-independent manner, 2) a linear manner and 3) a quadratic manner to the time-frequency content of the spectral envelope of sounds.

  10. Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Rotor With Auxiliary Support From a Clearance Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Feng, Li; Lawrence, Charles T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, clearance, support stiffness and damping is studied. Bifurcation diagrams are used as a tool to examine the dynamic behavior of this system as a function of the afore mentioned parameters. The harmonic balance method is also employed for synchronous response cases. The observed dynamical responses is discussed and some insights into the behavior of such systems are presented.

  11. Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Rotor With Auxiliary Support From a Clearance Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Feng, Li; Lawrence, Charles T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, clearance, support stiffness and damping is studied. Bifurcation diagrams are used as a tool to examine the dynamic behavior of this system as a function of the afore mentioned parameters. The harmonic balance method is also employed for synchronous response cases. The observed dynamical responses is discussed and some insights into the behavior of such systems are presented.

  12. Steady state growth of E. Coli in low ammonium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsu; Deris, Barret; Zhang, Zhongge; Hwa, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for many microorganisms. In medium with low ammonium concentrations, enteric bacteria turn on the nitrogen responsive (ntr) genes to assimilate ammonium. Two proteins in E. coli, Glutamine synthetase (GS) and the Ammonium/methylammonium transporter AmtB play crucial roles in this regard. GS is the major ammonium assimilation enzyme below 1mM of NH4 + . AmtB is an inner membrane protein that transports NH4 + across the cell membrane against a concentration gradient. In order to study ammonium uptake at low NH4 + concentration at neutral pH, we developed a microfluidic flow chamber that maintains a homogenous nutrient environment during the course of exponential cell growth, even at very low concentration of nutrients. Cell growth can be accurately monitored using time-lapse microscopy. We followed steady state growth down to micro-molar range of NH4 + for the wild type and Δ amtB strains. The wild type strain is able to maintain the growth rate from 10mM down to a few uM of NH4 + , while the mutant exhibited reduced growth below ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + . Simultaneous characterization of the expression levels of GS and AmtB using fluorescence reporters reveals that AmtB is turned on already at 1mM, but contributes to function only below ~ 30 ~uM in the wild-type. Down to ~ 20 ~uM of NH4 + , E.~coli can compensate the loss of AmtB by GS alone.

  13. Mode-locking neurodynamics predict human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals.

    PubMed

    Lerud, Karl D; Almonte, Felix V; Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    The auditory nervous system is highly nonlinear. Some nonlinear responses arise through active processes in the cochlea, while others may arise in neural populations of the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and higher auditory areas. In humans, auditory brainstem recordings reveal nonlinear population responses to combinations of pure tones, and to musical intervals composed of complex tones. Yet the biophysical origin of central auditory nonlinearities, their signal processing properties, and their relationship to auditory perception remain largely unknown. Both stimulus components and nonlinear resonances are well represented in auditory brainstem nuclei due to neural phase-locking. Recently mode-locking, a generalization of phase-locking that implies an intrinsically nonlinear processing of sound, has been observed in mammalian auditory brainstem nuclei. Here we show that a canonical model of mode-locked neural oscillation predicts the complex nonlinear population responses to musical intervals that have been observed in the human brainstem. The model makes predictions about auditory signal processing and perception that are different from traditional delay-based models, and may provide insight into the nature of auditory population responses. We anticipate that the application of dynamical systems analysis will provide the starting point for generic models of auditory population dynamics, and lead to a deeper understanding of nonlinear auditory signal processing possibly arising in excitatory-inhibitory networks of the central auditory nervous system. This approach has the potential to link neural dynamics with the perception of pitch, music, and speech, and lead to dynamical models of auditory system development.

  14. Emotion and the auditory brainstem response to speech

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jade Q.; Nicol, Trent; Skoe, Erika; Sams, Mikko; Kraus, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Effects of emotion have been reported as early as 20 ms after an auditory stimulus onset for negative valence, and bivalent effects between 30-130 ms. To understand how emotional state influences the listener’s brainstem evoked responses to speech, subjects looked at emotion-evoking pictures while listening to an unchanging auditory stimulus (“danny”). The pictures (Positive, Negative, or Neutral, valence) were selected from the IAPS database and controlled for dominance and arousal. Utilizing an array of measurements to assess subcortical modulation, we have found that emotion does not significantly affect the brainstem response although there is a subtle effect of background noise suppression in both emotional conditions. PMID:20018226

  15. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  16. Effects of sedation on auditory brainstem response in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pillion, Joseph P; Bibat, Genila; Naidu, Sakkubai

    2010-05-01

    Prolongation of the I-V interpeak latency intervals have been reported in Rett syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been suggested that the use of sedation may account for differences in the interpeak latency intervals when comparisons are made across diagnostic groups if sedated control groups are not used for the basis of comparison. This study examined the effects of sedation on auditory brainstem response interpeak latency intervals (i.e., I-III, III-V, and I-V) in two groups: (1) a group with Rett syndrome who were positive for mutations in the MECP2 gene and (2) a group negative for mutations in the MECP2 gene but who were severely to profoundly delayed with other causes of mental retardation. To further assess the effects of sedation, a third group of sedated and nonsedated female participants, taken from an in-house normative auditory brainstem response database was also included. An analysis of variance indicated (1) longer I-V interpeak latency intervals in the sedated participants with Rett syndrome; (2) longer III-V interpeak latency intervals in the mutation-positive participants as compared to non-Rett syndrome, mutation-negative participants; and (3) no significant effects of sedation on the I-III, III-V, or I-V interpeak latency intervals among the normative group participants, according to t tests. The findings suggest a possible biological basis for the discrepancy in the literature on auditory brain stem responses in Rett syndrome, and warrant cautious interpretation of auditory brainstem responses findings in sedated subjects with Rett syndrome, as well as in those with mental retardation and seizures.

  17. Auditory brain stem responses in the detection of brain death.

    PubMed

    Ozgirgin, O Nuri; Ozçelik, Tuncay; Sevimli, Nilay Kizilkaya

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated comatose patients by auditory brain stem responses (ABR) to determine the role of ABR in the diagnosis of impending brain death. Sixty comatose patients in the intensive care unit were evaluated by brain stem evoked response audiometry. Correlations were sought between the absence or presence of ABRs and the presenting pathology, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and ultimate diagnoses. The brain stem responses were totally absent in 41 patients. Presence of wave I could be obtained in only 10 patients. All the waveforms were found in nine patients; however, in eight patients the potentials disappeared as the GCS scores decreased to 3. Detection of wave I alone strongly suggested dysfunction of the brain stem. However, loss of wave I particularly in trauma patients aroused doubt as to whether the absence was associated with auditory end organ injury or brain stem dysfunction. The results suggest that evaluation of ABR may support brain death in a comatose patient (i) when wave I is present alone, (ii) the absence of wave I is accompanied by a documented auditory end organ injury, or (iii) when previously recorded potentials are no longer detectable.

  18. Effect of prenatal lignocaine on auditory brain stem evoked response.

    PubMed Central

    Bozynski, M E; Schumacher, R E; Deschner, L S; Kileny, P

    1989-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that there would be a positive correlation between the interpeak wave (I-V) interval as measured by auditory brain stem evoked response and the ratio of umbilical cord blood arterial to venous lignocaine concentrations in infants born after maternal epidural anaesthesia, 10 normal infants born at full term by elective caesarean section were studied. Umbilical cord arterial and venous plasma samples were assayed for lignocaine, and auditory brain stem evoked responses were elicited at 35 and 70 dB at less than 4 (test 1) and greater than or equal to 48 hours (test 2). Mean wave I-V intervals were prolonged in test 1 when compared with test 2. Linear regression showed the arterial:venous ratio accounted for 66% (left ear) and 43% (right ear) of the variance in test 1 intervals. No association was found in test 2. In newborn infants, changes in serial auditory brain stem evoked response tests occur after maternal lignocaine epidural anaesthesia and these changes correlate with blood lignocaine concentrations. PMID:2774635

  19. GABAergic inhibition shapes SAM responses in rat auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Cai, R; Caspary, D M

    2015-07-23

    Auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body [MGB]) receives ascending inhibitory GABAergic inputs from inferior colliculus (IC) and descending GABAergic projections from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) with both inputs postulated to play a role in shaping temporal responses. Previous studies suggested that enhanced processing of temporally rich stimuli occurs at the level of MGB, with our recent study demonstrating enhanced GABA sensitivity in MGB compared to IC. The present study used sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) stimuli to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), to examine the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping the response properties of MGB single units in anesthetized rats. Rate MTFs (rMTFs) were parsed into "bandpass (BP)", "mixed (Mixed)", "highpass (HP)" or "atypical" response types, with most units showing the Mixed response type. GABAA receptor blockade with iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist gabazine (GBZ) selectively altered the response properties of most MGB neurons examined. Mixed and HP units showed significant GABAAR-mediated SAM-evoked rate response changes at higher modulation frequencies (fms), which were also altered by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor blockade (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). BP units, and the lower arm of Mixed units responded to GABAAR blockade with increased responses to SAM stimuli at or near the rate best modulation frequency (rBMF). The ability of GABA circuits to shape responses at higher modulation frequencies is an emergent property of MGB units, not observed at lower levels of the auditory pathway and may reflect activation of MGB NMDA receptors (Rabang and Bartlett, 2011; Rabang et al., 2012). Together, GABAARs exert selective rate control over selected fms, generally without changing the units' response type. These results showed that coding of modulated stimuli at the level of auditory thalamus is at least, in part, strongly controlled by GABA

  20. Nonlinear Processing of Auditory Brainstem Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    presentation of lower and lower acoustic signals to the patient the fluctuations and deformations of the ABR signals resulting from presence of...shifts and deforms with the decreasing intensity of the acoustic signal stimulating the response, and finally vanishes in random fluctuation of the ABR...revealing the signal’s features essential for its recognition at the same time eliminating random deformations . In the neural network the form of

  1. Exploration of trade-offs between steady-state and dynamic properties in signaling cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radivojevic, A.; Chachuat, B.; Bonvin, D.; Hatzimanikatis, V.

    2012-08-01

    In the intracellular signaling networks that regulate important cell processes, the base pattern comprises the cycle of reversible phosphorylation of a protein, catalyzed by kinases and opposing phosphatases. Mathematical modeling and analysis have been used for gaining a better understanding of their functions and to capture the rules governing system behavior. Since biochemical parameters in signaling pathways are not easily accessible experimentally, it is necessary to explore possibilities for both steady-state and dynamic responses in these systems. While a number of studies have focused on analyzing these properties separately, it is necessary to take into account both of these responses simultaneously in order to be able to interpret a broader range of phenotypes. This paper investigates the trade-offs between optimal characteristics of both steady-state and dynamic responses. Following an inverse sensitivity analysis approach, we use systematic optimization methods to find the biochemical and biophysical parameters that simultaneously achieve optimal steady-state and dynamic performance. Remarkably, we find that even a single covalent modification cycle can simultaneously and robustly achieve high ultrasensitivity, high amplification and rapid signal transduction. We also find that the response rise and decay times can be modulated independently by varying the activating- and deactivating-enzyme-to-interconvertible-protein ratios.

  2. Auditory screening of special care neonates using the auditory response cradle.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, B; Curnock, D A; Spavins, F

    1984-01-01

    The Linco-Bennett auditory response cradle is a microprocessor controlled device for screening the hearing of neonates. A total of 396 neonates admitted to a special care unit were tested on the cradle and later followed up in a comprehensive test programme between the ages of 3 months and 8 months. Altogether 374 (94%) were available for follow up. The use of the cradle resulted in the detection of six neonates with appreciable deafness. One neonate who passed the cradle test has severe bilateral hearing impairment. The false alarm rate for neonates failing two tests on the cradle but having normal hearing at follow up was 4.3%. The auditory response cradle was designed for use in mass screening programmes but testing the hearing of all newborns would require many staff. It is argued that this is unrealistic when resources are scarce, but that neonates in high risk groups should have their hearing screened at birth by an objective test such as this. The cradle has considerable potential but its method of use and the 'decision making' programme could be improved. PMID:6524947

  3. Suppression of the P(b) (P(1)) component of the auditory middle latency response with contralateral masking.

    PubMed

    Ozdamar, Ozcan; Bohórquez, Jorge

    2008-08-01

    In this study, the effects of contralateral noise or speech on middle latency response (MLR) components P(a) and P(b) (P(1) or P50) were studied using high rates clicks in normal hearing awake adult subjects. One standard (4.88 Hz) and four jittered click sequences (24.4, 39.1, 58.6, 78.1 Hz) at different mean rates were monaurally presented to ten subjects. The contralateral ears were stimulated with continuous pink noise, recorded speech or no stimulus for control. Overlapping MLR responses to jittered click stimuli were deconvolved using the frequency domain continuous loop averaging deconvolution (CLAD). The recordings show that contralateral noise or speech stimulation suppresses P(b) component greatly at rates around 40 Hz while earlier components (ABR and P(a)) are not significantly affected. The suppression of the P(b) component is about 50% with some latency reduction. The results show that the P(b) component of the MLR is significantly affected by contralateral stimulus at resonance rates at around 40 Hz. It appears that the contralateral noise obliterates the amplitude enlargement due to resonance effect. These findings show that the P(b) is generated very differently from the P(a) component and strongly inhibited by the contralateral ear. These results also explain the previously observed masking of the 40 Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) with contralateral noise.

  4. Steady state volcanism: Evidence from eruption histories of polygenetic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Wadge, G.

    1982-05-10

    Some volcanoes erupt magma at average rates which are constant over periods of many years, even through this magma may appear in a complex series of eruptions. This constancy of output is tested by construction of a curve of cumulative volume of erupted magma, which is linear for steady state volcanism, and whose gradient defines the steady state rate Q/sub s/s. The assumption is made that Q/sub s/s is the rate at which magma is supplied to these polygenetic volcanoes. Five general types of eruptive behavior can be distinguished from the cumulative volume studied. These types are interpreted in terms of a simple model of batches of magma rising buoyantly through the crust and interacting with a small-capacity subvolcanic magma reservoir. Recognition of previous steady state behavior at a volcano may enable the cumulative volume curve to be used empirically as a constraint on the timing and volume of the next eruption. The steady state model thus has a limited predictive capability. With the exception of Kilauea (O/sub s/s = 4m/sup 3/ s/sup -1/) all the identified steady state volcanoes have values of Q/sub s/s of a few tenths of one cubic meter per second. These rates are consistent with the minimum flux rates required by theoretical cooling models of batches of magma traversing the crust. The similarity of these Q/sub s/s values of volcanoes (producing basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas) in very different tectonic settings suggests that the common factors of crustal buoyancy forces and the geotherm-controlled cooling rates control the dynamics of magma supply through the crust. Long-term dormancy at active volcanoes may be a manifestation of the steady accumulation of magma in large crustal reservoirs, a process that complements the intermittent periods of steady state output at the surface. This possibility has several implications, the most important of which is that it provides a constraint on the supply rate of new magma to the bases of plutons.

  5. Simulations of KSTAR high performance steady state operation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yong-Su; Kessel, C. E.; Park, J. M.; Yi, Sumin; Becoulet, A.; Sips, A. C. C.; Kim, J. Y.

    2009-11-01

    We report the results of predictive modelling of high performance steady state operation scenarios in KSTAR. Firstly, the capabilities of steady state operation are investigated with time-dependent simulations using a free-boundary plasma equilibrium evolution code coupled with transport calculations. Secondly, the reproducibility of high performance steady state operation scenarios developed in the DIII-D tokamak, of similar size to that of KSTAR, is investigated using the experimental data taken from DIII-D. Finally, the capability of ITER-relevant steady state operation is investigated in KSTAR. It is found that KSTAR is able to establish high performance steady state operation scenarios; βN above 3, H98(y, 2) up to 2.0, fBS up to 0.76 and fNI equals 1.0. In this work, a realistic density profile is newly introduced for predictive simulations by employing the scaling law of a density peaking factor. The influence of the current ramp-up scenario and the transport model is discussed with respect to the fusion performance and non-inductive current drive fraction in the transport simulations. As observed in the experiments, both the heating and the plasma current waveforms in the current ramp-up phase produce a strong effect on the q-profile, the fusion performance and also on the non-inductive current drive fraction in the current flattop phase. A criterion in terms of qmin is found to establish ITER-relevant steady state operation scenarios. This will provide a guideline for designing the current ramp-up phase in KSTAR. It is observed that the transport model also affects the predictive values of fusion performance as well as the non-inductive current drive fraction. The Weiland transport model predicts the highest fusion performance as well as non-inductive current drive fraction in KSTAR. In contrast, the GLF23 model exhibits the lowest ones. ITER-relevant advanced scenarios cannot be obtained with the GLF23 model in the conditions given in this work. Finally

  6. Simulations of KSTAR high performance steady state operation scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Y S; Kessel, C. E.; Park, Jin Myung; Yi, Sumin; Becoulet, A.; Sips, A C C; Kim, J Y

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of predictive modelling of high performance steady state operation scenarios in KSTAR. Firstly, the capabilities of steady state operation are investigated with time-dependent simulations using a free-boundary plasma equilibrium evolution code coupled with transport calculations. Secondly, the reproducibility of high performance steady state operation scenarios developed in the DIII-D tokamak, of similar size to that of KSTAR, is investigated using the experimental data taken from DIII-D. Finally, the capability of ITER-relevant steady state operation is investigated in KSTAR. It is found that KSTAR is able to establish high performance steady state operation scenarios; beta(N) above 3, H-98(y, 2) up to 2.0, f(BS) up to 0.76 and f(NI) equals 1.0. In this work, a realistic density profile is newly introduced for predictive simulations by employing the scaling law of a density peaking factor. The influence of the current ramp-up scenario and the transport model is discussed with respect to the fusion performance and non-inductive current drive fraction in the transport simulations. As observed in the experiments, both the heating and the plasma current waveforms in the current ramp-up phase produce a strong effect on the q-profile, the fusion performance and also on the non-inductive current drive fraction in the current flattop phase. A criterion in terms of q(min) is found to establish ITER-relevant steady state operation scenarios. This will provide a guideline for designing the current ramp-up phase in KSTAR. It is observed that the transport model also affects the predictive values of fusion performance as well as the non-inductive current drive fraction. The Weiland transport model predicts the highest fusion performance as well as non-inductive current drive fraction in KSTAR. In contrast, the GLF23 model exhibits the lowest ones. ITER-relevant advanced scenarios cannot be obtained with the GLF23 model in the conditions given in this work

  7. Chirality, causality, and fluctuation-dissipation theorems in nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenjie; Feldman, D E

    2013-01-18

    Edges of some quantum Hall liquids and a number of other systems exhibit chiral transport: excitations can propagate in one direction only, e.g., clockwise. We derive a family of fluctuation-dissipation relations in nonequilibrium steady states of such chiral systems. The theorems connect nonlinear response with fluctuations far from thermal equilibrium and hold only in case of chiral transport. They can be used to test the chiral or nonchiral character of the system.

  8. Steady-state evoked potentials to study the processing of tactile and nociceptive somatosensory input in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Colon, E; Legrain, V; Mouraux, A

    2012-10-01

    The periodic presentation of a sensory stimulus induces, at certain frequencies of stimulation, a sustained electroencephalographic response of corresponding frequency, known as steady-state evoked potentials (SS-EP). In visual, auditory and vibrotactile modalities, studies have shown that SS-EP reflect mainly activity originating from early, modality-specific sensory cortices. Furthermore, it has been shown that SS-EP have several advantages over the recording of transient event-related brain potentials (ERP), such as a high signal-to-noise ratio, a shorter time to obtain reliable signals, and the capacity to frequency-tag the cortical activity elicited by concurrently presented sensory stimuli. Recently, we showed that SS-EP can be elicited by the selective activation of skin nociceptors and that nociceptive SS-EP reflect the activity of a population of neurons that is spatially distinct from the somatotopically-organized population of neurons underlying vibrotactile SS-EP. Hence, the recording of SS-EP offers a unique opportunity to study the cortical representation of nociception and touch in humans, and to explore their potential crossmodal interactions. Here, (1) we review available methods to achieve the rapid periodic stimulation of somatosensory afferents required to elicit SS-EP, (2) review previous studies that have characterized vibrotactile and nociceptive SS-EP, (3) discuss the nature of the recorded signals and their relationship with transient event-related potentials and (4) outline future perspectives and potential clinical applications of this technique.

  9. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of auditory function in the dog.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, Peter M; Clark, John Greer

    2012-11-01

    Given the high incidence of deafness within several breeds of dogs, accurate hearing screening and assessment is essential. In addition to brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) testing, 2 other electrophysiologic tests are now being examined as audiologic tools for use in veterinary medicine: otoacoustic emissions and the auditory steady state response (ASSR). To improve BAER testing of animals and ensure an accurate interpretation of test findings from one test site to another, the establishment of and adherence to clear protocols is essential. The ASSR holds promise as an objective test for rapid testing of multiple frequencies in both ears simultaneously.

  10. Viscoelastic shear wave at thermal steady state in gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sheng-Yi; Ho, Chien-Wa; Hsieh, Tong-Sheng; Yu, Li-Ping; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    Viscoelastic shear waves (VESW) propagation in soft matters such as gelatin under thermal steady state was studied. VESW in a slab of gelatin causes the transverse displacement of the surface in a harmonic wave. The harmonic oscillation frequency of the transverse displacement of gelatin surface was then measured in real time in order to measure the modulus of rigidity of gelatin in terms of the measured oscillation frequency. A polarized heterodyne interferometer (PHI) was setup in this experiment which enables to precisely measure the transverse displacement of surface in real time at 0.3 nm resolution. This results in the proposed VESW method able to characterize gelatin soft material in real time. From the experimental demonstration, the properties of VESW propagation in soft material at thermal steady state potentially can become a novel nano-scale non-intrusion strain-stress sensor able to characterize the modulus rigidity of soft material.

  11. Task-specific stability of multifinger steady-state action.

    PubMed

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The authors explored task-specific stability during accurate multifinger force production tasks with different numbers of instructed fingers. Subjects performed steady-state isometric force production tasks and were instructed not to interfere voluntarily with transient lifting-and-lowering perturbations applied to the index finger. The main results were (a) intertrial variance in the space of finger modes at steady states was larger within the subspace that had no effect on the total force (the uncontrolled manifold [UCM]); (b) perturbations caused large deviations of finger modes within the UCM (motor equivalence); and (c) deviations caused by the perturbation showed larger variance within the UCM. No significant effects of the number of task fingers were noted in any of the 3 indicators. The results are discussed within the frameworks of the UCM and referent configuration hypotheses. The authors conclude, in particular, that all the tasks were effectively 4-finger tasks with different involvement of task and nontask fingers.

  12. Multiplying steady-state culture in multi-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Erm, Sten; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-11-01

    Cultivation of microorganisms in batch experiments is fast and economical but the conditions therein change constantly, rendering quantitative data interpretation difficult. By using chemostat with controlled environmental conditions the physiological state of microorganisms is fixed; however, the unavoidable stabilization phase makes continuous methods resource consuming. Material can be spared by using micro scale devices, which however have limited analysis and process control capabilities. Described herein are a method and a system combining the high throughput of batch with the controlled environment of continuous cultivations. Microorganisms were prepared in one bioreactor followed by culture distribution into a network of bioreactors and continuation of independent steady state experiments therein. Accelerostat cultivation with statistical analysis of growth parameters demonstrated non-compromised physiological state following distribution, thus the method effectively multiplied steady state culture of microorganisms. The theoretical efficiency of the system was evaluated in inhibitory compound analysis using repeated chemostat to chemostat transfers.

  13. Extending Molecular Theory to Steady-State Diffusing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    FRINK,LAURA J. D.; SALINGER,ANDREW G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.

    1999-10-22

    Predicting the properties of nonequilibrium systems from molecular simulations is a growing area of interest. One important class of problems involves steady state diffusion. To study these cases, a grand canonical molecular dynamics approach has been developed by Heffelfinger and van Swol [J. Chem. Phys., 101, 5274 (1994)]. With this method, the flux of particles, the chemical potential gradients, and density gradients can all be measured in the simulation. In this paper, we present a complementary approach that couples a nonlocal density functional theory (DFT) with a transport equation describing steady-state flux of the particles. We compare transport-DFT predictions to GCMD results for a variety of ideal (color diffusion), and nonideal (uphill diffusion and convective transport) systems. In all cases excellent agreement between transport-DFT and GCMD calculations is obtained with diffusion coefficients that are invariant with respect to density and external fields.

  14. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  15. A non-inductively driven steady state tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Devoto, R.S.; Bulmer, R.H.; Lee, J.D.; Miller, J.R.; Schultz, J.

    1988-09-20

    The physics and engineering guidelines for the ITER device are shown to lead to viable and attractive operating points for a steady state tokamak power reactor. Non-inductive current drive is provided in steady state by high energy neutral beam injection in the plasma core, lower hybrid slow waves in the outer regions of the plasma and bootstrap current. Plasma gain Q (/equivalent to/fusion power/input power) in excess of 20 and average neutron wall loading, approx. 2.0 MW/m/sup 2/ are predicted in a device with major radius, R/sub 0/ = 7.5 m and minor radius, a = 2.8 m. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Optimal Control of Transitions between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    PubMed Central

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; Sivak, David A.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems fundamentally exist out of equilibrium in order to preserve organized structures and processes. Many changing cellular conditions can be represented as transitions between nonequilibrium steady states, and organisms have an interest in optimizing such transitions. Using the Hatano-Sasa Y-value, we extend a recently developed geometrical framework for determining optimal protocols so that it can be applied to systems driven from nonequilibrium steady states. We calculate and numerically verify optimal protocols for a colloidal particle dragged through solution by a translating optical trap with two controllable parameters. We offer experimental predictions, specifically that optimal protocols are significantly less costly than naive ones. Optimal protocols similar to these may ultimately point to design principles for biological energy transduction systems and guide the design of artificial molecular machines. PMID:24386112

  17. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  18. Speaker normalization using cortical strip maps: a neural model for steady-state vowel categorization.

    PubMed

    Ames, Heather; Grossberg, Stephen

    2008-12-01

    Auditory signals of speech are speaker dependent, but representations of language meaning are speaker independent. The transformation from speaker-dependent to speaker-independent language representations enables speech to be learned and understood from different speakers. A neural model is presented that performs speaker normalization to generate a pitch-independent representation of speech sounds, while also preserving information about speaker identity. This speaker-invariant representation is categorized into unitized speech items, which input to sequential working memories whose distributed patterns can be categorized, or chunked, into syllable and word representations. The proposed model fits into an emerging model of auditory streaming and speech categorization. The auditory streaming and speaker normalization parts of the model both use multiple strip representations and asymmetric competitive circuits, thereby suggesting that these two circuits arose from similar neural designs. The normalized speech items are rapidly categorized and stably remembered by adaptive resonance theory circuits. Simulations use synthesized steady-state vowels from the Peterson and Barney [Peterson, G. E., and Barney, H.L., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 24, 175-184 (1952).] vowel database and achieve accuracy rates similar to those achieved by human listeners. These results are compared to behavioral data and other speaker normalization models.

  19. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  20. Multiple steady states for characteristic initial value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.; Abarbanel, S.; Gottlieb, D.

    1984-01-01

    The time dependent, isentropic, quasi-one-dimensional equations of gas dynamics and other model equations are considered under the constraint of characteristic boundary conditions. Analysis of the time evolution shows how different initial data may lead to different steady states and how seemingly anamolous behavior of the solution may be resolved. Numerical experimentation using time consistent explicit algorithms verifies the conclusions of the analysis. The use of implicit schemes with very large time steps leads to erroneous results.

  1. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  2. A correspondence principle for steady-state wave problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmerr, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    A correspondence principle was developed for treating the steady state propagation of waves from sources moving along a plane surface or interface. This new principle allows one to obtain, in a unified manner, explicit solutions for any source velocity. To illustrate the correspondence principle in a particular case, the problem of a load moving at an arbitrary constant velocity along the surface of an elastic half-space is considered.

  3. Analytic Steady-State Accuracy of a Spacecraft Attitude Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2000-01-01

    This paper extends Farrenkopf's analysis of a single-axis spacecraft attitude estimator using gyro and angle sensor data to include the angle output white noise of a rate-integrating gyro. Analytic expressions are derived for the steady-state pre-update and post-update angle and drift bias variances and for the state update equations. It is shown that only part of the state update resulting from the angle sensor measurement is propagated to future times.

  4. The approach to steady state using homogeneous and Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Gochberg, D F; Ding, Z

    2013-01-01

    Repeating an arbitrary sequence of RF pulses and magnetic field gradients will eventually lead to a steady-state condition in any magnetic resonance system. While numerical methods can quantify this trajectory, analytic analysis provides significantly more insight and a means for faster calculation. Recently, an analytic analysis using homogeneous coordinates was published. The current work further develops this line of thought and compares the relative merits of using a homogeneous or a Cartesian coordinate system.

  5. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions.

    PubMed

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-14

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  6. Steady state magnetic field configurations for the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hau, L.-N.; Wolf, R. A.; Voigt, G.-H.; Wu, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional, force-balance magnetic field model is presented. The theoretical existence of a steady state magnetic field configuration that is force-balanced and consistent with slow, lossless, adiabatic, earthward convection within the limit of the ideal MHD is demonstrated. A numerical solution is obtained for a two-dimensional magnetosphere with a rectangular magnetopause and nonflaring tail. The results are consistent with the convection time sequences reported by Erickson (1985).

  7. MUTATION RATES OF BACTERIA IN STEADY STATE POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Maurice S.

    1955-01-01

    The breeder and the chemostat have been used to measure mutation rates for two mutations under a variety of steady state growth conditions. These rates have been found to be higher in complex medium than in minimal (F) medium. The effects of changes in nutritional conditions on these high rates have been described. In addition, the mutation rates at short generation times, in complex medium, have been shown to decrease with increasing generation time. PMID:13271726

  8. Harmonic coupling of steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Krusienski, Dean J; Allison, Brendan Z

    2008-01-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) are oscillating components of the electroencephalogram (EEG) that are detected over the occipital areas, having frequencies corresponding to visual stimulus frequencies. SSVEPs have been demonstrated to be reliable control signals for operating a brain-computer interface (BCI). This study uses offline analyses to investigate the characteristics of SSVEP harmonic amplitude and phase coupling and the impact of using this information to construct a matched filter for continuously tracking the signal.

  9. Auditory ERP response to successive stimuli in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Varghese; Burnham, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Auditory Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) are useful for understanding early auditory development among infants, as it allows the collection of a relatively large amount of data in a short time. So far, studies that have investigated development in auditory ERPs in infancy have mainly used single sounds as stimuli. Yet in real life, infants must decode successive rather than single acoustic events. In the present study, we tested 4-, 8-, and 12-month-old infants’ auditory ERPs to musical melodies comprising three piano notes, and examined ERPs to each individual note in the melody. Methods. Infants were presented with 360 repetitions of a three-note melody while EEG was recorded from 128 channels on the scalp through a Geodesic Sensor Net. For each infant, both latency and amplitude of auditory components P1 and N2 were measured from averaged ERPs for each individual note. Results. Analysis was restricted to response collected at frontal central site. For all three notes, there was an overall reduction in latency for both P1 and N2 over age. For P1, latency reduction was significant from 4 to 8 months, but not from 8 to 12 months. N2 latency, on the other hand, decreased significantly from 4 to 8 to 12 months. With regard to amplitude, no significant change was found for either P1 or N2. Nevertheless, the waveforms of the three age groups were qualitatively different: for the 4-month-olds, the P1–N2 deflection was attenuated for the second and the third notes; for the 8-month-olds, such attenuation was observed only for the middle note; for the 12-month-olds, the P1 and N2 peaks show relatively equivalent amplitude and peak width across all three notes. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that the infant brain is able to register successive acoustic events in a stream, and ERPs become better time-locked to each composite event over age. Younger infants may have difficulties in responding to late occurring events in a stream, and the onset response to

  10. Non-steady-state operation of polymer/TiO2 photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, Kiril R.; Burlakov, Victor M.; Xie, Zhibin; Henry, Bernard M.; Carey, Michelle J.; Grovenor, Christopher R. M.; Burn, Paul L.; Assender, Hazel E.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    We present data on the initial period of operation of Gilch-route MEH-PPV/TiO2 composite solar cells (CSCs) which show that during this period the CSCs operate in a non-steady state regime. The behavior is complex and may include a gradual rise of the open circuit voltage (Voc) and of the short-circuit current density (Jsc) with time, a passage through a maximum of either or both parameters, and even a sign reversal. The mechanisms most probably contributing to the transient processes are: i) diffusion driven redistribution of charges resulting in the build up of a quasi steady state charge density profile across the device; ii) photo-doping resulting in a relatively slow increase of the average charge carrier concentration and consequently of the conductivity of the device. The latter is responsible for a strong decrease in Voc, and is evidenced by the significant increase in dark current after device illumination.

  11. A periodogram-based method for the detection of steady-state visually evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Liavas, A P; Moustakides, G V; Henning, G; Psarakis, E Z; Husar, P

    1998-02-01

    The task of objective perimetry is to scan the visual field and find an answer about the function of the visual system. Flicker-burst stimulation--a physiological sensible combination of transient and steady-state stimulation--is used to generate deterministic sinusoidal responses or visually evoked potentials (VEP's) at the visual cortex, which are derived from the electroencephalogram by a suitable electrode array. In this paper we develop a new method for the detection of VEP's. Based on the periodogram of a time-series, we test the data for the presence of hidden periodic components, which correspond to steady-state VEP's. The method is applied successfully to real data.

  12. Addressable nanoelectrode membrane arrays: fabrication and steady-state behavior.

    PubMed

    Zoski, Cynthia G; Yang, Nianjun; He, Peixin; Berdondini, Luca; Koudelka-Hep, Milena

    2007-02-15

    An addressable nanoelectrode membrane array (ANEMA) based on a Au-filled track-etched polycarbonate membrane was fabricated. The Au-filled membrane was secured to a lithographically fabricated addressable ultramicroelectrode (UME) array patterned with 25 regularly spaced (100 microm center to center spacing), 10 microm diameter recessed Pt UMEs to create 25 microregions of 10 microm diameter nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) on the membrane. The steady-state voltammetric behavior of 1.0 mM Ru(NH(3))(6)Cl(3) and 1.0 mM ferrocene methanol in 0.1 M KCl on each of the micro NEEs resulted in sigmoidal-shaped voltammograms which were reproducible across the ANEMA. This reproducibility of the steady-state current was attributed to the overlapping hemispherical diffusion layers at the Au-filled nanopores of each 10 microm diameter NEE of a ANEMA. The track-etched polycarbonate membranes were filled using a gold electroless deposition procedure into the 30 nm diameter pores in the membrane. Electrical connection between the Au-filled template array and the lithographic UME platform array was achieved by potentiostatic electrodeposition of Cu from an acidic copper solution into each of the 25 recessed Pt UMEs on the UME array platform. A multiplexer unit capable of addressing 64 individual micro NEEs on an ANEMA is described. ANEMAs have advantages of high reproducibility, facile fabrication, multitime reuse of lithographically fabricated UME arrays, and purely steady-state behavior.

  13. A steady-state theory for processive cellulases.

    PubMed

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Elmerdahl, Jens; Praestgaard, Eigil; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Processive enzymes perform sequential steps of catalysis without dissociating from their polymeric substrate. This mechanism is considered essential for efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose (particularly crystalline cellulose), but a theoretical framework for processive kinetics remains to be fully developed. In this paper, we suggest a deterministic kinetic model that relies on a processive set of enzyme reactions and a quasi steady-state assumption. It is shown that this approach is practicable in the sense that it leads to mathematically simple expressions for the steady-state rate, and only requires data from standard assay techniques as experimental input. Specifically, it is shown that the processive reaction rate at steady state may be expressed by a hyperbolic function related to the conventional Michaelis-Menten equation. The main difference is a 'kinetic processivity coefficient', which represents the probability of the enzyme dissociating from the substrate strand before completing n sequential catalytic steps, where n is the mean processivity number measured experimentally. Typical processive cellulases have high substrate affinity, and therefore this probability is low. This has significant kinetic implications, for example the maximal specific rate (V(max)/E₀) for processive cellulases is much lower than the catalytic rate constant (k(cat)). We discuss how relationships based on this theory may be used in both comparative and mechanistic analyses of cellulases. © 2013 FEBS.

  14. Nonequilibrium Steady State Thermodynamics and Fluctuations for Stochastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tooru; Cohen, E. G. D.

    2008-02-01

    We use the work done on and the heat removed from a system to maintain it in a nonequilibrium steady state for a thermodynamic-like description of such a system as well as of its fluctuations. Based on an extended Onsager-Machlup theory for nonequilibrium steady states we indicate two ambiguities, not present in an equilibrium state, in defining such work and heat: one due to a non-uniqueness of time-reversal procedures and another due to multiple possibilities to separate heat into work and an energy difference in nonequilibrium steady states. As a consequence, for such systems, the work and heat satisfy multiple versions of the first and second laws of thermodynamics as well as of their fluctuation theorems. Unique laws and relations appear only to be obtainable for concretely defined systems, using physical arguments to choose the relevant physical quantities. This is illustrated on a number of systems, including a Brownian particle in an electric field, a driven torsion pendulum, electric circuits and an energy transfer driven by a temperature difference.

  15. Numerical computation of steady-state acoustic disturbances in flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Myers, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    Two time domain methods for computing two dimensional steady-state acoustic disturbances propagating through internal subsonic viscous flow fields in the presence of variable area are investigated. The first method solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the combined steady and acoustic field together and subtracts the steady flow to obtain the acoustic field. The second method solves a system of perturbation equations to obtain the acoustic disturbances, making use of a separate steady flow computation as input to the system. In each case the periodic steady-state acoustic fluctuations are obtained numerically on a supercomputer using a second order unsplit explicit MacCormack predictor-corrector method. Results show that the first method is not very effective for computing acoustic disturbances of even moderate amplitude. It appears that more accurate steady flow algorithms are required for this method to succeed. On the other hand, linear and nonlinear acoustic disturbances extracted from the perturbation approach are shown to exhibit expected behavior for the problems considered. It is also found that inflow boundary conditions for an equivalent uniform duct can be successfully applied to a nonuniform duct to obtain steady-state acoustic disturbances.

  16. Steady states of continuous-time open quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaobin; Balu, Radhakrishnan

    2017-07-01

    Continuous-time open quantum walks (CTOQW) are introduced as the formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups of trace-preserving and completely positive linear maps (or quantum Markov semigroups) on graphs. We show that a CTOQW always converges to a steady state regardless of the initial state when a graph is connected. When the graph is both connected and regular, it is shown that the steady state is the maximally mixed state. As shown by the examples in this article, the steady states of CTOQW can be very unusual and complicated even though the underlying graphs are simple. The examples demonstrate that the structure of a graph can affect quantum coherence in CTOQW through a long-time run. Precisely, the quantum coherence persists throughout the evolution of the CTOQW when the underlying topology is certain irregular graphs (such as a path or a star as shown in the examples). In contrast, the quantum coherence will eventually vanish from the open quantum system when the underlying topology is a regular graph (such as a cycle).

  17. STEADY-STATE MODEL OF SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.

    2015-10-20

    In a recent paper, Kim et al. put forth a steady-state model for the solar wind electrons. The model assumed local equilibrium between the halo electrons, characterized by an intermediate energy range, and the whistler-range fluctuations. The basic wave–particle interaction is assumed to be the cyclotron resonance. Similarly, it was assumed that a dynamical steady state is established between the highly energetic superhalo electrons and high-frequency Langmuir fluctuations. Comparisons with the measured solar wind electron velocity distribution function (VDF) during quiet times were also made, and reasonable agreements were obtained. In such a model, however, only the steady-state solution for the Fokker–Planck type of electron particle kinetic equation was considered. The present paper complements the previous analysis by considering both the steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations. It is shown that the model halo and superhalo electron VDFs, as well as the assumed wave intensity spectra for the whistler and Langmuir fluctuations, approximately satisfy the quasi-linear wave kinetic equations in an approximate sense, thus further validating the local equilibrium model constructed in the paper by Kim et al.

  18. Cavitation modeling for steady-state CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanimann, L.; Mangani, L.; Casartelli, E.; Widmer, M.

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic turbomachines is an important phenomenon to be considered for performance predictions. Correct analysis of the cavitation onset and its effect on the flow field while diminishing the pressure level need therefore to be investigated. Even if cavitation often appears as an unsteady phenomenon, the capability to compute it in a steady state formulation for the design and assessment phase in the product development process is very useful for the engineer. In the present paper the development and corresponding application of a steady state CFD solver is presented, based on the open source toolbox OpenFOAM®. In the first part a review of different cavitation models is presented. Adopting the mixture-type cavitation approach, various models are investigated and developed in a steady state CFD RANS solver. Particular attention is given to the coupling between cavitation and turbulence models as well as on the underlying numerical procedure, especially the integration in the pressure- correction step of pressure-based solvers, which plays an important role in the stability of the procedure. The performance of the proposed model is initially assessed on simple cases available in the open literature. In a second step results for different applications are presented, ranging from airfoils to pumps.

  19. Basin stability measure of different steady states in coupled oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Rakshit, Sarbendu; Bera, Bidesh K.; Majhi, Soumen; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we investigate the stabilization of saddle fixed points in coupled oscillators where individual oscillators exhibit the saddle fixed points. The coupled oscillators may have two structurally different types of suppressed states, namely amplitude death and oscillation death. The stabilization of saddle equilibrium point refers to the amplitude death state where oscillations are ceased and all the oscillators converge to the single stable steady state via inverse pitchfork bifurcation. Due to multistability features of oscillation death states, linear stability theory fails to analyze the stability of such states analytically, so we quantify all the states by basin stability measurement which is an universal nonlocal nonlinear concept and it interplays with the volume of basins of attractions. We also observe multi-clustered oscillation death states in a random network and measure them using basin stability framework. To explore such phenomena we choose a network of coupled Duffing-Holmes and Lorenz oscillators which are interacting through mean-field coupling. We investigate how basin stability for different steady states depends on mean-field density and coupling strength. We also analytically derive stability conditions for different steady states and confirm by rigorous bifurcation analysis. PMID:28378760

  20. Basin stability measure of different steady states in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Sarbendu; Bera, Bidesh K; Majhi, Soumen; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-04-05

    In this report, we investigate the stabilization of saddle fixed points in coupled oscillators where individual oscillators exhibit the saddle fixed points. The coupled oscillators may have two structurally different types of suppressed states, namely amplitude death and oscillation death. The stabilization of saddle equilibrium point refers to the amplitude death state where oscillations are ceased and all the oscillators converge to the single stable steady state via inverse pitchfork bifurcation. Due to multistability features of oscillation death states, linear stability theory fails to analyze the stability of such states analytically, so we quantify all the states by basin stability measurement which is an universal nonlocal nonlinear concept and it interplays with the volume of basins of attractions. We also observe multi-clustered oscillation death states in a random network and measure them using basin stability framework. To explore such phenomena we choose a network of coupled Duffing-Holmes and Lorenz oscillators which are interacting through mean-field coupling. We investigate how basin stability for different steady states depends on mean-field density and coupling strength. We also analytically derive stability conditions for different steady states and confirm by rigorous bifurcation analysis.

  1. Basin stability measure of different steady states in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Sarbendu; Bera, Bidesh K.; Majhi, Soumen; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-04-01

    In this report, we investigate the stabilization of saddle fixed points in coupled oscillators where individual oscillators exhibit the saddle fixed points. The coupled oscillators may have two structurally different types of suppressed states, namely amplitude death and oscillation death. The stabilization of saddle equilibrium point refers to the amplitude death state where oscillations are ceased and all the oscillators converge to the single stable steady state via inverse pitchfork bifurcation. Due to multistability features of oscillation death states, linear stability theory fails to analyze the stability of such states analytically, so we quantify all the states by basin stability measurement which is an universal nonlocal nonlinear concept and it interplays with the volume of basins of attractions. We also observe multi-clustered oscillation death states in a random network and measure them using basin stability framework. To explore such phenomena we choose a network of coupled Duffing-Holmes and Lorenz oscillators which are interacting through mean-field coupling. We investigate how basin stability for different steady states depends on mean-field density and coupling strength. We also analytically derive stability conditions for different steady states and confirm by rigorous bifurcation analysis.

  2. Adaptive control of unknown unstable steady states of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, K; Pyragas, V; Kiss, I Z; Hudson, J L

    2004-08-01

    A simple adaptive controller based on a low-pass filter to stabilize unstable steady states of dynamical systems is considered. The controller is reference-free; it does not require knowledge of the location of the fixed point in the phase space. A topological limitation similar to that of the delayed feedback controller is discussed. We show that the saddle-type steady states cannot be stabilized by using the conventional low-pass filter. The limitation can be overcome by using an unstable low-pass filter. The use of the controller is demonstrated for several physical models, including the pendulum driven by a constant torque, the Lorenz system, and an electrochemical oscillator. Linear and nonlinear analyses of the models are performed and the problem of the basins of attraction of the stabilized steady states is discussed. The robustness of the controller is demonstrated in experiments and numerical simulations with an electrochemical oscillator, the dissolution of nickel in sulfuric acid; a comparison of the effect of using direct and indirect variables in the control is made. With the use of the controller, all unstable phase-space objects are successfully reconstructed experimentally.

  3. Numerical computation of steady-state acoustic disturbances in flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Myers, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    Two time domain methods for computing two dimensional steady-state acoustic disturbances propagating through internal subsonic viscous flow fields in the presence of variable area are investigated. The first method solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the combined steady and acoustic field together and subtracts the steady flow to obtain the acoustic field. The second method solves a system of perturbation equations to obtain the acoustic disturbances, making use of a separate steady flow computation as input to the system. In each case the periodic steady-state acoustic fluctuations are obtained numerically on a supercomputer using a second order unsplit explicit MacCormack predictor-corrector method. Results show that the first method is not very effective for computing acoustic disturbances of even moderate amplitude. It appears that more accurate steady flow algorithms are required for this method to succeed. On the other hand, linear and nonlinear acoustic disturbances extracted from the perturbation approach are shown to exhibit expected behavior for the problems considered. It is also found that inflow boundary conditions for an equivalent uniform duct can be successfully applied to a nonuniform duct to obtain steady-state acoustic disturbances.

  4. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowell, Sara E.; Berlin, Alicia; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676–680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  5. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Sara E.; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M.; Carr, Catherine E.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E.; Yannuzzi, Sally E.; Ketten, Darlene R.

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al. 1969). We therefore measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e. frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species’ vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range. PMID:26156644

  6. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-08-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676-680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  7. Analytical comparison of transient and steady state visual evoked cortical potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K. M.; Kleinman, D. L.; Mcclurg, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    To better describe the linear-dynamic properties of the human visual-cortical response system, transient and steady state Visual Evoked Response Potentials (VERP) were observed. The stimulus presentation device provided both the evoking stimulus (flickering or pulsing lights) and a video task display. The steady state stimulus was modulated by a complex, ten frequency, sum-of-sines, wave. The transient VERP was the time-locked average of the EEG to a series of narrow light pulses (pulse width of 10 msec). The Fourier transform of the averaged pulses had properties that approximate band limited white noise, i.e., a flat spectrum over the frequency region spanned by the 10 summed sines. The Fourier transform of both the steady state and the transient evoked potentials resulted in transfer that are equivalent and therefore comparable. To investigate the effects of task loading on evoked potentials, a grammatical reasoning task was provided. Results support the relevancy of continued application of a systems engineering approach for describing neurosensory functioning.

  8. Oxygen consumption dynamics in steady-state tumour models.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Fletcher, Alexander G; Partridge, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen levels in cancerous tissue can have a significant effect on treatment response: hypoxic tissue is both more radioresistant and more chemoresistant than well-oxygenated tissue. While recent advances in medical imaging have facilitated real-time observation of macroscopic oxygenation, the underlying physics limits the resolution to the millimetre domain, whereas oxygen tension varies over a micrometre scale. If the distribution of oxygen in the tumour micro-environment can be accurately estimated, then the effect of potential dose escalation to these hypoxic regions could be better modelled, allowing more realistic simulation of biologically adaptive treatments. Reaction-diffusion models are commonly used for modelling oxygen dynamics, with a variety of functional forms assumed for the dependence of oxygen consumption rate (OCR) on cellular status and local oxygen availability. In this work, we examine reaction-diffusion models of oxygen consumption in spherically and cylindrically symmetric geometries. We consider two different descriptions of oxygen consumption: one in which the rate of consumption is constant and one in which it varies with oxygen tension in a hyperbolic manner. In each case, we derive analytic approximations to the steady-state oxygen distribution, which are shown to closely match the numerical solutions of the equations and accurately predict the extent to which oxygen can diffuse. The derived expressions relate the limit to which oxygen can diffuse into a tissue to the OCR of that tissue. We also demonstrate that differences between these functional forms are likely to be negligible within the range of literature estimates of the hyperbolic oxygen constant, suggesting that the constant consumption rate approximation suffices for modelling oxygen dynamics for most values of OCR. These approximations also allow the rapid identification of situations where hyperbolic consumption forms can result in significant differences from constant

  9. Role of irregular otolith afferents in the steady-state nystagmus during off-vertical axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Perachio, A. A.; Mustari, M. J.; Strunk, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    1. During constant velocity off-vertical axis rotations (OVAR) in the dark a compensatory ocular nystagmus is present throughout rotation despite the lack of a maintained signal from the semicircular canals. Lesion experiments and canal plugging have attributed the steady-state ocular nystagmus during OVAR to inputs from the otolith organs and have demonstrated that it depends on an intact velocity storage mechanism. 2. To test whether irregularly discharging otolith afferents play a crucial role in the generation of the steady-state eye nystagmus during OVAR, we have used anodal (inhibitory) currents bilaterally to selectively and reversibly block irregular vestibular afferent discharge. During delivery of DC anodal currents (100 microA) bilaterally to both ears, the slow phase eye velocity of the steady-state nystagmus during OVAR was reduced or completely abolished. The disruption of the steady-state nystagmus was transient and lasted only during the period of galvanic stimulation. 3. To distinguish a possible effect of ablation of the background discharge rates of irregular vestibular afferents on the velocity storage mechanism from specific contributions of the dynamic responses from irregular otolith afferents to the circuit responsible for the generation of the steady-state nystagmus, bilateral DC anodal galvanic stimulation was applied during optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN). No change in OKN and OKAN was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Auditory Neural Maturation After Exposure to Multiple Courses of Antenatal Betamethasone in Premature Infants as Evaluated by Auditory Brainstem Response

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sanjiv B.; Guillet, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Our goal was to determine if multiple courses of antenatal betamethasone affect auditory neural maturation in 28 to 32 weeks’ gestational age infants. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective cohort study was performed to compare auditory neural maturation between premature infants exposed to 1 course of betamethasone and infants exposed to ≥2 courses of betamethasone. Inclusion criteria included all 28 to 32 weeks’ gestational age infants delivered between July 1996 and December 1998 who had auditory brainstem response testing performed (80-dB click stimuli at a repetition rate of 39.9/second) within 24 hours of postnatal life as part of bilirubin-auditory studies. Infants with toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes infections, chromosomal disorders, unstable conditions, exposure to antenatal dexamethasone, and exposure to <1 complete course of betamethasone were excluded. Auditory waveforms were categorized into response types on response replicability and peak identification as types 1 through 4 (type 1 indicating most mature). Absolute and interpeak wave latencies were measured when applicable. Categorical and continuous variables were analyzed by using the χ2 test and Student’s t test, respectively. RESULTS Of 174 infants studied, 123 received antenatal steroids. Of these, 50 received 1 course and 29 received ≥2 courses of betamethasone. There were no significant differences in perinatal demographics between the 2 groups. After controlling for confounding variables, there was no significant difference in mean absolute wave latencies, mean interpeak latencies, or distribution of response type between the 2 groups. There also was no significant difference in any auditory brainstem response parameters between infants exposed to 1 course of betamethasone (n = 50) and infants exposed to >2 courses of betamethasone (n = 17). CONCLUSION Compared with a single recommended course of antenatal steroids, multiple courses of antenatal

  11. Steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis cysteine ligase (MshC).

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Luxenburger, Andreas; Painter, Gavin F; Blanchard, John S

    2007-10-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and many other members of the Actinomycetes family produce mycothiol, i.e., 1-d-myo-inosityl-2-(N-acetyl-l-cysteinyl)amido-2-deoxy-alpha-d-glucopyranoside (MSH or AcCys-GlcN-Ins), to act against oxidative and antibiotic stress. The biosynthesis of MSH is essential for cell growth and has been proposed to proceed via a biosynthetic pathway involving four key enzymes, MshA-MshD. The MSH biosynthetic enzymes present potential targets for inhibitor design. With this as a long-term goal, we have carried out a kinetic and mechanistic characterization, using steady-state and pre-steady-state approaches, of the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis MshC. MshC catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of GlcN-Ins and cysteine to form Cys-GlcN-Ins. Initial velocity and inhibition studies show that the steady-state kinetic mechanism of MshC is a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong mechanism, with ATP binding followed by cysteine binding, release of PPi, binding of GlcN-Ins, followed by the release of Cys-GlcN-Ins and AMP. The steady-state kinetic parameters were determined to be kcat equal to 3.15 s-1, and Km values of 1.8, 0.1, and 0.16 mM for ATP, cysteine, and GlcN-Ins, respectively. A stable bisubstrate analogue, 5'-O-[N-(l-cysteinyl)sulfamonyl]adenosine, exhibits competitive inhibition versus ATP and noncompetitive inhibition versus cysteine, with an inhibition constant of approximately 306 nM versus ATP. Single-turnover reactions of the first and second half reactions were determined using rapid-quench techniques, giving rates of approximately 9.4 and approximately 5.2 s-1, respectively, consistent with the cysteinyl adenylate being a kinetically competent intermediate in the reaction by MshC.

  12. Steady-State and Pre-Steady-State Kinetic Analysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis Cysteine Ligase (MshC)

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Luxenburger, Andreas; Painter, Gavin F.; Blanchard, John S

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and many other members of the Actinomycetes family produce mycothiol, i.e., 1-D-myo-inosityl-2-(N-acetyl-L-cysteinyl)amido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside (MSH or AcCys-GlcN-Ins), to act against oxidative and antibiotic stress. The biosynthesis of MSH is essential for cell growth, and has been proposed to proceed via a biosynthetic pathway involving four key enzymes, MshA-D. The MSH biosynthetic enzymes present potential targets for inhibitor design. With this as a long-term goal, we have carried out a kinetic and mechanistic characterization, using steady state and pre-steady state approaches, of the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis MshC. MshC catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of GlcN-Ins and cysteine to form Cys-GlcN-Ins. Initial velocity and inhibition studies show that the steady state kinetic mechanism of MshC is a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong mechanism, with ATP binding followed by cysteine binding, release of PPi, binding of GlcN-Ins, followed by the release of Cys-GlcN-Ins and AMP. The steady state kinetic parameters were determined to be: kcat equal to 3.15 s−1, and Km values of 1.8, 0.1, and 0.16 mM for ATP, cysteine, and GlcN-Ins, respectively. A stable bisubstrate analog, 5′-O-[N-(L-cysteinyl)sulfamonyl]adenosine, exhibits competitive inhibition versus ATP and non-competitive inhibition versus cysteine, with an inhibition constant of ~306 nM versus ATP. Single-turnover reactions of the first and second half reactions were determined using rapid quench techniques, giving rates of ~9.4 s−1 and ~5.2 s−1, respectively, consistent with the cysteinyl adenylate being a kinetically competent intermediate in the reaction by MshC. PMID:17848100

  13. [Speech evoked auditory brainstem response and cognitive disorders].

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Wang, N Y

    2016-12-07

    Speech evoked auditory brainstem response(s-ABR)is evoked by compound syllable, and those stimulus are similar to the daily language which convey both semantic information and non-semantic information. Speech coding program can take place at brainstem. As a new method, s-ABR may reveal the mystery of speech coding program. Many tests have proved that s-ABR is somehow related to cognitive ability. We mainly illustrated the possibility of grading the cognitive ability using s-ABR, the abnormal test result from those cognitive disorders, and the family factors that contribute to cognitive disorder.

  14. Auditory Brain Stem Responses Recorded With Uncushioned Earphones.

    PubMed

    Marsh, R R; Knightly, C A

    1992-11-01

    Although the cushion is essential to accurate pure-tone audiometry with conventional earphones, it may interfere with the auditory brain stem response (ABR) testing of small infants because of its size and the risk of ear canal collapse. To determine the consequences of ABR testing with an uncushioned earphone, adults were tested with and without the cushion, and probe-tube sound measurements were made. Although removing the cushion results in substantial signal attenuation below 1 kHz, there is little effect on the click-elicited ABR.

  15. Abnormal brainstem auditory response in young females with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Claesdotter-Hybbinette, Emma; Safdarzadeh-Haghighi, Maryam; Råstam, Maria; Lindvall, Magnus

    2015-10-30

    Studies have shown that the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is often affected in neurodevelopmental disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate possible differences in ABR between young females with ADHD compared to control subjects. This study focuses on young females, age 7-17 with ADHD, comparing the ABR of 43 young females with ADHD to 21 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Young females with ADHD have a significantly different ABR in a region between cochlear nucleus and superior olivary complex as well as in the thalamic region compared to control subjects. These data indicate specific differences in ABR between girls with ADHD compared to female controls.

  16. Crank inertial load has little effect on steady-state pedaling coordination.

    PubMed

    Fregly, B J; Zajac, F E; Dairaghi, C A

    1996-12-01

    Inertial load can affect the control of a dynamic system whenever parts of the system are accelerated or decelerated. During steady-state pedaling, because within-cycle variations in crank angular acceleration still exist, the amount of crank inertia present (which varies widely with road-riding gear ratio) may affect the within-cycle coordination of muscles. However, the effect of inertial load on steady-state pedaling coordination is almost always assumed to be negligible, since the net mechanical energy per cycle developed by muscles only depends on the constant cadence and workload. This study test the hypothesis that under steady-state conditions, the net joint torques produced by muscles at the hip, knee, and ankle are unaffected by crank inertial load. To perform the investigation, we constructed a pedaling apparatus which could emulate the low inertial load of a standard ergometer or the high inertial load of a road bicycle in high gear. Crank angle and bilateral pedal force and angle data were collected from ten subjects instructed to pedal steadily (i.e., constant speed across cycles) and smoothly (i.e., constant speed within a cycle) against both inertias at a constant workload. Virtually no statistically significant changes were found in the net hip and knee muscle joint torques calculated from an inverse dynamics analysis. Though the net ankle muscle joint torque, as well as the one- and two-legged crank torque, showed statistically significant increases at the higher inertia, the changes were small. In contrast, large statistically significant reductions were found in crank kinematic variability both within a cycle and between cycles (i.e., cadence), primarily because a larger inertial load means a slower crank dynamic response. Nonetheless, the reduction in cadence variability was somewhat attenuated by a large statistically significant increase in one-legged crank torque variability. We suggest, therefore, that muscle coordination during steady-state

  17. General theory of Onsager symmetries for perturbations of equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krommes, John A.; Hu, Genze

    1993-11-01

    The theory of Onsager symmetry is reconsidered from the point of view of its application to nonequilibrium, possibly turbulent steady states. A dynamical formalism based on correlation and response functions is used; understanding of its relationship to more conventional approaches based on entropy production enables one to resolve various confusions about the proper use of the theory, even near thermal equilibrium. Previous claims that ``kinematic'' flows must be excluded from considerations of Onsager symmetry are refuted by showing that suitably defined reversible and irreversible parts of the Onsager matrix separately obey the appropriate symmetry; fluctuating hydrodynamics serves as an example. It is shown that Onsager symmetries are preserved under arbitrary covariant changes of variables; the Weinhold metric is used as a fundamental tensor. Covariance is used to render moot the controversy over the proper choice of fluxes and forces in neoclassical plasma transport theory. The fundamental distinction between the fully contravariant Onsager matrix Lij and its mixed representation Lij is emphasized and used to explain why some previous workers have failed to find Onsager symmetry around turbulent steady states. The generalized Onsager theorem of Dufty and Rubí [Phys. Rev. A 36, 222 (1987)] is reviewed. An explicitly soluble Langevin problem is shown to violate Onsager's original symmetry but to obey the generalized theorem. The physical content of the generalized Onsager symmetry is discussed from the point of view of Nosé-Hoover dynamics. A set of extended Graham-Haken potential conditions are derived for Fokker-Planck models and shown to be consistent with the generalized Onsager relations. Finally, for quite general, possibly turbulent steady states it is argued that realizable Markovian statistical closures with underlying Langevin representations must also obey the generalized theorem. In the special case in which all state variables have even parity

  18. When can time-dependent currents be reproduced by the Landauer steady-state approximation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Rachel; Chen, Liping; Gu, Bing; Franco, Ignacio

    2017-05-01

    We establish well-defined limits in which the time-dependent electronic currents across a molecular junction subject to a fluctuating environment can be quantitatively captured via the Landauer steady-state approximation. For this, we calculate the exact time-dependent non-equilibrium Green's function (TD-NEGF) current along a model two-site molecular junction, in which the site energies are subject to correlated noise, and contrast it with that obtained from the Landauer approach. The ability of the steady-state approximation to capture the TD-NEGF behavior at each instant of time is quantified via the same-time correlation function of the currents obtained from the two methods, while their global agreement is quantified by examining differences in the average currents. The Landauer steady-state approach is found to be a useful approximation when (i) the fluctuations do not disrupt the degree of delocalization of the molecular eigenstates responsible for transport and (ii) the characteristic time for charge exchange between the molecule and leads is fast with respect to the molecular correlation time. For resonant transport, when these conditions are satisfied, the Landauer approach is found to accurately describe the current, both on average and at each instant of time. For non-resonant transport, we find that while the steady-state approach fails to capture the time-dependent transport at each instant of time, it still provides a good approximation to the average currents. These criteria can be employed to adopt effective modeling strategies for transport through molecular junctions in interaction with a fluctuating environment, as is necessary to describe experiments.

  19. Analytical determination of transition time between transient and steady state water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, Laurent; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Iovino, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The hydraulic characterization of soil hydraulic properties is a prerequisite to the modelling of flow in the vadose zone. Since many years, numerous methods were developed to determine soil hydraulic properties. Many of these methods rely on water infiltration experiments and their analysis using analytical or numerical models. At the beginning, most models were developed for water infiltration at steady state. These models had the advantage to be easy to develop from a theoretical point of view. Yet, many drawbacks remain including the need to wait for a long time, leading to time-consuming experiments, the risk to infiltrate water in large volumes of soil, leading to a response affected by soil variability, and the uncertainty regarding the attainment of steady state (i.e. constant infiltration rate). More recently, infiltration models and mathematical developments addressed the case of consecutive transient and steady states. Yet, one main problem remain. In the field, the operator is never sure about the state of water infiltration data. This paper present analytical formulations for the estimation of a transition time. We consider the model developed by Haverkamp et al. (1994) linking 1D infiltration flux to cumulative infiltration and related approximated expansions. An analytical method based on scaling is proposed to define transition time values in terms of both scaled cumulative infiltration and times. Dimensional times are then calculated for a large variety of soils and initial conditions. These time database can be considered as a relevant tool for the guidance for operators who conduct water infiltration experiments and wants to know when to stop and also for modelers who want to know how to select the data to fit transient or steady state models. Haverkamp, R., Ross, P. J., Smetten, K. R. J., Parlange, J. Y. (1994), Three-dimensional analysis of infiltration from the disc infiltrometer: 2 Physically based infiltration equation. Water Resour. Res

  20. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  1. Steady state fractionation of heavy noble gas isotopes in a deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seltzer, Alan M.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Andraski, Brian; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore steady state fractionation processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ), we measured argon, krypton, and xenon isotope ratios throughout a ∼110 m deep UZ at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in Nevada, USA. Prior work has suggested that gravitational settling should create a nearly linear increase in heavy-to-light isotope ratios toward the bottom of stagnant air columns in porous media. Our high-precision measurements revealed a binary mixture between (1) expected steady state isotopic compositions and (2) unfractionated atmospheric air. We hypothesize that the presence of an unsealed pipe connecting the surface to the water table allowed for direct inflow of surface air in response to extensive UZ gas sampling prior to our first (2015) measurements. Observed isotopic resettling in deep UZ samples collected a year later, after sealing the pipe, supports this interpretation. Data and modeling each suggest that the strong influence of gravitational settling and weaker influences of thermal diffusion and fluxes of CO2 and water vapor accurately describe steady state isotopic fractionation of argon, krypton, and xenon within the UZ. The data confirm that heavy noble gas isotopes are sensitive indicators of UZ depth. Based on this finding, we outline a potential inverse approach to quantify past water table depths from noble gas isotope measurements in paleogroundwater, after accounting for fractionation during dissolution of UZ air and bubbles.

  2. Steady-state and transient analysis of a squeeze film damper bearing for rotor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, L. E.; Gunter, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the steady-state and transient response of the squeeze film damper bearing is presented. Both the steady-state and transient equations for the hydrodynamic bearing forces are derived. The bearing equivalent stiffness and damping coefficients are determined by steady-state equations. These coefficients are used to find the bearing configuration which will provide the optimum support characteristics based on a stability analysis of the rotor-bearing system. The transient analysis of rotor-bearing systems is performed by coupling the bearing and journal equations and integrating forward in time. The effects of unbalance, cavitation, and retainer springs are included in the analysis. Methods of determining the stability of a rotor-bearing system under the influence of aerodynamic forces and internal shaft friction are discussed with emphasis on solving the system characteristic frequency equation and on producing stability maps. It is shown that for optimum stability and low force transmissability the squeeze bearing should operate at an eccentricity ratio epsilon 0.4.

  3. A Series RCL Circuit Theory for Analyzing Non-Steady-State Water Uptake of Maize Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths. PMID:25335512

  4. Steady state fractionation of heavy noble gas isotopes in a deep unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Alan M.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-04-01

    To explore steady state fractionation processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ), we measured argon, krypton, and xenon isotope ratios throughout a ˜110 m deep UZ at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in Nevada, USA. Prior work has suggested that gravitational settling should create a nearly linear increase in heavy-to-light isotope ratios toward the bottom of stagnant air columns in porous media. Our high-precision measurements revealed a binary mixture between (1) expected steady state isotopic compositions and (2) unfractionated atmospheric air. We hypothesize that the presence of an unsealed pipe connecting the surface to the water table allowed for direct inflow of surface air in response to extensive UZ gas sampling prior to our first (2015) measurements. Observed isotopic resettling in deep UZ samples collected a year later, after sealing the pipe, supports this interpretation. Data and modeling each suggest that the strong influence of gravitational settling and weaker influences of thermal diffusion and fluxes of CO2 and water vapor accurately describe steady state isotopic fractionation of argon, krypton, and xenon within the UZ. The data confirm that heavy noble gas isotopes are sensitive indicators of UZ depth. Based on this finding, we outline a potential inverse approach to quantify past water table depths from noble gas isotope measurements in paleogroundwater, after accounting for fractionation during dissolution of UZ air and bubbles.

  5. A series RCL circuit theory for analyzing non-steady-state water uptake of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jie; Yu, Gui-Rui; Nakayama, Keiichi

    2014-10-22

    Understanding water uptake and transport through the soil-plant continuum is vital for ecosystem management and agricultural water use. Plant water uptake under natural conditions is a non-steady transient flow controlled by root distribution, plant configuration, soil hydraulics, and climatic conditions. Despite significant progress in model development, a mechanistic description of transient water uptake has not been developed or remains incomplete. Here, based on advanced electrical network theory (RLC circuit theory), we developed a non-steady state biophysical model to mechanistically analyze the fluctuations of uptake rates in response to water stress. We found that the non-steady-state model captures the nature of instantaneity and hysteresis of plant water uptake due to the considerations of water storage in plant xylem and coarse roots (capacitance effect), hydraulic architecture of leaf system (inductance effect), and soil-root contact (fuse effect). The model provides insights into the important role of plant configuration and hydraulic heterogeneity in helping plants survive an adverse environment. Our tests against field data suggest that the non-steady-state model has great potential for being used to interpret the smart water strategy of plants, which is intrinsically determined by stem size, leaf size/thickness and distribution, root system architecture, and the ratio of fine-to-coarse root lengths.

  6. The Corticofugal Effects of Auditory Cortex Microstimulation on Auditory Nerve and Superior Olivary Complex Responses Are Mediated via Alpha-9 Nicotinic Receptor Subunit.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Cristian; Terreros, Gonzalo; León, Alex; Delano, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    The auditory efferent system is a complex network of descending pathways, which mainly originate in the primary auditory cortex and are directed to several auditory subcortical nuclei. These descending pathways are connected to olivocochlear neurons, which in turn make synapses with auditory nerve neurons and outer hair cells (OHC) of the cochlea. The olivocochlear function can be studied using contralateral acoustic stimulation, which suppresses auditory nerve and cochlear responses. In the present work, we tested the proposal that the corticofugal effects that modulate the strength of the olivocochlear reflex on auditory nerve responses are produced through cholinergic synapses between medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons and OHCs via alpha-9/10 nicotinic receptors. We used wild type (WT) and alpha-9 nicotinic receptor knock-out (KO) mice, which lack cholinergic transmission between MOC neurons and OHC, to record auditory cortex evoked potentials and to evaluate the consequences of auditory cortex electrical microstimulation in the effects produced by contralateral acoustic stimulation on auditory brainstem responses (ABR). Auditory cortex evoked potentials at 15 kHz were similar in WT and KO mice. We found that auditory cortex microstimulation produces an enhancement of contralateral noise suppression of ABR waves I and III in WT mice but not in KO mice. On the other hand, corticofugal modulations of wave V amplitudes were significant in both genotypes. These findings show that the corticofugal modulation of contralateral acoustic suppressions of auditory nerve (ABR wave I) and superior olivary complex (ABR wave III) responses are mediated through MOC synapses.

  7. Concurrent brain responses to separate auditory and visual targets.

    PubMed

    Finoia, Paola; Mitchell, Daniel J; Hauk, Olaf; Beste, Christian; Pizzella, Vittorio; Duncan, John

    2015-08-01

    In the attentional blink, a target event (T1) strongly interferes with perception of a second target (T2) presented within a few hundred milliseconds. Concurrently, the brain's electromagnetic response to the second target is suppressed, especially a late negative-positive EEG complex including the traditional P3 wave. An influential theory proposes that conscious perception requires access to a distributed, frontoparietal global workspace, explaining the attentional blink by strong mutual inhibition between concurrent workspace representations. Often, however, the attentional blink is reduced or eliminated for targets in different sensory modalities, suggesting a limit to such global inhibition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we confirm that visual and auditory targets produce similar, distributed patterns of frontoparietal activity. In an attentional blink EEG/MEG design, however, an auditory T1 and visual T2 are identified without mutual interference, with largely preserved electromagnetic responses to T2. The results suggest parallel brain responses to target events in different sensory modalities. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Auditory middle latency response in children with learning difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Frizzo, Ana Claudia Figueiredo; Issac, Myriam Lima; Pontes-Fernandes, Angela Cristina; Menezes, Pedro de Lemos; Funayama, Carolina Araújo Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: This is an objective laboratory assessment of the central auditory systems of children with learning disabilities. Aim: To examine and determine the properties of the components of the Auditory Middle Latency Response in a sample of children with learning disabilities. Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional cohort study with quantitative, descriptive, and exploratory outcomes. We included 50 children aged 8–13 years of both genders with and without learning disorders. Those with disorders of known organic, environmental, or genetic causes were excluded. Results and Conclusions: The Na, Pa, and Nb waves were identified in all subjects. The ranges of the latency component values were as follows: Na = 9.8–32.3 ms, Pa = 19.0–51.4 ms, Nb = 30.0–64.3 ms (learning disorders group) and Na = 13.2–29.6 ms, Pa = 21.8–42.8 ms, Nb = 28.4–65.8 ms (healthy group). The values of the Na-Pa amplitude ranged from 0.3 to 6.8 ìV (learning disorders group) or 0.2–3.6 ìV (learning disorders group). Upon analysis, the functional characteristics of the groups were distinct: the left hemisphere Nb latency was longer in the study group than in the control group. Peculiarities of the electrophysiological measures were observed in the children with learning disorders. This study has provided information on the Auditory Middle Latency Response and can serve as a reference for other clinical and experimental studies in children with these disorders. PMID:25991954

  9. Auditory middle latency response in children with learning difficulties.

    PubMed

    Frizzo, Ana Claudia Figueiredo; Issac, Myriam Lima; Pontes-Fernandes, Angela Cristina; Menezes, Pedro de Lemos; Funayama, Carolina Araújo Rodrigues

    2012-07-01

     This is an objective laboratory assessment of the central auditory systems of children with learning disabilities.  To examine and determine the properties of the components of the Auditory Middle Latency Response in a sample of children with learning disabilities.  This was a prospective, cross-sectional cohort study with quantitative, descriptive, and exploratory outcomes. We included 50 children aged 8-13 years of both genders with and without learning disorders. Those with disorders of known organic, environmental, or genetic causes were excluded.  The Na, Pa, and Nb waves were identified in all subjects. The ranges of the latency component values were as follows: Na = 9.8-32.3 ms, Pa = 19.0-51.4 ms, Nb = 30.0-64.3 ms (learning disorders group) and Na = 13.2-29.6 ms, Pa = 21.8-42.8 ms, Nb = 28.4-65.8 ms (healthy group). The values of the Na-Pa amplitude ranged from 0.3 to 6.8 ìV (learning disorders group) or 0.2-3.6 ìV (learning disorders group). Upon analysis, the functional characteristics of the groups were distinct: the left hemisphere Nb latency was longer in the study group than in the control group. Peculiarities of the electrophysiological measures were observed in the children with learning disorders. This study has provided information on the Auditory Middle Latency Response and can serve as a reference for other clinical and experimental studies in children with these disorders.

  10. Steady-state analysis of a nonlinear rotor-housing system. [Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noah, S. T.; Kim, Y. B.

    1990-01-01

    The periodic steady state response of a high pressure oxygen turbopump (HBOTP) of a Space Shuttle main engine (SSME), involving a clearance between the bearing and housing carrier, is sought. A harmonic balance method utilizig Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm is developed for the analysis. An impedance method is used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom to the displacements at the bearing clearance. Harmonic and subharmonic responses to imbalance for various system parameters are studied. The results show that the computational technique developed in this study is an effective and flexible method for determining the stable and unstable periodic response of complex rotor-housing systems with clearance type nonlinearity.

  11. Posaconazole Plasma Concentrations on Days Three to Five Predict Steady-State Levels

    PubMed Central

    Prattes, Jürgen; Duettmann, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Low posaconazole plasma concentrations (PPCs) have been associated with breakthrough invasive fungal infections. We assessed the correlation between pre-steady-state PPCs (obtained between days 3 and 5) and PPCs obtained during steady state in 48 patients with underlying hematological malignancies receiving posaconazole oral-solution prophylaxis. Pre-steady-state PPCs correlated significantly with PPCs obtained at steady state (Spearman r = 0.754; P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of pre-steady-state PPCs revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.790 to 0.977) for predicting satisfactory PPCs at steady state. PMID:27324763

  12. A Steady-State Mass Transfer Model of Removing CPAs from Cryopreserved Blood with Hollow Fiber Modules

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Weiping; Zhou, Xiaoming; Heimfeld, Shelly; Reems, Jo-Anna; Gao, Dayong

    2010-01-01

    Hollow fiber modules are commonly used to conveniently and efficiently remove cryoprotective agents (CPAs) from cryopreserved cell suspensions. In this paper, a steady-state model coupling mass transfers across cell and hollow fiber membranes is theoretically developed to evaluate the removal of CPAs from cryopreserved blood using hollow fiber modules. This steady-state model complements the unsteady-state model which was presented in our previous study. As the steady-state model, unlike the unsteady-state model, can be used to evaluate the effect of ultrafiltration flow rates on the clearance of CPAs. The steady-state model is validated by experimental results and then is compared with the unsteady-state model. Using the steady-state model, the effects of ultrafiltration flow rates, NaCl concentrations in dialysate, blood flow rates and dialysate flow rates on CPA concentration variation and cell volume response are investigated in detail. According to the simulative results, the osmotic damage of red blood cells (RBCs) can easily be reduced by increasing ultrafiltration flow rates, increasing NaCl concentrations in dialysate, increasing blood flow rates or decreasing dialysate flow rates. PMID:20524740

  13. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Jarzynski, C.

    2016-04-01

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents. To generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters—also known as a stochastic pump (SP)—reaches a periodic state with nonvanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between nonequilibrium stationary states and stochastic pumps. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents, and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: They show that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics. Nonequilibrium steady states and stochastic pumps are often used to model, respectively, biomolecular motors driven by chemical reactions and artificial molecular machines steered by the variation of external, macroscopic parameters. Our results loosely suggest that anything a biomolecular machine can do, an artificial molecular machine can do equally well. We illustrate this principle by showing that kinetic proofreading, a NESS mechanism that explains the low error rates in biochemical reactions, can be effectively mimicked by a constrained periodic driving.

  14. Fitting Boolean Networks from Steady State Perturbation Data

    PubMed Central

    Almudevar, Anthony; McCall, Matthew N; McMurray, Helene; Land, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Gene perturbation experiments are commonly used for the reconstruction of gene regulatory networks. Typical experimental methodology imposes persistent changes on the network. The resulting data must therefore be interpreted as a steady state from an altered gene regulatory network, rather than a direct observation of the original network. In this article an implicit modeling methodology is proposed in which the unperturbed network of interest is scored by first modeling the persistent perturbation, then predicting the steady state, which may then be compared to the observed data. This results in a many-to-one inverse problem, so a computational Bayesian approach is used to assess model uncertainty. The methodology is first demonstrated on a number of synthetic networks. It is shown that the Bayesian approach correctly assigns high posterior probability to the network structure and steady state behavior. Further, it is demonstrated that where uncertainty of model features is indicated, the uncertainty may be accurately resolved with further perturbation experiments. The methodology is then applied to the modeling of a gene regulatory network using perturbation data from nine genes which have been shown to respond synergistically to known oncogenic mutations. A hypothetical model emerges which conforms to reported regulatory properties of these genes. Furthermore, the Bayesian methodology is shown to be consistent in the sense that multiple randomized applications of the fitting algorithm converge to an approximately common posterior density on the space of models. Such consistency is generally not feasible for algorithms which report only single models. We conclude that fully Bayesian methods, coupled with models which accurately account for experimental constraints, are a suitable tool for the inference of gene regulatory networks, in terms of accuracy, estimation of model uncertainty, and experimental design. PMID:23089817

  15. Relaxation versus adiabatic quantum steady-state preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic preparation of the ground states of many-body Hamiltonians in the closed-system limit is at the heart of adiabatic quantum computation, but in reality systems are always open. This motivates a natural comparison between, on the one hand, adiabatic preparation of steady states of Lindbladian generators and, on the other hand, relaxation towards the same steady states subject to the final Lindbladian of the adiabatic process. In this work we thus adopt the perspective that the goal is the most efficient possible preparation of such steady states, rather than ground states. Using known rigorous bounds for the open-system adiabatic theorem and for mixing times, we are then led to a disturbing conclusion that at first appears to doom efforts to build physical quantum annealers: relaxation seems to always converge faster than adiabatic preparation. However, by carefully estimating the adiabatic preparation time for Lindbladians describing thermalization in the low-temperature limit, we show that there is, after all, room for an adiabatic speedup over relaxation. To test the analytically derived bounds for the adiabatic preparation time and the relaxation time, we numerically study three models: a dissipative quasifree fermionic chain, a single qubit coupled to a thermal bath, and the "spike" problem of n qubits coupled to a thermal bath. Via these models we find that the answer to the "which wins" question depends for each model on the temperature and the system-bath coupling strength. In the case of the "spike" problem we find that relaxation during the adiabatic evolution plays an important role in ensuring a speedup over the final-time relaxation procedure. Thus, relaxation-assisted adiabatic preparation can be more efficient than both pure adiabatic evolution and pure relaxation.

  16. Electromagnetic recording of the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Poeppel, David; Hickok, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Auditory processing is remarkably fast and sensitive to the precise temporal structure of acoustic signals over a range of scales, from submillisecond phenomena such as localization to the construction of elementary auditory attributes at tens of milliseconds to basic properties of speech and music at hundreds of milliseconds. In light of the rapid (and often transitory) nature of auditory phenomena, in order to investigate the neurocomputational basis of auditory perception and cognition, a technique with high temporal resolution is appropriate. Here we briefly outline the utility of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for the study of the neural basis of audition. The basics of MEG are outlined in brief, and some of the most-used neural responses are described. We discuss the classic transient evoked fields (e.g., M100), responses elicited by change in a stimulus (e.g., pitch-onset response), the auditory steady-state response, and neural oscillations (e.g., theta-phase tracking). Because of the high temporal resolution and the good spatial resolution of MEG, paired with the convenient location of human auditory cortex for MEG-based recording, electromagnetic recording of this type is well suited to investigate various aspects from audition, from crafted laboratory experiments on pitch perception or scene analysis to naturalistic speech and music tasks. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Steady-State Solution of a Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karkehabadi, Reza; Chandra, Suresh; Krishnamurthy, Ramesh

    1997-01-01

    A fluid-structure interaction code, ENSAERO, has been used to compute the aerodynamic loads on a swept-tapered wing. The code has the capability of using Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. Both options have been used and compared in the present paper. In the calculation of the steady-state solution, we are interested in knowing how the flexibility of the wing influences the lift coefficients. If the results of a flexible wing are not affected by the flexibility of the wing significantly, one could consider the wing to be rigid and reduce the problem from fluid-structure interaction to a fluid problem.

  18. A Spreadsheet Program for Steady-State Temperature Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, G.J.

    2000-11-01

    A desktop program is developed in Microsoft EXCEL using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to solve a two-dimensional steady state heat conduction problem with a radiation boundary condition. The resulting partial differential equation and boundary conditions are solved using finite difference techniques and the results are compared with a finite element solution using the commercially available software package MSC/THERMAL. The results from the two methods are found to be within 1 percent. The VBA solution demonstrates how spreadsheet programs, like EXCEL, can be used to solve practical engineering problems with good accuracy.

  19. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-12-31

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels.

  20. System studies for quasi-steady-state advanced physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1983-11-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of veriation in physics parameters and technology limits on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, high beta, quasi-steady-state tokamak for the purpose of fusion engineering experimentation. The features and characteristics chosen from each study were embodied into a single Advanced Physics Tokamak design for which a self-consistent set of parameters was generated and a value of capital cost was estimated.

  1. Steady state self-induced current in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gott, Yu. V.; Yurchenko, E. I.

    2009-11-15

    A model, which may make it possible to self-consistently calculate the self-driven current in tokamaks taking into account asymmetry and bootstrap currents, is presented. It is shown that the described self-driven current can provide steady-state tokamak operation without the seed current produced with the help of additional methods. The total self-consistent, self-driven current does not depend on magnetic field magnitude and is proportional to the square root from plasma pressure. The experimental data obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment are satisfactorily described by this model.

  2. Energy decay and steady states in externally driven magnetohydrodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    Some relaxed magnetohydrodynamic states of a plasma, such as the Taylor or the Alfvén state are often presented as the logical end of the plasma evolution by an argument of energy minimization under some constraint. However, these arguments are unsatisfactory and the very existence of nontrivial steady states as limits of magnetohydrodynamic evolution is far from obvious. For steady solutions to exist, the forcing term must be time-independent, it is shown that in this case, either the plasma undergoes constant change at a positive minimum rate or it comes arbitrarily close, in the quadratic mean norm, to the set of steady solutions of the magnetohydrodynamic equations.

  3. Non-steady-state aerosol filtration in nanostructured fibrous media.

    PubMed

    Przekop, Rafal; Gradoń, Leon

    2011-06-28

    The filtration of aerosol particles using composites of nano- and microsized fibrous structures is a promising method for the effective separation of nanoparticles from gases. A multi-scale physical system describing the flow pattern and particle deposition at a non-steady-state condition requires an advanced method of modelling. The combination of lattice Boltzmann and Brownian dynamics was used for analysis of the particle deposition pattern in a fibrous system. The dendritic structures of deposits for neutral and charged fibres and particles are present. The efficiency of deposition, deposit morphology, porosity and fractal dimension were calculated for a selected operational condition of the process.

  4. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  5. Steady-State-Preserving Simulation of Genetic Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xilin

    2017-01-01

    A novel family of exponential Runge-Kutta (expRK) methods are designed incorporating the stable steady-state structure of genetic regulatory systems. A natural and convenient approach to constructing new expRK methods on the base of traditional RK methods is provided. In the numerical integration of the one-gene, two-gene, and p53-mdm2 regulatory systems, the new expRK methods are shown to be more accurate than their prototype RK methods. Moreover, for nonstiff genetic regulatory systems, the expRK methods are more efficient than some traditional exponential RK integrators in the scientific literature. PMID:28203268

  6. Steady-State-Preserving Simulation of Genetic Regulatory Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruqiang; Ehigie, Julius Osato; Hou, Xilin; You, Xiong; Yuan, Chunlu

    2017-01-01

    A novel family of exponential Runge-Kutta (expRK) methods are designed incorporating the stable steady-state structure of genetic regulatory systems. A natural and convenient approach to constructing new expRK methods on the base of traditional RK methods is provided. In the numerical integration of the one-gene, two-gene, and p53-mdm2 regulatory systems, the new expRK methods are shown to be more accurate than their prototype RK methods. Moreover, for nonstiff genetic regulatory systems, the expRK methods are more efficient than some traditional exponential RK integrators in the scientific literature.

  7. Steady-state capabilities for hydroturbines with OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M.; Beaudoin, M.; Giroux, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    The availability of a high quality Open Source CFD simulation platform like OpenFOAM offers new R&D opportunities by providing direct access to models and solver implementation details. Efforts have been made by Hydro-Québec to adapt OpenFOAM to hydroturbines for the development of steady-state capabilities. The paper describes the developments that have been made to implement new turbomachinery related capabilities: Multiple Frame of Reference solver, domain coupling interfaces (GGI, cyclicGGI and mixing plane) and specialized boundary conditions. Practical use of the new turbomachinery capabilities are demonstrated for the analysis of a 195-MW Francis hydroturbine.

  8. Steady State Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure Facility With Automated Calibration Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field designed and developed a steady state vacuum ultraviolet automated (SSVUVa) facility with in situ VUV intensity calibration capability. The automated feature enables a constant accelerated VUV radiation exposure over long periods of testing without breaking vacuum. This test facility is designed to simultaneously accommodate four isolated radiation exposure tests within the SSVUVa vacuum chamber. Computer-control of the facility for long, term continuous operation also provides control and recording of thermocouple temperatures, periodic recording of VUV lamp intensity, and monitoring of vacuum facility status. This paper discusses the design and capabilities of the SSVUVa facility.

  9. Steady State Creep of Zirconium at High and Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.S.; Hayes, T.A.

    2000-04-08

    Creep of zirconium and zirconium alloys has been labeled ''anomalous.'' Researchers often report that zirconium and its alloys never reach true steady state creep and have stress exponents that continuously change with stress and temperature. Many varied interpretations have been offered explaining the creep behavior of zirconium. Some have suggested that creep is diffusion controlled, while others maintain that creep is dislocation glide controlled. Cumulative zirconium creep data will be presented based on an extensive literature review. An interpretation of results will be presented and compared to previous interpretations.

  10. Stabilizing unstable steady states using multiple delay feedback control.

    PubMed

    Ahlborn, Alexander; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2004-12-31

    Feedback control with different and independent delay times is introduced and shown to be an efficient method for stabilizing fixed points (equilibria) of dynamical systems. In comparison to other delay based chaos control methods multiple delay feedback control is superior for controlling steady states and works also for relatively large delay times (sometimes unavoidable in experiments due to system dead times). To demonstrate this approach for stabilizing unstable fixed points we present numerical simulations of Chua's circuit and a successful experimental application for stabilizing a chaotic frequency doubled Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser.

  11. Nonequilibrium steady-state circulation and heat dissipation functional.

    PubMed

    Qian, H

    2001-08-01

    A nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS), different from an equilibrium, is sustained by circular balance rather than detailed balance. The circular fluxes are driven by energy input and heat dissipation, accompanied by a positive entropy production. Based on a Master equation formalism for NESS, we show the circulation is intimately related to the recently studied Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry of heat dissipation functional, which in turn suggests a Boltzmann's formulalike relation between rate constants and energy in NESS. Expanding this unifying view on NESS to diffusion is discussed.

  12. An automatic method for deriving steady-state rate equations.

    PubMed Central

    Cornish-Bowden, A

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for systematically deriving steady-state rate equations. It is based on the schematic method of King & Altman [J. Phys. Chem. (1956) 60, 1375-1378], but is expressed in purely algebraic terms. It is suitable for implementation as a computer program, and a program has been written in FORTRAN IV and deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50078 (12 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1977) 161, 1-2. PMID:889575

  13. Long Pulse Operation on Tore-Supra: Towards Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Brosset, C.; Dufour, E.; Loarer, T.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Tsitrone, E.; Basiuk, V.; Bremond, S.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hertout, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Kazarian, F.; Mazon, D.

    2006-01-15

    The experimental programme of Tore Supra is devoted to the study of technology and physics issues associated to long-duration high performance discharges. This new domain of operation requires simultaneously and in steady state: heat removal capability, particle exhaust, fully non-inductive current drive, advanced technology integration and real time plasma control. The long discharge allows for addressing new time scale physic such as the wall particle retention and erosion. Moreover, the physics of fully non-inductive discharges is full of novelty, namely: the MHD stability, the slow spontaneous oscillation of the central electron temperature or the outstanding inward particle pinch.

  14. Steady-state grain growth in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Galinari, C.M.; Lameiras, F.S.

    1998-06-05

    The authors have observed steady-state grain growth in sintered UO{sub 2} pellets of nuclear purity at 2,003 K under H{sub 2}. The behavior of the grain size distribution at different instants is consistent with the grain growth model proposed by one of the authors. The total number of grains was estimated using the Saltykov`s method, and the evolution is in accordance with the model proposed by Rhines and Craig. The parabolic growth law was observed for the mean intercept length with n = 0.4.

  15. Linear modeling of steady-state behavioral dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Palya, William L; Walter, Donald; Kessel, Robert; Lucke, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The observed steady-state behavioral dynamics supported by unsignaled periods of reinforcement within repeating 2,000-s trials were modeled with a linear transfer function. These experiments employed improved schedule forms and analytical methods to improve the precision of the measured transfer function, compared to previous work. The refinements include both the use of multiple reinforcement periods that improve spectral coverage and averaging of independently determined transfer functions. A linear analysis was then used to predict behavior observed for three different test schedules. The fidelity of these predictions was determined. PMID:11831782

  16. An optimization-based design framework for steering steady states and improving robustness of glycolysis-glycogenolysis pathway.

    PubMed

    Panja, Surajit; Patra, Sourav; Mukherjee, Anirban; Basu, Madhumita; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Dutta, Pranab K

    2013-02-01

    A robust synthesis technique is devised for synergism and saturation systems, commonly known as S-systems, for controlling the steady states of the glycolysis-glycogenolysis pathway. The development of the robust biochemical network is essential owing to the fragile response to the perturbation of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the nominal S-system. The synthesis problem is formulated in a computationally attractive convex optimization framework. The linear matrix inequalities are framed to aim at the minimization of steady-state error, improvement of robustness, and utilization of minimum control input to the biochemical network.

  17. Construction of Hindi Speech Stimuli for Eliciting Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad Shamim; Rangasayee, R

    2016-12-01

    Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses (spABRs) provide considerable information of clinical relevance to describe auditory processing of complex stimuli at the sub cortical level. The substantial research data have suggested faithful representation of temporal and spectral characteristics of speech sounds. However, the spABR are known to be affected by acoustic properties of speech, language experiences and training. Hence, there exists indecisive literature with regards to brainstem speech processing. This warrants establishment of language specific speech stimulus to describe the brainstem processing in specific oral language user. The objective of current study is to develop Hindi speech stimuli for recording auditory brainstem responses. The Hindi stop speech of 40 ms containing five formants was constructed. Brainstem evoked responses to speech sound |da| were gained from 25 normal hearing (NH) adults having mean age of 20.9 years (SD = 2.7) in the age range of 18-25 years and ten subjects (HI) with mild SNHL of mean 21.3 years (SD = 3.2) in the age range of 18-25 years. The statistically significant differences in the mean identification scores of synthesized for speech stimuli |da| and |ga| between NH and HI were obtained. The mean, median, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and 95 % confidence interval for the discrete peaks and V-A complex values of electrophysiological responses to speech stimulus were measured and compared between NH and HI population. This paper delineates a comprehensive methodological approach for development of Hindi speech stimuli and recording of ABR to speech. The acoustic characteristic of stimulus |da| was faithfully represented at brainstem level in normal hearing adults. There was statistically significance difference between NH and HI individuals. This suggests that spABR offers an opportunity to segregate normal speech encoding from abnormal speech processing at sub cortical level, which implies that

  18. Reduced object related negativity response indicates impaired auditory scene analysis in adults with autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, Veema; Brock, Jon; Johnson, Blake W; Hautus, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Auditory Scene Analysis provides a useful framework for understanding atypical auditory perception in autism. Specifically, a failure to segregate the incoming acoustic energy into distinct auditory objects might explain the aversive reaction autistic individuals have to certain auditory stimuli or environments. Previous research with non-autistic participants has demonstrated the presence of an Object Related Negativity (ORN) in the auditory event related potential that indexes pre-attentive processes associated with auditory scene analysis. Also evident is a later P400 component that is attention dependent and thought to be related to decision-making about auditory objects. We sought to determine whether there are differences between individuals with and without autism in the levels of processing indexed by these components. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to measure brain responses from a group of 16 autistic adults, and 16 age- and verbal-IQ-matched typically-developing adults. Auditory responses were elicited using lateralized dichotic pitch stimuli in which inter-aural timing differences create the illusory perception of a pitch that is spatially separated from a carrier noise stimulus. As in previous studies, control participants produced an ORN in response to the pitch stimuli. However, this component was significantly reduced in the participants with autism. In contrast, processing differences were not observed between the groups at the attention-dependent level (P400). These findings suggest that autistic individuals have difficulty segregating auditory stimuli into distinct auditory objects, and that this difficulty arises at an early pre-attentive level of processing.

  19. Steady-state operation of spheromaks by inductive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1984-04-01

    A method to maintain a steady-state spheromak configuration inductively using the S-1 Spheromak device is described. The S-1 Spheromak formation apparatus can be utilized to inject magnetic helicity continuously (C.W., not pulsed or D.C.) into the spheromak configuration after equilibrium is achieved in the linked mode of operation. Oscillation of both poloidal- and toroidal-field currents in the flux core (psi-phi Pumping), with proper phasing, injects a net time-averaged helicity into the plasma. Steady-state maintenance relies on flux conversion, which has been earlier identified. Relevant experimental data from the operation of S-1 are described. Helicity flow has been measured and the proposed injection scheme simulated. In a reasonable time practical voltages and frequencies can inject an amount of helicity comparable to that in the initial plasma. Plasma currents can be maintained or increased. This pumping technique is similar to F-THETA Pumping of a Reversed-Field-Pinch but is applied to this inverse-pinch formation.

  20. Integrated stoichiometric, thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of steady state metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I; Provan, G; Nasheuer, H P

    2010-06-07

    The quantitative analysis of biochemical reactions and metabolites is at frontier of biological sciences. The recent availability of high-throughput technology data sets in biology has paved the way for new modelling approaches at various levels of complexity including the metabolome of a cell or an organism. Understanding the metabolism of a single cell and multi-cell organism will provide the knowledge for the rational design of growth conditions to produce commercially valuable reagents in biotechnology. Here, we demonstrate how equations representing steady state mass conservation, energy conservation, the second law of thermodynamics, and reversible enzyme kinetics can be formulated as a single system of linear equalities and inequalities, in addition to linear equalities on exponential variables. Even though the feasible set is non-convex, the reformulation is exact and amenable to large-scale numerical analysis, a prerequisite for computationally feasible genome scale modelling. Integrating flux, concentration and kinetic variables in a unified constraint-based formulation is aimed at increasing the quantitative predictive capacity of flux balance analysis. Incorporation of experimental and theoretical bounds on thermodynamic and kinetic variables ensures that the predicted steady state fluxes are both thermodynamically and biochemically feasible. The resulting in silico predictions are tested against fluxomic data for central metabolism in Escherichia coli and compare favourably with in silico prediction by flux balance analysis.

  1. Integrated stoichiometric, thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of steady state metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, R.M.T.; Thiele, I.; Provan, G.; Nasheuer, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of biochemical reactions and metabolites is at frontier of biological sciences. The recent availability of high-throughput technology data sets in biology has paved the way for new modelling approaches at various levels of complexity including the metabolome of a cell or an organism. Understanding the metabolism of a single cell and multi-cell organism will provide the knowledge for the rational design of growth conditions to produce commercially valuable reagents in biotechnology. Here, we demonstrate how equations representing steady state mass conservation, energy conservation, the second law of thermodynamics, and reversible enzyme kinetics can be formulated as a single system of linear equalities and inequalities, in addition to linear equalities on exponential variables. Even though the feasible set is non-convex, the reformulation is exact and amenable to large-scale numerical analysis, a prerequisite for computationally feasible genome scale modelling. Integrating flux, concentration and kinetic variables in a unified constraint-based formulation is aimed at increasing the quantitative predictive capacity of flux balance analysis. Incorporation of experimental and theoretical bounds on thermodynamic and kinetic variables ensures that the predicted steady state fluxes are both thermodynamically and biochemically feasible. The resulting in silico predictions are tested against fluxomic data for central metabolism in E. coli and compare favourably with in silico prediction by flux balance analysis. PMID:20230840

  2. Steady-state mushy layers: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppin, S.; Aussillous, P.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Grae Worster, M.

    2006-11-01

    A new facility has been developed to investigate mushy layers formed during the steady directional solidification of transparent aqueous solutions in a quasi-two-dimensional system. Experiments have been conducted on NaCl--H20 solutions by translating a Hele-Shaw cell at prescribed rates between fixed heat exchangers providing a temperature gradient of approximately 1,^0C/mm. Ice formed the primary solid phase and the dense residual fluid ponded within the mushy layer at the base of the system. Mathematical predictions of the steady-state temperature profile and mushy layer thickness as functions of freezing rate are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Experiments have also been performed on aqueous NH4Cl solutions, with the salt forming the primary solid phase, yielding buoyancy-driven convection in the mushy layer and the development of chimneys. The lifetime of the chimneys increased with decreasing freezing rate; however, no steady-state chimneys have been observed. Rather, a convecting chimney appears to deplete the surrounding solution and is eventually extinguished. At freezing rates larger than about 5.5,μm/s a uniform mushy layer develops with no chimneys. However, at rates larger than about 5,μm/s a second mode of behaviour is observed in which the mushy layer is thin and there is significant supercooling and nucleation above it. There is hysteresis between the two modes.

  3. Classical Orbital Paramagnetism in Non-equilibrium Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Avinash A.; Kumar, N.

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of our numerical simulation of classical-dissipative dynamics of a charged particle subjected to a non-Markovian stochastic forcing. We find that the system develops a steady-state orbital magnetic moment in the presence of a static magnetic field. Very significantly, the sign of the orbital magnetic moment turns out to be paramagnetic for our choice of parameters, varied over a wide range. This is shown specifically for the case of classical dynamics driven by a Kubo-Anderson type non-Markovian noise. Natural spatial boundary condition was imposed through (1) a soft (harmonic) confining potential, and (2) a hard potential, approximating a reflecting wall. There was no noticeable qualitative difference. What appears to be crucial to the orbital magnetic effect noticed here is the non-Markovian property of the driving noise chosen. Experimental realization of this effect on the laboratory scale, and its possible implications are briefly discussed. We would like to emphasize that the above steady-state classical orbital paramagnetic moment complements, rather than contradicts the Bohr-van Leeuwen (BvL) theorem on the absence of classical orbital diamagnetism in thermodynamic equilibrium.

  4. Steady-State ALPS for Real-Valued Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2009-01-01

    The two objectives of this paper are to describe a steady-state version of the Age-Layered Population Structure (ALPS) Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and to compare it against other GAs on real-valued problems. Motivation for this work comes from our previous success in demonstrating that a generational version of ALPS greatly improves search performance on a Genetic Programming problem. In making steady-state ALPS some modifications were made to the method for calculating age and the method for moving individuals up layers. To demonstrate that ALPS works well on real-valued problems we compare it against CMA-ES and Differential Evolution (DE) on five challenging, real-valued functions and on one real-world problem. While CMA-ES and DE outperform ALPS on the two unimodal test functions, ALPS is much better on the three multimodal test problems and on the real-world problem. Further examination shows that, unlike the other GAs, ALPS maintains a genotypically diverse population throughout the entire search process. These findings strongly suggest that the ALPS paradigm is better able to avoid premature convergence then the other GAs.

  5. Calculations of two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic axisymmetric steady-states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Jardin, S. C.

    2009-11-01

    M3D- C1 is an implicit, high-order finite element code for the solution of the time-dependent nonlinear two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations [S.C. Jardin, J. Breslau, N. Ferraro, A high-order implicit finite element method for integrating the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in two dimensions, J. Comp. Phys. 226 (2) (2007) 2146-2174]. This code has now been extended to allow computations in toroidal geometry. Improvements to the spatial integration and time-stepping algorithms are discussed. Steady-states of a resistive two-fluid model, self-consistently including flows, anisotropic viscosity (including gyroviscosity) and heat flux, are calculated for diverted plasmas in geometries typical of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Exploration of spherical torus physics in the NSTX device, Nucl. Fusion 40 (3Y) (2000) 557-561]. These states are found by time-integrating the dynamical equations until the steady-state is reached, and are therefore stationary or statistically steady on both magnetohydrodynamic and transport time-scales. Resistively driven cross-surface flows are found to be in close agreement with Pfirsch-Schlüter theory. Poloidally varying toroidal flows are in agreement with comparable calculations [A.Y. Aydemir, Shear flows at the tokamak edge and their interaction with edge-localized modes, Phys. Plasmas 14]. New effects on core toroidal rotation due to gyroviscosity and a local particle source are observed.

  6. Steady States and Universal Conductance in a Quenched Luttinger Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, Edwin; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Mastropietro, Vieri; Moosavi, Per

    2017-01-01

    We obtain exact analytical results for the evolution of a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger model prepared in a domain wall initial state, i.e., a state with different densities on its left and right sides. Such an initial state is modeled as the ground state of a translation invariant Luttinger Hamiltonian {H_{λ}} with short range non-local interaction and different chemical potentials to the left and right of the origin. The system evolves for time t > 0 via a Hamiltonian {H_{λ'}} which differs from {H_{λ}} by the strength of the interaction. Asymptotically in time, as {t to ∞}, after taking the thermodynamic limit, the system approaches a translation invariant steady state. This final steady state carries a current I and has an effective chemical potential difference {μ+ - μ-} between right- (+) and left- (-) moving fermions obtained from the two-point correlation function. Both I and {μ+ - μ-} depend on {λ} and {λ'}. Only for the case {λ = λ' = 0} does {μ+ - μ-} equal the difference in the initial left and right chemical potentials. Nevertheless, the Landauer conductance for the final state, {G = I/(μ+ - μ-)}, has a universal value equal to the conductance quantum {e^2/h} for the spinless case.

  7. Ecological Implications of Steady State and Nonsteady State Bioaccumulation Models.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Anne M; Paterson, Gordon; Drouillard, Ken G; Haffner, G Douglas

    2016-10-18

    Accurate predictions on the bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are critical for hazard and ecosystem health assessments. Aquatic systems are influenced by multiple stressors including climate change and species invasions and it is important to be able to predict variability in POP concentrations in changing environments. Current steady state bioaccumulation models simplify POP bioaccumulation dynamics, assuming that pollutant uptake and elimination processes become balanced over an organism's lifespan. These models do not consider the complexity of dynamic variables such as temperature and growth rates which are known to have the potential to regulate bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. We contrast a steady state (SS) bioaccumulation model with a dynamic nonsteady state (NSS) model and a no elimination (NE) model. We demonstrate that both the NSS and the NE models are superior at predicting both average concentrations as well as variation in POPs among individuals. This comparison demonstrates that temporal drivers, such as environmental fluctuations in temperature, growth dynamics, and modified food-web structure strongly determine contaminant concentrations and variability in a changing environment. These results support the recommendation of the future development of more dynamic, nonsteady state bioaccumulation models to predict hazard and risk assessments in the Anthropocene.

  8. New models for fast steady state magnetic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    A new unified family of models for incompressible, steady-state magnetic reconnection in a finite region is presented. The models are obtained by expanding in powers of the Alfven Mach number and may be used to elucidate some of the puzzling properties of numerical experiments on reconnection which are not present in the classical models. The conditions imposed on the inflow boundary of the finite region determine which member of the family occurs. Petscheklien and Sonnerup like solutions are particular members. The Sonneruplike regime is a special case of a weak slow mode expansion in the inflow region, and it separates two classes of members with reversed currents. The Petscheklike regime is a singular case of a weak fast mode expansion, and it separates the hybrid regime from a regime of slow mode compressions. Care should be taken in deciding which type of reconnection is operating in a numerical experiment. Indeed, no experiment to date has used boundary conditions appropriate for demonstrating steady state Petschek reconnection.

  9. Nonequilibrium many-body steady states via Keldysh formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    Many-body systems with both coherent dynamics and dissipation constitute a rich class of models which are nevertheless much less explored than their dissipationless counterparts. The advent of numerous experimental platforms that simulate such dynamics poses an immediate challenge to systematically understand and classify these models. In particular, nontrivial many-body states emerge as steady states under nonequilibrium dynamics. While these states and their phase transitions have been studied extensively with mean-field theory, the validity of the mean-field approximation has not been systematically investigated. In this paper, we employ a field-theoretic approach based on the Keldysh formalism to study nonequilibrium phases and phase transitions in a variety of models. In all cases, a complete description via the Keldysh formalism indicates a partial or complete failure of the mean-field analysis. Furthermore, we find that an effective temperature emerges as a result of dissipation, and the universal behavior including the dynamics near the steady state is generically described by a thermodynamic universality class.

  10. Modeling steady-state methanogenic degradation of phenols in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, Barbara A.; Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Field and microcosm observations of methanogenic phenolic compound degradation indicate that Monod kinetics governs the substrate disappearance but overestimates the observed biomass. In this paper we present modeling results from an ongoing multidisciplinary study of methanogenic biodegradation of phenolic compounds in a sand and gravel aquifer contaminated by chemicals and wastes used in wood treatment. Field disappearance rates of four phenols match those determined in batch microcosm studies previously performed by E.M. Godsy and coworkers. The degradation process appears to be at steady-state because even after a sustained influx over several decades, the contaminants still are disappearing in transport downgradient. The existence of a steady-state degradation profile of each substrate together with a low biomass density in the aquifer indicate that the bacteria population is exhibiting no net growth. This may be due to the oligotrophic nature of the biomass population in which utilization and growth are approximately independent of concentration for most of the concentration range. Thus a constant growth rate should exist over much of the contaminated area which may in turn be balanced by an unusually high decay or maintenance rate due to hostile conditions or predation.

  11. Steady-state wear and friction in boundary lubrication studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to obtain improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester-base and C-ether-base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a friction and wear apparatus. Conditions included loads of 1/2 and 1 kg and sliding velocities of 3.6 to 18.2 m/min in a dry air atmosphere and stepwise time intervals from 1 to 250 min for wear measurements. The wear rate results were compared with those from previous studies where a single 25 min test period was used. Satisfactory test conditions for studying friction and wear in boundary lubrication for this apparatus were found to be 1 kg load; sliding velocities of 7.1 to 9.1 m/min (50 rpm disk speed); and use of a time stepwise test procedure. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates and steady-state friction coefficients were determined under boundary conditions. Wear rates and coefficients of friction were constant following initially high values during run-in periods.

  12. Zonal Flow Growth Rates: Modulational Instability vs Statistical Steady States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krommes, J. A.; Kolesnikov, R. A.

    2002-11-01

    The nonlinear growth rate of zonal flows has been the subject of various investigations. The calculations can be grouped into two major classes: those based on modulational instability of a fixed pump wave;(L. Chen et al., Phys. Plasmas 7), 3129 (2000); P. N. Guzdar et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 015001 (2001); C. N. Lashmore-Davies et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5121 (2001). and those employing statistical formalism to describe a self-consistent, energy-conserving steady state.(J. A. Krommes and C.--B. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 62), 8508 (2000), and references therein. The results from these two approaches do not necessarily agree either in their dependence on parameters like the plasma pressure β, on the threshold for instability, or even, in some cases, on the sign. The reasons for such disagreements are isolated, and it is shown to what extent the steady-state statistical approach can be reconciled with a generic modulational instability calculation. Generalizations of the statistical formalism to the multifield systems appropriate for finite β are described. Specific calculations based on model systems are used to illustrate the general arguments.

  13. Effects of Steady-State Noise on Verbal Working Memory in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Mary; DeDe, Gayle; Olson, Sarah; Shehorn, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We set out to examine the impact of perceptual, linguistic, and capacity demands on performance of verbal working-memory tasks. The Ease of Language Understanding model (Rönnberg et al., 2013) provides a framework for testing the dynamics of these interactions within the auditory-cognitive system. Methods Adult native speakers of English (n = 45) participated in verbal working-memory tasks requiring processing and storage of words involving different linguistic demands (closed/open set). Capacity demand ranged from 2 to 7 words per trial. Participants performed the tasks in quiet and in speech-spectrum-shaped noise. Separate groups of participants were tested at different signal-to-noise ratios. Word-recognition measures were obtained to determine effects of noise on intelligibility. Results Contrary to predictions, steady-state noise did not have an adverse effect on working-memory performance in every situation. Noise negatively influenced performance for the task with high linguistic demand. Of particular importance is the finding that the adverse effects of background noise were not confined to conditions involving declines in recognition. Conclusions Perceptual, linguistic, and cognitive demands can dynamically affect verbal working-memory performance even in a population of healthy young adults. Results suggest that researchers and clinicians need to carefully analyze task demands to understand the independent and combined auditory-cognitive factors governing performance in everyday listening situations. PMID:26384291

  14. Auditory Brainstem Responses and EMFs Generated by Mobile Phones.

    PubMed

    Khullar, Shilpa; Sood, Archana; Sood, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    There has been a manifold increase in the number of mobile phone users throughout the world with the current number of users exceeding 2 billion. However this advancement in technology like many others is accompanied by a progressive increase in the frequency and intensity of electromagnetic waves without consideration of the health consequences. The aim of our study was to advance our understanding of the potential adverse effects of GSM mobile phones on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). 60 subjects were selected for the study and divided into three groups of 20 each based on their usage of mobile phones. Their ABRs were recorded and analysed for latency of waves I-V as well as interpeak latencies I-III, I-V and III-V (in ms). Results revealed no significant difference in the ABR parameters between group A (control group) and group B (subjects using mobile phones for maximum 30 min/day for 5 years). However the latency of waves was significantly prolonged in group C (subjects using mobile phones for 10 years for a maximum of 30 min/day) as compared to the control group. Based on our findings we concluded that long term exposure to mobile phones may affect conduction in the peripheral portion of the auditory pathway. However more research needs to be done to study the long term effects of mobile phones particularly of newer technologies like smart phones and 3G.

  15. Auditory brainstem responses to stop consonants predict literacy.

    PubMed

    Neef, Nicole E; Schaadt, Gesa; Friederici, Angela D

    2017-03-01

    Precise temporal coding of speech plays a pivotal role in sound processing throughout the central auditory system, which, in turn, influences literacy acquisition. The current study tests whether an electrophysiological measure of this precision predicts literacy skills. Complex auditory brainstem responses were analysed from 62 native German-speaking children aged 11-13years. We employed the cross-phaseogram approach to compute the quality of the electrophysiological stimulus contrast [da] and [ba]. Phase shifts were expected to vary with literacy. Receiver operating curves demonstrated a feasible sensitivity and specificity of the electrophysiological measure. A multiple regression analysis resulted in a significant prediction of literacy by delta cross-phase as well as phonological awareness. A further commonality analysis separated a unique variance that was explained by the physiological measure, from a unique variance that was explained by the behavioral measure, and common effects of both. Despite multicollinearities between literacy, phonological awareness, and subcortical differentiation of stop consonants, a combined assessment of behavior and physiology strongly increases the ability to predict literacy skills. The strong link between the neurophysiological signature of sound encoding and literacy outcome suggests that the delta cross-phase could indicate the risk of dyslexia and thereby complement subjective psychometric measures for early diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 40 CFR 86.1362-2010 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Torque(percent) 2 3 1a Steady-state 170 Warm Idle 0 1b Transition 20 Linear Transition Linear Transition. 2a Steady-state 173 A 100 2b Transition 20 Linear Transition Linear Transition. 3a Steady-state 219 B 50 3b Transition 20 B Linear Transition. 4a Steady-state 217 B 75 4b Transition 20 Linear...

  17. Tracking Control for an Overactuated Hypersonic Air-Breathing Vehicle with Steady State Constraints (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    choice of a steady state control is completely independent from the choice of a stabilizing control law. This separation is key for the methods we will...develop for steady state optimization in later sections. Combining the steady state with the stabilizing control , we can express the control law as u...for stabilizing control and optimization methods for steady state control, both unconstrained and constrained, we were able to produce promising results

  18. Auditory brainstem responses to chirps delivered by different insert earphones.

    PubMed

    Elberling, Claus; Kristensen, Sinnet G B; Don, Manuel

    2012-03-01

    The frequency response and sensitivity of the ER-3A and ER-2 insert earphones are measured in the occluded-ear simulator using three ear canal extensions. Compared to the other two extensions, the DB 0370 (Brüel & Kjær), which is recommended by the international standards, introduces a significant resonance peak around 4500 Hz. The ER-3A has an amplitude response like a band-pass filter (1400 Hz, 6 dB/octave -4000 Hz, -36 dB/octave), and a group delay with "ripples" of up to ±0.5 ms, while the ER-2 has an amplitude response, and a group delay which are flat and smooth up to above 10000 Hz. Both earphones are used to record auditory brainstem responses, ABRs, from 22 normal-hearing ears in response to two chirps and a click at levels from 20 to 80 dB nHL. While the click-ABRs are slightly larger for ER-2 than for ER-3A, the chirp-ABRs are much larger for ER-2 than for ER-3A at levels below 60 dB nHL. With a simulated amplitude response of the ER-3A and the smooth group delay of the ER-2 it is shown that the increased chirp-ABR amplitude with the ER-2 is caused by its broader amplitude response and not by its smoother group delay. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  19. Experiential Response to Auditory and Visual Hallucination Suggestions in Hypnotic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanos, Nicholas P.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of several attitudinal, cognitive skill, and personality variables in response to auditory and visual hallucination suggestions to hypnotic subjects are assessed. Cooperative attitudes toward hypnosis and involvement in everyday imaginative activities (absorption) correlated with response to auditory and visual hallucination…

  20. Experiential Response to Auditory and Visual Hallucination Suggestions in Hypnotic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanos, Nicholas P.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of several attitudinal, cognitive skill, and personality variables in response to auditory and visual hallucination suggestions to hypnotic subjects are assessed. Cooperative attitudes toward hypnosis and involvement in everyday imaginative activities (absorption) correlated with response to auditory and visual hallucination…

  1. Steady-State Voltammetry of a Microelectrode in a Closed Bipolar Cell

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Guerrette, Joshua P.; Zhang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the theory and experimental study of the steady-state voltammetric behavior of a microelectrode used as a limiting pole in a closed bipolar electrochemical cell. We show that the steady-state voltammetric response of a microelectrode used in a closed bipolar cell can be quantitatively understood by considering the responses of both poles in their respective conventional two-electrode setups. In comparison to a conventional electrochemical cell the voltammetric response of the bipolar cell has a similar sigmoidal shape and limiting current, however, the response is often slower than that of the typical two-electrode setup. This leads to a broader voltammogram and a decreased wave slope which can be somewhat misleading and appear that the process being studied is irreversible when it instead can be a result of the coupling of two reversible processes. We show that a large limiting current on the excess pole would facilitate the observation of a faster voltammetric response and both redox concentration and electrode area of the excess pole affect the wave shape. Both factors should be maximized in electroanalytical experiments in order to obtain fast voltammetric responses on the main electrode of interest and to detect quick changes in analyte concentrations. PMID:22992030

  2. Cross-Modal Plasticity in Higher-Order Auditory Cortex of Congenitally Deaf Cats Does Not Limit Auditory Responsiveness to Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Lomber, Stephen G.; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Congenital sensory deprivation can lead to reorganization of the deprived cortical regions by another sensory system. Such cross-modal reorganization may either compete with or complement the “original“ inputs to the deprived area after sensory restoration and can thus be either adverse or beneficial for sensory restoration. In congenital deafness, a previous inactivation study documented that supranormal visual behavior was mediated by higher-order auditory fields in congenitally deaf cats (CDCs). However, both the auditory responsiveness of “deaf” higher-order fields and interactions between the reorganized and the original sensory input remain unknown. Here, we studied a higher-order auditory field responsible for the supranormal visual function in CDCs, the auditory dorsal zone (DZ). Hearing cats and visual cortical areas served as a control. Using mapping with microelectrode arrays, we demonstrate spatially scattered visual (cross-modal) responsiveness in the DZ, but show that this did not interfere substantially with robust auditory responsiveness elicited through cochlear implants. Visually responsive and auditory-responsive neurons in the deaf auditory cortex formed two distinct populations that did not show bimodal interactions. Therefore, cross-modal plasticity in the deaf higher-order auditory cortex had limited effects on auditory inputs. The moderate number of scattered cross-modally responsive neurons could be the consequence of exuberant connections formed during development that were not pruned postnatally in deaf cats. Although juvenile brain circuits are modified extensively by experience, the main driving input to the cross-modally (visually) reorganized higher-order auditory cortex remained auditory in congenital deafness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In a common view, the “unused” auditory cortex of deaf individuals is reorganized to a compensatory sensory function during development. According to this view, cross-modal plasticity takes

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1042 - Steady-State Duty Cycles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...%. 1bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 2aSteady-state 166 63% 25%. 2bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 3aSteady-state 570 91% 75%. 3bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 4aSteady-state 175 80% 50%. 1 Speed terms are defined...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1042 - Steady-State Duty Cycles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...%. 1bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 2aSteady-state 166 63% 25%. 2bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 3aSteady-state 570 91% 75%. 3bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 4aSteady-state 175 80% 50%. 1 Speed terms are defined...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1042 - Steady-State Duty Cycles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...%. 1bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 2aSteady-state 166 63% 25%. 2bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 3aSteady-state 570 91% 75%. 3bTransition 20 Linear transition Linear transition in torque. 4aSteady-state 175 80% 50%. 1 Speed terms are defined...

  6. Simultaneously-evoked auditory potentials (SEAP): A new method for concurrent measurement of cortical and subcortical auditory-evoked activity.

    PubMed

    Slugocki, Christopher; Bosnyak, Daniel; Trainor, Laurel J

    2017-03-01

    Recent electrophysiological work has evinced a capacity for plasticity in subcortical auditory nuclei in human listeners. Similar plastic effects have been measured in cortically-generated auditory potentials but it is unclear how the two interact. Here we present Simultaneously-Evoked Auditory Potentials (SEAP), a method designed to concurrently elicit electrophysiological brain potentials from inferior colliculus, thalamus, and primary and secondary auditory cortices. Twenty-six normal-hearing adult subjects (mean 19.26 years, 9 male) were exposed to 2400 monaural (right-ear) presentations of a specially-designed stimulus which consisted of a pure-tone carrier (500 or 600 Hz) that had been amplitude-modulated at the sum of 37 and 81 Hz (depth 100%). Presentation followed an oddball paradigm wherein the pure-tone carrier was set to 500 Hz for 85% of presentations and pseudo-randomly changed to 600 Hz for the remaining 15% of presentations. Single-channel electroencephalographic data were recorded from each subject using a vertical montage referenced to the right earlobe. We show that SEAP elicits a 500 Hz frequency-following response (FFR; generated in inferior colliculus), 80 (subcortical) and 40 (primary auditory cortex) Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a (when there is an occasional change in carrier frequency; secondary auditory cortex) in addition to the obligatory N1-P2 complex (secondary auditory cortex). Analyses showed that subcortical and cortical processes are linked as (i) the latency of the FFR predicts the phase delay of the 40 Hz steady-state response, (ii) the phase delays of the 40 and 80 Hz steady-state responses are correlated, and (iii) the fidelity of the FFR predicts the latency of the N1 component. The SEAP method offers a new approach for measuring the dynamic encoding of acoustic features at multiple levels of the auditory pathway. As such, SEAP is a promising tool with which to study how

  7. Development of Steady-State Diffusion Gradients for the Cultivation of Degradative Microbial Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Wolfaardt, G. M.; Lawrence, J. R.; Hendry, M. J.; Robarts, R. D.; Caldwell, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    A diffusion gradient plate was constructed and evaluated for its potential use in the isolation of degradative microbial consortia from natural habitats. In this model, a steady-state concentration gradient of diclofop methyl, established by diffusion through an agarose gel, provided the carbon for microbial growth. Colonization of the gel surface was observed with epifluorescence and scanning confocal laser microscopy to determine microbial responses to the diclofop gradient. A detectable gradient developed over a narrow band (<10 mm). Consequently, quantitative analyses of the microbial response to the gradient were difficult to obtain. A two-dimensional, finite-element numerical transport model for advective-diffusive transport was used to simulate concentration and flux profiles in the physical model. The simulated profiles were correlated with the measured concentration gradient (R2 = 0.89) and the cell numbers on the gel surface (R2 = 0.85). The numerical model was subsequently used to redesign the physical model. The detectable concentration gradient in the modified physical model extended over the length of the gel (38 mm). The simulated profile again showed a good correlation with the measured profile (R2 = 0.96) and the microbial responses to the concentration gradient (R2 = 0.99). It was concluded that these gradients provide the steady-state environments needed to sustain steady-state consortia. They also provide a physical pathway for the development of degradative biofilms from low to high concentrations of toxicants and simulate conditions under which low concentrations of toxicant are supplied at a constant flux over long periods of time, such as the conditions that could occur in natural environments. Images PMID:16349007

  8. Task-dependent neural representations of salient events in dynamic auditory scenes

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Lan; Elhilali, Mounya

    2014-01-01

    Selecting pertinent events in the cacophony of sounds that impinge on our ears every day is regulated by the acoustic salience of sounds in the scene as well as their behavioral relevance as dictated by top-down task-dependent demands. The current study aims to explore the neural signature of both facets of attention, as well as their possible interactions in the context of auditory scenes. Using a paradigm with dynamic auditory streams with occasional salient events, we recorded neurophysiological responses of human listeners using EEG while manipulating the subjects' attentional state as well as the presence or absence of a competing auditory stream. Our results showed that salient events caused an increase in the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) irrespective of attentional state or complexity of the scene. Such increase supplemented ASSR increases due to task-driven attention. Salient events also evoked a strong N1 peak in the ERP response when listeners were attending to the target sound stream, accompanied by an MMN-like component in some cases and changes in the P1 and P300 components under all listening conditions. Overall, bottom-up attention induced by a salient change in the auditory stream appears to mostly modulate the amplitude of the steady-state response and certain event-related potentials to salient sound events; though this modulation is affected by top-down attentional processes and the prominence of these events in the auditory scene as well. PMID:25100934

  9. Nonequilibrium steady states in contact: approximate thermodynamic structure and zeroth law for driven lattice gases.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Punyabrata; Amann, Christian P; Seifert, Udo

    2010-10-08

    We explore driven lattice gases for the existence of an intensive thermodynamic variable which could determine "equilibration" between two nonequilibrium steady-state systems kept in weak contact. In simulations, we find that these systems satisfy surprisingly simple thermodynamic laws, such as the zeroth law and the fluctuation-response relation between the particle-number fluctuation and the corresponding susceptibility remarkably well. However, at higher densities, small but observable deviations from these laws occur due to nontrivial contact dynamics and the presence of long-range spatial correlations.

  10. High magnetic field test of bismuth Hall sensors for ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, I.; Entler, S.; Kohout, M.; Kočan, M.; Vayakis, G.

    2016-11-01

    Performance of bismuth Hall sensors developed for the ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic was investigated for high magnetic fields in the range ±7 T. Response of the sensors to the magnetic field was found to be nonlinear particularly within the range ±1 T. Significant contribution of the planar Hall effect to the sensors output voltage causing undesirable cross field sensitivity was identified. It was demonstrated that this effect can be minimized by the optimization of the sensor geometry and alignment with the magnetic field and by the application of "current-spinning technique."

  11. High magnetic field test of bismuth Hall sensors for ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Entler, S; Kohout, M; Kočan, M; Vayakis, G

    2016-11-01

    Performance of bismuth Hall sensors developed for the ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic was investigated for high magnetic fields in the range ±7 T. Response of the sensors to the magnetic field was found to be nonlinear particularly within the range ±1 T. Significant contribution of the planar Hall effect to the sensors output voltage causing undesirable cross field sensitivity was identified. It was demonstrated that this effect can be minimized by the optimization of the sensor geometry and alignment with the magnetic field and by the application of "current-spinning technique."

  12. Speech training alters consonant and vowel responses in multiple auditory cortex fields.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Buell, Elizabeth P; Fink, Melyssa K; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Speech sounds evoke unique neural activity patterns in primary auditory cortex (A1). Extensive speech sound discrimination training alters A1 responses. While the neighboring auditory cortical fields each contain information about speech sound identity, each field processes speech sounds differently. We hypothesized that while all fields would exhibit training-induced plasticity following speech training, there would be unique differences in how each field changes. In this study, rats were trained to discriminate speech sounds by consonant or vowel in quiet and in varying levels of background speech-shaped noise. Local field potential and multiunit responses were recorded from four auditory cortex fields in rats that had received 10 weeks of speech discrimination training. Our results reveal that training alters speech evoked responses in each of the auditory fields tested. The neural response to consonants was significantly stronger in anterior auditory field (AAF) and A1 following speech training. The neural response to vowels following speech training was significantly weaker in ventral auditory field (VAF) and posterior auditory field (PAF). This differential plasticity of consonant and vowel sound responses may result from the greater paired pulse depression, expanded low frequency tuning, reduced frequency selectivity, and lower tone thresholds, which occurred across the four auditory fields. These findings suggest that alterations in the distributed processing of behaviorally relevant sounds may contribute to robust speech discrimination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Speech training alters consonant and vowel responses in multiple auditory cortex fields

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Crystal T.; Rahebi, Kimiya C.; Buell, Elizabeth P.; Fink, Melyssa K.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Speech sounds evoke unique neural activity patterns in primary auditory cortex (A1). Extensive speech sound discrimination training alters A1 responses. While the neighboring auditory cortical fields each contain information about speech sound identity, each field processes speech sounds differently. We hypothesized that while all fields would exhibit training-induced plasticity following speech training, there would be unique differences in how each field changes. In this study, rats were trained to discriminate speech sounds by consonant or vowel in quiet and in varying levels of background speech-shaped noise. Local field potential and multiunit responses were recorded from four auditory cortex fields in rats that had received 10 weeks of speech discrimination training. Our results reveal that training alters speech evoked responses in each of the auditory fields tested. The neural response to consonants was significantly stronger in anterior auditory field (AAF) and A1 following speech training. The neural response to vowels following speech training was significantly weaker in ventral auditory field (VAF) and posterior auditory field (PAF). This differential plasticity of consonant and vowel sound responses may result from the greater paired pulse depression, expanded low frequency tuning, reduced frequency selectivity, and lower tone thresholds, which occurred across the four auditory fields. These findings suggest that alterations in the distributed processing of behaviorally relevant sounds may contribute to robust speech discrimination. PMID:25827927

  14. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; De Angeli, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bykov, I.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; Brochard, F.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Litnovsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization in fusion devices under steady state conditions are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions—direct lift-up, sliding, rolling—are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  15. Locating CVBEM collocation points for steady state heat transfer problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method or CVBEM provides a highly accurate means of developing numerical solutions to steady state two-dimensional heat transfer problems. The numerical approach exactly solves the Laplace equation and satisfies the boundary conditions at specified points on the boundary by means of collocation. The accuracy of the approximation depends upon the nodal point distribution specified by the numerical analyst. In order to develop subsequent, refined approximation functions, four techniques for selecting additional collocation points are presented. The techniques are compared as to the governing theory, representation of the error of approximation on the problem boundary, the computational costs, and the ease of use by the numerical analyst. ?? 1985.

  16. Modelling of pulsed and steady-state DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Baruzzo, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Fable, E.; Garzotti, L.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Kemp, R.; King, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stankiewicz, R.; Stępniewski, W.; Vincenzi, P.; Ward, D.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    Scenario modelling for the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) has been carried out using a variety of simulation codes. Two DEMO concepts have been analysed: a pulsed tokamak, characterized by rather conventional physics and technology assumptions (DEMO1) and a steady-state tokamak, with moderately advanced physics and technology assumptions (DEMO2). Sensitivity to impurity concentrations, radiation, and heat transport models has been investigated. For DEMO2, the impact of current driven non-inductively by neutral beams has been studied by full Monte Carlo simulations of the fast ion distribution. The results obtained are a part of a more extensive research and development (R&D) effort carried out in the EU in order to develop a viable option for a DEMO reactor, to be adopted after ITER for fusion energy research.

  17. A Steady-state Trio for Bretherton Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhao; Liu, Zeng; Cui, Jifeng

    2016-12-01

    To investigate if steady-state resonant solution exist for any system of weakly interacting waves in a dispersive medium, a trio is considered in the Bretherton equation based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Time-independent spectrum was found when all components were travelling in the same direction. Within the trio, the amplitude of longer component is larger than that of shorter one. As the difference of wave number between components in trio increases or the nonlinearity of whole system increases, the amplitudes of all components tends to increase simultaneously. These findings are helpful to enrich and deepen our understanding about resonant solutions in any dispersive medium, especially for a two-dimensional scenario.

  18. Relativistic hydrodynamics and non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillane, Michael; Herzog, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We review recent interest in the relativistic Riemann problem as a method for generating a non-equilibrium steady state. In the version of the problem under consideration, the initial conditions consist of a planar interface between two halves of a system held at different temperatures in a hydrodynamic regime. The new double shock solutions are in contrast with older solutions that involve one shock and one rarefaction wave. We use numerical simulations to show that the older solutions are preferred. Briefly we discuss the effects of a conserved charge. Finally, we discuss deforming the relativistic equations with a nonlinear term and how that deformation affects the temperature and velocity in the region connecting the asymptotic fluids.

  19. Steady-state mushy layers: experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppin, S. S. L.; Aussillous, P.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Grae Worster, M.

    A new facility has been developed to investigate the directional solidification of transparent aqueous solutions forming mushy layers in a quasi-two-dimensional system. Experiments have been conducted on NaCl H_{2}O solutions by translating a Hele-Shaw cell at prescribed rates between fixed heat exchangers providing a temperature gradient of approximately 1 (°) C mm(-1) . The mush liquid interface remained planar at all freezing velocities larger than 8 umum s(-1) , while steepling occurred at lower velocities. No significant undercooling of the mush liquid interface was detected at freezing velocities up to 12 umum s(-1) . Mathematical predictions of the steady-state temperature profile and mushy-layer thickness as functions of freezing rate are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  20. Steady State Thermal Analyses of SCEPTOR X-57 Wingtip Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnulo, Sydney L.; Chin, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Andrew D.; Dubois, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Electric aircraft concepts enable advanced propulsion airframe integration approaches that promise increased efficiency as well as reduced emissions and noise. NASA's fully electric Maxwell X-57, developed under the SCEPTOR program, features distributed propulsion across a high aspect ratio wing. There are 14 propulsors in all: 12 high lift motor that are only active during take off and climb, and 2 larger motors positioned on the wingtips that operate over the entire mission. The power electronics involved in the wingtip propulsion are temperature sensitive and therefore require thermal management. This work focuses on the high and low fidelity heat transfer analysis methods performed to ensure that the wingtip motor inverters do not reach their temperature limits. It also explores different geometry configurations involved in the X-57 development and any thermal concerns. All analyses presented are performed at steady state under stressful operating conditions, therefore predicting temperatures which are considered the worst-case scenario to remain conservative.

  1. Steady-State Density Functional Theory for Finite Bias Conductances.

    PubMed

    Stefanucci, G; Kurth, S

    2015-12-09

    In the framework of density functional theory, a formalism to describe electronic transport in the steady state is proposed which uses the density on the junction and the steady current as basic variables. We prove that, in a finite window around zero bias, there is a one-to-one map between the basic variables and both local potential on as well as bias across the junction. The resulting Kohn-Sham system features two exchange-correlation (xc) potentials, a local xc potential, and an xc contribution to the bias. For weakly coupled junctions the xc potentials exhibit steps in the density-current plane which are shown to be crucial to describe the Coulomb blockade diamonds. At small currents these steps emerge as the equilibrium xc discontinuity bifurcates. The formalism is applied to a model benzene junction, finding perfect agreement with the orthodox theory of Coulomb blockade.

  2. Steady-state plasma transition in the Venus ionosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-De-tejada, H.; Intriligator, D. S.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of an extended analysis of the plasma and electric field data of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are presented. The persistent presence of a plasma transition embedded in the flanks of the Venus ionosheath between the bow shock and the ionopause is reported. This transition is identified by the repeated presence of characteristic bursts in the 30 kHz channel of the electric field detector of the PVO. The observed electric field signals coincide with the onset of different plasma conditions in the inner ionosheath where more rarified plasma fluxes are measured. The repeated identification of this intermediate ionosheath transition in the PVO data indicates that it is present as a steady state feature of the Venus plasma environment. The distribution of PVO orbits in which the transition is observed suggests that it is more favorably detected in the vicinity of and downstream from the terminator.

  3. Progress Toward Steady-State Operation on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J, Jacquinot; G, T. Hoang

    2004-02-01

    Important technological and physics issues related to steady-state operation required for next step are being examined on Tore Supra, after a major upgrade of internal components in order to increase the heat extraction capability to 25 MW for 1000 s. Here, we show first experimental results, where all the plasma facing components were actively cooled during pulses exceeding four minutes, with reactor-relevant heat load. New physics was observed in non-inductively driven plasmas, including a stationary peaked radial profile of the plasma density generated by an anomalous inward pinch; and a regime characterized by sinusoidal oscillations of central electron temperature, governed by non-linear coupling between heat transport and plasma current analogous to a predator-prey mechanism.

  4. Transient and steady state modelling of a coupled WECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, G. K.; Tan, J. K.

    The paper presents a method for simulation of a wind turbine using a dc motor. The armature and field voltages of the dc motor are independently regulated to obtain torque-speed characteristics which correspond to those of a wind turbine at different wind speeds. The mass moment of inertia of the wind turbine is represented by adding a rotating mass to a parallel shaft which is positively coupled to the motor shaft. To verify the method of simulation, an American multiblade wind turbine is chosen, loaded by coupling to a centrifugal pump. Using the principle of conservation of energy and characteristics of both constituent units, two mathematical models are proposed: one for steady state operation and another for the transient state. The close comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results validates the proposed models and the method of simulation. The experimental method is described and the results of the experimental and theoretical investigation are presented.

  5. Steady-state magma discharge at Etna 1971-81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.; Guest, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Throughout the past decade Mount Etna has been in almost continuous activity and even during periods of repose incandescent lava has often been visible in at least one of the summit vents. Using observations by Italian, British and French volcanological teams, the volumes of lava produced by each eruption from 1971 to July 1981 have been estimated. The computed output of magma for this period approximates to a rate of 0.7 cu m/s. This is compared with the output rate estimates for Etna's historic past. The steady-state nature of the output during the past decade has implications for the interpretation of the volcano's internal plumbing and the petrology of its lavas, and the assumption that this state will be maintained allows a discussion of the timing and magnitude of future eruptions.

  6. Steady state asymmetric planetary electrical induction. [by solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horning, B. L.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic solution is presented for the steady state electric and magnetic fields induced by the motional electric field of the solar wind in the atmosphere or interior of a planet that is asymmetrically surrounded by solar wind plasma. The electrically conducting ionosphere or interior must be in direct electrical contact with the solar wind over the day side of the planet. The conducting region of the planet is modeled by a sphere or a spherical shell of arbitrarily stratified electrical conductivity. A monoconducting cylindrical cavity is assumed to extend downstream on the night side of the planet. The solar wind is assumed to be highly conducting so that the induced fields are confined to the planet and cavity. Induced currents close as sheet currents at the solar wind-cavity and solar wind-planet interfaces. Numerical evaluations of the analytic formulas are carried out for a uniformly conducting spherical model.

  7. Characterization of a class of stellarator steady states

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzner, Harold

    2011-01-15

    A stellarator steady state is obtained for a specific class of magnetic fields by a formal expansion in the small Larmor radius parameters of the coupled ion-electron Fokker-Planck equations. A system of relatively simple ordinary differential equations is given to determine the plasma profile functions, the number density, the temperature, and the electrostatic potential. A particular low collisionality ordering is used. The magnetic field is assumed to have stellarator symmetry of N periods in the toroidal direction and is approximated by a closed magnetic line configuration with rotational transform N/R. The magnetic field is nearly quasisymmetric. The chosen magnetic field also includes a small additional component leading to a configuration without closed lines or closed flux surfaces. The theoretical logic behind this choice of magnetic fields is also presented.

  8. NASA Lewis Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mi, Ye; Tower, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed the LERCHP code. The PC-based LERCHP code can be used to predict the steady-state performance of heat pipes, including the determination of operating temperature and operating limits which might be encountered under specified conditions. The code contains a vapor flow algorithm which incorporates vapor compressibility and axially varying heat input. For the liquid flow in the wick, Darcy s formula is employed. Thermal boundary conditions and geometric structures can be defined through an interactive input interface. A variety of fluid and material options as well as user defined options can be chosen for the working fluid, wick, and pipe materials. This report documents the current effort at GRC to update the LERCHP code for operating in a Microsoft Windows (Microsoft Corporation) environment. A detailed analysis of the model is presented. The programming architecture for the numerical calculations is explained and flowcharts of the key subroutines are given

  9. Steady-state thermodynamics for population growth in fluctuating environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sughiyama, Yuki; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2017-01-01

    We report that population dynamics in fluctuating environments is characterized by a mathematically equivalent structure to steady-state thermodynamics. By employing the structure, population growth in fluctuating environments is decomposed into housekeeping and excess parts. The housekeeping part represents the integral of the stationary growth rate for each condition during a history of the environmental change. The excess part accounts for the excess growth induced by environmental fluctuations. Focusing on the excess growth, we obtain a Clausius inequality, which gives the upper bound of the excess growth. The equality is shown to be achieved in quasistatic environmental changes. We also clarify that this bound can be evaluated by the "lineage fitness", which is an experimentally observable quantity.

  10. Petri nets for steady state analysis of metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Voss, Klaus; Heiner, Monika; Koch, Ina

    2011-01-01

    Computer assisted analysis and simulation of biochemical pathways can improve the understanding of the structure and the dynamics of cell processes considerably. The construction and quantitative analysis of kinetic models is often impeded by the lack of reliable data. However, as the topological structure of biochemical systems can be regarded to remain constant in time, a qualitative analysis of a pathway model was shown to be quite promising as it can render a lot of useful knowledge, e. g., about its structural invariants. The topic of this paper are pathways whose substances have reached a dynamic concentration equilibrium (steady state). It is argued that appreciated tools from biochemistry and also low-level Petri nets can yield only part of the desired results, whereas executable high-level net models lead to a number of valuable additional insights by combining symbolic analysis and simulation.

  11. Steady state analysis of metabolic pathways using Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Voss, Klaus; Heiner, Monika; Koch, Ina

    2003-01-01

    Computer assisted analysis and simulation of biochemical pathways can improve the understanding of the structure and the dynamics of cell processes considerably. The construction and quantitative analysis of kinetic models is often impeded by the lack of reliable data. However, as the topological structure of biochemical systems can be regarded to remain constant in time, a qualitative analysis of a pathway model was shown to be quite promising as it can render a lot of useful knowledge, e. g., about its structural invariants. The topic of this paper are pathways whose substances have reached a dynamic concentration equilibrium (steady state). It is argued that appreciated tools from biochemistry and also low-level Petri nets can yield only part of the desired results, whereas executable high-level net models lead to a number of valuable additional insights by combining symbolic analysis and simulation.

  12. Steady-state spectroscopy of new biological probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2007-02-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and (2,2'-bipyridine)-3,3'-diol (BP(OH) II) were studied here free in solution and in human serum albumin (HSA) in order to test their applicability as new biological probes. HBO and BP(OH) II are known to undergo intramolecular proton transfers in the excited state. Their absorption and fluorescence spectra are sensitive to environmental change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, thus allowing the opportunity to use them as environment-sensitive probes. The effect of water on the steady state spectra of the two molecules also shows unique features which may position them as water sensors in biological systems. For HBO in buffer, fluorescence is only due to the syn-keto tautomer, whereas in HSA the fluorescence is due to four species in equilibrium in the excited state (the syn-keto tautomer, the anti-enol tautomer, the solvated syn-enol tautomer, and the anion species of HBO). Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of HBO in HSA indicates that HBO is exposed to less water in the HBO:HSA complex. For the BP(OH) II molecule, unique absorption due to water was observed in the spectral region of 400-450 nm. This absorption decreases in the presence of HSA due to less accessibility to water as a result of binding to HSA. Fluorescence of BP(OH) II is due solely to the di-keto tautomer after double proton transfer in the excited state. The fluorescence peak of BP(OH) II shows a red-shift upon HSA recognition which is attributed to the hydrophobic environment inside the binding site of HSA. We discuss also the effect of probe-inclusion inside well-defined hydrophobic cavities of cyclodextrins.

  13. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N. Li, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H{sub 98}∼1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te∼4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  14. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H98˜1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te˜4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  15. A mathematical model of pan evaporation under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wee Ho; Roderick, Michael L.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of changing climate, global pan evaporation records have shown a spatially-averaged trend of ∼ -2 to ∼ -3 mm a-2 over the past 30-50 years. This global phenomenon has motivated the development of the "PenPan" model (Rotstayn et al., 2006). However, the original PenPan model has yet to receive an independent experimental evaluation. Hence, we constructed an instrumented US Class A pan at Canberra Airport (Australia) and monitored it over a three-year period (2007-2010) to uncover the physics of pan evaporation under non-steady state conditions. The experimental investigations of pan evaporation enabled theoretical formulation and parameterisation of the aerodynamic function considering the wind, properties of air and (with or without) the bird guard effect. The energy balance investigation allowed for detailed formulation of the short- and long-wave radiation associated with the albedos and the emissivities of the pan water surface and the pan wall. Here, we synthesise and generalise those earlier works to develop a new model called the "PenPan-V2" model for application under steady state conditions (i.e., uses a monthly time step). Two versions (PenPan-V2C and PenPan-V2S) are tested using pan evaporation data available across the Australian continent. Both versions outperformed the original PenPan model with better representation of both the evaporation rate and the underlying physics of a US Class A pan. The results show the improved solar geometry related calculations (e.g., albedo, area) for the pan system led to a clear improvement in representing the seasonal cycle of pan evaporation. For general applications, the PenPan-V2S is simpler and suited for applications including an evaluation of long-term trends in pan evaporation.

  16. Optimizing organic fertilizer applications under steady-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Crohn, David M

    2006-01-01

    Because organic N fertilizers must be mineralized before they become plant-available, application designs should consider time and temperature effects on N release as well as crop N requirements. This study presents deterministic (DOpt) and stochastic (SOpt) linear optimization models to determine sustainable land application schedules. The easily solved models minimize the amount of N that is applied while assuring than crop N demands are met as they develop. Temperature effects on N mineralization were included by using the Arrhenius equation to create a temperature-adjusted time series. Uncertainties associated with mineralization rates and the temperature-adjustment (Q10) factor are considered by SOpt. Examples are presented for a summer maize (Zea mays L.) and winter triticale (Triticum aestivum L. x Secale cereale L.) rotation operated by a hypothetical dairy operation in Stanislaus County, California. Monte Carlo simulations were used to test the models. A closed-form solution for estimating the time until steady state is presented and steady-state conditions were reached within 7 yr after applications were initiated. Because of temperature effects, DOpt solutions were 12% greater during the winter and 29% lower during the summer than a reference approach that applied liquid manure at 130% of the crop N demand. Stochastic linear optimization values were 1.7% greater than DOpt values in the summer and 6.2% greater in the winter. Surplus N estimates from Monte Carlo simulations averaged 104 kg ha(-1) for DOpt and 126 ka ha(-1) for SOpt, but SOpt was much less likely to result in crop N deficits. Linear optimization is a viable tool for scheduling organic N applications.

  17. Equatorial ground ice on Mars: Steady-state stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellon, Michael T.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Postawko, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Current Martian equatorial surface temperatures are too warm for water ice to exist at the surface for any appreciable length of time before subliming into the atmosphere. Subsurface temperatures are generally warmer still and, despite the presence of a diffusive barrier of porous regolith material, it has been shown by Smoluchowski, Clifford and Hillel, and Fanale et al. that buried ground ice will also sublime and be lost to the atmosphere in a relatively short time. We investigate the behavior of this subliming subsurface ice and show that it is possible for ice to maintain at a steady-state depth, where sublimation and diffusive loss to the atmosphere is balanced by resupply from beneath by diffusion and recondensation of either a deeper buried ice deposits or ground water. We examine the behavior of equatorial ground ice with a numercial time-marching molecular diffusion model. In our model we allow for diffusion of water vapor through a porous regolith, variations in diffusivity and porosity with ice content, and recondensation of sublimed water vapor. A regolith containing considerable amounts of ice can still be very porous, allowing water vapor to diffuse up from deeper within the ice layer where temperatures are warmer due to the geothermal gradient. This vapor can then recondense nearer to the surface where ice had previously sublimed and been lost to the atmosphere. As a result we find that ice deposits migrate to find a steady-state depth, which represents a balance between diffusive loss to the atmosphere through the overlying porous regolith and diffusive resupply through a porous icy regolith below. This depth depends primarily on the long-term mean surface temperature and the nature of the geothermal gradient, and is independent of the ice-free porosity and the regolith diffusivity. Only the rate of loss of ground ice depends on diffusive properties.

  18. Torque-balanced Steady States of Single-component Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, James R.

    2005-10-01

    Penning-Malmberg traps provide an excellent method to confine single-component plasmas. Specially tailored, high-density plasmas can be created in these devices by the application of azimuthally phased rf fields [i.e., the so-called ``rotating wall'' (RW) technique]. Recently, we reported a new regime of RW compression of electron (or positron) plasmas ootnotetextJ. R. Danielson and C. M. Surko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 035001 (2005).. In this ``strong-drive'' regime, plasmas are compressed until the E x B rotation frequency, φE (with φE plasma density) approaches the applied frequency, φRW. Good compression is achieved over a broad range of RW frequencies, without the need to tune to a mode in the plasma. The resulting steady-state density is found to be only weakly dependent on the applied RW amplitude. A simple nonlinear dynamical model explains these observations as convergence to an attracting fixed point - the torque-balanced steady state. The applied RW torque, τRW, can be understood as a generic, linear coupling between the plasma and the Debye- shielded RW electric field. The thermodynamic equations ootnotetextT. M. O'Neil and D. H. E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2163 (1998). governing the evolution will be discussed and compared to the experiments. This new regime facilitates improved compression and colder plasmas (since less transport means less plasma heating). Factors limiting the utility of the technique and applications will be discussed, including the development of a multicell trap to confine large numbers (i.e., N >=10^ 12) of positrons ootnotetextC. M. Surko and R. G. Greaves, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2333 (2004)..

  19. Age-related increase in cross-sensory noise in resting and steady-state cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Hugenschmidt, Christina E.; Mozolic, Jennifer L.; Tan, Huan; Kraft, Robert A.; Laurienti, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral research indicates that healthy aging is accompanied by maintenance of voluntary attentional function in many situations, suggesting older adults are able to use attention to enhance and suppress neural activity. However, other experiments show increased distractibility with age, suggesting a failure of attention. One hypothesis for these apparently conflicting findings is that older adults experience a greater sensory processing load at baseline compared to younger adults. In this situation, older adults might successfully modulate sensory cortical activity relative to a baseline referent condition, but the increased baseline load results in more activity than younger adults after attentional modulation. This hypothesis was tested by comparing average functional brain activity in auditory cortex using quantitative perfusion imaging during resting state and steady-state visual conditions. It was observed that older adults demonstrated greater processing of task-irrelevant auditory background noise than younger adults in both conditions. As expected, auditory activity was attenuated relative to rest during a visually engaging task for both older and younger participants. However, older adults continued to show greater auditory processing than their younger counterparts even after this task modulation. Furthermore, auditory activity during the visual task was predictive of cross-sensory distraction on a behavioral task in older adults. Together, these findings suggest that older adults are more distractible than younger, and the cause of this increased distractibility may lie in baseline brain functioning. PMID:19415481

  20. Effect of airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation and infection on steady-state bronchiectasis in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Li, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in clinically stable bronchiectasis in mainland China remains unclear. Objective To compare the inflammation and lung function impairment in bronchiectasis patients isolated or infected with PA, potentially pathogenic microorganisms (PPMs) and commensals, and to identify factors associated with PA isolation and infection. Methods Patients with steady-state bronchiectasis and healthy subjects were recruited. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to determine inflammatory markers and bacterial loads in steady-state bronchiectasis and health. Spirometry and diffusing capacity were also measured. Results We enrolled 144 bronchiectasis patients and 23 healthy subjects. PA isolation and infection accounted for 44 and 39 patients, who demonstrated significant inflammatory responses and markedly impaired spirometry, but not diffusing capacity, compared with healthy subjects and patients isolated with other PPMs and commensals (all P<0.05). Except for heightened sputum inflammatory responses, there were no notable differences in serum inflammation and lung function as with the increased density of PA. Female gender [odds ratio (OR): 3.10 for PA isolation; OR: 3.74 for PA infection], 4 or more exacerbations within 2 years (OR: 3.74 for PA isolation, OR: 2.95 for PA infection) and cystic bronchiectasis (OR: 3.63 for PA isolation, OR: 4.47 for PA infection) were the factors consistently associated with PA isolation and infection. Conclusions PA elicits intense inflammation and lung function impairment in steady-state bronchiectasis. The density of PA does not correlate with most clinical indices. PA infection is associated with females, frequent exacerbations and cystic bronchiectasis. PMID:25973228