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Sample records for augmented flow fields

  1. Modeling dynamic stall on wind turbine blades under rotationally augmented flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur, S.; Schreck, S.; Sorensen, N. N.; Bergami, L.

    2015-04-22

    It is well known that airfoils under unsteady flow conditions with a periodically varying angle of attack exhibit aerodynamic characteristics different from those under steady flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as dynamic stall. It is also well known that the steady aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in the inboard region of a rotating blade differ from those under steady two-dimensional (2D) flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as rotational augmentation. This paper presents an investigation of these two phenomena together in the inboard parts of wind turbine blades. This analysis is carried out using data from three sources: (1) the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI experimental data, including constant as well as continuously pitching blade conditions during axial operation, (2) data from unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) carried out using the Technical University of Denmark’s in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D, and (3) data from a simplified model based on the blade element momentum method with a dynamic stall subroutine that uses rotationally augmented steady-state polars obtained from steady Phase VI experimental sequences, instead of the traditional 2D nonrotating data. The aim of this work is twofold. First, the blade loads estimated by the DDES simulations are compared to three select cases of the N sequence experimental data, which serves as a validation of the DDES method. Results show reasonable agreement between the two data in two out of three cases studied. Second, the dynamic time series of the lift and the moment polars obtained from the experiments are compared to those from the dynamic stall subroutine that uses the rotationally augmented steady polars. This allowed the differences between the stall phenomenon on the inboard parts of harmonically pitching blades on a rotating wind turbine and the classic dynamic stall representation in 2D flow to be

  2. Nonsteady-Flow Thrust Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foa, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Ejector augmenters in which the transfer of mechanical energy from the primary to the secondary flow takes place through the work of interface pressure forces are investigated. Nonsteady flow processes are analyzed from the standpoint of energy transfer efficiency and a comparison of a rotary jet augmenter to an ejector is presented.

  3. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Flow interaction of diffuser augmented wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göltenbott, U.; Ohya, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Jamieson, P.

    2016-09-01

    Up-scaling of wind turbines has been a major trend in order to reduce the cost of energy generation from the wind. Recent studies however show that for a given technology, the cost always rises with upscaling, notably due to the increased mass of the system. To reach capacities beyond 10 MW, multi-rotor systems (MRS) have promising advantages. On the other hand, diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs) can significantly increase the performance of the rotor. Up to now, diffuser augmentation has only been applied to single small wind turbines. In the present research, DAWTs are used in a multi-rotor system. In wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamics of two and three DAWTs, spaced in close vicinity in the same plane normal to a uniform flow, have been analysed. Power increases of up to 5% and 9% for the two and three rotor configurations are respectively achieved in comparison to a stand-alone turbine. The physical dynamics of the flows are analysed on the basis of the results obtained with a stand-alone turbine.

  5. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  6. Entrainment and thrust augmentation in pulsatile ejector flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Bernal, L.; Bui, T.

    1981-01-01

    This study comprised direct thrust measurements, flow visualization by use of a spark shadowgraph technique, and mean and fluctuating velocity measurements with a pitot tube and linearized constant temperature hot-wire anemometry respectively. A gain in thrust of as much as 10 to 15% was observed for the pulsatile ejector flow as compared to the steady flow configuration. From the velocity profile measurements, it is concluded that this enhanced augmentation for pulsatile flow as compared to a nonpulsatile one was accomplished by a corresponding increased entrainment by the primary jet flow. It is also concluded that the augmentation and total entrainment by a constant area ejector critically depends upon the inlet geometry of the ejector. Experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of primary jet to ejector area ratio, ejector length, and presence of a diffuser on pulsatile ejector performance.

  7. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  8. Equivariant mean field flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castéras, Jean-baptiste

    2013-12-01

    We consider a gradient flow associated to the mean field equation on (M,g), a compact Riemannian surface without boundary. We prove that this flow exists for all time. Moreover, letting G be a group of isometry acting on (M,g), we obtain the convergence of the flow to a solution of the mean field equation under suitable hypothesis on the orbits of points of M under the action of G.

  9. Augmented reality three-dimensional display with light field fusion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Songlin; Wang, Peng; Sang, Xinzhu; Li, Chengyu

    2016-05-30

    A video see-through augmented reality three-dimensional display method is presented. The system that is used for dense viewpoint augmented reality presentation fuses the light fields of the real scene and the virtual model naturally. Inherently benefiting from the rich information of the light field, depth sense and occlusion can be handled under no priori depth information of the real scene. A series of processes are proposed to optimize the augmented reality performance. Experimental results show that the reconstructed fused 3D light field on the autostereoscopic display is well presented. The virtual model is naturally integrated into the real scene with a consistence between binocular parallax and monocular depth cues.

  10. Kamoamoa Flow Field Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-06

    This frame from an animation, which depicts the growth of the Kamoamoa Flow Field, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, was generated from a sequence of ten multispectral images acquired between September 3 and 17, 1995.

  11. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  12. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  13. The Augmented Lagrangian Method Applied to Unsolvable Power Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambaldi, Mario C.; Francisco, Juliano B.; Barboza, Luciano V.

    2011-11-01

    This work aims to present and discuss an approach to restore the network electric equations solvability. The unsolvable power flow is modeled as a constrained optimization problem. The cost function is the least squares of the real and reactive power mismatches sum. The equality constraints are the real and reactive power mismatches at null injection buses and/or at those buses that must have their power demands totally supplied for technical or economical criteria. The mathematical model is solved by an algorithm based on the Augmented Lagrangian method considering the particular structure of the problem. Numerical results for a real equivalent system from the Brazilian South-Southeast region are presented in order to assess the performance of the proposed approach.

  14. Alturas Lake Creek Flow Augmentation, 1986 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, John; Lloyd, John; Webster, Bert

    1987-04-01

    Two alternatives were outlined in the first statement of work as possibilities for flow augmentation in Alturas Lake Creek. The alternatives were to raise the level of Alturas Lake and to acquire necessary water rights in Alturas Lake Creek. The first alternative considered in the study was raising the water level at Alturas Lake with a low head dam. Raising Alturas Lake, appeared feasible in that it provided the necessary fish flows in Alturas Lake Creek. However, raising the level of Alturas Lake has adverse effects to other resources and forced pursuing the second alternative as defined in this report. Some of these effects included: flooding Smokey Bear boat ramp, inundation of recreation beaches for extended periods, flooding of the campground and some of the road system, potentially contaminating the quality of lake water from flooded toilet vaults, and destroying the conifer canopy around the lake. Maintenance and operation costs of the dam, along with the need to have a watermaster to distribute flows over the course of the irrigation season, raised additional concerns that detracted from this alternative. The second alternative considered was the acquisition of water rights. This led to an appraisal of the water right values which was completed by BPA with a comparison appraisal done by the Forest Service.

  15. Numerical Study of Flow Augmented Thermal Management for Entry and Re-Entry Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Neroorkar, Kshitij D.; Chen, Yen-Sen; Wang, Ten-See; Daso, Endwell O.

    2007-01-01

    The use of a flow augmented thermal management system for entry and re-entr environments is one method for reducing heat and drag loads. This concept relies on jet penetration from supersonic and hypersonic counterflowing jets that could significantly weaken and disperse the shock-wave system of the spacecraft flow field. The objective of this research effort is to conduct parametric studies of the supersonic flow over a 2.6% scale model of the Apollo capsule, with and without the counterflowing jet, using time-accurate and steady-state computational fluid dynamics simulations. The numerical studies, including different freestream Mach number angle of attack counterflowing jet mass flow rate, and nozzle configurations, were performed to examine their effect on the drag and beat loads and to explore the counternowing jet condition. The numerical results were compared with the test data obtained from transonic blow-down wind-tunnel experiments conducted independently at NASA MSFC.

  16. Holographic and light-field imaging for augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jong-Young; Jang, Changwon; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Chang-Kun

    2017-02-01

    We discuss on the recent state of the augmented reality (AR) display technology. In order to realize AR, various seethrough three-dimensional (3D) display techniques have been reported. We describe the AR display with 3D functionality such as light-field display and holography. See-through light-field display can be categorized by the optical elements which are used for see-through property: optical elements controlling path of the light-fields and those generating see-through light-field. Holographic display can be also a good candidate for AR display because it can reconstruct wavefront information and provide realistic virtual information. We introduce the see-through holographic display using various optical techniques.

  17. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  18. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  19. Ground vortex flow field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Delfrate, John H.; Eshleman, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Flow field investigations were conducted at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (water tunnel) to investigate the ground effect produced by the impingement of jets from aircraft nozzles on a ground board in a STOL operation. Effects on the overall flow field with both a stationary and a moving ground board were photographed and compared with similar data found in other references. Nozzle jet impingement angles, nozzle and inlet interaction, side-by-side nozzles, nozzles in tandem, and nozzles and inlets mounted on a flat plate model were investigated. Results show that the wall jet that generates the ground effect is unsteady and the boundary between the ground vortex flow field and the free-stream flow is unsteady. Additionally, the forward projection of the ground vortex flow field with a moving ground board is one-third less than that measured over a fixed ground board. Results also showed that inlets did not alter the ground vortex flow field.

  20. Inlet flow field investigation. Part 1: Transonic flow field survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Salemann, V.; Sussman, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the local inlet flow field characteristics of an advanced tactical supersonic cruise airplane. A data base for the development and validation of analytical codes directed at the analysis of inlet flow fields for advanced supersonic airplanes was established. Testing was conducted at the NASA-Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel at freestream Mach numbers of 0.6 to 1.20 and angles of attack from 0.0 to 10.0 degrees. Inlet flow field surveys were made at locations representative of wing (upper and lower surface) and forebody mounted inlet concepts. Results are presented in the form of local inlet flow field angle of attack, sideflow angle, and Mach number contours. Wing surface pressure distributions supplement the flow field data.

  1. On the correspondence between flow structures and convective heat transfer augmentation for multiple jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzis, Alexandros

    2016-09-01

    The correspondence between local fluid flow structures and convective heat transfer is a fundamental aspect that is not yet fully understood for multiple jet impingement. Therefore, flow field and heat transfer experiments are separately performed investigating mutual-jet interactions exposed in a self-gained crossflow. The measurements are taken in two narrow impingement channels with different cross-sectional areas and a single exit design. Hence, a gradually increased crossflow momentum is developed from the spent air of the upstream jets. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and liquid crystal thermography (LCT) are used in order to investigate the aerothermal characteristics of the channel with high spatial resolution. The PIV measurements are taken at planes normal to the target wall and along the centreline of the jets, providing quantitative flow visualisation of jet and crossflow interactions. Spatially resolved heat transfer coefficient distributions on the target plate are evaluated with transient techniques and a multi-layer of thermochromic liquid crystals. The results are analysed aiming to provide a better understanding about the impact of near-wall flow structures on the convective heat transfer augmentation for these complex flow phenomena.

  2. Integrated flow field (IFF) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Shyhing M. (Inventor); Warshay, Marvin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present disclosure relates in part to a flow field structure comprising a hydrophilic part and a hydrophobic part communicably attached to each other via a connecting interface. The present disclosure further relates to electrochemical cells comprising the aforementioned flow fields.

  3. Frequency-Dependent Material Damping Using Augmenting Thermodynamic Fields (ATF) with Fractional Time Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    field, z - (q + r)7T/2 a,, a2 - material parameter, relation of affinity to the augmenting thermodynamic field a 3 - coupling between two ATFs 0T...frequency range, coupled material constitutive ix relations are developed using the concept of augmenting thermodynamic fields, with non-integer...material, for which the relation of stress to strain is defined by Hooke’s law a = EE , where E is called the modulus of elasticity. For this

  4. Additional Navigational Strategies Can Augment Odor-Gated Rheotaxis for Navigation under Conditions of Variable Flow.

    PubMed

    Vasey, Gabrielle; Lukeman, Ryan; Wyeth, Russell C

    2015-09-01

    The navigation strategies animals use to find sources of odor depend on the olfactory stimuli, the properties of flowing fluids, and the locomotory capabilities of the animal. In high Reynolds number environments, animals typically use odor-gated rheotaxis to find the source of turbulent odor plumes. This strategy succeeds because, although turbulence creates an intermittent chemical cue, the animal follows the (continuous) directional cue created by the flow that is transporting the chemical. However, in nature, animals may lose all contact with an odor plume as variations in the direction of bulk flow cause the plume to be rotated away before the animal reaches the source of the odor. Our goal was to use a mathematical model to test the hypothesis that strategies that augment odor-gated rheotaxis would be beneficial for finding the source of an odor plume in such variable flow. The model links a stochastic variable-direction odor plume with a turbulence-based intermittent chemical signal and four different movement strategies, including: odor-gated rheotaxis alone (as a control), odor-gated rheotaxis augmented by further rheotaxis in the absence of odor, odor-gated rheotaxis augmented by a random walk, and odor-gated rheotaxis augmented by movement actively guided by the heading of the flow when the odor was still present. We found that any of the three augmented strategies could improve on strict odor-gated rheotaxis. Moreover, variations in performance caused the best strategy to depend on the speed of movement of the animal and the magnitude of the variation in flow, and more subtly on the duration over which the augmented strategy was performed. For most combinations of parameters in the model, either augmenting with a random walk or following the last-known heading were the best-performing strategies. Overall, our results suggest that marine animals that rely on odor cues to navigate in turbulent environments may augment odor-gated rheotaxis with additional

  5. Integration of indocyanine green videoangiography with operative microscope: augmented reality for interactive assessment of vascular structures and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Skoch, Jesse; Watson, Jeffrey R; Lemole, G Michael; Romanowski, Marek; Anton, Rein

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of adequate blood flow and exclusion of flow from lesions are key concepts of vascular neurosurgery. Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence videoangiography is now widely used for the intraoperative assessment of vessel patency. Here, we present a proof-of-concept investigation of fluorescence angiography with augmented microscopy enhancement: real-time overlay of fluorescence videoangiography within the white light field of view of conventional operative microscopy. The femoral artery was exposed in 7 anesthetized rats. The dissection microscope was augmented to integrate real-time electronically processed near-infrared filtered images with conventional white light images seen through the standard oculars. This was accomplished by using an integrated organic light-emitting diode display to yield superimposition of white light and processed near-infrared images. ICG solution was injected into the jugular vein, and fluorescent femoral artery flow was observed. Fluorescence angiography with augmented microscopy enhancement was able to detect ICG fluorescence in a small artery of interest. Fluorescence appeared as a bright-green signal in the ocular overlaid with the anatomic image and limited to the anatomic borders of the femoral artery and its branches. Surrounding anatomic structures were clearly visualized. Observation of ICG within the vessel lumens permitted visualization of the blood flow. Recorded video loops could be reviewed in an offline mode for more detailed assessment of the vasculature. The overlay of fluorescence videoangiography within the field of view of the white light operative microscope allows real-time assessment of the blood flow within vessels during simultaneous surgical manipulation. This technique could improve intraoperative decision making during complex neurovascular procedures.

  6. Numerical Solution of Viscoplastic Flow Problems by Augmented Lagrangians.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Lagrange multipliers. RAIRO Anal. Numer. 8R2, p 129-151. CIARLET, P. G. (1978]: The finite element method for elliptic problems. Amsterdan, North...lineaires. RAIRO , serie rouge, Anal. Numer., 11, p 369-400. TANGUY, P. (19831: Numerical Simulation of a Pseudo 3-D Turbulent Flow in a iAplan Turbine

  7. Augmentation of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow by Microvascular Anastomosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    the Adult Foxhound after Middle Cerebral Root Occlusion 5 ABSTRACT Intracranial surgical procedures for cerebrovascular occlusive disease...11 I. INTRODUCTION Recent advances in stroke therapy have been highlighted by the development of direct intracraniai surgical approaches to...experimental acute stroke in dogs. J. Neurosurg. 38:26-31, 1973. 2. Fein, J, M. and Boulos, R, Local cerebral blood flow in experimental middle

  8. Diabetes augments in vivo microvascular blood flow dynamics after stroke.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Kelly A; Brown, Craig E

    2013-12-04

    Stroke usually affects people with underlying medical conditions. In particular, diabetics are significantly more likely to have a stroke and the prognosis for recovery is poor. Because diabetes is associated with degenerative changes in the vasculature of many organs, we sought to determine how hyperglycemia affects blood flow dynamics after an ischemic stroke. Longitudinal in vivo two-photon imaging was used to track microvessels before and after photothrombotic stroke in a diabetic mouse model. Chronic hyperglycemia exacerbated acute (3-7 d) ischemia-induced increases in blood flow velocity, vessel lumen diameter, and red blood cell flux in peri-infarct regions. These changes in blood flow dynamics were most evident in superficial blood vessels within 500 μm from the infarct, rather than deeper or more distant cortical regions. Long-term imaging of diabetic mice not subjected to stroke indicated that these acute stroke-related changes in vascular function could not be attributed to complications from hyperglycemia alone. Treating diabetic mice with insulin immediately after stroke resulted in less severe alterations in blood flow within the first 7 d of recovery, but had more variable results at later time points. Analysis of microvessel branching patterns revealed that stroke led to a pruning of microvessels in peri-infarct cortex, with very few instances of sprouting. These results indicate that chronic hyperglycemia significantly affects the vascular response to ischemic stroke and that insulin only partially mitigates these changes. The combination of these acute and chronic alterations in blood flow dynamics could underlie diabetes-related deficits in cortical plasticity and stroke recovery.

  9. NADH augments blood flow in physiologically activated retina and visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Yasuo; Chang, Katherine; Williamson, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism(s) that increase retinal and visual cortex blood flows in response to visual stimulation are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that increased transfer of electrons and protons from glucose to cytosolic free NAD+, reducing it to NADH, evoked by increased energy metabolism, fuels redox-signaling pathways that augment flow. The near-equilibrium between free cytosolic NADH/NAD+ and lactate/pyruvate ratios established by lactate dehydrogenase predicts that transfer of additional electrons and protons from injected lactate to NAD+ will augment the elevated blood flows in stimulated retina and cortex, whereas transfer of electrons and protons from NADH to injected pyruvate will attenuate the elevated flows. These predictions were tested and confirmed in rats. Increased flows evoked by stimulation also were prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. These findings support an important role for cytosolic free NADH in fueling a signaling cascade that increases NO production, which augments blood flow in photostimulated retina and visual cortex.

  10. Particle and flow field holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trolinger, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The current status of particle field and flow field holography is examined, and the methods based on the principles of either class of imagery are described. Special consideration is given to the automated data reduction technology. Current applications of flow diagnostics, which can provide thousands of holograms during a one-day experiment, include NASA applications in wind tunnel holography, in a Laser Doppler Velocimeter, in holographic movies, and in an optical device for recording crystal growth at zero gravity, to be used in the Space Lab 3 shuttle mission scheduled for May 1985. Military applications of the flow diagnostics include the use of holographic tomography for visualizing flow fields around airborne structures, in wind tunnels, and in the analyses of rocket exhausts and gun ranges. The information provided by the particle sizing holography, concerning the size, shape, number, and velocity of particles and the records of the particle break-up phenomenon, can be used in various military field oriented and airborne applications and in meteorology and environment protection science.

  11. Augmented limb blood flow during neurovascular stress in physically fit women.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K; Jackson, Erica M; Nakamura, Yoshio; Ray, Chester A

    2013-09-01

    The study examined whether cardiorespiratory fitness modifies cardiovascular responses by normotensive men and women during the Stroop color-word interference test. Independent of age and an estimate of body fatness, fitness level was positively related (R²  = .39 and .51) to increases in limb blood flow and vascular conductance, coherent with cardiac-vagal withdrawal and a decrease in heart period, among women but not men. Fitness was unrelated to changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressures and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. The augmented hemodynamic responses among fitter women were not consistent with passive vasodilation via withdrawal of sympathetic neural tone. The results encourage further gender comparisons testing whether fitness augments limb blood flow during mental stress by neurohumoral and flow-mediated vasodilatory mechanisms or by increased cardiac output. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  12. Hemodynamic correlates of late systolic flow velocity augmentation in the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Augustine, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-01

    Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx). We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA) were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years). Forward waves (W 1) and backward waves (negative area, NA) were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/W 1 = RIx). Additional parameters included W 2 which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx). Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included W 2 (r = - 0.52, P < 0.05), logRIx (r = 0.56, P < 0.05), and AIx (r = 0.60, P < 0.05). FAIx was not associated with CCA stiffness (P > 0.05). Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle) and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  13. Supersonic reacting internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    1989-01-01

    The national program to develop a trans-atmospheric vehicle has kindled a renewed interest in the modeling of supersonic reacting flows. A supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, has been proposed to provide the propulsion system for this vehicle. The development of computational techniques for modeling supersonic reacting flow fields, and the application of these techniques to an increasingly difficult set of combustion problems are studied. Since the scramjet problem has been largely responsible for motivating this computational work, a brief history is given of hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems. A discussion is also given of some early modeling efforts applied to high speed reacting flows. Current activities to develop accurate and efficient algorithms and improved physical models for modeling supersonic combustion is then discussed. Some new problems where computer codes based on these algorithms and models are being applied are described.

  14. Flow Characteristics in an Augmentation Channel of a Direct Drive Turbine for Wave Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Deepak; Zullah, Mohammed Asid; Choi, Young-Do; Lee, Young-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Cross flow turbine also known as Banki turbine, is a hydraulic turbine that may be classified as an impulse turbine. At present it has gained interest in small and low head establishments because of its simple structure, cost effectiveness and low maintenance. Therefore, the present paper expands on this idea and aims at implementing the Direct Drive Turbine (DDT) for wave power generation. Wave power has enormous amount of energy which is environmentally friendly, renewable and can be exploited to satisfy the energy needs. A Numerical Wave Tank (NWT) was used to simulate the sea conditions and after obtaining desired wave properties; the augmentation channel plus the front guide nozzle and rear chamber were integrated to the NWT. The augmentation channel consisted of a front nozzle, rear nozzle and an internal fluid region which represented the turbine housing. The front and rear nozzle were geometrically identical. Two different nozzle configurations were studied; spiral rear wall type and a straight rear wall type. In addition to this, the effect of front guide nozzle divergent angle was also studied. The general idea is to investigate how different augmentation channel geometry and front guide nozzle divergent angle affects the flow, the water horse power and the first stage (primary stage) energy conversion. The analysis was performed using a commercial CFD code of the ANSYS-CFX. The results of the flow in an augmentation channel of the Direct Drive Turbine in oscillating flow for all the cases are presented by means of pressure and velocity vectors. The water horse power (WHP) and first stage energy conversion for the models are also presented.

  15. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeffrey R; Gainer, Christian F; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures.

  16. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Gainer, Christian F.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G. Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures. PMID:26440760

  17. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Gainer, Christian F.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G. Michael, Jr.; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures.

  18. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Flow Augmentation in the Snake River, 1991-1995 : Phase I: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.; Schlecte, J.Warren |

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to estimate the volume and shape of flow augmentation water delivered in the Snake Basin during the years 1991 through 1995, and to assess the biological consequences to ESA-listed salmon stocks in that drainage. HDR Engineering, Inc. calculated flow augmentation estimates and compared their values to those reported by agencies in the Northwest. BioAnalysts, Inc. conducted the biological evaluation.

  19. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  20. Flow Field Classification Using Critical Point Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Williams, Sheila; Hahsler, Michael; Olinick, Eli V.

    2016-11-01

    Classification of flow fields according to topological similarities can help reveal features of the flow generation and evolution for bluff body flows, and characterize different swimming maneuvers in aquatic locomotion, to name a few. Rigorous classification can be challenging, however, especially when complex flows are distorted by measurement uncertainties or variable flow generating conditions. The present work uses critical points of the velocity field to characterize the global flow topology. Flow fields are compared by finding a best match of critical points in two flow fields based on topological and location characteristics of the critical points together with general point set distance measures. The similarity between the flow fields is quantified based on the matched critical points. Applying clustering algorithms to a set of flow fields with quantified similarity can then be used to group flows with similar characteristics. This approach has been applied to generic 2D flow fields constructed using potential flow results and is able to correctly identify similar flow fields even after large distortions (up to 20% of the vortex separation) have been applied to the flows. Support of NSF Grant Nos. 1115139 and 1557698, and the Lyle School of Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Semiochemical lures reduce emigration and enhance pest control services in open-field predator augmentation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Augmentation biocontrol is a commercially viable pest management tactic in enclosed glasshouse environments, but is far less effective in open-field agriculture where newly released enemies rapidly disperse from release sites. We tested the potential for behavior-modifying semiochemicals to increase...

  2. Variational Geminal-augmented Multireference Self-consistent Field Theory: Two-electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey

    2010-06-18

    We introduce a geminal-augmented multiconfigurational self-consistent field method for describing electron correlation effects. The approach is based on variational optimization of a MCSCF-type wave function augmented by a single geminal. This wave function is able to account for some dynamic correlation without explicit excitations to virtual molecular orbitals. Test calculations on two-electron systems demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to describe ionic and covalent electronic states in a balanced way, i.e., including the effects of both static and dynamic correlation simultaneously. Extension of the theory to larger systems will potentially provide an alternative to standard multireference methods.

  3. Augmented Reality in a Simulated Tower Environment: Effect of Field of View on Aircraft Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Adelstein, Bernard D.; Reisman, Ronald J.; Schmidt-Ott, Joelle R.; Gips, Jonathan; Krozel, Jimmy; Cohen, Malcolm (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical see-through, augmented reality display was used to study subjects' ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing at the Dallas Ft. Worth International airport in an ATC Tower simulation. Subjects monitored the traffic patterns as if from the airport's western control tower. Three binocular fields of view (14 deg, 28 deg and 47 deg) were studied in an independent groups' design to measure the degradation in detection performance associated with the visual field restrictions. In a second experiment the 14 deg and 28 deg fields were presented either with 46% binocular overlap or 100% overlap for separate groups. The near asymptotic results of the first experiment suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47% are unlikely to dramatically improve performance; and those of the second experiment suggest that partial binocular overlap is feasible for augmented reality displays such as may be used for ATC tower applications.

  4. Spectral indices of human cerebral blood flow control: responses to augmented blood pressure oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hamner, J W; Cohen, Michael A; Mukai, Seiji; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Taylor, J Andrew

    2004-09-15

    We set out to fully examine the frequency domain relationship between arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow. Oscillatory lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) was used to create consistent blood pressure oscillations of varying frequency and amplitude to rigorously test for a frequency- and/or amplitude-dependent relationship between arterial pressure and cerebral flow. We also examined the predictions from OLBNP data for the cerebral flow response to the stepwise drop in pressure subsequent to deflation of ischaemic thigh cuffs. We measured spectral powers, cross-spectral coherence, and transfer function gains and phases in arterial pressure and cerebral flow during three amplitudes (0, 20, and 40 mmHg) and three frequencies (0.10, 0.05, and 0.03 Hz) of OLBNP in nine healthy young volunteers. Pressure fluctuations were directly related to OLBNP amplitude and inversely to OLBNP frequency. Although cerebral flow oscillations were increased, they did not demonstrate the same frequency dependence seen in pressure oscillations. The overall pattern of the pressure-flow relation was of decreasing coherence and gain and increasing phase with decreasing frequency, characteristic of a high-pass filter. Coherence between pressure and flow was increased at all frequencies by OLBNP, but was still significantly lower at frequencies below 0.07 Hz despite the augmented pressure input. In addition, predictions of thigh cuff data from spectral estimates were extremely inconsistent and highly variable, suggesting that cerebral autoregulation is a frequency-dependent mechanism that may not be fully characterized by linear methods.

  5. Motion field and optical flow: Qualitative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verri, Alessandro; Poggio, Tomaso

    1986-12-01

    The optical flow, a 2-D field that can be associated with the variation of the image brightness pattern, and the 2-D motion field, the projection on the image plane of the 3-D velocity field of a moving scene, are in general different, unless very special conditions are satisfied. The optical flow, therefore, is ill suited for computing structure from motion, and for reconstructing the 3-D velocity field, problems that require an accurate estimate of the 2-D motion field. A different use of the optical flow is suggested. Stable field and the 3-D structure of the scene, and they can usually be obtained from the optical flow. The smoothed optical flow and 2-D motion field, interpreted as vector fields tangent to flows of planar dynamical systems, may have the same qualitative properties from the point of view of the theory of structural stability of dynamical systems.

  6. Optical experiments on thermophoretically augmented submicron particle deposition from 'dusty' high temperature gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Kim, Sang-Soo

    1984-01-01

    A real-time laser reflectivity method and Pt ribbon targets are used to obtain experimental data on the initial deposition rate of MgO(s) particles of approximately 700 nm diameter from otherwise clean combustion products as a function of target temperature (about 950-1450 K) and mainstream gas temperature (about 1500-1600 K). These preliminary data are used to demonstrate the dominant role of thermophoresis (particle drift down a temperature gradient) and to assess the utility of recently developed theoretical methods for predicting and correlating the temperature dependence of thermophoretically augmented convective-diffusion 'dust' deposition rates from flowing hot gases.

  7. Augmentation of Muscle Blood Flow by Ultrasound Cavitation Is Mediated by ATP and Purinergic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Belcik, J Todd; Davidson, Brian P; Xie, Aris; Wu, Melinda D; Yadava, Mrinal; Qi, Yue; Liang, Sherry; Chon, Chae Ryung; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Field, Joshua; Harmann, Leanne; Chilian, William M; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2017-03-28

    Augmentation of tissue blood flow by therapeutic ultrasound is thought to rely on convective shear. Microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation markedly amplify these effects. We hypothesized that purinergic signaling is responsible for shear-dependent increases in muscle perfusion during therapeutic cavitation. Unilateral exposure of the proximal hindlimb of mice (with or without ischemia produced by iliac ligation) to therapeutic ultrasound (1.3 MHz, mechanical index 1.3) was performed for 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 2×10(8) lipid microbubbles. Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by low-power contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging. In vivo muscle ATP release and in vitro ATP release from endothelial cells or erythrocytes were assessed by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Purinergic signaling pathways were assessed by studying interventions that (1) accelerated ATP degradation; (2) inhibited P2Y receptors, adenosine receptors, or KATP channels; or (3) inhibited downstream signaling pathways involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase or prostanoid production (indomethacin). Augmentation in muscle perfusion by ultrasound cavitation was assessed in a proof-of-concept clinical trial in 12 subjects with stable sickle cell disease. Therapeutic ultrasound cavitation increased muscle perfusion by 7-fold in normal mice, reversed tissue ischemia for up to 24 hours in the murine model of peripheral artery disease, and doubled muscle perfusion in patients with sickle cell disease. Augmentation in flow extended well beyond the region of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound cavitation produced an ≈40-fold focal and sustained increase in ATP, the source of which included both endothelial cells and erythrocytes. Inhibitory studies indicated that ATP was a critical mediator of flow augmentation that acts primarily through either P2Y receptors or adenosine produced by ectonucleotidase activity. Combined indomethacin and inhibition of

  8. Graphics and Flow Visualization of Computer Generated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    Flow field variables are visualized using color representations described on surfaces that are interpolated from computational grids and transformed to digital images. Techniques for displaying two and three dimensional flow field solutions are addressed. The transformations and the use of an interactive graphics program for CFD flow field solutions, called PLOT3D, which runs on the color graphics IRIS workstation are described. An overview of the IRIS workstation is also described.

  9. Chronic hypertension impairs flow-induced vasodilation and augments the myogenic response in fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Storme, Laurent; Parker, Thomas A; Kinsella, John P; Rairigh, Robyn L; Abman, Steven H

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that altered vasoreactivity in perinatal pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by abnormal responses to hemodynamic stress, including the loss of flow-induced vasodilation and an augmented myogenic response. Therefore, we studied the acute hemodynamic effects of brief compression of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in control fetal lambs and in lambs during exposure to chronic PH. In both groups, acute DA compression decreased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) by 20% at baseline (day 0). After 2 days of hypertension, acute DA compression paradoxically increased PVR by 50% in PH lambs, whereas PVR decreased by 25% in controls. During the 8-day study period, PVR increased during acute DA compression in PH lambs, whereas acute DA compression continued to cause vasodilation in controls. Brief treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) increased basal PVR in control but not PH lambs, suggesting decreased NO production in PH lambs. Chronic hypertension increased the myogenic response after L-NA in PH lambs, whereas the myogenic response remained unchanged in controls. The myogenic response was inhibited by nifedipine in PH lambs, suggesting that the myogenic response is dependent upon the influx of extracellular calcium. We conclude that chronic PH impairs flow-induced vasodilation and increases the myogenic response in fetal lung. We speculate that decreased NO signaling and an augmented myogenic response contributes to abnormal vasoreactivity in PH.

  10. Turbulent flow field predictions in sharply curved turn around ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation, two-dimensional turbulent flow of incompressible Newtonian fluids in sharply curved 180 deg turn around ducts is studied. Results of an approximate numerical flow field analysis utilizing an orthogonal, body-fitted, curvilinear coordinate system are compared to results based on a traditional cylindrical reference frame. Qualitative indication of general streamfield characteristics as well as quantitative benchmarks for the planning of future experimentation are provided. In addition, preliminary results of an augmented kappa-epsilon turbulence model analysis, which explicitly accounts for the effects of streamline curvature and pressure strain in internal turbulent flows, are presented. Specific model difficulties are discussed and comparisons with standard kappa-esilon model predictions are included.

  11. Lupus anticoagulants form immune complexes with prothrombin and phospholipid that can augment thrombin production in flow.

    PubMed

    Field, S L; Hogg, P J; Daly, E B; Dai, Y P; Murray, B; Owens, D; Chesterman, C N

    1999-11-15

    Lupus anticoagulants (LA) are a family of autoantibodies that are associated with in vitro anticoagulant activity but a strong predisposition to in vivo thrombosis. They are directed against plasma phospholipid binding proteins, including prothrombin. We found that a murine monoclonal antiprothrombin antibody and 7 of 7 LA IgGs tested enhanced binding of prothrombin to 25:75 phosphatidyl serine:phosphatidyl choline vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. We hypothesized that enhanced binding of prothrombin to phospholipid in the presence of LA IgG might result in increased thrombin production when reactions are performed in flow. Thrombin production by purified prothrombinase components was measured in a phospholipid-coated flow reactor. The flow reactor was incubated with prothrombin, calcium ions, and the IgGs and then perfused with prothrombin, calcium ions, the IgGs, factor Va, and factor Xa. A murine monoclonal antiprothrombin antibody and 4 of 6 LA IgGs from patients with a history of thrombosis increased thrombin production up to 100% over control in the first 15 minutes. In summary, LA IgGs concentrate prothrombin on a phospholipid surface that can augment thrombin production by prothrombinase in flow. These observations suggest that LA might propagate coagulation in flowing blood by facilitating prothrombin interaction with the damaged blood vessel wall.

  12. Influence of flow velocity on flow field's optical tomography diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-yun; Yu, Yang; Zhong, Xia; Zhang, Ying-ying

    2017-01-01

    The effect of flow velocity is usually neglected when optical computerized tomography (OCT) methods are chosen to measure the temperature distribution of the flow fields up to now. In this paper, two sets of experiment are supplied to verify the effect of flow velocity on flow field's moiré tomography. Specifically speaking, the temperature results with the assumption that it is an isobaric process (omit the effect of flow velocity) in the measured flame flow fields, manifest that the isobaric supposition is not suitable for all the flames. And then, a condition, which can be adopted to judge that when the effect of flow velocity on its temperature reconstruction can not be neglected any more, is proposed. This study would provide some reference to the temperature diagnosis by the optical methods which are based on the measurement of the refractive index.

  13. Knowledge-based flow field zoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards easing the three-dimensional grid generation bottleneck in computational fluid dynamics. A knowledge based approach works well, but certain aspects of flow field zoning make the use of such an approach challenging. A knowledge based flow field zoner, called EZGrid, was implemented and tested on representative two-dimensional aerodynamic configurations. Results are shown which illustrate the way in which EZGrid incorporates the effects of physics, shape description, position, and user bias in a flow field zoning.

  14. A study of the Flint River, Michigan, as it relates to low-flow augmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hulbert, Gordon C.

    1972-01-01

    One of the uses of the Flint River is dilution of waste-water. Population and industrial growth in the Flint area hah placed new demands on the stream and emphasized the need for an analysis of the surface water resources of the basin. This report describes selected streamflow characteristics of the Flint River and its tributaries, and presents draft-storage relations for the river basin. Flow characteristics for 17 sites show that the 7-day 2-year low flow ranges from 0 to 0.17 cfs (cubic feet per second) per square mile. Draft-storage relations for the basin show that existing storage, if fully utilized, could, on an average, provide a minimum discharge at Montrose of 160 cfs in 19 out of 20 years. The discharge, in conjunction with water diverted from Lake Huron to the Flint River through the Detroit and Flint water systems (about 60 cfs in 1971), indicates that low flows would seldom be less than about 200 cfs at Montrose. Diversions from the basin for irrigation may reduce low flows by about 12 cfs. Ground-water sources offer small potential for development of large supplies of water for streamflow augmentation, although wells in the glacial deposits may provide a supplemental source of water at some locations.

  15. Recent advances in head-mounted light field displays for virtual and augmented reality (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Head-mounted light field displays render a true 3D scene by sampling either the projections of the 3D scene at different depths or the directions of the light rays apparently emitted by the 3D scene and viewed from different eye positions. They are capable of rendering correct or nearly correct focus cues and addressing the very well-known vergence-accommodation mismatch problem in conventional virtual and augmented reality displays. In this talk, I will focus on reviewing recent advancements of head-mounted light field displays for VR and AR applications. I will demonstrate examples of HMD systems developed in my group.

  16. Io: Heat flow from dark volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2009-11-01

    Dark flow fields on the jovian satellite Io are evidence of current or recent volcanic activity. We have examined the darkest volcanic fields and quantified their thermal emission in order to assess their contribution to Io's total heat flow. Loki Patera, the largest single source of heat flow on Io, is a convenient point of reference. We find that dark volcanic fields are more common in the hemisphere opposite Loki Patera and this large scale concentration is manifested as a maximum in the longitudinal distribution (near ˜200 °W), consistent with USGS global geologic mapping results. In spite of their relatively cool temperatures, dark volcanic fields contribute almost as much to Io's heat flow as Loki Patera itself because of their larger areal extent. As a group, dark volcanic fields provide an asymmetric component of ˜5% of Io's global heat flow or ˜5 × 10 12 W.

  17. Lattice-based flow field modeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Zhao, Ye; Fan, Zhe; Li, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Yoakum-Stover, Suzanne; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach for simulating the natural dynamics that emerge from the interaction between a flow field and immersed objects. We model the flow field using the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) with boundary conditions appropriate for moving objects and accelerate the computation on commodity graphics hardware (GPU) to achieve real-time performance. The boundary conditions mediate the exchange of momentum between the flow field and the moving objects resulting in forces exerted by the flow on the objects as well as the back-coupling on the flow. We demonstrate our approach using soap bubbles and a feather. The soap bubbles illustrate Fresnel reflection, reveal the dynamics of the unseen flow field in which they travel, and display spherical harmonics in their undulations. Our simulation allows the user to directly interact with the flow field to influence the dynamics in real time. The free feather flutters and gyrates in response to lift and drag forces created by its motion relative to the flow. Vortices are created as the free feather falls in an otherwise quiescent flow.

  18. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  19. Augmented Lagrangian and penalty methods for the simulation of two-phase flows interacting with moving solids. Application to hydroplaning flows interacting with real tire tread patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Stéphane; Sarthou, Arthur; Caltagirone, Jean-Paul; Sonilhac, Fabien; Février, Pierre; Mignot, Christian; Pianet, Grégoire

    2011-02-01

    The numerical simulation of the interaction between a free surface flow and a moving obstacle is considered for the analysis of hydroplaning flows. A new augmented Lagrangian method, coupled to fictitious domains and penalty methods, is proposed for the simulation of multi-phase flows. The augmented Lagrangian parameter is estimated by an automatic analysis of the discretization matrix resulting from the approximation of the momentum equations. The algebraic automatic augmented Lagrangian 3AL approach is validated on the natural convection in a differentially heated cavity, a two-dimensional collapse of a water column, the three-dimensional settling of a particle in a tank and the falling of a dense cylinder in air. Finally, the 3AL method is utilized to simulate the hydroplaning of a tire under various pattern shape conditions.

  20. Magnetic field induced augmented thermal conduction phenomenon in magneto-nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Ajay; Dhar, Purbarun; Nandi, Tandra; Das, Sarit K.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic field induced augmented thermal conductivity of magneto-nanocolloids involving nanoparticles, viz. Fe2O3, Fe3O4, NiO and Co3O4 dispersed in different base fluids have been reported. Experiments reveal the augmented thermal transport under external applied magnetic field. A maximum thermal conductivity enhancement ∼114% is attained at 7.0 vol% concentration and 0.1 T magnetic flux density for Fe3O4/EG magneto-nanocolloid. However, a maximum ∼82% thermal conductivity enhancement is observed for Fe3O4/kerosene magneto-nanocolloid for the same concentration but relatively at low magnetic flux density (∼0.06 T). Thereby, a strong effect of fluid as well as particle physical properties on the chain formation propensity, leading to enhanced conduction, in such systems is observed. Co3O4 nanoparticles show insignificant effect on the thermal conductivity enhancement of MNCs due to their minimal magnetic moment. A semi-empirical approach has been proposed to understand the mechanism and physics behind the thermal conductivity enhancement under external applied magnetic field, in tune with near field magnetostatic interactions as well as Neel relaxivity of the magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the phenomenon of enhanced thermal conductivity as a function of physical parameters and shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Detection of PIT-tagged subyearling Chinook salmon at a Snake River dam: Implications for summer flow augmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, W.P.; Burge, H.L.; Bennett, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Rearing subyearling chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (≥60 mm in fork length) were captured in the Snake River and tagged with passive integrated transponders to provide an index of their survival to Lower Granite Dam, the first of eight dams encountered by seaward migrants. Water was released from reservoirs upstream of Lower Granite Dam to augment summer flows and thereby increase subyearling chinook salmon survival. Mean summer flow and maximum summer water temperature in Lower Granite Reservoir were highly correlated (N = 4; r = −0.999). Acknowledging this correlation, we conducted two separate least-squares regressions using detection rate as the dependent variable. Detection rate at Lower Granite Dam was positively related to mean summer flow (N = 4; r 2 = 0.993; P = 0.003) and negatively related to maximum summer water temperature (N = 4; r 2 = 0.984; P = 0.008). Summer flow augmentation increased flow and decreased water temperature in Lower Granite Reservoir especially in low-flow years. Our results support summer flow augmentation as a beneficial interim recovery measure for enhancing survival of subyearling chinook salmon in the Snake River. Additional research should include replicate within-year releases of PIT-tagged subyearlings as well as studies of fish guidance efficiency.

  2. A Mixed Methods Assessment of Students' Flow Experiences during a Mobile Augmented Reality Science Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressler, D. M.; Bodzin, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Current studies have reported that secondary students are highly engaged while playing mobile augmented reality (AR) learning games. Some researchers have posited that players' engagement may indicate a flow experience, but no research results have confirmed this hypothesis with vision-based AR learning games. This study investigated factors…

  3. A Mixed Methods Assessment of Students' Flow Experiences during a Mobile Augmented Reality Science Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressler, D. M.; Bodzin, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Current studies have reported that secondary students are highly engaged while playing mobile augmented reality (AR) learning games. Some researchers have posited that players' engagement may indicate a flow experience, but no research results have confirmed this hypothesis with vision-based AR learning games. This study investigated factors…

  4. Evolving Dynamics of the Supergranular Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, M. L.; Lisle, J. P.; Toomre, J.

    2000-05-01

    We study several large (45-degree square) fields of supergranules for as long as they remain visible on the solar disk (about 6 days) to characterize the dynamics of the supergranular flow field and its interaction with surrounding photospheric magnetic field elements. These flow fields are determined by applying correlation tracking methods to time series of mesogranules seen in full-disk SOI-MDI velocity images. We have shown previously that mesogranules observed in this way are systematically advected by the larger scale supergranular flow field in which they are embedded. Applying correlation tracking methods to such time series yields the positions of the supergranular outflows quite well, even for locations close to disk center. These long-duration datasets contain several instances where individual supergranules are recognizable for time scales as long as 50 hours, though most cells persist for about 25 hours that is often quoted as a supergranular lifetime. Many supergranule merging and splitting events are observed, as well as other evolving flow patterns such as lanes of converging and diverging fluid. By comparing the flow fields with the corresponding images of magnetic fields, we confirm the result that small-scale photospheric magnetic field elements are quickly advected to the intercellular lanes to form a network between the supergranular outflows. In addition, we characterize the influence of larger-scale regions of magnetic flux, such as active regions, on the flow fields. Furthermore, we have measured even larger-scale flows by following the motions of the supergranules, but these flow fields contain a high noise component and are somewhat difficult to interpret. This research was supported by NASA through grants NAG 5-8133 and NAG 5-7996, and by NSF through grant ATM-9731676.

  5. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  6. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M.; Vogel, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The solutions to the equations of motion for inviscid fluid flow around a pointed elliptic cone at incidence are presented. The numerical method used, MacCormack's second order preferential predictor-corrector finite difference approximation, is applied to the fluid flow equations derived in conservation-law form. The entropy boundary condition, hitherto unused for elliptic cone problems, is investigated and compared to reflection boundary condition solutions. The stagnation streamline movement of the inclined elliptic cone is noted and surface pressure coefficients are plotted. Also presented are solutions for an elliptic cone and a circular cone at zero incidence and a circular cone at a small angle of attack. Comparisons are made between these present solutions and previously published theory.

  7. Gradient-augmented hybrid interface capturing method for incompressible two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fu; Shi-Yu, Wu; Kai-Xin, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by inconveniences of present hybrid methods, a gradient-augmented hybrid interface capturing method (GAHM) is presented for incompressible two-phase flow. A front tracking method (FTM) is used as the skeleton of the GAHM for low mass loss and resources. Smooth eulerian level set values are calculated from the FTM interface, and are used for a local interface reconstruction. The reconstruction avoids marker particle redistribution and enables an automatic treatment of interfacial topology change. The cubic Hermit interpolation is employed in all steps of the GAHM to capture subgrid structures within a single spacial cell. The performance of the GAHM is carefully evaluated in a benchmark test. Results show significant improvements of mass loss, clear subgrid structures, highly accurate derivatives (normals and curvatures) and low cost. The GAHM is further coupled with an incompressible multiphase flow solver, Super CE/SE, for more complex and practical applications. The updated solver is evaluated through comparison with an early droplet research. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10972010, 11028206, 11371069, 11372052, 11402029, and 11472060), the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP), China (Grant No. 2014B0201030), and the Defense Industrial Technology Development Program of China (Grant No. B1520132012).

  8. Assessment of Aerothermal Heating Augmentation Attributed to Surface Catalysis in High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, M.; Holden, M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gas/surface interaction in making CFD predictions of convective heating has been considered with application to ground tests performed in high enthalpy shock tunnels where additional heating augmentation attributable to surface recombination has been observed for nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide flows. For test articles constructed of stainless steel and aluminum, measurements have been made with several types of heat transfer instrumentation including thin- film, calorimeter, and coaxial thermocouple sensors. These experiments have been modeled by computations made with the high quality, chemically reacting, Navier- Stokes solver, DPLR and the heating results compared. Some typical cases considered include results on an axisymmetric sphere-cone, axisymmetric spherical capsule, spherical capsule at angle of attack, and two- dimensional cylinder. In nitrogen flows, cases considered show a recombination probability on the order of 10-3, which agrees with published data. In many cases in air and CO2, measurements exceeding the predicted level of convective heating have been observed which are consistent with approximately complete recombination (to O2/N2 or CO2) on the surface of the model (sometimes called a super-catalytic wall). It has been recognized that the conclusion that this behavior is tied to an excessively high degree of catalytic efficiency is dependent on the current understanding of the freestream and shock-layer state of the gas.

  9. Increased lactate/pyruvate ratio augments blood flow in physiologically activated human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintun, Mark A.; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Rundle, Melissa M.; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2004-01-01

    The factors regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in physiological activation remain the subject of great interest and debate. Recent experimental studies suggest that an increase in cytosolic NADH mediates increased blood flow in the working brain. Lactate injection should elevate NADH levels by increasing the lactate/pyruvate ratio, which is in near equilibrium with the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We studied CBF responses to bolus lactate injection at rest and in visual stimulation by using positron-emission tomography in seven healthy volunteers. Bolus lactate injection augmented the CBF response to visual stimulation by 38-53% in regions of the visual cortex but had no effect on the resting CBF or the whole-brain CBF. These lactate-induced CBF increases correlated with elevations in plasma lactate/pyruvate ratios and in plasma lactate levels but not with plasma pyruvate levels. Our observations support the hypothesis that an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio activates signaling pathways to selectively increase CBF in the physiologically stimulated brain regions.

  10. Wave field reconstruction from multiple plane intensity-only data: augmented lagrangian algorithm.

    PubMed

    Migukin, Artem; Katkovnik, Vladimir; Astola, Jaakko

    2011-06-01

    A complex-valued wave field is reconstructed from intensity-only measurements given at multiple observation planes parallel to the object plane. The phase-retrieval algorithm is obtained from the constrained maximum likelihood approach provided that the additive noise is gaussian. The forward propagation from the object plane to the measurement plane is treated as a constraint in the proposed variational setting of reconstruction. The developed iterative algorithm is based on an augmented lagrangian technique. An advanced performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  11. Decorrelation Times of Photospheric Fields and Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsch, B. T.; Kusano, K.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Muglach, K.

    2012-01-01

    We use autocorrelation to investigate evolution in flow fields inferred by applying Fourier Local Correlation Tracking (FLCT) to a sequence of high-resolution (0.3 "), high-cadence (approx = 2 min) line-of-sight magnetograms of NOAA active region (AR) 10930 recorded by the Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite over 12 - 13 December 2006. To baseline the timescales of flow evolution, we also autocorrelated the magnetograms, at several spatial binnings, to characterize the lifetimes of active region magnetic structures versus spatial scale. Autocorrelation of flow maps can be used to optimize tracking parameters, to understand tracking algorithms f susceptibility to noise, and to estimate flow lifetimes. Tracking parameters varied include: time interval Delta t between magnetogram pairs tracked, spatial binning applied to the magnetograms, and windowing parameter sigma used in FLCT. Flow structures vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales (including unresolved scales), so tracked flows represent a local average of the flow over a particular range of space and time. We define flow lifetime to be the flow decorrelation time, tau . For Delta t > tau, tracking results represent the average velocity over one or more flow lifetimes. We analyze lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls as functions of magnetic field strength and spatial scale. We find a significant trend of increasing lifetimes of flow components, divergences, and curls with field strength, consistent with Lorentz forces partially governing flows in the active photosphere, as well as strong trends of increasing flow lifetime and decreasing magnitudes with increases in both spatial scale and Delta t.

  12. Io: Heat Flow from Dark Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    We focus on the heat flow contribution from dark volcanic fields on Io. These are concentrated in the anti-Loki hemisphere. We use the areas and estimated effective temperatures of dark flucti to derive their total power.

  13. Augmented reality on poster presentations, in the field and in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Kolawole, Folarin

    2017-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is the direct addition of virtual information through an interface to a real-world environment. In practice, through a mobile device such as a tablet or smartphone, information can be projected onto a target- for example, an image on a poster. Mobile devices are widely distributed today such that augmented reality is easily accessible to almost everyone. Numerous studies have shown that multi-dimensional visualization is essential for efficient perception of the spatial, temporal and geometrical configuration of geological structures and processes. Print media, such as posters and handouts lack the ability to display content in the third and fourth dimensions, which might be in space-domain as seen in three-dimensional (3-D) objects, or time-domain (four-dimensional, 4-D) expressible in the form of videos. Here, we show that augmented reality content can be complimentary to geoscience poster presentations, hands-on material and in the field. In the latter example, location based data is loaded and for example, a virtual geological profile can be draped over a real-world landscape. In object based AR, the application is trained to recognize an image or object through the camera of the user's mobile device, such that specific content is automatically downloaded and displayed on the screen of the device, and positioned relative to the trained image or object. We used ZapWorks, a commercially-available software application to create and present examples of content that is poster-based, in which important supplementary information is presented as interactive virtual images, videos and 3-D models. We suggest that the flexibility and real-time interactivity offered by AR makes it an invaluable tool for effective geoscience poster presentation, class-room and field geoscience learning.

  14. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  15. Flow-synchronous field motion refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Hassen, Charles N.

    2017-08-22

    An improved method to manage the flow of heat in an active regenerator in a magnetocaloric or an electrocaloric heat-pump refrigeration system, in which heat exchange fluid moves synchronously with the motion of a magnetic or electric field. Only a portion of the length of the active regenerator bed is introduced to or removed from the field at one time, and the heat exchange fluid flows from the cold side toward the hot side while the magnetic or electric field moves along the active regenerator bed.

  16. Gradient Augmented Level Set Method for Two Phase Flow Simulations with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anumolu, C. R. Lakshman; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2016-11-01

    A sharp interface capturing approach is presented for two-phase flow simulations with phase change. The Gradient Augmented Levelset method is coupled with the two-phase momentum and energy equations to advect the liquid-gas interface and predict heat transfer with phase change. The Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) is adopted for velocity to discretize the advection and diffusion terms in the interfacial region. Furthermore, the GFM is employed to treat the discontinuity in the stress tensor, velocity, and temperature gradient yielding an accurate treatment in handling jump conditions. Thermal convection and diffusion terms are approximated by explicitly identifying the interface location, resulting in a sharp treatment for the energy solution. This sharp treatment is extended to estimate the interfacial mass transfer rate. At the computational cell, a d-cubic Hermite interpolating polynomial is employed to describe the interface location, which is locally fourth-order accurate. This extent of subgrid level description provides an accurate methodology for treating various interfacial processes with a high degree of sharpness. The ability to predict the interface and temperature evolutions accurately is illustrated by comparing numerical results with existing 1D to 3D analytical solutions.

  17. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that have been reduced to a relatively compact set of equations in a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-average behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equations a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. Hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates chemical nonequilibrium is considered, and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  18. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that were reduced to a relatively compact set of equations of a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-averaged behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equation a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. For hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates, chemical nonequilibrium is considered and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  19. Decreased Symptoms without Augmented Skin Blood Flow in Subjects with RLS/WED after Vibration Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ulrike H.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Hunsaker, Erik; Ulfberg, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Vascular disturbances leading to tissue hypoxia have been named as a possible cause for RLS/WED. Vibration to the whole body (WBV) in subjects with RLS/WED results in increased skin blood flow (SBF). The aims of this investigation were to (1) determine if a two-week treatment with WBV will decrease symptoms associated with RLS/WED and, (2) if so, determine if the mechanism for improvement in symptoms is related to an increase in SBF, as measured in flux. Methods: Eleven subjects with RLS/WED underwent 2 weeks of 14-minute intermittent WBV and a 2-week sham treatment in randomized order. Pre and post intervention RLS symptom severity were compared. Baseline SBF was compared between subjects with RLS/WED and an age- and sex-matched control group. A crossover design (aim 1) and a matched case-control design and repeated measures design (aim 2) were used. The data analyses consisted of 2-sample and paired t-tests; where applicable we used a standard crossover design adjustment. Results: WBV did significantly decrease symptoms associated with RLS/WED compared to baseline data and compared to sham treatment. The baseline flux was significantly lower in RLS/WED subjects than matched controls, but this deficit was negated with WBV. There was no increase in resting SBF over the 2 weeks of treatment. Conclusions: Subjects with RLS/WED have decreased SBF but are able to increase flux to the same level as normal subjects with WBV. A 2-week intervention with WBV decreases symptoms associated with RLS/WED, but this does not seem to be related to an increase in resting SBF. Citation: Mitchell UH, Hilton SC, Hunsaker E, Ulfberg J. Decreased symptoms without augmented skin blood flow in subjects with RLS/WED after vibration treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):947–952. PMID:27070250

  20. Flow Fields Over Unsteady Three Dimensional Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Reesink, A.; Parsons, D. R.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.

    2013-12-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively measured in laboratory conditions and there is general understanding on the nature of the flow over dunes formed under equilibrium flow conditions. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly responding and reorganizing to these unsteady flows, over a range of both spatial and temporal scales. This is primarily through adjustment of bed forms (including ripples, dunes and bar forms) which then subsequently alter the flow field. This paper investigates, through the application of a numerical model, the influence of these roughness elements on the overall flow and the increase in flow resistance. A series of experiments were undertaken in a flume, 16m long and 2m wide, where a fine sand (D50 of 239μm) mobile bed was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate a series of quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. During the experiments flow was measured with acoustic Doppler velocimeters, (aDv's). On four occasions the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This data provide the necessary boundary conditions and validation data for a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model, which provided a three dimensional time dependent prediction of flow over the four static beds. The numerical predicted flow is analyzed through a series of approaches, and included: i) standard Reynolds decomposition to the flow fields; ii) Eulerian coherent structure detection methods based on the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor; iii) Lagrangian coherent structure identification methods based upon direct Lyapunov exponents (DLE). The results show that superimposed bed forms can cause changes in the nature of the classical separated flow region in particularly the number of locations where vortices are shed and the point of flow reattachment, which may be important for

  1. Flow Field Around a Hovering Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, C.; Low, S.

    1997-01-01

    A lifting surface hover code developed by the Analytical Method Inc. (AMI) was used to compute the average and unsteady velocity flow field of an isolated rotor without ground effect. The predicted velocity field compares well with experimental data obtained by hot-wire anemometry and by Laser Doppler Velocimetry. A subroutine 'DOWNWASH' was written to predict the velocity field at any given point in the wake for a given blade position.

  2. A call for innovative social media research in the field of augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan; Palmer, Stuart; Dann, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) social media research is relatively new, and is built on a foundation of research on use of the Internet and social media by people with communication disabilities. Although the field is expanding to include a range of people who use AAC, there are limitations and gaps in research that will need to be addressed in order to keep pace with the rapid evolution of social media connectivity in assistive communication technologies. In this paper, we consider the aims, scope, and methodologies of AAC social media research, with a focus on social network sites. Lack of detailed attention to specific social network sites and little use of social media data limits the extent to which findings can be confirmed. Increased use of social media data across a range of platforms, including Instagram and YouTube, would provide important insights into the lives of people who use AAC and the ways in which they and their supporters use social media. New directions for AAC social media research are presented in line with those discussed at the social media research symposium at the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Toronto, Canada, on August 12, 2016.

  3. Images constructed from computed flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs from ideal- and real-gas, two- and three-dimensional computed flow fields is described. The computational grids can be structured or unstructured, and multiple grids are an option. The constructed images are compared to experimental images for several types of flow, including a ramp, a blunt-body, a nozzle, and a reacting flow. The constructed images simulate the features observed in the experimental images. They are sensitive to errors in the flow-field solutions and can be used to identify solution errors. In addition, techniques for obtaining phase shifts from experimental finite-fringe interferograms and for removing experimentally induced phase-shift errors are discussed. Both the constructed images and calculated phase shifts can be used for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

  4. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, G. S.; Mo, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes code was developed for low thrust viscous nozzle flow field prediction. An implicit finite volume in an arbitrary curvilinear coordinate system lower-upper (LU) scheme is used to solve the governing Navier-Stokes equations and species transportation equations. Sample calculations of carbon dioxide nozzle flow are presented to verify the validity and efficiency of this code. The computer results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  5. DEM simulation of granular flows in a centrifugal acceleration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Peng, Chong; Wu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The main purpose of mass-flow experimental models is abstracting distinctive features of natural granular flows, and allow its systematic study in the laboratory. In this process, particle size, space, time, and stress scales must be considered for the proper representation of specific phenomena [5]. One of the most challenging tasks in small scale models, is matching the range of stresses and strains among the particle and fluid media observed in a field event. Centrifuge modelling offers an alternative to upscale all gravity-driven processes, and it has been recently employed in the simulation of granular flows [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]. Centrifuge scaling principles are presented in Ref. [4], collecting a wide spectrum of static and dynamic models. However, for the case of kinematic processes, the non-uniformity of the centrifugal acceleration field plays a major role (i.e., Coriolis and inertial effects). In this work, we discuss a general formulation for the centrifugal acceleration field, implemented in a discrete element model framework (DEM), and validated with centrifuge experimental results. Conventional DEM simulations relate the volumetric forces as a function of the gravitational force Gp = mpg. However, in the local coordinate system of a rotating centrifuge model, the cylindrical centrifugal acceleration field needs to be included. In this rotating system, the centrifugal acceleration of a particle depends on the rotating speed of the centrifuge, as well as the position and speed of the particle in the rotating model. Therefore, we obtain the formulation of centrifugal acceleration field by coordinate transformation. The numerical model is validated with a series of centrifuge experiments of monodispersed glass beads, flowing down an inclined plane at different acceleration levels and slope angles. Further discussion leads to the numerical parameterization necessary for simulating equivalent granular flows under an augmented acceleration field. The premise of

  6. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability was developed that makes it possible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) procedure was applied to the analysis of flow field measurements within a low aspect ratio transonic axial flow fan rotor obtained with 2-D laser anemometry. The procedure generates input for the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamics problems. The relative Mach number contour plots obtained by this method resemble the conventional contour plots obtained by more traditional methods. The results show that the MMS procedure can be used to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analysis tools developed for data from numerical flow field simulations. They show that an experimenter can apply the MMS procedure to his data and then use an interactive graphics program to display scalar quantities like the Mach number by profiles, carpet plots, contour lines, and surfaces using various colors. Also, flow directionality can be shown by display of vector fields and particle traces.

  7. Accelerating self-consistent field convergence with the augmented Roothaan–Hall energy function

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-01

    Based on Pulay’s direct inversion iterative subspace (DIIS) approach, we present a method to accelerate self-consistent field (SCF) convergence. In this method, the quadratic augmented Roothaan–Hall (ARH) energy function, proposed recently by Høst and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 124106 (2008)], is used as the object of minimization for obtaining the linear coefficients of Fock matrices within DIIS. This differs from the traditional DIIS of Pulay, which uses an object function derived from the commutator of the density and Fock matrices. Our results show that the present algorithm, abbreviated ADIIS, is more robust and efficient than the energy-DIIS (EDIIS) approach. In particular, several examples demonstrate that the combination of ADIIS and DIIS (“ADIIS+DIIS”) is highly reliable and efficient in accelerating SCF convergence. PMID:20136307

  8. Mean Field Type Control with Congestion (II): An Augmented Lagrangian Method

    SciTech Connect

    Achdou, Yves Laurière, Mathieu

    2016-12-15

    This work deals with a numerical method for solving a mean-field type control problem with congestion. It is the continuation of an article by the same authors, in which suitably defined weak solutions of the system of partial differential equations arising from the model were discussed and existence and uniqueness were proved. Here, the focus is put on numerical methods: a monotone finite difference scheme is proposed and shown to have a variational interpretation. Then an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers for solving the variational problem is addressed. It is based on an augmented Lagrangian. Two kinds of boundary conditions are considered: periodic conditions and more realistic boundary conditions associated to state constrained problems. Various test cases and numerical results are presented.

  9. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  10. Neurohumoral response and clinical effectiveness of continuous aortic flow augmentation in patients with decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Till; Aidonides, Georg; Konorza, Thomas; Krings, Peter; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    The increasing number of patients with progressive or exacerbated heart failure that is refractory to medical treatment necessitates the development of innovative cardiac assist devices. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a new percutaneously inserted system, which allows continuous aortic flow augmentation (CAFA), could be shown to be clinically effective with neurohormonal benefit in patients admitted with decompensated heart failure. Patients with exacerbations of chronic heart failure were recruited for the study. A percutaneous circulation assist device (Cancion system) promoting CAFA was implanted for up to 4 days in each patient. Clinical improvement was evaluated by measuring the clinical status according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification and biochemical parameters including troponin and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) as markers of cardiac necrosis and cardiac overload; these parameters were measured before, during, and after CAFA treatment. The decrease in BNP was determined after implantation, reaching, on average, a maximum decrease of 57% at 72 h (P = 0.04). The neurohumoral response remained significant (P < 0.05) up to 120 h after implantation, with a decrease in BNP levels of 37%, on average, compared to baseline values. Troponin I did not show any significant change during mechanical assistance (P > 0.2). All patients had improved clinical status according to the NYHA classification, and the improvement lasted for more than 1 week. Percutaneous heart-assist devices promoting CAFA offer clinical improvement and a neurohumoral response, with a significant BNP reduction in severe exacerbation of chronic heart failure that is refractory to medical treatment.

  11. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  12. FreshAiR and Field Studies—Augmenting Geological Reality with Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Crompton, H.; Dunleavy, M.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, mobile devices have fomented a revolution in geological mapping. Present Clinton set the stage for this revolution in the year 2000 when he ordered a cessation to Selective Availability, making reliable GPS available for civilian use. Geologists began using personal digital assistants and ruggedized tablet PCs for geolocation and data recording and the pace of change accelerated with the development of mobile apps such as Google Maps, digital notebooks, and digital compass-clinometers. Despite these changes in map-making technologies, most students continue to learn geology in the field the old-fashioned way, by following a field trip leader as a group and trying to hear and understand lecturettes at the outcrop. In this presentation, we demonstrate the potential of a new Augment Reality (AR) mobile app called "FreshAiR" to change fundamentally the way content-knowledge and learning objectives are delivered to students in the field. FreshAiR, which was developed by co-author and ODU alumnus M.D., triggers content delivery to mobile devices based on proximity. Students holding their mobile devices to the horizon see trigger points superimposed on the field of view of the device's built-in camera. When they walk towards the trigger, information about the location pops up. This can include text, images, movies, and quiz questions (multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank). Students can use the app to reinforce the field trip leader's presentations or they can visit outcrops individuals at different times. This creates the possibility for asynchronous field class, a concept that has profound implications for distance education in the geosciences.

  13. Turbulent flow field predictions in sharply curved turn-around ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent flow of incompressible Newtonian fluids in sharply curved 180 deg turn around ducts is studied. Results of an approximate numerical flow field analysis utilizing an orthogonal, body-fitted, curvilinear coordinate system are compared to results based on a traditional cylindrical reference frame. Qualitative induction of general streamfield characteristics as well as quantitative benchmarks for the planning of future experimentation are provided. In addition, preliminary results of an augmented kappa - epsilon turbulence model analysis, which explicitly accounts for the effects of streamline curvature and pressure strain in internal turbulent flows, are presented. Specific model difficulties are discussed and comparisons with standard kappa - epsilon model predictions are included.

  14. Interactive Near-Field Illumination for Photorealistic Augmented Reality with Varying Materials on Mobile Devices.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, Kai; Buschel, Wolfgang; Dachselt, Raimund; Grosch, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    At present, photorealistic augmentation is not yet possible since the computational power of mobile devices is insufficient. Even streaming solutions from stationary PCs cause a latency that affects user interactions considerably. Therefore, we introduce a differential rendering method that allows for a consistent illumination of the inserted virtual objects on mobile devices, avoiding delays. The computation effort is shared between a stationary PC and the mobile devices to make use of the capacities available on both sides. The method is designed such that only a minimum amount of data has to be transferred asynchronously between the participants. This allows for an interactive illumination of virtual objects with a consistent appearance under both temporally and spatially varying real illumination conditions. To describe the complex near-field illumination in an indoor scenario, HDR video cameras are used to capture the illumination from multiple directions. In this way, sources of illumination can be considered that are not directly visible to the mobile device because of occlusions and the limited field of view. While our method focuses on Lambertian materials, we also provide some initial approaches to approximate non-diffuse virtual objects and thereby allow for a wider field of application at nearly the same cost.

  15. Digital enhancement of flow field images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlinski, Robert A.; Park, Stephen K.

    1988-01-01

    Most photographs of experimentally generated fluid flow fields have inherently poor photographic quality, specifically low contrast. Thus, there is a need to establish a process for quickly and accurately enhancing these photographs to provide improved versions for physical interpretation, analysis, and publication. A sequence of digital image processing techniques which have been demonstrated to effectively enhance such photographs is described.

  16. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer-generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radially scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters of 3/16 inch to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 mm to 38.1 mm). The N(2) mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  17. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radically scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate, and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters to 3/16 to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 to 38.1 mm). The N2 mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  18. Numerical simulation of scramjet inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1986-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlet flow fields. The program solves the three-dimensional Euler or Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations in full conservation form by either the fully explicit or explicit-implicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Turbulence is modeled by an algebraic eddy-viscosity model. The analysis allows inclusion of end effects which can significantly affect the inlet flow field. Detailed laminar and turbulent flow results are presented for a symmetric-wedge corner, and comparisons are made with the available experimental results to allow assessment of the program. Results are then presented for two inlet configurations for which experimental results exist at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Solid rocket motor aft field joint flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, Jayant S.; Gibeling, Edward J.; Mcdonald, Henry

    1987-01-01

    An efficient Navier-Stokes analysis was successfully applied to simulate the complex flow field in the vicinity of a slot in a solid rocket motor with segment joints. The capability of the computer code to resolve the flow near solid surfaces without using a wall function assumption was demonstrated. In view of the complex nature of the flow field in the vicinity of the slot, this approach is considered essential. The results obtained from these calculations provide valuable design information, which would otherwise be extremely difficult to obtain. The results of the axisymmetric calculations indicate the presence of a region of reversed axial flow at the aft-edge of the slot and show the over-pressure in the slot to be only about 10 psi. The results of the asymmetric calculations indicate that a pressure asymmetry more than two diameters downstream of the slot has no noticeable effect on the flow field in the slot. They also indicate that the circumferential pressure differential caused in the slot due to failure of a 15 deg section of the castable inhibitor will be approximately 1 psi.

  20. Percutaneous continuous aortic flow augmentation for cardiac recovery in a chronic heart failure patient with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Saberin, Amir; Mueller, Bettina; Konstam, Marvin A; Wagner, Daniel R

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral vascular disease is an obstacle to the use of continuous aortic flow augmentation (CAFA). The authors used CAFA in a patient with a 50% stenosis of the left iliac artery. Five hours after initiating therapy, flow rates dropped from 1.47 L/min to 0.2 L/min, possibly due to obstruction around the inflow cannula near the site of the iliac artery stenosis. Flow was stabilized by adequate fluid infusion and successfully restored by slightly withdrawing the tip of the inflow catheter. This finding suggests that peripheral vascular disease is a relative-not an absolute-contraindication for CAFA, but requires close monitoring of flow during CAFA therapy.

  1. Centurial changes in the augmentation of low flows by snow and glacier melt in the River Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Kerstin; Kohn, Irene; Boehm, Mario; Freudiger, Daphné; Gerlinger, Kai; Seibert, Jan; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Low flows can have severe consequences for river ecosystems, energy production, navigation and other river water uses. In the mid- and downstream reaches of the River Rhine late-summer low flows are augmented by the ice melt component from the glaciated mountain headwaters upstream. As the glaciers are retreating fast, the quantification of this augmentation has become a highly relevant question. Based on results from a long-term modelling experiment, this study explores the contributions of snow and ice melt to the River Rhine's daily streamflows in extreme low flow events since 1900 from a downstream perspective. While the glacier ice melt component only contributes a few percent to the average annual flow of the Rhine downstream of Switzerland, its contribution is much higher during drought events such as those that have caused extreme low flows in the late summers of 1921, 1947, and 2003. In these situations, over 30% of the low flow downstream of Basel was comprised of ice melt and this fraction remains rather similar further along the Rhine to the Netherlands. Despite the loss of glacier volume and area in the headwaters over the course of the 20th century, an increasingly negative mass balance appears to have compensated for the glacier retreat, resulting in little long-term change to the ice melt component in summer streamflow. However, for an extreme event such as that in 2003, the ice melt component would have contributed a third more flow if it had occurred in the early 1900s. We use the modeled long-term coupled changes in glaciers and hydrology to quantify the low flow hazard that may loom ahead as the glaciers continue to decline.

  2. Field emission microplasma actuation for microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashank Tholeti, Siva; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2016-06-01

    Microplasmas offer attractive flow control methodology for gas transport in microsystems where large viscous losses make conventional pumping methods highly inefficient. We study microscale flow actuation by dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) with field emission (FE) of electrons, which allows lowering the operational voltage from kV to a few hundred volts and below. A feasibility study of FE-DBD for flow actuation is performed using 2D particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) at 10 MHz in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The free diffusion dominated, high velocity field emission electrons create a large positive space charge and a body force on the order of 106 N m-3. The body force and Joule heat decrease with increase in dielectric thickness and electrode thickness. The body force also decreases at lower pressures. The plasma body force distribution along with the Joule heating is then used in the Navier-Stokes simulations to quantify the flow actuation in a microchannel. Theoretical analysis and simulations for plasma actuated planar Poiseuille flow show that the gain in flow rate is inversely proportional to Reynolds number. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with the simulations for a microchannel with closely placed actuators under incompressible conditions. Flow rate of FE-DBD driven 2D microchannel is around 100 ml min-1 mm-1 for an input power of 64 μW mm-1. The gas temperature rises by 1500 K due to the Joule heating, indicating FE-DBD’s potential for microcombustion, micropropulsion and chemical sensing in addition to microscale pumping and mixing applications.

  3. The Flow Field Inside Ventricle Assist Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einav, Shmuel; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Avrahami, Idit

    2000-11-01

    The evaluation of innovative ventricle assist devices (VAD), is of major importance. A New Left Heart Assist Device, with an improved energy converter unit, has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. For this purpose, an experimental Continuous Digital Particle Imagining Velocimetry (CDPIV) is combined with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. These tools complement each other to result into a comprehensive description of the complex 3D, viscous and time-dependent flow field inside the artificial ventricle. A 3D numerical model was constructed to simulate the VAD pump and a time-depended CFD analysis with moving walls was performed to predict the flow behaviour in the VAD during the cardiac cycle. A commercial finite element package was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (FIDAP, Fluent Inc., Evanston). In the experimental analysis, an optically clear elastic model of the VAD was placed inside a 2D CDPIV system. The CDPIV system is capable of sampling 15 velocity vector fields per second based on image-pairs intervals lower than 0.5 millisecond. Continuous sequences of experimental images, followed by their calculated velocity transient fields, are given as animated presentation of the distensible VAD. These results are used for validating the CFD simulations. Once validated, the CFD results provide a detailed 3D and time dependent description of the flow field, allowing the identification of stagnation or high shear stress regions.

  4. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded

  5. Disturbed Laminar Blood Flow Vastly Augments Lipoprotein Retention in the Artery Wall: A Key Mechanism Distinguishing Susceptible From Resistant Sites.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Lasse Bach; Mortensen, Martin Bødtker; Kjolby, Mads; Hagensen, Mette Kallestrup; Oxvig, Claus; Bentzon, Jacob Fog

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis develops initially at branch points and in areas of high vessel curvature. Moreover, experiments in hypercholesterolemic mice have shown that the introduction of disturbed flow in straight, atherosclerosis-resistant arterial segments turns them highly atherosclerosis susceptible. Several biomechanical mechanisms have been proposed, but none has been demonstrated. In the present study, we examined whether a causal link exists between disturbed laminar flow and the ability of the arterial wall to retain lipoproteins. Lipoprotein retention was detected at natural predilection sites of the murine thoracic aorta 18 hours after infusion of fluorescently labeled low-density lipoprotein. To test for causality between blood flow and the ability of these areas to retain lipoproteins, we manipulated blood flow in the straight segment of the common carotid artery using a constrictive collar. Disturbed laminar flow did not affect low-density lipoprotein influx, but increased the ability of the artery wall to bind low-density lipoprotein. Concordantly, disturbed laminar flow led to differential expression of genes associated with phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells, increased expression of proteoglycan core proteins associated with lipoprotein retention, and of enzymes responsible for chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan synthesis and sulfation. Blood flow regulates genes associated with vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation, as well as the expression and post-translational modification of lipoprotein-binding proteoglycan core proteins, and the introduction of disturbed laminar flow vastly augments the ability of a previously resistant, straight arterial segment to retain lipoproteins. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Flow Field of a Human Cough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean

    2005-11-01

    Cough generated infectious aerosols are of interest while developing strategies for the mitigation of disease risks ranging from the common cold to SARS. In this work, the velocity field of human cough was measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The project subjects (total 29) coughed into an enclosure seeded with stage fog for most measurements. Cough flow speed profiles, average widths of the cough jet, waveform, and maximum cough speeds were measured. Maximum cough speeds ranged from 1.5 m/s to 28.8 m/s. No correlation was found for maximum cough flow speeds to height or gender. The slow growth of the width of the cough flow suggests that a cough may penetrate farther into a room than a steady jet of similar volume. The velocity profile was found to scale with the square root of downstream distance.

  7. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts.

  8. Field Emission Microplasma Actuated Microchannel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina

    2015-11-01

    Flow actuation by dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) involve no moving parts and provide high power density for flow enhancement, heating and mixing applications in microthrusters, micropumps and microcombustors. Conventional micro-DBDs require voltages ~ kV for flow enhancement of a few m/s for 500 μm high channel. However for gaps <10 microns, field emission lowers the breakdown voltage following modified Paschen curve. We consider a micropump concept that takes advantage of the field emission from a micro-DBD with dielectric thickness of 3 μm and a peak voltage of -325 V at 10 MHz. At 760 Torr, for electrode thickness of 1 μm, Knudsen number with respect to the e-nitrogen collisions is 0.1. So, kinetic approach of particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions is applied in nitrogen at 300 K to resolve electron (ne) and ion (ni) number densities. Body force, fb = eE(ni-ne) , where, e is electron charge and E is electric field. The major source of heating from plasma is Joule heating, J.E, where J is current density. At 760 Torr, for fb,avg = 1 mN/cubic mm and J.E = 8 W/cubic mm, micro-DBD induced a flow with a velocity of 4.1 m/s for a 64 mW/m power input for a channel height of 500 μm. The PIC/MCC plasma simulations are coupled to a CFD solver for analysis of the resulting flow actuation in microchannels at various Reynolds numbers. This work was supported by NSF ECCS Grant No. 1202095.

  9. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  10. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  11. Clinical application of navigation surgery using augmented reality in the abdominal field.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Onda, Shinji; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki

    2015-04-01

    This article presents general principles and recent advancements in the clinical application of augmented reality-based navigation surgery (AR based NS) for abdominal procedures and includes a description of our clinical trial and subsequent outcomes. Moreover, current problems and future aspects are discussed. The development of AR-based NS in the abdomen is delayed compared with another field because of the problem of intraoperative organ deformations or the existence of established modalities. Although there are a few reports on the clinical use of AR-based NS for digestive surgery, sophisticated technologies in urology have often been reported. However, the rapid widespread use of video- or robot assisted surgeries requires this technology. We have worked to develop a system of AR-based NS for hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery. Then we developed a short rigid scope that enables surgeons to obtain 3D view. We recently focused on pancreatic surgery, because intraoperative organ shifting is minimal. The position of each organ in overlaid image almost corresponded with that of the actual organ with about 5 mm of mean registration errors. Intraoperative information generated from this system provided us with useful navigation. However, AR-based NS has several problems to overcome such as organ deformity, evaluation of utility, portability or cost.

  12. 'Communicative competence' in the field of augmentative and alternative communication: a review and critique.

    PubMed

    Teachman, Gail; Gibson, Barbara E

    2014-01-01

    Understandings of 'communicative competency' (CC) have an important influence on the ways that researchers and practitioners in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) work toward achieving positive outcomes with AAC users. Yet, very little literature has critically examined conceptualizations of CC in AAC. Following an overview of the emergence of the concept of CC and of the field of AAC, we review seven conceptualizations of CC identified in the literature. To consider the contributions and potential shortcomings of conceptualizations of CC in AAC. We use a critical theoretical approach to review, critique and synthesize conceptualizations of CC in AAC, with a particular focus on uncovering 'taken for granted' assumptions. By historically situating the reviewed literature, we examine the shifting boundaries and tensions among theoretical conceptualizations of CC in AAC and their potential impacts on practice. We suggest ways that revisiting past scholarly work, alongside emergent, innovative conceptualizations of CC might shift ways of thinking about CC in AAC which tend to focus on the individual who communicates differently, toward (re)location of CC as a shared, socially incorporated and performed communication construct. We propose that emerging critical perspectives drawn from AAC and other interdisciplinary literatures offer innovative ways of theorizing communication difference, which might inform evolving conceptualizations of CC in AAC. © 2013 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  13. Numerical study of lift augmentation in massively separated turbulent flows with forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Andrew Gregory

    At high angles of attack the flow over any lifting body experiences massive separation. The resulting shear layers naturally tend to roll up into large vortical structures. The presence and motion of these structures has a significant impact on the continuing flowfield development. By applying an artificial forcing to the shedding shear layer the rollup can be intensified or reduced, and the entire vorticity field may be altered. Control of these vortical structures by forcing to enhance lift has been the goal of numerous investigations, and some progress has been made in understanding how an unsteady forcing can be used to advantage. This study describes work done in determining the effectiveness of using computational simulations to model massively separated, turbulent unsteady flowfields subject to small-amplitude mechanical forcing. Algorithm development and validation highlight certain concerns that arise in the modeling of such unsteady flowfields using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, and questions of grid density, numerical diffusion, timestep size, and turbulence modeling are addressed with a suite of sample calculations. Simulation of flowfields undergoing mechanical forcing by flap is accomplished using an overset grid methodology with the flow solver. Excellent agreement is demonstrated for flow over a NACA 63sb3-018 airfoil with a small flap placed near the leading edge separation point. Computed values of the unforced lift and drag coefficients agree with given experimental values to less than 2%. Forcing frequencies for the experimental configuration were in the range of global shedding frequency, and the maximum variation of the aerodynamic coefficients was seen when the forcing frequency was equal to the shedding frequency. Excellent agreement with experiment is also found for the cases involving forcing, and the data is used to explain the effect of forcing in terms of a global receptivity mechanism.

  14. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two-dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  15. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W. . Applied Mechanics Div. III)

    1989-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  16. Simulating unsaturated flow fields based on saturationmeasurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kitterod, Nils-Otto; Finsterle, Stefan

    2003-12-15

    Large amounts of de-icing chemicals are applied at the airport of Oslo, Norway. These chemicals pose a potential hazard to the groundwater because the airport is located on a delta deposit over an unconfined aquifer. Under normal flow conditions, most of the chemicals degrade in the vadose zone, but during periods of intensive infiltration, the residence time of contaminants in the unsaturated zone may be too short for sufficient degradation. To assess the potential for groundwater contamination and to design remedial actions, it is essential to quantify flow velocities in the vadose zone. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate theoretical possibilities of using measurements of liquid saturation in combination with inverse modeling for the estimation of unsaturated flow velocities. The main stratigraphic units and their geometry were identified from ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements and borehole logs. These observations are included as a priori information in the inverse modeling. The liquid saturation measurements reveal the smaller-scale heterogeneities within each stratigraphic unit. The relatively low sensitivity of flow velocities to the observable saturation limits the direct inference of hydraulic parameters. However, even an approximate estimate of flow velocities is valuable as long as the estimate is qualified by an uncertainty measure. A method referred to as simulation by Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) was adapted for uncertainty propagation analyses. The EOF method is conditional in the sense that statistical moments are reproduced independent of second-order stationarity. This implies that unlikely parameter combinations are discarded from the uncertainty propagation analysis. Simple forward simulations performed with the most likely parameter set are qualitatively consistent with the apparent fast flow of contaminants from an accidental spill. A field tracer test performed close to the airport will be used as an independent

  17. Directed Plasma Flow across Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presura, R.; Stepanenko, Y.; Neff, S.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2008-04-01

    The Hall effect plays a significant role in the penetration of plasma flows across magnetic field. For example, its effect may become dominant in the solar wind penetration into the magnetosphere, in the magnetic field advection in wire array z-pinch precursors, or in the arcing of magnetically insulated transmission lines. An experiment performed at the Nevada Terawatt Facility explored the penetration of plasma with large Hall parameter (˜10) across ambient magnetic field. The plasma was produced by ablation with the short pulse high intensity laser Leopard (0.35 ps, 10^17W/cm^2) and the magnetic field with the pulsed power generator Zebra (50 T). The expanding plasma assumed a jet configuration and propagated beyond a distance consistent with a diamagnetic bubble model. Without magnetic field, the plasma expansion was close to hemispherical. The ability to produce the plasma and the magnetic field with distinct generators allows a controlled, quasi-continuous variation of the Hall parameter and other plasma parameters making the experiments useful for benchmarking numerical simulations.

  18. Mean-flow measurements of the flow field diffusing bend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.

    1982-01-01

    Time-average measurements of the low-speed turbulent flow in a diffusing bend are presented. The experimental geometry consists of parallel top and bottom walls and curved diverging side walls. The turning of the center line of this channel is 40 deg, the area ratio is 1.5 and the ratios of height and center-line length to throat width are 1.5 and 3, respectively. The diffusing bend is preceded and followed by straight constant area sections. The inlet boundary layers on the parallel walls are artificially thickened and occupy about 30% of the channel height; those on the side walls develop naturally and are about half as thick. The free-stream speed at the inlet was approximately 30 m/sec for all the measurements. Inlet boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are presented, as are data for wall static pressures, and at six cross sections, surveys of the velocity-vector and static-pressure fields. The dominant feature of the flow field is a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices formed by the cross-stream pressure gradient in the bend on which an overall deceleration is superimposed.

  19. Flow field simulation for a corncob incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.

    1999-02-01

    This article utilizes the standard k-{epsilon} turbulent model to simulate a corncob incinerator using the PISO algorithm with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The flow patterns of the incinerator equipped with secondary air inlets are predicted and compared for the various geometrical layouts. It is demonstrated that a wider recirculation zone can be found while the inclined angles of inlets increased, so a longer residence time and higher combustion efficiency will be expected. The longer distance between primary and secondary inlets will facilitate the formation of recirculation zone in this bigger space. The more the number of the secondary air inlets, the less the resident air in the top recirculation zone near the exit of the furnace. By using the CFD technique, the flow field of the incinerator can be understood more precisely, and it can serve as an excellent design tool. Furthermore, the computational program can be composed with FORTRAN and set up on a PC, and can easily be analyzed to get the flow field of the corncob incinerator.

  20. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  1. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  2. Entrainment and mixing in thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, L.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector flows has been conducted. Measurements of the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean velocity, turbulent intensities and Reynolds stresses were made in two shroud geometries at various primary nozzle pressure ratios. The effects of shroud geometry and primary nozzle pressure ratio on the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean flow field and turbulent field were determined. From these measurements the evolution of mixing within the shroud of the primary flow and entrained fluid was obtained. The relationship between the mean flow field, the turbulent field and the shroud surface pressure distribution is discussed.

  3. Inviscid Flow Field Effects: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, L. J., III; Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-04-01

    The aero-optical distortions due to invisid flow effects over airborne laser turrets is investigated. Optical path differences across laser turret apertures are estimated from two data sources. The first is a theoretical study of main flow effects for a spherical turret assembly for a Mach number (M) of 0.6. The second source is an actual wind tunnel density field measurement on a 0.3 scale laser turret/fairing assembly, with M = 0.75. A range of azimuthal angles from 0 to 90 deg was considered, while the elevation angle was always 0 deg (i.e., in the plane of the flow). The calculated optical path differences for these two markedly different geometries are of the same order. Scaling of results to sea level conditions and an aperture diameter of 50 cm indicated up to 0.0007 cm of phase variation across the aperture for certain forward look angles and a focal length of F = -11.1 km. These values are second order for a 10.6 micron system.

  4. A control-volume method for analysis of unsteady thrust augmenting ejector flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for predicting transient thrust augmenting ejector characteristics is presented. The analysis blends classic self-similar turbulent jet descriptions with a control volume mixing region discretization to solicit transient effects in a new way. Division of the ejector into an inlet, diffuser, and mixing region corresponds with the assumption of viscous-dominated phenomenon in the latter. Inlet and diffuser analyses are simplified by a quasi-steady analysis, justified by the assumptions that pressure is the forcing function in those regions. Details of the theoretical foundation, the solution algorithm, and sample calculations are given.

  5. Applications of Augmented Reality-Based Natural Interactive Learning in Magnetic Field Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Su; Chiang, Feng-Kuang; Sun, Yuchen; Lin, Chenglong; Lee, Joey J.

    2017-01-01

    Educators must address several challenges inherent to the instruction of scientific disciplines such as physics -- expensive or insufficient laboratory equipment, equipment error, difficulty in simulating certain experimental conditions. Augmented reality (AR) can be a promising approach to address these challenges. In this paper, we discuss the…

  6. Effect of heat transfer augmentation on two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical boiling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentes, A.; Gurgenci, H.; Yildirim, O. T.; Kakac, S.; Veziroglu, T. N.

    1983-05-01

    The effect of different heater surface configuration on two-phase flow instabilities has been investigated in a single channel, forced convection, open loop, up-flow system. Freon-11 is used as the test fluid, and six different heater tubes with various inside surface configurations have been tested at five different heat inputs. In addition to temperature and pressure recordings, high speed motion pictures of the two-phase flow were taken for some of the experiments to study the two-phase behavior at different operating points. Experimental results are shown on system pressure drop versus mass flow rate curves, and stability boundaries are also indicated on these curves. Comparisons of different heater tubes is made by the use of the stability boundary maps and the plots of inlet throttling necessary to stabilize the system versus mass flow rate. Tubes with internal springs were found to be more stable than the other tubes.

  7. Heating Augmentation in Laminar Flow Due to Heat-Shield Cavities on the Project Orion CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield at laminar conditions. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements on and around the compression pads using global phosphor thermography. Consistent trends in heating augmentation levels were observed in the data and correlations of average and maximum heating at the cavities were formulated in terms of the local boundary-layer parameters and cavity dimensions. Additional heating data from prior testing of Genesis and Mars Science Laboratory models were also examined to extend the parametric range of cavity heating correlations.

  8. Fluctuating pressures in flow fields of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. C.; Haviland, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    The powered lift configurations under present development for STOL aircraft are the externally blown flap (EBF), involving direct jet impingement on the aircraft flaps, and the upper surface blown (USB), where the jet flow is attached on the upper surface of the wing and directed downwards. Towards the goal of developing scaling laws to predict unsteady loads imposed on the structural components of these STOL aircraft from small model tests, the near field fluctuating pressure behavior for the simplified cases of a round free cold jet and the same jet impinging on a flat plate was investigated. Examples are given of coherences, phase lags (giving convection velocities), and overall fluctuating pressure levels measured. The fluctuating pressure levels measured on the flat plate are compared to surface fluctuating pressure levels measured on full-scale powered-lift configuration models.

  9. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  10. Flow field interactions between two tandem cyclists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Nathan; Burton, David; Sheridan, John; Thompson, Mark; Brown, Nicholas A. T.

    2016-12-01

    Aerodynamic drag is the primary resistive force acting on cyclists at racing speeds. Many events involve cyclists travelling in very close proximity. Previous studies have shown that interactions result in significant drag reductions for inline cyclists. However, the interaction between cyclist leg position (pedalling) and the vortical flow structures that contribute significantly to the drag on an isolated cyclist has not previously been quantified or described for tandem cyclists of varying separation. To this end, scale model cyclists were constructed for testing in a water channel for inline tandem configurations. Particle image velocimetry was used to capture time-averaged velocity fields around two tandem cyclists. Perhaps surprisingly, the wake of a trailing cyclist maintains strong similarity to the characteristic wake of a single cyclist despite a significant disturbance to the upstream flow. Together with streamwise velocity measurements through the wake and upstream of the trailing cyclist, this work supports previous findings, which showed that the trailing cyclist drag reduction is primarily due to upstream sheltering effects reducing the stagnation pressure on forward-facing surfaces.

  11. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1987-01-01

    An existing Navier-Stokes code (PARC2D) was used to compute the nozzle flow field. Grids were generated by the interactive grid generator codes TBGG and GENIE. All computations were made on the NASA/MSFC CRAY X-MP computer. Comparisons were made between the computations and MSFC in-house wall pressure measurements for CO2 flow through a conical nozzle having an area ratio of 40. Satisfactory agreements exist between the computations and measurements for different stagnation pressures of 29.4, 14.7, and 7.4 psia, at stagnation temperature of 1060 R. However, agreements did not match precisely near the nozzle exit. Several reasons for the lack of agreement are possible. The computational code assumes a constant gas gamma, whereas the gamma i.e. the specific heat ratio for CO2 varied from 1.22 in the plenum chamber to 1.38 at the nozzle exit. The computations also assumes adiabatic and no-slip walls. Both assumptions may not be correct. Finally, it is possible that condensation occurs during the nozzle expansion at the low stagnation pressure. The next phase of the work will incorporate variable gamma and slip wall boundary conditions in the computational code and develop a more accurate computer code.

  12. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1987-12-01

    An existing Navier-Stokes code (PARC2D) was used to compute the nozzle flow field. Grids were generated by the interactive grid generator codes TBGG and GENIE. All computations were made on the NASA/MSFC CRAY X-MP computer. Comparisons were made between the computations and MSFC in-house wall pressure measurements for CO2 flow through a conical nozzle having an area ratio of 40. Satisfactory agreements exist between the computations and measurements for different stagnation pressures of 29.4, 14.7, and 7.4 psia, at stagnation temperature of 1060 R. However, agreements did not match precisely near the nozzle exit. Several reasons for the lack of agreement are possible. The computational code assumes a constant gas gamma, whereas the gamma i.e. the specific heat ratio for CO2 varied from 1.22 in the plenum chamber to 1.38 at the nozzle exit. The computations also assumes adiabatic and no-slip walls. Both assumptions may not be correct. Finally, it is possible that condensation occurs during the nozzle expansion at the low stagnation pressure. The next phase of the work will incorporate variable gamma and slip wall boundary conditions in the computational code and develop a more accurate computer code.

  13. Microgravity Geyser and Flow Field Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, J. I.; Marchetta, J. G.; Thornton, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and prediction of flow fields and geyser formation in microgravity cryogenic propellant tanks was investigated. A computational simulation was used to reproduce the test matrix of experimental results performed by other investigators, as well as to model the flows in a larger tank. An underprediction of geyser height by the model led to a sensitivity study to determine if variations in surface tension coefficient, contact angle, or jet pipe turbulence significantly influence the simulations. It was determined that computational geyser height is not sensitive to slight variations in any of these items. An existing empirical correlation based on dimensionless parameters was re-examined in an effort to improve the accuracy of geyser prediction. This resulted in the proposal for a re-formulation of two dimensionless parameters used in the correlation; the non-dimensional geyser height and the Bond number. It was concluded that the new non-dimensional geyser height shows little promise. Although further data will be required to make a definite judgement, the reformulation of the Bond number provided correlations that are more accurate and appear to be more general than the previously established correlation.

  14. Turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rib heat transfer augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, B. H.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow in a 2D channel with repeated rectangular rib roughness was numerically simulated using a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Friction factors and average Stanton numbers were calculated for various pitch to rib height ratios and bulk Reynolds numbers. Comparisons with experiment were generally adequate, with the predictions of friction superior to those for heat transfer. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated, and the results showed a greater effect for friction than for heat transfer. Comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. The turbulence model was also validated for a related problem, that of flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion.

  15. Flow Control Research at NASA Langley in Support of High-Lift Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Jones, Gregory S.; Moore, Mark D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the efforts at NASA Langley to apply active and passive flow control techniques for improved high-lift systems, and advanced vehicle concepts utilizing powered high-lift techniques. The development of simplified high-lift systems utilizing active flow control is shown to provide significant weight and drag reduction benefits based on system studies. Active flow control that focuses on separation, and the development of advanced circulation control wings (CCW) utilizing unsteady excitation techniques will be discussed. The advanced CCW airfoils can provide multifunctional controls throughout the flight envelope. Computational and experimental data are shown to illustrate the benefits and issues with implementation of the technology.

  16. Development of the 1990 Kalapana Flow Field, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattox, T.N.; Heliker, C.; Kauahikaua, J.; Hon, K.

    1993-01-01

    The 1990 Kalapana flow field is a complex patchwork of tube-fed pahoehoe flows erupted from the Kupaianaha vent at a low effusion rate (approximately 3.5 m3/s). These flows accumulated over an 11-month period on the coastal plain of Kilauea Volcano, where the pre-eruption slope angle was less than 2??. the composite field thickened by the addition of new flows to its surface, as well as by inflation of these flows and flows emplaced earlier. Two major flow types were identified during the development of the flow field: large primary flows and smaller breakouts that extruded from inflated primary flows. Primary flows advanced more quickly and covered new land at a much higher rate than breakouts. The cumulative area covered by breakouts exceeded that of primary flows, although breakouts frequently covered areas already buried by recent flows. Lava tubes established within primary flows were longer-lived than those formed within breakouts and were often reoccupied by lava after a brief hiatus in supply; tubes within breakouts were never reoccupied once the supply was interrupted. During intervals of steady supply from the vent, the daily areal coverage by lava in Kalapana was constant, whereas the forward advance of the flows was sporadic. This implies that planimetric area, rather than flow length, provides the best indicator of effusion rate for pahoehoe flow fields that form on lowangle slopes. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  18. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  19. Lava flow superposition: the reactivation of flow units in compound flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, Jane; Pinkerton, Harry; James, Mike; Calvari, Sonia

    2010-05-01

    Long-lived basaltic eruptions often produce compound `a`ā lava flow fields that are constructed of many juxtaposed and superposed flow units. We have examined the processes that result from superposition when the underlying flows are sufficiently young to have immature crusts and deformable cores. It has previously been recognised that the time elapsed between the emplacement of two units determines the fate of the underlying flow[1], because it controls the rheological contrast between the units. If the time interval is long, the underlying flow is able to cool, degas and develop a rigid crust, so that it shows no significant response to loading, and the two units are easily discernable stratigraphically. If the interval is short, the underlying flow has little time to cool, so the two units may merge and cool as a single unit, forming a ‘multiple' flow[1]. In this case, the individual units are more difficult to distinguish post-eruption. The effects of superposition in intermediate cases, when underlying flows have immature roofs, are less well understood, and have received relatively little attention in the literature, possibly due to the scarcity of observations. However, the lateral and vertical coalescence of lava tubes has been described on Mt. Etna, Sicily[2], suggesting that earlier tubes can be reactivated and lengthened as a result of superposition. Through our recent analysis of images taken by INGV Catania during the 2001 eruption of Mt. Etna (Sicily), we have observed that the emplacement of new surface flows can reactivate underlying units by squeezing the still-hot flow core away from the site of loading. We have identified three different styles of reactivation that took place during that eruption, which depend on the time interval separating the emplacement of the two flows, and hence the rheological contrast between them. For relatively long time intervals (> 2 days), hence high rheological contrasts, superposition can cause an overpressure

  20. A Study of Coaxial Rotor Performance and Flow Field Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-22

    A Study of Coaxial Rotor Performance and Flow Field Characteristics Natasha L. Barbely Aerospace Engineer NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field...The pressure field generated by the two airfoils aided our interpretation of the more complex coaxial rotor system flow field. The pressure fields...velocity (ft/sec) Z vertical distance between rotors (ft) αS pitch angle (deg), negative pitch down κint coaxial rotor induced power interference

  1. Supersonic Flow Control by Magnetic Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    control over supersonic flows in supersonic intakes . Experimental and numerical investigations focuses on the basic aspects of MHD interaction taking into...transport, shock-waves dynamics, boundary layers on the intake walls, massive flow separation within the scram-jet flow pass. Recent results of...that a global change of intake flow structure might be achieved with local ( in time and space ) MHD impact. Other aspect is supposed to be

  2. Numerical computations of Orbiter flow fields and heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Li, C. P.; Houston, C. K.; Chiu, P.; Olmedo, L.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical computations of flow fields around an analytical description of the Space Shuttle Orbiter windward surface, including the root of the wing leading edge, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of these calculations to several flow field modeling assumptions. Results of parametric flow field and boundary layer computations using the axisymmetric analogue concept to obtain three-dimensional heating rates, in conjunction with exact three-dimensional inviscid floe field solutions and two-dimensional boundary layer analysis - show the sensitivity of boundary layer edge conditions and heating rates to considerations of the inviscid flow field entropy layer, equilibrium air versus chemically and vibrationally frozen flow, and nonsimilar terms in the boundary layer computations. A cursory comparison between flow field predictions obtained from these methods and current Orbiter design methods has established a benchmark for selecting and adjusting these and future design methodologies.

  3. Shear augmented dispersion of a solute in a casson fluid flowing in a conduit.

    PubMed

    Dash, R K; Jayaraman, G; Mehta, K N

    2000-04-01

    The unsteady dispersion of a solute in a Casson fluid flowing in a conduit (pipe/channel) is studied using the generalized dispersion model of Gill and Sankarasubramanian. With this approach, the entire dispersion process is described appropriately in terms of a simple diffusion process with the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of time, in addition to its dependence on the yield stress of the fluid. The results are accurate up to a first approximation for small times, but verified with Sharp to be exact for large times. The model brings out mainly the effect of yield stress, or equivalently, the plug flow region on the overall dispersion process. It is found that the rate of dispersion is reduced (i.e., the effective diffusivity decreases) due to the yield stress of the fluid, or equivalently, the plug flow region in the conduit. Also, the effective diffusivity increases with time, but eventually attains its steady state value below a critical time [0.48(a2/Dm) for dispersion in a pipe and 0.55(a2/Dm) for dispersion in a channel-the critical transient time for a Newtonian fluid-where "a" is the radius of the pipe and Dm is the molecular diffusivity]. At steady state, for dispersion in a pipe with the plug flow radius one tenth of the radius of the pipe, the effective diffusivity is reduced to about 0.78 times of the corresponding value for a Newtonian fluid at equivalent flow rates; for dispersion in a channel, the reduction factor is about 0.73 confirming the earlier result of Sharp. Further, the location of the center of mass of a passive species over a cross section is found to remain unperturbed during the course of dispersion and for different values of the plug flow parameter (i.e., the yield stress of the fluid). The study can be used as a starting first approximate solution for studying the dispersion in the cardiovascular system or blood oxygenators.

  4. Studies of Transitional Flow, Unsteady Separation Phenomena and Particle Induced Augmentation Heating on Ablated Nose Tips.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    63 29 Variation of Profile Shape with Time for Axisyinmetric Camphor Models 63 30 The Development of Ablated Nose Shapes Over Which Flow...ablation tests using camphor models and inferred from downrange observation of full scale flight missions. Regions of gross instability on nose...been verified in wind tunnel tests of camphor models where shapes similar to those shown on Figure 29 can be developed under transitional conditions

  5. Testing of SLA-561V in NASA-Ames' Turbulent Flow Duct with Augmented Radiative Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Kornienko, Robert S.; Radbourne, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of Mars Science Laboratory s (MSL) heatshield development program, SLA-561 was tested in NASA Ames Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD) Facility. For these tests, the TFD facility was modified to include a ceramic plate located in the wall opposite to the test model. Normally the TFD wall opposite to the test model is water-cooled steel. Installing a noncooled ceramic plate allows the ceramic to absorb convective heating and radiate the energy back to the test model as the plate heats up. This work was an effort to increase the severity of TFD test conditions. Presented here are the results from these tests.

  6. The role of magnetic fields in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation is made of the dynamical effects of the intracluster magnetic field, whose radial inflow and shear can produce a dramatic increase in the field's strength while rendering it more radial, with cooling flows. It is found that field reconnection is the most likely dominant-loss mechanism, so that buoyancy effects are probably not important. Attention is given to the effect of the magnetic field on thermal instabilities. The most important observable effect of the magnetic field in cooling flows will probably be very strong Faraday rotation of the polarization of radio sources within or behind the cooling flow.

  7. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Supersensing through industrial process tomography’. PMID:27185961

  8. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  9. Tethered by Self-Generated Flow: Mucus String Augmented Feeding Current Generation in Larval Oysters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Wheeler, J.; Anderson, E.

    2016-02-01

    Marine zooplankton live in a nutritionally dilute environment. To survive, they must process an enormous volume of water relative to their own body volume for food. To achieve this, many zooplankters including copepods, invertebrate larvae, and protists create a feeding current to concentrate and transport food items to their food gathering structures. To enhance the efficiency of the feeding current, these zooplankters often rely on certain "tethering" mechanisms to retard their translational motion for producing a strong feeding current. The tethering force may include excess weight due to gravity, force from attachment to solid surfaces, and drag experienced by strategically placed morphological structures. Larval oysters are known from previous studies to release mucus strings during feeding, presumably for supplying a tethering force to enhance their feeding-current efficiency. But the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a high-speed microscale imaging system (HSMIS) to observe the behavior of freely swimming and feeding larval oysters. We also used HSMIS to measure larval imposed feeding currents via a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV) technique. HSMIS allows observations along a vertically oriented focal plane in a relatively large water vessel with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our high-speed videos show that a feeding larval oyster continuously released a long mucus string into its feeding current that flows downward; the feeding current subsequently dragged the mucus string downward. Analysis of our µPIV data combined with a hydrodynamic model further suggests that the drag force experienced by the mucus string in the feeding current contributes significantly to the tethering force required to generate the feeding current. Thus, mucus strings in larval oysters act as "anchors" in larval self-generated flow to actively tether the feeding larvae.

  10. Effectiveness of basic display augmentation in vehicular control by visual field cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, A. J.; Merhav, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of different basic display augmentation concepts - fixed reticle, velocity vector, and predicted future vehicle path - for RPVs controlled by a vehicle-mounted TV camera. The task is lateral manual control of a low flying RPV along a straight reference line in the presence of random side gusts. The man-machine system and the visual interface are modeled as a linear time-invariant system. Minimization of a quadratic performance criterion is assumed to underlie the control strategy of a well-trained human operator. The solution for the optimal feedback matrix enables the explicit computation of the variances of lateral deviation and directional error of the vehicle and of the control force that are used as performance measures.

  11. Effectiveness of basic display augmentation in vehicular control by visual field cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, A. J.; Merhav, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of different basic display augmentation concepts - fixed reticle, velocity vector, and predicted future vehicle path - for RPVs controlled by a vehicle-mounted TV camera. The task is lateral manual control of a low flying RPV along a straight reference line in the presence of random side gusts. The man-machine system and the visual interface are modeled as a linear time-invariant system. Minimization of a quadratic performance criterion is assumed to underlie the control strategy of a well-trained human operator. The solution for the optimal feedback matrix enables the explicit computation of the variances of lateral deviation and directional error of the vehicle and of the control force that are used as performance measures.

  12. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  13. Controlling flow direction in nanochannels by electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Tianshou; Li, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the flow behavior of CsF solutions in nanochannels under external electric fields E . It is found that the channel surface energy greatly affects the flow behavior. In channels of high surface energy, water molecules, on average, move in the same direction as that of the electric field regardless of the strength of E . In low surface energy channels, however, water transports in the opposite direction to the electric field at weak E and the flow direction is changed when E becomes sufficiently large. The direction change of water flow is attributed to the coupled effects of different water-ion interactions, inhomogeneous water viscosity, and ion distribution changes caused by the electric field. The flow direction change observed in this work may be employed for flow control in complex micro- or nanofluidic systems.

  14. Flow field design development using the segmented cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, G.; Ramsey, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fuel cell flow-field development employing two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (2-D CFD). Simulation of the flow distribution of a parallel channel flow-field, with a simple one-channel manifold, predicted inhomogeneous performance distribution within the cell. Further modeling, focusing on modification of the inlet and outlet flow fields, was used to predict a more homogeneous flow distribution in the flow-field. Attempts were made to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally by application of the segmented cell system. Measurements of the current distribution and CO transient response supported the 2-D CFD predictions. However, the margin of error between predicted and experimental results was considered insufficient to be of practical use. Future work will involve the evaluation of 3-D CFD to achieve the appropriate level of accuracy.

  15. Internal corner flow fields. [calculations for super/hypersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.

    1979-01-01

    A computational procedure has been developed to predict the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field of conical internal corners. The prediction of internal corner flow fields can be important in the design of supersonic 'box' type inlets. The computational procedure utilizes a second order finite difference marching technique to asymptote to the conical corner flow solution of Euler's equations. These flow fields are dominated by complex shock interactions. All discontinuities, shocks and slip surfaces are fitted with the appropriate jump conditions. The 'triple' points (the interaction of two shocks and a slip surface) are also computed exactly. Computed results are compared with experimental data and the computational results of other investigators. In addition, the sensitivity of these flow fields to a number of geometric parameters is studied, and the impact of these flows on inlet performance is assessed.

  16. Use of computer graphics for visualization of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Buning, Pieter; Choi, Diana; Bancroft, Gordon; Merritt, Fergus; Rogers, Stuart

    1987-01-01

    A high-performance graphics workstation has been combined with software developed for flow-field visualization to yield a highly effective tool for analysis of fluid-flow dynamics. After the flow fields are obtained from experimental measurements or computer simulations, the workstation permits one to interactively view the dynamics of the flow fields; e.g., the viewer can zoom into a region or rotate his viewing position about the region to study it in more detail. Several techniques for visualization of flow fields with this workstation are described in this paper and illustrated with a videotape available from the authors. The computer hardware and software required to create effective flow visualization displays are discussed. Additional software and hardware required to create videotapes or 16mm movies are also described. Limitations imposed by current workstation performance is addressed and future workstation performance is forecast.

  17. Field theoretical approach for bio-membrane coupled with flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Kawakatsu, T.

    2013-02-01

    Shape deformation of bio-membranes in flow field is well known phenomenon in biological systems, for example red blood cell in blood vessel. To simulate such deformation with use of field theoretical approach, we derived the dynamical equation of phase field for shape of membrane and coupled the equation with Navier-Stokes equation for flow field. In 2-dimensional simulations, we found that a bio-membrane in a Poiseuille flow takes a parachute shape similar to the red blood cells.

  18. Field methods for measuring concentrated flow erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; James, M. R.; Quinton, J. N.; Taguas, E. V.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    techniques (3D) for measuring erosion from concentrated flow (pole, laser profilemeter, photo-reconstruction and terrestrial LiDAR) The comparison between two- and three-dimensional methods has showed the superiority of the 3D techniques for obtaining accurate cross sectional data. The results from commonly-used 2D methods can be subject to systematic errors in areal cross section that exceed magnitudes of 10 % on average. In particular, the pole simplified method has showed a clear tendency to understimate areas. Laser profilemeter results show that further research on calibrating optical devices for a variety of soil conditions must be carried out to improve its performance. For volume estimations, photo-reconstruction results provided an excellent approximation to terrestrial laser data and demonstrate that this new remote sensing technique has a promising application field in soil erosion studies. 2D approaches involved important errors even over short measurement distances. However, as well as accuracy, the cost and time requirements of a technique must be considered.

  19. Background field method in the gradient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    In perturbative consideration of the Yang-Mills gradient flow, it is useful to introduce a gauge non-covariant term (“gauge-fixing term”) to the flow equation that gives rise to a Gaussian damping factor also for gauge degrees of freedom. In the present paper, we consider a modified form of the gauge-fixing term that manifestly preserves covariance under the background gauge transformation. It is shown that our gauge-fixing term does not affect gauge-invariant quantities as does the conventional gauge-fixing term. The formulation thus allows a background gauge covariant perturbative expansion of the flow equation that provides, in particular, a very efficient computational method of expansion coefficients in the small flow time expansion. The formulation can be generalized to systems containing fermions.

  20. Experimental Study of Impinging Jets Flow-Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    the jet plumes and outwash flow . Lift plate surface pressure measurements have also been made. The unsteady flow , known to have significant large...contributed to the identification and measurement of the major features of the flow -field generated by the two parallel impinging model jets. These...and outwash flow . 3 Laser Doppler Velocimeter Measurements Highlights of the LDV measurements are presented in the next two figures

  1. Precipitation-Snowmelt Timing and Snowmelt Augmentation of Large Peak Flow Events, Western Cascades, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, K. S.; Jones, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme rain-on-snow floods are known to result from snowmelt coincident with precipitation, but comparatively little is known about the relative timing of these factors within storm events. Cumulative net snowmelt (hourly, from a snowmelt lysimeter) was plotted against precipitation for 26 large storms (> 1-yr return period) over the period 1991-2012 in the transient snow zone of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the western Cascades of Oregon. The relative timing of precipitation and net snowmelt at the hourly time scale was assessed with wavelet coherence. Five precipitation-net snowmelt response categories were identified: flat; persistent melt; persistent snow accumulation; late melt; and late snow accumulation. Persistent melt events were characterized by increasing cumulative net snowmelt and precipitation and had the highest mean peak flow and water available for runoff. Both the persistent melt and persistent snow accumulation categories had large, contiguous regions of significant wavelet coherence at multiple temporal scales, but pulses of precipitation preceded pulses of snowmelt in the persistent melt events, whereas precipitation was absorbed by the snowpack in the persistent accumulation category. A dewpoint temperature consistently above 0.5°C, elevated wind speeds, and a high fraction of precipitation falling as rain in the persistent melt category facilitated rapid snowmelt rates. During the two extreme rain-on-snow events in the sample, snowmelt was significantly synchronized with precipitation at 1-h to 64-h time scales throughout the 10-day event duration. Event categorization and analysis of wavelet coherence between precipitation and snowmelt can help predict peak discharge magnitude.

  2. Field Detection of Chemical Assimilation in A Basaltic Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Whelley, P. L.; Scheidt, S. P.; Williams, D. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lava channels are features seen throughout the inner Solar System, including on Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Flow emplacement is therefore a crucial process in the shaping of planetary surfaces. Many studies, including some completed by members of this team at the December 1974 lava flow, have investigated the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, both on Earth and on the Moon and how pre-flow terrain can impact final channel morphology, but far fewer have focused on how the compositional characteristics of the substrate over which a flow was em-placed influenced its final flow morphology. Within the length of one flow, it is common for flows to change in morphology, a quality linked to rheology (a function of multiple factors including viscosi-ty, temperature, composition, etc.). The relationship between rheology and temperature has been well-studied but less is known about the relationship between an older flow's chemistry and how the interaction between this flow and the new flow might affect lava rheology and therefore emplacement dynamics. Lava erosion. Through visual observations of active terrestrial flows, mechanical erosion by flowing lava has been well-documented. Lava erosion by which flow composition is altered as the active lava melts and assimilates the pre-flow terrain over which it moves is also hypothesized to affect channel formation. However, there is only one previous field study that geochemically documents the process in recent basaltic flow systems.

  3. Rationale, design, and methods for a pivotal randomized clinical trial of continuous aortic flow augmentation in patients with exacerbation of heart failure: the MOMENTUM trial.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry; Czerska, Barbara; Abraham, William T; Neaton, James D; Delgado, Reynolds M; Mather, Paul; Bourge, Robert; Parker, Irene C; Konstam, Marvin A

    2007-11-01

    For patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF) who are inadequately responsive to medical therapy, the options include ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplant. In animal models and patients, continuous aortic flow augmentation using the Orqis Medical Cancion System (Orqis Medical Corporation, Lake Forest, California), a percutaneously placed arterial-to-arterial circuit (continuous flow up to 1.5 L/min) with an extracorporeal, magnetic, centrifugal pump, improves hemodynamics and renal function with benefits persisting 24 hours after discontinuation. The Multi-center Trial of the Orqis Medical Cancion System for the Enhanced Treatment of Heart Failure Unresponsive to Medical Therapy is enrolling patients hospitalized with HF who are randomized to continuous aortic flow augmentation or medical therapy alone. Entry requires persistent HF, elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, reduced cardiac index, and impaired renal function or substantial diuretic requirement despite intravenous inotrope or vasodilator treatment. The primary efficacy end point is a composite including the components of 72- to 96-hour pulmonary capillary wedge pressure reduction and days alive out of hospital with no mechanical support for more than 35 days. Additional end points include changes in serum creatinine, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and health-related quality of life. The Multi-center Trial of the Orqis Medical Cancion System for the Enhanced Treatment of Heart Failure Unresponsive to Medical Therapy tests the hypothesis that continuous aortic flow augmentation improves the clinical status and outcomes in patients hospitalized with HF exacerbation who are inadequately responsive to medical therapy.

  4. An Explorative Study Examining Augmentative and Alternative Communication Training in the Field of Music Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadberry, Anita L; Sweeney, Alison

    2017-07-01

    Music therapists work with many people who require Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). As communication goals are central to music therapy practice, many music therapists would benefit from training in AAC. The purpose of this survey study was to determine the state of AAC education for music therapists at the university level, how AAC is being used in music therapy sessions, and how practicing music therapists are trained in AAC. Music therapy faculty and credentialed music therapists in North America and Europe were invited to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey data from each group of respondents. With regard to training in AAC at the university level, results indicate that almost half of music therapy faculty (44.66%) provided some training. The primary reason given for not providing training was a lack of educator knowledge in this area. Results indicate that a majority (81.77%) of music therapy clinicians are familiar with AAC and slightly over half (55.08%) reported that they work with clients who use AAC. Sixty-two percent of music therapists reported using AAC to promote expressive language, and 49% to increase receptive language. Over 80% of clinicians stated they would benefit from additional AAC training. Although a majority of music therapists are familiar with ACC, results indicate that ACC competency could be enhanced through university-level instruction and continuing professional development courses.

  5. Time resolved Schlieren imaging of DBD actuator flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourgostar, Cyrus; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-10-01

    Schlieren imaging methods measure the first derivative of density in the direction of a knife-edge spatial filter. It has been used extensively in aerodynamic research to visualize the structure of flow fields. With a single barrier planer dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator, Schlieren images clearly show the absence of significant vertical air flow normal to the surface, and no more than few millimeters thick induced boundary layer flow. A gated intensified CCD camera along with a Schlieren system can not only visualize the flow field induced by the actuator, but also temporarily resolve the images of the flow and plasma field. Our time resolved images with triangular applied voltage waveforms indicate that several separate discharge regimes occur during positive and negative going half cycles of single and double barrier DBD actuators. Time resolved Schlieren imaging of both single and double barrier DBDs with different applied waveforms, discharge parameters and electrode geometries reveal important information on the induced flow structure.

  6. Augmented Reality in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Shingles, Luke J.

    2013-09-01

    Augmented Reality consists of merging live images with virtual layers of information. The rapid growth in the popularity of smartphones and tablets over recent years has provided a large base of potential users of Augmented Reality technology, and virtual layers of information can now be attached to a wide variety of physical objects. In this article, we explore the potential of Augmented Reality for astrophysical research with two distinct experiments: (1) Augmented Posters and (2) Augmented Articles. We demonstrate that the emerging technology of Augmented Reality can already be used and implemented without expert knowledge using currently available apps. Our experiments highlight the potential of Augmented Reality to improve the communication of scientific results in the field of astrophysics. We also present feedback gathered from the Australian astrophysics community that reveals evidence of some interest in this technology by astronomers who experimented with Augmented Posters. In addition, we discuss possible future trends for Augmented Reality applications in astrophysics, and explore the current limitations associated with the technology. This Augmented Article, the first of its kind, is designed to allow the reader to directly experiment with this technology.

  7. Flow Field Measurement of Mixing Driven by Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batur, C.; Zhong, H.

    2003-01-01

    Mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows inside a cavity consists of stretching and folding of an interface. Measurement of the flow field using particle imaging velocimetry shows that during stretching the flow field has a single elliptic point, thus dominated by a single vortex. However, global bifurcation that results in folding introduces a hyperbolic point whereby the flow field degenerates to multiple vortex interactions. The short-lived coherent structure observed during mixing which results in the Rayleigh- Taylor morphology is attributed to vortex interactions. The mixing characteristics of non-homogeneous fluids driven by buoyancy are important towards understanding transport phenomenon in a microgravity environment. Mixing consists of stretching and folding of an interface due to a flow field whose intensity depends on the body force. For miscible liquids, the characteristic of the flow field determines whether mass transport is governed by diffusion or bulk stirring which induces mixing. For technologically important processes, transport of mass is governed by the coupling of the body force to scalar gradients such as concentration and or temperature' 2 3 . In order to lend insight into these classes of problems we consider a model experimental system to study mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows. The characteristics of mixing is addressed from detail measurements of the flow field using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), and its corresponding interface dynamics using image processing techniques.

  8. Dynamics of Deformable Active Particles under External Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, Mitsusuke

    2017-10-01

    In most practical situations, active particles are affected by their environment, for example, by a chemical concentration gradient, light intensity, gravity, or confinement. In particular, the effect of an external flow field is important for particles swimming in a solvent fluid. For deformable active particles such as self-propelled liquid droplets and active vesicles, as well as microorganisms such as euglenas and neutrophils, a general description has been developed by focusing on shape deformation. In this review, we present our recent studies concerning the dynamics of a single active deformable particle under an external flow field. First, a set of model equations of active deformable particles including the effect of a general external flow is introduced. Then, the dynamics under two specific flow profiles is discussed: a linear shear flow, as the simplest example, and a swirl flow. In the latter case, the scattering dynamics of the active deformable particles by the swirl flow is also considered.

  9. Flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Shimizu, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.; Akiyama, T.; Emoto, M.; Evans, T.; Dinklage, A.; Du, X.; Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Goto, T.; Hasuo, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Ichiguchi, K.; Ishizawa, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Kamiya, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kawamura, G.; Kato, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Mukai, K.; Murakami, I.; Murakami, S.; Narushima, Y.; Nunami, M.; Ohdach, S.; Ohno, N.; Osakabe, M.; Pablant, N.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Shoji, M.; Sudo, S.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Todo, Y.; Wang, H.; Yamada, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Mutoh, T.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Ejiri, A.; Furukawa, M.; Fujita, T.; Hamaguchi, S.; Igami, H.; Isobe, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Motojima, G.; Nagasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Oya, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Sakamoto, M.; Sanpei, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tokitani, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sugama, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Idei, H.; Isayama, A.; Kitajima, S.; Masamune, S.; Shinohara, K.; Bawankar, P. S.; Bernard, E.; von Berkel, M.; Funaba, H.; Huang, X. L.; Ii, T.; Ido, T.; Ikeda, K.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Moon, C.; Muto, S.; Miyazawa, J.; Ming, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ozaki, T.; Oishi, T.; Ohno, M.; Pandya, S.; Seki, R.; Sano, R.; Saito, K.; Sakaue, H.; Takemura, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, H.; Toi, K.; Wieland, B.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Zhang, H.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.

    2015-01-01

    The driving and damping mechanism of plasma flow is an important issue because flow shear has a significant impact on turbulence in a plasma, which determines the transport in the magnetized plasma. Here we report clear evidence of the flow damping due to stochastization of the magnetic field. Abrupt damping of the toroidal flow associated with a transition from a nested magnetic flux surface to a stochastic magnetic field is observed when the magnetic shear at the rational surface decreases to 0.5 in the large helical device. This flow damping and resulting profile flattening are much stronger than expected from the Rechester–Rosenbluth model. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that the flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport. PMID:25569268

  10. Thermo-capillary driven flow under the influence of rotation and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Pratik

    Microgravity conditions pose unique challenges for fluid handling and heat transfer applications. By controlling (curtailing or augmenting) the buoyant and thermocapillary convection, the latter being the dominant convective flow in a microgravity environment, significant advantages can be achieved in space based processing. The control of this surface tension gradient driven flow is sought using (1) rotation and (2) magnetic field, and the effects of these are computationally studied in two separate parts. In the first part, the main parameters are the solutal Marangoni number Mc, representing the surface tension gradient force and the Taylor number Ta representing the rotational effect. For given values of Mc, certain values of Ta were detected where the Sherwood number Sh, representing the convective solute flux, and the convective flow effects are noticeably reduced. These results can provide conditions under which convective flow transport approaches the diffusion limited transport, which is desirable, for example in the production of higher quality protein crystals. In the second part, a two-fluid layer system, with the lower fluid being a non-conducting ferrofluid, is considered under the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient. To capture the deformable interface, a numerical method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations, Heat equations and Maxwell's equations was developed using a hybrid Level Set/Volume-of-Fluid technique. The convective velocities and heat fluxes were studied under various regimes of the thermal Marangoni number Ma, the external field represented by the magnetic Bond number Bom, and various gravity levels, Fr. Regimes where the convection were either curtailed or augmented were identified. It was found that the surface force due to the step change in the magnetic permeability at the interface could be suitably utilized to control the instability at the interface.

  11. A color video display technique for flow field surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.; Tsao, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Color video display techniques for flow field surveys are presented. The following techniques were examined: traverse device, used for flow field surveys above and behind finite wing models; flow chart of data reduction for color video display technique; location of spanwise survey stations above and behind wing; hot wire data at first three survey stations on fully stalled wing; hot wire data at last three stations behind fully stalled wing; hot wire and pitch probe data; magnitude of velocity, yaw angle, pitch angle, and cross flow direction from 5 tube survey at X/C = 2.70 behind fully stalled wing.

  12. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions.

  13. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, W.D.

    1999-06-15

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

  14. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1990-01-01

    Because of the complexity of helicopter flow field, a zonal method of analysis of computational aerodynamics is required. Here, a new procedure for coupling potential and viscous flow is proposed. An overlapping, velocity coupling technique is to be developed with the unique feature that the potential flow surface singularity strengths are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes at a smoother inner fluid boundary. The closed-loop iteration method proceeds until the velocity field is converged. This coupling should provide the means of more accurate viscous computations of the near-body and rotor flow fields with resultant improved analysis of such important performance parameters as helicopter fuselage drag and rotor airloads.

  15. Viscous and Interacting Flow Field Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    supersonic causing a dramatic decrease in inmtx (see Fig 4). analysis, the frequency was predicted for six experi- Sepration will not occur at the spike...conditions at the solid wall have been discussed by the author [7]. The important fact is, that the flow close to the surface is strongly affected by the...without any solid theoretical foundation. It is there- fore of fundamental and practical importance to establish a basic theory of this damping

  16. Computational Methods for Complex Flow Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-28

    James J. Riley Joel H . Ferziger "Turbulent Flow Simulation - Future Needs" Micha Wolfshtein " Numerical Calculation of the Reynolds Stress and Turbulent...July 1983. Also in RECENT ADVANCES IN NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS, Vol. 3, Editor W.G. Habashi, Pineridge Press. 2. Usab, W.J., "Embedded Mesh Solutions...ridiaconal matrices applicable to approximane factorization methods . E:xlicit algcrit-s are also easier to adapz to multiProcessor arcr.itectures as the

  17. A fast response miniature probe for wet steam flow field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosdas, Ilias; Mansour, Michel; Kalfas, Anestis I.; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-12-01

    Modern steam turbines require operational flexibility due to renewable energies’ increasing share of the electrical grid. Additionally, the continuous increase in energy demand necessitates efficient design of the steam turbines as well as power output augmentation. The long turbine rotor blades at the machines’ last stages are prone to mechanical vibrations and as a consequence time-resolved experimental data under wet steam conditions are essential for the development of large-scale low-pressure steam turbines. This paper presents a novel fast response miniature heated probe for unsteady wet steam flow field measurements. The probe has a tip diameter of 2.5 mm, and a miniature heater cartridge ensures uncontaminated pressure taps from condensed water. The probe is capable of providing the unsteady flow angles, total and static pressure as well as the flow Mach number. The operating principle and calibration procedure are described in the current work and a detailed uncertainty analysis demonstrates the capability of the new probe to perform accurate flow field measurements under wet steam conditions. In order to exclude any data possibly corrupted by droplets’ impact or evaporation from the heating process, a filtering algorithm was developed and implemented in the post-processing phase of the measured data. In the last part of this paper the probe is used in an experimental steam turbine test facility and measurements are conducted at the inlet and exit of the last stage with an average wetness mass fraction of 8.0%.

  18. Two-way Interaction of Lagrangian Bubble Dynamics and Eulerian Mixture Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Although under simple flow conditions a well dispersed bubble cloud in a liquid can be modeled with an Eulerian continuum model, the fine scale interactions between the two phases, the potential non-uniformities and high bubble concentrations in stiff gradient regions of complex flows can only be represented by more detailed numerical models such as Lagrangian tracking of individual bubbles. To meet both needs of describing individual bubbles and of including the collective effects in the two-phase continuum, we have developed a method coupling in a two-way fashion the two approaches. The bubble dynamics and tracking scheme is based on extensive studies on bubble dynamics and interactions at Dynaflow and is based on a Surface Averaged Pressure spherical model using a modified incompressible Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a modified compressible Gilmore equation. The bubbles presence in the Eulerian flow field is considered through a variable medium density formulation resulting from the instantaneous bubble population distribution in the field. The developed method is applicable to many practical flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. We present the method and its application to waterjet thrust augmentation by bubble injection.

  19. Interaction of unsteady separated flow over multi-bodies moving relatively in the same flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zheng, Xin-qian; Hou, An-ping; Lu, Ya-jun

    2005-12-01

    Unsteady separated flow is one of research frontiers in current aerodynamic. Great accomplishments have been acquired; however, most studies are on single body in a stream, such as studies on unsteady separated flows over airfoils. There are typical cases in the nature and engineering applications, in which several interacting bodies with relative motions are within the same flow field. These interacting unsteady separated flow fields not only are closely related to the phenomena of noise and flutter induced by flows, but also have strong influences on aerodynamic performances. With axial flow compressors as background, the present paper carried out studies on 'interaction of unsteady separated flow over multi-bodies moving relatively in the same flow field'. Experiment investigations carried out in the stationary annular cascade wind tunnel and the single-stage low-speed axial flow compressor experimental facility as well as relevant CFD simulations demonstrate that under properly organized interactions between all unsteady components, the time-space structure of unsteady separated flow field can be remarkably improved and the time-averaged aerodynamic performances be significantly enhanced accordingly. The maximum reduction of the loss coefficient reached 27.4% and 76.5% in the stationary annular cascade wind tunnel and the CFD simulation for single-stage axial flow compressor, respectively.

  20. Synthetic Jet Flow Field Database for CFD Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Chung-Sheng; Chen, Fang Jenq; Neuhart, Dan; Harris, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    An oscillatory zero net mass flow jet was generated by a cavity-pumping device, namely a synthetic jet actuator. This basic oscillating jet flow field was selected as the first of the three test cases for the Langley workshop on CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control. The purpose of this workshop was to assess the current CFD capabilities to predict unsteady flow fields of synthetic jets and separation control. This paper describes the characteristics and flow field database of a synthetic jet in a quiescent fluid. In this experiment, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and hot-wire anemometry were used to measure the jet velocity field. In addition, the actuator operating parameters including diaphragm displacement, internal cavity pressure, and internal cavity temperature were also documented to provide boundary conditions for CFD modeling.

  1. Investigation of Spherical-Wave-Initiated Flow Fields Around Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Donald R.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity flow fields and vortex movements have been made about various simple blunt models undergoing spherical blast waves with a positive overpressure of 4 pounds per square inch. A bullet-optical method was used to determine flow velocities and is applied to velocity fields in which the gradients are largely normal to the free-stream direction. The velocity flow fields are shown at various flow times following passage of the blast front for different models. Vortex movements with time are compared for square-bar models of various aspect ratios. Corner sharpness had no discernible effect on the overall disturbed velocity fields or vortex movements for the square-box models used.

  2. Unsteady fluid dynamic model for propeller induced flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Ashby, Dale L.; Yon, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A potential flow based three-dimensional panel method was modified to treat time dependent flow conditions in which the body's geometry may vary with time. The main objective of this effort was the study of a flow field due to a propeller rotating relative to a nonrotating body which is otherwise moving at a constant forward speed. Calculated surface pressure, thrust and torque coefficient data for a four-bladed marine propeller/body compared favorably with previously published experimental results.

  3. Unsteady fluid dynamic model for propeller induced flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Ashby, Dale L.; Yon, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A potential flow based three-dimensional panel method was modified to treat time dependent flow conditions in which the body's geometry may vary with time. The main objective of this effort was the study of a flow field due to a propeller rotating relative to a nonrotating body which is otherwise moving at a constant forward speed. Calculated surface pressure, thrust and torque coefficient data for a four-bladed marine propeller/body compared favorably with previously published experimental results.

  4. Biofilm responses to smooth flow fields and chemical gradients in novel microfluidic flow cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jisun L.; Au, Kelly H.; Huynh, Kimberly T.

    2013-01-01

    We present two novel microfluidic flow cells developed to provide reliable control of flow distributions and chemical gradients in biofilm studies. We developed a single-inlet microfluidic flow cell to support biofilm growth under a uniform velocity field, and a double-inlet flow cell to provide a very smooth transverse concentration gradient. Both flow cells consist of a layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bonded to glass cover slips and were fabricated using the replica molding technique. We demonstrate the capabilities of the flow cells by quantifying flow patterns before and after growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms through particle imaging velocimetry, and by evaluating concentration gradients within the double-inlet microfluidic flow cell. Biofilm growth substantially increased flow complexity by diverting flow around biomass, creating high- and low-velocity regions and surface friction. Under a glucose gradient in the double-inlet flow cell, P. aeruginosa biofilms grew in proportion to the local glucose concentration, producing distinct spatial patterns in biofilm biomass relative to the imposed glucose gradient. When biofilms were subjected to a ciprofloxacin gradient, spatial patterns of fractions of dead cells were also in proportion to the local antibiotic concentration. These results demonstrate that the microfluidic flow cells are suitable for quantifying flow complexities resulting from flow-biofilm interactions and investigating spatial patterns of biofilm growth under chemical gradients. These novel microfluidic flow cells will facilitate biofilm research that requires flow control and in situ imaging, particularly investigations of biofilm-environment interactions. PMID:24038055

  5. Flow field studies using holographic interferometry at Langley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Helms, V. T.; Gooderum, P. B.

    1982-09-01

    Some of the uses of holographic interferometry at Langley Research Center both for flow visualization and for density field determinations are described and tests in cryogenic flows at the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel are discussed. Experimental and theoretical fringe shift data are compared.

  6. Particle and flow field holography: A critical survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1987-01-01

    A brief background is provided for the fields of particle and flow visualization holography. A summary of methods currently in use is given, followed by a discussion of more recent and unique applications. The problem of data reduction is discussed. A state of the art summary is then provided with a prognosis of the future of the field. Particle and flow visualization holography are characterized as powerful tools currently in wide use and with significant untapped potential.

  7. Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in a Buoyant Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    John William Strutt , the third Baron of Rayleigh , or more commonly known as Lord Rayleigh , was the first to offer a correct explanation of the...FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD         THESIS       Steven Michael Meents, Captain, USAF...AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-M22 FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics

  8. Lava Flow Fields on Earth and Mars: Scales of Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, T. K.; Bulmer, M. H.; Warner, N. H.

    2001-12-01

    Because an active lava flow has yet to be observed on Mars, and available data on surface composition is of limited scope (e.g., the SNC meteorites, or data collected by Sojourner) or resolution (e.g., the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emissions Spectrometer [MGS TES]), Martian eruption and emplacement parameters must be inferred from the resulting volcanic morphologies. A unique set of lava flow lobes to the southwest of Arsia Mons (and possibly genetically associated with that volcano) were initially identified using high-resolution ( ~50 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter (VO) images. These flows are characterized by a ridged surface texture, similar to that observed on folded evolved lava flows (e.g., andesites, dacites and rhyolites) on Earth, and relatively thick ( ~40 to 80 m) flow margins. Additional data collected by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) reveal that these ridged flows are much more widespread than indicated by the VO images. MGS and VO datasets allow us to identify the location of these ridged flows, measure flow thickness and the wavelengths and amplitudes of the surface undulations. A large lava flow field ( ~67.5 km2) surrounding Sabancaya volcano, Peru, displays similar surface textures and flow thicknesses, and we have been investigating these andesitic to trachyandesitic lavas as potential analogs to the Martian flows. Using high-resolution GPS surveys-collected both along-flow and across-flow, we can quantify the surface topography of these flows with +/-1 cm horizontal and +/-2 cm vertical resolution. This resolution is approximately one order of magnitude better than will be obtained using global MOLA coverage of Mars. Quantitative comparison of the Sabancaya lava flows with those adjacent to Arsia Mons, combined with results from analytical and numerical modeling, suggest that the Sabancaya lavas are fundamentally different from the Martian flows. We therefore suggest that the Martian flows are either not

  9. Computational study of generic hypersonic vehicle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Johnny R.

    1994-01-01

    The geometric data of the generic hypersonic vehicle configuration included body definitions and preliminary grids for the forebody (nose cone excluded), midsection (propulsion system excluded), and afterbody sections. This data was to be augmented by the nose section geometry (blunt conical section mated with the noncircular cross section of the forebody initial plane) along with a grid and a detailed supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) geometry (inlet and combustor) which should be merged with the nozzle portion of the afterbody geometry. The solutions were to be obtained by using a Navier-Stokes (NS) code such as TUFF for the nose portion, a parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) solver such as the UPS and STUFF codes for the forebody, a NS solver with finite rate hydrogen-air chemistry capability such as TUFF and SPARK for the scramjet and a suitable solver (NS or PNS) for the afterbody and external nozzle flows. The numerical simulation of the hypersonic propulsion system for the generic hypersonic vehicle is the major focus of this entire work. Supersonic combustion ramjet is such a propulsion system, hence the main thrust of the present task has been to establish a solution procedure for the scramjet flow. The scramjet flow is compressible, turbulent, and reacting. The fuel used is hydrogen and the combustion process proceeds at a finite rate. As a result, the solution procedure must be capable of addressing such flows.

  10. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  11. Flow field characteristics of an ornithopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Allen, James

    2007-11-01

    This paper details phase locked PIV measurements from a model Ornithopther flying in a wind tunnel at representative flight conditions. Testing over a range of Strouhal numbers, 0.1-0.3, shows that the unsteady wake is composed of coherent vortical structures that resemble vortex rings. A single ring is formed in the wake of each wing during one wing beat. Momentum balance from velocity field measurements are used to estimate the lift and drag of the ornithopter.

  12. Flow Field Evolution of a Decaying Sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Na; Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Tritschler, Alexandra; Denker, Carsten; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haimin

    2007-12-01

    We study the evolution of the flows and horizontal proper motions in and around a decaying follower sunspot based on time sequences of two-dimensional spectroscopic observations in the visible and white-light imaging data obtained over 6 days from 2005 June 7 to 12. During this time period the sunspot decayed gradually to a pore. The spectroscopic observations were obtained with the Fabry-Pérot-based Visible-Light Imaging Magnetograph (VIM) in conjunction with the high-order adaptive optics (AO) system operated at the 65 cm vacuum reflector of the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). We apply local correlation tracking (LCT) to the speckle-reconstructed time sequences of white-light images around 600 nm to infer horizontal proper motions, while the Doppler shifts of the scanned Fe I line at 630.15 nm are used to calculate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities with subarcsecond resolution. We find that the dividing line between radial inward and outward proper motions in the inner and outer penumbra, respectively, survives the decay phase. In particular the moat flow is still detectable after the penumbra disappeared. Based on our observations, three major processes removed flux from the sunspot: (1) fragmentation of the umbra, (2) flux cancelation of moving magnetic features (MMFs; of the same polarity as the sunspot) that encounter the leading opposite polarity network and plages areas, and (3) flux transport by MMFs (of the same polarity as the sunspot) to the surrounding network and plage regions that have the same polarity as the sunspot.

  13. Block Implicit Computation of Flow Field in Solid Rocket Ramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhibo; Zhu, Jianshi

    To compute the flow field in solid rocket ramjet (SRR) in which the chamber has a complex boundary, a block implicit algorithm (BIA) had been developed. The boundary conditions of three-dimensional steady-state Navier-Stokes (NS) equations were treated by modifying the discrete equations and the grids were generated through an algebraic way. These methods have been put into practice and proved to be valid and efficient in the computation of flow field in the chamber. The technique developed here applies to similar problems in porous medium flows. Keywords: rocket ramjet, numerical simulation, block implicit algorithm

  14. On the flow field around a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeles, G.; Athanassiadis, N.

    A model of a two-bucket Savonius rotor windmill was constructed and tested in a wind tunnel. The flow field around the rotor was examined visually and also quantitatively with the use of a hot wire. The flow visualization revealed an upstream influence on the flow field up to 3 rotor diameters away and a strong downwash downstream. Hot wire measurements showed a large velocity deficit behind the rotor and a quick velocity recovery downstream due to strong mixing; the latter was associated with high levels of turbulence. Energy spectra revealed that all turbulence was concentrated in a single harmonic corresponding to twice the rotational speed of the rotor.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Canted Nozzle and Scarfed Nozzle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used for the analysis of issues concerning non-conventional (canted and scarfed) nozzle flow fields. Numerical simulations are carried out for the quality of flow in terms of axisymmetric nature at the inlet of canted nozzles of a rocket motor. Two different nozzle geometries are examined. The analysis of these simulation results shows that the flow field at the entry of the nozzles is non axisymmetric at the start of the motor. With time this asymmetry diminishes, also the flow becomes symmetric before the nozzle throat, indicating no misalignment of thrust vector with the nozzle axis. The qualitative flow fields at the inlet of the nozzles are used in selecting the geometry with lesser flow asymmetry. Further CFD methodology is used to analyse flow field of a scarfed nozzle for the evaluation of thrust developed and its direction. This work demonstrates the capability of the CFD based methods for the nozzle analysis problems which were earlier solved only approximately by making simplifying assumptions and semi empirical methods.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Canted Nozzle and Scarfed Nozzle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2017-10-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used for the analysis of issues concerning non-conventional (canted and scarfed) nozzle flow fields. Numerical simulations are carried out for the quality of flow in terms of axisymmetric nature at the inlet of canted nozzles of a rocket motor. Two different nozzle geometries are examined. The analysis of these simulation results shows that the flow field at the entry of the nozzles is non axisymmetric at the start of the motor. With time this asymmetry diminishes, also the flow becomes symmetric before the nozzle throat, indicating no misalignment of thrust vector with the nozzle axis. The qualitative flow fields at the inlet of the nozzles are used in selecting the geometry with lesser flow asymmetry. Further CFD methodology is used to analyse flow field of a scarfed nozzle for the evaluation of thrust developed and its direction. This work demonstrates the capability of the CFD based methods for the nozzle analysis problems which were earlier solved only approximately by making simplifying assumptions and semi empirical methods.

  17. Observation of airplane flow fields by natural condensation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1988-01-01

    In-flight condensation patterns can illustrate a variety of airplane flow fields, such as attached and separated flows, vortex flows, and expansion and shock waves. These patterns are a unique source of flow visualization that has not been utilized previously. Condensation patterns at full-scale Reynolds number can provide useful information for researchers experimenting in subscale tunnels. It is also shown that computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field provide an inexpensive way to analyze the qualitative features of the condensation pattern, although a more complete theoretical modeling is necessary to obtain details of the condensation process. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that relative humidity is more sensitive to changes in local static temperature than to changes in pressure.

  18. The structure of the vorticity field in homogeneous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the vorticity fields in several homogeneous irrotational straining flows and a homogeneous turbulent shear flow were examined using a database generated by direct numerical simulation of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. In all cases, strong evidence was found for the presence of coherent vortical structures. The initially isotropic vorticity fields were rapidly affected by imposed mean strain and the rotational component of mean shear and developed accordingly. In the homogeneous turbulent shear-flow cases, the roll-up of mean vorticity into characteristic hairpin vortices was clearly observed, supporting the view that hairpin vortices are an important vortical structure in all turbulent shear flows; the absence of mean shear in the homogeneous irrotational straining flows precludes the presence of hairpin-like vortices.

  19. Vapor Bubbles in Flow and Acoustic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Hao, Yue

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents an order-of-magnitude analysis of the physical processes occurring during the pulsations of a vapor bubble subject to a sound field and shows several numerical examples relating to vapor bubbles in water with and without a translational velocity relative to the liquid. Finally, the growth and collapse of a bubble in a small tube under the action of a heat pulse is considered and it is pointed out that, in suitable conditions, a potentially useful pumping effect without mechanical moving parts can be achieved.

  20. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  1. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  2. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  3. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Non-Rotating and Rotating Coolant Channel Flow Fields. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Future generations of ultra high bypass-ratio jet engines will require far higher pressure ratios and operating temperatures than those of current engines. For the foreseeable future, engine materials will not be able to withstand the high temperatures without some form of cooling. In particular the turbine blades, which are under high thermal as well as mechanical loads, must be cooled. Cooling of turbine blades is achieved by bleeding air from the compressor stage of the engine through complicated internal passages in the turbine blades (internal cooling, including jet-impingement cooling) and by bleeding small amounts of air into the boundary layer of the external flow through small discrete holes on the surface of the blade (film cooling and transpiration cooling). The cooling must be done using a minimum amount of air or any increases in efficiency gained through higher operating temperature will be lost due to added load on the compressor stage. Turbine cooling schemes have traditionally been based on extensive empirical data bases, quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, and trial and error. With improved capabilities of CFD, these traditional methods can be augmented by full three-dimensional simulations of the coolant flow to predict in detail the heat transfer and metal temperatures. Several aspects of turbine coolant flows make such application of CFD difficult, thus a highly effective CFD methodology must be used. First, high resolution of the flow field is required to attain the needed accuracy for heat transfer predictions, making highly efficient flow solvers essential for such computations. Second, the geometries of the flow passages are complicated but must be modeled accurately in order to capture all important details of the flow. This makes grid generation and grid quality important issues. Finally, since coolant flows are turbulent and separated the effects of turbulence must be modeled with a low Reynolds number

  5. Wind-tunnel Investigation of External-flow Jet-augmented Double Slotted Flaps on a Rectangular Wing at an Angle of Attack of 0 Degree to High Momentum Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, Edwin E

    1957-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been made to determine the characteristics of external-flow jet-augmented double slotted flaps which appear suitable for application to airplanes with pod-mounted engines. The investigation included tests of the rectangular wing with an aspect ratio of 6 over a momentum-coefficient range from 0 to 28. Lift coefficients larger than the jet reaction in the lift direction were obtained with the external-flow jet-augmented double slotted flaps.

  6. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  7. Augmented asymmetrical visual field dependence in asymptomatic diabetics: evidence of subclinical asymmetrical bilateral vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Rima Abdul; Bagust, Jeffery; Docherty, Sharon; Hussein, Wiam; Al-Otaibi, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes negatively affects the vestibular system in many ways, with vestibular dysfunction (VD), a co-morbidity with a high prevalence in diabetics. The ability to perceive subjective visual vertical (SVV), as a sign of vestibular dysfunction, and visual field dependence was measured using a computerized rod and frame test (CRAF). Alignment errors recorded from 47 asymptomatic Type II diabetics (no vertigo or falls, without peripheral neuropathy or retinopathy) were compared to 29 healthy age matched (46-69years) controls. Visual field dependence was significantly larger and more asymmetrical in the diabetics than controls. In the absence of any visual references, or when a vertical reference frame was provided, SVV perception was accurate in both groups, with no significant difference between the controls and diabetics. During tilted frame presentations, the proportion of subjects with either SVV deviations, or an asymmetry index, larger than an upper limit derived from the control data was significantly greater in diabetics than controls. These results suggest that the decreased ability to resolve visuo-vestibular conflict in asymptomatic diabetic patients (free of retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy) compared to controls may be related to diabetic complications affecting vestibular structures and thus causing a decompensation of subclinical vestibular asymmetries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  9. Convective Flow Induced by Localized Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric traveling magnetic field induces a meridional base flow in a cylindrical zone of an electrically conducting liquid. This remotely induced flow can be conveniently controlled, in magnitude and direction, and can have benefits for crystal growth applications. In particular, it can be used to offset natural convection. For long vertical cylinders, non-uniform and localized in the propagating direction, magnetic fields are required for this purpose. Here we investigate a particular form of this field, namely that induced by a set of a few electric current coils. An order of magnitude reduction of buoyancy convection is theoretically demonstrated for a vertical Bridgman crystal growth configuration.

  10. Paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation. The paper fluidic system consisting of a straight channel connected with expansion regions can generate a fluid flow with a constant flow rate for 10 min without any external pumping devices. The flow bifurcates with a fraction ratio of up to 30 depending on the control parameters of the channel geometry. Utilizing this simple paper-based bifurcation system, we developed a continuous-flow preconcentrator and a field-flow fractionator on a paper platform. Our experimental results show that the continuous-flow preconcentrator can produce a 33-fold enrichment of the ion concentration and that the flow fractionation system successfully separates the charged dyes. Our study suggests simple, cheap ways to construct preconcentration and field-flow fractionation systems for paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (NRF-2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  11. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  12. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  13. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-02-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  14. Analysis of a solar collector field water flow network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, J. E.; Knoll, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A number of methods are presented for minimizing the water flow variation in the solar collector field for the Solar Building Test Facility at the Langley Research Center. The solar collector field investigated consisted of collector panels connected in parallel between inlet and exit collector manifolds to form 12 rows. The rows were in turn connected in parallel between the main inlet and exit field manifolds to complete the field. The various solutions considered included various size manifolds, manifold area change, different locations for the inlets and exits to the manifolds, and orifices or flow control valves. Calculations showed that flow variations of less than 5 percent were obtainable both inside a row between solar collector panels and between various rows.

  15. Experiments on the flow field physics of confluent boundary layers for high-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert C.; Thomas, F. O.; Chu, H. C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of sub-scale wind tunnel test data to predict the behavior of commercial transport high lift systems at in-flight Reynolds number is limited by the so-called 'inverse Reynolds number effect'. This involves an actual deterioration in the performance of a high lift device with increasing Reynolds number. A lack of understanding of the relevant flow field physics associated with numerous complicated viscous flow interactions that characterize flow over high-lift devices prohibits computational fluid dynamics from addressing Reynolds number effects. Clearly there is a need for research that has as its objective the clarification of the fundamental flow field physics associated with viscous effects in high lift systems. In this investigation, a detailed experimental investigation is being performed to study the interaction between the slat wake and the boundary layer on the primary airfoil which is known as a confluent boundary layer. This little-studied aspect of the multi-element airfoil problem deserves special attention due to its importance in the lift augmentation process. The goal of this research is is to provide an improved understanding of the flow physics associated with high lift generation. This process report will discuss the status of the research being conducted at the Hessert Center for Aerospace Research at the University of Notre Dame. The research is sponsored by NASA Ames Research Center under NASA grant NAG2-905. The report will include a discussion of the models that have been built or that are under construction, a description of the planned experiments, a description of a flow visualization apparatus that has been developed for generating colored smoke for confluent boundary layer studies and some preliminary measurements made using our new 3-component fiber optic LDV system.

  16. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  17. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.

    2014-04-01

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow vi, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow ve can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J ×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×ve×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δBz. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  18. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Within Parallel Plate Plastometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    2002-01-01

    Parallel Plate Plastometer (PPP) is a device commonly used for measuring the viscosity of high polymers at low rates of shear in the range 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) poises. This device is being validated for use in measuring the viscosity of liquid glasses at high temperatures having similar ranges for the viscosity values. PPP instrument consists of two similar parallel plates, both in the range of 1 inch in diameter with the upper plate being movable while the lower one is kept stationary. Load is applied to the upper plate by means of a beam connected to shaft attached to the upper plate. The viscosity of the fluid is deduced from measuring the variation of the plate separation, h, as a function of time when a specified fixed load is applied on the beam. Operating plate speeds measured with the PPP is usually in the range of 10.3 cm/s or lower. The flow field within the PPP can be simulated using the equations of motion of fluid flow for this configuration. With flow speeds in the range quoted above the flow field between the two plates is certainly incompressible and laminar. Such flows can be easily simulated using numerical modeling with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. We present below the mathematical model used to simulate this flow field and also the solutions obtained for the flow using a commercially available finite element CFD code.

  20. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  1. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    1998-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  2. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  3. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

    1998-08-25

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

  4. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part II: Transient and Modulated Flow Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Fautrelle, Yves; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Baltaretu, Florin

    2016-12-01

    The present study considers the transient and modulated flow behaviors of liquid metal driven by a helical permanent magnetic field. The transient process, in which the fluid at rest experiences an increase in the angular velocity, is observed both in secondary and global axial flow with duration time less than 1 second. The flow fields are measured quantitatively to reveal the evolution of the transient flow, and the transient process is due to the variation of the electromagnetic force. Besides, the modulated flow behaviors of global axial flow, which is significantly different from that of secondary flow, is expected to avoid flow-induced macrosegregation in solidification process if the modulated time is suitable because its direction reversed periodically with the modulated helical stirrer. In addition, an optimal modulation frequency, under which the magnetic field could efficiently stir the solute at the solidification front, exists both in secondary and global axial flow (0.1 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively). Future investigations will focus on additional metallic alloy solidification experiments.

  5. Field-effect Flow Control in Polymer Microchannel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan; Lee, Cheng S.; Beamesderfer, Mike; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    A new Bio-MEMS electroosmotic flow (EOF) modulator for plastic microchannel networks has been developed. The EOF modulator uses field-effect flow control (FEFC) to adjust the zeta potential at the Parylene C microchannel wall. By setting a differential EOF pumping rate in two of the three microchannels at a T-intersection with EOF modulators, the induced pressure at the intersection generated pumping in the third, field-free microchannel. The EOF modulators are able to change the magnitude and direction of the pressure pumping by inducing either a negative or positive pressure at the intersection. The flow velocity is tracked by neutralized fluorescent microbeads in the microchannels. The proof-of-concept of the EOF modulator described here may be applied to complex plastic ,microchannel networks where individual microchannel flow rates are addressable by localized induced-pressure pumping.

  6. The mantle flow field beneath western North America.

    PubMed

    Silver, P G; Holt, W E

    2002-02-08

    Although motions at the surface of tectonic plates are well determined, the accompanying horizontal mantle flow is not. We have combined observations of surface deformation and upper mantle seismic anisotropy to estimate this flow field for western North America. We find that the mantle velocity is 5.5 +/- 1.5 centimeters per year due east in a hot spot reference frame, nearly opposite to the direction of North American plate motion (west-southwest). The flow is only weakly coupled to the motion of the surface plate, producing a small drag force. This flow field is probably due to heterogeneity in mantle density associated with the former Farallon oceanic plate beneath North America.

  7. Patterns in the sky: Natural visualization of aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the current publication is to present the collection of flight photographs to illustrate the types of flow patterns that were visualized and to present qualitative correlations with computational and wind tunnel results. Initially in section 2, the condensation process is discussed, including a review of relative humidity, vapor pressure, and factors which determine the presence of visible condensate. Next, outputs from computer code calculations are postprocessed by using water-vapor relationships to determine if computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field correlate with the qualitative features of the in-flight condensation patterns. The photographs are then presented in section 3 by flow type and subsequently in section 4 by aircraft type to demonstrate the variety of condensed flow fields that was visualized for a wide range of aircraft and flight maneuvers.

  8. Investigation of flow fields within large scale hypersonic inlet models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnos, A. V.; Watson, E. C.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Sanator, R. J.; Decarlo, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to determine the internal flow characteristics in model passages representative of hypersonic inlets for use at Mach numbers to about 12. The passages were large enough to permit measurements to be made in both the core flow and boundary layers. The analytical techniques for designing the internal contours and predicting the internal flow-field development accounted for coupling between the boundary layers and inviscid flow fields by means of a displacement-thickness correction. Three large-scale inlet models, each having a different internal compression ratio, were designed to provide high internal performance with an approximately uniform static-pressure distribution at the throat station. The models were tested in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 7.4 and a unit free-stream Reynolds number of 8.86 X one million per meter.

  9. Field-effect Flow Control in Polymer Microchannel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan; Lee, Cheng S.; Beamesderfer, Mike; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    A new Bio-MEMS electroosmotic flow (EOF) modulator for plastic microchannel networks has been developed. The EOF modulator uses field-effect flow control (FEFC) to adjust the zeta potential at the Parylene C microchannel wall. By setting a differential EOF pumping rate in two of the three microchannels at a T-intersection with EOF modulators, the induced pressure at the intersection generated pumping in the third, field-free microchannel. The EOF modulators are able to change the magnitude and direction of the pressure pumping by inducing either a negative or positive pressure at the intersection. The flow velocity is tracked by neutralized fluorescent microbeads in the microchannels. The proof-of-concept of the EOF modulator described here may be applied to complex plastic ,microchannel networks where individual microchannel flow rates are addressable by localized induced-pressure pumping.

  10. Propulsion efficiency and imposed flow fields of a copepod jump.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Pelagic copepods jump to relocate, to attack prey and to escape predators. However, there is a price to be paid for these jumps in terms of their energy costs and the hydrodynamic signals they generate to rheotactic predators. Using observed kinematics of various types of jumps, we computed the imposed flow fields and associated energetics of jumps by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations by modeling the copepod as a self-propelled body. The computational fluid dynamics simulation was validated by particle image velocimetry data. The flow field generated by a repositioning jump quickly evolves into two counter-rotating viscous vortex rings that are near mirror image of one another, one in the wake and one around the body of the copepod; this near symmetrical flow may provide hydrodynamic camouflage because it contains no information about the position of the copepod prey within the flow structure. The flow field associated with an escape jump sequence also includes two dominant vortex structures: one leading wake vortex generated as a result of the first jump and one around the body, but between these two vortex structures is an elongated, long-lasting flow trail with flow velocity vectors pointing towards the copepod; such a flow field may inform the predator of the whereabouts of the escaping copepod prey. High Froude propulsion efficiency (0.94-0.98) was obtained for individual power stroke durations of all simulated jumps. This is unusual for small aquatic organisms but is caused by the rapidity and impulsiveness of the jump that allows only a low-cost viscous wake vortex to travel backwards.

  11. Magnetic field generation from shear flow in flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Gao, K.; Klarenbeek, J.; Yoo, C.

    2012-10-01

    In the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) we have measured out of plane quadrupole magnetic field structure in situations where magnetic reconnection was minimal. This quadrupole out of plane magnetic signature has historically been presumed to be the smoking gun harbinger of reconnection. On the other hand, we showed that when flux ropes bounced instead of merging and reconnecting, this signature could evolve. This can follow from sheared fluid flows in the context of a generalized Ohms Law. We reconstruct a shear flow model from experimental data for flux ropes that have been experimentally well characterized in RSX as screw pinch equilibria, including plasma ion and electron flow, with self consistent profiles for magnetic field, pressure, and current density. The data can account for the quadrupole field structure.

  12. Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

  13. Neutron tomography of axisymmetric flow fields in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Deinert, M. R.

    2013-04-01

    A significant problem in the study of fluid transport in porous media is the ability to visualize the structure of the flow field when moisture contents vary rapidly in space and time. Here we present a method for determining the radial and vertical saturation profiles within axisymmetric preferential flow fields using neutron radiography. Flow fields such as these are surprisingly common in nature and determining the three-dimensional structure of their wetting front region has proven difficult. In this work, the moisture profiles are determined using a simple algorithm for algebraic computed tomography, which gives the three-dimensional structure of the moisture profile with a temporal resolution that is limited only by the desired noise level. The algorithm presented can be translated to radiography done using X-rays or light and is applicable to any rotationally symmetric object.

  14. Acoustic tomographic imaging of temperature and flow fields in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Manuela; Raabe, Armin

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic travel-time tomography is a remote sensing technique that uses the dependence of sound speed in air on temperature and wind speed along the sound propagation path. Travel-time measurements of acoustic signals between several sound sources and receivers travelling along different paths through a measuring area give information on the spatial distribution of temperature and flow fields within the area. After a separation of the two influences, distributions of temperature and flow can be reconstructed using inverse algorithms. As a remote sensing method, one advantage of acoustic travel-time tomography is its ability to measure temperature and flow field quantities without disturbing the area under investigation due to insertion of sensors. Furthermore, the two quantities—temperature and flow velocity—can be recorded simultaneously with this measurement method. In this paper, an acoustic tomographic measurement system is introduced which is capable of resolving three-dimensional distributions of temperature and flow fields in air within a certain volume (1.3 m × 1.0 m × 1.2 m) using 16 acoustic transmitter-receiver pairs. First, algorithms for the 3D reconstruction of distributions from line-integrated measurements are presented. Moreover, a measuring apparatus is introduced which is suited for educational purposes, for demonstration of the method as well as for indoor investigations. Example measurements within a low-speed wind tunnel with different incident flow situations (e.g. behind bluff bodies) using this system are shown. Visualizations of the flow illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures. Furthermore, alternative individual measurement methods for temperature and flow speed provide comparable results.

  15. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-10-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  16. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  17. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  18. Three dimensional flow field inside the passage of a low speed axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouagare, M.; Murthy, K. N. S.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the subsonic flow in the rotor passage of a single stage axial flow compressor were made to study the nature of the flow field and to verify the existing numerical codes. The velocity and pressure fields were measured across the entire rotor passage at six axial locations and at five radial locations. A five-hole probe, rotating with the rotor, was used to measure the three components of velocity, the static and the total pressure. The experimental results are compared with the predictions from Katsanis and McNally's computer program. The agreement between the two is good for most of the cases.

  19. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.

  20. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  1. Turbulence in Flowing Soap Films: Velocity, Vorticity, and Thickness Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, M.; Vorobieff, P.; Ecke, R.E.

    1998-08-01

    We report experimental measurements of the velocity, vorticity, and thickness fields of turbulent flowing soap films using a modified particle-image velocimetry technique. These data yield the turbulent energy and enstrophy of the two-dimensional flows with microscale Reynolds numbers of about 100 and demonstrate the effects of compressibility arising from variations in film thickness. Despite the compressibility of the flow, real-space correlations of velocity, vorticity, and enstrophy flux are consistent with theoretical predictions for two-dimensional turbulence. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  2. Effective contaminant detection networks in uncertain groundwater flow fields.

    PubMed

    Hudak, P F

    2001-01-01

    A mass transport simulation model tested seven contaminant detection-monitoring networks under a 40 degrees range of groundwater flow directions. Each monitoring network contained five wells located 40 m from a rectangular landfill. The 40-m distance (lag) was measured in different directions, depending upon the strategy used to design a particular monitoring network. Lagging the wells parallel to the central flow path was more effective than alternative design strategies. Other strategies allowed higher percentages of leaks to migrate between monitoring wells. Results of this study suggest that centrally lagged groundwater monitoring networks perform most effectively in uncertain groundwater-flow fields.

  3. Geohydrology and simulations of ground-water flow at Verona well field, Battle Creek, Michigan, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, E.A.; Grannemann, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    Public water supply for the city of Battle Creek, Mich. is withdrawn from the Marshall Sandstone through wells at the Verona well field. Analysis of borehole acoustic televiewer, gamma, and single-point-resistance logs from wells in Bailey Park, near the well field, indicates 12 fracture zones in the Marshall Sandstone. Further interpretation of flow-meter and temperature logs from the same wells indicates that the fracture zones are locally interconnected but appear to remain isolated over a lateral distance of 3,000 feet. Organic chemicals were detected in water samples collected from water-supply wells in the Verona well field in 1981. In 1985, six water-supply wells were converted to purge wells to intercept organic chemicals and divert them from the remaining water-supply wells. Removal of these wells from service resulted in a water-supply shortage. A proposal in which an alternative purge system could be installed so that wells that are out of service may be reactivated was examined. A ground-water-flow model developed for this study indicates that, under the current purge configuration, most water from contaminant-source areas either is captured by purge wells or flows to the Battle Creek River. Some water, however, is captured by three water-supply wells. Model simulations indicate that with the addition of eight purge wells, the well field would be protected from contamination, most water from the contaminant-source areas would be captured by the purge system, and only a small portion would flow to the Battle Creek River. In an effort to augment the city's water supply, the potential for expansion of the Verona well field to the northeast also was investigated. Because of the addition of three municipal wells northeast of the well field, some water from the site of a gasoline spill may be captured by two water-supply wells. Ground water in the area northeast of Verona well field contains significantly lower concentrations of iron, manganese, and calcium

  4. High-throughput flowing upstream sperm sorting in a retarding flow field for human semen analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jen-Kuei; Chen, Peng-Chun; Lin, Yu-Nan; Wang, Chia-Woei; Pan, Li-Chern; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2017-03-13

    In this paper, we propose a microfluidic device capable of generating a retarding flow field for the sorting and separation of human motile sperm in a high-throughput manner. The proposed sorting/separation process begins with a rapid flow field in a straight-flow zone to carry sperm into a sorting zone to maintain the sperm's mobility. The sorting zone consists of a diffuser-type sperm sorter to differentiate sperm with different motilities based on the flowing upstream nature of human sperm in a retarding flow field. The dead sperm will then be separated from the live ones by passing through a dumbbell flow field to the outlet for disposal. The proposed flowing upstream sperm sorter (FUSS) is designed to imitate the selection mechanism found in the female body when sperm swim into the uterus. The experimental results demonstrate the utility of this device with regard to throughput (approximately 200 000 sperm per minute and a maximum of 200 million cells per mL), efficiency (90% of selected sperm are mobile), and the ability to select sperm with high motility (∼20% of sperm with a velocity exceeding 120 μm s(-1)). The proposed device is suitable for intrauterine insemination as well as in vitro fertilization thanks to the highly efficient sorting process not interfering with the natural function and energy resource of human sperm.

  5. Laboratory Observation Of Magnetic Field Growth Driven By Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Dorf, L.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Lapenta, G.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. These data allow a complete screw pinch equilibrium with guide magnetic field to be reconstructed, and the electron flows to be inferred. We use this information to evaluate the Hall JxB term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohms Law. The difference between ion and electron flows allows us to show experimentally and theoretically that the sheared electron flows can account for the generation of magnetic field. For example we show a measured quadrupole out of plane magnetic field B_z structure that occurs even in the absence of magnetic reconnection. This out of plane quadrupole pattern has historically been used as a signature of magnetic reconnection, especially with small to vanishing guide field. Recent theoretical analyses have pointed out that this presumption need not be true. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  6. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-08

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate.

  7. Penn State axial flow turbine facility: Performance and nozzle flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zaccaria, M.; Itoh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to gain a thorough understanding of the flow field in a turbine stage including three-dimensional inviscid and viscid effects, unsteady flow field, rotor-stator interaction effects, unsteady blade pressures, shear stress, and velocity field in rotor passages. The performance of the turbine facility at the design condition is measured and compared with the design distribution. The data on the nozzle vane static pressure and wake characteristics are presented and interpreted. The wakes are found to be highly three-dimensional, with substantial radial inward velocity at most spanwise locations.

  8. Computational Analysis of Flow Field Inside Coral Colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Monir; Staples, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Development of the flow field inside coral colonies is a key issue for understanding coral natural uptake, photosynthesis and wave dissipation capabilities. But most of the computations and experiments conducted earlier, measured the flow outside the coral reef canopies. Experimental studies are also constrained due to the limitation of measurement techniques and limited environmental conditions. Numerical simulations can be an answer to overcome these shortcomings. In this work, a detailed, three-dimensional simulation of flow around a single coral colony was developed to examine the interaction between coral geometry and hydrodynamics. To simplify grid generation and minimize computational cost, Immersed Boundary method (IBM) was implemented. The computation of IBM involves identification of the interface between the solid body and the fluid, establishment of the grid/interface relation and identification of the forcing points on the grid and distribution of the forcing function on the corresponding points. LES was chosen as the framework to capture the turbulent flow field without requiring extensive modeling. The results presented will give insight into internal coral colony flow fields and the interaction between coral and surrounding ocean hydrodynamics.

  9. Rapid Numerical Simulation of Viscous Axisymmetric Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been developed for rapid numerical simulation of axisymmetric flow fields, including flow fields with an azimuthal velocity component. The azimuthal-invariant Navier-Stokes equations in a cylindrical coordinate system are mapped to a general body-fitted coordinate system, with the streamwise viscous terms then neglected by applying the thin-layer approximation. Turbulence effects are modeled using an algebraic model, typically the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, although a modified Cebeci-Smith model can also be used. The equations are discretized using central finite differences and solved using a multistage Runge-Kutta algorithm with a spatially varying time step and implicit residual smoothing. Results are presented for calculations of supersonic flow over a waisted body-of-revolution, transonic flow through a normal shock wave in a straight circular duct of constant cross sectional area, swirling supersonic (inviscid) flow through a strong shock in a straight radial duct, and swirling subsonic flow in an annular-to-circular diffuser duct. Comparisons between computed and experimental results are in fair to good agreement, demonstrating that the viscous code can be a useful tool for practical engineering design and analysis work.

  10. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  11. Analytical solutions for flow fields near continuous wall reactive barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk

    2008-05-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are widely applied for in-situ remediation of contaminant plumes transported by groundwater. Besides the goal of a sufficient contaminant remediation inside the reactive cell (residence time) the width of plume intercepted by a PRB is of critical concern. A 2-dimensional analytical approach is applied to determine the flow fields towards rectangular PRBs of the continuous wall (CW) configuration with and without impermeable side walls (but yet no funnel). The approach is based on the conformal mapping technique and assumes a homogeneous aquifer with a uniform ambient flow field. The hydraulic conductivity of the reactive material is furthermore assumed to exceed the conductivity of the aquifer by at least one order of magnitude as to neglect the hydraulic gradient across the reactor. The flow fields are analyzed regarding the widths and shapes of the respective capture zones as functions of the dimensions (aspect ratio) of the reactive cell and the ambient groundwater flow direction. Presented are an improved characterization of the advantages of impermeable side walls, a convenient approach to improved hydraulic design (including basic cost-optimization) and new concepts for monitoring CW PRBs. Water level data from a CW PRB at the Seneca Army Depot site, NY, are used for field demonstration.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic flow caused by field-enhanced dissociation solely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkov, S. A.; Chirkov, V. A.; Stishkov, Yu. K.

    2017-06-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flows emerge in dielectric liquids under the action of the Coulomb force and underlie energy-efficient techniques for heat and mass transfer. The key issue in the phenomena is the way how the net charge is created. One of the most promising, yet poorly studied charge formation mechanisms is the field-enhanced dissociation (or the Wien effect). So the paper studies an EHD flow caused solely by the effect by virtue of both experiment and computer simulation. To preclude the competing mechanism of charge formation—the injection—a new EHD system of a special design was examined. Its main feature is the use of solid insulation to create the region of the strong electric field far from the electrode metal surfaces. The experimental study used the particle image velocimetry technique to observe velocity distributions, whereas the computations were based on the complete set of electrohydrodynamic equations employing the commercial software package COMSOL Multiphysics. Spatial distributions of key quantities (including the ion concentrations, the total space charge density, and the velocity) and the acting forces were obtained in the computer simulation and were analyzed. The experimental flow structure was observed for a number of voltages up to 30 kV. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results yielded a good quantitative agreement for strong electric fields though some overshoot was observed for weak ones. The results allow concluding on the applicability of the Onsager theory of the field-enhanced dissociation in the context of EHD flows.

  13. An Examination of the Resonant Acoustic Mixers Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    research. The most profound assumption that we make is that LESLIE3D is multiphase physics code designed for compressible fluid flows . At face value, this...AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2013-108 AN EXAMINATION OF THE RESONANT ACOUSTIC MIXER’S FLOW FIELD Douglas V. Nance AFRL/RWWC 101 W. Eglin Blvd...Simulation…………………………………………………………9 3.0 Results…………………………………………………………………………………….12 3.1 Flow Field Structure During the Mixing Process…………………………………13 3.2

  14. Adaptive flow-field measurements using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, Jürgen W.; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fregin, Bob; König, Jörg; Büttner, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Variations of the optical detection path-length in image correlation based flow-field measurements result in strong errors in position allocation and thus lead to a strong enhancement of the measurement uncertainty of the velocity. In this contribution we use digital holography to measure the wavefront distortion induced by fluctuating phase boundary, employing spatially extended guide stars. The measured phase information is used to correct the influence of the phase boundary in the detection path employing a spatial light modulator. We analyze the potential of guide stars that are reflected by the phase boundary, i.e. the Fresnel reflex, and transmitted. Our results show, that the usage of wavefront shaping enables to strongly reduce the measurement uncertainty and to strongly improve the quality of image correlation based flow-field measurements. The approaches presented here are not limited to application in flow measurement, but could be useful for a variety of applications.

  15. A simple apparatus for the experimental study of non-steady flow thrust-augmenter ejector configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, J. M.; Kentfield, J. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A flexible, and easily modified, test rig is described which allows a one dimensional nonsteady flow stream to be generated, economically from a steady flow source of compressed air. This nonsteady flow is used as the primary stream in a nonsteady flow ejector constituting part of the test equipment. Standard piezo-electric pressure transducers etc. allow local pressures to be studied, as functions of time, in both the primary and secondary (mixed) flow portions of the apparatus. Provision is also made for measuring the primary and secondary mass flows and the thrust generated. Sample results obtained with the equipment are presented.

  16. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-15

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  17. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  18. On the flow field about an electrophoretic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Gabriele; Tricoli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The flow field about an electrophoretic body is theoretically investigated by analytical methods. An effective boundary condition for the electric potential at particle surface is derived. This condition, which generalizes the one obtained by Levich [Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1962), Chap. 9, p. 475], captures the effect of (convective and electromigratory) surface current in the Debye layer and is valid as far as it is legitimate to neglect ion-concentration gradient in the bulk liquid. Conditions for negligible concentration gradients are also presented and discussed. The effect of surface current determines a deviation from Morrison's "classical" theory, which predicts irrotational flow-field for any particle shape with electrophoretic velocity given by the well-known Smoluchowski formula and always directed along the applied electric field. It is shown here that in the presence of the above effect the irrotationality of the flow field is not preserved if the particle surface has non-uniform curvature. However, irrotational flow-field still subsists for a sphere and a cylinder and is analytically determined in terms of a new non-dimensional parameter, referred to as the electrophoretic number. The case of spheroidal objects is also examined in detail. In this case the flow field, though not strictly irrotational, is shown to be nearly approximated by an irrotational flow-field, which is also determined over wide ranges of electrophoretic number and spheroid aspect ratio. The quality of this approximation is expressed as a relative error on the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski condition and numerically evaluated both in longitudinal and transverse configuration. The limiting cases of spheroid degenerating into a needle and a disk are also addressed. In all above cases the respective mobilities deviate from Smoluchowski's formula and depend on the electrophoretic number. An important effect of surface ion-transport in the double layer is

  19. Mean-field dynamo action in renovating shearing flows.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Sanved; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Sridhar, S

    2012-08-01

    We study mean-field dynamo action in renovating flows with finite and nonzero correlation time (τ) in the presence of shear. Previous results obtained when shear was absent are generalized to the case with shear. The question of whether the mean magnetic field can grow in the presence of shear and nonhelical turbulence, as seen in numerical simulations, is examined. We show in a general manner that, if the motions are strictly nonhelical, then such mean-field dynamo action is not possible. This result is not limited to low (fluid or magnetic) Reynolds numbers nor does it use any closure approximation; it only assumes that the flow renovates itself after each time interval τ. Specifying to a particular form of the renovating flow with helicity, we recover the standard dispersion relation of the α(2)Ω dynamo, in the small τ or large wavelength limit. Thus mean fields grow even in the presence of rapidly growing fluctuations, surprisingly, in a manner predicted by the standard quasilinear closure, even though such a closure is not strictly justified. Our work also suggests the possibility of obtaining mean-field dynamo growth in the presence of helicity fluctuations, although having a coherent helicity will be more efficient.

  20. Drop Breakup in Fixed Bed Flows as Model Stochastic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Mosler, Alisa B.; Patel, Prateek

    1999-01-01

    We examine drop breakup in a class of stochastic flow fields as a model for the flow through fixed fiber beds and to elucidate the general mechanisms whereby drops breakup in disordered, Lagrangian unsteady flows. Our study consists of two parallel streams of investigation. First, large scale numerical simulations of drop breakup in a class of anisotropic Gaussian fields will be presented. These fields are generated spectrally and have been shown in a previous publication to be exact representations of the flow in a dilute disordered bed of fibers if close interactions between the fibers and the drops are dynamically unimportant. In these simulations the drop shape is represented by second and third order small deformation theories which have been shown to be excellent for the prediction of drop breakup in steady strong flows. We show via these simulations that the mechanisms of drop breakup in these flows are quite different than in steady flows. The predominant mechanism of breakup appears to be very short lived twist breakups. Moreover, the occurrence of breakup events is poorly predicted by either the strength of the local flow in which the drop finds itself at breakup, or the degree of deformation that the drop achieves prior to breakup. It is suggested that a correlation function of both is necessary to be predictive of breakup events. In the second part of our research experiments are presented where the drop deformation and breakup in PDMS/polyisobutylene emulsions is considered. We consider very dilute emulsions such that coalescence is unimportant. The flows considered are simple shear and the flow through fixed fiber beds. Turbidity, small angle light scattering, dichroism and microscopy are used to interrogate the drop deformation process in both flows. It is demonstrated that breakup at very low capillary numbers occurs in both flows but larger drop deformation occurs in the fixed bed flow. Moreover, it is witnessed that breakup in the bed occurs

  1. Mantle flow field in the southern Ryukyu subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Kuo, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Okinawa trough in the Ryukyu subduction system is the only active back arc basin formed within a continental lithosphere. Recent shear-wave splitting measurements show variable fast directions along the trough suggesting complex three-dimensional flow field in the mantle wedge. In this study we use numerical subduction models to explore the effects of plate thickness variations caused by non-uniform lithospheric stretching on the dynamics in the southern Ryukyu subduction system. We calculate orientations of infinite strain axes as a proxy for olivine lattice preferred orientations and orientations of seismic anisotropy. Our models demonstrate that flow patterns may vary significantly with depth near the plate edge as a result of the along-arc variations in lithospheric thickness. The model results show that the toroidal circulation around the lateral slab edge predominates at greater depths. The thick neighboring lithosphere acts as an effective barrier of the lateral mass exchanges in the shallow portion of the mantle wedge. The wedge material is drawn in horizontally toward the plate edge from the central region of the subduction zone induced by pressure gradients, opposite to the inwards lateral flow at greater depths. Model predictions for the lattice preferred orientations of olivine aggregates agree reasonably well with the observed shear-wave splitting patterns. The results suggest that the depth-varying flow field near the subduction zone edge and the westward flow components in the shallow portion of the mantle wedge may contribute to complex patterns of seismic anisotropy and arc isotopic systematics.

  2. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation of white wine chromophoric colloidal matter.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Parot, Jérémie; Gonsior, Michael; Nikolantonaki, Maria; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parlanti, Edith; Gougeon, Régis D

    2017-04-01

    Two analytical separation methods-size-exclusion chromatography and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-were implemented to evaluate the integrity of the colloidal composition of Chardonnay white wine and the impact of pressing and fermentations on the final macromolecular composition. Wine chromophoric colloidal matter, representing UV-visible-absorbing wine macromolecules, was evaluated by optical and structural measurements combined with the description of elution profiles obtained by both separative techniques. The objective of this study was to apply these two types of fractionation on a typical Chardonnay white wine produced in Burgundy and to evaluate how each of them impacted the determination of the macromolecular chromophoric content of wine. UV-visible and fluorescence measurements of collected fractions were successfully applied. An additional proteomic study revealed that grape and microorganism proteins largely impacted the composition of chromophoric colloidal matter of Chardonnay wines. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation appeared to be more reliable and less invasive with respect to the native chemical environment of chromophoric wine macromolecules, and hence is recommended as a tool to fractionate chromophoric colloidal matter in white wines. Graphical Abstract An innovative macromolecular separation method based on Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation was developed to better control colloidal dynamics across Chardonnay white winemaking.

  3. Navier-Stokes Flow Field Analysis of Compressible Flow in a Pressure Relief Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Wang, Ten-See; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    1993-01-01

    The present study was motivated to analyze the complex flow field involving gaseous oxygen (GOX) flow in a relief valve (RV). The 9391 RV, pictured in Figure 1, was combined with the pilot valve to regulate the actuation pressure of the main valve system. During a high-pressure flow test at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the valve system developed a resonance chatter, which destroyed most of the valve body. Figures 2-4 show the valve body before and after accident. It was understood that the subject RV has never been operated at 5500 psia. In order to fully understand the flow behavior in the RV, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is carried out to investigate the side load across the piston sleeve and the erosion patterns resulting from flow distribution around piston/nozzle interface.

  4. Laboratory Observation of Magnetic Field Growth Driven by Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Feng, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. The electron flows v_e can therefore be inferred, and we use this information to evaluate the Hall J × B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm’s Law. Mutually attracted and compressed flux ropes break the cylindrical symmetry. This simple and coherent example of shear flow supports magnetic field growth corresponding to non vanishing curl × v_e × B. In the absence of magnetic reconnection we measure and predict a quadrupole out of plane magnetic field δBz, even though this has historically been invoked to be the signature of Hall magnetic reconnection. This provides a natural and general mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  5. Time-to-passage judgments in nonconstant optical flow fields.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, M K; Hecht, H

    1995-08-01

    The time until an approaching object will pass an observer (time to passage, or TTP) is optically specified by a global flow field even in the absence of local expansion or size cues. Kaiser and Mowafy (1993) have demonstrated that observers are in fact sensitive to this global flow information. The present studies investigate two factors that are usually ignored in work related TTP: (1) non-constant motion functions and (2) concomitant eye rotation. Non-constant velocities violate an assumption of some TTP derivations, and eye rotations may complicate heading extraction. Such factors have practical significance, for example, in the case of a pilot accelerating an aircraft or executing a roll. In our studies, a flow field of constant-sized stars was presented monocularly on a large screen. TTP judgments had to be made on the basis of one target star. The flow field varied in its acceleration pattern and its roll component. Observers did not appear to utilize acceleration information. In particular, TTPs with decelerating motion were consistently underestimated. TTP judgments were fairly robust with respect to roll, even when roll axis and track vector were decoupled. However, substantial decoupling between heading and track vector led to a decrement in performance, in both the presence and the absence of roll.

  6. Path planning in uncertain flow fields using ensemble method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Le Maître, Olivier P.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar M.

    2016-10-01

    An ensemble-based approach is developed to conduct optimal path planning in unsteady ocean currents under uncertainty. We focus our attention on two-dimensional steady and unsteady uncertain flows, and adopt a sampling methodology that is well suited to operational forecasts, where an ensemble of deterministic predictions is used to model and quantify uncertainty. In an operational setting, much about dynamics, topography, and forcing of the ocean environment is uncertain. To address this uncertainty, the flow field is parametrized using a finite number of independent canonical random variables with known densities, and the ensemble is generated by sampling these variables. For each of the resulting realizations of the uncertain current field, we predict the path that minimizes the travel time by solving a boundary value problem (BVP), based on the Pontryagin maximum principle. A family of backward-in-time trajectories starting at the end position is used to generate suitable initial values for the BVP solver. This allows us to examine and analyze the performance of the sampling strategy and to develop insight into extensions dealing with general circulation ocean models. In particular, the ensemble method enables us to perform a statistical analysis of travel times and consequently develop a path planning approach that accounts for these statistics. The proposed methodology is tested for a number of scenarios. We first validate our algorithms by reproducing simple canonical solutions, and then demonstrate our approach in more complex flow fields, including idealized, steady and unsteady double-gyre flows.

  7. Time-to-Passage Judgments in Nonconstant Optical Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Hecht, Heiko

    1995-01-01

    The time until an approaching object will pass an observer (time to passage, or TTP) is optically specified by a global flow field even in the absence of local expansion or size cues. Kaiser and Mowafy have demonstrated that observers are in fact sensitive to this global flow information. The present studies investigate two factors that are usually ignored in work related to TTP: (1) non-constant motion functions and (2) concomitant eye rotation. Non-constant velocities violate an assumption of some TTP derivations, and eye rotations may complicate heading extraction. Such factors have practical significance, for example, in the case of a pilot accelerating an aircraft or executing a roll. In our studies, a flow field of constant-sized stars was presented monocularly on a large screen. TIP judgments had to be made on the basis of one target star. The flow field varied in its acceleration pattern and its roll component. Observers did not appear to utilize acceleration information. In particular, TTP with decelerating motion were consistently underestimated. TTP judgments were fairly robust with respect to roll, even when roll axis and track vector were decoupled. However, substantial decoupling between heading and track vector led to a decrement in performance, in both the presence and the absence of roll.

  8. [Effects of carrier liquid and flow rate on the separation in gravitational field-flow fractionation].

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Zhu, Chenqi; Gao-Yang, Yaya; Qiu, Bailing; Wu, Di; Liang, Qihui; He, Jiayuan; Han, Nanyin

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation is the simplest field-flow fractionation technique in terms of principle and operation. The earth' s gravity is its external field. Different sized particles are injected into a thin channel and carried by carrier fluid. The different velocities of the carrier liquid in different places results in a size-based separation. A gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) instrument was designed and constructed. Two kinds of polystyrene (PS) particles with different sizes (20 µm and 6 µm) were chosen as model particles. In this work, the separation of the sample was achieved by changing the concentration of NaN3, the percentage of mixed surfactant in the carrier liquid and the flow rate of carrier liquid. Six levels were set for each factor. The effects of these three factors on the retention ratio (R) and plate height (H) of the PS particles were investigated. It was found that R increased and H decreased with increasing particle size. On the other hand, the R and H increased with increasing flow rate. The R and H also increased with increasing NaN3 concentration. The reason was that the electrostatic repulsive force between the particles and the glass channel wall increased. The force allowed the samples approach closer to the channel wall. The results showed that the resolution and retention time can be improved by adjusting the experimental conditions. These results can provide important values to the further applications of GrFFF technique.

  9. Comparison of Orbiter PRCS Plume Flow Fields Using CFD and Modified Source Flow Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, Wm. C.; Kinsey, Robin E.; Reid, Ethan A.; Stuart, Phillip C.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter will use Reaction Control System (RCS) jets for docking with the planned International Space Station (ISS). During approach and backout maneuvers, plumes from these jets could cause high pressure, heating, and thermal loads on ISS components. The object of this paper is to present comparisons of RCS plume flow fields used to calculate these ISS environments. Because of the complexities of 3-D plumes with variable scarf-angle and multi-jet combinations, NASA/JSC developed a plume flow-field methodology for all of these Orbiter jets. The RCS Plume Model (RPM), which includes effects of scarfed nozzles and dual jets, was developed as a modified source-flow engineering tool to rapidly generate plume properties and impingement environments on ISS components. This paper presents flow-field properties from four PRCS jets: F3U low scarf-angle single jet, F3F high scarf-angle single jet, DTU zero scarf-angle dual jet, and F1F/F2F high scarf-angle dual jet. The RPM results compared well with plume flow fields using four CFD programs: General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), Cartesian (CART), Unified Solution Algorithm (USA), and Reacting and Multi-phase Program (RAMP). Good comparisons of predicted pressures are shown with STS 64 Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) data.

  10. Performance enhancement of iron-chromium redox flow batteries by employing interdigitated flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhou, X. L.; Zeng, L.; Yan, X. H.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    The catalyst for the negative electrode of iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) is commonly prepared by adding a small amount of Bi3+ ions in the electrolyte and synchronously electrodepositing metallic particles onto the electrode surface at the beginning of charge process. Achieving a uniform catalyst distribution in the porous electrode, which is closely related to the flow field design, is critically important to improve the ICRFB performance. In this work, the effects of flow field designs on catalyst electrodeposition and battery performance are investigated. It is found that compared to the serpentine flow field (SFF) design, the interdigitated flow field (IFF) forces the electrolyte through the porous electrode between the neighboring channels and enhances species transport during the processes of both the catalyst electrodeposition and iron/chromium redox reactions, thus enabling a more uniform catalyst distribution and higher mass transport limitation. It is further demonstrated that the energy efficiency of the ICRFB with the IFF reaches 80.7% at a high current density (320 mA cm-2), which is 8.2% higher than that of the ICRFB with the SFF. With such a high performance and intrinsically low-cost active materials, the ICRFB with the IFF offers a great promise for large-scale energy storage.

  11. Flow field around a sphere colliding against a wall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, R.; Hunt, M. L.

    1998-11-01

    This study investigates the flow field and the fluid agitation generated by particle collisions. The motion of a particle towards a wall, or towards another particle, will result in a collision if the Reynolds number of the flow is large. As the particle approaches the wall, the fluid in the gap between the particle and the wall will be displaced. When the particle touches the wall and rebounds, the direction of the flow will reverse. This process produces a considerable agitation in the fluid phase. To study this process an immersed pendulum experiment was built to produce controlled collisions of particles. A fine string is attached to a particle, which is positioned at rest from some initial angle. Once released, the particle accelerates towards a wall, or to another suspended particle, resulting in a collision. The fluid is seeded with neutrally buoyant micro-spheres, which illuminated by a laser sheet serve as flow tracers. The motion of the particles and tracers is recorded using a high speed digital camera. The images are digitally processed to calculate displacements and velocities for different times before and after the collision. Flow fields are obtained for different impact velocities, particle diameters and solid-fluid density ratios, as well as for particle-wall and particle-particle collisions. Preliminary results show that for the flow conditions tested, the rebound of the particle is dependent on the shape of the wake behind the particle at the moment of collision, and not only on the flow in the gap between the particle and the wall. The amount of collision-generated agitation appears to increase with impact velocity and density ratio.

  12. A Study of Hybrid Computing Techniques for Transonic Flow Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    e (2.8) ax rr x r ar r r where, with e = div q, 8uav 8u T = z L. -+xe T rTr- + Moc ax Kr rx ax 8r (Z.9) T = + T + e rr = r + r Supersonic Far Field...Since only the flow downstream of a sonic nozzle is really needed for testing purposes, the numerical computations should not be very difficult. In this... Nozzle Throat, J. Fluid Mech., 69 (1975), 97-108. (3)Richey, 0. K. and Adamson, T. C., Jr., Analysis of Unsteady Transonic Channel Flow with Shock Waves

  13. Large perturbation flow field analysis and simulation for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varner, M. O.; Martindale, W. R.; Phares, W. J.; Kneile, K. R.; Adams, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis technique for simulation of supersonic mixed compression inlets with large flow field perturbations is presented. The approach is based upon a quasi-one-dimensional inviscid unsteady formulation which includes engineering models of unstart/restart, bleed, bypass, and geometry effects. Numerical solution of the governing time dependent equations of motion is accomplished through a shock capturing finite difference algorithm, of which five separate approaches are evaluated. Comparison with experimental supersonic wind tunnel data is presented to verify the present approach for a wide range of transient inlet flow conditions.

  14. Interaction of multiple supersonic jets with a transonic flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Manela, J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of multiple high pressure, supersonic, radial or tangential jets, that are injected from the circumference of the base plane of an axisymmetric body, on its longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients in transonic flow is studied experimentally. The interaction of the jets with the body flow field increases the pressures on the forebody, thus altering its lift and static stability characteristics. It is shown that, within the range of parameters studied. This interaction has a stabilizing effect on the body. The contribution to lift and stability is significant at small angles of attack and decreases nonlinearly at higher angles when the crossflow mechanism becomes dominant.

  15. Flow Web: a graph based user interface for 3D flow field exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijie; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    While there have been intensive efforts in developing better 3D flow visualization techniques, little attention has been paid to the design of better user interfaces and more effective data exploration work flow. In this paper, we propose a novel graph-based user interface called Flow Web to enable more systematic explorations of 3D flow data. The Flow Web is a node-link graph that is constructed to highlight the essential flow structures where a node represents a region in the field and a link connects two nodes if there exist particles traveling between the regions. The direction of an edge implies the flow path, and the weight of an edge indicates the number of particles traveling through the connected nodes. Hierarchical flow webs are created by splitting or merging nodes and edges to allow for easy understanding of the underlying flow structures. To draw the Flow Web, we adopt force based graph drawing algorithms to minimize edge crossings, and use a hierarchical layout to facilitate the study of flow patterns step by step. The Flow Web also supports user queries to the properties of nodes and links. Examples of the queries for node properties include the degrees, complexity, and some associated physical attributes such as velocity magnitude. Queries for edges include weights, flow path lengths, existence of circles and so on. It is also possible to combine multiple queries using operators such as and , or, not. The FlowWeb supports several types of user interactions. For instance, the user can select nodes from the subgraph returned by a query and inspect the nodes with more details at different levels of detail. There are multiple advantages of using the graph-based user interface. One is that the user can identify regions of interest much more easily since, unlike inspecting 3D regions, there is very little occlusion. It is also much more convenient for the user to query statistical information about the nodes and links at different levels of detail. With

  16. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  17. Laser velocimetry in turbulent flow fields - Particle response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Rudoff, R.; Houser, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the particle response in a decelerating flow and a highly turbulent two-phase flow were obtained. Simultaneous measurements of the particle size and velocity served to quantify the particle response to the prevailing flow field. In the case of a flow incident upon a cylinder, the particle lag for a range of size classes was recorded. Results were also obtained in the flow generated by an atomizer operating on the leeward side of a flat disk bluff body in a coflowing air stream. Measurements of the mean axial, mean radial, and rms velocities and angles of trajectories were obtained for representative particle size classes. The air velocity and turbulence intensity were inferred from the seed particles on the order of one micrometer in diameter. Particles 9 micrometers and larger showed significant differences with respect to the gas phase mean velocity and turbulence intensity even at low velocities. In two-phase flows, reliable measurements of the continuous phase velocity and turbulence parameters requires the simultaneous measurement of particle size as a means for rejecting readings from large particles from the velocity pdf's.

  18. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  19. Reducing the Need for Accurate Stream Flow Forecasting for Water Supply Planning by Augmenting Reservoir Operations with Seawater Desalination and Wastewater Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, R.; Ng, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate stream flow forecasts are critical for reservoir operations for water supply planning. As the world urban population increases, the demand for water in cities is also increasing, making accurate forecasts even more important. However, accurate forecasting of stream flows is difficult owing to short- and long-term weather variations. We propose to reduce this need for accurate stream flow forecasts by augmenting reservoir operations with seawater desalination and wastewater recycling. We develop a robust operating policy for the joint operation of the three sources. With the joint model, we tap into the unlimited reserve of seawater through desalination, and make use of local supplies of wastewater through recycling. However, both seawater desalination and recycling are energy intensive and relatively expensive. Reservoir water on the other hand, is generally cheaper but is limited and variable in its availability, increasing the risk of water shortage during extreme climate events. We operate the joint system by optimizing it using a genetic algorithm to maximize water supply reliability and resilience while minimizing vulnerability subject to a budget constraint and for a given stream flow forecast. To compute the total cost of the system, we take into account the pumping cost of transporting reservoir water to its final destination, and the capital and operating costs of desalinating seawater and recycling wastewater. We produce results for different hydro climatic regions based on artificial stream flows we generate using a simple hydrological model and an autoregressive time series model. The artificial flows are generated from precipitation and temperature data from the Canadian Regional Climate model for present and future scenarios. We observe that the joint operation is able to effectively minimize the negative effects of stream flow forecast uncertainty on system performance at an overall cost that is not significantly greater than the cost of a

  20. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  1. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called "elevator modes," are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  2. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  3. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts. This supplement contains data files, charts and source code.

  4. Flow-Field Surveys for Rectangular Nozzles. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for three rectangular nozzles are presented for a low subsonic condition obtained primarily by hot-wire anemometry. The three nozzles have aspect ratios of 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1. A fourth case included has 2:1 aspect ratio with chevrons added to the long edges. Data on mean velocity, turbulent normal and shear stresses as well as streamwise vorticity are presented covering a streamwise distance up to sixteen equivalent diameters from the nozzle exit. These detailed flow properties, including initial boundary layer characteristics, are usually difficult to measure in high speed flows and the primary objective of the study is to aid ongoing and future computational and noise modeling efforts. This supplement contains data files, charts and source code.

  5. Reactive transport in stratified flow fields with idealized heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, James N.; Montas, Hubert J.

    2009-06-01

    A two-dimensional equation governing the steady state spatial concentration distribution of a reactive constituent within a heterogeneous advective-dispersive flow field is solved analytically. The solution which is developed for the case of a single point source can be generalized to represent analogous situations with any number of separate point sources. A limiting case of special interest has a line source of constant concentration spanning the domain's upstream boundary. The work has relevance for improving understanding of reactive transport within various kinds of advection-dominated natural or engineered environments including rivers and streams, and bioreactors such as treatment wetlands. Simulations are used to examine quantitatively the impact that transverse dispersion (deviations from purely stochastic-convective flow) can have on mean concentration decline in the direction of flow. Results support the contention that transverse mixing serves to enhance the overall rate of reaction in such systems.

  6. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-04-15

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called “elevator modes,” are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  7. Longitudinal Dispersivity in a Radial Diverging Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, J. C.; Wilson, M.; Bertsch, P. M.; Aburime, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive data sets exist for evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion under non-uniform flow conditions. In addition, anionic tracers are often used to estimate physical transport parameters based on an erroneous assumption of conservative (i.e., non-reactive) behavior. Therefore, a series of field experiments using tritiated water and several other commonly used hydrologic tracers (Br, Cl, FBAs) were conducted in the water-table aquifer on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) to evaluate solute transport processes in a diverging radial flow field. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 hours at a fixed rate of 56.7 L/min (15 gpm) to establish a forced radial gradient prior to the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using non-labeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using a set of six sampling wells radially spaced at approximate distances of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 meters from a central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were monitored continuously throughout the course of the tracer experiment. At various time intervals, discrete groundwater samples were collected from all 18 sampling ports for tritium analysis. Longitudinal dispersivity for tritium breakthrough at each sampling location was estimated using analytical approximations of the convection dispersion equation (CDE) for radial flow assuming an instantaneous Dirac pulse and a pulse of known duration. The results were also compared to dispersivity values derived from fitting the tracer data to analytical solutions derived from assuming uniform flow conditions. Tremendous variation in dispersivity values and tracer arrival

  8. A high-performance flow-field structured iron-chromium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhou, X. L.; An, L.; Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-08-01

    Unlike conventional iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) with a flow-through cell structure, in this work a high-performance ICRFB featuring a flow-field cell structure is developed. It is found that the present flow-field structured ICRFB reaches an energy efficiency of 76.3% with a current density of 120 mA cm-2 at 25 °C. The energy efficiency can be as high as 79.6% with an elevated current density of 200 mA cm-2 at 65 °C, a record performance of the ICRFB in the existing literature. In addition, it is demonstrated that the energy efficiency of the battery is stable during the cycle test, and that the capacity decay rate of the battery is 0.6% per cycle. More excitingly, the high performance of the flow-field structured battery significantly lowers the capital cost at 137.6 kWh-1, which is 28.2% lower than that of the conventional ICRFB for 8-h energy storage.

  9. Potential field cellular automata model for pedestrian flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiao-Xia; Wong, S C; Choi, Keechoo

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a cellular automata model of pedestrian flow that defines a cost potential field, which takes into account the costs of travel time and discomfort, for a pedestrian to move to an empty neighboring cell. The formulation is based on a reconstruction of the density distribution and the underlying physics, including the rule for resolving conflicts, which is comparable to that in the floor field cellular automaton model. However, we assume that each pedestrian is familiar with the surroundings, thereby minimizing his or her instantaneous cost. This, in turn, helps reduce the randomness in selecting a target cell, which improves the existing cellular automata modelings, together with the computational efficiency. In the presence of two pedestrian groups, which are distinguished by their destinations, the cost distribution for each group is magnified due to the strong interaction between the two groups. As a typical phenomenon, the formation of lanes in the counter flow is reproduced.

  10. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1997-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

  11. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.

    1997-06-24

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers. 9 figs.

  12. Earth's field NMR flow meter: preliminary quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of Earth's field NMR (EF NMR) combined with a pre-polarising permanent magnet for measuring fast fluid velocities. This time of flight measurement protocol has a considerable history in the literature; here we demonstrate that it is quantitative when employing the Earth's magnetic field for signal detection. NMR signal intensities are measured as a function of flow rate (0-1m/s) and separation distance between the permanent magnet and the EF NMR signal detection. These data are quantitatively described by a flow model, ultimately featuring no free parameters, that accounts for NMR signal modulation due to residence time inside the pre-polarising magnet, between the pre-polarising magnet and the detection RF coil and inside the detection coil respectively. The methodology is subsequently demonstrated with a metallic pipe in the pre-polarising region.

  13. Unsteady Simulation of a Landing-Gear Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results of an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of a landing-gear flow field. The geometry of the four-wheel landing gear assembly consists of several of the fine details including the oleo-strut, two diagonal struts, a door, yokes/pin and a flat-plate simulating the wing surface. The computational results, obtained by using 13.3 million grid points, are presented with an emphasis on the characteristics of the unsteadiness ensuing from different parts of the landing-gear assembly, including vortex shedding patterns and frequencies of dominant oscillations. The results show that the presence of the diagonal struts and the door significantly influence the flow field. Owing to the induced asymmetry, vortices are shed only from one of the rear wheels and not the other. Present computations also capture streamwise vortices originating from the upstream corners of the door.

  14. The laser measurement technology of combustion flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingdong; Wang, Guangyu; Qu, Dongsheng

    2014-07-01

    The parameters of combustion flow field such as temperature, velocity, pressure and mole-fraction are of significant value in engineering application. The laser spectroscopy technology which has the non-contact and non- interference properties has become the most important method and it has more advantages than conventionally contacting measurement. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF/LIF) is provided with high sensibility and resolution. Filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) is a good measurement method for complex flow field .Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is prosperity on development and application. This article introduced the theoretical foundation, technical principle, system structure, merits and shortages. It is helpful for researchers to know about the latest development tendency and do the related research.

  15. Mixing, chemical reaction and flow field development in ducted rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Vanka, S.P.; Craig, R.R.; Stull, F.D.

    1984-09-01

    Calculations have been made of the three-dimensional mixing, chemical reaction, and flow field development in a typical ducted rocket configuration. The governing partial differential equations are numerically solved by an iterative finite-difference solution procedure. The physical models include the k approx. epsilon turbulence model, one-step reaction, and mixing controlled chemical reaction rate. Radiation is neglected. The mean flow structure, fuel dispersal patterns, and temperature field are presented in detail for a base configuration with 0.058 m (2 in.) dome height, 45/sup 0/ side arm inclination, and with gaseous ethylene injected from the dome plate at an eccentric location. In addition, the influences of the geometrical parameters such as dome height, inclination of the side arms, and location of the fuel injector are studied.

  16. Augmentation of seasonal low stream flows by artificial recharge in the Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie aquifer of Idaho and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Michael E.; Hossain, Akram; Covert, John J.; Gregory, Guy J.

    2009-09-01

    Conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater requires sophisticated spatial and temporal analysis. In situations involving multiple jurisdictions such as state boundaries, management problems are magnified due to often conflicting regulations and policies. A transient MODFLOW model of the Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie (SVRP) aquifer/river system mutually accepted by both the states of Idaho and Washington, USA, was used to evaluate regional solutions to potential water shortages through the use of strategically placed infiltration basins or injection wells. Artificial recharge of the SVRP aquifer was simulated using diversions from Lake Pend Oreille during winter periods when flows are high and excess water is available. Alternative locations for potential wells and detention basins were examined. Lag times for the water to impact stream/groundwater interaction areas along the Spokane River were evaluated to assess the potential for augmenting stream flows from July through September. Results indicated that the aquifer could be used to improve low-flow season streamflow values utilizing both infiltration basins and injection wells with winter surface water diversions. Depending on the location, as much as 30% of the winter diversion rate could be lagged to improve summer flows at the Spokane gage. Thus, a regional mitigation strategy is scientifically feasible.

  17. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-06

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Numerical simulation study on the flow field of porous hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F. R.; Zhang, L. X.

    2012-11-01

    Because cavitation and cavitation erosion will caused significant impact to the security and stability of hydro turbine, so changing geometric structure to reduce the risk of cavitation is considered. Punching many holes on the hydrofoil is adopted. By using RNG κ - ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLEC algorithm, the flow field around hydrofoil and porous hydrofoil are simulated based computational fluid dynamics(CFD). The numerical simulation result-velocity and pressure field of hydrofoil with different geometry are compared and analysed. This study introduces geometry optimization ideas to researchers for improving cavitation phenomenon in water turbine.

  19. Stochastic field modeling of cavitating flows in OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranft, Michael; Class, Andreas G.

    2013-11-01

    In analysis is presented for a fluidic diode with low/high pressure drop in forward/reverse flow direction. Accurate description of cavitation is needed due to the dominant effect of vapor bubbles on sound speed. The stochastic field method developed in represents the statistics of growing cavitation bubbles by a set of stochastic fields of vapor fraction which evolve according to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and local instantaneous LES flow conditions. Cavitation may originate from nucleation sites in the core of turbulent vortices. In this work a RANS model is used instead of LES. Local turbulent pressure fluctuations are recovered based on kinetic energy k of turbulence and its Dissipation ɛ. In the Rayleigh-Plesset equation these fluctuations are represented by a Wiener process which is superimposed on the mean pressure. Usually a set of stochastic fields is introduced for each stochastic variable. Here two independent Wiener processes, both acting on the vapor-fraction stochastic fields, drive the evolution of vapor bubble growth, so that a single set of stochastic fields can be maintained. The proposed methodology is implemented in OpenFOAM and applied to verification cases including the fluidic diode. Funded by ANPS.

  20. Flow field and near and far sound field of a subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Flow and sound field data are presented for a 2.54 cm diameter air jet at a Mach number of 0.50 and a Reynolds number of 300,000. Distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stress, spectral components of turbulence as well as of the near field pressure, together with essential characteristics of the far field sound are reported. This detailed set of data for one particular flow, erstwhile unavailable in the literature, is expected to help promoote and calibrate subsonic jet noise theories. 'Source locations' in terms of the turbulence maxima, coupling between the entrainment dynamics and the near pressure field, the sound radiation paths, and the balance in mass, momentum and sound energy fluxes are discussed. The results suggest that the large scale coherent structures of the jet govern the 'source locations' by controlling the turbulence and also strongly influence the near field pressure fluctuations.

  1. Flow field and near and far sound field of a subsonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Flow and sound field data are presented for a 2.54 cm diameter air jet at a Mach number of 0.50 and a Reynolds number of 300,000. Distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stress, spectral components of turbulence as well as of the near field pressure, together with essential characteristics of the far field sound are reported. This detailed set of data for one particular flow, erstwhile unavailable in the literature, is expected to help promoote and calibrate subsonic jet noise theories. 'Source locations' in terms of the turbulence maxima, coupling between the entrainment dynamics and the near pressure field, the sound radiation paths, and the balance in mass, momentum and sound energy fluxes are discussed. The results suggest that the large scale coherent structures of the jet govern the 'source locations' by controlling the turbulence and also strongly influence the near field pressure fluctuations.

  2. Laser Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field By M.S.Chandrasekharal Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics ...tunnel of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory(FML) angle information. The other could be used for the at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It is one of...were on throat is always kept choked so that no disturbances a different traverse mechanism , but this was driven as can propagate upstream into the

  3. Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kinouchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The flow of blood in the presence of a magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the major arteries of the central circulatory system. Under certain simplifying conditions, such as the assumption that the length of major arteries (e.g., the aorta) is infinite and that the vessel walls are not electrically conductive, the distribution of induced voltages and currents within these blood vessels can be calculated with reasonable precision. However, the propagation of magnetically induced voltages and currents from the aorta into neighboring tissue structures such as the sinuatrial node of the heart has not been previously determined by any experimental or theoretical technique. In the analysis presented in this paper, a solution of the complete Navier-Stokes equation was obtained by the finite element technique for blood flow through the ascending and descending aortic vessels in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field. Spatial distributions of the magnetically induced voltage and current were obtained for the aortic vessel and surrounding tissues under the assumption that the wall of the aorta is electrically conductive. Results are presented for the calculated values of magnetically induced voltages and current densities in the aorta and surrounding tissue structures, including the sinuatrial node, and for their field-strength dependence. In addition, an analysis is presented of magnetohydrodynamic interactions that lead to a small reduction of blood volume flow at high field levels above approximately 10 tesla (T). Quantitative results are presented on the offsetting effects of oppositely directed blood flows in the ascending and descending aortic segments, and a quantitative estimate is made of the effects of assuming an infinite vs. a finite length of the aortic vessel in calculating the magnetically induced voltage and current density distribution in tissue.

  4. Development of flow/steric field-flow fractionation as a routine process control method

    SciTech Connect

    Barman, B.N.

    1988-08-30

    Researchers studied the feasibility of using the Flow/Steric Field-Flow Fractionation (Flow/StFFF) method for the characterization of particulate materials with diameters in the 1-100 micrometers range. Studies on the optimization of the method for the separation and characterization of different size particulate samples, as well as on the role of the crossflow field and channel flowrate on the separation and resolution, were performed with a number of spherical polystyrene divinylbenzene latex standards and included in the report. Applicability of the method as a fast and reliable practical tool for industrial process control, particularly for grinding operations, was examined by analyzing a number of samples obtained by grinding. Examples of materials considered include coal, limestone and glass.

  5. Flow fields in soap films: Relating viscosity and film thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, V.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2009-08-01

    We follow the diffusive motion of colloidal particles in soap films with varying h/d , where h is the thickness of the film and d is the diameter of the particles. The hydrodynamics of these films are determined by looking at the correlated motion of pairs of particles as a function of separation R . The Trapeznikov approximation [A. A. Trapeznikov, Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress on Surface Activity (Butterworths, London, 1957), p. 242] is used to model soap films as an effective two-dimensional (2D) fluid in contact with bulk air phases. The flow fields determined from correlated particle motions show excellent agreement with what is expected for the theory of 2D fluids for all our films where 0.6≤h/d≤14.3 , with the 2D shear viscosity matching that predicted by Trapeznikov. However, the parameters of these flow fields change markedly for thick films (h/d>7±3) . Our results indicate that three-dimensional effects become important for these thicker films, despite the flow fields still having a 2D character.

  6. Determining 3D flow fields via multi-camera light field imaging.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Tadd T; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R; Daily, David J; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-03-06

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture (1). Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet.

  7. Effect of uniform electric field on the drop deformation in simple shear flow and emulsion shear rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-07-01

    Electrohydrodynamic deformation and orientation of a neutrally buoyant, leaky dielectric, Newtonian drop suspended in another immiscible, leaky dielectric, Newtonian medium is analyzed under the combined influence of uniform electric field and simple shear flow. Application of uniform electric field, perpendicular to the direction of shear flow, not only deforms the drop but also modifies the rheological behavior of a dilute emulsion. In the creeping flow limit, an analytical solution for the deformed drop shape is obtained when the drop shape remains nearly spherical and the surface charge convection is weak. The effective shear rheology is obtained for a dilute emulsion of non-interacting drops by calculating the one-particle contribution to the emulsion stress. The results show that the combined influence of uniform electric field and shear flow is not a simple linear superposition of the independent contributions from electric field and shear flow. Application of uniform electric field always leads to larger drop deformation with drop inclination more towards the direction of velocity gradient for the particular case of perfectly dielectric drops. Presence of surface charge convection for a leaky dielectric drop can increase or decrease the drop deformation with the drop inclination more towards either the direction of shear flow or velocity gradient. The effective shear viscosity and normal stress differences are found to be independent of shear rate. These quantities are significantly affected by the surface charge convection and shape deformation. Shape deformation always increases the effective viscosity of a dilute emulsion composed of perfectly dielectric drops. Interestingly, for a dilute emulsion composed of leaky dielectric drops, results show that the combined influence of charge convection and shape deformation can augment or decrease the effective shear viscosity.

  8. Flow field around Vorticella: Mixing with a reciprocal stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Rachel E.; Roper, Marcus; Stone, Howard A.

    2008-11-01

    Vorticella is a stalked protozoan. It has an extremely fast biological spring, whose contraction is among the fastest biological motions relative to size. Though the Vorticella body is typically only 30 μm across, the contracting spring accelerates it up to speeds of centimeters per second. Vorticella live in an aqueous environment attached to a solid substrate and use their spring to retract their body towards the substrate. The function of the rapid retraction is not known. Many hypothesize that it stirs the surrounding liquid and exposes the Vorticella to fresh nutrients. We evaluate this hypothesis by modeling the Vorticella as a sphere moving normal to a wall, with a stroke that moves towards the wall at high Reynolds number, and away from the wall at low Reynolds number. We approximate the flow during contraction as potential flow, while the flow during re-extension is considered Stokes flow. The analytical results are compared to the flow field obtained with a finite element (Comsol Multiphysics) simulation of the full Navier-Stokes equations.

  9. Quantitative three-dimensional holographic interferometry for flow field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, C. M. E.; Parker, S. C. J.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    Holographic interferometry offers the potential for quantitative, wholefield analysis of three-dimensional compressible flows. The technique is non-intrusive, does not require the introduction of seeding particles, and records the entire flow information within the pulse duration of a Q-switched ruby laser (~30ns). At present, however, holographic interferometry is mainly used qualitatively due to the practical restrictions of data recording, acquisition and processing. To address the potential of holographic flow analysis a prototype multi-channel interferometer has been designed and preliminary wind tunnel results have been obtained. The proposed configuration uses specular illumination which, unlike comparable diffuse systems, does not suffer from fringe localisation and speckle noise. Beam collimation and steering through the flow field is achieved in a single operation by the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs). The resulting design is compact, light efficient, has aberration compensation, and the recorded data are conducive to both tomographic analysis and direct comparison to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions. Holograms have been recorded of simple two-dimensional and axisymmetric compressible flows, to compare the accuracy of holographic density measurements with data from conventional pressure sensors and CFD codes. Data extraction from the holograms, and the elimination of rigid body motion, was achieved using digital Fourier transform fringe analysis. The introduction of phase errors by image processing has been investigated by analysing simulated fringe patterns generated from a combination of experimental amplitude information and computer generated phase data.

  10. Mathematical modeling of flow field in ceramic candle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Taewon; Kim, Heuy-Dong; Choi, Joo-Hong; Chung, Jae Hwa

    1998-06-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is one of the candidates to achieve stringent environmental regulation among the clean coal technologies. Advancing the technology of the hot gas cleanup systems is the most critical component in the development of the IGCC. Thus the aim of this study is to understand the flow field in the ceramic filter and the influence of ceramic filter in removal of the particles contained in the hot gas flow. The numerical model based on the Reynolds stress turbulence model with the Darcy’s law in the porous region is adopted. It is found that the effect of the porosity in the flowfield is negligibly small while the effect of the filter length is significant. It is also found as the permeability decreases, the reattachment point due to the flow separation moves upstream. This is because the fluid is sucked into the filter region due to the pressure drop before the flow separation occurs. The particle follows well with the fluid stream and the particle is directly sucked into the filter due to the pressure drop even in the flow separation region.

  11. Flow field investigation in a bulb turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M.; Duquesne, P.; Aeschlimann, V.; Deschênes, C.

    2017-04-01

    An important drop in turbine performances has been measured in a bulb turbine model operated at overload. Previous investigations have correlated the performance drop with diffuser losses, and particularly to the flow separation zone at the diffuser wall. The flow has been investigated in the transition part of the diffuser using two LDV measurement sections. The transition part is a diffuser section that transforms from a circular to a rectangular section. The two measurement sections are at the inlet and outlet of the diffuser transition part. The turbine has been operated at three operating points, which are representative of different flow patterns at the diffuser exit at overload. In addition to the average velocity field, the analysis is conducted based on a backflow occurrence function and on the swirl level. Results reveal a counter-rotating zone in the diffuser, which intensifies with the guide vanes opening. The guide vanes opening induces a modification of the flow phenomena: from a central backflow recirculation zone at the lowest flowrate to a backflow zone induced by flow separation at the wall at the highest flowrate.

  12. Metrology of confined flows using wide field nanoparticle velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ranchon, Hubert; Picot, Vincent; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of fluids in micro/nanofabricated systems opens new avenues to engineer the transport of matter at the molecular level. Yet the number of methods for the in situ characterization of fluid flows in shallow channels is limited. Here we establish a simple method called nanoparticle velocimetry distribution analysis (NVDA) that relies on wide field microscopy to measure the flow rate and channel height based on the fitting of particle velocity distributions along and across the flow direction. NVDA is validated by simulations, showing errors in velocity and height determination of less than 1% and 8% respectively, as well as with experiments, in which we monitor the behavior of 200 nm nanoparticles conveyed in channels of ~1.8 μm in height. We then show the relevance of this assay for the characterization of flows in bulging channels, and prove its suitability to characterize the concentration of particles across the channel height in the context of visco-elastic focusing. Our method for rapid and quantitative flow characterization has therefore a broad spectrum of applications in micro/nanofluidics, and a strong potential for the optimization of Lab-on-Chips modules in which engineering of confined transport is necessary. PMID:25974654

  13. The morphology and evolution of the Stromboli 2002-2003 lava flow field--An example of a basaltic flow field emplaced on a steep slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lodato, Luigi; Harris, A.; Spampinato, L.; Calvari, Sonia; Dehn, J.; Patrick, M.

    2007-01-01

    The use of a hand-held thermal camera during the 2002–2003 Stromboli effusive eruption proved essential in tracking the development of flow field structures and in measuring related eruption parameters, such as the number of active vents and flow lengths. The steep underlying slope on which the flow field was emplaced resulted in a characteristic flow field morphology. This comprised a proximal shield, where flow stacking and inflation caused piling up of lava on the relatively flat ground of the vent zone, that fed a medial–distal lava flow field. This zone was characterized by the formation of lava tubes and tumuli forming a complex network of tumuli and flows linked by tubes. Most of the flow field was emplaced on extremely steep slopes and this had two effects. It caused flows to slide, as well as flow, and flow fronts to fail frequently, persistent flow front crumbling resulted in the production of an extensive debris field. Channel-fed flows were also characterized by development of excavated debris levees in this zone (Calvari et al. 2005). Collapse of lava flow fronts and inflation of the upper proximal lava shield made volume calculation very difficult. Comparison of the final field volume with that expecta by integrating the lava effusion rates through time suggests a loss of ~70% erupted lava by flow front crumbling and accumulation as debris flows below sea level. Derived relationships between effusion rate, flow length, and number of active vents showed systematic and correlated variations with time where spreading of volume between numerous flows caused an otherwise good correlation between effusion rate, flow length to break down. Observations collected during this eruption are useful in helping to understand lava flow processes on steep slopes, as well as in interpreting old lava–debris sequences found in other steep-sided volcanoes subject to effusive activity.

  14. Penetration of conductive plasma flows across a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher Ryan

    2008-02-01

    Plasma interacts with magnetic fields in a variety of natural and laboratory settings. While a magnetic field "traps" isolated charged particles, plasma penetration across magnetic field is observed in many situations where a plasma-magnetic interface exists. For example, in the realm of pulsed power technology, this behavior is important for magnetically insulated transmission lines and for plasma opening switches. In the realm of astrophysics, the nature of the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the Earth's magnetic field affects the reliability of telecommunication devices and satellites. Experiments were performed at the Nevada Terawatt Facility to investigate how a conductive plasma penetrates an externally applied magnetic field. In experiment, a plasma flow was produced by laser ablation. This plasma was observed to penetrate an externally applied magnetic field produced by a 0.6 MA pulsed power generator. In experiment, the duration of the laser pulse was changed by three orders of magnitude, from ns (GW pulse power) to ps (TW) . This resulted in a significant variation of the plasma parameters, which in turn led to the actuation of different magnetic field penetration mechanisms.

  15. Coupling Linearized Far-Field Boundary Conditions with Nonlinear Near-Field Solutions in Transonic Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-29

    Plate and a NACA 64A010 Airfoil Section . 31 3. Spatial Variations of Velocity Potentials on a Flat Plate and MBB-A3 Airfoil Section ........ 32 4...39 14. Steady Flow Field Mach Number Variation for a NACA 64A010 Airfoil at a 10 Angle of Attack w ith M = 0.80...44 22. Steady Flow Field Mach Number Variation for a NACA 64A010 Airfoil at a 10 Angle of Attack 23. W ith M = 0.78

  16. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  17. Modeling field scale unsaturated flow and transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gelhar, L.W.; Celia, M.A.; McLaughlin, D.

    1994-08-01

    The scales of concern in subsurface transport of contaminants from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities are in the range of 1 to 1,000 m. Natural geologic materials generally show very substantial spatial variability in hydraulic properties over this range of scales. Such heterogeneity can significantly influence the migration of contaminants. It is also envisioned that complex earth structures will be constructed to isolate the waste and minimize infiltration of water into the facility. The flow of water and gases through such facilities must also be a concern. A stochastic theory describing unsaturated flow and contamination transport in naturally heterogeneous soils has been enhanced by adopting a more realistic characterization of soil variability. The enhanced theory is used to predict field-scale effective properties and variances of tension and moisture content. Applications illustrate the important effects of small-scale heterogeneity on large-scale anisotropy and hysteresis and demonstrate the feasibility of simulating two-dimensional flow systems at time and space scales of interest in radioactive waste disposal investigations. Numerical algorithms for predicting field scale unsaturated flow and contaminant transport have been improved by requiring them to respect fundamental physical principles such as mass conservation. These algorithms are able to provide realistic simulations of systems with very dry initial conditions and high degrees of heterogeneity. Numerical simulation of the movement of water and air in unsaturated soils has demonstrated the importance of air pathways for contaminant transport. The stochastic flow and transport theory has been used to develop a systematic approach to performance assessment and site characterization. Hypothesis-testing techniques have been used to determine whether model predictions are consistent with observed data.

  18. Holocene Flows of the Cima Volcanic Field, Mojave Desert, Part 2: Flow Rheology from Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.; Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology is often utilized as an indicator of rheological behavior during flow emplacement. Rheological behavior can be characterized by the viscosity and yield strength of lava, which in turn are dependent on physical and chemical properties including crystallinity, vesicularity, and bulk composition. We are studying the rheology of a basaltic lava flow from a monogenetic Holocene cinder cone in the Cima lava field (Mojave Desert, California). The flow is roughly 2.5 km long and up to 700m wide, with a well-developed central channel along much of its length. Samples were collected along seven different traverses across the flow, along with real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS profiles to allow levee heights and slopes to be measured. Surface textures change from pahoehoe ropes near the vent to predominantly jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow, including all levees and the toe. Chemically the lava shows little variation, plotting on the trachybasalt-basanite boundary on the total alkali-silica diagram. Mineralogically the lava is dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, with abundant flow-aligned plagioclase microcrystals. The total crystal fraction is ~50% near the vent, with higher percentages in the distal portion of the flow. Vesicularity varies between ~10 and more than ~60%. Levees are ~10-15m high with slopes typically ~25-35˚, suggesting a yield strength at final emplacement of ~150,000 Pa. The effective emplacement temperature and yield strength of lava samples will be determined using the parallel-plate technique. We will test the hypothesis that these physical and rheological properties of the lava during final emplacement correlate with spatial patterns in flow morphology, such as average slope and levee width, which have been determined using remote sensing observations (Beem et al. 2014).

  19. An Experimental Investigation of Steady and Unsteady Flow Field in an Axial Flow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaccaria, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements were made in a large scale single stage turbine facility. Within the nozzle passage measurements were made using a five hole probe, a two-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV), and a single sensor hot wire probe. These measurements showed weak secondary flows at midchord, and two secondary flow loss cores at the nozzle exit. The casing vortex loss core was the larger of the two. At the exit radial inward flow was found over the entire passage, and was more pronounced in the wake. Nozzle wake decay was found to be more rapid than for an isolated vane row due to the rotor's presence. The midspan rotor flow field was measured using a two-component LDV. Measurements were made from upstream of the rotor to a chord behind the rotor. The distortion of the nozzle wake as it passed through the rotor blade row was determined. The unsteadiness in the rotor flow field was determined. The decay of the rotor wake was also characterized.

  20. Computational and Experimental Flow Field Analyses of Separate Flow Chevron Nozzles and Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Thomas, Russell H.; AbdolHamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2003-01-01

    A computational and experimental flow field analyses of separate flow chevron nozzles is presented. The goal of this study is to identify important flow physics and modeling issues required to provide highly accurate flow field data which will later serve as input to the Jet3D acoustic prediction code. Four configurations are considered: a baseline round nozzle with and without a pylon, and a chevron core nozzle with and without a pylon. The flow is simulated by solving the asymptotically steady, compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, up-wind, flux-difference splitting finite volume scheme and standard two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model with a linear stress representation and the addition of a eddy viscosity dependence on total temperature gradient normalized by local turbulence length scale. The current CFD results are seen to be in excellent agreement with Jet Noise Lab data and show great improvement over previous computations which did not compensate for enhanced mixing due to high temperature gradients.

  1. Mast cells mediate acid-induced augmentation of opossum esophageal blood flow via histamine and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M J; Morris, G P; Dinda, P K; Paterson, W G

    1996-01-01

    Increased esophageal blood flow during reflux episodes may play an important role in mucosal resistance to injury, although the mechanism remains unclear. Decreased stainable mast cells and increased luminal histamine release during acid exposure has been previously documented. Therefore, the role of mast cells, nerves, histamine, and nitric oxide in mediating increased blood flow during acid challenge of the distal esophagus was investigated. The effects of the mast cell stabilizers disodium cromoglycate and doxantrazole, the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin, the histamine H1 receptor antagonist promethazine, and the NO synthase inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were examined by monitoring opossum esophageal histamine release and blood flow during perfusion with 100 mmol/L HCl. Luminal acid challenge significantly increased both histamine release and blood flow (P < 0.05). Disodium cromoglycate, promethazine, and N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester attenuated the increase in blood flow to basal (saline-perfused) levels. Tetrodotoxin did not prevent an acute increase in blood flow that rapidly returned to baseline, likely from the ensuing hypotension. These findings provide evidence that mast cell-derived histamine, acting through an NO-dependent mechanism, plays a central role in the response of the esophageal microcirculation to luminal acid.

  2. The 3D Flow Field Around an Embedded Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Artymowicz, Pawel; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    3D modifications to the well-studied 2D flow topology around an embedded planet have the potential to resolve long-standing problems in planet formation theory. We present a detailed analysis of the 3D isothermal flow field around a 5 Earth-mass planet on a fixed circular orbit, simulated using our graphics processing unit hydrodynamics code PEnGUIn. We find that, overall, the horseshoe region has a columnar structure extending vertically much beyond the Hill sphere of the planet. This columnar structure is only broken for some of the widest horseshoe streamlines, along which high altitude fluid descends rapidly into the planet’s Bondi sphere, performs one horseshoe turn, and exits the Bondi sphere radially in the midplane. A portion of this flow exits the horseshoe region altogether, which we refer to as the “transient” horseshoe flow. The flow continues as it rolls up into a pair of up-down symmetric horizontal vortex lines shed into the wake of the planet. This flow, unique to 3D, affects both planet accretion and migration. It prevents the planet from sustaining a hydrostatic atmosphere due to its intrusion into the Bondi sphere, and leads to a significant corotation torque on the planet, unanticipated by 2D analysis. In the reported simulation, starting with a {{Σ }}˜ {r}-3/2 radial surface density profile, this torque is positive and partially cancels with the negative differential Lindblad torque, resulting in a factor of three slower planet migration rate. Finally, we report 3D effects can be suppressed by a sufficiently large disk viscosity, leading to results similar to 2D.

  3. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements for Supersonic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The application of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) to high-speed flows has its origins in the original development of the technology by Komine et al (1991). Komine used a small shop-air driven nozzle to generate a 200 m/s flow. This flow velocity was chosen since it produced a fairly large Doppler shift in the scattered light, resulting in a significant transmission loss as the light passed through the Iodine vapor. This proof-of-concept investigation showed that the technology was capable of measuring flow velocity within a measurement plane defined by a single-frequency laser light sheet. The effort also proved that velocity measurements could be made without resolving individual seed particles as required by other techniques such as Fringe- Type Laser Velocimetry and Particle Image Velocimetry. The promise of making planar velocity measurements with the possibility of using 0.1-micron condensation particles for seeding, Dibble et al (1989), resulted in the investigation of supersonic jet flow fields, Elliott et al (1993) and Smith and Northam (1995) - Mach 2.0 and 1.9 respectively. Meyers (1993) conducted a wind tunnel investigation above an inclined flat plate at Mach 2.5 and above a delta wing at Mach 2.8 and 4.6. Although these measurements were crude from an accuracy viewpoint, they did prove that the technology could be used to study supersonic flows using condensation as the scattering medium. Since then several research groups have studied the technology and developed solutions and methodologies to overcome most of the measurement accuracy limitations:

  4. Inclination of magnetic fields and flows in sunspot penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, K.; Scharmer, G. B.; Kiselman, D.; Löfdahl, M. G.; Berger, T. E.

    2005-06-01

    An observational study of the inclination of magnetic fields and flows in sunspot penumbrae at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec is presented. The analysis is based on longitudinal magnetograms and Dopplergrams obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on La Palma using the Lockheed Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter birefringent filter. Data from two sunspots observed at several heliocentric angles between 12 ° and 39 ° were analyzed. We find that the magnetic field at the level of the formation of the Fe i-line wing (630.25 nm) is in the form of coherent structures that extend radially over nearly the entire penumbra giving the impression of vertical sheet-like structures. The inclination of the field varies up to 45 ° over azimuthal distances close to the resolution limit of the magnetograms. Dark penumbral cores, and their extensions into the outer penumbra, are prominent features associated with the more horizontal component of the magnetic field. The inclination of this dark penumbral component - designated B - increases outwards from approximately 40 ° in the inner penumbra such that the field lines are nearly horizontal or even return to the solar surface already in the middle penumbra. The bright component of filaments - designated A - is associated with the more vertical component of the magnetic field and has an inclination with respect to the normal of about 35 ° in the inner penumbra, increasing to about 60 ° towards the outer boundary. The magnetogram signal is lower in the dark component B regions than in the bright component A regions of the penumbral filaments. The measured rapid azimuthal variation of the magnetogram signal is interpreted as being caused by combined fluctuations of inclination and magnetic field strength. The Dopplergrams show that the velocity field associated with penumbral component B is roughly aligned with the magnetic field while component A flows are more horizontal than the magnetic field. The observations give

  5. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  6. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF.

  7. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  8. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  9. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  10. Three Dimensional Viscous Flow Field in an Axial Flow Turbine Nozzle Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristic, D.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is experimental and computational study of three dimensional viscous flow field in the nozzle passage of an axial flow turbine stage. The nozzle passage flow field has been measured using a two sensor hot-wire probe at various axial and radial stations. In addition, two component LDV measurements at one axial station (x/c(sum m) = 0.56) were performed to measure the velocity field. Static pressure measurements and flow visualization, using a fluorescent oil technique, were also performed to obtain the location of transition and the endwall limiting streamlines. A three dimensional boundary layer code, with a simple intermittency transition model, was used to predict the viscous layers along the blade and endwall surfaces. The boundary layers on the blade surface were found to be very thin and mostly laminar, except on the suction surface downstream of 70% axial chord. Strong radial pressure gradient, especially close to the suction surface, induces strong cross flow components in the trailing edge regions of the blade. On the end-walls the boundary layers were much thicker, especially near the suction corner of the casing surface, caused by secondary flow. The secondary flow region near the suction-casing surface corner indicates the presence of the passage vortex detached from the blade surface. The corner vortex is found to be very weak. The presence of a closely spaced rotor downstream (20% of the nozzle vane chord) introduces unsteadiness in the blade passage. The measured instantaneous velocity signal was filtered using FFT square window to remove the periodic unsteadiness introduced by the downstream rotor and fans. The filtering decreased the free stream turbulence level from 2.1% to 0.9% but had no influence on the computed turbulence length scale. The computation of the three dimensional boundary layers is found to be accurate on the nozzle passage blade surfaces, away from the end-walls and the secondary flow region. On

  11. Augmented Reality Binoculars.

    PubMed

    Oskiper, Taragay; Sizintsev, Mikhail; Branzoi, Vlad; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present an augmented reality binocular system to allow long range high precision augmentation of live telescopic imagery with aerial and terrain based synthetic objects, vehicles, people and effects. The inserted objects must appear stable in the display and must not jitter and drift as the user pans around and examines the scene with the binoculars. The design of the system is based on using two different cameras with wide field of view and narrow field of view lenses enclosed in a binocular shaped shell. Using the wide field of view gives us context and enables us to recover the 3D location and orientation of the binoculars much more robustly, whereas the narrow field of view is used for the actual augmentation as well as to increase precision in tracking. We present our navigation algorithm that uses the two cameras in combination with an inertial measurement unit and global positioning system in an extended Kalman filter and provides jitter free, robust and real-time pose estimation for precise augmentation. We have demonstrated successful use of our system as part of information sharing example as well as a live simulated training system for observer training, in which fixed and rotary wing aircrafts, ground vehicles, and weapon effects are combined with real world scenes.

  12. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  13. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  14. An analysis of the flow field in the region of the ASRM field joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The flow field in the region of a solid rocket motor field joint is very important since fluid dynamic and mechanical propellant stresses can couple to cause a motor failure at a joint. Presented here is an examination of the flow field in the region of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) field joints. The analyses were performed as a first step in assessing the design of the ASRM forward and aft field joints in order to assure the proper operation of the motor prior to further development of test firing. The analyses presented here were performed by employing a two-dimensional axisymmetric assumption. Fluent/BFC, a three dimensional full Navier-Stokes flow field code, was used to make the numerical calculations. This code utilizes a staggered grid formulation along with the SIMPLER numerical algorithm. Wall functions are used to determine the character of the laminar sublayer, and a standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model is used to close the fluid dynamic equations. The analyses performed to this date verify that the ASRM field joint design operates properly. The fluid dynamic stresses at the field joints are small due to the inherent design of the field joints. A problem observed in some other solid rocket motors is that large fluid dynamic stresses are generated at the motor joint on the downstream propellant grain due to forward facing step geometries. The design of the ASRM field joints are such that this is not a problem as shown by the analyses. Also, the analyses of the inhibitor stub left protruding into the port flow from normal propellant burn back show that more information is necessary to complete these analyses. These analyses were performed as parametric analyses in relation to the height of the inhibitor stub left protruding into the motor port. A better estimate of the amount of the inhibitor stub remaining at later burn times must be determined since the height which the inhibitor stub protrudes into the port flow drastically affects the fluid

  15. Field flow fractionation techniques to explore the "nano-world".

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia

    2017-04-01

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) techniques are used to successfully characterize several nanomaterials by sizing nano-entities and producing information about the aggregation/agglomeration state of nanoparticles. By coupling FFF techniques to specific detectors, researchers can determine particle-size distributions (PSDs), expressed as mass-based or number-based PSDs. This review considers FFF applications in the food, biomedical, and environmental sectors, mostly drawn from the past 4 y. It thus underlines the prominent role of asymmetrical flow FFF within the FFF family. By concisely comparing FFF techniques with other techniques suitable for sizing nano-objects, the advantages and the disadvantages of these instruments become clear. A consideration of select recent publications illustrates the state of the art of some lesser-known FFF techniques and innovative instrumental set-ups.

  16. Microscal Thermal Flow Field Fractionation of DNA by Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Jennifer; Alfahani, Faihan

    2015-11-01

    We present results from a lattice-Boltzmann-base Brownian Dynamics simulation on the separation of DNA by length using thermal flow field fractionation in a microfluidic device. A temperature gradient in combination with fluid flow allows us to separate long and short strands of DNA. Shorter DNA fragments have higher Soret coefficients and therefore migrate more strongly in the temperature gradient than long strands. They are therefore closer to the channel walls and have a lower mean velocity than longer strands. The retention time in the channel for longer DNA chains is significantly shorter than for small chains. This technique has the advantage that long strands can be processed quickly, unlike traditional agarose gel techniques which require longer times for longer fragments.

  17. SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC INTERFERENCE FLOW FIELDS AND HEATING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Small areas of high heat transfer and pressure can occur on a vehicle surface due to the influence of an impinging shock on the local flow. A method was needed to determine peak pressure and heating of these areas. This package is a system of computer programs designed to calculate two-dimensional shock interference patterns for six types of interference flows. Results also include properties of the inviscid flow field and the inviscid-viscous interaction at the surface along with peak pressure and peak heating at the impingement point. The six types of interference flow patterns considered are: 1) Type I interference patterns, occurring when two weak shocks of opposite families, BS (bow shock) and IS (impingment shock), intersect when the flow upstream of the impingement point is supersonic, or in the case of a blunt body, takes place well below the sonic point. 2) Type II interference pattern occurs when two shocks of opposite families (bow shock and impinging shock) intersect. Both shocks are weak as in type I, but are of such strength that in order to turn the flow, a Mach reflection must exist in the center of the flow field with an embedded subsonic region occurring between the intersection points (A & B) and the accompanying shear layers. Type II interference occurs on a blunt body when the impinging shock intersects the bow shock near the sonic point. 3) Type III shock interference pattern occurs when a weak impinging shock intersects a strong detached bow shock. On a blunt body the shock intersection occurs near or above the lower sonic point. 4) Type IV interference can occur when the impinging shock intersects a strong bow shock ahead of a subsonic flow region. On a blunt body this shock intersection is located between the lower sonic point and just above the body axis. The impinging shock causes a displacement of the bow shock and the formation of a supersonic jet that is embedded in the subsonic region. A jet bow shock is produced when the jet impinges

  18. Three-Dimensional Flow Fields and Bedform Migration in a Field-Scale Meandering Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarek, J. L.; Palmsten, M. L.; Calantoni, J.; Khosronejad, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2012-12-01

    The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) at the University of Minnesota was constructed in 2008 as field-scale sand bed meandering stream channel within a vegetated floodplain. This state-of-the-art facility provides the unique opportunity to investigate physical, chemical, and biological stream and floodplain processes in a controlled outdoor environment with laboratory-quality measurement capabilities. The research presented here summarizes results from several experiments conducted in the OSL examining the effect of three-dimensional (3-D) flow fields on sediment transport and bedform development. Specifically, we examined bedform dimensions and flow fields in two scenarios 1) in the vicinity immobile rock structures, and 2) on the quasi-equilibrium bar that formed on the inner bank of a meander. A combination of methods were used for each study to determine the rate of scour hole formation, quasi-equilibrium bed elevation and variation in bed elevation, and bedform size and spacing. Bed topography data were collected at 1 cm resolution under live-bed conditions using a downward looking sonar probe attached to a mobile data acquisition (DAQ) cart. At each DAQ station, repeat scans were collected giving insight into the 3-dimensionality of bedforms in a meandering channel with and without rock structures. Supplementary data were collected at transects under two flow and sediment conditions (280 L/s and 6 kg/min and 199 L/s and 4 kg/min, for water and sediment, respectively) using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and a profiling ADV to measure 3-D flow fields and concurrent velocity and bed elevation data. These data were used in conjunction with data from optical remote sensing of bedform migration in the OSL to provide a validation dataset for a high-resolution 3-D hydro-morphodynamic model that is being used to simulate flow and sediment transport processes in meandering channels with embedded rock structures (Khosronejad et al. Adv. in

  19. The effect of ejector augmentation on test-section flow quality in the Calspan 8-ft transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.; Hanly, R. D.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.; Chudyk, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Tests to determine the flow disturbances effects of four ejectors located in the corners just downstream of the diffuser in the Calspan wind tunnel are described. The flow quality in the nonejector mode is employed as the base-line configuration, and operating parameters are compared with data from other wind tunnels. During tests with the ejectors working, fluctuation levels increased between Mach 0.4-0.6, while temperature and vorticity levels remained constant. The ejector exhibited broad spectrum noise typical of free jet noise, yet static pressure measurements revealed only a slight increase in the broadband rms levels with the ejectors on, indicating negligible disturbances upstream caused by the ejectors. Choking the diffuser eliminated the jet noise, and the use of ejectors in the Mach range considered is concluded to cause no significant degradation in the Calspan tunnel flow quality.

  20. Modeling two-phase flow in three-dimensional complex flow-fields of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinyong; Luo, Gang; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-10-01

    3D fine-mesh flow-fields recently developed by Toyota Mirai improved water management and mass transport in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks, suggesting their potential value for robust and high-power PEM fuel cell stack performance. In such complex flow-fields, Forchheimer's inertial effect is dominant at high current density. In this work, a two-phase flow model of 3D complex flow-fields of PEMFCs is developed by accounting for Forchheimer's inertial effect, for the first time, to elucidate the underlying mechanism of liquid water behavior and mass transport inside 3D complex flow-fields and their adjacent gas diffusion layers (GDL). It is found that Forchheimer's inertial effect enhances liquid water removal from flow-fields and adds additional flow resistance around baffles, which improves interfacial liquid water and mass transport. As a result, substantial improvements in high current density cell performance and operational stability are expected in PEMFCs with 3D complex flow-fields, compared to PEMFCs with conventional flow-fields. Higher current density operation required to further reduce PEMFC stack cost per kW in the future will necessitate optimizing complex flow-field designs using the present model, in order to efficiently remove a large amount of product water and hence minimize the mass transport voltage loss.

  1. Magnetic Field Generation and Particle Energization in Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Boettcher, Markus; Smith, Ian

    2012-10-01

    We present Particle-in-Cell simulation results of magnetic field generation by relativistic shear flows in collisionless electron-ion (e-ion) and electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. In the e+e- case, small current filaments are first generated at the shear interface due to streaming instabilities of the interpenetrating particles from boundary perturbations. Such current filaments create transverse magnetic fields which coalesce into larger and larger flux tubes with alternating polarity, eventually forming ordered flux ropes across the entire shear boundary layer. Particles are accelerated across field lines to form power-law tails by semi-coherent electric fields sustained by oblique Langmuir waves. In the e-ion case, a single laminar slab of transverse flux rope is formed at the shear boundary, sustained by thin current sheets on both sides due to different drift velocities of electrons and ions. The magnetic field has a single polarity for the entire boundary layer. Electrons are heated to a fraction of the ion energy, but there is no evidence of power-law tail forming in this case.

  2. Steady hydromagnetic flows in open magnetic fields. II - Global flows with static zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K.; Low, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of an axisymmetric steady stellar wind with a static zone is presented, with emphasis on the situation where the global magnetic field is symmetrical about the stellar equator and is partially open. In this scenario, the wind escapes in open magnetic fluxes originating from a region at the star pole and a region at an equatorial belt of closed magnetic field in static equilibrium. The two-dimensional balance of the pressure gradient and the inertial, gravitational, and Lorentz forces in different parts of the flow are studied, along with the static interplay between external sources of energy (heating and/or cooling) distributed in the flow and the pressure distribution.

  3. Steady hydromagnetic flows in open magnetic fields. II - Global flows with static zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K.; Low, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical study of an axisymmetric steady stellar wind with a static zone is presented, with emphasis on the situation where the global magnetic field is symmetrical about the stellar equator and is partially open. In this scenario, the wind escapes in open magnetic fluxes originating from a region at the star pole and a region at an equatorial belt of closed magnetic field in static equilibrium. The two-dimensional balance of the pressure gradient and the inertial, gravitational, and Lorentz forces in different parts of the flow are studied, along with the static interplay between external sources of energy (heating and/or cooling) distributed in the flow and the pressure distribution.

  4. Aspects of flow visualization and density field monitoring of stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Peter A.

    Stratified flows which have considerable and wide-range engineering relevance, particularly in the areas of offshore and coastal engineering, and air and water modeling are reviewed. Particular attention is given to internal waves and solitons in estuaries, shallow seas, fjords, and the deep oceans; pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere and coastal waters; energy storage and management systems; ventilation and fire safety; saline intrusion; rotating machinery; velocity measurements based on nonintrusive techniques; density field data; velocity measurements based on intrusive techniques; and density field monitoring.

  5. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  6. Field-flow fractionation: addressing the nano challenge.

    PubMed

    Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs; Runyon, J Ray; Ashames, Akram A

    2011-02-01

    Field-flow fractionation is coming of age as a family of analytical methods for separating and characterizing macromolecules, nanoparticles, and particulates. The capabilities and versatility of these techniques are discussed in light of the challenges that are being addressed in analyzing nanometer-sized sample components and the insights gained through their use in applications ranging from materials science to biology. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  7. Real gas flow fields about three dimensional configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Lombard, C. K.; Davy, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    Real gas, inviscid supersonic flow fields over a three-dimensional configuration are determined using a factored implicit algorithm. Air in chemical equilibrium is considered and its local thermodynamic properties are computed by an equilibrium composition method. Numerical solutions are presented for both real and ideal gases at three different Mach numbers and at two different altitudes. Selected results are illustrated by contour plots and are also tabulated for future reference. Results obtained compare well with existing tabulated numerical solutions and hence validate the solution technique.

  8. Evaluation of the intranasal flow field through computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Goubergrits, Leonid; Heppt, Werner Johannes; Bessler, Stephan; Zachow, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    A reliable and comprehensive assessment of nasal breathing is problematic and still a common issue in rhinosurgery. Impairments of nasal breathing need an objective approach. In this regard, currently rhinomanometry is the only standard diagnostic tool available but has various limitations. However, in the last decade, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has become a promising method in facing the challenge of qualifying nasal breathing. This article presents use of CFD with a symptom-free subject and a symptomatic patient. Thereby, certain flow field features and changes before and after surgery were investigated. Moreover, the study outlines suggestions for concrete rhinologic CFD applications. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Real gas flow fields about three dimensional configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Lombard, C. K.; Davy, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    Real gas, inviscid supersonic flow fields over a three-dimensional configuration are determined using a factored implicit algorithm. Air in chemical equilibrium is considered and its local thermodynamic properties are computed by an equilibrium composition method. Numerical solutions are presented for both real and ideal gases at three different Mach numbers and at two different altitudes. Selected results are illustrated by contour plots and are also tabulated for future reference. Results obtained compare well with existing tabulated numerical solutions and hence validate the solution technique.

  10. Field-flow fractionation of nucleic acids and proteins under large-scale gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2007-05-01

    For the purpose of developing techniques for separating biological macromolecules, the present study reports a magnetic chromatography system employing high performance liquid chromatography and superconducting magnets of 14 and 5T. We observed chromatograms of catalase and albumin, which were eluded from columns that were exposed to magnetic fields of up to 14T with a maximum gradient of 90T/m. Without the magnetic fields, the chromatograms of the macromolecules showed a clear peak, while the chromatograms changed to have separated peaks for the same molecules after exposure to gradient magnetic fields. When the chromatocolumn was placed so the magnetic forces were opposite to the direction of flow, the albumin molecules separated into two groups. In addition, the chromatograms of catalase exposed to the magnetic fields indicated that the retention times of the two kinds of magnetically separated catalase were relatively changed if the column-field configuration was changed. Probably, the balance of paramagnetism in the heme and diamagnetism in the protein controlled the transport velocity under the influence of the gradient magnetic fields. In addition, the transport velocity of DNA molecules in the flow with a high gradient magnetic field was observed using a time-resolved spectrophotometric system.

  11. Effects of interaction between plasma-flow fields and electrostatic fields in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsytovich, V. N.

    2007-04-01

    Interaction between plasma-flow fields and electrostatic fields is considered as the most appropriate method for describing the characteristic properties of a dusty plasma. This method makes it possible to treat the openness of the dusty plasma systems and to describe the processes of self-organization and change in interaction between dust particles that are caused by the presence of plasma flows, in particular, to describe attraction between the dust particles at large distances, as well as the pairing of identically charged particles and the formation of complicated dusty structures including dusty plasma crystals. Interaction between the plasma-flow fields and electrostatic fields was previously taken into account only when considering particular problems but was not considered as the general characteristic property of the dusty plasma. It is emphasized that the model taking into account the plasma-flow fields and their interaction with the electrostatic fields is the only model that allows simultaneous explanation of all basic parameters characterizing the condensation of the dusty plasma to plasma crystals (coupling constant Γ, interparticle distance r min, and melting temperature T d) obtained in observations. Attraction between the dust particles at large distances leads to instability similar to gravitational instability, which was erroneously disregarded in previous descriptions of the dust sound. The corresponding critical size is similar to the Jeans radius. As a result of such attraction, dusty systems are structured, and such structuring is similar to known gravitational structuring and can explain the observation of dusty structures in most laboratory experiments on the dusty plasma.

  12. Simultaneous 3D Strain and Flow Fields Measurement of a Model Artery under Unsteady Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction imposes challenges in both aero-elasticity and biomedical studies. A simultaneous solid deformation and fluid flow measurement technique based on digital in-line holographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been developed. It allows us to measure concurrently 3D strain field of a deforming structure and the unsteady flow near it. To facilitate the measurement, both wall and flow are seeded with tracer particles distinguished by size. The motion of these tracers provides the 3D deformation of the wall and the 3D velocity distribution of the flow separately. A fully index matched facility including transparent artery and NaI solution is constructed to enable observations near the wall or through the complex geometry. An arterial model with the inner diameter of 9.5 mm and the thickness of 0.9 mm is manufactured from the cross-linked transparent PDMS at the mixing ratio of 1:10 and doped with mono-dispersed 19 μm polystyrene particles. A cinematic holographic PTV system is used to trace the 3D particle motion in the model and flow simultaneously. Preliminary study is performed within a sample volume of 15 × 15 × 75 mm with the spatial resolution of 7.4 μm in lateral and 10 μm in depth. Uncertainty and accuracy analysis will be reported. NSF Grant No: CBET-0844647.

  13. Measuring patient outcomes in breast augmentation: introducing the BREAST-Q Augmentation module.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Reavey, Patrick L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie; McCarthy, Colleen; Cano, Stefan J

    2009-01-01

    The Breast-Q Augmentation module is a new and unique questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes following breast augmentation. It has undergone a rigorous development and validation process and is currently the only questionnaire for breast augmentation that meets international and federal standards for questionnaire development. The Breast-Q Augmentation module covers a comprehensive set of concerns of breast augmentation patients, including satisfaction with breasts and impact on quality of life. With its excellent psychometric properties, the Breast-Q Augmentation module can provide clinicians and researchers with a wealth of essential data to improve the field of breast augmentation from the perspectives of both surgeons and patients.

  14. Magnetic Field Suppression of Flow in Semiconductor Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoseyev, A. I.; Kansa, E. J.; Marin, C.; Volz, M. P.; Ostrogorsky, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the most promising approaches for the reduction of convection during the crystal growth of conductive melts (semiconductor crystals) is the application of magnetic fields. Current technology allows the experimentation with very intense static fields (up to 80 KGauss) for which nearly convection free results are expected from simple scaling analysis in stabilized systems (vertical Bridgman method with axial magnetic field). However, controversial experimental results were obtained. The computational methods are, therefore, a fundamental tool in the understanding of the phenomena accounting during the solidification of semiconductor materials. Moreover, effects like the bending of the isomagnetic lines, different aspect ratios and misalignments between the direction of the gravity and magnetic field vectors can not be analyzed with analytical methods. The earliest numerical results showed controversial conclusions and are not able to explain the experimental results. Although the generated flows are extremely low, the computational task is a complicated because of the thin boundary layers. That is one of the reasons for the discrepancy in the results that numerical studies reported. Modeling of these magnetically damped crystal growth experiments requires advanced numerical methods. We used, for comparison, three different approaches to obtain the solution of the problem of thermal convection flows: (1) Spectral method in spectral superelement implementation, (2) Finite element method with regularization for boundary layers, (3) Multiquadric method, a novel method with global radial basis functions, that is proven to have exponential convergence. The results obtained by these three methods are presented for a wide region of Rayleigh and Hartman numbers. Comparison and discussion of accuracy, efficiency, reliability and agreement with experimental results will be presented as well.

  15. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  16. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  17. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  18. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  19. Flow field predictions for a slab delta wing at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, R. J.; Thomas, P. D.; Chou, Y. S.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical results are presented for the structure of the hypersonic flow field of a blunt slab delta wing at moderately high angle of attack. Special attention is devoted to the interaction between the boundary layer and the inviscid entropy layer. The results are compared with experimental data. The three-dimensional inviscid flow is computed numerically by a marching finite difference method. Attention is concentrated on the windward side of the delta wing, where detailed comparisons are made with the data for shock shape and surface pressure distributions. Surface streamlines are generated, and used in the boundary layer analysis. The three-dimensional laminar boundary layer is computed numerically using a specially-developed technique based on small cross-flow in streamline coordinates. In the rear sections of the wing the boundary layer decreases drastically in the spanwise direction, so that it is still submerged in the entropy layer at the centerline, but surpasses it near the leading edge. Predicted heat transfer distributions are compared with experimental data.

  20. Graphene field-effect transistor application for flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łuszczek, Maciej; Świsulski, Dariusz; Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Petryka, Leszek

    Microflow sensors offer great potential for applications in microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip systems. However, thermal-based sensors, which are commonly used in modern flow sensing technology, are mainly made of materials with positive temperature coefficients (PTC) and suffer from a self-heating effect and slow response time. Therefore, the design of novel devices and careful selection of materials are required to improve the overall flow sensor performance. In this work we propose graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) to be used as microflow sensor. Temperature distribution in graphene channel was simulated and the analysis of heat convection was performed to establish the relation between the fluidic flow velocity and the temperature gradient. It was shown that the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) of graphene could enable the self-protection of the device and should minimize sensing error from currentinduced heating. It was also argued that the planar design of the GFET sensor makes it suitable for the real application due to supposed mechanical stability of such a construction.

  1. Investigation of a supersonic cruise fighter model flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.; Bare, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to survey the flow field around a model of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration. Local values of angle of attack, side flow, Mach number, and total pressure ratio were measured with a single multi-holed probe in three survey areas on a model previously used for nacelle/nozzle integration investigations. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2, and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 10 deg. The purpose of the investigation was to provide a base of experimental data with which theoretically determined data can be compared. To that end the data are presented in tables as well as graphically, and a complete description of the model geometry is included as fuselage cross sections and wing span stations. Measured local angles of attack were generally greater than free stream angle of attack above the wing and generally smaller below. There were large spanwise local angle-of-attack and side flow gradients above the wing at the higher free stream angles of attack.

  2. Field measurements of boundary-layer flows in ventilated rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.; MacDonald, R.A.; Nguyen-Thi, L.C.; Kerr, G.

    1995-12-31

    Profiles of air velocity and turbulent kinetic energy near the surfaces of walls, ceilings, floors, and furnishings were measured under field conditions for four space layouts of an office building: a partitioned office room, a single office room, a small conference room, and a computer room. Three types of flows near the surfaces were identified based on the measured data: (1) near-stagnant flow that had mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energies of less than 0.05 {+-} 0.025 m/s (10 {+-} 5 fpm) and 0.001 {+-} 0.001 (m/s){sup 2} (38.75 {+-} 38.75 (fpm){sup 2}), respectively; (2) weak turbulence flow that had mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energies from 0.05 {+-} 0.025 to 0.25 {+-} 0.05 m/s (10 {+-} 5 to 50 {+-} 10 fpm) and from 0.001 {+-} 0.001 to 0.01 {+-} 0.002 (m/s){sup 2} (38.75 {+-} 38.75 to 387.5 {+-} 77.5 [fpm]{sup 2}), respectively. The results are useful for establishing realistic airflow conditions in testing and modeling contaminant emission from building materials and indoor furnishings.

  3. Coating microchannels to improve Field-Flow Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Slater, Gary W.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a selective-steric-mode Field-Flow Fractionation (ssFFF) technique for size separation of particles. Grafting a dense polymer brush onto the accumulation wall of a microchannel adds two novel effects to FFF: the particles must pay an entropic cost to enter the brush and the brush has a hydrodynamic thickness that shifts the no-slip condition. For small particles, the brush acts as a low-velocity region, leading to chromatographic-like retention. We present an analytical retention theory for small but finite-sized particles in a microchannel with a dense Alexander brush coating that possesses a well-defined hydrodynamic thickness. This theory is compared to a numerical solution for the retention ratio given by a flow approximated by the Brinkman equation and particle-brush interaction that is both osmotic and compressional. Large performance improvements are predicted in several regimes. Multi-Particle Collision simulations of the system assess the impact of factors neglected by the theory such as the dynamics of particle impingement on the brush subject to a flow.

  4. Fast wave power flow along SOL field lines in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Leblanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Sabbagh, S.

    2012-10-01

    On NSTX, a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power can occur along open field lines passing in front of the antenna over the width of the scrape-off layer (SOL). Up to 60% of the RF power can be lost and at least partially deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling [1,2]. The flow of HHFW power from the antenna region to the divertor is mostly aligned along the SOL magnetic field [3], which explains the pattern of heat deposition as measured with infrared (IR) cameras. By tracing field lines from the divertor back to the midplane, the IR data can be used to estimate the profile of HHFW power coupled to SOL field lines. We hypothesize that surface waves are being excited in the SOL, and these results should benchmark advanced simulations of the RF power deposition in the SOL (e.g., [4]). Minimizing this loss is critical optimal high-power long-pulse ICRF heating on ITER while guarding against excessive divertor erosion.[4pt] [1] J.C. Hosea et al., AIP Conf Proceedings 1187 (2009) 105. [0pt] [2] G. Taylor et al., Phys. Plasmas 17 (2010) 056114. [0pt] [3] R.J. Perkins et al., to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett. [0pt] [4] D.L. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 (2011) 145001.

  5. Control of Flowing Liquid Films by Electrostatic Fields in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffing, E. M.; Bankoff, S. G.; Schluter, R. A.; Miksis, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of a spacially varying electric field and a flowing thin liquid film is investigated experimentally for the design of a proposed light weight space radiator. Electrodes are utilized to create a negative pressure at the bottom of a fluid film and suppress leaks if a micrometeorite punctures the radiator surface. Experimental pressure profiles under a vertical falling film, which passes under a finite electrode, show that fields of sufficient strength can be used safely in such a device. Leak stopping experiments demonstrate that leaks can be stopped with an electric field in earth gravity. A new type of electrohydrodynamic instability causes waves in the fluid film to develop into 3D cones and touch the electrode at a critical voltage. Methods previously used to calculate critical voltages for non moving films are shown to be inappropriate for this situation. The instability determines a maximum field which may be utilized in design, so the possible dependence of critical voltage on electrode length, height above the film, and fluid Reynolds number is discussed.

  6. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part II. Experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Emma; Håkansson, Andreas; Janiak, John; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    In this study we investigate the effect of programmed cross-flows on the error in the hydrodynamic radii (r(h)) determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). Three different standard polystyrene particles (nominal radii of 30 and 40 and 50 nm) are fractionated with exponentially and linearly decaying cross-flows with different decay rates. Hydrodynamic radii are calculated according to retention theory including steric effects. Rapid decay is expected to give rise to systematic deviations in r(h) determination. The error in r(h) was found to be small when decay rates with half-lives longer than 6 min were used, whereas steeper decays could give rise to errors as high as 16% of the particle size. The error is often explained in terms of secondary relaxation. However, comparisons show that experimental errors are significantly larger than what would be expected due to secondary relaxation, suggesting that other factors also have to be considered in order to fully understand deviations for rapidly decaying cross-flow.

  7. Sudden Flow Changes Not Related to Field Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. K.; Chapman, J. T.; den Hartog, D. J.; Hegna, C. C.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    1997-11-01

    It has heretofore been assumed that, in the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP, the slowing down of core-resonant tearing modes during a sawtooth crash is caused by external field errors(Den Hartog et. al., Phys. Plasmas 2) 2281, June 1995. New evidence suggests other torques are responsible. In plasmas which have been electrostatically biased to produce reversed toroidal rotation, the rotation speed increases at a crash, i.e. the usual trend is preserved. This is contrary to a torque exerted by a field error, which should always decrease the speed of the mode velocities. Examples of torques possibly responsible for the flow changes during the crash are internal electromagnetic torques between the modes and a fluctuation-driven torque acting on the plasma flow. These torques may also provide an explanation for the observed bifurcation^2 between reacceleration and permanent locking of the modes at an individual crash. We have observed that the mode deceleration occurs earlier for sawteeth in which permanent locking occurs than those where there is reacceleration; also, the core mode amplitudes increase earlier in the sawtooth cycle which immediately precedes locking.

  8. Microscopic and continuum descriptions of Janus motor fluid flow fields.

    PubMed

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-11-13

    Active media, whose constituents are able to move autonomously, display novel features that differ from those of equilibrium systems. In addition to naturally occurring active systems such as populations of swimming bacteria, active systems of synthetic self-propelled nanomotors have been developed. These synthetic systems are interesting because of their potential applications in a variety of fields. Janus particles, synthetic motors of spherical geometry with one hemisphere that catalyses the conversion of fuel to product and one non-catalytic hemisphere, can propel themselves in solution by self-diffusiophoresis. In this mechanism, the concentration gradient generated by the asymmetric catalytic activity leads to a force on the motor that induces fluid flows in the surrounding medium. These fluid flows are studied in detail through microscopic simulations of Janus motor motion and continuum theory. It is shown that continuum theory is able to capture many, but not all, features of the dynamics of the Janus motor and the velocity fields of the fluid.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. TAS: A Transonic Aircraft/Store flow field prediction code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed that has the capability to predict the transonic flow field around an aircraft with an arbitrarily located, separated store. The TAS code, the product of a joint General Dynamics/NASA ARC/AFWAL research and development program, will serve as the basis for a comprehensive predictive method for aircraft with arbitrary store loadings. This report described the numerical procedures employed to simulate the flow field around a configuration of this type. The validity of TAS code predictions is established by comparison with existing experimental data. In addition, future areas of development of the code are outlined. A brief description of code utilization is also given in the Appendix. The aircraft/store configuration is simulated using a mesh embedding approach. The computational domain is discretized by three meshes: (1) a planform-oriented wing/body fine mesh, (2) a cylindrical store mesh, and (3) a global Cartesian crude mesh. This embedded mesh scheme enables simulation of stores with fins of arbitrary angular orientation.

  10. Microscopic and continuum descriptions of Janus motor fluid flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Active media, whose constituents are able to move autonomously, display novel features that differ from those of equilibrium systems. In addition to naturally occurring active systems such as populations of swimming bacteria, active systems of synthetic self-propelled nanomotors have been developed. These synthetic systems are interesting because of their potential applications in a variety of fields. Janus particles, synthetic motors of spherical geometry with one hemisphere that catalyses the conversion of fuel to product and one non-catalytic hemisphere, can propel themselves in solution by self-diffusiophoresis. In this mechanism, the concentration gradient generated by the asymmetric catalytic activity leads to a force on the motor that induces fluid flows in the surrounding medium. These fluid flows are studied in detail through microscopic simulations of Janus motor motion and continuum theory. It is shown that continuum theory is able to capture many, but not all, features of the dynamics of the Janus motor and the velocity fields of the fluid. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  11. Modeling local flotation frequency in a turbulent flow field.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou, Margaritis; Karapantsios, Thodoris D; Matis, Kostas A

    2006-09-25

    Despite the significance of turbulent fluid motion for enhancing the flotation rate in several industrial processes, there is no unified approach to the modeling of the flotation rate in a turbulent flow field. Appropriate modeling of the local flotation (bubble-particle attachment) rate is the basic constituent for global modeling and prediction of flotation equipment efficiency. Existing approaches for the local flotation rate are limited to specific set of conditions like high or low turbulence. In addition, the combined effects of buoyant bubble rise and/or particle gravity settling are usually ignored. The situation is even vaguer for the computation of collision and attachment efficiencies which are usually computed using the gravity induced velocities although the dominant mode of flotation is the turbulent one. The scope of this work is clear: the development of a general expression for the flotation rate in a turbulent flow field which will cover in a unified and consistent way all possible sets of the problem parameters. This is achieved by using concepts from statistical approach to homogeneous turbulence and gas kinetic theory.

  12. Unsteady-flow-field predictions for oscillating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    The unsteady flow field around an oscillating cascade of flat plates with zero stagger was studied by using a time marching Euler code. This case had an exact solution based on linear theory and served as a model problem for studying pressure wave propagation in the numerical solution. The importance of using proper unsteady boundary conditions, grid resolution, and time step size was shown for a moderate reduced frequency. Results show that an approximate nonreflecting boundary condition based on linear theory does a good job of minimizing reflections from the inflow and outflow boundaries and allows the placement of the boundaries to be closer to the airfoils than when reflective boundaries are used. Stretching the boundary to dampen the unsteady waves is another way to minimize reflections. Grid clustering near the plates captures the unsteady flow field better than when uniform grids are used as long as the 'Courant Friedrichs Levy' (CFL) number is less than 1 for a sufficient portion of the grid. Finally, a solution based on an optimization of grid, CFL number, and boundary conditions shows good agreement with linear theory.

  13. Electrical modulation of the sympathetic nervous system in order to augment cerebral blood flow: a protocol for an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J Marc C; Staal, Michiel J; Elting, Jan-Willem J

    2011-07-22

    Introduction Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated by several mechanisms. Neurogenic control has been a matter of debate, even though several publications reported the effects of changes in sympathetic tone on CBF. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal-cord stimulation have been shown to influence peripheral and cerebral blood flow through a sympathetic pathway. The authors hypothesise that certain pathological conditions result in a relative increase in the neurogenic regulation of CBF and that this regulation can be modulated electrically. Methods and analysis Patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage will be included. The experimental set-up measures several parameters that are involved in cerebral blood flow regulation in patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage. Measurements are taken at baseline and with stimulation in several frequencies. An ad hoc statistical analysis is used to evaluate different settings of the electrical stimulation. Autoregulation is evaluated with transfer function analysis and autoregulatory index calculations. Ethics and dissemination Ethical registration was granted by Medical Review Ethics Committee Groningen (ID METc 2010.123). All participants provide written informed consent on participation. Upon finishing a pilot study to investigate feasibility and effect, either future prospective (randomised) studies will be designed, or other modalities of electrical stimulation will be explored using the same set-up. Trial Registration Dutch Trial Registry: NTR2358.

  14. Instantaneous velocity field imaging instrument for supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Legner, H. H.; Mcmanus, K. R.; Mulhall, P. A.; Parker, T. E.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The technical tasks conducted to develop and demonstrate a new gas velocity measurement technique for high enthalpy reacting flows is described. The technique is based on Doppler-shifted Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical. The imaging approach permits, in principle, single-shot measurements of the 2-D distribution of a single velocity component in the measurement plane, and is thus a technique of choice for applications in high enthalpy transient flow facilities. In contrast to previous work in this area, the present program demonstrated an approach which modified the diagnostic technique to function under the constraints of practical flow conditions of engineering interest, rather than vice-versa. In order to accomplish the experimental demonstrations, the state-of-the-art in PLIF diagnostic techniques was advanced in several ways. Each of these tasks is described in detail and is intended to serve as a reference in supporting the transition of this new capability to the fielded PLIF instruments now installed at several national test facilities. Among the new results of general interest in LlF-based flow diagnostics, a detailed set of the first measurements of the collisional broadening and shifting behavior of OH (1,0) band transitions in H7-air combustion environments is included. Such measurements are critical in the design of a successful strategy for PLIF velocity imaging; they also relate to accurate concentration and temperature measurements, particularly in compressible flow regimes. Furthermore, the results shed new light on the fundamental relationship between broadening and energy transfer collisions in OH A(sup 2)Sigma(+)v(sup ') = 1. The first single-pulse, spectrally-resolved measurements of the output of common pulsed dye lasers were also produced during the course of this effort. As with the OH broadening measurements, these data are a significant aspect of a successful velocity imaging strategy, and also have

  15. The flow field investigations of no load conditions in axial flow fixed-blade turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhou, X. Z.; Xu, H. X.

    2014-03-01

    During the start-up process, the strong instabilities happened at no load operation in a low head axial flow fixed-blade turbine, with strong pressure pulsation and vibration. The rated speed can not reach until guide vane opening to some extent, and stable operation could not be maintained under the rated speed at some head, which had a negative impact on the grid-connected operation of the unit. In order to find the reason of this phenomenon, the unsteady flow field of the whole flow passage at no load conditions was carried out to analyze the detailed fluid field characteristics including the pressure pulsation and force imposed on the runner under three typical heads. The main hydraulic cause of no load conditions instability was described. It is recommended that the power station should try to reduce the no-load running time and go into the high load operation as soon as possible when connected to grid at the rated head. Following the recommendations, the plant operation practice proved the unstable degree of the unit was reduced greatly during start up and connect to the power grid.

  16. Extensive lava flow fields on Venus: Preliminary investigation of source elevation and regional slope variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee-Roberts, K.; Head, James W., III; Lancaster, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Large-volume lava flow fields have been identified on Venus, the most areally extensive of which are known as fluctus and have been subdivided into six morphologic types. Sheetlike flow fields (Type 1) lack the numerous, closely spaced, discrete lava flow lobes that characterize digitate flow fields. Transitional flow fields (Type 2) are similar to sheetlike flow fields but contain one or more broad flow lobes. Digitate flow fields are divided further into divergent (Types 3-5) and subparallel (Type 6) classes on the basis of variations in the amount of downstream flow divergence. As a result of our previous analysis of the detailed morphology, stratigraphy, and tectonic associations of Mylitta Fluctus, we have formulated a number of questions to apply to all large flow fields on Venus. In particular, we would like to address the following: (1) eruption conditions and style of flow emplacement (effusion rate, eruption duration), (2) the nature of magma storage zones (presence of neutral buoyancy zones, deep or shallow crustal magma chambers), (3) the origin of melt and possible link to mantle plumes, and (4) the importance of large flow fields in plains evolution. To answer these questions we have begun to examine variations in flow field dimension and morphology; the distribution of large flow fields in terms of elevation above the mean planetary radius; links to regional tectonic or volcanic structures (e.g., associations with large shield edifices, coronae, or rift zones); statigraphic relationships between large flow fields, volcanic plains, shields, and coronae; and various models of flow emplacement in order to estimate eruption parameters. In this particular study, we have examined the proximal elevations and topographic slopes of 16 of the most distinctive flow fields that represent each of the 6 morphologic types.

  17. Several examples where turbulence models fail in inlet flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.

    1993-01-01

    Computational uncertainties in turbulence modeling for three dimensional inlet flow fields include flows approaching separation, strength of secondary flow field, three dimensional flow predictions of vortex liftoff, and influence of vortex-boundary layer interactions; computational uncertainties in vortex generator modeling include representation of generator vorticity field and the relationship between generator and vorticity field. The objectives of the inlet flow field studies presented in this document are to advance the understanding, prediction, and control of intake distortion and to study the basic interactions that influence this design problem.

  18. Seismology of Oscillating Flux Tube with Twisted Magnetic Field and Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari, Karam

    2017-08-01

    Transverse oscillations of a thin coronal loop in a zero-beta plasma in the presence of a twisted magnetic field and flow are investigated. The dispersion relation is obtained in the limit of weak twist. The twisted magnetic field modifies the phase difference and asymmetry of standing kink oscillations caused by the flow. Using data from observations the kink speed and flow speed have been determined. The presence of the twisted magnetic field can cause underestimation or overestimation of the flow speed in coronal loops depending on the direction of the flow and twisted magnetic field, but a twisted magnetic field has little effect on the estimated value of the kink speed.

  19. Several examples where turbulence models fail in inlet flow field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.

    Computational uncertainties in turbulence modeling for three dimensional inlet flow fields include flows approaching separation, strength of secondary flow field, three dimensional flow predictions of vortex liftoff, and influence of vortex-boundary layer interactions; computational uncertainties in vortex generator modeling include representation of generator vorticity field and the relationship between generator and vorticity field. The objectives of the inlet flow field studies presented in this document are to advance the understanding, prediction, and control of intake distortion and to study the basic interactions that influence this design problem.

  20. Monitoring the growth of polyoxomolybdate nanoparticles in suspension by flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bailin; Jiang, Huijian; Zhu, Yan; Cammers, Arthur; Selegue, John P

    2005-03-30

    We follow the evolution of polyoxomolybdate nanoparticles in suspensions derived from the keplerate (NH4)42[MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3CO2)30(H2O)72].ca..300H2O.ca..10CH3CO2NH4 ({Mo132}) by flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) to monitor the particle-size distribution in situ, atomic force and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AFM, SEM, and HRTEM) to confirm particle sizes, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) to determine the Mo content of the FlFFF-separated fractions, and UV/visible spectroscopy to confirm the identity of the species in suspension. We observe the formation of 3-75-nm polyoxomolybdate particles in suspension and the dynamic growth of {Mo132} crystals.

  1. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  2. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  3. Measurements of surface-pressure and wake-flow fluctuations in the flow field of a whitcomb supercritical airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roos, F. W.; Riddle, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface pressure and wake flow fluctuations were made as part of a transonic wind tunnel investigation into the nature of a supercritical airfoil flow field. Emphasis was on a range of high subsonic Mach numbers and moderate lift coefficients corresponding to the development of drag divergence and buffeting. Fluctuation data were analyzed statistically for intensity, frequency content, and spatial coherence. Variations in these parameters were correlated with changes in the mean airfoil flow field.

  4. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  5. An optical flow-based method for velocity field of fluid flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głomb, Grzegorz; Świrniak, Grzegorz; Mroczka, Janusz

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a method for estimating flow-velocity vector fields using the Lucas-Kanade algorithm. The optical flow measurements are based on the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique, which is commonly used in fluid mechanics laboratories in both research institutes and industry. Common approaches for an optical characterization of velocity fields base on computation of partial derivatives of the image intensity using finite differences. Nevertheless, the accuracy of velocity field computations is low due to the fact that an exact estimation of spatial derivatives is very difficult in presence of rapid intensity changes in the PIV images, caused by particles having small diameters. The method discussed in this paper solves this problem by interpolating the PIV images using Gaussian radial basis functions. This provides a significant improvement in the accuracy of the velocity estimation but, more importantly, allows for the evaluation of the derivatives in intermediate points between pixels. Numerical analysis proves that the method is able to estimate even a separate vector for each particle with a 5× 5 px2 window, whereas a classical correlation-based method needs at least 4 particle images. With the use of a specialized multi-step hybrid approach to data analysis the method improves the estimation of the particle displacement far above 1 px.

  6. Near field flow structure of isothermal swirling flows and reacting non-premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Olivani, Andrea; Solero, Giulio; Cozzi, Fabio; Coghe, Aldo

    2007-04-15

    Two confined lean non-premixed swirl-stabilized flame typologies were investigated in order to achieve detailed information on the thermal and aerodynamic field in the close vicinity of the burner throat and provide correlation with the exhaust emissions. Previous finding indicated the generation of a partially premixed flame with radial fuel injection and a purely diffusive flame with co-axial injection in a swirling co-flow. In the present work, the experimental study is reported which has been conducted on a straight exit laboratory burner with no quarl cone, fuelled by natural gas and air, and fired vertically upwards with the flame stabilized at the end of two concentric pipes with the annulus supplying swirled air and the central pipe delivering the fuel. Two fuel injection typologies, co-axial and radial (i.e., transverse), leading to different mixing mechanisms, have been characterized through different techniques: particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for a comprehensive analysis of the velocity field, still photography for the detection of flame front and main visible features, and thermocouples for the temperature distribution. Isothermal flow conditions have been included in the experimental investigation to provide a basic picture of the flow field and to comprehend the modifications induced by the combustion process. The results indicated that, although the global mixing process and the main flame structure are governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the two different fuel injection methodologies play an important role on mixture formation and flame stabilization in the primary mixing zone. Particularly, it has been found that, in case of axial injection, the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the backflow generated by the swirl can induce an intermittent fuel penetration in the recirculated hot products and the formation of a central sooting luminous plume, a phenomenon totally

  7. A conservative approach for flow field calculations on multiple grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flow fields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct body-fitted coordinate systems. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach and its applications are investigated in this study. The method follows the conservative approach and provides conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-state Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Some steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed.

  8. Sedimentation field flow fractionation monitoring of bimodal wheat starch amylolysis.

    PubMed

    Salesse, C; Battu, S; Begaud-Grimaud, G; Cledat, D; Cook-Moreau, J; Cardot, P J P

    2006-10-06

    Enzymatic starch granule hydrolysis is one of the most important reactions in many industrial processes. In this study, we investigated the capacity of sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) to monitor the amylolysis of a bimodal starch population: native wheat starch. Results demonstrated a correlation between fractogram changes and enzymatic hydrolysis. Furthermore, SdFFF was used to sort sub-populations which enhanced the study of granule size distribution changes occurring during amylolysis. These results show the interest in coupling SdFFF with particle size measurement methods to study complex starch size/density modifications associated to hydrolysis. These results suggested different applications such as the association of SdFFF with structural investigations to better understand the specific mechanisms of amylolysis or starch granule structure.

  9. Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light scattering detection - an orthogonal sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Galyean, Anne A; Filliben, James J; Holbrook, R David; Vreeland, Wyatt N; Weinberg, Howard S

    2016-11-18

    Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF(4)) has several instrumental factors that may have a direct effect on separation performance. A sensitivity analysis was applied to ascertain the relative importance of AF(4) primary instrument factor settings for the separation of a complex environmental sample. The analysis evaluated the impact of instrumental factors namely, cross flow, ramp time, focus flow, injection volume, and run buffer concentration on the multi-angle light scattering measurement of natural organic matter (NOM) molar mass (MM). A 2((5-1)) orthogonal fractional factorial design was used to minimize analysis time while preserving the accuracy and robustness in the determination of the main effects and interactions between any two instrumental factors. By assuming that separations resulting in smaller MM measurements would be more accurate, the analysis produced a ranked list of effects estimates for factors and interactions of factors based on their relative importance in minimizing the MM. The most important and statistically significant AF(4) instrumental factors were buffer concentration and cross flow. The least important was ramp time. A parallel 2((5-2)) orthogonal fractional factorial design was also employed on five environmental factors for synthetic natural water samples containing silver nanoparticles (NPs), namely: NP concentration, NP size, NOM concentration, specific conductance, and pH. None of the water quality characteristic effects or interactions were found to be significant in minimizing the measured MM; however, the interaction between NP concentration and NP size was an important effect when considering NOM recovery. This work presents a structured approach for the rigorous assessment of AF(4) instrument factors and optimal settings for the separation of complex samples utilizing efficient orthogonal factional factorial design and appropriate graphical analysis.

  10. Constraints on RG flow for four dimensional quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, I.; Osborn, H.

    2014-06-01

    The response of four dimensional quantum field theories to a Weyl rescaling of the metric in the presence of local couplings and which involve a, the coefficient of the Euler density in the energy momentum tensor trace on curved space, is reconsidered. Previous consistency conditions for the anomalous terms, which implicitly define a metric G on the space of couplings and give rise to gradient flow like equations for a, are derived taking into account the role of lower dimension operators. The results for infinitesimal Weyl rescaling are integrated to finite rescalings e2σ to a form which involves running couplings gσ and which interpolates between IR and UV fixed points. The results are also restricted to flat space where they give rise to broken conformal Ward identities. Expressions for the three loop Yukawa β-functions for a general scalar/fermion theory are obtained and the three loop contribution to the metric G for this theory is also calculated. These results are used to check the gradient flow equations to higher order than previously. It is shown that these are only valid when β→B, a modified β-function, and that the equations provide strong constraints on the detailed form of the three loop Yukawa β-function. N=1 supersymmetric Wess-Zumino theories are also considered as a special case. It is shown that the metric for the complex couplings in such theories may be restricted to a hermitian form.

  11. Application of strand meshes to complex aerodynamic flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aaron; Wissink, Andrew M.; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Meakin, Robert L.; Chan, William M.

    2011-07-01

    We explore a new approach for viscous computational fluid dynamics calculations for external aerodynamics around geometrically complex bodies that incorporates nearly automatic mesh generation and efficient flow solution methods. A prismatic-like grid using "strands" is grown a short distance from the body surface to capture the viscous boundary layer, and adaptive Cartesian grids are used throughout the rest of the domain. The approach presents several advantages over established methods: nearly automatic grid generation from triangular or quadrilateral surface tessellations, very low memory overhead, automatic mesh adaptivity for time-dependent problems, and fast and efficient solvers from structured data in both the strand and Cartesian grids.The approach is evaluated for complex geometries and flow fields. We investigate the effects of strand length and strand vector smoothing to understand the effects on computed solutions. Results of three applications using the strand-adaptive Cartesian approach are given, including a NACA wing, isolated V-22 (TRAM) rotor in hover, and the DLR-F6 wing-body transport. The results from these cases show that the strand approach can successfully resolve near-body and off-body features as well as or better than established methods.

  12. Gravitational field-flow fractionation of human hemopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Alviano, Francesco; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Bagnara, Gian Paolo; Ricci, Francesca; Buzzi, Marina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Michelini, Elisa; Roda, Aldo

    2009-12-25

    New cell sorting methodologies, which are simple, fast, non-invasive, and able to isolate homogeneous cell populations, are needed for applications ranging from gene expression analysis to cell-based therapy. In particular, in the forefront of stem cell isolation, progenitor cells have to be separated under mild experimental conditions from complex heterogeneous mixtures prepared from human tissues. Most of the methodologies now employed make use of immunological markers. However, it is widely acknowledged that specific markers for pluripotent stem cells are not as yet available, and cell labelling may interfere with the differentiation process. This work presents for the first time gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), as a tool for tag-less, direct selection of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cell samples obtained by peripheral blood aphaeresis. These cells are responsible to repopulate the hemopoietic system and they are used in transplantation therapies. Blood aphaeresis sample were injected into a GrFFF system and collected fractions were characterized by flow cytometry for CD34 and CD45 expression, and then tested for viability and multi-differentiation potential. The developed GrFFF method allowed obtaining high enrichment levels of viable, multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells in specific fraction and it showed to fulfil major requirements of analytical performance, such as selectivity and reproducibility of the fractionation process and high sample recovery.

  13. Human lymphocyte sorting by gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Buzzi, Marina; Ricci, Francesca; Bontadini, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interest in biological studies on various cell types for many biomedical applications, from research to patient treatments, is constantly increasing. The ability to discriminate (sort) and/or quantify distinct subpopulations of cells has become increasingly important. For instance, not only detection but also the highest depletion of neoplastic cells from normal cells is an important requisite in the autologous transplantation of lymphocytes for blood cancer treatments. In this work, gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) is shown to be effective for sorting a heterogeneous mixture of human, living lymphocytes constituted of neoplastic B cells from a Burkitt lymphoma cell line and healthy T and B lymphocytes from blood samples. GrFFF does not require the use of fluorescent immunotags for sorting cells, and the sorted cells can be collected for their further characterization. Flow cytometry was used to assess the viability of the cells collected, and to evaluate the cell fractionation achieved. A low amount of neoplastic B lymphocytes (less than 2%) was found in a specific fraction obtained by GrFFF. The high depletion from neoplastic cells (more than 98%) was confirmed by a clonogenicity test.

  14. Numerical simulation of supersonic and hypersonic inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcrae, D. Scott; Kontinos, Dean A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed by North Carolina State University and NASA Ames Research Center under Cooperative Agreement NCA2-719, 'Numerical Simulation of Supersonic and Hypersonic Inlet Flow Fields". Four distinct rotated upwind schemes were developed and investigated to determine accuracy and practicality. The scheme found to have the best combination of attributes, including reduction to grid alignment with no rotation, was the cell centered non-orthogonal (CCNO) scheme. In 2D, the CCNO scheme improved rotation when flux interpolation was extended to second order. In 3D, improvements were less dramatic in all cases, with second order flux interpolation showing the least improvement over grid aligned upwinding. The reduction in improvement is attributed to uncertainty in determining optimum rotation angle and difficulty in performing accurate and efficient interpolation of the angle in 3D. The CCNO rotational technique will prove very useful for increasing accuracy when second order interpolation is not appropriate and will materially improve inlet flow solutions.

  15. A Field Study of Particle Orientations in Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. R.; Twardowski, M.; Sullivan, J. M.; McFarland, M.; Stockley, N.; Nardelli, S.

    2016-02-01

    Oceanic waters are populated by a myriad of particles of various shapes and sizes which play a critical role in the propagation and scattering of light. Ocean optics theory and models (e.g., radiative transfer) inherently assume that the particles are randomly oriented in the water column. Increasingly, this critical assumption has been challenged by a handful of recent theoretical and experimental studies. Thus, it is imperative to thoroughly assess the prevalence of any non-random particle orientation by characterizing the biophysical interactions through in situ measurements in natural, undisturbed oceanic flows. To achieve this objective, a suite of optical and acoustic instruments were concurrently deployed during field measurements recently conducted at East Sound, WA. The platform consisted of the following instrumentation: (i) a submersible holographic microscopy system (HOLOCAM) capable of acquiring video images at 15 Hz, while maintaining adequate resolution to characterize particles ranging in size over three orders of magnitude, i.e. 1 micron to 5 mm; (ii) an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and a high resolution Doppler profiler to provide simultaneous measurements of the turbulence and shear in the water column, and (iii) an optical package consisting of several instruments at different orientations measuring polarized and unpolarized volume scattering functions and path attenuation. Over a span of 10 days, nearly 40 runs, each spanning 10-15 minutes were obtained by slowly profiling the platform with a free fall velocity of 4-10 cm/s through the water column under varying environmental conditions. In this presentation, we explore whether the local small scale flow structure plays an important role in preferentially orienting the particle field.

  16. Characterization of Three-Stream Jet Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were conducted on single-, dual- and three-stream jets using two-component and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow-field measurements complimented previous acoustic measurements. The exhaust system consisted of externally-plugged, externally-mixed, convergent nozzles. The study used bypass-to-core area ratios equal to 1.0 and 2.5 and tertiary-to-core area ratios equal to 0.6 and 1.0. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated high-subsonic conditions. Centerline velocity decay rates for the single-, dual- and three-stream axisymmetric jets compared well when axial distance was normalized by an equivalent diameter based on the nozzle system total exit area. The tertiary stream had a greater impact on the mean axial velocity for the small bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles than for large bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles. Normalized turbulence intensities were similar for the single-, dual-, and three-stream unheated jets due to the small difference (10 percent) in the core and bypass velocities for the dual-stream jets and the low tertiary velocity (50 percent of the core stream) for the three-stream jets. For heated jet conditions where the bypass velocity was 65 percent of the core velocity, additional regions of high turbulence intensity occurred near the plug tip which were not present for the unheated jets. Offsetting the tertiary stream moved the peak turbulence intensity levels upstream relative to those for all axisymmetric jets investigated.

  17. Characterization of Three-Stream Jet Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were conducted on single-, dual- and three-stream jets using two-component and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow-field measurements complimented previous acoustic measurements. The exhaust system consisted of externally-plugged, externally-mixed, convergent nozzles. The study used bypass-to-core area ratios equal to 1.0 and 2.5 and tertiary-to-core area ratios equal to 0.6 and 1.0. Axisymmetric and offset tertiary nozzles were investigated for heated and unheated high-subsonic conditions. Centerline velocity decay rates for the single-, dual- and three-stream axisymmetric jets compared well when axial distance was normalized by an equivalent diameter based on the nozzle system total exit area. The tertiary stream had a greater impact on the mean axial velocity for the small bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles than for large bypass-to-core area ratio nozzles. Normalized turbulence intensities were similar for the single-, dual-, and three-stream unheated jets due to the small difference (10%) in the core and bypass velocities for the dual-stream jets and the low tertiary velocity (50% of the core stream) for the three-stream jets. For heated jet conditions where the bypass velocity was 65% of the core velocity, additional regions of high turbulence intensity occurred near the plug tip which were not present for the unheated jets. Offsetting the tertiary stream moved the peak turbulence intensity levels upstream relative to those for all axisymmetric jets investigated.

  18. Biomat flow: fluorescent dye field experiments, pore-scale modeling of flow and transport properties, and field-scale flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.; Sidle, R. C.; Mallants, D.; Vasilyev, R.; Karsanina, M.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Korost, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies highlight the important role that the upper litter layer in forest soils (biomat) plays in hillslope and catchment runoff generation. This biomat layer is a very loose material with high porosity and organic content. Direct sampling is usually problematic due to limited layer thickness. Conventional laboratory measurements can mobilize solids or even cause structure failure of the sample thus making measurements unreliable. It is also difficult to assess local variation in soil properties and transition zones using these methods; thus, they may not be applicable to biomat studies. However, if the physics of flow through this layer needs to be quantified and incorporated into a model, a detailed study of hydraulic properties is necessary. Herein we show the significance of biomat flow by staining experiments in the field, study its structure and transition to mineral soil layer using X-ray micro-tomography, assess hydraulic properties and structure differences using a pore-scale modeling approach, and, finally, use conventional variably-saturated flow modeling based on Richards equation to simulate flow in the hillslope. Using staining tracers we show that biomat flow in forested hillslopes can extend long distances (lateral displacement was about 1.2 times larger than for subsurface lateral flow) before infiltration occurs into deeper layers. The three-dimensional structure of an undisturbed sample (4 x 3 x 2.5 cm) of both biomat and deeper consolidated soil was obtained using an X-ray micro-tomography device with a resolution of 15 um. Local hydraulic properties (e.g., permeability and water retention curve) for numerous layers (e.g., transition zones, biomat, mineral soil) were calculated using Stokes flow FDM solution and pore-network modeling. Anisotropy, structure differences, and property fluctuations of different layers were quantified using local porosity analysis and correlation functions. Current results support the hypothesis that small

  19. Biomat flow: fluorescent dye field experiments, pore-scale modeling of flow and transport properties, and field-scale flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.; Sidle, R. C.; Mallants, D.; Vasilyev, R.; Karsanina, M.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Korost, D. V.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies highlight the important role that the upper litter layer in forest soils (biomat) plays in hillslope and catchment runoff generation. This biomat layer is a very loose material with high porosity and organic content. Direct sampling is usually problematic due to limited layer thickness. Conventional laboratory measurements can mobilize solids or even cause structure failure of the sample thus making measurements unreliable. It is also difficult to assess local variation in soil properties and transition zones using these methods; thus, they may not be applicable to biomat studies. However, if the physics of flow through this layer needs to be quantified and incorporated into a model, a detailed study of hydraulic properties is necessary. Herein we show the significance of biomat flow by staining experiments in the field, study its structure and transition to mineral soil layer using X-ray micro-tomography, assess hydraulic properties and structure differences using a pore-scale modeling approach, and, finally, use conventional variably-saturated flow modeling based on Richards equation to simulate flow in the hillslope. Using staining tracers we show that biomat flow in forested hillslopes can extend long distances (lateral displacement was about 1.2 times larger than for subsurface lateral flow) before infiltration occurs into deeper layers. The three-dimensional structure of an undisturbed sample (4 x 3 x 2.5 cm) of both biomat and deeper consolidated soil was obtained using an X-ray micro-tomography device with a resolution of 15 um. Local hydraulic properties (e.g., permeability and water retention curve) for numerous layers (e.g., transition zones, biomat, mineral soil) were calculated using Stokes flow FDM solution and pore-network modeling. Anisotropy, structure differences, and property fluctuations of different layers were quantified using local porosity analysis and correlation functions. Current results support the hypothesis that small

  20. A new flow field and its two-dimension model for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaochun; Ouyang, Wenze; Liu, Changpeng; Lu, Tianhong; Xing, Wei; An, Lijia

    A new flow field was designed to search flow fields fitting polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) better due its extensible. There are many independent inlets and outlets in the new flow field. The new flow field we named NINO can extend to be more general when pressures at the inlet and outlet vary and some usual flow fields will be obtained. A new mathematical model whose view angle is obverse is used to describe the flow field.

  1. Magnetic field flow phenomena in a falling particle receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Kenneth M.; Ho, Clifford; Anderson, Ryan; Christian, Joshua; Babiniec, Sean; Ortega, Jesus

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) falling particle receivers are being pursued as a desired means for utilizing low-cost, high-absorptance particulate materials that can withstand high concentration ratios (˜1000 suns), operating temperatures above 700 °C, and inherent storage capabilities which can be used to reduce to levelized cost of electricity (LCOE)1. Although previous falling particle receiver designs have proven outlet temperatures above 800 °C, and thermal efficiencies between 80-90%, performance challenges still exist to operate at higher concentration ratios above 1000 suns and greater solar absorptance levels. To increase absorptance, these receivers will require enhanced particle residence time within a concentrated beam of sunlight. Direct absorption solid particle receivers that can enhance this residence time will have the potential to achieve heat-transfer media temperatures2 over 1000 °C. However, depending on particle size and external forces (e.g., external wind and flow due to convective heat losses), optimized particle flow can be severely affected, which can reduce receiver efficiency. To reduce particle flow destabilization and increase particle residence time on the receiver an imposed magnetic field is proposed based on a collimated design for two different methodologies. These include systems with ferromagnetic and charged particle materials. The approaches will be analytically evaluated based on magnetic field strength, geometry, and particle parameters, such as magnetic moment. A model is developed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS FLUENT to analyze these approaches for a ˜2 MWth falling particle receiver at Sandia National Laboratories5,6. Here, assessment will be made with respect to ferromagnetic particles such as iron-oxides, as well as charged particles. These materials will be parametrically assessed (e.g., type, size, dipole moment and geometry) over a range of magnetic permeability, μ values. Modeling

  2. Kinematics and flow fields in 3D around swimming lamprey using light field PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2016-11-01

    The fully time-resolved 3D kinematics and flow field velocities around freely swimming sea lamprey are derived using 3D light field imaging PIV. Lighthill's Elongated Body Theory (EBT) predicts that swimmers with anguilliform kinematics likened to lamprey, and similarly eels, will exhibit relatively poor propulsive efficiency. However, previous experimental studies of eel locomotion utilizing 2D PIV suggest disagreement with EBT estimates of wake properties; although, the thrust force generated by such swimmers has yet to be fully resolved using 3D measurements. A light field imaging array of multiple high-speed cameras is used to perform 3D synthetic aperture PIV around ammocoete sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Fluid mechanics equations are used to determine thrust force generation, leading experimental studies closer to underpinning the physical mechanisms that enable aquatic locomotion of long, slender undulatory swimmers.

  3. High rate CNP removal from a milk processing wastewater in a single ultrasound augmented up-flow anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, S; Zinatizadeh, A A L; Asadi, A

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous removal of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (CNP) in a single bioreactor is of high significance in terms of reactor volume and energy consumption. Therefore, in this study, an innovative up-flow anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic bioreactor (UAAASB) augmented by ultrasound was developed as a high rate single bioreactor for the simultaneous removal of nutrients from a milk processing wastewater. The ultrasonic irradiation used in this work was in the range of high frequency (1.7 MHz). The central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied to design the experimental conditions, model obtained data, and optimize the process. The effects of three independent variables, i.e. hydraulic retention time (HRT), aeration mode and mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration on 10 process responses were investigated. The results prove that the ultrasonic irradiation has a positive effect on the sludge settling velocity and effluent turbidity. The optimum conditions were determined as 12-15 h, 4000-5000 mg/l and 1.5-2 for HRT, MLSS concentration and aeration mode, respectively, based on removal efficiency of sCOD ⩾ 90%, TN and TP ⩾ 50%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Flow field description of the Space Shuttle Vernier reaction control system exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerimele, Mary P.; Alred, John W.

    1987-01-01

    The flow field for the Vernier Reaction Control System (VRCS) jets of the Space Shuttle Orbiter has been calculated from the nozzle throat to the far-field region. The calculations involved the use of recently improved rocket engine nozzle/plume codes. The flow field is discussed, and a brief overview of the calculation techniques is presented. In addition, a proposed on-orbit plume measurement experiment, designed to improve future estimations of the Vernier flow field, is addressed.

  5. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. Effect of channel angle.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Ri; Kang, Da Young; Chmelik, Josef; Kang, Namgoo; Kim, Jin Seog; Lee, Seungho

    2008-10-31

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) has been shown to be useful for separation and characterization of various types of micrometer-sized particles. It has been recognized however that GrFFF is less versatile than other members of FFF because the external field (Earth's gravity) in GrFFF is relatively weak and is not tunable (constant), which makes the force acting on the particles constant. A few approaches have been suggested to control the force acting on particles in GrFFF. They include (1) changing the angle between the Earth's gravitational field and the longitudinal axis of the channel, and (2) the use of carrier liquid having different densities. In the hyperlayer mode of GrFFF, the hydrodynamic lift force (HLF) also act on particles. The existence of HLF allows other means of changing the force acting on the particles in GrFFF. They include (1) the flow rate programming, or (2) the use of channels having non-constant cross-section. In this study, with polystyrene latex beads used as model particles, the channel angle was varied to study its effect on elution parameters (such as selectivity, band broadening and resolution) in the steric or in the hyperlayer mode of GrFFF. In addition, the effects of the channel thickness and the flow rate on the elution parameters were also investigated. It was found that, in the steric mode, the resolution decreases as the flow rate increases due to increased zone broadening despite of the increase in the selectivity. At a constant volumetric flow rate, both the zone broadening and the selectivity increase as the channel thickness increases, resulting in the net increase in the resolution. It was also found that the retention time decreases as the channel angle increases in both up- and down-flow positions. The zone broadening tends to increase almost linearly with the channel angle, while no particular trends were found in selectivity. As a result, the resolution decreases as the channel angle increases.

  6. Flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering for ultrahigh molecular weight sodium hyaluronate characterization.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myeong Hee

    2010-11-01

    This review describes the utility of flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multiangle light scattering and differential refractive index (FlFFF-MALS-DRI) detection methods for the separation of ultrahigh molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) materials and for the characterization of molecular weight distribution as well as structural determination. The sodium salt of hyaluronic acid (HA), NaHA, is a water-soluble polysaccharide with a broad range of molecular weights (10(5) -10(8) ) found in various naturally occurring fluids and tissues. Basic principles of FlFFF-MALS using field programming for the separation of the degraded products of NaHA prepared by treating raw materials with depolymerization or degradation processes such as membrane filtration, enzymatic degradation, ultrasonic degradation, alkaline reaction, irradiation by γ-rays, and thermal treatment for the development of pharmaceutical applications are introduced. Changes in molecular weight distribution and conformation of NaHA materials due to external stimuli are also discussed. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Flow Charts: Visualization of Vector Fields on Arbitrary Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Shi; Tricoche, Xavier; Weiskopf, Daniel; Hansen, Charles

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel flow visualization method called Flow Charts, which uses a texture atlas approach for the visualization of flows defined over curved surfaces. In this scheme, the surface and its associated flow are segmented into overlapping patches, which are then parameterized and packed in the texture domain. This scheme allows accurate particle advection across multiple charts in the texture domain, providing a flexible framework that supports various flow visualization techniques. The use of surface parameterization enables flow visualization techniques requiring the global view of the surface over long time spans, such as Unsteady Flow LIC (UFLIC), particle-based Unsteady Flow Advection Convolution (UFAC), or dye advection. It also prevents visual artifacts normally associated with view-dependent methods. Represented as textures, Flow Charts can be naturally integrated into hardware accelerated flow visualization techniques for interactive performance. PMID:18599918

  8. Magnetic Field Generation and Zonal Flows in the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, L.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2013-12-01

    The surface dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn is dominated by a banded system of fierce zonal winds. The depth of these winds remains unclear but they are thought to be confined to the very outer envelopes where hydrogen remains molecular and the electrical conductivity is negligible. The dynamo responsible for the dipole dominated magnetic fields of both Gas Giants, on the other hand, likely operates in the deeper interior where hydrogen assumes a metallic state. We present numerical simulations that attempt to model both the zonal winds and the interior dynamo action in an integrated approach. Using the anelastic version of the MHD code MagIC, we explore the effects of density stratification and radial electrical conductivity variations. The electrical conductivity is assumed to remain constant in the thicker inner metallic region and decays exponentially towards the outer boundary throughout the molecular envelope. Our results show that the combination of stronger density stratification (Δρ≈55) and a weaker conducting outer layer is essential for reconciling dipole dominated dynamo action and a fierce equatorial zonal jet. Previous simulations with homogeneous electrical conductivity show that both are mutually exclusive, with solutions either having strong zonal winds and multipolar magnetic fields or weak zonal winds and dipole dominated magnetic fields. The particular setup explored here allows the equatorial jet to remain confined to the weaker conducting region where is does not interfere with the deeper seated dynamo action. The equatorial jet can afford to remain geostrophic and reaches throughout the whole shell. This is not an option for the additional mid to higher latitude jets, however. In dipole dominated dynamo solutions, appropriate for the Gas Giants, zonal flows remain very faint in the deeper dynamo region but increase in amplitude in the weakly conducting outer layer in some of our simulations. This suggests that the mid to high latitude jets

  9. Introducing dielectrophoresis as a new force field for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y; Wang, X B; Becker, F F; Gascoyne, P R

    1997-01-01

    We present the principle of cell characterization and separation by dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation and show preliminary experimental results. The operational device takes the form of a thin chamber in which the bottom wall supports an array of microelectrodes. By applying appropriate AC voltage signals to these electrodes, dielectrophoretic forces are generated to levitate cells suspended in the chamber and to affect their equilibrium heights. A laminar flow profile is established in the chamber so that fluid flows faster with increasing distance from the chamber walls. A cell carried in the flow stream will attain an equilibrium height, and a corresponding velocity, based on the balance of dielectrophoretic, gravitational, and hydrodynamic lift forces it experiences. We describe a theoretical model for this system and show that the cell velocity is a function of the mean fluid velocity, the voltage and frequency of the signals applied to the electrodes, and, most significantly, the cell dielectric properties. The validity of the model is demonstrated with human leukemia (HL-60) cells subjected to a parallel electrode array, and application of the device to separating HL-60 cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is shown. PMID:9251828

  10. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP.

  11. Program to stimulate graduate training in the field of aeroacoustics. [cross correlation of flow fields of a jet-blown flap with far fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment is reported to cross correlate the output of hot film probes located at various points in the flow field of a jet-blown flap with the output of microphones in the acoustic far field. Fluid dynamic measurements of the flow fields of the test configuration are reported.

  12. Flow Augmentation and Reservoir Drawdown : Strategies for Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Stocks of Salmon in the Snake River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 2 of 11.

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1993-06-01

    The premise for flow augmentation is based on the argument that increasing water velocity increases smolt migration speed, which in turn improves smolt survival through reservoirs and at ocean entry. The purpose of this document is to examine key technical issues regarding the benefits of flow augmentation as a strategy for improving survival of downstream migrants. Reservoir drawdown, an altemative strategy for increasing water velocity through the mainstream Snake and Columbia rivers will also be examined. Data sets and analyses that pertain to Snake River stocks will be emphasized, particularly those stocks currently listed as threatened or endangered. This document focuses on treating two smolt responses that can be useful in reflecting the effects of flow augmentation, or increased water velocity; travel time or migration speed, and survival. Although there has been recent interest in using migrational timing as a measure of flow effects that response reflects principally the temporal initiation of the migration event and does not provide a performance measure once fish are in transit between two locations.

  13. Field_flow Fractionation For The Characterisation of Natural Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Kammer, F.; Saal, C.; Baborowski, M.

    The investigation of colloid contribution to transport processes requires a detailed analysis of the actually and potentially mobile colloidal phases present in a certain system of interest. In general all important parameters can not be determined with a single method. Field Flow Fractionation (FFF) is considered as a powerful technique regarding the analysis of colloid molecular weight or size-distributions. FFF can be labelled as a hydrodynamic chromatography that provides a fractionation of an usu- ally aqueous colloid dispersion due to the selective retention of particles/colloids in a ribbon shaped channel. The retention ratios of particles are depending on particle volume, density or diffusion coefficient, depending on the type of channel and method used. In contrast to methods like size exclusion chromatography, the absence of a sta- tionary phase enables FFF to cover a particle size range of theoretically five orders of magnitude (0.001 to 100 µm) and provides the analysis even of fragile aggregates. FFF equipped with modern detection systems like on-line (or quasi-on-line) static or dynamic light scattering detectors provide an internal verification of the fractionation itself and methods to retrieve the particles mean shape factor from the combination of different fractionation/detection methods are in development. Moreover, regarding the light scattering techniques, FFF provides close to monodisperse sample slices, enabling the scattering techniques to work at optimal conditions even with broad dis- tributed samples. ICP-detectors provide main and trace element distributions over par- ticle size. The presentation will give a critical overview of the application of advanced FFF methods on natural colloidal samples, covering Flow-FFF, Sedimentation-FFF and hyphenated methods using static and dynamic light scattering, UV-VIS and fluo- rescence detection as well as ICP-MS couplings.

  14. Experiments and modeling of dilution jet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results of the mixing of single, double, and opposed rows of jets with an isothermal or variable-temperature main stream in a straight duct are presented. This study was performed to investigate flow and geometric variations typical of the complex, three-dimensional flow field in the dilution zone of gas-turbine-engine combustion chambers. The principal results, shown experimentally and analytically, were the following: (1) variations in orifice size and spacing can have a significant effect on the temperature profiles; (2) similar distributions can be obtained, independent of orifice diameter, if momentum-flux ratio and orifice spacing are coupled; (3) a first-order approximation of the mixing of jets with a variable-temperature main stream can be obtained by superimposing the main-stream and jets-in-an-isothermal-crossflow profiles; (4) the penetration of jets issuing mixing is slower and is asymmetric with respect to the jet centerplanes, which shift laterally with increasing downstream distance; (5) double rows of jets give temperature distributions similar to those from a single row of equally spaced, equal-area circular holes; (6) for opposed rows of jets, with the orifice centerlines in line, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is one-half the optimum value for single-side injection at the same momentum-flux ratiol and (7) for opposed rows of jets, with the orifice centerlines staggered, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is twice the optimum value for single-side injection at the same momentum-flux ratio.

  15. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  16. Augmentation of antibiotic activity by low-frequency electric and electromagnetic fields examining Staphylococcus aureus in broth media.

    PubMed

    Matl, F D; Obermeier, A; Zlotnyk, J; Friess, W; Stemberger, A; Burgkart, R

    2011-07-01

    Systemic treatment of biomaterial-associated bacterial infections with high doses of antibiotics is an established therapeutic concept. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the influence of magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric fields on gentamicin-based, antibiotic therapy. It has been previously reported that these fields are successful in the treatment of bone healing and reducing osteitis in infected tibia-pseudarthroses. Four separate experimental setups were used to expose bacterial cultures of Staphylococcus aureus both in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and on Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA), in the presence of gentamicin, to (1) a low-frequency magnetic field (MF) 20 Hz, 5 mT; (2) a low-frequency MF combined with an additional alternating electric field (MF + EF) 20 Hz, 5 mT, 470 mV/cm; (3) a sinusoidal alternating electric field (EF AC) 20 Hz, 470 mV/cm; and (4) a direct current electric field (EF DC) 588 mV/cm. No significant difference between samples and controls was detected on MHA. However, in MHB each of the four fields applied showed a significant growth reduction of planktonically grown Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of gentamicin between 32% and 91% within 24 h of the experiment. The best results were obtained by a direct current EF, decreasing colony-forming units (CFU)/ml more than 91%. The application of electromagnetic fields in the area of implant and bone infections could offer new perspectives in antibiotic treatment and antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  17. Investigation of temperature fields in supersonic flow behind a backward-facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedarev, I. A.; Goldfeld, M. A.; Zakharova, Yu. V.; Fedorova, N. N.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical modelling and experimental investigations of high-enthalpy turbulent flows in the neighborhood of 90-degree backward-facing steps at the Mach numbers M∞ = 2-4 are presented. The experiments were conducted in the hot-shot wind tunnel IT-302M of ITAM SB RAS. The computations were carried out on the basis of the full Favres-averaged Navier — Stokes equations augmented by the Wilcox turbulence model. The temperature factor influence on the flow structure in the separated zone and temperature distributions was investigated numerically for different Mach numbers. The wall temperature is shown to affect significantly the quantity and sizes of recirculation vortices as well as the temperature distribution in the zone of flow separation and reattachment. The computational results are compared with experimental data on the pressure distribution on the model surface and the wave structure of the flow.

  18. Study on performance and flow field of an undershot cross-flow water turbine comprising different number of blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Hatano, Kentaro; Inagaki, Terumi

    2017-10-01

    Recently, small hydroelectric generators have gained attention as a further development in water turbine technology for ultra low head drops in open channels. The authors have evaluated the application of cross-flow water turbines in open channels as an undershot type after removing the casings and guide vanes to substantially simplify these water turbines. However, because undershot cross-flow water turbines are designed on the basis of cross-flow water turbine runners used in typical pipelines, it remains unclear whether the number of blades has an effect on the performance or flow fields. Thus, in this research, experiments and numerical analyses are employed to study the performance and flow fields of undershot cross-flow water turbines with varying number of blades. The findings show that the turbine output and torque are lower, the fluctuation is significantly higher, and the turbine efficiency is higher for runners with 8 blades as opposed to those with 24 blades.

  19. Large-volume lava flow fields on Venus: Dimensions and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, M. G.; Guest, J. E.; Roberts, K. M.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Of all the volcanic features identified in Magellan images, by far the most extensive and really important are lava flow fields. Neglecting the widespread lava plains themselves, practically every C1-MIDR produced so far contains several or many discrete lava flow fields. These range in size from a few hundred square kilometers in area (like those fields associated with small volcanic edifices for example), through all sizes up to several hundred thousand square kilometers in extent (such as many rift related fields). Most of these are related to small, intermediate, or large-scale volcanic edifices, coronae, arachnoids, calderas, fields of small shields, and rift zones. An initial survey of 40 well-defined flow fields with areas greater than 50,000 sq km (an arbitrary bound) has been undertaken. Following Columbia River Basalt terminology, these have been termed great flow fields. This represents a working set of flow fields, chosen to cover a variety of morphologies, sources, locations, and characteristics. The initial survey is intended to highlight representative flow fields, and does not represent a statistical set. For each flow field, the location, total area, flow length, flow widths, estimated flow thicknesses, estimated volumes, topographic slope, altitude, backscatter, emissivity, morphology, and source has been noted. The flow fields range from about 50,000 sq km to over 2,500,000 sq km in area, with most being several hundred square kilometers in extent. Flow lengths measure between 140 and 2840 km, with the majority of flows being several hundred kilometers long. A few basic morphological types have been identified.

  20. MAST solution of advection problems in irrotational flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2007-03-01

    A new numerical-analytical Eulerian procedure is proposed for the solution of convection-dominated problems in the case of existing scalar potential of the flow field. The methodology is based on the conservation inside each computational elements of the 0th and 1st order effective spatial moments of the advected variable. This leads to a set of small ODE systems solved sequentially, one element after the other over all the computational domain, according to a MArching in Space and Time technique. The proposed procedure shows the following advantages: (1) it guarantees the local and global mass balance; (2) it is unconditionally stable with respect to the Courant number, (3) the solution in each cell needs information only from the upstream cells and does not require wider and wider stencils as in most of the recently proposed higher-order methods; (4) it provides a monotone solution. Several 1D and 2D numerical test have been performed and results have been compared with analytical solutions, as well as with results provided by other recent numerical methods.

  1. Flow field topology of submerged jets with fractal generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafiero, Gioacchino; Discetti, Stefano; Astarita, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Fractal grids (FGs) have been recently an object of numerous investigations due to the interesting capability of generating turbulence at multiple scales, thus paving the way to tune mixing and scalar transport. The flow field topology of a turbulent air jet equipped with a square FG is investigated by means of planar and volumetric particle image velocimetry. The comparison with the well-known features of a round jet without turbulence generators is also presented. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle exit section diameter for all the experiments is set to about 15 000. It is demonstrated that the presence of the grid enhances the entrainment rate and, as a consequence, the scalar transfer of the jet. Moreover, due to the effect of the jet external shear layer on the wake shed by the grid bars, the turbulence production region past the grid is significantly shortened with respect to the documented behavior of fractal grids in free-shear conditions. The organization of the large coherent structures in the FG case is also analyzed and discussed. Differently from the well-known generation of toroidal vortices due to the growth of azimuthal disturbances within the jet shear layer, the fractal grid introduces cross-wise disturbs which produce streamwise vortices; these structures, although characterized by a lower energy content, have a deeper streamwise penetration than the ring vortices, thus enhancing the entrainment process.

  2. Autophagic subpopulation sorting by sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Naves, Thomas; Battu, Serge; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Cardot, Philippe J P; Ratinaud, Marie-Hélène; Verdier, Mireille

    2012-10-16

    The development of hypoxic areas often takes place in solid tumors and leads cells to undergo adaptive signalization like autophagy. This process is responsible for misfolded or aggregated proteins and nonfunctional organelle recycling, allowing cells to maintain their energetic status. However, it could constitute a double-edged pathway leading to both survival and cell death. So, in response to stress such as hypoxia, autophagic and apoptotic cells are often mixed. To specifically study and characterize autophagic cells and the process, we needed to develop a method able to (1) isolate autophagic subpopulation and (2) respect apoptotic and autophagic status. Sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was first used to monitor physical parameter changes due to the hypoxia mimetic CoCl(2) in the p53 mutated SKNBE2(c) human neuroblastoma cell line. Second, we showed that "hyperlayer" elution is able to prepare autophagic enriched populations, fraction (F3), overexpressing autophagic markers (i.e., LC3-II accumulation and punctiform organization of autophagosomes as well as cathepsin B overactivity). Conversely, the first eluted fraction exhibited apoptotic markers (caspase-3 activity and Bax increased expression). For the first time, SdFFF was employed as an analytical tool in order to discriminate apoptotic and autophagic cells, thus providing an enriched autophagic fraction consecutively to a hypoxic stress.

  3. Near-Field Heat Flow Between Two Quantum Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the exact steady-state heat flow P between two Ohmically damped quantum oscillators 1 and 2, with natural frequency ω 0, interacting through their near-field dipole-dipole potential V. To keep them at nominally constant temperatures T1, T2 respectively, they have to be coupled to thermostats functioning in a way one must specify explicitly unless one assumes local thermal equilibrium, which would, inadequately as a rule, restrict the calculation to leading order in V. Here the thermostats are modelled as stretched strings, one end attached to the oscillator, and the other to an infinitely distant device ensuring that the string carries thermal noise appropriate to T1 or T2 in addition to whatever motion is enforced by the oscillator. Aiming at insight rather than numerics, we focus mainly on simple approximations by powers of T1 and T2 for weak damping in the essentially quantum low-temperature regime where kBT_{1,2}≪ ω 0. From P it is easy to find the heat flux between two insulating Drude-modelled half-spaces.

  4. Experiments of Flow Field Influenced by Vegetation Distribution on Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Fu; Wang, Shun-Chang; Chen, Su-Chin

    2015-04-01

    The vegetation on floodplain can block river flow, raise flood level, and scour riverbed downstream the vegetation region. However, it can also protect the dike, reduce flood velocity, and increase the stability of channel. This experiment analyzed the relationship between vegetation distribution and flow field. We designed three vegetation arrangement pattern of unilateral vegetation, unilateral interval vegetation and no vegetation, respectively. The unilateral vegetation was defined as a 4.9 m length and 0.5 m width with vegetative area in one side of the experiment flume. The unilateral interval vegetation was defined as the same dimension of vegetative area but inserted 2 gaps with 1 m interval, and the vegetative area was separated into 3 blocks. The model of a single plant was assembled with stem and frond. The stem was a woody cylinder with 10 cm height and 2.2 cm in diameter. The other part was plastic frond with 10 cm in height. The flume was 20 m length, 1 m width and 0.7 m height with 2 kinds of bed slopes in 0.001 and 0.002, and 3 different discharges in 0.2 m3/s, 0.145 m3/s and 0.0855 m3/s. The velocity was measured by 2-D electromagnetic velocimeter (ACM2-R2). In addition, water depth was measured by Vernier calipers. The velocity distribution showed that the current were divided into two parts. In the part of inside vegetation area, water level uplifted when flow entering the vegetation area, and it declined until the current leaving vegetation area. Compared with the current in the other half part of flume, the magnitudes of uplift were about 50% in both case of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation. Downstream the vegetation area edge, the water level dropped immediately and violently. The water depth was shallower than that in the other half non-vegetation part, and the decline magnitude were 48% and 39% in cases of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation, respectively. To explain this phenomenon, we measured

  5. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation.

  6. Apparatus and method for using radar to evaluate wind flow fields for wind energy applications

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2017-02-21

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind flow field using one or more radars. Data is collected from the one or more radars, and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind flow field. The one or more radars are positioned to have a portion of the wind flow field within a scanning sector of the one or more radars.

  7. Sound propagation through a real jet flow field with scattering due to interaction with turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Liu, C. H.; Ting, L.; Gunzburger, M.

    1974-01-01

    The sound propagation through a nonuniform turbulent jet flow field is studied by means of a system of linearized equations governing the acoustic variables. These equations depend on the fluctuating flow-field variables which are prescribed by experimental results. It is shown that the redistribution of the acoustic energy in the far field depends on space-time correlation of the turbulent velocities and on the mean flow variables and their gradients.

  8. Flow Field Analysis of Micromixer Powered by Ciliary Motion of Vorticella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaka, Yo; Nagai, Moeto; Matsumoto, Nobuyoshi; Kawashima, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki

    We demonstrate the observation of a flow field generated by ciliary motion of Vorticella in a microfluidic chamber. We applied the property that Vorticella vibrates its cilia and create a flow field to a micromixer. The stability and mixing performance of Vorticella were measured by PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry). One cell of Vorticella mixed the half area of the microchamber. We revealed that the flow field of a single cell in a chamber was more stable than that of multiple cells.

  9. Studies and Vorticity Effects by the Euler Equations with Emphasis on Supersonic Flow Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    to see if the Euler equations will predict the fi loads in highly vortical flow fields for cruciform missiles . Body-alone and wing ...flow fields for cruciform missiles . Body-alone and wing -body flow :* fields were measured in the Bumblebee Program at a position where a tail might be...application of a supersonic marching Euler code to complete configurations , such as a wing -body- tail combination, further investigation

  10. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of PEG-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    John, C; Herz, T; Boos, J; Langer, K; Hempel, G

    2016-01-01

    Monomethoxypolyethylene glycol L-asparaginase (PEG-ASNASE) is the PEGylated version of the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNASE). Both are used for remission induction in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The treatment control is generally carried out by performing activity assays, though methods to determine the actual enzyme rather than its activity are rare. Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offered the chance to develop a method capable of simultaneously measuring PEG-ASNASE and PEG. A method validation was performed in accordance with FDA guidelines for PEG-ASNASE from non-biological solutions. The method unfolded a linearity of 15-750 U/mL with coefficients of correlation of r(2)>0.99. The coefficients of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run variability were 1.18-10.15% and 2.43-8.73%, respectively. Furthermore, the method was used to perform stability tests of the product Oncaspar® (PEG-ASNASE) and estimation of the molecular weight by multi-angle light scattering (MALS) of stressed samples to correlate them with the corresponding activity. The findings indicate that Oncaspar® stock solution should not be stored any longer than 24 h at room temperature and cannot be frozen in pure aqueous media. The validated method might be useful for the pharmaceutical industry and its quality control of PEG-ASNASE production.

  11. High Speed Size Sorting of Subcellular Organelles by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joon Seon; Lee, Ju Yong; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-06-16

    Separation/isolation of subcellular species, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, peroxisomes, Golgi apparatus, and others, from cells is important for gaining an understanding of the cellular functions performed by specific organelles. This study introduces a high speed, semipreparative scale, biocompatible size sorting method for the isolation of subcellular organelle species from homogenate mixtures of HEK 293T cells using flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). Separation of organelles was achieved using asymmetrical FlFFF (AF4) channel system at the steric/hyperlayer mode in which nuclei, lysosomes, mitochondria, and peroxisomes were separated in a decreasing order of hydrodynamic diameter without complicated preprocessing steps. Fractions in which organelles were not clearly separated were reinjected to AF4 for a finer separation using the normal mode, in which smaller sized species can be well fractionated by an increasing order of diameter. The subcellular species contained in collected AF4 fractions were examined with scanning electron microscopy to evaluate their size and morphology, Western blot analysis using organelle specific markers was used for organelle confirmation, and proteomic analysis was performed with nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS). Since FlFFF operates with biocompatible buffer solutions, it offers great flexibility in handling subcellular components without relying on a high concentration sucrose solution for centrifugation or affinity- or fluorescence tag-based sorting methods. Consequently, the current study provides an alternative, competitive method for the isolation/purification of subcellular organelle species in their intact states.

  12. Analysis of plant ribosomes with asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Tuomainen, Päivi; Eskelin, Katri

    2014-02-01

    Ribosome profiling is a technique used to separate ribosomal subunits, 80S ribosomes (monosomes), and polyribosomes (polysomes) from other RNA-protein complexes. It is traditionally performed in sucrose gradients. In this study, we used asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) to characterize ribosome profiles of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. With the optimized running conditions, we were able to separate free molecules from ribosomal subunits and intact ribosomes. We used various chemical and enzymatic treatments to validate the positions of subunits, monosomes, and polysomes in the AsFlFFF fractograms. We also characterized the protein and RNA content of AsFlFFF fractions by gel electrophoresis and western blotting. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that ribosomes remained bound to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) during the analysis. Therefore, we conclude that AsFlFFF can be used for ribosome profiling to study the mRNAs that are being translated. It can also be used to study the protein composition of ribosomes that are active in translation at that particular moment.

  13. Impact of carrier fluid composition on recovery of nanoparticles and proteins in flow field flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Schachermeyer, Samantha; Ashby, Jonathan; Kwon, Minjung; Zhong, Wenwan

    2012-11-16

    Flow field flow fractionation (F4) is an invaluable separation tool for large analytes, including nanoparticles and biomolecule complexes. However, sample loss due to analyte-channel membrane interaction limits extensive usage of F4 at present, which could be strongly affected by the carrier fluid composition. This work studied the impacts of carrier fluid (CF) composition on nanoparticle (NP) recovery in F4, with focus on high ionic strength conditions. Successful analysis of NPs in a biomolecules-friendly environment could expand the applicability of F4 to the developing field of nanobiotechnology. Recovery of the unfunctionalized polystyrene NPs of 199, 102, and 45 nm in CFs with various pH (6.2, 7.4 and 8.2), increasing ionic strength (0-0.1M), and different types of co- and counter-ions, were investigated. Additionally, elution of the 85 nm carboxylate NPs and two proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin (IgG), at high ionic strengths (0-0.15M) was investigated. Our results suggested that (1) electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged NPs and the regenerated cellulose membrane was the main force to avoid particle adsorption on the membrane; (2) larger particles experienced higher attractive force and thus were influenced more by variation in CF composition; and (3) buffers containing weak anions or NPs with weak anion as the surface functional groups provided higher tolerance to the increase in ionic strength, owing to more anions being trapped inside the NP porous structure. Protein adsorption onto the membrane was also briefly investigated in salted CFs, using HSA and IgG. We believe our findings could help to identify the basic carrier fluid composition for higher sample recovery in F4 analysis of nanoparticles in a protein-friendly environment, which will be useful for applying F4 in bioassays and in nanotoxicology studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  15. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  16. Analysis on the design and property of flow field plates of innovative direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chin-Guo; Lee, Kuang-Ying

    2014-10-01

    The paper uses technology of lithography process to etch flow fields on single side of a printed circuit board (PCB), and combines flow field plate with collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates required in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), and meanwhile makes membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and methanol fuel plate. The flow field plates are designed to be in the form of serpentine flow field. The paper measured the assembled DMFC to achieve the overall efficiency of DMFC under the conditions of different screw torques and different concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol. Experimental results show that when the flow field width of flow field plate is 1 mm, the screw torque is 16 kgf/cm, and the concentration, flow rate and temperature of methanol-water are 1 M, 180 ml/h and 50 degrees C respectively, the prepared DMFC can have better power density of 5.5 mW/cm2, 5.4 mW/cm2, 11.2 mW/cm2 and 11.8 mW/cm2. Besides, the volume of the DMFC designed and assembled by the study is smaller than the generally existing DMFC by 40%.

  17. Bumblebee program, aerodynamic data. Part 2: Flow fields at Mach number 2.0. [supersonic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. A.; Cronvich, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Available flow field data which can be used in validating theoretical procedures for computing flow fields around supersonic missiles are presented. Tabulated test data are given which define the flow field around a conical-nosed cylindrical body in a crossflow plane corresponding to a likely tail location. The data were obtained at a Mach number of 2.0 for an angle of attack of 0 to 23 degrees. The data define the flow field for cases both with and without a forward wing present.

  18. Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator analysis of the PSCz local Universe: density field and cosmic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano-Díaz, Emilio; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2007-11-01

    We apply the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) to reconstruct and analyse the matter distribution and cosmic velocity flows in the local Universe on the basis of the PSCz galaxy survey. The prime objective of this study is the production of optimal resolution 3D maps of the volume-weighted velocity and density fields throughout the nearby universe, the basis for a detailed study of the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web at each level probed by underlying galaxy sample. Fully volume-covering 3D maps of the density and (volume-weighted) velocity fields in the cosmic vicinity, out to a distance of 150h-1Mpc, are presented. Based on the Voronoi and Delaunay tessellation defined by the spatial galaxy sample, DTFE involves the estimate of density values on the basis of the volume of the related Delaunay tetrahedra and the subsequent use of the Delaunay tessellation as natural multidimensional (linear) interpolation grid for the corresponding density and velocity fields throughout the sample volume. The linearized model of the spatial galaxy distribution and the corresponding peculiar velocities of the PSCz galaxy sample, produced by Branchini et al., forms the input sample for the DTFE study. The DTFE maps reproduce the high-density supercluster regions in optimal detail, both their internal structure as well as their elongated or flattened shape. The corresponding velocity flows trace the bulk and shear flows marking the region extending from the Pisces-Perseus supercluster, via the Local Superclusters, towards the Hydra-Centaurus and the Shapley concentration. The most outstanding and unique feature of the DTFE maps is the sharply defined radial outflow regions in and around underdense voids, marking the dynamical importance of voids in the local Universe. The maximum expansion rate of voids defines a sharp cut-off in the DTFE velocity divergence probability distribution function. We found that on the basis of this cut-off DTFE manages to consistently

  19. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part I. A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Magnusson, Emma; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    Direct determination of hydrodynamic radius from retention time is an advantage of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, this is not always completely straight forward since non-idealities exist and assumptions have been made in deriving the retention equations. In this study we investigate the effect on accuracy from two factors: (1) level of sophistication of the equations used to determine channel height from a calibration experiment and (2) the influence of secondary relaxation on the accuracy of hydrodynamic radius determination. A new improved technique for estimating the channel height from calibration experiments is suggested. It is concluded that severe systematic error can arise if the most common channel height equations are used and an alternative more rigorous approach is described. For secondary relaxation it is concluded that this effect increases with the cross-flow decay rate. The secondary relaxation effect is quantified for different conditions. This is part one of two. In the second part the determination of hydrodynamic radius are evaluated experimentally under similar conditions.

  20. Dose-remission of pulsating electromagnetic fields as augmentation in therapy-resistant depression: a randomized, double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Straasø, Birgit; Lauritzen, Lise; Lunde, Marianne; Vinberg, Maj; Lindberg, Lone; Larsen, Erik Roj; Dissing, Steen; Bech, Per

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate to what extent a twice daily dose of Transcranial Pulsating ElectroMagnetic Fields (T-PEMF) was superior to once daily in patients with treatment-resistant depression as to obtaining symptom remission after 8 weeks of augmentation therapy. A self-treatment set-up of the T-PEMF device was used allowing self-administration by patients in own homes. All patients were treated for 30 min per T-PEMF session. The antidepressant medication the patients were receiving at baseline remained unchanged during the trial. The patients were randomised to either one T-PEMF dose (active dose in the morning and sham in the afternoon) or two T-PEMF doses (active dose both morning and afternoon) in a double-blind procedure. A score of 7 or less on the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) was the criterion of remission. In total 34 patients received active T-PEMF once a day and 31 patients twice daily. After 5 weeks of therapy remission was obtained in 26.5% and 32.3% on one dose and two doses of T-PEMF, respectively. After 8 weeks the rate of remission was 73.5% and 67.7%, respectively. The side effects as measured by the Udvalget for Kliniske Undersøgelser scale showed a better toleration of the antidepresssive medication in both treatment groups, which was reflected by the WHO-5 well-being scale with increased scores in both groups of patients. The high remission rate obtained by the T-PEMF augmentation was not a dose effect (one versus two daily T-PEMF sessions) but was explained by the extension of the treatment period from 5 to 8 weeks.

  1. Accelerated ions from pulsed-power-driven fast plasma flow in perpendicular magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Takezaki, Taichi Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Toru Harada, Nob.; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2016-06-15

    To understand the interaction between fast plasma flow and perpendicular magnetic field, we have investigated the behavior of a one-dimensional fast plasma flow in a perpendicular magnetic field by a laboratory-scale experiment using a pulsed-power discharge. The velocity of the plasma flow generated by a tapered cone plasma focus device is about 30 km/s, and the magnetic Reynolds number is estimated to be 8.8. After flow through the perpendicular magnetic field, the accelerated ions are measured by an ion collector. To clarify the behavior of the accelerated ions and the electromagnetic fields, numerical simulations based on an electromagnetic hybrid particle-in-cell method have been carried out. The results show that the behavior of the accelerated ions corresponds qualitatively to the experimental results. Faster ions in the plasma flow are accelerated by the induced electromagnetic fields modulated with the plasma flow.

  2. Groundwater Flow Field Distortion by Monitoring Wells and Passive Flux Meters.

    PubMed

    Verreydt, G; Bronders, J; Van Keer, I; Diels, L; Vanderauwera, P

    2015-01-01

    Due to differences in hydraulic conductivity and effects of well construction geometry, groundwater lateral flow through a monitoring well typically differs from groundwater flow in the surrounding aquifer. These differences must be well understood in order to apply passive measuring techniques, such as passive flux meters (PFMs) used for the measurement of groundwater and contaminant mass fluxes. To understand these differences, lab flow tank experiments were performed to evaluate the influences of the well screen, the surrounding filter pack and the presence of a PFM on the natural groundwater flux through a monitoring well. The results were compared with analytical calculations of flow field distortion based on the potential theory of Drost et al. (1968). Measured well flow field distortion factors were found to be lower than calculated flow field distortion factors, while measured PFM flow field distortion factors were comparable to the calculated ones. However, this latter is not the case for all conditions. The slotted geometry of the well screen seems to make a correct analytical calculation challenging for conditions where flow field deviation occurs, because the potential theory assumes a uniform flow field. Finally, plots of the functional relationships of the distortion of the flow field with the hydraulic conductivities of the filter screen, surrounding filter pack and corresponding radii make it possible to design well construction to optimally function during PFM applications.

  3. Field and Lava Flow Experiment Analysis of Vesicle Deformation as a Means of Determining Ancient Flow Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, B.; Teasdale, R.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this work is to test whether flow direction of ancient lavas can be determined from orientations of preserved vesicles. We have attempted to correlate field observations with lab experiments as a means of understanding the development of deformed vesicles. This work focuses on vesicles deformed parallel to the lava flow direction. On a fieldtrip, we observed deformed vesicles in basaltic lava flows at cinder cones in the Coso Volcanic Field. Other basalt flows with similarly deformed vesicles are also documented in the Lovejoy Basalt (Chico, CA) and in flows at Lava Beds National Monument, Medicine Lake Volcanic Field. We believe that the vesicles were deformed during lava flow emplacement and cooling. Analog flow experiments used materials with Newtonian behavior (honey, syrup) but Bingham fluid behavior is more similar to natural lavas so gelatin was also attempted. Experiments started with the analog fluids on a horizontal surface. Air was then injected into the fluids with a hypodermic needle and then the surface was inclined to approximately 4-5 degrees. The deformation of the bubbles in the analog fluids was recorded with digital photos taken from above the flows. In some cases, bubbles rose to the surface of the flow and were not deformed parallel to the flow direction. In other cases, bubbles were deformed and we recorded a bulbous end and elongate tail parallel to the flow direction. In all cases the bulbous end of deformed vesicles are directed down stream and a tail stretches behind. Honey best preserved vesicle deformation. Bubbles in syrup rose to the surface too quickly to document (even when syrup was chilled). Air injected into gelatin caused shear, releasing the air without forming bubbles. Future work will address analog material issues by using wax or polyethylene glycol (PEG). These materials are likely to better represent rheologies of basalt lavas during flow emplacement.

  4. Understanding Angiography-Based Aneurysm Flow Fields through Comparison with Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cebral, J R; Mut, F; Chung, B J; Spelle, L; Moret, J; van Nijnatten, F; Ruijters, D

    2017-06-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to be an important factor for aneurysm progression and rupture. Our aim was to evaluate whether flow fields reconstructed from dynamic angiography data can be used to realistically represent the main flow structures in intracranial aneurysms. DSA-based flow reconstructions, obtained during interventional treatment, were compared qualitatively with flow fields obtained from patient-specific computational fluid dynamics models and quantitatively with projections of the computational fluid dynamics fields (by computing a directional similarity of the vector fields) in 15 cerebral aneurysms. The average similarity between the DSA and the projected computational fluid dynamics flow fields was 78% in the parent artery, while it was only 30% in the aneurysm region. Qualitatively, both the DSA and projected computational fluid dynamics flow fields captured the location of the inflow jet, the main vortex structure, the intrasaccular flow split, and the main rotation direction in approximately 60% of the cases. Several factors affect the reconstruction of 2D flow fields from dynamic angiography sequences. The most important factors are the 3-dimensionality of the intrasaccular flow patterns and inflow jets, the alignment of the main vortex structure with the line of sight, the overlapping of surrounding vessels, and possibly frame rate undersampling. Flow visualization with DSA from >1 projection is required for understanding of the 3D intrasaccular flow patterns. Although these DSA-based flow quantification techniques do not capture swirling or secondary flows in the parent artery, they still provide a good representation of the mean axial flow and the corresponding flow rate. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Particle characterization in centrifugal fields. Comparison between ultracentrifugation and sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Caldwell, K D; Mächtle, W

    1990-09-26

    A ten-component mixture of polystyrene latex particles in the 67-1220 nm size range was subjected to analysis by analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) using programmed and constant fields. The AUC analysis of the mixture yielded diameter values in good agreement with data determined on the separate components; the relative amounts of each component in the mixture were likewise closely reproducing the sample's known composition. Diameters determined by SdFFF, either in a constant- or programmed-field mode, were in good agreement with the AUC for particles smaller than about 500 nm. For the sample's larger components, however, particularly the programmed mode showed diameter values smaller than expected. In addition, field programming resulted in incomplete recoveries of the larger particles, leading to more or less distorted mass distributions for the complex sample. The observed discrepancies, which are thought to result from events at the analytical wall in the FFF channel, suggested a protocol for accurate sizing, as opposed to fingerprinting, of samples with broad size distribution. By tracking sizes and amounts of the different components at different but constant field strengths, and retaining as analytically valid only those data recorded in a retention range from five to about thirty column volumes, it was possible to determine sizes and amounts in good agreement with known parameters for the sample. Unlike the AUC procedure, SdFFF produces fractions of a high degree of uniformity, which lend themselves to a secondary analysis, e.g. by electron microscopy, as shown in the study.

  6. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and flow field flow fractionation as tools for studying the aging effects of WO₃ colloids for photoelectrochemical uses.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2011-07-08

    WO₃ colloidal suspensions obtained through a simple sol-gel procedure were subjected to a controlled temperature aging process whose time evolution in terms of particle mass and size distribution was followed by sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) and flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF). The experiments performed at a temperature of 60 °C showed that in a few hours the initially transparent sol of WO₃ particles, whose size was less than 25 nm, undergoes a progressive size increase allowing nanoparticles to reach a maximum equivalent spherical size of about 130 nm after 5 h. The observed shift in particle size distribution maxima (SdFFF), the broadening of the curves (FlFFF) and the SEM-TEM observations suggest a mixed mechanism of growth-aggregation of initial nanocrystals to form larger particles. The photoelectrochemical properties of thin WO₃ films obtained from the aged suspensions at regular intervals, were tested in a biased photoelectrocatalytic cell with 1M H₂SO₄ under solar simulated irradiation. The current-voltage polarization curves recorded in the potential range 0-1.8 V (vs. SCE) showed a diminution of the maximum photocurrent from 3.7 mA cm⁻² to 2.8 mA cm⁻² with aging times of 1h and 5h, respectively. This loss of performance was mainly attributed to the reduction of the electroactive surface area of the sintered particles as suggested by the satisfactory linear correlation between the integrated photocurrent and the cyclic voltammetry cathodic wave area of the W(VI)→W(V) process measured in the dark.

  7. Decoding complex flow-field patterns in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Christophel, Thomas B; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-05-01

    There has been a long history of research on visual working memory. Whereas early studies have focused on the role of lateral prefrontal cortex in the storage of sensory information, this has been challenged by research in humans that has directly assessed the encoding of perceptual contents, pointing towards a role of visual and parietal regions during storage. In a previous study we used pattern classification to investigate the storage of complex visual color patterns across delay periods. This revealed coding of such contents in early visual and parietal brain regions. Here we aim to investigate whether the involvement of visual and parietal cortex is also observable for other types of complex, visuo-spatial pattern stimuli. Specifically, we used a combination of fMRI and multivariate classification to investigate the retention of complex flow-field stimuli defined by the spatial patterning of motion trajectories of random dots. Subjects were trained to memorize the precise spatial layout of these stimuli and to retain this information during an extended delay. We used a multivariate decoding approach to identify brain regions where spatial patterns of activity encoded the memorized stimuli. Content-specific memory signals were observable in motion sensitive visual area MT+ and in posterior parietal cortex that might encode spatial information in a modality independent manner. Interestingly, we also found information about the memorized visual stimulus in somatosensory cortex, suggesting a potential crossmodal contribution to memory. Our findings thus indicate that working memory storage of visual percepts might be distributed across unimodal, multimodal and even crossmodal brain regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlation analysis of spatio-temporal images for estimating two-dimensional flow velocity field in a rotating flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kwonkyu; Kim, Seojun; Kim, Dongsu

    2015-10-01

    Flow velocity estimation in actual rivers using image processing technique has been highlighted for hydrometric communities in the last decades, and this technique is called Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). Although LSPIV has been successfully tested in many flow conditions, it has addressed several limitations estimating mean flow field because of difficult flow conditions such as rotating, lack of light and seeds, and noisy flow conditions. Recently, an alternative technique named STIV to use spatio-temporal images based on successively recorded images has been introduced to overcome the limitations of LSPIV. The STIV was successfully applied to obtain one-dimensional flow component in the river for estimating streamflow discharge, where the main flow direction is known. Using the 5th order of central difference scheme, the STIV directly calculated the mean angle of slopes which appeared as strips in the spatio-temporal images and has been proved to be more reliable and efficient for the discharge estimation as compared with the conventional LSPIV. However, yet it has not been sufficiently qualified to derive two-dimensional flow field in the complex flow, such as rotating or locally unsteady flow conditions. We deemed that it was because the strips in the given spatio-temporal images from not properly oriented for main flow direction are not narrow enough or clearly visible, thus the direct estimating strip slope could give erroneous results. Thereby, the STIV has been mainly applied for obtaining one-dimensional flow component. In this regard, we proposed an alternative algorithm to estimate the mean slope angle for enhancing the capability of the STIV, which used correlation coefficient between odd and even image splits from the given spatio-temporal image. This method was named CASTI (Correlation Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Image). This paper described the step-by-step procedure of the CASTI and validated its capability for estimating two

  9. Numerical calculation of flow fields about rectangular wings of finite thickness in supersonic flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of the outer inviscid flow about a rectangular wing moving at supersonic speeds is reported. The inviscid equations of motion governing the flow generated by the wing form a set of hyperbolic differential equations. The flow field about the rectangular wing is separated into three regions consisting of the forebody, the afterbody, and the wing wake. Solutions for the forebody are obtained using conical flow techniques while the afterbody and the wing wake regions are treated as initial value problems. The numerical solutions are compared in the two dimensional regions with known exact solutions.

  10. Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

  11. Thrust Augmentation Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, S.; Santoro, Robert J.; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust augmentation results of an ongoing study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) setup with various ejector configurations. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, and an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. High fidelity thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system. The baseline thrust of the PDE engine was first measured and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The parameter space for the study included ejector length, PDE tube exit to ejector tube inlet overlap distance, and straight versus rounded ejector inlets. The relationship between the thrust augmentation results and various physical phenomena is described. To further understand the flow dynamics, shadow graph images of the exiting shock wave front from the PDE were also made. For the studied parameter space, the results showed a maximum augmentation of 40%. Further increase in augmentation is possible if the geometry of the ejector is tailored, a topic currently studied by numerous groups in the field.

  12. Probing and quantifying DNA-protein interactions with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jonathan; Schachermeyer, Samantha; Duan, Yaokai; Jimenez, Luis A; Zhong, Wenwan

    2014-09-05

    Tools capable of measuring binding affinities as well as amenable to downstream sequencing analysis are needed for study of DNA-protein interaction, particularly in discovery of new DNA sequences with affinity to diverse targets. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) is an open-channel separation technique that eliminates interference from column packing to the non-covalently bound complex and could potentially be applied for study of macromolecular interaction. The recovery and elution behaviors of the poly(dA)n strand and aptamers in AF4 were investigated. Good recovery of ssDNAs was achieved by judicious selection of the channel membrane with consideration of the membrane pore diameter and the radius of gyration (Rg) of the ssDNA, which was obtained with the aid of a Molecular Dynamics tool. The Rg values were also used to assess the folding situation of aptamers based on their migration times in AF4. The interactions between two ssDNA aptamers and their respective protein components were investigated. Using AF4, near-baseline resolution between the free and protein-bound aptamer fractions could be obtained. With this information, dissociation constants of ∼16nM and ∼57nM were obtained for an IgE aptamer and a streptavidin aptamer, respectively. In addition, free and protein-bound IgE aptamer was extracted from the AF4 eluate and amplified, illustrating the potential of AF4 in screening ssDNAs with high affinity to targets. Our results demonstrate that AF4 is an effective tool holding several advantages over the existing techniques and should be useful for study of diverse macromolecular interaction systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation to the characterization of colloidal dispersions undergoing aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Olivo, Carlos; Gauer, Cornelius; Storti, Giuseppe; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-05-18

    The characterization of complex colloidal dispersions is a relevant and challenging problem in colloidal science. In this work, we show how asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to static light scattering can be used for this purpose. As an example of complex colloidal dispersions, we have chosen two systems undergoing aggregation. The first one is a conventional polystyrene latex undergoing reaction-limited aggregation, which leads to the formation of fractal clusters with well-known structure. The second one is a dispersion of elastomeric colloidal particles made of a polymer with a low glass transition temperature, which undergoes coalescence upon aggregation. Samples are withdrawn during aggregation at fixed times, fractionated with AF4 using a two-angle static light scattering unit as a detector. We have shown that from the analysis of the ratio between the intensities of the scattered light at the two angles the cluster size distribution can be recovered, without any need for calibration based on standard elution times, provided that the geometry and scattering properties of particles and clusters are known. The nonfractionated samples have been characterized also by conventional static and dynamic light scattering to determine their average radius of gyration and hydrodynamic radius. The size distribution of coalescing particles has been investigated also through image analysis of cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures. The average radius of gyration and the average hydrodynamic radius of the nonfractionated samples have been calculated and successfully compared to the values obtained from the size distributions measured by AF4. In addition, the data obtained are also in good agreement with calculations made with population balance equations.

  14. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of manufactured silver nanoparticles spiked into soil solution.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, G F; Hiemstra, T; Regelink, I C; Molleman, B; Comans, R N J

    2015-05-01

    Manufactured metallic silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are intensively utilized in consumer products and this will inevitably lead to their release to soils. To assess the environmental risks of AgNP in soils, quantification of both their concentration and size in soil solution is essential. We developed a methodology consisting of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with on-line detection by UV-vis spectroscopy and off-line HR-ICP-MS measurements to quantify the concentration and size of AgNP, coated with either citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), in water extracts of three different soils. The type of mobile phase was a critical factor in the fractionation of AgNP by AF4. In synthetic systems, fractionation of a series of virgin citrate- and PVP-coated AgNP (10-90 nm) with reasonably high recoveries could only be achieved with ultrahigh purity water as a mobile phase. For the soil water extracts, 0.01% (w:v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 8 was the key to a successful fractionation of the AgNP. With SDS, the primary size of AgNP in all soil water extracts could be determined by AF4, except for PVP-coated AgNP when clay colloids were present. The PVP-coated AgNP interacted with colloidal clay minerals, leading to an overestimation of their primary size. Similar interactions between PVP-coated AgNP and clay colloids can take place in the environment and facilitate their transport in soils, aquifers, and surface waters. In conclusion, AF4 in combination with UV-vis spectroscopy and HR-ICP-MS measurements is a powerful tool to characterize AgNP in soil solution if the appropriate mobile phase is used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Augmented reality in surgery.

    PubMed

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the history and current knowledge of computer-augmented reality in the field of surgery and its potential goals in education, surgeon training, and patient treatment. National Library of Medicine's database and additional library searches. Only articles suited to surgical sciences with a well-defined aim of study, methodology, and precise description of outcome were included. Augmented reality is an effective tool in executing surgical procedures requiring low-performance surgical dexterity; it remains a science determined mainly by stereotactic registration and ergonomics. Strong evidence was found that it is an effective teaching tool for training residents. Weaker evidence was found to suggest a significant influence on surgical outcome, both morbidity and mortality. No evidence of cost-effectiveness was found. Augmented reality is a new approach in executing detailed surgical operations. Although its application is in a preliminary stage, further research is needed to evaluate its long-term clinical impact on patients, surgeons, and hospital administrators. Its widespread use and the universal transfer of such technology remains limited until there is a better understanding of registration and ergonomics.

  16. Numerical Analysis of the Turbine 99 Draft Tube Flow Field Provoked by Redesigned Inlet Velocity Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván, S.; Reggio, M.; Guibault, F.; Castro, L.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, several investigations on hydraulic turbine draft tube performance have shown that the hydrodynamic flow field at the runner outlet determines the diffuser efficiency affecting the overall performance of the turbine. This flow field, for which the principal characteristics are the flow rate and the inlet swirling flow intensity, is mostly developed on turbines designed for low head (high specific velocity) and operated away from their best efficiency point. To identify factors of the flow field responsible for loosing draft- tube efficiency, the correlations between the flow pattern along the diffuser and both swirl intensity and flow rate have been examined. An analytical representation of inlet flow field has been manipulated by a Multi Island Genetic Algorithm through the automatic coupling of multidisciplinary commercial software systems in order to obtain redesigned inlet velocity profiles. This loop allowed determining the profile for which the minimum energy loss factor was reached. With different flow field patterns obtained during the optimization process it was possible to undertake a qualitative and quantitative analysis which has helped to understand how to suppress or at least mitigate undesirable draft tube flow characteristics. The direct correlation between the runner blade design and the kinematics of the swirl at the draft tube inlet should suppose the perfect coupling at the runner-draft tube interface without compromising the overall flow stability of the machine.

  17. Numerical simulation of cantilevered ramp injector flow fields for hypervelocity fuel/air mixing enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jurgen Christian

    Increasing demand for affordable access to space and high speed terrestrial transport has spawned research interest into various air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems. Propulsion concepts such as the supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) and the shock-induced combustion ramjet (shcramjet) utilize oxygen freely available in the atmosphere and thereby substantially reduce the weight penalty of on-board oxidizer tankage used in rocket based systems. Of key importance to the ultimate success of an air-breathing concept is the ability to efficiently mix the fuel with atmospheric air. In the case of a hypersonic air-breather the challenge is accentuated due to the requirement of supersonic combustion. Flow velocities through the combustor on the order of thousands of meters per second provide the fuel and air with only a brief time to adequately combine. Contemporary mixing augmentation methods to address this issue have focused on fuel injection devices which promote axial vortices to enhance the mixing process. Much research effort has been expended on investigation of ramp injectors for this purpose. The present study introduces a new ramp injector design, based on the conventional ramp injector, dubbed the cantilevered ramp injector. A two-pronged numerical approach was employed to investigate the mixing performance and characteristics of the cantilevered injector consisting of, (1) comparison with conventional designs and (2) a parametric study of various cantilevered injector geometries. A laminar, three-dimensional, multispecies flowsolver was developed in generalized coordinates to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow fields of injected H2 into high-enthalpy air. The scheme consists of an upwind TVD scheme for discretization of the convective fluxes coupled with a semi-implicit LU-SGS scheme for temporal discretization. Through analysis of the numerical solutions, it has been shown that the cantilevered ramp injector is a viable fuel injection

  18. Application of full field optical studies for pulsatile flow in a carotid artery phantom

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, M.; Loozen, G. B.; van der Wekken, N.; van de Belt, G.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.; Kenjeres, S.

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary comparative measurement between particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) to study pulsatile flow using ventricular assist device in a patient-specific carotid artery phantom is reported. These full-field optical techniques have both been used to study flow and extract complementary parameters. We use the high spatial resolution of PIV to generate a full velocity map of the flow field and the high temporal resolution of LASCA to extract the detailed frequency spectrum of the fluid pulses. Using this combination of techniques a complete study of complex pulsatile flow in an intricate flow network can be studied. PMID:26504652

  19. Synchrotron microimaging technique for measuring the velocity fields of real blood flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Guk Bae

    2005-03-15

    Angiography and Doppler methods used for diagnosing vascular diseases give information on the shape of blood vessels and pointwise blood speed but do not provide detailed information on the flow fields inside the blood vessels. In this study, we developed a method for visualizing blood flow by using coherent synchrotron x rays. This method, which does not require the addition of any contrast agent or tracer particles, visualizes the flow pattern of blood by enhancing the diffraction and interference characteristics of the blood cells. This was achieved by optimizing the sample- (blood) to-detector (charge-coupled device camera) distance and the sample thickness. The proposed method was used to extract quantitative velocity field information from blood flowing inside an opaque microchannel by applying a two-frame particle image velocimetry algorithm to enhanced x-ray images of the blood flow. The measured velocity field data showed a flow structure typical of flow in a macrochannel.

  20. Spatial variation of the magnetic field inside laminar flows of a perfect conductive fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duka, Bejo; Boçi, Sonila

    2017-01-01

    The steady state of a perfect conductive fluid in laminar flow resulting from the ‘Hall effect’ is studied. Using the Maxwell equations, the spatial variation of the magnetic field in the steady state is calculated for three cases of different fluid flow geometries: flow between two infinite parallel planes, flow between two coaxial infinite-long cylinders and flow between two concentric spheres. According to our calculation of the three cases, the spatial variation of the magnetic field depends on the flow velocity. The magnetic field is strengthened in layers where the velocity is greater, but this dependency is negligible for non relativistic flows. Our approach in this study provides an example of how to receive interesting results using only basic knowledge of physics and mathematics.

  1. ITG modes in the presence of inhomogeneous field-aligned flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.; McCarthy, D. R.; Lontano, M.; Lazzaro, E.; Honary, F.

    2010-02-01

    In a recent paper, Varischetti et al. (Plasma Phys. Contr. F. 2008, 50, 105008-1-15) have found that in a slab geometry the effect of the flow shear in the field-aligned parallel flow on the linear mode stability of the ion temperature gradient (ITG)-driven modes is not very prominent. They found that the flow shear also has a negligible effect on the mode characteristics. The work in this paper shows that the inclusion of flow curvature in the field-aligned flow can have a considerable effect on the mode stability; it can also change the mode structure so as to effect the mixing length transport in the core region of a fusion device. Flow shear, on the other hand, has indeed an insignificant role in the mode stability and mode structure. Inhomogeneous field-aligned flow should therefore still be considered for a viable candidate in controlling the ITG mode stability and mode structure.

  2. Comparision of numerical simulation and flow field visualisation using heating foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejka, Milan; Hyhlik, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    Paper deals with comparison of numerical and experimental solution of the flow field of hump. Synthetic jet actuators were used to influence flow field of the hump. Visualization using heating foil was done and compared with data from numerical simulation. The hump is located in closed measurement area of Eiffel type wind tunnel. Commercial code Fluent was used to perform numerical solution.

  3. Determination of space shuttle flow field by the three-dimensional method of characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C.; Powers, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    The newly improved three-dimensional method of characteristics program has been applied successfully to the calculation of flow fields over a variety of bodies including slab delta wings and shuttle orbiters. Flow fields over fuselage shapes for Mach numbers as low as 1.5 have been calculated. Some typical results are presented.

  4. Grid-size reduction in flow calculations on infinite domains by higher-order far-field asymptotics in numerical boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wubs, F. W.; Boerstoel, J. W.; Vanderwees, A. J.

    1983-05-01

    An error analysis of the numerical calculation of the steady flow on an infinite domain around a given airfoil by a domain-splitting (= zonal) method is presented. This method combines a fully conservative finite-difference approximation on a finite domain around the airfoil with an approximate asymptotic solution outside this finite domain. The errors are analyzed as a function of the accuracy of the approximate asymptotic expansion, of the distance to the airfoil of the far-field boundary of the finite domain, and of the mesh size. The numerical experiments show that, for a given desired accuracy level, large reductions in grid size are possible, if the usual far field asymptotic approximation is augmented by only a few extra terms in the approximate asymptotic far field solution.

  5. Turbulent Flow Field Measurements of Separate Flow Round and Chevron Nozzles with Pylon Interaction Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Henerson, Brenda S.; Kinzie, Kevin W.

    2004-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements for six separate flow bypass ratio five nozzle configurations have recently been obtained in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory. The six configurations include a baseline configuration with round core and fan nozzles, an eight-chevron core nozzle at two different clocking positions, and repeats of these configurations with a pylon included. One run condition representative of takeoff was investigated for all cases with the core nozzle pressure ratio set to 1.56 and the total temperature to 828 K. The fan nozzle pressure ratio was set to 1.75 with a total temperature of 350 K, and the freestream Mach number was M = 0.28. The unsteady flow field measurements provided by PIV complement recent computational, acoustic, and mean flow field studies performed at NASA Langley for the same nozzle configurations and run condition. The PIV baseline configuration measurements show good agreement with mean flow field data as well as existing PIV data acquired at NASA Glenn. Nonetheless, the baseline configuration turbulence profile indicates an asymmetric flow field, despite careful attention to concentricity. The presence of the pylon increases the upper shear layer turbulence levels while simultaneously decreasing the turbulence levels in the lower shear layer. In addition, a slightly shorter potential core length is observed with the addition of the pylon. Finally, comparisons of computational results with PIV measurements are favorable for mean flow, slightly over-predicted for Reynolds shear stress, and underpredicted for Reynolds normal stress components.

  6. Interactive grid generation for turbomachinery flow field simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Reno, Charles; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The control point form of algebraic grid generation presented provides the means that are needed to generate well structured grids of turbomachinery flow simulations. It uses a sparse collection of control points distributed over the flow domain. The shape and position of coordinate curves can be adjusted from these control points while the grid conforms precisely to all boundaries. An interactive program called TURBO, which uses the control point form, is being developed. Basic features of the code are discussed and sample grids are presented. A finite volume LU implicit scheme is used to simulate flow in a turbine cascade on the grid generated by the program.

  7. Investigation of the flow field surrounding circular-arc boattail nozzles at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, W. K.; Putnam, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of jet exhaust on the subsonic flow field surrounding boattail nozzles with attached and separated boundary layers were investigated. Measurements of local Mach numbers and flow angles were made at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.80 at an angle of attack of 0 deg. Jet exhaust flow was simulated with a solid cylindrical sting and with high pressure air at jet-nozzle total pressure ratios of 2.9 and 5.0. Results show strong effects of the jet-wave structure on the external flow field. The predicted local Mach numbers and flow angles for attached-flow nozzles with solid jet simulators obtained by using subsonic inviscid/viscous-flow theory are in good agreement with experimental data. Prediction of nozzle surface pressure distributions which include jet-entrainment effects also agree with experimental data for attached-flow nozzles with high pressure air jets.

  8. Investigation of bifurcation structure flow field for bipolar plates in PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Gong, Shi-Chao; Xiao, Yong

    2013-02-01

    Uniform flow field in fuel cells is important to the performance. Even distribution of reactant gases over the electrode surfaces is a key to the good performance of fuel cells since this enables them to operate as close as possible to maximum capability and electrochemical reactions. In this paper, the bifurcation principle can be used to design the flow field structure for bipolar plate in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). It is demonstrated by numerical simulation that branch flow field structure can provide substantially flow-field distribution, current density and heat transfer when compared to the traditional structure. Then a kind of excellent flow field structure for bipolar plate in PEMFC can be achieved.

  9. The effect of swirling number on the flow field of downshot flame furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Zhijun, Z.; Zili, Z.; Xiang, Z.; Xinyu, C.; Junhu, Z.; Zhengyu, H.; Jianzhong, L.; Kefa, C.

    2000-07-01

    The cold model test is adopted to study the flow field of downshot flame furnace with swirling burners in this paper. The flow field is measured with tri-hole probe. The ribbon method and fireworks tracer technology are adopted to find out the flow field distribution qualitatively. The results show that the momentum ratio of arch air and side-wall air is not the most important factor which determines the flow field when swirling burners are adopted. The effect of swirling number of arch air on the flow field is notable, and the jet will decline like normal swirling jet. Under general swirling number, the momentum ratio of arch air and side-wall air should be large enough.

  10. Combustion-augmented laser ramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Tamada, Kazunobu; Kimura, Itsuro

    2006-05-01

    A preliminary study of combustion-augmented laser-ramjets was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in combustion-augmented operation.

  11. Experimental Study on Flow Field behind Backward-Facing Step Using Detonation-Driven Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Obara, Tetsuro; Ohyagi, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Masato

    As a research to develop a SCRAM-jet engine is actively conducted, a necessity to produce a high-enthalpy flow in a laboratory is increasing. In order to develop the SCRAM-jet engine, stabilized combustion in a supersonic flow-field should be attained, in which a duration time of flow is extremely short. Therefore, a mixing process of breathed air and fuel, which is injected into supersonic flow-fields is one of the most important problem. Since, the flow inside SCRAM-jet engine has high-enthalpy, an experimental facility is required to produce such high-enthalpy flow-field. In this study, a detonation-driven shock tunnel was built and was used to produce high-enthalpy flow. At first, a performance of this facility was investigated in order to obtain a Tayloring condition. Furthermore, SCRAM-jet combustor model equipped backward-facing step was installed at test section and flow-fields were visualized using color-schlieren technique. The fuel was injected perpendicular to the flow of Mach number three behind step. The height of backward-facing step and injection pressure were changed to investigate effects of the step on a mixing characteristic between air and fuel. The schlieren photograph and pressure histories show that the fuel was ignited behind step and the height of step is important factor to ignite a fuel in a supersonic flow-field.

  12. Direct measurement of the flow field around swimming microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Michel, Nicolas; Tuval, Idan

    2010-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms create flows that influence their mutual interactions and modify the rheology of their suspensions. While extensively studied theoretically, these flows have not been measured in detail around any freely-swimming microorganism. We report such measurements for the microphytes Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The minute (˜0.3%) density excess of V. carteri over water leads to a strongly dominant Stokeslet contribution, with the widely-assumed stresslet flow only a correction to the subleading source dipole term. This implies that suspensions of V. carteri have features similar to suspensions of sedimenting particles. The flow in the region around C. reinhardtii where significant hydrodynamic interaction is likely to occur differs qualitatively from a "puller" stresslet, and can be described by a simple three-Stokeslet model.

  13. Direct Measurement of the Flow Field around Swimming Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Michel, Nicolas; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2010-10-01

    Swimming microorganisms create flows that influence their mutual interactions and modify the rheology of their suspensions. While extensively studied theoretically, these flows have not been measured in detail around any freely-swimming microorganism. We report such measurements for the microphytes Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The minute (˜0.3%) density excess of V. carteri over water leads to a strongly dominant Stokeslet contribution, with the widely-assumed stresslet flow only a correction to the subleading source dipole term. This implies that suspensions of V. carteri have features similar to suspensions of sedimenting particles. The flow in the region around C. reinhardtii where significant hydrodynamic interaction is likely to occur differs qualitatively from a puller stresslet, and can be described by a simple three-Stokeslet model.

  14. In situ visualization study of CO 2 gas bubble behavior in DMFC anode flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Zhao, T. S.; Ye, Q.

    This paper reports on a visual study of the CO 2 bubble behavior in the anode flow field of an in-house fabricated transparent Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC), which consisted of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an active area of 4.0 × 4.0 cm 2, two bipolar plates with a single serpentine channel, and a transparent enclosure. The study reveals that at low current densities, small discrete bubbles appeared in the anode flow field. At moderate current densities, a number of gas slugs formed, in addition to small discrete bubbles. And at high current densities, the flow field was predominated by rather long gas slugs. The experiments also indicate that the cell orientation had a significant effect on the cell performance, especially at low methanol flow rates; for the present flow field design the best cell performance could be achieved when the cell was orientated vertically. It has been shown that higher methanol solution flow rates reduced the average length and the number of gas slugs in the flow field, but led to an increased methanol crossover. In particular, the effect of methanol solution flow rates on the cell performance became more pronounced at low temperatures. The effect of temperature on the bubble behavior and the cell performance was also examined. Furthermore, for the present flow field consisting of a single serpentine channel, the channel-blocking phenomenon caused by CO 2 gas slugs was never encountered under all the test conditions in this work.

  15. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  16. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  17. Flow Field Effects on Nucleation in a Reacting Mixture Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    chemically reacting flows has been analysed by Fendell (1965) who considered the effect of the straining motion in a stagnation point flow on ignition...stagnation point diffusion flame ( Fendell , 1965, Linan, 1974). In the present study the effect of the strain rate or velocity gradient on nucleation kinetics...Symposium (International) on Corn- bustion, 799-810, Academic Press. Fendell , F. E. (1965). Ignition and extinction in combustion of initially unmixed

  18. Lava-flow characterization at Pisgah Volcanic Field, California, with multiparameter imaging radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaddis, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multi-incidence-angle (in the 25?? to 55?? range) radar data aquired by the NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) at three wavelengths simultaneously and displayed at three polarizations are examined for their utility in characterizing lava flows at Pisgah volcanic field, California. Pisgah lava flows were erupted in three phases; flow textures consist of hummocky pahoehoe, smooth pahoehoe, and aa (with and without thin sedimentary cover). Backscatter data shown as a function of relative age of Pisgah flows indicate that dating of lava flows on the basis of average radar backscatter may yield ambiguous results if primary flow textures and modification processes are not well understood. -from Author

  19. Transport of Magnetic Field by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, R.; Odier, Ph.; Pinton, J.-F.; Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F.

    2006-08-18

    We study the effect of a turbulent flow of liquid sodium generated in the von Karman geometry, on the localized field of a magnet placed close to the frontier of the flow. We observe that the field can be transported by the flow on distances larger than its integral length scale. In the most turbulent configurations, the mean value of the field advected at large distance vanishes. However, the rms value of the fluctuations increases linearly with the magnetic Reynolds number. The advected field is strongly intermittent.

  20. Generation of a Magnetic Field by Dynamo Action in a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Monchaux, R.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B.; Gasquet, C.; Marie, L.; Ravelet, F.; Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F.; Bourgoin, M.; Moulin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R.

    2007-01-26

    We report the observation of dynamo action in the von Karman sodium experiment, i.e., the generation of a magnetic field by a strongly turbulent swirling flow of liquid sodium. Both mean and fluctuating parts of the field are studied. The dynamo threshold corresponds to a magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}{approx}30. A mean magnetic field of the order of 40 G is observed 30% above threshold at the flow lateral boundary. The rms fluctuations are larger than the corresponding mean value for two of the components. The scaling of the mean square magnetic field is compared to a prediction previously made for high Reynolds number flows.

  1. Intermittent magnetic field excitation by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium.

    PubMed

    Nornberg, M D; Spence, E J; Kendrick, R D; Jacobson, C M; Forest, C B

    2006-07-28

    The magnetic field measured in the Madison dynamo experiment shows intermittent periods of growth when an axial magnetic field is applied. The geometry of the intermittent field is consistent with the fastest-growing magnetic eigenmode predicted by kinematic dynamo theory using a laminar model of the mean flow. Though the eigenmodes of the mean flow are decaying, it is postulated that turbulent fluctuations of the velocity field change the flow geometry such that the eigenmode growth rate is temporarily positive. Therefore, it is expected that a characteristic of the onset of a turbulent dynamo is magnetic intermittency.

  2. Simulation and analysis on the flow field of the low temperature mini-type cold store

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, X. H.; Ju, Y. L.

    2011-07-01

    The understanding of the flow field inside the cold store is very important to food storage at low temperatures. In this paper, the CFD simulation on the flow field for low temperature cold store with air forced supply mode is presented. The turbulence flow of three-dimensional steady incompressible viscous fluid is analyzed using finite volume method and standard K-ɛ two-equation. The temperature and velocity fields of this cold store are simulated, analyzed and compared. The simulation results show that the velocity and temperature fields are evidently influenced by the cross section from the ground, and the optimal cross section is also given in this paper.

  3. Using a magnetic field to redirect an oncolytic adenovirus complexed with iron oxide augments gene therapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Park, Ji Won; Na, Youjin; Jung, Soo-Jung; Hwang, June Kyu; Choi, Dongho; Lee, Kyeong Geun; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) is a widely used vector for cancer gene therapy but its therapeutic efficacy is limited by low coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression in tumors and non-specifically targeted infection. Ad infectivity and specificity can be markedly improved by creating Ad-magnetic nanoparticles cluster complexes and directing their migration with an external magnetic field (MGF). We electrostatically complexed GFP-expressing, replication-incompetent Ad (dAd) with PEGylated and cross-linked iron oxide nanoparticles (PCION), generating dAd-PCION complexes. The dAd-PCION showed increased transduction efficiency, independent of CAR expression, in the absence or presence of an MGF. Cancer cell killing and intracellular oncolytic Ad (HmT)-PCION replication significantly increased with MGF exposure. Site-directed, magnetically-targeted delivery of the HmT-PCION elicited significantly greater therapeutic efficacy versus treatment with naked HmT or HmT-PCION without MGF in CAR-negative MCF7 tumors. Immunohistochemical tumor analysis showed increased oncolytic Ad replication in tumors following infection by HmT-PCION using an MGF. Whole-body bioluminescence imaging of tumor-bearing mice showed a 450-fold increased tumor-to-liver ratio for HmT-PCION with, versus without, MGF. These results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of external MGF-responsive PCION-coated oncolytic Ads as smart hybrid vectors for cancer gene therapy.

  4. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  5. Morphological complexities and hazards during the emplacement of channel-fed `a`ā lava flow fields: A study of the 2001 lower flow field on Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Pinkerton, H.; James, M. R.; Calvari, S.

    2010-08-01

    Long-lived basaltic eruptions often produce structurally complex, compound `a`ā flow fields. Here we reconstruct the development of a compound flow field emplaced during the 2001 eruption of Mt. Etna (Italy). Following an initial phase of cooling-limited advance, the reactivation of stationary flows by superposition of new units caused significant channel drainage. Later, blockages in the channel and effusion rate variations resulted in breaching events that produced two new major flow branches. We also examined small-scale, late-stage ‘squeeze-up’ extrusions that were widespread in the flow field. We classified these as ‘flows’, ‘tumuli’ or ‘spines’ on the basis of their morphology, which depended on the rheology, extrusion rate and cooling history of the lava. Squeeze-up flows were produced when the lava was fluid enough to drain away from the source bocca, but fragmented to produce blade-like features that differed markedly from `a`ā clinker. As activity waned, increased cooling and degassing led to lava arriving at boccas with a higher yield strength. In many cases this was unable to flow after extrusion, and laterally extensive, near-vertical sheets of lava developed. These are considered to be exogenous forms of tumuli. In the highest yield strength cases, near-solid lava was extruded from the flow core as a result of ramping, forming spines. The morphology and location of the squeeze-ups provides insight into the flow rheology at the time of their formation. Because they represent the final stages of activity of the flow, they may also help to refine estimates of the most advanced rheological states in which lava can be considered to flow. Our observations suggest that real-time monitoring of compound flow field evolution may allow complex processes such as channel breaching and bocca formation to be forecast. In addition, documenting the occurrence and morphology of squeeze-ups may allow us to determine whether there is any risk of a

  6. Numerical Investigation of Near-Field Plasma Flows in Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Kamesh; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    The development and application of a multidimensional numerical simulation code for investigating near-field plasma processes in magnetic nozzles are presented. The code calculates the time-dependent evolution of all three spatial components of both the magnetic field and velocity in a plasma flow, and includes physical models of relevant transport phenomena. It has been applied to an investigation of the behavior of plasma flows found in high-power thrusters, employing a realistic magnetic nozzle configuration. Simulation of a channel-flow case where the flow was super-Alfvenic has demonstrated that such a flow produces adequate back-emf to significantly alter the shape of the total magnetic field, preventing the flow from curving back to the magnetic field coil in the near-field region. Results from this simulation can be insightful in predicting far-field behavior and can be used as a set of self-consistent boundary conditions for far-field simulations. Future investigations will focus on cases where the inlet flow is sub-Alfvenic and where the flow is allowed to freely expand in the radial direction once it is downstream of the coil.

  7. The Three Dimensional Flow Field at the Exit of an Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Ristic, D.; Chu, S.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive investigation was performed to provide detailed data on the three dimensional viscous flow phenomena downstream of a modem turbine rotor and to understand the flow physics such as origin, nature, development of wakes, secondary flow, and leakage flow. The experiment was carried out in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) at Penn State, with velocity measurements taken with a 3-D LDV System. Two radial traverses at 1% and 10% of chord downstream of the rotor have been performed to identify the three-dimensional flow features at the exit of the rotor blade row. Sufficient spatial resolution was maintained to resolve blade wake, secondary flow, and tip leakage flow. The wake deficit is found to be substantial, especially at 1% of chord downstream of the rotor. At this location, negative axial velocity occurs near the tip, suggesting flow separation in the tip clearance region. Turbulence intensities peak in the wake region, and cross- correlations are mainly associated with the velocity gradient of the wake deficit. The radial velocities, both in the wake and in the endwall region, are found to be substantial. Two counter-rotating secondary flows are identified in the blade passage, with one occupying the half span close to the casino and the other occupying the half span close to the hub. The tip leakage flow is well restricted to 10% immersion from the blade tip. There are strong vorticity distributions associated with these secondary flows and tip leakage flow. The passage averaged data are in good agreement with design values.

  8. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  9. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  10. Laser velocimeter measurements of two-bladed helicopter rotor flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggers, J. C.; Lee, A.; Orloff, K. L.; Lemmer, O. J.

    1977-01-01

    Data from a wind tunnel investigation of the flow fields around helicopter rotors were presented. A two component laser velocimeter was used to measure the velocity fields of two 2.1 m diameter rotors. A minicomputer-based online data system is described which monitored, reduced, and plotted the results. Tip vortices constitute the primary disturbances in the flow field, but present theories do not predict vortex positions and velocity distributions with sufficient accuracy.

  11. Quasi-steady current sheet structures with field-aligned flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the characteristics of quasi-steady plasma and field structures with field-aligned flow. Explicit solutions are developed for modeling the compressible flow around a plasmoid in the distant magnetotail. The expected and observed plasmoid signatures are found. Field signatures outside the plasmoid are typically those of encounters of traveling compression region: a north-south signature of Bz accompanied by an enhancement of Bx.

  12. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: programmed operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) is a widely used technique for analyzing polydisperse nanoparticle and macromolecular samples. The programmed decay of cross flow rate is often employed. The interdependence of the cross flow rate through the membrane and the fluid flow along the channel length complicates the prediction of elution time and fractionating power. The theory for their calculation is presented. It is also confirmed for examples of exponential decay of cross flow rate with constant channel outlet flow rate that the residual sample polydispersity at the channel outlet is quite well approximated by the reciprocal of four times the fractionating power. Residual polydispersity is of importance when online MALS or DLS detection are used to extract quantitative information on particle size or molecular weight. The theory presented here provides a firm basis for the optimization of programmed flow conditions in As-FlFFF. Graphical abstract Channel outlet polydispersity remains significant following fractionation by As-FlFFF under conditions of programmed decay of cross flow rate.

  13. Computational flow field in energy efficient engine (EEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Kenji; Moder, Jeff; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, preliminary results for the recently-updated Open National Combustor Code (Open NCC) as applied to the EEE are presented. The comparison between two different numerical schemes, the standard Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) scheme and the advection upstream splitting method (AUSM), is performed for the cold flow and the reacting flow calculations using the RANS. In the cold flow calculation, the AUSM scheme predicts a much stronger reverse flow in the central recirculation zone. In the reacting flow calculation, we test two cases: gaseous fuel injection and liquid spray injection. In the gaseous fuel injection case, the overall flame structures of the two schemes are similar to one another, in the sense that the flame is attached to the main nozzle, but is detached from the pilot nozzle. However, in the exit temperature profile, the AUSM scheme shows a more uniform profile than that of the JST scheme, which is close to the experimental data. In the liquid spray injection case, we expect different flame structures in this scenario. We will give a brief discussion on how two numerical schemes predict the flame structures inside the Eusing different ways to introduce the fuel injection. Supported by NASA's Transformational Tools and Technologies project.

  14. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  15. Analytical study on the influence of nonequilibrium ionization for current flow pattern and flow field of MPD arcjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Itsuro; Shoji, Tsunetake

    1990-07-01

    The effect of non-equilibrium ionization on a one-dimensional supersonic self-field MPD flow, which starts from the point of Mach number 1, is analyzed taking ionization and recombination rate-equations and electron energy equation into consideration. It was observed generally that for given inlet boundary conditions and a total discharge current, the solution exists in a limited region of propellant flow rate and the required electrode becomes longer for lower propellant flow rate, as in the cases of frozen or thermal-equilibrium flow. Based on the calculated results with argon or hydrogen propellant, it was shown that a remarkable deviation from ionization equilibrium appears in the course of plasma acceleration, when the propellant flow rate is near the lower limit, and that for molecular species hydrogen, current concentration on the inlet part, observed in the case of argon, is removed by the influence of dissociation process.

  16. Flow-driven cell migration under external electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this paper, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent. PMID:26765031

  17. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  18. Investigations of flow field perturbations induced on slotted transonic-tunnel walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Collins, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    The free-stream interference caused by the flow through the slotted walls of the test sections of transonic wind tunnels has continuously a problem in transonic tunnel testing. The adaptive-wall transonic tunnel is designed to actively control the near-wall boundary conditions by sucking or blowing through the wall. In order to make the adaptive-wall concept work, parameters for computational boundary conditions must be known. These parameters must be measured with sufficient accuracy to allow numerical convergence of the flow field computations and must be measured in an inviscid region away from the model that is placed inside the wind tunnel. The near-wall flow field was mapped in detail using a five-port cone probe that was traversed in a plane transverse to the free-stream flow. The initial experiments were made using a single slot and recent measurements used multiple slots, all with the tunnel empty. The projection of the flow field velocity vectors on the transverse plane revealed the presence of a vortex-like flow with vorticity in the free stream. The current research involves the measurement of the flow field above a multislotted system with segmented plenums behind it, in which the flow is controlled through several plenums simultaneously. This system would be used to control a three-dimensional flow field.

  19. The Plastic Flow Field in the Vicinity of the Pin-Tool During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, E. L.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The plastic flow field in the vicinity of the pin-tool during Friction Stir Welding (FSW) needs to be understood if a theoretical understanding of the process is to be attained. The structure of welds does not exhibit the flow field itself, but consists in a residue of displacements left by the plastic flow field. The residue requires analysis to extract from it the instantaneous flow field around the pin-tool. A simplified merry-go-round model makes sense of some tracer experiments reported in the literature. A quantitative comparison is made of the displacements of copper wire markers with displacements computed from a hypothetical plastic flow field. The hypothetical plastic flow field consists in a circular rotation field about a translating pin tool with angular velocity varying with radius from the pin centerline. A sharply localized rotational field comprising slip on a surface around the tool agreed better with observations than a distributed slip field occupying a substantial volume around the tool. Both the tracer and the wire displacements support the "rotating plug" model, originally invoked or thermal reasons, of the FSW process.

  20. The Effect of Magnetic Field on Mean Flow Generation by Rotating Two-dimensional Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Laura K.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the significant interaction of convection, rotation, and magnetic field in many astrophysical objects, we investigate the interplay between large-scale flows driven by rotating convection and an imposed magnetic field. We utilize a simple model in two dimensions comprised of a plane layer that is rotating about an axis inclined to gravity. It is known that this setup can result in strong mean flows; we numerically examine the effect of an imposed horizontal magnetic field on such flows. We show that increasing the field strength in general suppresses the time-dependent mean flows, but in some cases it organizes them, leading to stronger time-averaged flows. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of the field on the correlations responsible for driving the flows and the competition between Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. A change in behavior is observed when the (fluid and magnetic) Prandtl numbers are decreased. In the smaller Prandtl number regime, it is shown that significant mean flows can persist even when the quenching of the overall flow velocity by the field is relatively strong.