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Sample records for augmented lung injury

  1. Curcumin augments lung maturation, preventing neonatal lung injury by inhibiting TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Reiko; Li, Yishi; Torday, John S.

    2011-01-01

    There is no effective intervention to prevent or treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Curcumin has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and it modulates signaling of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), an important molecule in the pathobiology of BPD. However, its role in the prevention of BPD is not known. We determined 1) if curcumin enhances neonatal lung maturation, 2) if curcumin protects against hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury, and 3) if this protection is mediated by blocking TGF-β. Embryonic day 19 fetal rat lung fibroblasts were exposed to 21% or 95% O2 for 24 h following 1 h of treatment with curcumin. Curcumin dose dependently accelerated e19 fibroblast differentiation [increased parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) receptor, PPARγ, and adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP) levels and triolein uptake] and proliferation (increased thymidine incorporation). Pretreatment with curcumin blocked the hyperoxia-induced decrease (PPARγ and ADRP) and increase (α-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin) in markers of lung injury/repair, as well as the activation of TGF-β signaling. In a separate set of experiments, neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat pups were exposed to 21% or 95% O2 for 7 days with or without intraperitoneal administration of curcumin. Analysis for markers of lung injury/repair [PTHrP receptor, PPARγ, ADRP, fibronectin, TGF-β receptor (activin receptor-like kinase 5), and Smad3] and lung morphology (radial alveolar count) demonstrated that curcumin effectively blocks TGF-β activation and hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Therefore, curcumin accelerates lung maturation by stimulating key alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and prevents hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury, possibly by blocking TGF-β activation, suggesting that it is a potential intervention against BPD. PMID:21821729

  2. Nebulized PPARγ Agonists: A Novel Approach to Augment Neonatal Lung Maturation and Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Edith; Sakurai, Reiko; Husain, Sumair; Paek, Dave; Gong, Ming; Ibe, Basil; Li, Yishi; Husain, Maleha; Torday, John S.; Rehan, Virender K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND By stimulating lipofibroblast maturation, parenterally administered PPARγ agonists promote lung homeostasis and injury repair in the neonatal lung. In this study, we determined whether PPARγ agonists could be delivered effectively via nebulization to neonates, and whether this approach would also protect against hyperoxia-induced lung injury. METHODS One-day old Sprague-Dawley rat pups were administered PPARγ agonists rosiglitazone (RGZ, 3 mg/kg), pioglitazone (PGZ, 3 mg/kg), or the diluent, via nebulization every 24h; animals were exposed to 21% or 95% O2 for up to 72h. Twenty-four and 72h following initial nebulization, the pups were sacrificed for lung tissue and blood collection to determine markers of lung maturation, injury repair, and RGZ and PGZ plasma levels. RESULTS Nebulized RGZ and PGZ enhanced lung maturation in both males and females, as evidenced by the increased expression of markers of alveolar epithelial and mesenchymal maturation. This approach also protected against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, since hyperoxia-induced changes in bronchoalveolar lavage cell and protein contents and lung injury markers were all blocked by nebulized PGZ. CONCLUSIONS Nebulized PPARγ agonist administration promotes lung maturation and prevents neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury in both males and females. PMID:24488089

  3. Andrographolide protects against cigarette smoke-induced oxidative lung injury via augmentation of Nrf2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Guan, SP; Tee, W; Ng, DSW; Chan, TK; Peh, HY; Ho, WE; Cheng, C; Mak, JC; Wong, WSF

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cigarette smoke is a major cause for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Andrographolide is an active biomolecule isolated from the plant Andrographis paniculata. Andrographolide has been shown to activate nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a redox-sensitive antioxidant transcription factor. As Nrf2 activity is reduced in COPD, we hypothesize that andrographolide may have therapeutic value for COPD. Experimental Approach Andrographolide was given i.p. to BALB/c mice daily 2 h before 4% cigarette smoke exposure for 1 h over five consecutive days. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lungs were collected for analyses of cytokines, oxidative damage markers and antioxidant activities. BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and used to study the antioxidant mechanism of action of andrographolide. Key Results Andrographolide suppressed cigarette smoke-induced increases in lavage fluid cell counts; levels of IL-1β, MCP-1, IP-10 and KC; and levels of oxidative biomarkers 8-isoprostane, 8-OHdG and 3-nitrotyrosine in a dose-dependent manner. Andrographolide promoted inductions of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in lungs from cigarette smoke-exposed mice. In BEAS-2B cells, andrographolide markedly increased nuclear Nrf2 accumulation, promoted binding to antioxidant response element (ARE) and total cellular glutathione level in response to CSE. Andrographolide up-regulated ARE-regulated gene targets including glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit, GCL modifier (GCLM) subunit, GPx, GR and heme oxygenase-1 in BEAS-2B cells in response to CSE. Conclusions Andrographolide possesses antioxidative properties against cigarette smoke-induced lung injury probably via augmentation of Nrf2 activity and may have therapeutic potential for treating COPD. PMID:23146110

  4. Deficiency in the divalent metal transporter 1 augments bleomycin-induced lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to bleomycin can result in an inflammatory lung injury. The biological effect of this anti-neoplastic agent is dependent on its coordination of iron with subsequent oxidant generation. In lung cells, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) can participate in metal transport ...

  5. Mechanical Ventilation Augments Poly(I:C)-Induced Lung Injury via a WISP1-Integrin β3-Dependent Pathway in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuqing; Chen, Zhixia; Ding, Xibing; Zhao, Xiang; Jiang, Xi; Tong, Yao; Billiar, Timothy R; Li, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can improve hypoxemia, but can also cause the so-called ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), an analogue of natural double-strand RNA virus, can induce lung inflammation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether moderate tidal volume mechanical ventilation (MTV) augments poly(I:C)-induced lung injury, and if so, the mechanism responsible for it. Two μg/g poly(I:C) were instilled intratracheally in C57BL/6J wide type (WT) mice. They were then randomized to MTV (10 ml/kg tidal volume) or spontaneous breathing. Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected 4 h later for various measurements. Our results showed that MTV did not cause significant injury in normal lungs, but augmented poly(I:C)-induced lung injury. The expression level of WNT-induced secreted protein 1 (WISP1) was consistent with lung injury, and the amplification of lung injury by MTV could be alleviated by anti-WISP1 antibody treatment. MTV further increased poly(I:C)-induced integrin β3 expression in the lung. We performed coimmunoprecipitation, which showed there was an interaction between WISP1 and β3. WISP1 significantly increased poly(I:C)-induced TNF-α production in macrophages isolated from WT mice, but not in macrophages isolated from β3 knockout mice. Cotreatment with WISP1 and poly(I:C) markedly increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) in macrophages. Pretreating macrophages with an ERK inhibitor, U0126, dose-dependently antagonized the synergistic effect of WISP1 on poly(I:C)-induced TNF-α release. In conclusion, MTV exaggerates poly(I:C)-induced lung injury in a WISP1- and integrin β3-dependent manner, involving, at least in part, the activation of the ERK pathway. The WISP1-integrin β3 pathway could be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26772774

  6. Melatonin augments apoptotic adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment against sepsis-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lo; Lin, Kun-Chen; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chai, Han-Tan; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ching; Wu, Ying-Chung; Leu, Steve; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether combining melatonin and apoptotic adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (A-ADMSC) was superior to ADMSC alone in ameliorating sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=50) were randomized equally into five groups: sham controls (SC), sepsis induced by cecal-ligation and puncture (CLP), CLP-melatonin, CLP-A-ADMSC, and CLP-melatonin-A-ADMSC. Circulating interleukin (IL)-6 at 6, 18, and 72 hrs, were highest in CLP and lowest in SC groups, higher in CLP-melatonin than CLP-A-ADMSC and CLP-melatonin-A-ADMSC groups, higher in CLP-A-ADMSC than CLP-melatonin-A-ADMSC groups (all p<0.001). Immune reactivity (indicated by circulating cytotoxic-, and regulatory-T cells) and WBC count at 72 h exhibited the same pattern as that of circulating IL-6 (all p<0.001). Changes in histological scoring of lung parenchyma and the number of CD68+ and CD14+ cells showed a similar pattern compared to that of IL-6 level in all groups (all p<0.001). Changes in protein expressions of inflammatory (oxidative stress, RANTES, TNF-α, NF-κB, MMP-9, MIP-1, IL-1β), apoptotic (cleaved caspase 3 and PARP, mitochondrial Bax), fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β) markers and those of reactive-oxygen-species (NOX-1, NOX-2) displayed an identical pattern compared to that of circulating IL-6 in all groups (all p<0.001). Anti-oxidative capacities (GR+, GPx+, HO-1, NQO-1+) and angiogenesis marker (CXCR4+ cells) were lowest in SC group but highest in CLP-melatonin-A-ADMSC group, lower in CLP than CLP-melatonin and CLP-A-ADMSC groups, and lower in CLP-melatonin than CLP-A-ADMSC groups (all p<0.001). In conclusion, combined melatonin and A-ADMSC were superior to A-ADMSC alone in protecting the lung from sepsis-induced injury. PMID:25360211

  7. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  8. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  9. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  10. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS.

  11. Aortic homograft for pulmonary artery augmentation in single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Pablo; Morales, Jose; Guzman, Enrique; Tellez, Jose L; Niebla, Benito A; Avalos, Alejandro; Patiño, Hilda

    2005-06-01

    We present a case of unilateral lung transplantation in which a segment of the donor's descending aorta was used as a homograft for pulmonary artery augmentation in the donor lung. This technique can be used when the donor's lung artery has been cut at the base of the hilum during the harvesting procedure.

  12. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  13. Augmented oxygen-mediated transcriptional activation of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression and increased susceptibilities to hyperoxic lung injury in transgenic mice carrying the human CYP1A1 or mouse 1A2 promoter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiwu; Couroucli, Xanthi I; Wang, Lihua; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2011-04-01

    Supplemental oxygen administration is frequently administered to pre-term and term infants having pulmonary insufficiency. However, hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)A enzymes have been implicated in hyperoxic lung injury. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that hyperoxia induces CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes by transcriptional activation of the corresponding promoters in vivo, and transgenic mice expressing the human CYP1A1 or the mouse 1A2 promoter would be more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than wild type (WT) mice. Adult WT (CD-1) (12week-old) mice, transgenic mice carrying a 10kb human CYP1A1 promoter and the luciferase (luc) reporter gene (CYP1A1-luc), or mice expressing the mouse CYP1A2 promoter (CYP1A2-luc) were maintained in room air or exposed to hyperoxia for 24-72h. Hyperoxia exposure of CYP1A1-luc mice for 24 and 48h resulted in 2.5- and 1.25-fold increases, respectively, in signal intensities, compared to room air controls. By 72h, the induction had declined to control levels. CYP1A2-luc mice also showed enhanced luc expression after 24-48h, albeit to a lesser extent than those expressing the CYP1A1 promoter. Also, these mice showed decreased levels of endogenous CYP1A1 and 1A2 expression after prolonged hyperoxia, and were also more susceptible to lung injury than similarly exposed WT mice, with CYP1A2-luc mice showing the greatest injury. Our results support the hypothesis that hyperoxia induces CYP1A enzymes by transcriptional activation of its corresponding promoters, and that decreased endogenous expression of these enzymes contribute to the increased susceptibilities to hyperoxic lung injury in the transgenic animals. In summary, this is the first report providing direct evidence of hyperoxia-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression in vivo by mechanisms entailing transcriptional activation of the corresponding promoters, a phenomenon that has

  14. Augmentation of oxidant injury to human pulmonary epithelial cells by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections of the human lung, with resultant tissue injury. We have previously shown that iron bound to pyochelin, a siderophore secreted by the organism to acquire iron, is an efficient catalyst for hydroxyl radical (HO.) formation and augments injury to pulmonary artery endothelial cells resulting from their exposure to superoxide (O2.) and/or H2O2. Sources for O2-. and H2O2 included phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils and pyocyanin. Pyocyanin, another P. aeruginosa secretory product, undergoes cell-mediated redox, thereby forming O2-. and H2O2. In P. aeruginosa lung infections, damage to airway epithelial cells is probably more extensive than that to endothelial cells. Therefore, we examined whether ferripyochelin also augments oxidant-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. A549 cells, a human type II alveolar epithelial cell line, was exposed to H2O2, PMA-stimulated neutrophils, or pyocyanin, and injury was determined by release of 51Cr from prelabeled cells. Ferripyochelin significantly increased (> 10-fold) oxidant-mediated cell injury regardless of whether H2O2, neutrophils, or pyocyanin was employed. Apo-pyochelin was not effective, and ferripyochelin was not toxic by itself at the concentrations employed. Spin trapping with alpha-(4-pyrridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butyl-nitrone-ethanol confirmed the generation of HO., and injury was decreased by a variety of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethylthiourea. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of ferripyochelin at sites of P. aeruginosa lung infection could contribute to tissue injury through its ability to promote HO.-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. PMID:9038317

  15. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo.

  16. Metformin attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic patients may develop acute lung injury less often than non-diabetics; a fact that could be partially ascribed to the usage of antidiabetic drugs, including metformin. Metformin exhibits pleiotropic properties which make it potentially beneficial against lung injury. We hypothesized that pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, prevents ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Twenty-four rabbits were randomly assigned to pretreatment with metformin (250 mg/Kg body weight/day per os) or no medication for two days. Explanted lungs were perfused at constant flow rate (300 mL/min) and ventilated with injurious (peak airway pressure 23 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈17 mL/Kg) or protective (peak airway pressure 11 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈7 mL/Kg) settings for 1 hour. Alveolar capillary permeability was assessed by ultrafiltration coefficient, total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in BALF. Results High-pressure ventilation of the ex-vivo lung preparation resulted in increased microvascular permeability, edema formation and microhemorrhage compared to protective ventilation. Compared to no medication, pretreatment with metformin was associated with a 2.9-fold reduction in ultrafiltration coefficient, a 2.5-fold reduction in pulmonary edema formation, lower protein concentration in BALF, lower ACE activity in BALF, and fewer histological lesions upon challenge of the lung preparation with injurious ventilation. In contrast, no differences regarding pulmonary artery pressure and BALF total cell number were noted. Administration of metformin did not impact on outcomes of lungs subjected to protective ventilation. Conclusions Pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, decreases the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury in this model. PMID:22827994

  17. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    infectious lung injury, 96 proteins were differentially expressed. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that these proteins participate in biological processes involved in the development of lung injury after HSCT. These include acute phase response signaling, complement system, coagulation system, liver X receptor (LXR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR), and farsenoid X receptor (FXR)/RXR modulation. We identified 2 canonical pathways modulated by TNF-α, FXR/RXR activation, and IL2 signaling in macrophages. The proteins also mapped to blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and wound healing-processes that participate in organ repair. Cell movement was identified as significantly over-represented by proteins with differential expression between IPS and infection. In conclusion, the BALF protein expression in IPS differed significantly from infectious lung injury in HSCT recipients. These differences provide insights into mechanisms that are activated in lung injury in HSCT recipients and suggest potential therapeutic targets to augment lung repair. PMID:27155584

  18. Lung Injury after In Vivo Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Matot, Idit; Einav, Sharon; Weiniger, Carolyn F.; Pearl, Ron; Abramovitch, Rinat; Joshi, Balachandra V.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although short-term findings after lung reperfusion have been extensively reported, in vivo animal studies have not described outcome beyond the immediate time period. Therefore, the authors evaluated lung injury 27 h after reperfusion. They also investigated whether attenuation of lung injury with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS3558 was sustained beyond the immediate time period. Methods In intact-chest, spontaneously breathing cats in which the left lower lung lobe was isolated and subjected to 2 h of ischemia and 3 h of reperfusion, MRS3558 was administered before reperfusion. Animals were killed 3 or 27 h after reperfusion. Results When compared with 3 h of reperfusion, at 27 h the left lower lobe showed reduced apoptosis and no change in inflammation, but increased edema. Increased edema of the nonischemic right lung and hypoxemia were observed at 27 h after left lower lobe reperfusion. Increases in phosphorylated p38 levels were found at 3 h of reperfusion compared with control lung, with further increases at 27 h. The attenuation of injury observed with MRS3558 treatment at 3 h of reperfusion was sustained at 27 h. Conclusions Lung edema may worsen hours after the immediate postreperfusion period, even though lung apoptosis and inflammation are reduced or show no change, respectively. This was associated with further increases in phosphorylated p38 levels. The nonischemic lung may also be affected, suggesting a systemic response to reperfusion. In addition, early attenuation of injury is beneficial beyond the immediate period after reperfusion. Treatment aimed at inhibiting p38 activation, such as A3 receptor activation, should be further studied to explore its potential long-term beneficial effect. PMID:18648236

  19. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 Deficiency Amplifies Acute Lung Injury in Bleomycin-Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Burkhart, Kristin; Chen, Peter; Frevert, Charles W.; Randolph-Habecker, Julie; Hackman, Robert C.; Soloway, Paul D.; Madtes, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury triggers a profound and durable increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 expression, suggesting a potential role for this antiproteinase in the regulation of lung inflammation and fibrosis. TIMP-1 protein induction is spatially restricted to areas of lung injury as determined by immunohistochemistry. Using TIMP-1 null mutation mice, we demonstrate that TIMP-1 deficiency amplifies acute lung injury as determined by exaggerated pulmonary neutrophilia, hemorrhage, and vascular permeability compared with wild-type littermates after bleomycin exposure. The augmented pulmonary neutrophilia observed in TIMP-1–deficient animals was not found in similarly treated TIMP-2–deficient mice. Using TIMP-1 bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice, we observed that the TIMP-1–deficient phenotype was abolished in wild-type recipients of TIMP-1–deficient BM but not in TIMP-1–deficient recipients of wild-type BM. Acute lung injury in TIMP-1–deficient mice was accompanied by exaggerated gelatinase-B activity in the alveolar compartment. TIMP-1 deficiency did not alter neutrophil chemotactic factor accumulation in the injured lung nor neutrophil migration in response to chemotactic stimuli in vivo or in vitro. Moreover, TIMP-1 deficiency did not modify collagen accumulation after bleomycin injury. Our results provide direct evidence that TIMP-1 contributes significantly to the regulation of acute lung injury, functioning to limit inflammation and lung permeability. PMID:15947421

  20. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  1. Conceptual Approaches to Lung Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Peter M.; Henson, Jan E.; Janssen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury and repair is a broad topic that includes many cell types and is relevant to the pathogenesis of most lung diseases. Here, we focus on injury and repair of the alveolus, the principal function of which is to achieve gas exchange. The many cell types and structures present in the alveolus are discussed, with emphasis on their interactions in both health and disease. We define injury as damage resulting in impaired gas exchange; physiologic repair, then, requires restoration of normal alveolar architecture and function. The role of inflammation in both injury and repair of structural alveolar cells, particularly epithelial cells, as well as mechanisms of resolution of inflammation will be addressed. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance of addressing quantitatively the dynamic and complex multidirectional interactions between the many alveolar cell types and structures in three dimensions over time and in relating such mechanistic studies to physiologic outcomes and human disease. PMID:25830855

  2. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    PubMed Central

    Neuringer, Isabel P; Randell, Scott H

    2004-01-01

    Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung. PMID:15285789

  3. Mechanisms of Lung Injury and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2016-09-01

    Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most frequent adverse outcome for infants born at < 30 weeks gestational age, there remain major gaps in understanding the pathophysiology, and thus there are few effective targeted therapies to prevent and treat BPD. This review will focus on the substantial problems and knowledge gaps for the clinician and investigator when considering lung injury and BPD. The epidemiology of BPD is clear: BPD is a lung injury syndrome predominantly in extremely low-birth-weight infants with an incidence that increases as gestation/birth weight decrease, with growth restriction, in males and with fetal exposures and with injury from postdelivery respiratory care. However, we do not have a good definition of BPD that identifies the infants that die of respiratory disease before 36 weeks or that predicts long-term outcomes as well. The injury resulting in BPD likely begins as altered lung development before delivery in many infants (small for gestational age, chorioamnionitis, tobacco exposure), can be initiated by resuscitating at birth, and then amplified by postnatal exposures (oxygen, mechanical ventilation, infection). Conceptually the events leading to BPD are the continued interplay of lung development that is altered progressively by injury and repair to result in poorly defined phenotypes of BPD. The injury pathways prominently cause inflammation, and as a proof of principle, corticosteroids can decrease the incidence and severity of BPD, as demonstrated by three recent trials of the early use of steroids. There are likely "adaptation" and "tolerance" responses that modulate the injury and repair to increase or decrease the damage, interactions that are not understood. BPD is a more complex disease. PMID:27603539

  4. Smoke Inhalation Lung Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Demling, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to present a multifaceted, definitive review of the past and current status of smoke inhalation injury. History along with current understanding of anatomical, physiology, and biologic components will be discussed. Methods: The literature has been reviewed from the early onset of the concept of smoke inhalation in the 1920s to our current understanding as of 2007. Results: The results indicate that the current pathophysiologic concept is of a disease process that leads to immediate and delayed pulmonary injury best managed by aggressive physiologic support. Management approaches for the biochemical changes have not kept up with current knowledge. The lung injury process is activated by toxins in the smoke's gas and particle components and perpetuated by a resulting lung inflammation. This inflammatory process becomes self-perpetuating through the activation of a large number of inflammatory cascades. In addition, smoke injury leads to significant systemic abnormalities injuring other organs and accentuating the burn injury process and subsequently leading to mediator-induced cellular injury leading potentially to multisystem organ failure. Conclusions: Smoke inhalation injury results in the anatomic finding of denuded and sometimes sloughed airways mucosa. Physiologic findings include small airways containing fibrin casts of mucosa and neutrophils. Airway hyper-reactivity results as well, leading to further decreased collapse, causing obstruction. PMID:18552974

  5. Influenza lung injury: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gregory, David J; Kobzik, Lester

    2015-11-15

    In this Perspectives, we discuss some recent developments in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury following influenza infection, with an emphasis on promising therapeutic leads. Damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier has been quantified in mice, and agents have been identified that can help to preserve barrier integrity, such as vasculotide, angiopoietin-like 4 neutralization, and sphingosine 1-phosphate mimics. Results from studies using mesenchymal stem cells have been disappointing, despite promising data in other types of lung injury. The roles of fatty acid binding protein 5, prostaglandin E2, and the interplay between IFN-γ and STAT1 in epithelial signaling during infection have been addressed in vitro. Finally, we discuss the role of autophagy in inflammatory cytokine production and the viral life cycle and the opportunities this presents for intervention.

  6. Targeted Deletion of Nrf2 Impairs Lung Development and Oxidant Injury in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Houten, Bennett; Wang, Xuting; Miller-DeGraff, Laura; Fostel, Jennifer; Gladwell, Wesley; Perrow, Ligon; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Kobzik, Lester; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Bell, Douglas A.; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nrf2 is an essential transcription factor for protection against oxidant disorders. However, its role in organ development and neonatal disease has received little attention. Therapeutically administered oxygen has been considered to contribute to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in prematurity. The current study was performed to determine Nrf2-mediated molecular events during saccular-to-alveolar lung maturation, and the role of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of hyperoxic lung injury using newborn Nrf2-deficient (Nrf2−/−) and wild-type (Nrf2+/+) mice. Results: Pulmonary basal expression of cell cycle, redox balance, and lipid/carbohydrate metabolism genes was lower while lymphocyte immunity genes were more highly expressed in Nrf2−/− neonates than in Nrf2+/+ neonates. Hyperoxia-induced phenotypes, including mortality, arrest of saccular-to-alveolar transition, and lung edema, and inflammation accompanying DNA damage and tissue oxidation were significantly more severe in Nrf2−/− neonates than in Nrf2+/+ neonates. During lung injury pathogenesis, Nrf2 orchestrated expression of lung genes involved in organ injury and morphology, cellular growth/proliferation, vasculature development, immune response, and cell–cell interaction. Bioinformatic identification of Nrf2 binding motifs and augmented hyperoxia-induced inflammation in genetically deficient neonates supported Gpx2 and Marco as Nrf2 effectors. Innovation: This investigation used lung transcriptomics and gene targeted mice to identify novel molecular events during saccular-to-alveolar stage transition and to elucidate Nrf2 downstream mechanisms in protection from hyperoxia-induced injury in neonate mouse lungs. Conclusion: Nrf2 deficiency augmented lung injury and arrest of alveolarization caused by hyperoxia during the newborn period. Results suggest a therapeutic potential of specific Nrf2 activators for oxidative stress-associated neonatal disorders including BPD. Antioxid. Redox Signal

  7. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  8. Protease cleavage of iron-transferrin augments pyocyanin-mediated endothelial cell injury via promotion of hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R A; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D; Britigan, B E

    1996-01-01

    Although a number of bacterium- and host-derived factors have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-associated tissue injury, the mechanism remains unclear. We have previously shown that protease modification of iron (Fe)-transferrin generates new iron chelates capable of catalyzing hydroxyl radical (.OH) formation from superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. The latter two oxidants are generated during redox cycling of another P. aeruginosa secretory product, pyocyanin. The lung is a major site of P. aeruginosa infection, with damage to local endothelial cells contributing to the pathogenesis of such infections. Endothelial cells are highly susceptible to oxidant-mediated injury. Therefore, we examined whether pseudomonas elastase-cleaved Fe-transferrin and pyocyanin synergistically enhance pulmonary artery endothelial cell injury via .OH formation. By measuring 51Cr release from cultured endothelial cell monolayers, pseudomonas elastase-cleaved Fe-transferrin significantly augmented cell injury resulting from cellular exposure to sublethal concentrations of pyocyanin. This enhancement in injury was not protease specific, as similar results were obtained with pyocyanin in combination with trypsin- or porcine pancreatic elastase-cleaved Fe-transferrin. The association of iron with the transferrin appeared to be necessary in this process. Supporting the involvement of .OH generation via the Haber-Weiss reaction in augmenting cell injury, catalase, dimethyl thiourea, superoxide dismutase, deferoxamine, and dimethyl sulfoxide significantly inhibited cell injury resulting from exposure to pyocyanin and protease-cleaved Fe-transferrin. Furthermore, spin trapping demonstrated the production of .OH in this cellular system. We conclude that .OH formation resulting from the interaction of protease-cleaved Fe-transferrin and endothelial cell redox cycling of pyocyanin may contribute to P. aeruginosa-associated tissue injury via endothelial cell

  9. The role of autophagy in lung ischemia/reperfusion injury after lung transplantation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Bentong; Huang, Lei; Dai, Bin; Liu, Jichun; Tang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation. Methods: The rat orthotopic lung transplantation model was established to perform the level of autophagy in the cold I/R injury in this study. The pretreatment of inhibitor (3-Methyladenine [3-MA]) and activator (rapamycin [RAPA]) of autophagy were performed to assess the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation in rats. Results: After lung transplantation, the autophagy, lung cell apoptosis and lung injury were aggravated and peaked at 6 h following the transplantation. The inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA induced downregulated of autophagy, decreased cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, the lung injury, which was indicated by calculating the peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), pulmonary vein blood gas analysis (PO2) and ratio of wet to dry in lung (W/D), was ameliorated after treatment with 3-MA. The activation of autophagy by RAPA causing the upregulated of autophagy and apoptosis of lung cells, and enhanced the lung injury. Conclusion: All the results suggested that the autophagy was involved in the cold I/R injury in lung transplantation model, and played a potential role on the regulation of I/R injury after lung transplantation. PMID:27648150

  10. The role of autophagy in lung ischemia/reperfusion injury after lung transplantation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Bentong; Huang, Lei; Dai, Bin; Liu, Jichun; Tang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation. Methods: The rat orthotopic lung transplantation model was established to perform the level of autophagy in the cold I/R injury in this study. The pretreatment of inhibitor (3-Methyladenine [3-MA]) and activator (rapamycin [RAPA]) of autophagy were performed to assess the role of autophagy in the cold I/R injury following lung transplantation in rats. Results: After lung transplantation, the autophagy, lung cell apoptosis and lung injury were aggravated and peaked at 6 h following the transplantation. The inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA induced downregulated of autophagy, decreased cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, the lung injury, which was indicated by calculating the peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), pulmonary vein blood gas analysis (PO2) and ratio of wet to dry in lung (W/D), was ameliorated after treatment with 3-MA. The activation of autophagy by RAPA causing the upregulated of autophagy and apoptosis of lung cells, and enhanced the lung injury. Conclusion: All the results suggested that the autophagy was involved in the cold I/R injury in lung transplantation model, and played a potential role on the regulation of I/R injury after lung transplantation.

  11. Surfactant for pediatric acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F; Chess, Patricia R; Notter, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients who have ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS.

  12. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chen, Chin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN) on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control) thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV) of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology), neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory. PMID:25100435

  13. Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep.

  14. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury Following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Obervational Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studi...

  15. [Vasoconstriction is required for edema of contralateral lung after reperfusion injury of one lung].

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Alejandro; Castro, Ignacio; Trejo, Humberto; Urich, Daniela; Caraballo, Juan; Gutiérrez, Jeydith; Cano, Camilo; Sánchez de León, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) lung injury is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in certain clinical scenarios that include transplantation, thromboendarterectomy and reexpansion injury of the lung. Edema of the contralateral lung after IR injury of one lung has been reported and this study was aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of this phenomenon. One-lung ischemia/hypoxia followed by reperfusion with either blood or an acellular plasma substitute was achieved in an isolated rabbit lung model by hilum clamping. After reperfusion, we studied the isolated effects of vasoconstriction and inflammation on contralateral lung injury by using papaverine or hydrocortisone as vasodilator and anti-inflammatory, respectively. We observed that IR of one lung induces edema of the contralateral lung. Absence of leukocytes and platelets in the perfusate or use of hydrocortisone completely inhibits IR injury. Moreover, papaverine suppresses edema of the contralateral, but not that of the reperfused lung. We concluded that IR of one lung produces edema in the contralateral lung that requires vasoconstriction of the latter. PMID:20815156

  16. [Advances in the research of blast lung injury].

    PubMed

    Peng, L H; Guo, G H

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a variety of explosive weapons become increasingly common used in regional military conflicts and terrorist bomb attacks. Meanwhile, the incidence of accidental explosion also showed an increase in the industries and daily life. The lung is the most labile organ and it is used to be severely injured organ in blast injury although even no signs of external injury could be observed on chest. Blast injury can present the symptoms such as lung rupture, bleeding, edema and emphysema. Respiratory dysfunction can affect oxygen supply to organs and systemic tissue, resulting in rapid and sustained hypoxemia and high mortality rate. Blast lung injury is characterized by respiratory disturbance and hypoxia. This article summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiological changes, diagnosis, and treatment of blast lung injury, with a hope to provide some useful clinical information.

  17. [Advances in the research of blast lung injury].

    PubMed

    Peng, L H; Guo, G H

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a variety of explosive weapons become increasingly common used in regional military conflicts and terrorist bomb attacks. Meanwhile, the incidence of accidental explosion also showed an increase in the industries and daily life. The lung is the most labile organ and it is used to be severely injured organ in blast injury although even no signs of external injury could be observed on chest. Blast injury can present the symptoms such as lung rupture, bleeding, edema and emphysema. Respiratory dysfunction can affect oxygen supply to organs and systemic tissue, resulting in rapid and sustained hypoxemia and high mortality rate. Blast lung injury is characterized by respiratory disturbance and hypoxia. This article summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiological changes, diagnosis, and treatment of blast lung injury, with a hope to provide some useful clinical information. PMID:27030652

  18. Protease-cleaved iron-transferrin augments oxidant-mediated endothelial cell injury via hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R A; Britigan, B E

    1995-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the Pseudomonas-derived protease, pseudomonas elastase (PAE), can modify transferrin to form iron complexes capable of catalyzing the formation of hydroxyl radical (.OH) from neutrophil (PMN)-derived superoxide (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). As the lung is a major site of Pseudomonas infection, the ability of these iron chelates to augment oxidant-mediated pulmonary artery endothelial cell injury via release of 51Cr from prelabeled cells was examined. Diferrictransferrin previously cleaved with PAE significantly enhanced porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayer injury from 2.3-6.3 to 15.8-17.0% of maximum, resulting from exposure to H2O2, products of the xanthine/xanthine oxidase reaction, or PMA-stimulated PMNs. Iron associated with transferrin appeared to be responsible for cell injury. Spin trapping and the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive 2-deoxyribose oxidation products demonstrated the production of .OH in this system. The addition of catalase, dimethyl thiourea, and the hydrophobic spin trap, alpha-phenyl-n-terbutyl-nitrone, offered significant protection from injury (27.8-58.2%). Since sites of Pseudomonas infection contain other proteases, the ability of porcine pancreatic elastase and trypsin to substitute for PAE was examined. Results were similar to those observed with PAE. We conclude .OH formation resulting from protease alteration of transferrin may serve as a mechanism of tissue injury at sites of bacterial infection and other processes characterized by increased proteolytic activity. Images PMID:7769095

  19. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  20. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Velten, Markus; Tipple, Trent E; Nelin, Leif D; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-08-01

    Supraphysiological O2 concentrations, mechanical ventilation, and inflammation significantly contribute to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).Exposure of newborn mice to hyperoxia causes inflammation and impaired alveolarization similar to that seen in infants with BPD.Previously, we demonstrated that pulmonary cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression is increased in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice.The present studies were designed to define the role of COX-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of COX-2 activity would reduce hyperoxia-induced inflammation and improve alveolarization.Newborn C3H/HeN micewere injected daily with vehicle, aspirin (nonselective COX-2 inhibitor), or celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for the first 7 days of life.Additional studies utilized wild-type (C57Bl/6, COX-2(+/+)), heterozygous (COX-2(+/-)), and homozygous (COX-2(-/-)) transgenic mice.Micewere exposed to room air (21% O2) or hyperoxia (85% O2) for 14 days.Aspirin-injected and COX-2(-/-) pups had reduced levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL).Both aspirin and celecoxib treatment reduced macrophage numbers in the alveolar walls and air spaces.Aspirin and celecoxib treatment attenuated hyperoxia-induced COX activity, including altered levels of prostaglandin (PG)D2 metabolites.Decreased COX activity, however, did not prevent hyperoxia-induced lung developmental deficits.Our data suggest thatincreased COX-2 activity may contribute to proinflammatory responses, including macrophage chemotaxis, during exposure to hyperoxia.Modulation of COX-2 activity may be a useful therapeutic target to limit hyperoxia-induced inflammation in preterm infants at risk of developing BPD. PMID:23624331

  2. Radiation-induced lung injury: a hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.G.; Bryant, D.H.; Morgan, G.W.; Yeates, M.; Fernandez, V.; Penny, R.; Breit, S.N.

    1988-08-15

    Radiation pneumonitis occurs 6 to 12 weeks after thoracic irradiation, and is thought to be due to direct radiation-induced lung injury. Four patients who developed pneumonitis after unilateral thoracic irradiation for carcinoma of the breast were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan of the lung, and respiratory function tests. On the irradiated side of the chest, all four patients showed an increase in total cells recovered from the lavage fluid and a marked increase in the percentage of lymphocytes. When results for the unirradiated lung were compared with results for the irradiated lung, there was a comparable increase in total cells and percentage of lymphocytes. Gallium scans showed increases for both irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Prompt improvement was seen after corticosteroid therapy in all patients. The fact that abnormal findings occur equally in irradiated and unirradiated lung is inconsistent with simple direct radiation-induced injury and suggests an immunologically mediated mechanism such as a hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  3. [Difficulties in the radiodiagnosis of lung injuries in phthisiatric practice].

    PubMed

    Amansakhedov, R B; Perfil'ev, A V; Érgeshov, A É; Sigaev, A T

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes clinical cases of concomitant lung and intrathoracic lymph node involvements as evidenced by conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT). It shows difficulties in the differential diagnosis of different nosological entities in pulmonary tuberculosis. The x-ray semiotics of concomitant lung injuries is also depicted. PMID:25272723

  4. [Difficulties in the radiodiagnosis of lung injuries in phthisiatric practice].

    PubMed

    Amansakhedov, R B; Perfil'ev, A V; Érgeshov, A É; Sigaev, A T

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes clinical cases of concomitant lung and intrathoracic lymph node involvements as evidenced by conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT). It shows difficulties in the differential diagnosis of different nosological entities in pulmonary tuberculosis. The x-ray semiotics of concomitant lung injuries is also depicted.

  5. Therapeutic Strategies for Severe Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Janet. V.; Brower, Roy; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the management of patients with severe Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ALI/ARDS), clinicians are sometimes challenged to maintain acceptable gas exchange while avoiding harmful mechanical ventilation practices. In some of these patients, physicians may consider the use of “rescue therapies” to sustain life. Our goal is to provide a practical, evidence-based review to assist critical care physicians’ care for patients with severe ALI/ARDS. Data Sources and Study Selection We searched the Pub Med database for clinical trials examining the use of the following therapies in ALI/ARDS: recruitment maneuvers, high positive end expiratory pressure, prone position, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, glucocorticoids, inhaled nitric oxide, buffer therapy and extracorporeal life support. Study selection All clinical trials that included patients with severe ALI/ARDS were included in the review. Data Synthesis The primary author reviewed the aforementioned trials in depth and then disputed findings and conclusions with other authors until consensus was achieved. Conclusions This article is designed to: a) provide clinicians with a simple, bedside definition for the diagnosis of severe ARDS; b) describe several therapies that can be used in severe ARDS with an emphasis on the potential risks as well as the indications and benefits; and c) to offer practical guidelines for implementation of these therapies. PMID:20562704

  6. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  7. Serum copper concentration as an index of experimental lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'ao, C.; Ischiropoulos, H. )

    1989-01-01

    Serum copper (Cu) concentration was evaluated as an index of lung injury in two rat models of pneumotoxicity: hemithoracic irradiation and monocrotaline ingestion. In both models there was a dose- and time-dependent increase in serum Cu concentration. This hypercupremia paralleled the development of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction (decreased lung plasminogen activator activity and increased prostacyclin production) and pulmonary fibrosis (hydroxyproline accumulation). In the radiation model, lung injury and hypercupremia persisted for at least 6 months, and were spared similarly when the total dose was delivered in multiple daily fractions as compared to single doses. In irradiated rats, the elevated serum Cu concentration was accompanied by increases in plasma ceruloplasmin, lung Cu concentration, and lung Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In monocrotaline-treated rats, lung damage and hypercupremia also were accompanied by a reduction in liver Cu concentration, and by a direct correlation between the concentrations of Cu and SGOT in the serum. In both models, some but not all modifiers of lung damage (penicillamine, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, pentoxifylline) also partially prevented the insult-induced hypercupremia. In contrast, serum iron concentration was largely independent of treatment in all experiments. These data suggest that elevated serum copper concentration is an accurate and minimally invasive index of lung injury in irradiated and monocrotaline-treated rats.

  8. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  9. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  11. Augmented multisensory feedback enhances locomotor adaptation in humans with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Landry, Jill M; Wu, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Different forms of augmented feedback may engage different motor learning pathways, but it is unclear how these pathways interact with each other, especially in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to test whether augmented multisensory feedback could enhance aftereffects following short term locomotor training (i.e., adaptation) in patients with incomplete SCI. A total of 10 subjects with incomplete SCI were recruited to perform locomotor adaptation. Three types of augmented feedback were provided during the adaptation: (a) computerized visual cues showing the actual and target stride length (augmented visual feedback); (b) a swing resistance applied to the leg (augmented proprioceptive feedback); (c) a combination of the visual cues and resistance (augmented multisensory feedback). The results showed that subjects' stride length increased in all conditions following the adaptation, but the increase was greater and retained longer in the multisensory feedback condition. The multisensory feedback provided in this study may engage both explicit and implicit learning pathways during the adaptation and in turn enhance the aftereffect. The results implied that multisensory feedback may be used as an adjunctive approach to enhance gait recovery in humans with SCI. PMID:24746604

  12. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, and there is a significant need for more effective medicinal chemical agents for use in these severe and lethal lung injury syndromes. To facilitate future chemical-based drug discovery research on new agent development, this paper reviews present pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS in the context of biological and biochemical drug activities. The complex lung injury pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS offers an array of possible targets for drug therapy, including inflammation, cell and tissue injury, vascular dysfunction, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidant injury. Added targets for pharmacotherapy outside the lungs may also be present, since multiorgan or systemic pathology is common in ALI/ARDS. The biological and physiological complexity of ALI/ARDS requires the consideration of combined-agent treatments in addition to single-agent therapies. A number of pharmacologic agents have been studied individually in ALI/ARDS, with limited or minimal success in improving survival. However, many of these agents have complementary biological/biochemical activities with the potential for synergy or additivity in combination therapy as discussed in this article. PMID:18691048

  13. Angiotensin receptor blockade attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung injury and rescues lung architecture in mice.

    PubMed

    Podowski, Megan; Calvi, Carla; Metzger, Shana; Misono, Kaori; Poonyagariyagorn, Hataya; Lopez-Mercado, Armando; Ku, Therese; Lauer, Thomas; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Berger, Alan; Cheadle, Christopher; Tuder, Rubin; Dietz, Harry C; Mitzner, Wayne; Wise, Robert; Neptune, Enid

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent smoking-related disease for which no disease-altering therapies currently exist. As dysregulated TGF-β signaling associates with lung pathology in patients with COPD and in animal models of lung injury induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), we postulated that inhibiting TGF-β signaling would protect against CS-induced lung injury. We first confirmed that TGF-β signaling was induced in the lungs of mice chronically exposed to CS as well as in COPD patient samples. Importantly, key pathological features of smoking-associated lung disease in patients, e.g., alveolar injury with overt emphysema and airway epithelial hyperplasia with fibrosis, accompanied CS-induced alveolar cell apoptosis caused by enhanced TGF-β signaling in CS-exposed mice. Systemic administration of a TGF-β-specific neutralizing antibody normalized TGF-β signaling and alveolar cell death, conferring improved lung architecture and lung mechanics in CS-exposed mice. Use of losartan, an angiotensin receptor type 1 blocker used widely in the clinic and known to antagonize TGF-β signaling, also improved oxidative stress, inflammation, metalloprotease activation and elastin remodeling. These data support our hypothesis that inhibition of TGF-β signaling through angiotensin receptor blockade can attenuate CS-induced lung injury in an established murine model. More importantly, our findings provide a preclinical platform for the development of other TGF-β-targeted therapies for patients with COPD.

  14. Adiponectin protects against hyperoxic lung injury and vascular leak

    PubMed Central

    Sliman, Sean M.; Patel, Rishi B.; Cruff, Jason P.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Newland, Christie A.; Schrader, Carrie A.; Sherwani, Shariq I.; Gurney, Travis O.; Magalang, Ulysses J.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin (Ad), an adipokine exclusively secreted by the adipose tissue, has emerged as a paracrine metabolic regulator as well as a protectant against oxidative stress. Pharmacological approaches of protecting against clinical hyperoxic lung injury during oxygen therapy/treatment are limited. Earlier, we have reported that Ad inhibits the NADPH oxidase-catalyzed formation of superoxide from molecular oxygen in human neutrophils. Having this as the premise, we conducted studies to determine whether (i) exogenous Ad would protect against the hyperoxia-induced barrier dysfunction in the lung endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro and (ii) endogenously synthesized Ad would protect against hyperoxic lung injury in wild type (WT) and Ad-overexpressing transgenic (AdTg) mice in vivo. The results demonstrated that exogenous Ad protected against the hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress, loss of glutathione (GSH), cytoskeletal reorganization, barrier dysfunction, and leak in the lung ECs in vitro. Furthermore, the hyperoxia-induced lung injury, vascular leak, and lipid peroxidation were significantly attenuated in AdTg mice in vivo. Also, AdTg mice exhibited elevated levels of total thiols and GSH in the lungs as compared to WT mice. For the first time, our studies demonstrated that Ad protected against the hyperoxia-induced lung damage apparently through attenuation of oxidative stress and modulation of thiol-redox status. PMID:22183615

  15. Eotaxin Expression in Sephadex-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ren-Feng; Ward, Peter A.; Jordan, Jacqueline A.; Huber-Lang, Markus; Warner, Roscoe L.; Shi, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    The CC chemokine eotaxin is a potent and specific eosinophil chemoattractant. Eosinophil-dependent tissue injury has been shown to contribute to airway inflammation such as that in asthma. In the present study, We investigated eotaxin expression in a rat model of pulmonary inflammation (featuring accumulation of eosinophils) induced by intratracheal instillation of cross-linked dextran beads (Sephadex G200). Intratracheal instillation of 5 mg/kg Sephadex caused a time-dependent eosinophil infiltration into the lung, reaching a peak at 24 hours. Eotaxin mRNA in the lung paralleled the eosinophil influx. Eotaxin protein in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluids and lung homogenates was shown by Western blot and immunostaining to be maximally expressed by 24 hours. Sephadex-induced lung injury, as measured by 125I-labeled albumin leakage from the pulmonary vasculature, developed in a time-dependent manner. Intravenous injection of blocking antibody to eotaxin significantly decreased eosinophil infiltration and lung permeability. These data suggest that, in the Sephadex model of lung inflammation, eotaxin up-regulation mediates intrapulmonary accumulation of eosinophils and the development of lung injury. PMID:10595930

  16. Influence of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) inhibition on lung epithelial cell injury: role of oxidative stress and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Marianne E; Boshier, Piers R; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Keun, Hector C; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Kirkham, Paul A; Adcock, Ian M; Barton, Paul J; Takata, Masao; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-06-15

    Oxidant-mediated tissue injury is key to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with toxic oxidant compounds and are associated with acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that attenuation of cellular GST enzymes would augment intracellular oxidative and metabolic stress and induce lung cell injury. Treatment of murine lung epithelial cells with GST inhibitors, ethacrynic acid (EA), and caffeic acid compromised lung epithelial cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitors also potentiated cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl-hydroperoxide, and hypoxia and reoxygenation (HR). SiRNA-mediated attenuation of GST-π but not GST-μ expression reduced cell viability and significantly enhanced stress (H2O2/HR)-induced injury. GST inhibitors also induced intracellular oxidative stress (measured by dihydrorhodamine 123 and dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), caused alterations in overall intracellular redox status (as evidenced by NAD(+)/NADH ratios), and increased protein carbonyl formation. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely prevented EA-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Whereas EA had no effect on mitochondrial energetics, it significantly altered cellular metabolic profile. To explore the physiological impact of these cellular events, we used an ex vivo mouse-isolated perfused lung model. Supplementation of perfusate with EA markedly affected lung mechanics and significantly increased lung permeability. The results of our combined genetic, pharmacological, and metabolic studies on multiple platforms suggest the importance of GST enzymes, specifically GST-π, in the cellular and whole lung response to acute oxidative and metabolic stress. These may have important clinical implications.

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 abrogates bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rey-Parra, G J; Vadivel, A; Coltan, L; Hall, A; Eaton, F; Schuster, M; Loibner, H; Penninger, J M; Kassiri, Z; Oudit, G Y; Thébaud, B

    2012-06-01

    Despite substantial progress, mortality and morbidity of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), remain unacceptably high. There is no effective treatment for ARDS/ALI. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) through Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-generated Angiotensin II contributes to lung injury. ACE2, a recently discovered ACE homologue, acts as a negative regulator of the RAS and counterbalances the function of ACE. We hypothesized that ACE2 prevents Bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung injury. Fourteen to 16-week-old ACE2 knockout mice-male (ACE2(-/y)) and female (ACE2(-/-))-and age-matched wild-type (WT) male mice received intratracheal BLM (1.5U/kg). Male ACE2(-/y) BLM injured mice exhibited poorer exercise capacity, worse lung function and exacerbated lung fibrosis and collagen deposition compared with WT. These changes were associated with increased expression of the profibrotic genes α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Transforming Growth Factor ß1. Compared with ACE2(-/y) exposed to BLM, ACE2(-/-) exhibited better lung function and architecture and decreased collagen deposition. Treatment with intraperitoneal recombinant human (rh) ACE2 (2 mg/kg) for 21 days improved survival, exercise capacity, and lung function and decreased lung inflammation and fibrosis in male BLM-WT mice. Female BLM WT mice had mild fibrosis and displayed a possible compensatory upregulation of the AT2 receptor. We conclude that ACE2 gene deletion worsens BLM-induced lung injury and more so in males than females. Conversely, ACE2 protects against BLM-induced fibrosis. rhACE2 may have therapeutic potential to attenuate respiratory morbidity in ALI/ARDS. PMID:22246130

  18. DAP12 expression in lung macrophages mediates ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil extravasation.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Jessica H; Li, Wenjun; Bribriesco, Alejandro C; Liu, Jie; Shen, Hua; Ibricevic, Aida; Pan, Jie-Hong; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Brody, Steven L; Goldstein, Daniel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Gelman, Andrew E; Miller, Mark J; Kreisel, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Neutrophils are critical mediators of innate immune responses and contribute to tissue injury. However, immune pathways that regulate neutrophil recruitment to injured tissues during noninfectious inflammation remain poorly understood. DAP12 is a cell membrane-associated protein that is expressed in myeloid cells and can either augment or dampen innate inflammatory responses during infections. To elucidate the role of DAP12 in pulmonary ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), we took advantage of a clinically relevant mouse model of transplant-mediated lung IRI. This technique allowed us to dissect the importance of DAP12 in tissue-resident cells and those that infiltrate injured tissue from the periphery during noninfectious inflammation. Macrophages in both mouse and human lungs that have been subjected to cold ischemic storage express DAP12. We found that donor, but not recipient, deficiency in DAP12 protected against pulmonary IRI. Analysis of the immune response showed that DAP12 promotes the survival of tissue-resident alveolar macrophages and contributes to local production of neutrophil chemoattractants. Intravital imaging demonstrated a transendothelial migration defect into DAP12-deficient lungs, which can be rescued by local administration of the neutrophil chemokine CXCL2. We have uncovered a previously unrecognized role for DAP12 expression in tissue-resident alveolar macrophages in mediating acute noninfectious tissue injury through regulation of neutrophil trafficking.

  19. Accidental fatal lung injury by compressed air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rayamane, Anand Parashuram; Pradeepkumar, M V

    2015-03-01

    Compressed air is being used extensively as a source of energy at industries and in daily life. A variety of fatal injuries are caused by improper and ignorant use of compressed air equipments. Many types of injuries due to compressed air are reported in the literature such as colorectal injury, orbital injury, surgical emphysema, and so on. Most of these injuries are accidental in nature. It is documented that 40 pounds per square inch pressure causes fatal injuries to the ear, eyes, lungs, stomach, and intestine. Openings of body are vulnerable to injuries by compressed air. Death due to compressed air injuries is rarely reported. Many cases are treated successfully by conservative or surgical management. Extensive survey of literature revealed no reports of fatal injury to the upper respiratory tract and lungs caused by compressed air. Here, we are reporting a fatal event of accidental death after insertion of compressed air pipe into the mouth. The postmortem findings are corroborated with the history and discussed in detail.

  20. Crosstalk between ACE2 and PLGF regulates vascular permeability during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lantao; Li, Yong; Qin, Hao; Xing, Dong; Su, Jie; Hu, Zhenjie

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI), through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII) and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with placental growth factor (PLGF) remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and PLGF in ALI model in mice. We used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of PLGF in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5 µg/kg Visudyne. PLGF pump or soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) pump was given to augment or suppress PLGF effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. We found that ACE2 treatment did not alter PLGF levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of PLGF on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic PLGF abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. On the other hand, suppression of PLGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Thus, ACE2 may antagonize the PLGF-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI. PMID:27158411

  1. A model of blast overpressure injury to the lung.

    PubMed

    Stuhmiller, J H; Ho, K H; Vander Vorst, M J; Dodd, K T; Fitzpatrick, T; Mayorga, M

    1996-02-01

    Despite decades of animal experiments, data on blast injury to the lung cover only a limited number of circumstances and are in a fragmented form. This paper develops a mathematical model of the chest wall dynamics and the subsequent generation of strong pressure waves within the lung, which have been hypothesized as the mediator of injury. The model has been compared to an extensive database of observed pathologies from animal tests. The incidence of injury and lethality is found to follow a log-normal correlation with the computed total energy in these waves and, when the energy is normalized by the lung volume, the lethality correlation applies to all large animal species. Small animals also correlate with the normalized energy, but at a different value, and it is speculated that structural differences, other than lung volume, may be involved. This relatively simple model allows the potential for blast injury to the lung to be determined from measured or computed pressure traces without additional animal testing. Improved occupational exposure criteria should follow from this methodology. PMID:8849816

  2. Effect of dexmedetomidine on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, LILI; LI, LI; SHEN, JINMEI; QI, ZEYOU; GUO, LIANG

    2014-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a specific selective α2-adrenergic agonist, does not only have the characteristics of being a sedative and analgesic, but also exhibits a protective role in brain ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammation in animals with sepsis. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether dexmedetomidine is capable of attenuating rat pulmonary damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is a type of acute sterile lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into six groups: The sham-operated (sham) group, the lung ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group, intravenous injection of dexmedetomidine 2.5 μg/kg/h (Dex2.5) or 5 μg/kg/h (Dex5) for 1 h prior to ischemia, combination of α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine prior to dexmedetomidine pre-treatment (Dex+Yoh) and pre-administration of yohimbine alone (Yoh) prior to ischemia. Lung injury was assessed by the histopathological changes, arterial blood gas, wet/dry (w/d) weight ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the lung. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) mRNA in the lung were determined by quantitative PCR, and phosphorylated levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were determined by western blotting. Pre-treatment with dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the lung injury, w/d weight ratio and MPO activity, and decreased the concentration of TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 in BALF compared with the I/R group. The expression of TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA and the levels of phosphorylated JNK and ERK1/2 in the lung tissue were markedly downregulated by intravenous injection of dexmedetomidne for 1 h prior to lung I/R. The protective effects of dexmedetomidine

  3. The physical basis of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Plataki, Maria; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2010-01-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it can aggravate or cause lung injury, known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The biophysical characteristics of heterogeneously injured ARDS lungs increase the parenchymal stress associated with breathing, which is further aggravated by MV. Cells, in particular those lining the capillaries, airways and alveoli, transform this strain into chemical signals (mechanotransduction). The interaction of reparative and injurious mechanotransductive pathways leads to VILI. Several attempts have been made to identify clinical surrogate measures of lung stress/strain (e.g., density changes in chest computed tomography, lower and upper inflection points of the pressure–volume curve, plateau pressure and inflammatory cytokine levels) that could be used to titrate MV. However, uncertainty about the topographical distribution of stress relative to that of the susceptibility of the cells and tissues to injury makes the existence of a single ‘global’ stress/strain injury threshold doubtful. PMID:20524920

  4. Aerosolized human extracellular superoxide dismutase prevents hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chih-Ching; Lai, Yi-Wen; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Lai, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Wei; Kuan, Yu-Ping; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2011-01-01

    An important issue in critical care medicine is the identification of ways to protect the lungs from oxygen toxicity and reduce systemic oxidative stress in conditions requiring mechanical ventilation and high levels of oxygen. One way to prevent oxygen toxicity is to augment antioxidant enzyme activity in the respiratory system. The current study investigated the ability of aerosolized extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) to protect the lungs from hyperoxic injury. Recombinant human EC-SOD (rhEC-SOD) was produced from a synthetic cassette constructed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Female CD-1 mice were exposed in hyperoxia (FiO2>95%) to induce lung injury. The therapeutic effects of EC-SOD and copper-zinc SOD (CuZn-SOD) via an aerosol delivery system for lung injury and systemic oxidative stress at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of hyperoxia were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage, wet/dry ratio, lung histology, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in lung and liver tissues. After exposure to hyperoxia, the wet/dry weight ratio remained stable before day 2 but increased significantly after day 3. The levels of oxidative biomarker 8-oxo-dG in the lung and liver were significantly decreased on day 2 (P<0.01) but the marker in the liver increased abruptly after day 3 of hyperoxia when the mortality increased. Treatment with aerosolized rhEC-SOD increased the survival rate at day 3 under hyperoxia to 95.8%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (57.1%), albumin treated group (33.3%), and CuZn-SOD treated group (75%). The protective effects of EC-SOD against hyperoxia were further confirmed by reduced lung edema and systemic oxidative stress. Aerosolized EC-SOD protected mice against oxygen toxicity and reduced mortality in a hyperoxic model. The results encourage the use of an aerosol therapy with EC-SOD in intensive care units to reduce oxidative injury in patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, including acute

  5. Crocin attenuates lipopolysacchride-induced acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Kuai, Jianke; Luo, Zhonghua; Wang, Wuping; Wang, Lei; Ke, Changkang; Li, Xiaofei; Ni, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a representative of carotenoid compounds, exerts a spectrum of activities including radical scavenger, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the protective effect of crocin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). The mice received intragastric injection of crocin (50 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylineosin stain and lung wet/dry weight ratios were observed. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissues was determined by Western blot analysis. Crocin pretreatment significantly alleviated the severity of lung injury and inhibited the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in mice with ALI. After LPS administration, the lung wet/dry weight ratios, as an index of lung edema, and MPO activity were also markedly reduced by crocin pretreatment. Crocin pretreatment also reduced the concentrations of NO in lung tissues. Furthermore, the expression of iNOS was significantly suppressed by crocin pretreatment. Croncin potently protected against LPS-induced ALI and the protective effects of crocin may attribute partly to the suppression of iNOS expression. PMID:26191176

  6. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has

  7. Systemic air embolization from penetrating lung injury.

    PubMed

    Meier, G H; Wood, W J; Symbas, P N

    1979-02-01

    This study evaluates the role of increased intratracheal pressure in developing systemic air embolization. Twenty healthy mongrel dogs were monitored for air embolization, both by means of an extracorporeal arteriovenous shunt constructed from transparent plastic tubing for visualization of air emboli and by means of a Doppler flow probe implanted at the root of the aorta. Systemic arterial, left atrial, intratracheal, and intrapleural pressures were recorded. In 10 of the dogs, a penetrating wound of the lung 1 cm wide by 4 cm deep was produced; in 5 the chest was left open and in 5 the chest was closed. The remaining 10 dogs served as controls (with no wound of the lung); in 5 the chest was left open and in the other 5 the chest was closed. No air embolization occurred in any animals at intratracheal pressures less than 65 mm Hg. However, systemic air embolization occurred in every dog in all groups upon hyperinflation of the lung above 65 mm Hg. The control groups differed from the groups with penetrating wound only in the quantity of embolized air. This study suggests that hyperinflation of the lung to an intratracheal pressure above 65 mm Hg results in systemic air embolization and that the presence of a penetrating wound of the lung at such intratracheal pressure predisposes to a greater quantity of air embolization.

  8. Semaphorin 7A Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation during Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mariella; Granja, Tiago Folgosa; Rosenberger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The extent of pulmonary inflammation during lung injury ultimately determines patient outcome. Pulmonary inflammation is initiated by the migration of neutrophils into the alveolar space. Recent work has demonstrated that the guidance protein semaphorin 7A (SEMA7A) influences the migration of neutrophils into hypoxic tissue sites, yet, its role during lung injury is not well understood. Here, we report that the expression of SEMA7A is induced in vitro through pro-inflammatory cytokines. SEMA7A itself induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in endothelial and epithelial cells, enhancing pulmonary inflammation. The induction of SEMA7A facilitates the transendothelial migration of neutrophils. In vivo, animals with deletion of SEMA7A expression showed reduced signs of pulmonary inflammatory changes following lipopolysaccharide challenge. We define here the role of SEMA7A in the development of lung injury and identify a potential pathway to interfere with these detrimental changes. Future anti-inflammatory strategies for the treatment of lung injury might be based on this finding. PMID:26752048

  9. Histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Petri, Susan; Madea, Burkhard; Puschel, Klaus; Turk, Elisabeth E

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this autopsy-based study was to investigate the pathology of human blast lung injury using histology, Fat Red 7B staining, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy on lung specimens from eight medicolegal autopsy cases of fatal close-range detonations of chemical explosives. The micromorphologic equivalents of human blast lung injury can be summarized as follows: diffuse alveolar overdistension, circumscribed interstitial hemorrhages showing a cufflike pattern around pulmonary vessels, venous air embolism, bone marrow embolism, and pulmonary fat embolism. Hemorrhages within the lung parenchyma that were present in this study in blast victims without coexisting blunt or penetrating chest trauma must be regarded as potentially life-threatening intrapulmonary bleeding sites in survivors. In addition, the potential clinical importance of the presence of massive pulmonary fat embolism, which has, to the best of our knowledge, not been described previously in human blast lung injury, must be emphasized because pulmonary fat embolism may be a leading cause of the rapid respiratory deterioration with progressive hypoxia and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in blast victims who survive. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that air embolism presenting in blast victims is not a mere ventilation-induced artifact.

  10. Early coagulation events induce acute lung injury in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Donahue, Deborah L; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic coagulopathy are serious complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that frequently lead to poor clinical outcomes. Although the release of tissue factor (TF), a potent initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, from the injured brain is thought to play a key role in coagulopathy after TBI, its function in ALI following TBI remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the systemic appearance of TF correlated with the ensuing coagulopathy that follows TBI in ALI using an anesthetized rat blunt trauma TBI model. Blood and lung samples were obtained after TBI. Compared with controls, pulmonary edema and increased pulmonary permeability were observed as early as 5 min after TBI without evidence of norepinephrine involvement. Systemic TF increased at 5 min and then diminished 60 min after TBI. Lung injury and alveolar hemorrhaging were also observed as early as 5 min after TBI. A biphasic elevation of TF was observed in the lungs after TBI, and TF-positive microparticles (MPs) were detected in the alveolar spaces. Fibrin(ogen) deposition was also observed in the lungs within 60 min after TBI. Additionally, preadministration of a direct thrombin inhibitor, Refludan, attenuated lung injuries, thus implicating thrombin as a direct participant in ALI after TBI. The results from this study demonstrated that enhanced systemic TF may be an initiator of coagulation activation that contributes to ALI after TBI. PMID:27190065

  11. Activation of calpains mediates early lung neutrophilic inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dejie; Yan, Zhibo; Minshall, Richard D.; Schwartz, David E.; Chen, Yuguo

    2012-01-01

    Lung inflammatory responses in the absence of infection are considered to be one of primary mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury. Here, we determined the role of calpain in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation attributable to mechanical ventilation. Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h in the absence and presence of calpain inhibitor I (10 mg/kg). To address the isoform-specific functions of calpain 1 and calpain 2 during mechanical ventilation, we utilized a liposome-based delivery system to introduce small interfering RNAs targeting each isoform in pulmonary vasculature in vivo. Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume induced rapid (within minutes) and persistent calpain activation and lung inflammation as evidenced by neutrophil recruitment, production of TNF-α and IL-6, pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability, and lung edema formation. Pharmaceutical calpain inhibition significantly attenuated these inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. Depletion of calpain 1 or calpain 2 had a protective effect against ventilator-induced lung inflammatory responses. Inhibition of calpain activity by means of siRNA silencing or pharmacological inhibition also reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS-3)-mediated NO production and subsequent ICAM-1 phosphorylation following high tidal volume ventilation. These results suggest that calpain activation mediates early lung inflammation during ventilator-induced lung injury via NOS-3/NO-dependent ICAM-1 phosphorylation and neutrophil recruitment. Inhibition of calpain activation may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:22140070

  12. Role of toxicological interactions in lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.; Hakkinen, P.J.

    1984-04-01

    Interactions between two or more toxic agents can produce lung damage by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-receptor interactions or by modification, by a first agent, of the cell and tissue response to a second agent. Interactions may occur by simultaneous exposure and if exposure to two agents is separated in time. Chemical-chemical interactions have been mostly studied in the toxicology of air pollutants, where it was shown that the untoward effect of certain oxidants may be enhanced in the presence of other aerosols. Interactions at the receptor site have been found in isolated perfused lung experiments. Oxygen tolerance may be an example, when pre-exposure to one concentration of oxygen mitigates later exposure to 100% oxygen by modifying cellular and enzymatic composition of the lung. Damage of the alveolar zone by the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) can be greatly enhanced by subsequent exposure to oxygen concentration which, otherwise, would have little if any demonstrable effect. The synergistic interaction between BHT and oxygen results in a resulting interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Acute or chronic lung disease may then be caused not only by one agent, but very likely in many instances by the interaction of several agents. 121 references.

  13. Acute lung injury after inhalation of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shih Ling; Yap, Eng Soo; Khoo, See Meng; Lim, Tow Keang; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Teo, Sylvia Tzu Li

    2008-12-01

    We report two cases of acute lung injury after the inhalation of nitric acid fumes in an industrial accident. The first patient, who was not using a respirator and standing in close proximity to the site of spillage of concentrated nitric acid, presented within 12 h with worsening dyspnea and required noninvasive ventilation for type 1 respiratory failure. The second case presented 1 day later with similar symptoms, but only required supportive treatment with high-flow oxygen. Both patients' chest radiographs showed widespread bilateral airspace shadows consistent with acute lung injury. Both received treatment with systemic steroids. They were discharged from hospital 5 days postexposure. Initial lung function test showed a restrictive pattern that normalized by 3 weeks postexposure. This case series describes the natural history after acute inhalation of nitric acid fumes, and demonstrates that the severity of lung injury is directly dependent on the exposure level. It also highlights the use of noninvasive ventilatory support in the management of such patients.

  14. Lung inflation with hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase decreases lung graft injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Fang, Xianhai; Meng, Chao; Xing, Jingchun; Liu, Jinfeng; Yang, Wanchao; Li, Wenzhi; Zhou, Huacheng

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury when it is inhaled by donor or/and recipient. This study examined the effects of lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase on lung graft function in rats. The donor lung was inflated with 3% hydrogen, 40% oxygen, and 57% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg, and the gas was replaced every 20 min during the cold ischemia phase for 2 h. In the control group, the donor lung was inflated with 40% oxygen and 60% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg. The recipient was euthanized 2 h after orthotropic lung transplantation. The hydrogen concentration in the donor lung during the cold ischemia phase was 1.99-3%. The oxygenation indices in the arterial blood and pulmonary vein blood were improved in the hydrogen group. The inflammation response indices, including lung W/D ratio, the myeloperoxidase activity in the grafts, and the levels of IL-8 and TNF-α in serum, were significantly lower in the hydrogen group (5.2 ± 0.8, 0.76 ± 0.32 U/g, 340 ± 84 pg/mL, and 405 ± 115 pg/mL, respectively) than those in the control group (6.5 ± 0.7, 1.1 ± 0.5 U/g, 443 ± 94 pg/mL, and 657 ± 96 pg/mL, respectively (P < 0.05), and the oxidative stress indices, including the superoxide dismutase activity and the level of malonaldehyde in lung grafts were improved after hydrogen application. Furthermore, the lung injury score determined by histopathology, the cell apoptotic index, and the caspase-3 protein expression in lung grafts were decreased after hydrogen treatment, and the static pressure-volume curve of lung graft was improved by hydrogen inflation. In conclusion, lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase alleviated lung graft injury and improved graft function.

  15. Lung inflation with hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase decreases lung graft injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rongfang; Fang, Xianhai; Meng, Chao; Xing, Jingchun; Liu, Jinfeng; Yang, Wanchao

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on lung ischemia–reperfusion injury when it is inhaled by donor or/and recipient. This study examined the effects of lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase on lung graft function in rats. The donor lung was inflated with 3% hydrogen, 40% oxygen, and 57% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg, and the gas was replaced every 20 min during the cold ischemia phase for 2 h. In the control group, the donor lung was inflated with 40% oxygen and 60% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg. The recipient was euthanized 2 h after orthotropic lung transplantation. The hydrogen concentration in the donor lung during the cold ischemia phase was 1.99–3%. The oxygenation indices in the arterial blood and pulmonary vein blood were improved in the hydrogen group. The inflammation response indices, including lung W/D ratio, the myeloperoxidase activity in the grafts, and the levels of IL-8 and TNF-α in serum, were significantly lower in the hydrogen group (5.2 ± 0.8, 0.76 ± 0.32 U/g, 340 ± 84 pg/mL, and 405 ± 115 pg/mL, respectively) than those in the control group (6.5 ± 0.7, 1.1 ± 0.5 U/g, 443 ± 94 pg/mL, and 657 ± 96 pg/mL, respectively (P < 0.05), and the oxidative stress indices, including the superoxide dismutase activity and the level of malonaldehyde in lung grafts were improved after hydrogen application. Furthermore, the lung injury score determined by histopathology, the cell apoptotic index, and the caspase-3 protein expression in lung grafts were decreased after hydrogen treatment, and the static pressure–volume curve of lung graft was improved by hydrogen inflation. In conclusion, lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase alleviated lung graft injury and improved graft function. PMID:25662956

  16. Protective effects of asiaticoside on septic lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-na; Zheng, Jia-jia; Zhang, Li; Gong, Xia; Huang, Hai; Wang, Chang-dong; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meng-jiao; Li, Xiao-hui; Sun, Wen-juan; Liu, Ying-ju; Wan, Jing-yuan

    2011-09-01

    Asiaticoside (AS), a major triterpenoid saponin component isolated from Centella asiatica, has been described to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of AS on septic lung injury induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mice were pretreated with the AS (45 mg/kg) or AS as well as GW9662 at 1h before CLP, the survival, lung injury, inflammatory mediators and signaling molecules, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) were determined 24 h after CLP. The results showed that AS significantly decreased CLP-induced the mortality, lung pathological damage, the infiltration of mononuclear, polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes and total proteins. Moreover, AS inhibited CLP-induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein in lung tissues, and the production of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Interestingly, the expression of PPAR-γ protein in lung tissue was up-regulated by AS. Furthermore, GW9662 (the inhibitor of PPAR-γ) significantly reversed these beneficial effects of AS in septic mice. These findings suggest that AS could effectively protect from septic lung injury induced by CLP and the underlying mechanisms might be related to up-regulation of PPAR-γ expression to some extent, which inhibits MAPKs and NF-κB pathway.

  17. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  18. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  19. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  20. Early injury of the neonatal lung contributes to premature lung aging: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Meiners, Silke; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Chronic lung disease of the newborn, also known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), is the most common chronic lung disease in early infancy and results in an increased risk for long-lasting pulmonary impairment in the adult. BPD develops upon injury of the immature lung by oxygen toxicity, mechanical ventilation, and infections which trigger sustained inflammatory immune responses and extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix together with dysregulated growth factor signaling. Histopathologically, BPD is characterized by impaired alveolarization, disrupted vascular development, and saccular wall fibrosis. Here, we explore the hypothesis that development of BPD involves disturbance of conserved pathways of molecular aging that may contribute to premature aging of the lung and an increased susceptibility to chronic lung diseases in adulthood. PMID:27406259

  1. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  2. Role of heme in bromine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lam, Adam; Vetal, Nilam; Matalon, Sadis; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    Bromine (Br2 ) gas inhalation poses an environmental and occupational hazard resulting in high morbidity and mortality. In this review, we underline the acute lung pathology (within 24 h of exposure) and potential therapeutic interventions that may be utilized to mitigate Br2 -induced human toxicity. We discuss our latest published data, which suggest that an increase in heme-dependent tissue injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Our study was based on previous findings that demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which converts toxic heme into bilverdin. Interestingly, following Br2 inhalation, heme levels were indeed elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, plasma, and whole lung tissue in C57BL/6 mice. High heme levels correlated with increased lung oxidative stress, lung inflammation, respiratory acidosis, lung edema, higher airway resistance, and mortality. However, therapeutic reduction of heme levels, by either scavenging with hemopexin or degradation by HO-1, improved lung function and survival. Therefore, heme attenuation may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients after Br2 exposure. PMID:27244263

  3. Role of heme in bromine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lam, Adam; Vetal, Nilam; Matalon, Sadis; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    Bromine (Br2 ) gas inhalation poses an environmental and occupational hazard resulting in high morbidity and mortality. In this review, we underline the acute lung pathology (within 24 h of exposure) and potential therapeutic interventions that may be utilized to mitigate Br2 -induced human toxicity. We discuss our latest published data, which suggest that an increase in heme-dependent tissue injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Our study was based on previous findings that demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which converts toxic heme into bilverdin. Interestingly, following Br2 inhalation, heme levels were indeed elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, plasma, and whole lung tissue in C57BL/6 mice. High heme levels correlated with increased lung oxidative stress, lung inflammation, respiratory acidosis, lung edema, higher airway resistance, and mortality. However, therapeutic reduction of heme levels, by either scavenging with hemopexin or degradation by HO-1, improved lung function and survival. Therefore, heme attenuation may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients after Br2 exposure.

  4. [Sodium dichloroisocyanurate-induced acute lung injury in a child].

    PubMed

    Wiel, E; Sicot, J; Leteurtre, S; Binoche, A; Nisse, P; Assez, N

    2013-04-01

    Intoxication, by cyanurate and its chlorated derivatives in children, is increasingly reported in the literature due to accidental ingestion compared to accidental inhalation. We report a case in a 5-year-old child who presented with acute lung injury due to accidental inhalation of gas formed after a reaction of sodium dichloroisocyanurate tablets with water. Prevention remains the best way to reduce the risk of children being intoxicated by inhalation of the gas formed after contact of tablets with water. PMID:23433843

  5. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury. PMID:24082167

  6. Budesonide inhalation ameliorates endotoxin-induced lung injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious clinical problem that has a 30–50% mortality rate. Budesonide has been used to reduce lung injury. This study aims to investigate the effects of nebulized budesonide on endotoxin-induced ARDS in a rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbits were randomized into three groups. Rabbits in the control and budesonide groups were injected with endotoxin. Thereafter, budesonide or saline was instilled, ventilated for four hours, and recovered spontaneous respiratory. Peak pressure, compliance, and PaO2/FiO2 were monitored for 4 h. After seven days, PaO2/FiO2 ratios were measured. Wet-to-dry weight ratios, total protein, neutrophil elastase, white blood cells, and percentage of neutrophils in BALF were evaluated. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-10 in BALF were detected. Lung histopathologic injury and seven-day survival rate of the three groups were recorded. Peak pressure was downregulated, but compliance and PaO2/FiO2 were upregulated by budesonide. PaO2/FiO2 ratios significantly increased due to budesonide. Wet-to-dry weight ratios, total protein, neutrophil elastase, white blood cells and percentage of neutrophils in BALF decreased in the budesonide group. TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 levels decreased in BALF, while IL-10 levels increased in the budesonide group. Lung injuries were reduced and survival rate was upregulated by budesonide. Budesonide effectively ameliorated respiratory function, attenuated endotoxin-induced lung injury, and improved the seven-day survival rate. PMID:25956681

  7. ATTENUATION OF ISCHEMIC LIVER INJURY BY AUGMENTATION OF ENDOGENOUS ADENOSINE1,2

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Satoru; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Shimin; Jin, Maeng Bong; Ishizaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiromu; Subbotin, Vladimir; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic grafts from non-heartbeating donors may alleviate the organ shortage, but they inherently suffer from warm ischemia. In the present study, we tested our hypothesis that augmentation of endogenous adenosine by inhibition of nucleoside transport with R75231 attenuates ischemic liver injury. Adult female beagle dogs underwent 2-hr hepatic vascular exclusion with venovenous bypass. R75231 was given to the animals by continuous intravenous infusion for 30 min before ischemia at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg (Group 2, n=6), 0.05 mg/kg (Group 3, n=6), or 0.025 mg/kg (Group 4, n=6). Nontreated animals were used as the control (Group 1, n=10). Animal survival, hepatic tissue blood flow, liver function, and histopathology were analyzed. Two-week animal survival was 30% in Group 1, 88% in Group 2, 100% in Group 3, and 100% in Group 4. Postreperfusion hepatic tissue blood flow was markedly improved by the treatment. Treatment significantly attenuated liver enzyme release, lipid peroxidation, and changes in adenine nucleotides and purine catabolites. Structural abnormality of the liver after reperfusion was markedly improved by R75231 treatment, showing better architecture and less neutrophil infiltration. Preischemic administration of a nucleoside transport inhibitor ameliorated ischemic liver injury due to the positive effects of augmented endogenous adenosine, and is applicable clinically when the liver is procured from a controlled non-heartbeating donor. PMID:9020320

  8. The Heat Shock Response and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Derek S.; Wong, Hector R.

    2006-01-01

    All cells respond to stress through the activation of primitive, evolutionarily conserved genetic programs that maintain homeostasis and assure cell survival. Stress adaptation, which is known in the literature by a myriad of terms, including tolerance, desensitization, conditioning, and reprogramming, is a common paradigm found throughout nature, in which a primary exposure of a cell or organism to a stressful stimulus (e.g., heat) results in an adaptive response by which a second exposure to the same stimulus produces a minimal response. More interesting is the phenomenon of cross-tolerance, by which a primary exposure to a stressful stimulus results in an adaptive response whereby the cell or organism is resistant to a subsequent stress that is different from the initial stress (i.e. exposure to heat stress leading to resistance to oxidant stress). The heat shock response is one of the more commonly described examples of stress adaptation and is characterized by the rapid expression of a unique group of proteins collectively known as heat shock proteins (also commonly referred to as stress proteins). The expression of heat shock proteins is well described in both whole lungs and in specific lung cells from a variety of species and in response to a variety of stressors. More importantly, in vitro data, as well as data from various animal models of acute lung injury, demonstrate that heat shock proteins, especially Hsp27, Hsp32, Hsp60, and Hsp70 have an important cytoprotective role during lung inflammation and injury. PMID:17157189

  9. Neutrophil-dependent, oxygen-radical mediated lung injury associated with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Guice, K S; Oldham, K T; Caty, M G; Johnson, K J; Ward, P A

    1989-01-01

    Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats is associated with a reversible lung injury that is characterized by alveolar capillary endothelial-cell injury, increased microvascular permeability, interstitial edema formation, and intraalveolar hemorrhage and fibrin deposition. The role of mediators in this injury was analyzed using gravimetric data, microvascular permeability indices, electron microscopy, and a quantitative morphometric analysis. Neutrophil depletion induced by a specific antibody was highly protective against lung injury. Interruption of the complement pathway (using low dose Naja naja cobra venom factor) also protected against lung injury. Catalase and superoxide dismutase were also protective. The iron chelator deferoxamine and the hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethylsulfoxide, were not protective against acute lung injury. These data suggest that complement, neutrophils, and neutrophil-derived (H2O2-dependent) oxygen products mediate lung injury that occurs secondary to cerulein-induced pancreatitis. In contrast to other models of neutrophil-dependent, oxygen-radical-mediated lung injury, this lung injury does not appear to be an iron-dependent and hydroxyl-radical mediated injury. We postulate that the process of acute pancreatitis leads to complement activation followed by neutrophil recruitment, sequestration, and adherence to alveolar capillary endothelial cells. Ultimately lung injury appears to result from local endothelial-cell injury secondary to neutrophil-generated oxygen products that may be myeloperoxidase dependent. Images Figs. 3A-D. PMID:2589887

  10. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  11. The Lung Alveolar Lipofibroblast: An Evolutionary Strategy Against Neonatal Hyperoxic Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen, the main mode of support for premature infants with immature lungs, can cause toxicity by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt homeostasis; yet, these same molecules were entrained to promote vertebrate lung phylogeny. By providing a deeper understanding of this paradox, we propose physiologically rational strategies to prevent chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity. Recent Advances: To prevent neonatal hyperoxic lung damage biologically, we have exploited the alveolar defense mechanism(s) that evolutionarily evolved to combat increased atmospheric oxygen during the vertebrate water to land transition. Critical Issues: Over the course of vertebrate lung evolution, ROS promoted the formation of lipofibroblasts, specialized adepithelial cells, which protect the alveoli against oxidant injury; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the master switch for lipofibroblast differentiation, prevents such oxidant lung injury, both by directly promoting mesodermal differentiation and its antioxidant defenses, and indirectly by stimulating the developmental epithelial–mesenchymal paracrine interactions that have physiologically determined lung surfactant production in accord with the lung's phylogenetic adaptation to atmospheric oxygen, preventing Respiratory Distress Syndrome at birth. Future Directions: The molecular strategy (PPARγ agonists) to prevent CLD of prematurity, proposed by us, although seems to be robust, effective, and safe under experimental conditions, it awaits detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies for its safe and effective clinical translation to human infants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1893–1904. “I have procured air [oxygen]…between five and six times as good as the best common air that I have ever met with.” —Joseph Priestley, 1775 PMID:24386954

  12. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI. PMID:26576075

  13. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI.

  14. ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity Is Essential for Burn-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shichao; Cai, Weixia; Yang, Xuekang; Jia, Yanhui; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Jun; Li, Yan; Gao, Jianxin; Fan, Lei; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is necessary for initiating acute sterile inflammation. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the signaling pathways involved in burn-induced ALI. We observed that the rat lungs exhibited enhanced inflammasome activity after burn, as evidenced by increased levels of NLRP3 expression and Caspase-1 activity and augmented inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by BAY11-7082 attenuated burn-induced ALI, as demonstrated by the concomitant remission of histopathologic changes and the reduction of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, inflammatory cytokines in rat lung tissue, and protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In the in vitro experiments, we used AMs (alveolar macrophages) challenged with burn serum to mimic the postburn microenvironment and noted that the serum significantly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The use of ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed NLRP3 inflammasome activity in cells exposed to burn serum. These results indicate that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays an essential role in burn-induced ALI and that burn-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activity is a partly ROS-dependent process. Targeting this axis may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced ALI. PMID:26576075

  15. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-01

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  16. Lung injury in mice and rats acutely exposed to beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Sendelbach, L.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of lung injury, in rats and mice, exposed to an aerosol of beryllium sulfate (BE) for one hour, through nose-only inhalation, was evaluated by the methods of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung cell kinetics. The BAL in rats, sacrificed over a 21 day period following exposure, showed lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (Alk Pase) activities as the most sensitive indicators of lung damage. LDH activity peaked at day 8 while Alk Pase activity peaked at day 5, both being 30 times greater than comparable control values. Acid phosphatase activity and albumin levels were also increased, but not to the same extent as LDH and Alk Pase. The BAL of mice showed LDH activity as the most sensitive indicator of lung damage, with a maximum response 3 times greater than controls at day 5. In another series of experiments, animals were treated with three agents capable of inducing fibrosis: beryllium sulfate, bleomycin, and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Cy A completely inhibited the fibrogenic effects of BHT in mice, as measured through total lung hydroxyproline content. Bleomycin-induced fibrosis was significantly reduced by Cy A treatment in rats, but showed no effect in mice. Additionally, the effect of iron salt administration to rats decreased the intravenous LD/sub 50/ dose, and significantly reduced the inhalation toxicity, of beryllium sulfate. The protective mechanism of iron salt administration, through the induction of ferritin synthesis, is postulated.

  17. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  18. Nicotinamide Exacerbates Hypoxemia in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury Independent of Neutrophil Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Heather D.; Yoo, Jeena; Crother, Timothy R.; Kyme, Pierre; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Khalafi, Ramtin; Tseng, Ching W.; Parks, William C.; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventilator-induced lung injury is a form of acute lung injury that develops in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation and has a high degree of mortality. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is an enzyme that is highly upregulated in ventilator-induced lung injury and exacerbates the injury when given exogenously. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) directly inhibits downstream pathways activated by Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and is protective in other models of acute lung injury. Methods We administered nicotinamide i.p. to mice undergoing mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes to study the effects of nicotinamide on ventilator-induced lung injury. Measures of injury included oxygen saturations and bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophil counts, protein, and cytokine levels. We also measured expression of nicotinamide phosophoribosyltransferase, and its downstream effectors Sirt1 and Cebpa, Cebpb, Cebpe. We assessed the effect of nicotinamide on the production of nitric oxide during ventilator-induced lung injury. We also studied the effects of ventilator-induced lung injury in mice deficient in C/EBPε. Results Nicotinamide treatment significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during ventilator-induced lung injury, but did not affect protein leakage or cytokine production. Surprisingly, mice treated with nicotinamide developed significantly worse hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation. This effect was not linked to increases in nitric oxide production or alterations in expression of Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase, Sirt1, or Cebpa and Cebpb. Cebpe mRNA levels were decreased with either nicotinamide treatment or mechanical ventilation, but mice lacking C/EBPε developed the same degree of hypoxemia and ventilator-induced lung injury as wild-type mice. Conclusions Nicotinamide treatment during VILI inhibits neutrophil infiltration of the lungs consistent with a strong anti-inflammatory effect, but

  19. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  20. Transfixing cardiac injury with perforations in stomach, diaphragm and lung: unusual scenario in penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karigyo, Carlos Junior Toshiyuki; Fan, Otavio Goulart; Yoshida, Marcelo Miyazaki; Menescal, Roberto Jonathas; Tarasiewich, Marcos Jose

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old man suffered a penetrating injury caused by a metallic fragment thrown from a grass-cutting tool, resulting in perforating injuries in the stomach, diaphragm, heart, and lungs. PMID:24896170

  1. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 is protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Bi, Jing; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Jie; Rong, Linyi; Wang, Qin; Xu, Nuo; Zhong, Ming; Zhu, Duming; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2014-09-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) plays a key role in lung development, but its role in acute lung injury has not been well characterized. Lipopolysaccharide instillation caused acute lung injury, which significantly elevated lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inhibited surfactant protein A and C expression in lung tissue, and increased pathological injury. Pretreatment with KGF-2 improved the above lung injury parameters, partially restored surfactant protein A and C expression, and KGF-2 given 2-3 days before LPS challenge showed maximum lung injury improvement. Pretreatment with KGF-2 also markedly reduced the levels of TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 in BALF and the levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in lung tissue. Histological analysis showed there was increased proliferation of alveolar type II epithelial cells in lung parenchyma, which reached maximal 2 days after KGF-2 instillation. Intratracheal administration of KGF-2 attenuates lung injury induced by LPS, suggesting KGF-2 may be potent in the intervention of acute lung injury.

  2. Augmented Feedback Supports Skill Transfer and Reduces High-Risk Injury Landing Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Stroube, Benjamin W.; DiCesare, Christopher A.; Brent, Jensen L.; Ford, Kevin R.; Heidt, Robert S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a current need to produce a simple, yet effective method for screening and targeting possible deficiencies related to increased anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. Hypothesis Frontal plane knee angle (FPKA) during a drop vertical jump will decrease upon implementing augmented feedback into a standardized sport training program. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Thirty-seven female participants (mean ± SD: age, 14.7 ±1.5 years; height, 160.9 ± 6.8 cm; weight, 54.5 ± 7.2 kg) were trained over 8 weeks. During each session, each participant received standardized training consisting of strength training, plyometrics, and conditioning. They were also videotaped running on a treadmill at a standardized speed and performing a repeated tuck jump for 10 seconds. Study participants were randomized into 2 groups and received augmented feedback on either their jumping (AF) or sprinting (CTRL) form. Average (mean of 3 trials) and most extreme (trial with greatest knee abduction) FPKA were calculated from 2-dimensional video captured during performance of the drop vertical jump. Results After testing, a main effect of time was noted, with the AF group reducing their FPKA average by 37.9% over the 3 trials while the CTRL group demonstrated a 26.7% reduction average across the 3 trials (P < .05). Conversely, in the most extreme drop vertical jump trial, a significant time-by-group interaction was noted (P < .05). The AF group reduced their most extreme FPKA by 6.9° (pretest, 18.4° ± 12.3°; posttest, 11.4° ± 10.1°) on their right leg and 6.5° (pretest, 16.3° ± 14.5°; posttest, 9.8° ± 10.7°) on their left leg, which represented a 37.7% and 40.1 % reduction in FPKA, respectively. In the CTRL group, no similar changes were noted in the right (pretest, 16.9° ± 14.3°; posttest, 14.0° ± 12.3°) or left leg (pretest, 9.8° ± 11.1°; posttest, 7.2° ± 9.2°) after training. Conclusion Providing athletes with augmented

  3. Redistribution of pulmonary blood flow impacts thermodilution-based extravascular lung water measurements in a model of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Easley, R. Blaine; Mulreany, Daniel G.; Lancaster, Christopher T.; Custer, Jason W.; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Simon, Brett A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies using transthoracic thermodilution have demonstrated increased extravascular lung water (EVLW) measurements attributed to progression of edema and flooding during sepsis and acute lung injury. We hypothesize that redistribution of pulmonary blood flow can cause increased apparent EVLW secondary to increased perfusion of thermally silent tissue, not increased lung edema. Methods Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated canines were instrumented with PiCCO® (Pulsion Medical, Munich, Germany) catheters and underwent lung injury by repetitive saline lavage. Hemodynamic and respiratory physiologic data were recorded. After stabilized lung injury, endotoxin was administered to inactivate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Computerized tomographic imaging was performed to quantify in vivo lung volume, total tissue (fluid) and air content, and regional distribution of blood flow. Results Lavage injury caused an increase in airway pressures and decreased arterial oxygen content with minimal hemodynamic effects. EVLW and shunt fraction increased after injury and then markedly following endotoxin administration. Computerized tomographic measurements quantified an endotoxin-induced increase in pulmonary blood flow to poorly aerated regions with no change in total lung tissue volume. Conclusions The abrupt increase in EVLW and shunt fraction after endotoxin administration is consistent with inactivation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased perfusion to already flooded lung regions that were previously thermally silent. Computerized tomographic studies further demonstrate in vivo alterations in regional blood flow (but not lung water) and account for these alterations in shunt fraction and EVLW. PMID:19809280

  4. Experimental lung injury promotes alterations in energy metabolism and respiratory mechanics in the lungs of rats: prevention by exercise.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Maira J; da Cunha, Aline A; Scherer, Emilene B S; Machado, Fernanda Rossato; Loureiro, Samanta O; Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Guma, Fátima; Lago, Pedro Dal; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of lung injury on energy metabolism (succinate dehydrogenase, complex II, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP levels), respiratory mechanics (dynamic and static compliance, elastance and respiratory system resistance) in the lungs of rats, as well as on phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The protective effect of physical exercise on the alterations caused by lung injury, including lung edema was also evaluated. Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise. After this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide. Adult Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise and after this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide in dose 100 μg/100 g body weight. The sham group received isotonic saline instillation. Twelve hours after the injury was performed the respiratory mechanical and after the rats were decapitated and samples were collected. The rats subjected to lung injury presented a decrease in activities of the enzymes of the electron transport chain and ATP levels in lung, as well as the formation of pulmonary edema. A decreased lung dynamic and static compliance, as well as an increase in respiratory system resistance, and a decrease in phospholipids content were observed. Physical exercise was able to totally prevent the decrease in succinate dehydrogenase and complex II activities and the formation of pulmonary edema. It also partially prevented the increase in respiratory system resistance, but did not prevent the decrease in dynamic and static compliance, as well as in phospholipids content. These findings suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction may be one of the important contributors to lung damage and that physical exercise may be beneficial in this pathology, although it did not prevent all changes present in lung injury.

  5. Acid aspiration-induced acute lung injury causes leukocyte-dependent systemic organ injury.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Kindt, G C; Weisbrode, S E; Moore, S A; Dorinsky, P M

    1993-04-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome is a form of acute lung injury (ALI) that is frequently associated with systemic organ injury and often occurs in the setting of wide-spread inflammatory cell activation. However, whether conditions that lead to ALI result in systemic organ injury is unclear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ALI induced by acid aspiration will not result in systemic organ injury. Morphological alterations and lymph-to-plasma protein ratios were measured in autoperfused cat ileum preparations of four control animals and five animals with ALI produced by the endobronchial instillation of 0.1 N HCl (0.5 ml.kg-1.lung-1). After 2 h, the lymph-to-plasma protein ratio (a measure of microvascular permeability) was increased in the ilea of HCl-injured animals compared with control animals (0.234 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.121 +/- 0.005; P = 0.012) and was accompanied by extensive morphological alterations. Four additional HCl-injured animals were pretreated with an antileukocyte adherence antibody (anti-CD18, 2 mg/kg) that blocked the HCl-induced alterations in the ileum. This study provides evidence for significant systemic organ injury after acid aspiration-induced ALI and suggests that the neutrophil may be a key mediator.

  6. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  7. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Files, D. Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R.; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L.; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S.; Morris, Peter E.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)–mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  8. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Singer, Benjamin D; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-03-11

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)-mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  9. The ultrastructure of rat lung following acute primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, R F; Cooper, G J; Maynard, R L

    1993-04-01

    While a number of workers have described the effects of blast waves upon the lung at both the macroscopic and light microscopic level, studies involving the use of the electron microscope have not been reported. In the experiments reported here the ultrastructural changes seen in lungs from rats exposed to a blast wave impacting on the right side of the chest are described. Considerable damage to the right lower lobe was observed which took the form of tearing of the inter-alveolar septa with capillary rupture and intra-alveolar haemorrhage. Changes to the alveolar epithelium and type II pneumocytes were also noted. Lesions were also identified in the left lung; these included intra-alveolar oedema with a minimal amount of interstitial oedema together with increased pinocytosis and isolated rupture of the alveolar epithelium. 'Ballooning' of the endothelium into the lumen of the capillary was also observed. There was an indication that lesions noted in the left lung at the electron microscopic level may be progressive in the first 24 hours following injury. PMID:8499315

  10. Enhancement of ozone-induced lung injury by exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Mautz, W.J.; McClure, T.R.; Reischl, P.; Phalen, R.F.; Crocker, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    Rats were exposed for up to 3.75 h to 0.20-0.80 ppm O/sub 3/ under conditions of rest and treadmill exercise up to 30 m/min, 20% grade, to assess the importance of exposure duration, O/sub 3/ concentration, and exercise on lung tissue injury. Focal lung parenchymal lesions increased in abundance and severity in response to the three variables; however, exercise was the most important. Lesion response to exercise was greater than that predicted by a simple proportion to estimated effective dose of O/sub 3/. The results emphasize the importance of including exercise in assessment of possible adverse health effects of exposure to airborne pollutants.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dushianthan, A; Grocott, M P W; Postle, A D; Cusack, R

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening respiratory failure due to lung injury from a variety of precipitants. Pathologically ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar capillary leakage, and protein rich pulmonary oedema leading to the clinical manifestation of poor lung compliance, severe hypoxaemia, and bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Several aetiological factors associated with the development of ARDS are identified with sepsis, pneumonia, and trauma with multiple transfusions accounting for most cases. Despite the absence of a robust diagnostic definition, extensive epidemiological investigations suggest ARDS remains a significant health burden with substantial morbidity and mortality. Improvements in outcome following ARDS over the past decade are in part due to improved strategies of mechanical ventilation and advanced support of other failing organs. Optimal treatment involves judicious fluid management, protective lung ventilation with low tidal volumes and moderate positive end expiratory pressure, multi-organ support, and treatment where possible of the underlying cause. Moreover, advances in general supportive measures such as appropriate antimicrobial therapy, early enteral nutrition, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal ulceration are likely contributory reasons for the improved outcomes. Although therapies such as corticosteroids, nitric oxide, prostacyclins, exogenous surfactants, ketoconazole and antioxidants have shown promising clinical effects in animal models, these have failed to translate positively in human studies. Most recently, clinical trials with β2 agonists aiding alveolar fluid clearance and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids have also provided disappointing results. Despite these negative studies, mortality seems to be in decline due to advances in overall patient care. Future directions of research are likely to concentrate on identifying potential

  12. The mechanism of rapamycin in the intervention of paraquat-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Jiao, Guangyu; Ma, Tao; Liu, Xiaowei; Yang, Chen; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    1. Paraquat (PQ) is an organic nitrogen heterocyclic herbicide that is widely used in agriculture throughout the world. Numerous studies have reported PQ intoxication on humans. 2. In this study, we established a rat lung injury model induced by PQ and evaluated the intervention effect of rapamycin on the model, exploring the pathogenesis of PQ on lung injury as well as therapeutic effects of rapamycin on PQ-induced lung injury. 3. A rat lung injury model was established by gavage of PQ, and rapamycin was used to treat the model animals with PQ-induced lung injury. Different physiological indices were measured through Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the effect of rapamycin on the PQ-induced lung injury. 4. The analyses showed that application of rapamycin could significantly reduce the lung injury damage caused by PQ, with lung tissue wet-dry weight ratio, pathological features, compositions in serum, protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and other indices being significantly improved after the injection of rapamycin. 5. It was inferred that the use of rapamycin could improve the PQ-induced lung injury through inhibiting the activity of mTOR. And we expected the use of rapamycin to be a potential treatment method for the PQ intoxication in future. PMID:25523308

  13. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  14. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  15. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  16. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  17. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-deficient mice demonstrate reduced hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Florquin, Sandrine; de Beer, Regina; Pater, Jennie M; Verstege, Marleen I; Meijers, Joost C M; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-06-01

    Patients with respiratory failure often require supplemental oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation. Although both supportive measures are necessary to guarantee adequate oxygen uptake, they can also cause or worsen lung inflammation and injury. Hyperoxia-induced lung injury is characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lungs. The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been deemed important for leukocyte trafficking. To determine the expression and function of neutrophil uPAR during hyperoxia-induced lung injury, uPAR expression was determined on pulmonary neutrophils of mice exposed to hyperoxia. Hyperoxia exposure (O2>80%) for 4 days elicited a pulmonary inflammatory response as reflected by a profound rise in the number of neutrophils that were recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung cell suspensions, as well as increased bronchoalveolar keratinocyte-derived chemokine, interleukin-6, total protein, and alkaline phosphatase levels. In addition, hyperoxia induced the migration of uPAR-positive granulocytes into lungs from wild-type mice compared with healthy control mice (exposed to room air). uPAR deficiency was associated with diminished neutrophil influx into both lung tissues and bronchoalveolar spaces, which was accompanied by a strong reduction in lung injury. Furthermore, in uPAR(-/-) mice, activation of coagulation was diminished. These data suggest that uPAR plays a detrimental role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury and that uPAR deficiency is associated with diminished neutrophil influx into both lung tissues and bronchoalveolar spaces, accompanied by decreased pulmonary injury. PMID:19435793

  18. Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Gissela; Nishi, Miyuki; Yan, Rosalie; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Li, Yu; Whitson, Bryan A.; Duann, Pu; Li, Haichang; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Hua; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hunter, John C.; McLeod, Robbie L.; Weisleder, Noah; Zeng, Chunyu; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion and over-ventilation induced injury to the lung when compared with wild type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases. PMID:25034454

  19. Use of senescence-accelerated mouse model in bleomycin-induced lung injury suggests that bone marrow-derived cells can alter the outcome of lung injury in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianguo; Gonzalez, Edilson T; Iyer, Smita S; Mac, Valerie; Mora, Ana L; Sutliff, Roy L; Reed, Alana; Brigham, Kenneth L; Kelly, Patricia; Rojas, Mauricio

    2009-07-01

    The incidence of pulmonary fibrosis increases with age. Studies from our group have implicated circulating progenitor cells, termed fibrocytes, in lung fibrosis. In this study, we investigate whether the preceding determinants of inflammation and fibrosis were augmented with aging. We compared responses to intratracheal bleomycin in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP), with responses in age-matched control senescence-accelerated resistant mice (SAMR). SAMP mice demonstrated an exaggerated inflammatory response as evidenced by lung histology. Bleomycin-induced fibrosis was significantly higher in SAMP mice compared with SAMR controls. Consistent with fibrotic changes in the lung, SAMP mice expressed higher levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 in the lung. Furthermore, SAMP mice showed higher numbers of fibrocytes and higher levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the peripheral blood. This study provides the novel observation that apart from increases in inflammatory and fibrotic factors in response to injury, the increased mobilization of fibrocytes may be involved in age-related susceptibility to lung fibrosis. PMID:19359440

  20. Inhibition of Neutrophil Exocytosis Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Merchant, Michael L.; Jin, Shunying; Lentsch, Alex B.; Ward, Richard A.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis of neutrophil granules contributes to acute lung injury (ALI) induced by infection or inflammation, suggesting that inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis in vivo could be a viable therapeutic strategy. This study was conducted to determine the effect of a cell-permeable fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis (TAT-SNAP-23) on ALI using an immune complex deposition model in rats. The effect of inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis by intravenous administration of TAT-SNAP-23 on ALI was assessed by albumin leakage, neutrophil infiltration, lung histology, and proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf). Administration of TAT-SNAP-23, but not TAT-Control, significantly reduced albumin leakage, total protein levels in the BALf, and intra-alveolar edema and hemorrhage. Evidence that TAT-SNAP-23 inhibits neutrophil exocytosis included a reduction in plasma membrane CD18 expression by BALf neutrophils and a decrease in neutrophil granule proteins in BALf. Similar degree of neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and/or BALf suggests that TAT-SNAP-23 did not alter vascular endothelial cell function. Proteomic analysis of BALf revealed that components of the complement and coagulation pathways were significantly reduced in BALf from TAT-SNAP-23-treated animals. Our results indicate that administration of a TAT-fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis reduces in vivo ALI. Targeting neutrophil exocytosis is a potential therapeutic strategy to ameliorate ALI. PMID:23364427

  1. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  2. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  3. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Samuel W.; Zhou, Haibo; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara M.; Maile, Robert; Herbst, Margaret; Joyner Jr, Benny L.; Zhang, Hongtao; Kesic, Matthew; Jaspers, Ilona; Short, Kathleen A.; Meyer, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studies have been done in humans. Methods We carried out a prospective observational study of patients admitted to the NC Jaycees Burn Center who were intubated and on mechanical ventilation for burns and suspected inhalational injury. Subjects were enrolled over an 8-month period and followed till discharge or death. Serial bronchial washings from clinically-indicated bronchoscopies were collected and analyzed for markers of cell injury and inflammation. These markers were compared with clinical markers of ALI. Results Forty-three consecutive patients were studied, with a spectrum of burn and inhalation injury severity. Visible soot at initial bronchoscopy and gram negative bacteria in the lower respiratory tract were associated with ALI in univariate analyses. Subsequent multivariate analysis also controlled for % body surface area burns, infection, and inhalation severity. Elevated IL-10 and reduced IL-12p70 in bronchial washings were statistically significantly associated with ALI. Conclusions Independently of several factors including initial inhalational injury severity, infection, and extent of surface burns, high early levels of IL-10 and low levels of IL-12p70 in the central airways are associated with ALI in patients intubated after acute burn/inhalation injury. Lower airway secretions can be collected serially in critically ill burn/inhalation injury patients and may yield important clues to specific pathophysiologic pathways. PMID:23691180

  4. Hydrogen gas reduces hyperoxic lung injury via the Nrf2 pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Shigemura, Norihisa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yugo; Noda, Kentaro; Peng, Ximei; Takahashi, Toru; Billiar, Timothy R.; Okumura, Meinoshin; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoxic lung injury is a major concern in critically ill patients who receive high concentrations of oxygen to treat lung diseases. Successful abrogation of hyperoxic lung injury would have a huge impact on respiratory and critical care medicine. Hydrogen can be administered as a therapeutic medical gas. We recently demonstrated that inhaled hydrogen reduced transplant-induced lung injury and induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To determine whether hydrogen could reduce hyperoxic lung injury and investigate the underlying mechanisms, we randomly assigned rats to four experimental groups and administered the following gas mixtures for 60 h: 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% nitrogen; 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% hydrogen; 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% nitrogen; and 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% hydrogen. We examined lung function by blood gas analysis, extent of lung injury, and expression of HO-1. We also investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2, which regulates HO-1 expression, by examining the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes and the ability of hydrogen to reduce hyperoxic lung injury in Nrf2-deficient mice. Hydrogen treatment during exposure to hyperoxia significantly improved blood oxygenation, reduced inflammatory events, and induced HO-1 expression. Hydrogen did not mitigate hyperoxic lung injury or induce HO-1 in Nrf2-deficient mice. These findings indicate that hydrogen gas can ameliorate hyperoxic lung injury through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as HO-1. The findings suggest a potentially novel and applicable solution to hyperoxic lung injury and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms and actions of hydrogen. PMID:23475767

  5. Protection of rabbit lungs from endotoxin injury by in vivo hyperexpression of the prostaglandin G/H synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Conary, J T; Parker, R E; Christman, B W; Faulks, R D; King, G A; Meyrick, B O; Brigham, K L

    1994-01-01

    A recombinant prostaglandin G/H (PGH) synthase gene has been expressed in vitro in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells and in vivo in rabbits by transfection with a plasmid using cationic liposomes. Transfection of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells with the PGH synthase cDNA resulted in increased intracellular PGH synthase protein (determined by Western blot analysis) and increased release of prostacyclin. Rabbits intravenously transfected with the PGH synthase gene had increased plasma levels of prostacyclin and PGE2, and their lungs produced increased amounts of the same eicosanoids. In an in situ, perfused preparation of PGH synthase transfected rabbit lungs, the pressor response to endotoxin was markedly attenuated. In addition, pulmonary edema and release of thromboxane B2 into the perfusate after endotoxin infusion were markedly decreased in transfected lungs compared to controls (animals transfected with a pCMV4 construct that did not contain a cDNA insert). The data suggest that augmented endogenous production of prostacyclin and PGE2, achieved by liposome-mediated gene transfer, protects the lungs from endotoxin. This may be caused in part by suppression of endotoxin-stimulated thromboxane B2 production. Modification of lipid mediator responses by in vivo transfection is a potential approach to the therapy of acute lung injury. Images PMID:8163682

  6. Vascular response to radiation injury in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L M; Evans, M L; Graham, M M; Eary, J F; Dahlen, D D

    1992-02-01

    Changes in relative left-to-right lung blood flow ratios were followed as an index of vascular radiation injury in left-hemithorax-irradiated Sprague-Dawley rats. Single doses of 11 to 21 Gy gamma radiation resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in relative blood flow to the irradiated lung from 3 to 5 weeks after exposure during the development of pneumonitis. Blood flow returned to near normal by 5 weeks after lower doses (11-13.5 Gy). After a single dose of 15 Gy the left-to-right blood flow ratio recovered to 75% of normal at 12 weeks and leveled off. Following 18 Gy irradiation a second period of reduced flow began 16 weeks after exposure. After 21 Gy irradiation flow to the irradiated side remained low for 1 year after exposure. Rats that received a single dose of 18 Gy to the left hemithorax were also treated with one or two of the following drugs: captopril, cyproheptadine, dexamethasone, diethylcarbamazine, penicillamine, or theophylline. Dexamethasone was most effective at preventing the decrease in blood flow to the irradiated lung when treatment was continued through the pneumonitis period and dose was not tapered until 8 weeks after radiation exposure. All other drugs and drug combinations were, for the most part, virtually ineffective after the pneumonitis period. There was a relatively poor correlation with earlier vascular permeability surface area product studies. This suggests that endothelial damage, as well as damage to other cell types, contributes to the development of post-irradiation fibrosis in the lung. PMID:1734443

  7. Is adalimumab protective in ischemia-reperfusion injury in lung?

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Aysel; Tumkaya, Levent; Kalkan, Yildiray; Turut, Hasan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Cure, Erkan; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Bilgin, Hacer; Usta, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Increasing cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) during ischemia reperfusion (I-R) leads to the lung damage. Adalimumab (Ada) is a potent tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor agent. We aimed to evaluate whether Ada would prevent the lung tissue from damage development over the I-R process. Materials and Methods: Twenty seven Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups (each group had 9 rats). To the control group, only laparotomy procedure was carried out. For I-R group, first infrarenal abdominal aorta was cross-clamped during 2 hr, and then reperfusion was performed for 2 hr. To I-R+Ada group, first a single dose of 50 mg/kg Ada was given intraperitoneally and 5 days later, same I-R procedure was carried out. Results: Levels of TNF-α, malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and caspase-3 enzyme activity of I-R group were higher than that of both I-R+ Ada [TNF-α (P=0.021), MDA (P=0.029), MPO (P=0.012), ET-1 (P=0.036, caspase-3 (P=0.007), respectively] and control group [TNF-α (P=0.008), MDA (P<0.001), MPO (P=0.001), ET-1 (P<0.001), caspase-3 (P<0.001), respectively]. In I-R group, severe damage was detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. This damage was found less severe in Ada treatment group. Conclusion: The release of cytokines and ET-1 in a large proportion after I-R injury, and generating of ROS in excessive quantity could cause severe damage in the lung tissue. Ada could be considered as a protective agent for lung tissue during I-R process. PMID:26949496

  8. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Poroyko, Valeriy; Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3-V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Beta-Toxin Induces Lung Injury through Syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Atsuko; Bartlett, Allison H.; Foster, Timothy J.; Park, Pyong Woo

    2009-01-01

    In pneumonia caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the intense inflammatory response that is triggered by this infection can lead to the development of lung injury. Little is known, however, about the impact of specific virulence factors on this inflammatory disorder, which causes both significant mortality and morbidity. In this study, we examined the role of β-toxin, a neutral sphingomyelinase, in S. aureus-induced lung injury. Our results showed that the central features of lung injury—specifically, increased neutrophilic inflammation, vascular leakage of serum proteins into the lung tissue, and exudation of proteins into the airway—are significantly attenuated in mice infected intranasally with S. aureus deficient in β-toxin compared with mice infected with S. aureus expressing β-toxin. In addition, intranasal administration of β-toxin evoked the characteristic features of lung injury in wild-type mice whereas neutropenic mice were protected from such injury. However, mutant β-toxin mice deficient in sphingomyelinase activity failed to trigger features of lung injury. Ablation of sphingomyelinase activity also interfered with the ability of β-toxin to stimulate ectodomain shedding of syndecan-1, a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan found in epithelial cells. Moreover, syndecan-1-null mice were significantly protected from β-toxin-induced lung injury relative to wild-type mice. These data indicate that S. aureus β-toxin is a critical virulence factor that induces neutrophil-mediated lung injury through both its sphingomyelinase activity and syndecan-1. PMID:19147831

  10. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium longum Attenuate Lung Injury and Inflammatory Response in Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Khailova, Ludmila; Petrie, Benjamin; Baird, Christine H.; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Probiotic use to prevent nosocomial gastrointestinal and potentially respiratory tract infections in critical care has shown great promise in recent clinical trials of adult and pediatric patients. Despite well-documented benefits of probiotic use in intestinal disorders, the potential for probiotic treatment to reduce lung injury following infection and shock has not been well explored. Objective Evaluate if Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or Bifidobacterium longum (BL) treatment in a weanling mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) peritonitis will protect against lung injury. Methods 3 week-old FVB/N mice were orally gavaged with 200 µl of either LGG, BL or sterile water (vehicle) immediately prior to CLP. Mice were euthanized at 24 h. Lung injury was evaluated via histology and lung neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining. mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α, MyD88, TLR-4, TLR-2, NFΚB (p50/p105) and Cox-2 in the lung analyzed via real-time PCR. TNF-α and IL-6 in lung was analyzed via ELISA. Results LGG and BL treatment significantly improved lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and lung neutrophil infiltration was significantly lower than in untreated septic mice. Lung mRNA and protein levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and gene expression of Cox-2 were also significantly reduced in mice receiving LGG or BL treatment. Gene expression of TLR-2, MyD88 and NFΚB (p50/p105) was significantly increased in septic mice compared to shams and decreased in the lung of mice receiving LGG or BL while TLR-4 levels remained unchanged. Conclusions Treatment with LGG and BL can reduce lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and is associated with reduced lung inflammatory cell infiltrate and decreased markers of lung inflammatory response. Probiotic therapy may be a promising intervention to improve clinical lung injury following systemic infection and sepsis. PMID:24830455

  11. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  12. Lung injury following a 50-metre fall into water.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, H T; Lakshminarayan, S; Hudson, L D

    1978-01-01

    The pulmonary complications of a 50-metre fall to the water (a form of suicide attempt producing 87% mortality) were studied in 15 survivors. Presenting findings included crackles, haemoptysis, and hypotension. The alveolar-arterial oxygen difference was greater than 150 mmHg (20 kPa) in nine subjects on admission. Ventilatory failure developed in 10 of the patients, including all of those with massive haemoptysis. Radiographic findings included pneumothorax and diffuse pulmonary opacities adjacent to the area of impact. Pneumothorax developed within 12 hours of admission in 10 of 15 subjects but was associated with rib fractures in only four subjects. The clinical course of the condition is consistent with the hypothesis that the traumatic pulmonary tears produced interstitial emphysema, with subsequent development of pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, and pneumothorax. Pneumothorax is a common complication of severe lung contusion even in the absence of penetrating pleural injury. PMID:663876

  13. Bronchoalveolar hemostasis in lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glas, G J; Van Der Sluijs, K F; Schultz, M J; Hofstra, J-J H; Van Der Poll, T; Levi, M

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced intrapulmonary fibrin deposition as a result of abnormal broncho-alveolar fibrin turnover is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and is important to the pathogenesis of these conditions. The mechanisms that contribute to alveolar coagulopathy are localized tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation, impaired activity of natural coagulation inhibitors and depression of bronchoalveolar urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis, caused by the increase of plasminogen activator inhibitors. There is an intense and bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammatory pathways in the bronchoalveolar compartment. Systemic or local administration of anticoagulant agents (including activated protein C, antithrombin and heparin) and profibrinolytic agents (such as plasminogen activators) attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy. Several preclinical studies show additional anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies in ARDS and pneumonia. PMID:23114008

  14. Early Effect of Tidal Volume on Lung Injury Biomarkers in Surgical Patients with Healthy Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Klawitter, Jelena; Repine, John E.; Agazio, Amanda; Janocha, Allison J.; Shah, Chirag; Moss, Marc; Douglas, Ivor S.; Tran, Zung Vu; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Christians, Uwe; Seres, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Background The early biological impact of short-term mechanical ventilation on healthy lungs is unknown. We aimed to characterize the immediate tidal volume (VT)-related changes on lung injury biomarkers in patients with healthy lungs and low risk of pulmonary complications. Methods Twenty-eight healthy patients for knee replacement surgery were prospectively randomized to volume-controlled ventilation with VT 6 (VT6) or 10 (VT10) mL/kg predicted body weight. General anesthesia and other ventilatory parameters (positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cmH2O, FiO2 0.5, respiratory rate titrated for normocapnia) were managed similarly in the two groups. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and blood samples were collected for nitrite, nitrate, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins-1β, 6, 8, 10, 11, neutrophil elastase (NE), and Clara Cell protein 16 (CC16) measurements, at the onset of ventilation and 60 min later. Results No significant differences in biomarkers were detected between the VT groups at any time. The coefficient of variation of EBC nitrite and nitrate decreased in the VT6 but increased in the VT10 group after 60-min ventilation. Sixty minute ventilation significantly increased plasma NE levels in the VT6 (35.2 ± 30.4 vs. 56.4 ± 51.7 ng/mL, P = 0.008) and CC16 levels in the VT10 group (16.4 ± 8.8 vs. 18.7 ± 9.5 ng/mL, P = 0.015). EBC nitrite correlated with plateau pressure (r = 0.27, P = 0.042) and plasma NE (r = 0.44, P = 0.001). Plasma CC16 correlated with compliance (r = 0.34, P = 0.014). Conclusion No tidal volume-related changes were observed in the selected lung injury biomarkers of patients with healthy lungs after 60-min ventilation. Plasma NE and plasma CC16 might indicate atelectrauma and lung distention, respectively. PMID:24809976

  15. Lung vascular injury with protease infusion. Relationship to plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Cohler, L F; Saba, T M; Lewis, E P

    1985-01-01

    Fibronectin exists in a soluble form in plasma and in an insoluble form in tissues. Plasma fibronectin can modulate phagocytic function as well as incorporate into the tissue matrix where it is believed to influence microvascular integrity and tissue repair. The temporal alterations in plasma and lung lymph fibronectin were studied in relation to increased pulmonary vascular permeability induced by protease infusion. The acute sheep lung lymph fistula model was used. A 39% decrease in plasma fibronectin (control = 421 +/- 67 micrograms/ml) was observed 2.5 hours (255 +/- 43 micrograms/ml) after protease infusion. There was an elevation of lymph fibronectin early after protease infusion, followed by a progressive decline. Concomitant with the decrease in plasma fibronectin, an increase in lymph flow (QL) of greater than 200% (from a control of 6.7 +/- 1.0 ml/hr to 13.9 +/- 1.4 ml/hr) was observed within 2.5 hours. Also, there was a sustained elevation in the total protein lymph/plasma concentration (L/P) ratio, which was maximal at 2.5 hours. The transvascular protein clearance (TVPC = QL X L/P) was 4.5 +/- 0.7 ml/hr at the control period and 13.1 +/- 2.0 ml/hr by 2.5 hours. This was indicative of increased flux of protein-rich fluid across the pulmonary endothelial barrier. Lung vascular permeability stabilized after 2.5 hours as manifested by a slowly declining L/P ratio. Thus, plasma fibronectin deficiency may contribute to the etiology of increased lung vascular permeability with protease infusion. Since the progressive decline in plasma fibronectin was not reflected in a proportional increase in lymph fibronectin, plasma fibronectin may have sequestered in tissues such as the lung, or perhaps in reticuloendothelial cells during the injury phase. Whether the progressive decrease in plasma fibronectin reflects its incorporation into the endothelial barrier matrix where it may mediate stabilization of the pulmonary microvascular barrier remains to be determined

  16. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  17. Integrating acute lung injury and regulation of alveolar fluid clearance.

    PubMed

    Guidot, David M; Folkesson, Hans G; Jain, Lucky; Sznajder, Jacob I; Pittet, Jean-François; Matthay, Michael A

    2006-09-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and flooding of the alveolar air spaces with proteinaceous fluid. ARDS develops in response to inflammatory stresses including sepsis, trauma, and severe pneumonia, and despite aggressive critical care management, it still has a mortality of 30-50%. At the time of its original description in 1967, relatively little was known about the specific mechanisms by which the alveolar epithelium regulated lung fluid balance. Over the last 20 years, substantial advances in our understanding of the alveolar epithelium have provided major new insights into how molecular and cellular mechanisms regulate the active transport of solutes and fluid across the alveolar epithelium under both normal and pathological conditions. Beginning with the elucidation of active sodium transport as a major driving force for the transport of water from the air space to the interstitium, elegant work by multiple investigators has revealed a complex and integrated network of membrane channels and pumps that coordinately regulates sodium, chloride, and water flux in both a cell- and condition-specific manner. At the Experimental Biology Meeting in San Francisco on April 4, 2006, a symposium was held to discuss some of the most recent advances. Although there is still much to learn about the mechanisms that impair normal alveolar fluid clearance under pathological conditions, the compelling experimental findings presented in this symposium raise the prospect that we are now poised to test and develop therapeutic strategies to improve outcome in patients with acute lung injury. PMID:16698856

  18. Lung Injury Combined with Loss of Regulatory T Cells Leads to De Novo Lung-Restricted Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Stephen; Fernandez, Ramiro; Subramanian, Vijay; Sun, Haiying; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Kreisel, Daniel; Perlman, Harris; Budinger, G R Scott; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Bharat, Ankit

    2016-07-01

    More than one third of patients with chronic lung disease undergoing lung transplantation have pre-existing Abs against lung-restricted self-Ags, collagen type V (ColV), and k-α1 tubulin (KAT). These Abs can also develop de novo after lung transplantation and mediate allograft rejection. However, the mechanisms leading to lung-restricted autoimmunity remain unknown. Because these self-Ags are normally sequestered, tissue injury is required to expose them to the immune system. We previously showed that respiratory viruses can induce apoptosis in CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), the key mediators of self-tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that lung-tissue injury can lead to lung-restricted immunity if it occurs in a setting when Tregs are impaired. We found that human lung recipients who suffer respiratory viral infections experienced a decrease in peripheral Tregs. Pre-existing lung allograft injury from donor-directed Abs or gastroesophageal reflux led to new ColV and KAT Abs post respiratory viral infection. Similarly, murine parainfluenza (Sendai) respiratory viral infection caused a decrease in Tregs. Intratracheal instillation of anti-MHC class I Abs, but not isotype control, followed by murine Sendai virus infection led to development of Abs against ColV and KAT, but not collagen type II (ColII), a cartilaginous protein. This was associated with expansion of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells specific to ColV and KAT, but not ColII. Intratracheal anti-MHC class I Abs or hydrochloric acid in Foxp3-DTR mice induced ColV and KAT, but not ColII, immunity, only if Tregs were depleted using diphtheria toxin. We conclude that tissue injury combined with loss of Tregs can lead to lung-tissue-restricted immunity. PMID:27194786

  19. Lung injury after cigarette smoking is particle related

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Rahul G; Ghio, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    The specific component responsible and the mechanistic pathway for increased human morbidity and mortality after cigarette smoking are yet to be delineated. We propose that 1) injury and disease following cigarette smoking are associated with exposure to and retention of particles produced during smoking and 2) the biological effects of particles associated with cigarette smoking share a single mechanism of injury with all particles. Smoking one cigarette exposes the human respiratory tract to between 15,000 and 40,000 μg particulate matter; this is a carbonaceous product of an incomplete combustion. There are numerous human exposures to other particles, and these vary widely in composition, absolute magnitude, and size of the particle. Individuals exposed to all these particles share a common clinical presentation with a loss of pulmonary function, increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness, pathologic changes of emphysema and fibrosis, and comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cancers. Mechanistically, all particle exposures produce an oxidative stress, which is associated with a series of reactions, including an activation of kinase cascades and transcription factors, release of inflammatory mediators, and apoptosis. If disease associated with cigarette smoking is recognized to be particle related, then certain aspects of the clinical presentation can be predicted; this would include worsening of pulmonary function and progression of pathological changes and comorbidity (eg, emphysema and carcinogenesis) after smoking cessation since the particle is retained in the lung and the exposure continues. PMID:21660296

  20. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant. PMID:27212445

  1. Effect on extrapulmonary sepsis-induced acute lung injury by hemoperfusion with neutral microporous resin column.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhao; Wang, Si-rong; Yang, Zi-li; Liu, Ji-yun

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neutral microporous resin hemoperfusion on oxygenation improvement, removal of inflammatory cytokines in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage, and mortality in acute lung injury induced by extrapulmonary sepsis. Forty-six patients with acute lung injury induced by extrapulmonary sepsis were randomized to HA type hemoperfusion treatment (N=25) or standard therapy (N=21). Those undergoing hemoperfusion treatment received HA330 hemoperfusion. We measured the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1, and the following parameters were compared between the control group and the hemoperfusion group on days 0, 3 and 7: lung injury measurements (arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen ratio, lung injury score, chest X-ray score); interstitial edema of lung (extravascular lung water). Duration of mechanical ventilation, hospital, 28-day, and intensive care unit mortality were also observed. Patients treated with HA hemoperfusion showed a significant removal of plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage TNF-α and IL-1 over time while in the study. Patients in the HA group also demonstrated not only significant improvement of PaO2 /FiO2 , but also decreased Lung Injury Score and chest X-ray score at days 3 and 7. Furthermore, the measurements of the arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen ratio, lung injury score and extravascular lung water (EVLWI) significantly correlated with and the concentration of cytokines in the plasma (all P<0.05). The HA hemoperfusion treatment group had a significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and intensive care unit mortality. Significant removal of inflammatory cytokines from circulation and lung by hemoperfusion treatment using the HA type cartridge may contribute to the improvement of lung injury and intensive care unit outcome in extrapulmonary septic patients. PMID:23931889

  2. Interleukin 6 augments lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance via ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/NF-kappaB pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Huang, Xiao Bo; Ke, Shi Zhong; Jiang, Yi Na; Zhang, Yue Hua; Wang, Yi Nan; Li, Juan; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-09-01

    Although it is known that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) contribute to multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor chemotherapy, the exact role of ATM activation in MDR resulting from increased IL-6 expression is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that the activation of the ATM-NF-kappaB pathway, resulting from increased IL-6 expression, plays a central role in augmented chemoresistance in lung cancer cell lines. This result was supported by the increased expressions of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xl, and the upregulation of MDR-associated protein ABCG2. The higher level of IL-6 reveals not only higher ATM/NF-kappaB activity but also increased expressions of ABCG2, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl. Most importantly, lung cancer cells themselves upregulated IL-6 secretion by activating the p38/NF-kappaB pathway through treatment with cisplatin and camptothecin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that chemotherapeutic agents increase IL-6 expression, hence activating the ATM/NF-kappaB pathway, augmenting anti-apoptotic protein expression and contributing to MDR. This indicates that both IL-6 and ATM are potential targets for the treatment of chemotherapeutic resistance in lung cancer. PMID:24988892

  3. Interleukin 6 augments lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance via ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/NF-kappaB pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Huang, Xiao Bo; Ke, Shi Zhong; Jiang, Yi Na; Zhang, Yue Hua; Wang, Yi Nan; Li, Juan; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) contribute to multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor chemotherapy, the exact role of ATM activation in MDR resulting from increased IL-6 expression is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that the activation of the ATM-NF-kappaB pathway, resulting from increased IL-6 expression, plays a central role in augmented chemoresistance in lung cancer cell lines. This result was supported by the increased expressions of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xl, and the upregulation of MDR-associated protein ABCG2. The higher level of IL-6 reveals not only higher ATM/NF-kappaB activity but also increased expressions of ABCG2, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl. Most importantly, lung cancer cells themselves upregulated IL-6 secretion by activating the p38/NF-kappaB pathway through treatment with cisplatin and camptothecin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that chemotherapeutic agents increase IL-6 expression, hence activating the ATM/NF-kappaB pathway, augmenting anti-apoptotic protein expression and contributing to MDR. This indicates that both IL-6 and ATM are potential targets for the treatment of chemotherapeutic resistance in lung cancer. PMID:24988892

  4. Interleukin 6 augments lung cancer chemotherapeutic resistance via ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/NF-kappaB pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong Qiong; Huang, Xiao Bo; Ke, Shi Zhong; Jiang, Yi Na; Zhang, Yue Hua; Wang, Yi Nan; Li, Juan; Gao, Feng Guang

    2014-09-01

    Although it is known that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) contribute to multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor chemotherapy, the exact role of ATM activation in MDR resulting from increased IL-6 expression is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that the activation of the ATM-NF-kappaB pathway, resulting from increased IL-6 expression, plays a central role in augmented chemoresistance in lung cancer cell lines. This result was supported by the increased expressions of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xl, and the upregulation of MDR-associated protein ABCG2. The higher level of IL-6 reveals not only higher ATM/NF-kappaB activity but also increased expressions of ABCG2, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl. Most importantly, lung cancer cells themselves upregulated IL-6 secretion by activating the p38/NF-kappaB pathway through treatment with cisplatin and camptothecin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that chemotherapeutic agents increase IL-6 expression, hence activating the ATM/NF-kappaB pathway, augmenting anti-apoptotic protein expression and contributing to MDR. This indicates that both IL-6 and ATM are potential targets for the treatment of chemotherapeutic resistance in lung cancer.

  5. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation.

  6. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation. PMID:26608532

  7. Subcutaneous Administration of Bovine Superoxide Dismutase Protects Lungs from Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to determine whether single administration of the antioxidant enzyme bovine superoxide dismutase (bSOD) after radiation (RT) exposure mitigates development of pulmonary toxicity in rats. Methods Female F344 rats (n=60) were divided among six experimental groups: (1) RT, single dose of 21 Gy to the right hemithorax; (2) RT+5 mg/kg bSOD; (3) RT+15 mg/kg bSOD; (4) No RT; (5) sham RT+5mg/kg bSOD; and (6) sham RT+15mg/kg bSOD. A single subcutaneous injection of bSOD (5 or 15 mg/kg) was administered 24 hours postradiation. The effects of bSOD on radiation-induced lung injury were assessed by measurement of body weight, breathing frequency and histopathological changes. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate oxidative stress (8-OHdG+, NOX4+, nitrotyrosine+, 4HNE+ cells), macrophage activation (ED1+), and expression of profibrotic TGF-β in irradiated tissue. Results Radiation led to an increase in all evaluated parameters. Treatment with 15mg/kg bSOD significantly decreased levels of all evaluated parameters including tissue damage and breathing frequency starting 6 weeks post-radiation. Animals treated with 5 mg/kg bSOD trended toward a suppression of radiation-induced lung damage but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The single application of bSOD (15mg/kg) ameliorates radiation induced lung injury through suppression of ROS/RNS dependent tissue damage. PMID:26110460

  8. The serpentine path to a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of acute inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Comroe lecture on which this review is based described my research path during the past 45 years, beginning with studies of oxidant stress (hyperoxia) and eventuating in the discovery of a synthetic inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activity (called MJ33) that prevents acute lung injury in mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide. In between were studies of lung ischemia, lung surfactant metabolism, the protein peroxiredoxin 6 and its phospholipase A2 activity, and mechanisms for NADPH oxidase activation. These seemingly unrelated research activities provided the nexus for identification of a novel target and a potentially novel therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24744383

  9. A decremental PEEP trial for determining open-lung PEEP in a rabbit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yi-Ming; Lien, Shao-Hung; Liu, Tao-Yuan; Lee, Chuen-Ming; Yuh, Yeong-Seng

    2008-04-01

    A positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) above the lower inflection point (LIP) of the pressure-volume curve has been thought necessary to maintain recruited lung volume in acute lung injury (ALI). We used a strategy to identify the level of open-lung PEEP (OLP) by detecting the maximum tidal compliance during a decremental PEEP trial (DPT). We performed a randomized controlled study to compare the effect of the OLP to PEEP above LIP and zero PEEP on pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange, hemodynamic change, and lung injury in 26 rabbits with ALI. After recruitment maneuver, the lavage-injured rabbits received DPTs to identify the OLP. Animals were randomized to receive volume controlled ventilation with either: (a) PEEP = 0 cm H2O (ZEEP); (b) PEEP = 2 cm H2O above OLP (OLP + 2); or (c) PEEP = 2 cm H2O above LIP (LIP + 2). Peak inspiratory pressure and mean airway pressure were recorded and arterial blood gases were analyzed every 30 min. Mean blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously. Lung injury severity was assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio. Animals in OLP + 2 group had less lung injury as well as relatively better compliance, more stable pH, and less hypercapnia compared to the LIP + 2 and ZEEP groups. We concluded that setting PEEP according to the OLP identified by DPTs is an effective method to attenuate lung injury. This strategy could be used as an indicator for optimal PEEP. The approach is simple and noninvasive and may be of clinical interest. PMID:18293413

  10. Upregulation of PIAS1 protects against sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Liya; Sun, Yunwei; Yuan, Yaozong

    2011-06-01

    The regulator of cytokine signaling known as protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1 (PIAS1) is increasingly understood to have diverse regulatory functions for inflammation, but its effect in inflammatory conditions such as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) has not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upregulation of PIAS1 on SAP associated with acute lung injury (ALI), and its subsequent effect on disease severity. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IV injection of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)/F35-PIAS1, Ad5/F35-vector or saline before induction of SAP. The control group received only a sham operation. Lung and pancreas samples were harvested 16h after induction. The protein levels of PIAS1 in tissue were investigated. The severity of pancreatic injury was determined by a histological score of pancreatic injury, serum amylase, and pancreatic water content. The lung injury was evaluated by measurement of pulmonary microvascular permeability, lung myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels. The survival rates of rats were also analyzed. The results found that in Ad5/F35-PIAS1 treated rats, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels were decreased but showed no influence on the levels of IL-10, and the severity of pancreatic tissue injury was less compared with either untreated SAP or Ad5/F35-vector treated rats (P<0.01). The administration of Ad5/F35-PIAS1 in SAP-induced rats downregulated the activity of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) pathway and the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein in lung. Thus, compared with the untreated SAP rats, the inflammatory response and the severity of ALI decreased, and the survival rates increased (P<0.01). These findings suggest that PIAS1 could augment anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting STAT1, thus attenuating the severity of SAP associated with ALI.

  11. CXCR4 Blockade Attenuates Hyperoxia Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Shelley; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Suguihara, Cleide; Young, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) modulate the inflammatory response. Whether antagonism of CXCR4 will alleviate lung inflammation in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury is unknown. Objective To determine whether CXCR4 antagonism would attenuate lung injury in rodents with experimental BPD by decreasing pulmonary inflammation. Methods Newborn rats exposed to normoxia (RA) or hyperoxia (FiO2=0.9) from postnatal day 2 (P2)-P16 were randomized to receive the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 or placebo (PL) from P5 to P15. Lung alveolarization, angiogenesis, and inflammation were evaluated at P16. Results As compared to RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had a decrease in alveolarization, reduced lung vascular density and increased lung inflammation. In contrast, AMD3100-treated hyperoxic pups had improved alveolarization and increased angiogenesis. This improvement in lung structure was accompanied by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid macrophage and neutrophil count and reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion CXCR4 antagonism decreases lung inflammation and improves alveolar as well as vascular structure in neonatal rats with experimental BPD. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate lung injury in preterm infants with BPD. PMID:25825119

  12. Curcumin protects the developing lung against long-term hyperoxic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, R.; Villarreal, P.; Husain, S.; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, T.; Tou, E.; Torday, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent, modulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ signaling, a key molecule in the etiology of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We have previously shown curcumin's acute protection against neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury. However, its longer-term protection against BPD is not known. Hypothesizing that concurrent treatment with curcumin protects the developing lung against hyperoxia-induced lung injury long-term, we determined if curcumin protects against hyperoxic neonatal rat lung injury for the first 5 days of life, as determined at postnatal day (PND) 21. One-day-old rat pups were exposed to either 21 or 95% O2 for 5 days with or without curcumin treatment (5 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally one time daily, following which the pups grew up to PND21 in room air. At PND21 lung development was determined, including gross and cellular structural and functional effects, and molecular mediators of inflammatory injury. To gain mechanistic insights, embryonic day 19 fetal rat lung fibroblasts were examined for markers of apoptosis and MAP kinase activation following in vitro exposure to hyperoxia for 24 h in the presence or absence of curcumin (5 μM). Curcumin effectively blocked hyperoxia-induced lung injury based on systematic analysis of markers for lung injury (apoptosis, Bcl-2/Bax, collagen III, fibronectin, vimentin, calponin, and elastin-related genes) and lung morphology (radial alveolar count and alveolar septal thickness). Mechanistically, curcumin prevented the hyperoxia-induced increases in cleaved caspase-3 and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Molecular effects of curcumin, both structural and cytoprotective, suggest that its actions against hyperoxia-induced lung injury are mediated via Erk1/2 activation and that it is a potential intervention against BPD. PMID:23812632

  13. Lung injury, inflammation and Akt signaling following inhalation of particulate hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G.; Gigley, Jason P.; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D.

    2009-02-15

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0-24 h) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-{alpha} levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis.

  14. LUNG INJURY, INFLAMMATION AND AKT SIGNALING FOLLOWING INHALATION OF PARTICULATE HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G.; Gigley, Jason P.; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D.; Ceryak, Susan M.; Patierno, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0–24 hours) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-α levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis. PMID:19109987

  15. Lung injury, inflammation and Akt signaling following inhalation of particulate hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Laura M; Stemmy, Erik J; Constant, Stephanie L; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G; Gigley, Jason P; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D; Ceryak, Susan M; Patierno, Steven R

    2009-02-15

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0-24 h) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-alpha levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis.

  16. C5-derived activity is required for complement neutrophil-mediated lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Morganroth, M.L.; Till, G.O.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-05

    Cobra venom factor (CVF) derived from the cobra species Naja naja (NN) is a complement activator (cleaves C3, C5 and terminal components) which causes neutrophil dependent acute lung injury and pulmonary hypertension in rats. CVF, derived from the cobra species Naja haje (NH), differs from NN-CVF in that only C3 is cleaved. The authors investigated in isolated blood perfused rat lungs if NH-CVF (n=5), a complement activator which does not generate C5 derived peptides, causes pulmonary hypertension and acute lung injury. NN-CVF (n=5) caused a transient increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure (PA) which returned toward baseline by 30 min (Peak ..delta.. PA = 17 +/- 6 mmHg). Lung injury occurred and was quantitated by the leak of /sup 125/I bovine serum albumin (/sup 125/I-BSA added 30 min post CVF) into lung parenchyma (lung/perfusate /sup 125/I-BSA counts: control = .09 +/- .01, NN-CVF = .48 +/- .11, p < .05). NH-CVF, in an amount which caused equipotent in vitro hemolysis of nonsensitized rabbit erythrocytes, did not cause a PA pressor response (3.5 +/- 1.1 mm Hg, p=NS) or acute lung injury (lung/perfusate /sup 125/I-BSA counts .11 +/- .01, p=NS). Similarly, NH-CVF did not appear to cause lung injury in intact rats (lung perfusate /sup 125/I-BSA counts: control .20 +/- .01, n=3; NH-CVF .25 +/- .05, n=3; NN-CVF .83 +/- .27, n=2). Thus, C3 cleavage alone without the generation of C5 derived peptides is an inadequate stimulus to elicit neutrophil-mediated acute lung injury.

  17. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD.

  18. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  19. Toxic Lung Injury in a Patient Addicted to “Legal Highs” – Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Kulhawik, Dorota; Walecki, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Toxic lung injury may manifest itself in many different ways, ranging from respiratory tract irritation and pulmonary edema in severe cases to constrictive bronchiolitis, being a more distant consequence. It is most often the result of accidental exposure to harmful substances at work, at home, or a consequence of industrial disaster. Case Report This article presents a case of toxic lung injury which occurred after inhalation of legal highs, the so-called “artificial hashish” and at first presented itself radiologically as interstitial pneumonia with pleural effusion and clinically as hypoxemic respiratory insufficiency. After treatment with high doses of steroids, it was histopathologically diagnosed as organizing pneumonia with lipid bodies. Conclusions Due to the lack of pathognomonic radiological images for toxic lung injury, information on possible etiology of irritants is very important. As novel psychoactive substances appeared in Europe, they should be considered as the cause of toxic lung injury. PMID:25691919

  20. Development and assessment of countermeasure formulations for treatment of lung injury induced by chlorine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gary W; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A; Carson, Kenneth H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation.

  1. Akt2 deficiency as a therapeutic strategy protects against acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gauna, Adrienne E; Cha, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of: Vergadi E, Vaporidi K, Theodorakis EE et al. Akt2 deficiency protects from acute lung injury via alternative macrophage activation and miR-146a induction in mice. J. Immunol. 192, 394-406 (2013). Acute respiratory distress syndrome currently has limited effective treatments; however, recent evidence suggests that modulation of alveolar macrophage responses may be an effective method for protection or repair of lung injury. Vergadi et al. are the first to demonstrate that depletion of Akt2 kinase and microRNA-146a induction in mice resulted in polarization of alveolar macrophages towards an M2 activation phenotype and resulted in less severe injury following acid-induced lung injury. However, this M2 polarization also resulted in increased lung bacterial load following infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  2. Development and assessment of countermeasure formulations for treatment of lung injury induced by chlorine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gary W; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A; Carson, Kenneth H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation. PMID:26952014

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J.; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs. PMID:26869337

  4. Inhibition of pulmonary surfactants synthesis during N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Li, Lian; She, Hua; Yue, Shaojie; Li, Chen; Luo, Ziqiang

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors widely distributed in the central nervous system, and have been extensively investigated for their roles in embryonic development, synaptic plasticity and neuroexcitoxicity. Their functions in the peripheral nervous system and non-neural tissues have caught much attention recently. Over-activation of NMDA receptors induces excitotoxic lung injury. But the endogenous cell types in the lungs that express NMDA receptors remains elusive and the molecular mechanism underlies NMDA-induced lung injury has not been fully characterized. In this work, we reported that functional NMDA receptors were expressed in alveolar type II cells in the lungs. Over-activation of these receptors led to down-regulation of pulmonary surfactants synthesis. We further demonstrated that decreased cellular choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase alpha expression induced by NMDA treatment accounted for the decreased pulmonary surfactants synthesis. Our results provided important clues for treatment of glutamate lung injury by modulating pulmonary surfactants system.

  5. An objective index to estimate the survival rate of primary blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kihyuck; Yoon, Jungmin; Min, Kyeongran; Lee, Jungchang; Kang, Shinil; Hong, Sung Jun; Yoon, Sung Hoon; Lee, Jong-Shill; Nam, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seok Hyun; Park, Hoonki; Young, Kim In

    2014-01-01

    To supply proper treatments to the primary blast lung injury (PBLI) patients, it is important to estimate the severity of the primary blast lung injury in accordance with the blast conditions. In this study, a blast-induced mechanical parameter (first principal stress) of lung was calculated using a finite element thorax model and the correlation between the survival rate of the subjects with blast-induced lung damage and an objective index that was related to the first principal stress of the lung model. This study propose the objective index for the estimation of the degree of PBLI. The results have a potential clinical application to improve the efficacy of treatment for blast injury patients.

  6. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-04-06

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury.

  7. Differing effects when using phenylephrine and norepinephrine to augment cerebral blood flow after traumatic brain injury in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Friess, Stuart H; Bruins, Benjamin; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Smith, Colin; Margulies, Susan S

    2015-02-15

    Low cerebral blood flow (CBF) states have been demonstrated in children early after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and have been correlated with poorer outcomes. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) support following severe TBI is commonly implemented to correct cerebral hypoperfusion, but the efficacy of various vasopressors has not been determined. Sixteen 4-week-old female swine underwent nonimpact inertial brain injury in the sagittal plane. Intraparenchymal monitors were placed to measure intracranial pressure (ICP), CBF, brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2), and cerebral microdialysis 30 min to 6 h post-injury. One hour after injury, animals were randomized to receive either phenylephrine (PE) or norepinephrine (NE) infusions titrated to a CPP>70 mm Hg for 5 h. Animals were euthanized 6 h post-TBI, and brains were fixed and stained to assess regions of cell and axonal injury. After initiation of CPP augmentation with NE or PE infusions, there were no differences in ICP between the groups or over time. Animals receiving NE had higher PbtO2 than those receiving PE (29.6±10.2 vs. 19.6±6.4 torr at 6 h post-injury, p<0.05). CBF increased similarly in both the NE and PE groups. CPP support with PE resulted in a greater reduction in metabolic crisis than with NE (lactate/pyruvate ratio 16.7±2.4 vs. 42.7±10.2 at 6 h post-injury, p<0.05). Augmentation of CPP to 70 mm Hg with PE resulted in significantly smaller cell injury volumes at 6 h post-injury than CPP support with NE (0.4% vs. 1.4%, p<0.05). Despite similar increases in CBF, CPP support with NE resulted in greater brain tissue oxygenation and hypoxic-ischemic injury than CPP support with PE. Future clinical studies comparing the effectiveness of various vasopressors for CPP support are warranted.

  8. Monoacylglycerol Lipase (MAGL) Inhibition Attenuates Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costola-de-Souza, Carolina; Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Calefi, Atilio Sersun; Aloia, Thiago Pinheiro Arrais; Gimenes-Júnior, João Antonio; de Almeida, Vinicius Izidio; Pinheiro, Milena Lobão; Palermo-Neto, João

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoid signaling is terminated by enzymatic hydrolysis, a process that, for 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is mediated by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The piperidine carbamate, 4-​nitrophenyl- ​4-​(dibenzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-​5-​yl (hydroxy) methyl) piperidine- 1-​carboxylate (JZL184), is a drug that inhibits MAGL and presents high potency and selectivity. Thus, JZL184 increases the levels of 2-AG, an endocannabinoid that acts on the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Here, we investigated the effects of MAGL inhibition, with a single dose (16 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) of JZL184, in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced acute lung injury (ALI) 6, 24 and 48 hours after the inflammatory insult. Treatment with JZL184 decreased the leukocyte migration into the lungs as well as the vascular permeability measured through the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and histological analysis. JZL184 also reduced the cytokine and chemokine levels in the BAL and adhesion molecule expression in the blood and BAL. The CB1 and CB2 receptors were considered involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of JZL184 because the AM281 selective CB1 receptor antagonist (1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-4-morpholinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide) and the AM630 selective CB2 receptor antagonist ([6-​iodo-​2-​methyl-​1-​[2-​(4-​morpholinyl)ethyl]-​1H-​indol-​3-​yl](4-​methoxyphenyl)-​methanone) blocked the anti-inflammatory effects previously described for JZL184. It was concluded that MAGL inhibition, and consequently the increase in 2-AG levels, produced anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of LPS-induced ALI, a finding that was considered a consequence of the activation of the CB1 and CB2 receptors. PMID:24204926

  9. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Bryan D.; Hess, Dean R.; Harris, R. Scott; Wolf, Monroe A.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Davies, John D.; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Choi, Augustine M.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (108-109 CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100–300 ppm × 60–90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6–8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model. PMID:26320156

  10. Acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rabbits is mediated by interleukin-8-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, H G; Matthay, M A; Hébert, C A; Broaddus, V C

    1995-01-01

    Acid aspiration lung injury may be mediated primarily by neutrophils recruited to the lung by acid-induced cytokines. We hypothesized that a major acid-induced cytokine was IL-8 and that a neutralizing anti-rabbit-IL-8 monoclonal antibody (ARIL8.2) would attenuate acid-induced lung injury in rabbits. Hydrochloric acid (pH = 1.5 in 1/3 normal saline) or 1/3 normal saline (4 ml/kg) was instilled into the lungs of ventilated, anesthetized rabbits. The rabbits were studied for 6 or 24 h. In acid-instilled rabbits without the anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody, severe lung injury developed in the first 6 h; in the long-term experiments, all rabbits died with lung injury between 12 and 14 h. In acid-instilled rabbits given the anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody (2 mg/kg, intravenously) either as pretreatment (5 min before the acid) or as treatment (1 h after the acid), acid-induced abnormalities in oxygenation and extravascular lung water were prevented and extravascular protein accumulation was reduced by 70%; in the long-term experiments, anti-IL-8 treatment similarly protected lung function throughout the 24-h period. The anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody also significantly reduced air space neutrophil counts and IL-8 concentrations. This study establishes IL-8 as a critical cytokine for the development of acid-induced lung injury. Neutralization of IL-8 may provide the first useful therapy for this clinically important form of acute lung injury. Images PMID:7615779

  11. Mitochondrial Biogenesis in the Pulmonary Vasculature During Inhalational Lung Injury and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CARRAWAY, MARTHA S.; SULIMAN, HAGIR B.; KLIMENT, CORRINE; WELTY-WOLF, KAREN E.; OURY, TIM D.; PIANTADOSI, CLAUDE A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. By using reporter mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) exclusively in mitochondria, we tracked mitochondrial biogenesis and correlated it with histologic lung injury, proliferation, and fibrosis. At 72 hours after acute LPS or continuous exposure to hyperoxia (Fio2, 1.0), the lungs showed diffuse infiltration by inflammatory cells in the alveolar region. In reporter mice, patchy new mitochondrial fluorescence was found in the alveolar region but was most prominent and unexpected in perivascular regions. At 14 days after instillation of asbestos or bleomycin, diffuse chronic inflammation had developed, and green fluorescence appeared in inflammatory cells in the expanded interstitium and was most intense in smooth muscle cells of pulmonary vessels. In all four lung injuries, mitochondrial fluorescence colocalized with mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, but not with proliferating cell nuclear antigen. These data indicate that vascular mitochondrial biogenesis is activated in diverse inhalational lung injuries along with oxidative stress. This finding indicates a unique and unexpected mechanism of metabolic adaptation to pulmonary fibrotic injuries. PMID:17999632

  12. Preliminary observations of lung injury produced by instillation of HF in acidic and neutral buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, J.R.; Kinkead, S.A.; Kober, E.M.; Sebring, R.J.; Stavert, D.M.; Lehnert, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) is an extremely toxic organofluoride that can be produced during pyrolysis of tetrafluoroethylene polymers, including Teflon{reg sign}. Inhalation of PFIB at very low concentrations causes acute lung injury, the hallmark of which is pulmonary edema. Several lines of evidence have suggested that hydrolysis of PFIB and resulting production of hydrofluoric acid may be responsible for pulmonary damage. In order to investigate the potential involvement of hydrofluoric acid in producing lung injury and its relationship to the mechanism of fluorocarbon toxicity, we have compared the pulmonary injury produced by PFIB, by dissociated (H{sup +} and F{sup {minus}}), and by undissociated (HF) hydrofluoric acid in the deep lung. By delivering hydrofluoric acid by intratracheal instillation in neutral buffer, we demonstrate that F{sup {minus}} produces no significant pulmonary injury as assessed by increased in lung weight and ultrastructural changes. Similarly, instillation of acid buffer alone demonstrated that H{sup +} did not produce detectable lung injury. Instillation of HF produced changes in lung weight and ultrastructure similar to those observed in PFIB-treated rats. However, the ultrastructural studies show that in contrast to inhalation of PFIB, which produces both endothelial and epithelial cell damage, instillation of HF appears to exert its injurious effects only upon epithelial cells. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Claudin 4 knockout mice: normal physiological phenotype with increased susceptibility to lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kage, Hidenori; Flodby, Per; Gao, Danping; Kim, Yong Ho; Marconett, Crystal N.; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction proteins that regulate paracellular ion permeability of epithelium and endothelium. Claudin 4 has been reported to function as a paracellular sodium barrier and is one of three major claudins expressed in lung alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). To directly assess the role of claudin 4 in regulation of alveolar epithelial barrier function and fluid homeostasis in vivo, we generated claudin 4 knockout (Cldn4 KO) mice. Unexpectedly, Cldn4 KO mice exhibited normal physiological phenotype although increased permeability to 5-carboxyfluorescein and decreased alveolar fluid clearance were noted. Cldn4 KO AEC monolayers exhibited unchanged ion permeability, higher solute permeability, and lower short-circuit current compared with monolayers from wild-type mice. Claudin 3 and 18 expression was similar between wild-type and Cldn4 KO alveolar epithelial type II cells. In response to either ventilator-induced lung injury or hyperoxia, claudin 4 expression was markedly upregulated in wild-type mice, whereas Cldn4 KO mice showed greater degrees of lung injury. RNA sequencing, in conjunction with differential expression and upstream analysis after ventilator-induced lung injury, suggested Egr1, Tnf, and Il1b as potential mediators of increased lung injury in Cldn4 KO mice. These results demonstrate that claudin 4 has little effect on normal lung physiology but may function to protect against acute lung injury. PMID:25106430

  14. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E.; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The ‘response to microorganisms’ was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the ‘neuron projection morphogenesis’ process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection

  15. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  16. Normothermic ex vivo perfusion prevents lung injury compared to extended cold preservation for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cypel, M; Rubacha, M; Yeung, J; Hirayama, S; Torbicki, K; Madonik, M; Fischer, S; Hwang, D; Pierre, A; Waddell, T K; de Perrot, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2009-10-01

    Treatment of injured donor lungs ex vivo to accelerate organ recovery and ameliorate reperfusion injury could have a major impact in lung transplantation. We have recently demonstrated a feasible technique for prolonged (12 h) normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). This study was performed to examine the impact of prolonged EVLP on ischemic injury. Pig donor lungs were cold preserved in Perfadex for 12 h and subsequently divided into two groups: cold static preservation (CSP) or EVLP at 37 degrees C with Steen solution for a further 12 h (total 24 h preservation). Lungs were then transplanted and reperfused for 4 h. EVLP preservation resulted in significantly better lung oxygenation (PaO(2) 531 +/- 43 vs. 244 +/- 49 mmHg, p < 0.01) and lower edema formation rates after transplantation. Alveolar epithelial cell tight junction integrity, evaluated by zona occludens-1 protein staining, was disrupted in the cell membranes after prolonged CSP but not after EVLP. The maintenance of integrity of barrier function during EVLP translates into significant attenuation of reperfusion injury and improved graft performance after transplantation. Integrity of functional metabolic pathways during normothermic perfusion was confirmed by effective gene transfer and GFP protein synthesis by lung alveolar cells. In conclusion, EVLP prevents ongoing injury associated with prolonged ischemia and accelerates lung recovery. PMID:19663886

  17. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwu; Liu, Kehuan; Ma, Chunqing; Yu, Jiangang; Peng, Zhaoyun; Huang, Guoyang; Cai, Zhiyu; Li, Runping; Xu, Weigang; Sun, Xuejun; Liu, Kan; Zheng, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is one of the most widely used clinical interventions to counteract insufficient pulmonary oxygen delivery in patients with severe lung injury. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia leads to inflammation and acute lung injury. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) at 28 μmol/kg immediately before hyperoxia exposure and then exposed to pure oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) with continuous ventilation for six hours, Immediately after hyperoxia exposure, rats were sacrificed via anesthesia. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was harvested for the detection of protein concentration and IL-1 content, and the lungs were collected for HE staining, TUNEL staining and detection of wet/dry weight ratio. Our results showed hyperbaric hyperoixa exposure could significantly damage the lung (HE staining), increase the protein and IL-13 in the BALF, elevate the wet/dry Weight ratio and raise the TUNEL positive cells. However, pre-treatment with hydrogen sulfide improved the lung morphology, reduced the TUNEL positive cells and attenuated the lung inflammation (reduction in IL-13 of BALF and HE staining). Taken together, our findings indicate that hydrogen sulfide pretreatment may exert protective effects on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  18. Effect of Overground Training Augmented By Mental Practice On Gait Velocity in Chronic, Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kelli G.; Gramer, Robert; Butler, Laine; Cramer, Steven C.; Hade, Erinn; Page, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare efficacy of a regimen combining mental practice (MP) with overground training with the efficacy of a regimen comprised of overground training only on gait velocity and lower extremity motor outcomes in individuals with chronic (> 12 months post injury), incomplete, spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Randomized controlled, single blinded, study Setting Outpatient rehabilitation laboratories located in the Midwestern and Western United States Participants 18 subjects with chronic, incomplete SCI Interventions Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: (a) Overground Training only (OT), occurring 3 days/week for 8 weeks; or (b) OT augmented by MP (MP + OT), during which randomly assigned subjects listened to a mental practice audio recording directly following OT sessions. Main Outcome Measures Subjects were administered a test of gait velocity as well as the Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), Spinal Cord Injury Independence Measure (SCIM), and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) on 2 occasions before intervention, 1 week after intervention, and 12 weeks after intervention. Results A significant increase in gait velocity was exhibited across subjects at both 1 week post-therapy (p=0.0046) and at 12 weeks post-therapy (p=0.0056). However, no differences were seen in intervention response at either 1 or 12 weeks post intervention among subjects in the MP + OT versus the OT groups. Conclusion Overground training was associated with significant gains in gait velocity, and that these gains were not augmented by further addition of mental practice. PMID:24342552

  19. Neutrophil elastase inhibitor reduces ventilation-induced lung injury via nuclear factor-κB and NF-κB repressing factor in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Fu; Lai, Yi-Ting; Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Meng-Chih; Liu, Yung-Yang; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2014-04-11

    Mechanical ventilation used in patients with acute lung injury can damage pulmonary epithelial cells through production of inflammatory cytokines, oxygen radicals, and neutrophil infiltration, termed ventilator-induced lung injury. Neutrophil elastase, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and NF-κB repressing factor (NRF) have previously been shown to participate in the regulation of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) during airway inflammation. However, the mechanisms regulating interactions among mechanical ventilation, neutrophil influx, and NF-κB/NRF remain unclear. Thus, we hypothesized that neutrophil elastase inhibitor attenuated ventilation-induced neutrophil recruitment and MIP-2 production through inhibition of the NF-κB/NRF pathway. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to low-tidal-volume (6 mL/kg) or high-tidal-volume (30 mL/kg) mechanical ventilation using room air with or without 2 µg/g NF-κB inhibitor SN50 or 6 µg/g NRF short interfering RNA or 100 µg/g neutrophil elastase inhibitor administration. Nonventilated mice served as a control group. Evan blue dye, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, free radicals, myeloperoxidase, histopathologic grading of lung tissue, inflammatory cytokines, Western blot of NF-κB and NRF, and gene expression of NRF were measured to establish the extent of lung injury. Neutrophil elastase inhibitor ameliorated high-tidal-volume ventilation-induced lung injury, neutrophil influx, production of MIP-2 and malondialdehyde, activation of NF-κB and NRF, apoptotic epithelial cell death, and disruption of bronchial microstructure in mice. Mechanical stretch-augmented acute lung injury was also attenuated through pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity by SN50 and NRF expression by NRF short interfering RNA. Our data suggest that neutrophil elastase inhibitor attenuates high-tidal-volume mechanical ventilation-induced neutrophil influx, oxidative stress, and production of MIP-2, at least partly, through inhibition of

  20. The effects of morin on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by suppressing the lung NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Tianzhu, Zhang; Shihai, Yang; Juan, Du

    2014-12-01

    In previous study, the anti-inflammatory effect of morin had been found. In this study, we investigated anti-inflammatory effects of morin on acute lung injury using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The cell counting in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured. The animal lung edema degree was evaluated by wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. The superoxidase dismutase (SOD) activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed by SOD and MPO kits, respectively. The levels of inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Pathological changes of lung tissues were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The protein level of lung NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome was measured by Western blotting. The data showed that treatment with the morin markedly attenuated inflammatory cell numbers in the BALF, decreased lung NLRP3 inflammasome protein level, and improved SOD activity and inhibited MPO activity. Histological studies demonstrated that morin substantially inhibited LPS-induced neutrophils in lung tissue compared with model group. The results indicated that the morin had a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice.

  1. DEPLETION OF IRON AND ASCORBATE IN RODENTS DIMINISHES LUNG INJURY AFTER SILICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures of the lung to iron chelates can be associated with an injury. The catalysis of oxygen-based free radicals is postulated to participate in this injury. Such oxidant generation by mineral oxide particles can be dependent on availability of both iron and a reductant. We t...

  2. Changes in breath sound power spectra during experimental oleic acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute lung injury on the frequency spectra of breath sounds, we made serial acoustic recordings from nondependent, midlung and dependent regions of both lungs in ten 35- to 45-kg anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated pigs during development of acute lung injury induced with intravenous oleic acid in prone or supine position. Oleic acid injections rapidly produced severe derangements in the gas exchange and mechanical properties of the lung, with an average increase in venous admixture from 16 ± 12 to 62 ± 16% (P < 0.01), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 25 ± 4 to 14 ± 4 ml/cmH2O (P < 0.01). A concomitant increase in sound power was seen in all lung regions (P < 0.05), predominantly in frequencies 150-800 Hz. The deterioration in gas exchange and lung mechanics correlated best with concurrent spectral changes in the nondependent lung regions. Acute lung injury increases the power of breath sounds likely secondary to redistribution of ventilation from collapsed to aerated parts of the lung and improved sound transmission in dependent, consolidated areas.

  3. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-04

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production.

  4. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:26240569

  5. Chronic exposure to volcanogenic air pollution as cause of lung injury.

    PubMed

    Camarinho, Ricardo; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Rodrigues, Armindo Santos

    2013-10-01

    Few studies were made regarding the pulmonary effects of exposure to volcanogenic air pollution, representing an unrecognized health risk for humans inhabiting non-eruptive volcanically active areas (10% of world human population). We tested the hypothesis whether chronic exposure to air pollution of volcanogenic origin causes lung injury, using wild mice (Mus musculus) as model. Lung injury was determined using histological morphometric parameters, inflammatory status (InfS) and the amount of black silver deposits (BSD). Mice exposed to volcanogenic air pollution have decreased percentage of alveolar space, alveolar perimeter and lung structural functionality (LSF) ratio and, increased alveolar septal thickness, amount of BSD and InfS. For the first time it is evidenced that non-eruptive active volcanism has a high potential to cause lung injury. This study also highlights the usefulness of M. musculus as bioindicator species, and of the developed biomarker of effect LSF ratio, for future animal and/or human biomonitoring programs.

  6. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib prevents lung injury and death after intravenous LPS in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R Scott; Johnston, Laura; Servinsky, Laura; Kim, Bo S; Damarla, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are frequent causes of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, and important sources of human mortality. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls, plays a major role in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis and septic shock. LPS exposure induces the production of harmful reactive oxygen species, and the resultant oxidant injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both severe sepsis and ARDS. We previously showed that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib increases lung endothelial antioxidant enzymes and protects against pulmonary endothelial antioxidant injury. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that imatinib would protect against lung injury and systemic inflammation caused by intravenous LPS in an intact mouse model of endotoxemia mimicking early sepsis. We found that intravenous LPS induced a significant increase in the activity of lung xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), an enzyme which is a major source of reactive oxygen species and implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Imatinib had no effect of LPS-induced XOR activity. However, pretreatment of mice with imatinib increased lung catalase activity and decreased intravenous LPS-induced lung oxidant injury as measured by γ-H2AX, a marker of oxidant-induced DNA damage, lung apoptosis, and pulmonary edema. Imatinib also attenuated systemic cytokine expression after intravenous LPS exposure. Finally, imatinib completely prevented mortality in an in vivo, intravenous LPS mouse model of endotoxemia and lung injury. These results support the testing of imatinib as a novel pharmacologic agent in the treatment of Gram-negative sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:26620257

  7. Isoflurane ameliorates acute lung injury by preserving epithelial tight junction integrity

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Joshua A.; Macias, Alvaro A.; Amador-Munoz, Diana; Vera, Miguel Pinilla; Isabelle, Colleen; Guan, Jiazhen; Magaoay, Brady; Velandia, Margarita Suarez; Coronata, Anna; Lee, Awapuhi; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isoflurane may be protective in pre-clinical models of lung injury but its use in patients with lung injury remains controversial and the mechanism of its protective effects remains unclear. We hypothesized that this protection is mediated at the level of alveolar tight junctions and investigated the possibility in a two-hit model of lung injury that mirrors human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Wild-type mice were treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to nebulized endotoxin (n=8) or saline control (n=9) then allowed to recover for 24 hrs prior to mechanical ventilation (MV, tidal volume 15 mL/kg, 2 hrs) producing ventilator-induced lung injury. Mouse lung epithelial cells were similarly treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Cells were cyclically stretched the following day to mirror the MV protocol used in vivo. Results Mice treated with isoflurane following exposure to inhaled endotoxin and prior to MV exhibited significantly less physiologic lung dysfunction. These effects appeared to be mediated by decreased vascular leak, but not altered inflammatory indices. Mouse lung epithelial cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and cyclic stretch and lungs harvested from mice following treatment with lipopolysaccharide and MV had decreased levels of a key tight junction protein (i.e. zona occludens 1) that was rescued by isoflurane treatment. Conclusions Isoflurane rescued lung injury induced by a two-hit model of endotoxin exposure followed by MV by maintaining the integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier possibly by modulating the expression of a key tight junction protein. PMID:26068207

  8. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-15

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a(-/-)) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a(-/-) mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt(+/-) mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a(-/-) mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically.

  9. Lung Protective Ventilation (ARDSNet) versus APRV: Ventilatory Management in a Combined Model of Acute Lung and Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Leonard, Kenji L.; Falls, Randall K.; Mageau, Ronald P.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Hollowell, Joseph P.; Trainor, Wayne E.; Kanaan, Hilal A.; Hickner, Robert C.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Poulin, Nathaniel R.; Waibel, Brett H.; Toschlog, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concomitant lung/brain traumatic injury, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Lung protective ventilation (ARDSNet) has become the standard for managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, the resulting permissive hypercapnea may compound traumatic brain injury (TBI). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) offers an alternative strategy for management of this patient population. APRV was hypothesized to retard the progression of acute lung/brain injury to a greater degree than ARDSNet in a swine model. Methods Yorkshire swine were randomized to ARDSNet, APRV, or sham. Ventilatory settings and pulmonary parameters, vitals, blood gases, quantitative histopathology, and cerebral microdialysis were compared between groups using chi-square, Fisher’s exact, Student’s t-test, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and mixed effects repeated measures modeling. Results 22 swine (17 male, 5 female), weighing 25±6.0kg, were randomized to APRV (n=9), ARDSNet (n=12), or sham (n=1). PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio dropped significantly while intracranial pressure increased significantly for all three groups immediately following lung and brain injury. Over time, peak inspiratory pressure, mean airway pressure, and P/F ratio significantly increased, while total respiratory rate significantly decreased within the APRV group compared to the ARDSNet group. Histopathology did not show significant differences between groups in overall brain or lung tissue injury; however, cerebral microdialysis trends suggested increased ischemia within the APRV group compared to ARDSNet over time. Conclusion Previous studies have not evaluated the effects of APRV in this population. While our macroscopic parameters and histopathology did not observe a significant difference between groups, microdialysis data suggest a trend toward increased cerebral ischemia associated with APRV over time. Additional and future studies should focus on extending the time interval for observation to

  10. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  11. Spatiotemporal Aeration and Lung Injury Patterns Are Influenced by the First Inflation Strategy at Birth.

    PubMed

    Tingay, David G; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Black, Don; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Lavizzari, Anna; Frerichs, Inéz; Zahra, Valerie A; Davis, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    Ineffective aeration during the first inflations at birth creates regional aeration and ventilation defects, initiating injurious pathways. This study aimed to compare a sustained first inflation at birth or dynamic end-expiratory supported recruitment during tidal inflations against ventilation without intentional recruitment on gas exchange, lung mechanics, spatiotemporal regional aeration and tidal ventilation, and regional lung injury in preterm lambs. Lambs (127 ± 2 d gestation), instrumented at birth, were ventilated for 60 minutes from birth with either lung-protective positive pressure ventilation (control) or as per control after either an initial 30 seconds of 40 cm H2O sustained inflation (SI) or an initial stepwise end-expiratory pressure recruitment maneuver during tidal inflations (duration 180 s; open lung ventilation [OLV]). At study completion, molecular markers of lung injury were analyzed. The initial use of an OLV maneuver, but not SI, at birth resulted in improved lung compliance, oxygenation, end-expiratory lung volume, and reduced ventilatory needs compared with control, persisting throughout the study. These changes were due to more uniform inter- and intrasubject gravity-dependent spatiotemporal patterns of aeration (measured using electrical impedance tomography). Spatial distribution of tidal ventilation was more stable after either recruitment maneuver. All strategies caused regional lung injury patterns that mirrored associated regional volume states. Irrespective of strategy, spatiotemporal volume loss was consistently associated with up-regulation of early growth response-1 expression. Our results show that mechanical and molecular consequences of lung aeration at birth are not simply related to rapidity of fluid clearance; they are also related to spatiotemporal pressure-volume interactions within the lung during inflation and deflation.

  12. Effects of budesonide and N-acetylcysteine on acute lung hyperinflation, inflammation and injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Anne-Helene; Eriksson, Christina; Wang, Xiangdong

    2005-08-01

    Leukocyte activation and production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species are important in the pathogenesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. The present study investigated acute lung hyperinflation, edema, and lung inflammation 4 h after an intratracheal instillation of LPS (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 microg/ml/kg). Effects of budesonide, an inhaled anti-inflammatory corticosteroids, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, were evaluated in Wistar rats receiving either low (2.5 microg/ml/kg) or high (50 microg/ml/kg) concentrations of LPS. This study demonstrates that LPS in a concentration-dependent pattern induces acute lung hyperinflation measured by excised lung gas volume (25-45% above control), lung injury indicated by increased lung weight (10-60%), and lung inflammation characterized by the infiltration of leukocytes (40-14000%) and neutrophils (80-17000%) and the production of cytokines (up to 2700%) and chemokines (up to 350%) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pretreatment with NAC partially prevented tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) production induced by the low concentration of LPS, while pretreatment with budesonide totally prevented the increased production of TNFalpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractive protein (MCP)-1 after LPS challenge at both low and high concentrations. Budesonide failed to prevent BALF levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (GRO/CINC-1) as well as lung hyperinflation induced by both low and high concentrations of LPS. Pretreatment with budesonide totally prevented the formation of lung edema at the low concentration of LPS and had partial effects on acute lung injury and leukocyte influx at the high concentrations. Thus, our data indicate that therapeutic effects of budesonide and NAC are dependent upon the severity of the disease.

  13. Effects of simvastatin on the expression of inducible NOS in acute lung injury in septic rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Chao; Zou, Zi-Jun; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Yu-Kai; He, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The available evidence suggests that simvastatin plays a beneficial role in lung injury. In addition, statins have been shown to inhibit the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin on iNOS expression based on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic rat model. Methods: Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (control group, sepsis group and simvastatin group). A rat model of sepsis was established with LPS. The simvastatin group was pre-treated with simvastatin, whereas the control and sepsis groups were treated with saline before LPS treatment. LPS was injected into the rats in the simvastatin and sepsis groups, while as a negative control, the control group received saline alone. The oxygenation index, expression levels of iNOS and IL-6, and pathological integral of lung injury were analyzed to evaluate the effect of simvastatin on septic rats. Results: Compared with the septic group, significant decreases in the oxygenation index and expression level of iNOS were observed in the simvastatin group. Furthermore, simvastatin treatment resulted in a significant decrease in iNOS levels and the pathological integral of lung injury score in septic rats. Conclusion: Simvastatin can relieve acute lung injury induced by sepsis in rats. Decreasing iNOS levels may contribute to the protective role of simvastatin in lung injury. PMID:26823851

  14. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hummler, Helmut D.; Banke, Katharina; Wolfson, Marla R.; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Ebsen, Michael; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Fuchs, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor. Objectives To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency. Methods 30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O) and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN)-group: tidal volume (Vt) = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH)-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH)-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology. Results PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05), with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8) resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group. Conclusion Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone. PMID:26840779

  15. Early mechanical ventilation is deleterious after aspiration-induced lung injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hermon, Michael M; Wassermann, Esther; Pfeiler, Claudia; Pollak, Arnold; Redl, Heinz; Strohmaier, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether mechanical ventilation after aspiration is deleterious when started before surfactant therapy. Gas exchange and lung mechanics were measured in rabbits after aspiration either mechanically ventilated before or after lavage with diluted surfactant or Ringer's solution. Lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of 2 mL/kg of a betain/HCl pepsin mixture. After 30 min of spontaneous breathing, ventilation was started in 12 rabbits, which were then treated by lavage with diluted surfactant (15 mL/kg body weight; 5.3 mg/mL, group MVpre S) or with Ringer's solution (1 mL/kg; group MVpre R). Another 12 rabbits were treated by lavage while spontaneously breathing and were then connected to the ventilator (MVpost S and MVpost R). Sham control rabbits were mechanically ventilated for 4 h. At the end of experiment, PaO2/FiO2 ratio in MVpost S was five times higher than in MVpre S (P=0.0043). Lung mechanics measurements showed significant difference between MVpre S and MVpost S (P=0.0072). There was histopathologic evidence of decreased lung injury in MVpost S. Immediate initiation of ventilation is harmful when lung injury is induced by aspiration. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether the timing of lavage with diluted surfactant has an impact on the treatment of patients with aspiration or comparable types of direct lung injury. PMID:15614133

  16. Aerosolized bovine lactoferrin reduces lung injury and fibrosis in mice exposed to hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Yen, Chih-Ching; Wang, Shih-Ming; Tsai, Tung-Chou; Lai, Zi-Lun; Sun, Jheng-Yue; Lin, Willei; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the ability of aerosolized bovine lactoferrin (bLF) to protect the lungs from injury induced by chronic hyperoxia. Female CD-1 mice were exposed to hyperoxia (FiO2 = 80 %) for 7 days to induce lung injury and fibrosis. The therapeutic effects of bLF, administered via an aerosol delivery system, on the chronic lung injury induced by this period of hyperoxia were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage, lung histology, cell apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines in the lung tissues. After exposure to hyperoxia for 7 days, the survival of the mice was significantly decreased to 20 %. The protective effects of bLF against hyperoxia were further confirmed by significant reductions in lung edema, total cell numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), pulmonary fibrosis, and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. The aerosolized bLF protected the mice from oxygen toxicity and increased the survival fraction to 66.7 % in the hyperoxic model. The results support the use of an aerosol therapy with bLF in intensive care units to reduce oxidative injury in patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:24842100

  17. Lung injury after hemorrhage is age-dependent: role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W.; O’Connor, Michael; Burroughs, Timothy J.; Wong, Hector R.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The incidence of multiple organ failure in pediatric trauma victims is lower than in the adult population. However, the molecular mechanisms are not yet defined. We investigated whether the pathophysiologic characteristics of hemorrhage-induced lung injury may be age-dependent and may be regulated by the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor γ (PPARγ). Design Prospective, laboratory investigation that used an established rodent model of hemorrhagic shock. Setting University hospital laboratory. Subjects Young (n=67; 3–5 months old) and mature (n=66; 11–13 months old) male rats. Interventions Hemorrhagic shock was induced in young and mature rats by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg. After 3 hrs, rats were rapidly resuscitated by infusing the shed blood and sacrificed 3 hrs thereafter. Measurements and Main Results In young rats, lung injury was characterized by accumulation of red cells and neutrophils at the end of the resuscitation period; at Western blot analysis, lung expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was increased. In contrast, the severity of lung injury was more pronounced in mature rats. Lung myeloperoxidase activity and expression of constitutive and inducible ICAM-1 was significantly higher in mature rats when compared to young rats. Mature rats also had higher plasma levels of cytokines and chemokines when compared to young rats. This heightened inflammation was associated with higher degree of activation of nuclear factor-κB and down-regulation of PPARγ and heat shock factor-1 in the lung of mature rats when compared to young rats. Treatment with the PPARγ ligand, the cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, ameliorated lung injury in young, but not in mature animals. Conclusions Lung injury after severe hemorrhage is age-dependent and may be secondary to a diverse regulation of PPARγ. PMID:19384226

  18. Lung-specific loss of the laminin α3 subunit confers resistance to mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Urich, Daniela; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Takawira, Desire; Chiarella, Sergio E; Soberanes, Saul; Gonzalez, Angel; Koentgen, Frank; Manghi, Tomas; Hopkinson, Susan B; Misharin, Alexander V; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2011-09-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix that are secreted by epithelial cells and which are crucial for the normal structure and function of the basement membrane. We have generated a mouse harboring a conditional knockout of α3 laminin (Lama3(fl/fl)), one of the main laminin subunits in the lung basement membrane. At 60 days after intratracheal treatment of adult Lama3(fl/fl) mice with an adenovirus encoding Cre recombinase (Ad-Cre), the protein abundance of α3 laminin in whole lung homogenates was more than 50% lower than that in control-treated mice, suggesting a relatively long half-life for the protein in the lung. Upon exposure to an injurious ventilation strategy (tidal volume of 35 ml per kg of body weight for 2 hours), the mice with a knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit had less severe injury, as shown by lung mechanics, histology, alveolar capillary permeability and survival when compared with Ad-Null-treated mice. Knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit resulted in evidence of lung inflammation. However, this did not account for their resistance to mechanical ventilation. Rather, the loss of α3 laminin was associated with a significant increase in the collagen content of the lungs. We conclude that the loss of α3 laminin in the alveolar epithelium results in an increase in lung collagen, which confers resistance to mechanical injury. PMID:21878500

  19. Aspirin, but Not Tirofiban Displays Protective Effects in Endotoxin Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gombert, Alexander; Jacobs, Michael J.; Drechsler, Maik; Döring, Yvonne; Soehnlein, Oliver; Grommes, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) remains an unsolved problem in intensive care medicine. Recruitment of neutrophils into the lungs, regarded as a key mechanism in progression of ALI, depends on signaling between neutrophils and platelets. Consequently we explored the effect of platelet-targeted aspirin and tirofiban treatment in endotoxin induced acute lung injury Methods C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to aerosolized LPS (500μg/ml) for 30min and treated with Aspirin (100μg/g bodyweight via intraperitoneal injection, 30 min before or 1 hour after LPS inhalation) or Tirofiban (0.5μg/ g bodyweight via tail vein injection 30 min before or 1 hour after LPS inhalation). The count of alveolar, interstitial, and intravascular neutrophils was assessed 4h later by flow cytometry. Lung permeability changes were assessed by FITC-dextran clearance and protein content in the BAL fluid. Results Aspirin both before and after LPS inhalation reduced neutrophil influx into the lung and lung permeability indicating the protective role of Aspirin in ALI. Tirofiban, however, did not alter neutrophil recruitment after LPS inhalation. Release of platelet-derived chemokines CCL5 and PF4 and neutrophil extracellular traps was reduced by Aspirin but not by Tirofiban. Conclusion Aspirin, but not Tirofiban reduces neutrophil recruitment and displays protective effects during endotoxin induced lung injury. PMID:27583400

  20. Prenatal administration of the cytochrome P4501A inducer, {Beta}-naphthoflavone (BNF), attenuates hyperoxic lung injury in newborn mice: Implications for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants

    SciTech Connect

    Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Liang Yanhong Wei; Jiang Weiwu; Wang Lihua; Barrios, Roberto; Yang Peiying; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2011-10-15

    Supplemental oxygen contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal treatment of pregnant mice (C57BL/6J) with the cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 inducer, ss-napthoflavone (BNF), will lead to attenuation of lung injury in newborns (delivered from these dams) exposed to hyperoxia by mechanisms entailing transplacental induction of hepatic and pulmonary CYP1A enzymes. Pregnant mice were administered the vehicle corn oil (CO) or BNF (40 mg/kg), i.p., once daily for 3 days on gestational days (17-19), and newborns delivered from the mothers were either maintained in room air or exposed to hyperoxia (> 95% O{sub 2}) for 1-5 days. After 3-5 days of hyperoxia, the lungs of CO-treated mice showed neutrophil infiltration, pulmonary edema, and perivascular inflammation. On the other hand, BNF-pretreated neonatal mice showed decreased susceptibility to hyperoxic lung injury. These mice displayed marked induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) (CYP1A1) and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD) (CYP1A2) activities, and levels of the corresponding apoproteins and mRNA levels until PND 3 in liver, while CYP1A1 expression alone was augmented in the lung. Prenatal BNF did not significantly alter gene expression of pulmonary NAD(P)H quinone reductase (NQO1). Hyperoxia for 24-72 h resulted in increased pulmonary levels of the F{sub 2}-isoprostane 8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, whose levels were decreased in mice prenatally exposed to BNF. In conclusion, our results suggest that prenatal BNF protects newborns against hyperoxic lung injury, presumably by detoxification of lipid hydroperoxides by CYP1A enzymes, a phenomenon that has implications for prevention of BPD in infants. - Highlights: > Supplemental oxygen is routinely administered to premature infants. > Hyperoxia causes lung injury in experimental animals. > Prenatal treatment of mice with beta-naphthoflavone attenuates oxygen

  1. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Eis, Annie L; Konduri, Girija G; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure.

  2. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    SEPEHR, REYHANEH; AUDI, SAID H.; MALEKI, SEPIDEH; STANISZEWSKI, KEVIN; EIS, ANNIE L.; KONDURI, GIRIJA G.; RANJI, MAHSA

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure. PMID:24672581

  3. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  4. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection.

  5. Effect of corticosteroid treatment on cell recovery by lung lavage in acute radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wesselius, L.J.; Floreani, A.A.; Kimler, B.F.; Papasian, C.J.; Dixon, A.Y. )

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate cell populations recovered by lung lavage up to 6 weeks following thoracic irradiation (24 Gy) as an index of the acute inflammatory response within lung structures. Additionally, rats were treated five times weekly with intraperitoneal saline (0.3 cc) or methylprednisolone (7.5 mg/kg/week). Lung lavage of irradiated rats recovered increased numbers of total cells compared to controls beginning 3 weeks after irradiation (P less than 0.05). The initial increase in number of cells recovered was attributable to an influx of neutrophils (P less than 0.05), and further increases at 4 and 6 weeks were associated with increased numbers of recovered macrophages (P less than 0.05). Lung lavage of steroid-treated rats at 6 weeks after irradiation recovered increased numbers of all cell populations compared to controls (P less than 0.05); however, numbers of recovered total cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were all significantly decreased compared to saline-treated rats (P less than 0.05). The number of inflammatory cells recovered by lung lavage during acute radiation-induced lung injury is significantly diminished by corticosteroid treatment. Changes in cells recovered by lung lavage can also be correlated with alteration in body weight and respiration rate subsequent to treatment with thoracic irradiation and/or corticosteroids.

  6. HIF2α signaling inhibits adherens junctional disruption in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haixia; Rehman, Jalees; Tang, Haiyang; Wary, Kishore; Mittal, Manish; Chatturvedi, Pallavi; Zhao, Youyang; Komorova, Yulia A.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by edema and inflammatory cell infiltration. The transcription factor HIF2α is highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and may regulate endothelial barrier function. Here, we analyzed promoter sequences of genes encoding proteins that regulate adherens junction (AJ) integrity and determined that vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) is a HIF2α target. HIF2α-induced VE-PTP expression enhanced dephosphorylation of VE-cadherin, which reduced VE-cadherin endocytosis and thereby augmented AJ integrity and endothelial barrier function. Mice harboring an EC-specific deletion of Hif2a exhibited decreased VE-PTP expression and increased VE-cadherin phosphorylation, resulting in defective AJs. Mice lacking HIF2α in ECs had increased lung vascular permeability and water content, both of which were further exacerbated by endotoxin-mediated injury. Treatment of these mice with Fg4497, a prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 (PHD2) inhibitor, activated HIF2α-mediated transcription in a hypoxia-independent manner. HIF2α activation increased VE-PTP expression, decreased VE-cadherin phosphorylation, promoted AJ integrity, and prevented the loss of endothelial barrier function. These findings demonstrate that HIF2α enhances endothelial barrier integrity, in part through VE-PTP expression and the resultant VE-cadherin dephosphorylation-mediated assembly of AJs. Moreover, activation of HIF2α/VE-PTP signaling via PHD2 inhibition has the potential to prevent the formation of leaky vessels and edema in inflammatory diseases such as ARDS. PMID:25574837

  7. Clinical course of acute chemical lung injury caused by 3-chloropentafluoropene.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satomu; Takimoto, Takayuki; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nishi, Katsuji; lino, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroallyl chloride (PFAC), a fluorine-containing compound, has very severe toxicity, but this toxicity is not well characterised. We report a fatal case of acute chemical lung injury caused by the inhalation of PFAC. A 39-year-old man, working at a chemical factory, inhaled PFAC gas and died 16 days later of acute lung injury with severe pneumothorax. We present his clinical course together with thoracic CT findings, autopsy and analysis of PFAC in blood and urine samples with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Previously, a fatal case of PFAC was reported in 1981 but PFAC was not identified in any of the patient's samples. In our patient, we identified PFAC in both blood and urine samples. Our toxicological analysis may be used as a reference to detect PFAC toxicity in the future. Our study should be helpful for diagnosing lung injury induced by a highly toxic gas, such as PFAC. PMID:24311414

  8. CLOCK modulates survival and acute lung injury in mice with polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Hsieh, I-Chang; Shie, Shian-Sen; Ho, Ming-Yun; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2016-09-16

    Polymicrobial sepsis is a potentially fatal condition and a significant burden on health care systems. Acute lung injury is the most common complication of sepsis and results in high mortality. However, there has been no recent significant progress in the treatment of sepsis or acute lung injury induced by sepsis. Here we show that mice deficient in the circadian protein CLOCK had better survival than wild-type mice after induction of polymicrobial sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. Inflammatory cytokine production was attenuated and bacterial clearance was improved in CLOCK-deficient mice. Moreover, acute lung injury after induction of sepsis was significantly decreased in CLOCK-deficient mice. Genome-wide profiling analysis showed that inhibin signaling was reduced in CLOCK-deficient mice. These data establish the importance of circadian CLOCK-inhibin signaling in sepsis, which may have potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27520377

  9. Clinical course of acute chemical lung injury caused by 3-chloropentafluoropene.

    PubMed

    Morita, Satomu; Takimoto, Takayuki; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Nishi, Katsuji; lino, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Perfluoroallyl chloride (PFAC), a fluorine-containing compound, has very severe toxicity, but this toxicity is not well characterised. We report a fatal case of acute chemical lung injury caused by the inhalation of PFAC. A 39-year-old man, working at a chemical factory, inhaled PFAC gas and died 16 days later of acute lung injury with severe pneumothorax. We present his clinical course together with thoracic CT findings, autopsy and analysis of PFAC in blood and urine samples with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Previously, a fatal case of PFAC was reported in 1981 but PFAC was not identified in any of the patient's samples. In our patient, we identified PFAC in both blood and urine samples. Our toxicological analysis may be used as a reference to detect PFAC toxicity in the future. Our study should be helpful for diagnosing lung injury induced by a highly toxic gas, such as PFAC.

  10. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Results Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (P<0.0001, P=0.015, and P<0.01, respectively). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary partial destruction, consolidation, alveolar edema, and hemorrhage scores were significantly lower in alprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration scores in skeletal muscle tissue were significantly lower in the iloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I/R group (P<0.0001). Conclusion Alprostadil and iloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury.

  11. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Results Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (P<0.0001, P=0.015, and P<0.01, respectively). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary partial destruction, consolidation, alveolar edema, and hemorrhage scores were significantly lower in alprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration scores in skeletal muscle tissue were significantly lower in the iloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I/R group (P<0.0001). Conclusion Alprostadil and iloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury. PMID:27601882

  12. Suppressive oligonucleotides inhibit inflammation in a murine model of mechanical ventilator induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Scheiermann, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is commonly used to improve blood oxygenation in critically ill patients and for general anesthesia. Yet the cyclic mechanical stress induced at even moderate ventilation volume settings [tidal volume (Vt) <10 mL/kg] can injure the lungs and induce an inflammatory response. This work explores the effect of treatment with suppressive oligonucleotides (Sup ODN) in a mouse model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Methods Balb/cJ mice were mechanically ventilated for 4 h using clinically relevant Vt and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 3 cmH2O under 2–3% isoflurane anesthesia. Lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected to assess lung inflammation and lung function was monitored using a FlexiVent®. Results MV induced significant pulmonary inflammation characterized by the influx and activation of CD11c+/F4/80+ macrophages and CD11b+/Ly6G+ polymorphonuclear cells into the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The concurrent administration of Sup ODN attenuated pulmonary inflammation as evidenced by reduced cellular influx and production of inflammatory cytokines. Oligonucleotide treatment did not worsen lung function as measured by static compliance or resistance. Conclusions Treatment with Sup ODN reduces the lung injury induced by MV in mice. PMID:27746995

  13. Pentoxifylline Attenuates Nitrogen Mustard-induced Acute Lung Injury, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Vayas, Kinal N.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Malaviya, Rama; Hall, LeRoy; Massa, Christopher B.; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic alkylating agent that causes damage to the respiratory tract. Evidence suggests that macrophages and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α contribute to pulmonary injury. Pentoxifylline is a TNFα inhibitor known to suppress inflammation. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of pentoxifylline to mitigate NM-induced lung injury and inflammation. Exposure of male Wistar rats (250 g; 8–10 weeks) to NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in severe histolopathological changes in the lung within 3 d of exposure, along with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number and protein, indicating inflammation and alveolar-epithelial barrier dysfunction. This was associated with increases in oxidative stress proteins including lipocalin (Lcn)2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung, along with pro-inflammatory/cytotoxic (COX-2+ and MMP-9+), and anti-inflammatory/wound repair (CD163+ and Gal-3+) macrophages. Treatment of rats with pentoxifylline (46.7 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3 d beginning 15 min after NM significantly reduced NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress, as measured histologically and by decreases in BAL cell and protein content, and levels of HO-1 and Lcn2. Macrophages expressing COX-2 and MMP-9 also decreased after pentoxifylline, while CD163+ and Gal-3+ macrophages increased. This was correlated with persistent upregulation of markers of wound repair including pro-surfactant protein-C and proliferating nuclear cell antigen by Type II cells. NM-induced lung injury and inflammation were associated with alterations in the elastic properties of the lung, however these were largely unaltered by pentoxifylline. These data suggest that pentoxifylline may be useful in treating acute lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by vesicants. PMID:24886962

  14. Effect of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Blockade on Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Chow, Yu-Hua; Gill, Sean E.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 is increased in different models of acute lung injury, and is an important determinant of survival and proliferation in many cells. We previously demonstrated that treatment of mice with IGF-1 receptor–blocking antibody (A12) improved early survival in bleomycin-induced lung injury. We have now examined whether administration of A12 improved markers of lung injury in hyperoxia model of lung injury. C57BL/6 mice underwent intraperitoneal administration of A12 or control antibody (keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]), then were exposed to 95% hyperoxia for 88–90 hours. Mice were killed and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis. Hyperoxia caused a significant increase in IGF levels in BAL and lung lysates. Peripheral blood neutrophils expressed IGF-1R at baseline and after hyperoxia. BAL neutrophils from hyperoxia-treated mice and patients with acute lung injury also expressed cell surface IGF-1R. A12-treated mice had significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) count in BAL compared with KLH control mice (P = 0.02). BAL from A12-treated mice demonstrated decreased PMN chemotactic activity compared with BAL from KLH-treated mice. Pretreatment of PMNs with A12 decreased their chemotactic response to BAL from hyperoxia-exposed mice. Furthermore, IGF-1 induced a dose-dependent chemotaxis of PMNs. There were no differences in other chemotactic cytokines in BAL, including CXCL1 and CXCL2. In summary, IGF blockade decreased PMN recruitment to the alveolar space in a mouse model of hyperoxia. Furthermore, the decrease in BAL PMNs was at least partially due to a direct effect of A12 on PMN chemotaxis. PMID:22493012

  15. Pentoxifylline attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced acute lung injury, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Malaviya, Rama; Hall, LeRoy; Massa, Christopher B; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic alkylating agent that causes damage to the respiratory tract. Evidence suggests that macrophages and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α contribute to pulmonary injury. Pentoxifylline is a TNFα inhibitor known to suppress inflammation. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of pentoxifylline to mitigate NM-induced lung injury and inflammation. Exposure of male Wistar rats (150-174 g; 8-10 weeks) to NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in severe histopathological changes in the lung within 3d of exposure, along with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number and protein, indicating inflammation and alveolar-epithelial barrier dysfunction. This was associated with increases in oxidative stress proteins including lipocalin (Lcn)2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung, along with pro-inflammatory/cytotoxic (COX-2(+) and MMP-9(+)), and anti-inflammatory/wound repair (CD163+ and Gal-3(+)) macrophages. Treatment of rats with pentoxifylline (46.7 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3d beginning 15 min after NM significantly reduced NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress, as measured histologically and by decreases in BAL cell and protein content, and levels of HO-1 and Lcn2. Macrophages expressing COX-2 and MMP-9 also decreased after pentoxifylline, while CD163+ and Gal-3(+) macrophages increased. This was correlated with persistent upregulation of markers of wound repair including pro-surfactant protein-C and proliferating nuclear cell antigen by Type II cells. NM-induced lung injury and inflammation were associated with alterations in the elastic properties of the lung, however these were largely unaltered by pentoxifylline. These data suggest that pentoxifylline may be useful in treating acute lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by vesicants.

  16. Pediatric blast lung injury from a fireworks-related explosion.

    PubMed

    Ratto, Jessica; Johnson, Bernadette K; Condra, Cole S; Knapp, Jane F

    2012-06-01

    Blast injuries related to explosions have been described in the literature but are uncommon in children. We describe a multisystem blast injury in a child resulting from a commercial firework-related explosion in her home. She presented with respiratory failure, shock, altered level of consciousness, and multiple orthopedic injuries. The patient required immediate stabilization and resuscitation in the emergency department and a prolonged hospitalization. This report reviews the spectrum of injuries that are seen in blast-related trauma and the emergency measures needed for rapid stabilization of these critical patients.

  17. Inhibition of NF-κB Activation and Augmentation of IκBβ by Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor during Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lentsch, Alex B.; Jordan, Jacqueline A.; Czermak, Boris J.; Diehl, Kathleen M.; Younkin, Ellen M.; Sarma, Vidya; Ward, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    In earlier experiments, exogenous administration of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) suppressed acute lung injury induced by deposition of IgG immune complexes. In the current studies we examined the mechanism of the protective effects of SLPI in this model. The presence of SLPI in the IgG immune complex-model of lung injury reduced the increase in extravascular leakage of 125I-albumin, the intensity of up-regulation of lung vascular intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and the numbers of neutrophils accumulating in the lung. The presence of SLPI caused greatly reduced activation (ie, nuclear translocation) of the transcription nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in lung cells but did not suppress activation of lung mitogen-activated protein kinase. SLPI did not alter NF-κB activation in alveolar macrophages harvested 30 minutes after initiation of lung inflammation. In the presence of SLPI, content of tumor necrosis factor-α, CXC chemokines, and C5a in bronchoalveolar fluids was unaffected. In the inflamed lungs, inhibition of NF-κB activation by SLPI was associated with elevated levels of lung IκBβ (but not IκBα) protein in the absence of elevated mRNA for IκBβ. When instilled into normal lung, SLPI also caused similar changes (increases) in lung IκBβ. Finally, in the lung inflammatory model used, the presence of anti-SLPI caused accentuated activation of NF-κB. These data confirm the anti-inflammatory effect of SLPI in lung and point to a mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects of SLPI. SLPI appears to function as an endogenous regulator of lung inflammation. PMID:9916938

  18. Inhibition of lung tumor growth and augmentation of radiosensitivity by decreasing peroxiredoxin I expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Keng, Peter C.; Shau Hungyi; Wu, C.-T.; Hu, Y.-C.; Liao, S.-K.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: miaofen@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: In this study, we examined the role of peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) in lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and its influence on these tumor cells' sensitivity to radiotherapy. Methods and materials: We established stable transfectants of A549 (p53+) and H1299 (p53-) lung carcinoma cell lines with Prx I antisense to downregulate their Prx I protein. We then examined their in vitro biologic changes and used nude mice xenografts of these cell lines to compare tumor invasion, spontaneous metastatic capacity, and sensitivity to radiotherapy. Results: The Prx I antisense transfectants of both cell lines showed a significant reduction in Prx I protein production. Prx I antisense transfectants grew more slowly than did the wild type. As xenografts in mice, A549 Prx I antisense transfectants showed a threefold delay in the generation of palpable tumors. The incidence of spontaneous metastasis of Prx I antisense transfectants was significantly less than that of the wild-type cells. Furthermore, irradiation of Prx I antisense transfectants caused more than twice the growth delay compared with the wild type. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that inactivation of Prx I may be a promising approach to improve the treatment outcome of patients with lung cancer.

  19. Hesperetin attenuates ventilator-induced acute lung injury through inhibition of NF-κB-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongzhong; Feng, Xiaoli; Ding, Suchun

    2015-12-15

    Hesperetin, a major bioflavonoid in sweet oranges and lemons, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of hesperetin on ventilator-induced acute lung injury has not been studied. In present study, we investigated the protective effect of hesperetin on ventilator-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were orally administered hesperetin (10, 20, or 40mg/kg) two hour before acute lung injury was induced by mechanical ventilation. Rats were then randomly divided into six groups: the lung protective ventilation group (n=20, LV group), injurious ventilation group (n=20, HV group), vehicle-treated injurious ventilation group (n=20, LV+vehicle group), hesperetin (10mg/kg)-treated acute lung injury group (n=20, HV+Hsp (10mg)), hesperetin (20mg/kg)-treated acute lung injury group (n=20, HV+Hsp (20mg)), and hesperetin (40mg/kg)-treated acute lung injury group (n=20, HV+Hsp (40mg)). The lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were isolated for subsequent measurements. Treatment with hesperetin dramatically improved the histology of lung tissue, and reduced the wet/dry ratio, myeloperoxidase activity, protein concentration, and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats with ventilator-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, our study indicated that this protective effect of hesperetin results from its ability to increase the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and inhibit the activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway. These results suggest that hesperetin may be a potential novel therapeutic candidate for protection against ventilator-induced acute lung injury.

  20. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 Protects against Nickel-induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Tan, Zongqing; Chen, Liang; Peng, Zhimin; Dietsch, Maggie; Su, Bing; Leikauf, George; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Nickel compounds are environmental and occupational hazards that pose serious health problems and are causative factors of acute lung injury. The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are regulated through a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 3 kinase-MAP2 kinase cascade and have been implicated in nickel toxicity. In this study, we used genetically modified cells and mice to investigate the involvement of two upstream MAP3Ks, MAP3K1 and 2, in nickel-induced JNK activation and acute lung injury. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity induced by nickel were similar in the Map3k2-null and wild-type cells but were much lower in the Map3k1/Map3k2 double-null cells. Conversely, the levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity were unexpectedly much higher in the Map3k1-null cells. In adult mouse tissue, MAP3K1 was widely distributed but was abundantly expressed in the bronchiole epithelium of the lung. Accordingly, MAP3K1 ablation in mice resulted in severe nickel-induced acute lung injury and reduced survival. Based on these findings, we propose a role for MAP3K1 in reducing JNK activation and protecting the mice from nickel-induced acute lung injury. PMID:18467339

  1. Consumption of hydrogen water reduces paraquat-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shulin; Liu, Kan; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Wenwu; Xu, Weigang; Denoble, Petar; Tao, Hengyi; Sun, Xuejun

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to paraquat leads to acute lung injury and oxidative stress is widely accepted as a contributor to paraquat-induced acute lung injury. Recent studies have reported that consumption of water with dissolved molecular hydrogen to a saturated level (hydrogen water) prevents oxidative stress-induced diseases. Here, we investigated whether consumption of saturated hydrogen saline protects rats against paraquat-induced acute lung injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group; hydrogen water-only group (HW group); paraquat-only group (PQ group); paraquat and hydrogen water group (PQ + HW group). The rats in control group and HW group drank pure water or hydrogen water; the rats in PQ group and PQ + HW group were intraperitonealy injected with paraquat (35 mg/kg) and then provided pure water or hydrogen water. Both biochemical and histological lung alterations were measured. The results showed that hydrogen water ameliorated these alterations, demonstrating that hydrogen water alleviated paraquat-induced acute lung injury possibly by inhibition of oxidative damage. PMID:21318114

  2. Paracrine Factors of Multipotent Stromal Cells Ameliorate Lung Injury in an Elastase-induced Emphysema Model

    PubMed Central

    Katsha, Ahmed M; Ohkouchi, Shinya; Xin, Hong; Kanehira, Masahiko; Sun, Ruowen; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Saijo, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) ameliorate several types of lung injury. The differentiation of MSCs into specific cells at the injury site has been considered as the important process in the MSC effect. However, although MSCs reduce destruction in an elastase-induced lung emphysema model, MSC differentiation is relatively rare, suggesting that MSC differentiation into specific cells does not adequately explain the recuperation observed. Humoral factors secreted by MSCs may also play an important role in ameliorating emphysema. To confirm this hypothesis, emphysema was induced in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice by intratracheal elastase injection 14 days before intratracheal MSC or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) administration. Thereafter, lungs were collected at several time points and evaluated. Our results showed that MSCs reduced the destruction in elastase-induced emphysema. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence staining revealed infrequent MSC engraftment and differentiation into epithelial cells. Real-time PCR showed increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Real-time PCR and western blotting showed enhanced production of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in the lung. In-vitro coculture studies confirmed the in vivo observations. Our findings suggest that paracrine factors derived from MSCs is the main mechanism for the protection of lung tissues from elastase injury. PMID:20842104

  3. Interleukin-22 ameliorates acute severe pancreatitis-associated lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential protective effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-22 (rIL-22) on L-arginine-induced acute severe pancreatitis (SAP)-associated lung injury and the possible signaling pathway involved. METHODS: Balb/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with L-arginine to induce SAP. Recombinant mouse IL-22 was then administered subcutaneously to mice. Serum amylase levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissue were measured after the L-arginine administration. Histopathology of the pancreas and lung was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Expression of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung tissue was detected by real-time PCR. Expression and phosphorylation of STAT3 were analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: Serum amylase levels and MPO activity in the lung tissue in the SAP group were significantly higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the animals in the SAP group showed significant pancreatic and lung injuries. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mRNAs in the SAP group was decreased markedly, while the IL-22RA1 mRNA expression was increased significantly relative to the normal control group (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with PBS did not significantly affect the serum amylase levels, MPO activity or expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or IL-22RA1 mRNA (P > 0.05). Moreover, no significant differences in the degrees of pancreatic and lung injuries were observed between the PBS and SAP groups. However, the serum amylase levels and lung tissue MPO activity in the rIL-22 group were significantly lower than those in the SAP group (P < 0.05), and the injuries in the pancreas and lung were also improved. Compared with the PBS group, rIL-22 stimulated the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and IL-22RA1 mRNAs in the lung (P < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of p-STAT3 to STAT3 protein in the rIL-22 group was significantly higher than that in the PBS group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION

  4. Preventing cleavage of Mer promotes efferocytosis and suppresses acute lung injury in bleomycin treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Lee, Seung-Hae; Youn, Young-So; Choi, Ji-Yeon; Song, Keung-Sub; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-15

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) regulates macrophage activation and promotes apoptotic cell clearance. Mer activation is regulated through proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. To determine if membrane-bound Mer is cleaved during bleomycin-induced lung injury, and, if so, how preventing the cleavage of Mer enhances apoptotic cell uptake and down-regulates pulmonary immune responses. During bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice, membrane-bound Mer expression decreased, but production of soluble Mer and activity as well as expression of disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) were enhanced . Treatment with the ADAM inhibitor TAPI-0 restored Mer expression and diminished soluble Mer production. Furthermore, TAPI-0 increased Mer activation in alveolar macrophages and lung tissue resulting in enhanced apoptotic cell clearance in vivo and ex vivo by alveolar macrophages. Suppression of bleomycin-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, but enhancement of hepatocyte growth factor induction were seen after TAPI-0 treatment. Additional bleomycin-induced inflammatory responses reduced by TAPI-0 treatment included inflammatory cell recruitment into the lungs, levels of total protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis in lung tissue. Importantly, the effects of TAPI-0 on bleomycin-induced inflammation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration of specific Mer-neutralizing antibodies. These findings suggest that restored membrane-bound Mer expression by TAPI-0 treatment may help resolve lung inflammation and apoptosis after bleomycin treatment. -- Highlights: ►Mer expression is restored by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►Mer signaling is enhanced by TAPI-0 treatment in bleomycin-stimulated lung. ►TAPI-0 enhances efferocytosis and promotes resolution of lung injury.

  5. Enrichment of murine CD68+ CCR2+ and CD68+ CD206+ lung macrophages in acute pancreatitis-associated acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Akbarshahi, Hamid; Menzel, Mandy; Posaric Bauden, Monika; Rosendahl, Ann; Andersson, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an important cause of mortality in critically ill patients. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the risk factors for developing this syndrome. Among the inflammatory cells, macrophages have a key role in determining the severity of the acute lung injury. In the lungs, macrophages constitute a heterogeneous cell population distributed in different compartments. Changes in not only the macrophage count, but also in their phenotype have been seen during the course of lung injury. A murine ductal ligation model of acute pancreatitis showed substantial morphological changes in the pancreas and lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed neutrophil recruitment into both organs after 9 hours and later on. F4/80(+) cells in the pancreas increased in the ligated animals, though there was not a significant difference in their number in the lungs as compared to sham operated animals. Flow cytometry analysis of lung macrophages demonstrated an enrichment of F4/80(-) CD68(+)CCR2(+) and F4/80(-) CD68(+)CD206(+) lung macrophages in ligated animals (AP) as compared to the sham operated group. The level of interleukin-6 in plasma increased 3 hours after ligation compared to the sham operated group, as a first indicator of a systemic inflammatory response.This study suggests a role for F4/80(-) CD68(+) macrophages in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in acute pancreatitis. Studying lung macrophages for different phenotypic markers, their polarization, activation and recruitment, in the context of acute lung injury, is a novel area to potentially identify interventions which may improve the outcome of acute lung injury.

  6. Dexamethasone pretreatment attenuates lung and kidney injury in cholestatic rats induced by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liangyi; Yao, Xiangqing; Chen, Yanling

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) results in mild to severe organ injury, in which tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) seem to be involved. Thus, we aim to assess the influence of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury on remote organs in addition to cholestasis and consider the possible efficacy of steroid pretreatment in reducing the injury. A common bile duct ligation model was done on 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 7 days, the rats were divided randomly into control group, IR group, and dexamethasone (DEX) group. The IR group showed significant increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine levels compared with the control and DEX groups. By ELISA techniques, higher levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in lung and kidney tissues were measured in the IR group than in the control and DEX groups, these were verified by immunohistochemistry. The lung histology of the IR group rats showed neutrophil infiltration, interstitial edema, and alveolar wall thickening. Kidney histology of the IR group rats showed vacuolization of the proximal tubular epithelial cells and tubular dilatation with granular eosinophilic casts. Better morphological aspects were observed in the DEX-pretreated animals. Minimal lesions were observed in the control. The results suggest that hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in cholestatic rats induced lung and kidney injuries. Pretreatment with dexamethasone reduced the IR-induced injury in addition to cholestasis.

  7. Inflammasome, IL-1 and inflammation in ozone-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Michaudel, Chloé; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Chenuet, Pauline; Maillet, Isabelle; Mura, Catherine; Couillin, Isabelle; Gombault, Aurélie; Quesniaux, Valérie F; Huaux, François; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ambient ozone causes airway hyperreactivity and lung inflammation, which represent an important health concern in humans. Recent clinical and experimental studies contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms of epithelial injury, inflammation and airway hyperreactivity, which is reviewed here. The present data suggest that ozone induced oxidative stress causes inflammasome activation with the release of IL-1, other cytokines and proteases driving lung inflammation leading to the destruction of alveolar epithelia with emphysema and respiratory failure. Insights in the pathogenic pathway may allow to identify novel biomarkers of ozone-induced lung disease and therapeutic targets. PMID:27168953

  8. Elevated Plasma Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme-3 (LDH3) in Experimentally Induced Immunologic Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hagadorn, J. E.; Bloor, C. M.; Yang, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Normal rats injected intravenously with rabbit antiserum to rat lung develop acute pulmonary lesions characterized by an altered vascular permeability. In the present study, an increase in plasma LDH3 activity is shown to be positively correlated with the different levels of circulating antilung antibodies and with the morphologic severity of lung injury elicited by these pathogenic immunoglobulins. Within 24 hours, the acute lung changes are resolved, accompanied by a return of the activities of plasma LDH isoenzymes to normal. It is proposed that the plasma LDH3 isoenzymes are released into the circulation from injured alveolar capillary endothelial cells. ImagesFig 1 PMID:5133518

  9. C60 Exposure Augments Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Coronary Artery Contraction in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Nathan A.; Vidanapathirana, Achini K.; Pitzer, Joshua E.; Han, Li; Sumner, Susan J.; Lewin, Anita H.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Lust, Robert M.; Brown, Jared M.; Wingard, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The potential uses of engineered C60 fullerene (C60) have expanded in recent decades to include industrial and biomedical applications. Based on clinical findings associated with particulate matter exposure and our data with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, we hypothesized that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and pharmacological responses in isolated coronary arteries would depend upon the route of exposure and gender in rats instilled with C60. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were used to test this hypothesis by surgical induction of cardiac I/R injury in situ 24 h after intratracheal (IT) or intravenous (IV) instillation of 28 μg of C60 formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or PVP vehicle. Serum was collected for quantification of various cytokines. Coronary artery segments were isolated for assessment of vasoactive pharmacology via wire myography. Both IV and IT exposure to C60 resulted in expansion of myocardial infarction in male and female rats following I/R injury. Serum-collected post-I/R showed elevated concentrations of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in male rats exposed to IV C60. Coronary arteries isolated from male rats exposed to IT C60 demonstrated augmented vasocontraction in response to endothelin-1 that was attenuated with Indomethacin. IV C60 exposure resulted in impaired acetylcholine relaxation in male rats and IT C60 exposure resulted in depressed vasorelaxation in response to sodium nitroprusside in female rats. Based on these data, we conclude that IT and IV exposure to C60 results in unique cardiovascular consequences that may favor heightened coronary resistance and myocardial susceptibility to I/R injury. PMID:24431213

  10. Fluorometry of ischemia reperfusion injury in rat lungs in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated the utility of optical fluorometry to evaluate lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rats lungs under various chemically-induced respiratory states. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute ischemia on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in vivo using optical fluorometry. Under ischemic conditions, insufficient oxygen supply to the mitochondrial chain should reduce the mitochondrial redox state calculated from the ratio of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide). The chest of anesthetized, and mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rat was opened to induce acute ischemia by clamping the left hilum to block both blood flow and ventilation to one lung for approximately 10 minutes. NADH and FAD fluorescent signals were recorded continuously in a dark room via a fluorometer probe placed on the pleural surface of the left lung. Acute ischemia caused a decrease in FAD and an increase in NADH, which resulted in an increase in the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR=NADH/FAD). Restoration of blood flow and ventilation by unclamping the left hilum returned the RR back to its baseline. These results (increase in RR under ischemia) show promise for the fluorometer to be used in a clinical setting for evaluating the effect of pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in real time.

  11. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J

    2016-03-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.

  12. Genome-wide association mapping of acute lung injury in neonatal inbred mice

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Jennifer L.; Gladwell, Wesley; Verhein, Kirsten C.; Cho, Hye-Youn; Wess, Jürgen; Suzuki, Oscar; Wiltshire, Tim; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a respiratory condition that affects preterm infants. However, the mechanisms of susceptibility to oxidant stress in neonatal lungs are not completely understood. We evaluated the role of genetic background in response to oxidant stress in the neonatal lung by exposing mice from 36 inbred strains to hyperoxia (95% O2) for 72 h after birth. Hyperoxia-induced lung injury was evaluated by using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analysis and pathology. Statistically significant interstrain variation was found for BALF inflammatory cells and protein (heritability estimates range: 33.6–55.7%). Genome-wide association mapping using injury phenotypes identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 6, and 7. Comparative mapping of the chromosome 6 QTLs identified Chrm2 (cholinergic receptor, muscarinic 2, cardiac) as a candidate susceptibility gene, and mouse strains with a nonsynonymous coding single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Chrm2 that causes an amino acid substitution (P265L) had significantly reduced hyperoxia-induced inflammation compared to strains without the SNP. Further, hyperoxia-induced lung injury was significantly reduced in neonatal mice with targeted deletion of Chrm2, relative to wild-type controls. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of oxidative lung injury in neonates.—Nichols, J. L., Gladwell, W., Verhein, K. C., Cho, H.-Y., Wess, J., Suzuki, O., Wiltshire, T., Kleeberger, S. R. Genome-wide association mapping of acute lung injury in neonatal inbred mice. PMID:24571919

  13. Inhibiting Integrin αvβ5 Reduces Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in an Orthotopic Lung Transplant Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mallavia, B; Liu, F; Sheppard, D; Looney, M R

    2016-04-01

    Primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the immediate posttransplant period and is characterized by endothelial and epithelial barrier disruption and the leakage of protein-rich edema fluid. Integrins are cell surface receptors that have an important role in maintenance of the cell barrier, and inhibition of integrins, such as αvβ5, can diminish alveolar flooding in lung injury models. We hypothesized that inhibition of αvβ5 during donor lung cold ischemia would reduce endothelial permeability during reperfusion. Using an orthotopic single lung transplantation model with and without cold ischemia, donor lungs were perfused with αvβ5-blocking antibody (ALULA) or control antibody at the time of collection, followed by transplantation, 8 h of reperfusion, and the measurement of lung injury parameters. Prolonged cold ischemia (18 h) produced increases in extravascular lung water, protein permeability, and neutrophilic alveolitis and decreased oxygenation compared with lungs without cold ischemia. Perfusion of lungs with αvβ5 antibody versus control antibody protected donor lungs from injury and significantly improved oxygenation. In summary, αvβ5 integrin blockade protects from the development of ischemia-reperfusion lung injury and is a promising approach to preventing primary graft dysfunction in human lung transplant procedures.

  14. Inhibition of chlorine-induced lung injury by the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Weiyuan; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F.; Rando, Roy J.; Pathak, Yashwant V.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2012-09-01

    Chlorine is a highly toxic respiratory irritant that when inhaled causes epithelial cell injury, alveolar-capillary barrier disruption, airway hyperreactivity, inflammation, and pulmonary edema. Chlorine is considered a chemical threat agent, and its release through accidental or intentional means has the potential to result in mass casualties from acute lung injury. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram was investigated as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury. Rolipram inhibits degradation of the intracellular signaling molecule cyclic AMP. Potential beneficial effects of increased cyclic AMP levels include inhibition of pulmonary edema, inflammation, and airway hyperreactivity. Mice were exposed to chlorine (whole body exposure, 228–270 ppm for 1 h) and were treated with rolipram by intraperitoneal, intranasal, or intramuscular (either aqueous or nanoemulsion formulation) delivery starting 1 h after exposure. Rolipram administered intraperitoneally or intranasally inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema. Minor or no effects were observed on lavage fluid IgM (indicative of plasma protein leakage), KC (Cxcl1, neutrophil chemoattractant), and neutrophils. All routes of administration inhibited chlorine-induced airway hyperreactivity assessed 1 day after exposure. The results of the study suggest that rolipram may be an effective rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury and that both systemic and targeted administration to the respiratory tract were effective routes of delivery. -- Highlights: ► Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. ► Rolipram inhibited chlorine-induced pulmonary edema and airway hyperreactivity. ► Post-exposure rolipram treatments by both systemic and local delivery were effective. ► Rolipram shows promise as a rescue treatment for chlorine-induced lung injury.

  15. Amelioration of meconium-induced acute lung injury by parecoxib in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ai-Min; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Wen-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays important roles in various inflammatory conditions and is significantly increased in meconium-induced lung injury. We investigated the effects of parecoxib on meconium-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbits. Twenty-four rabbits were randomized into sham, control, and parecoxib groups. Rabbits in the control and parecoxib groups underwent tracheal instillation of meconium, followed by intravenous injection of saline or parecoxib and 4 h of ventilation. The airway pressure, dynamic compliance, and ratio of partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2 ratio) were recorded at baseline (T0) and 4 h after instillation (T1-T4). The lung tissue wet-to-dry weight ratio; neutrophil percentage; and total protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. The myeloperoxidase activity, COX-2 expression, and degree of histopathologic injury in lung tissue were also analyzed. The airway pressure, compliance, and PaO2/FiO2 ratio were significantly improved by parecoxib after meconium instillation. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, total protein level, and neutrophil percentage in BALF were lowest in the parecoxib group. The TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels in the BALF were lowest in the parecoxib group. The COX-2 expression and myeloperoxidase activity in lung tissue were significantly reduced by parecoxib. The degree of lung injury was also reduced. In conclusions: Parecoxib effectively ameliorates respiratory function and attenuates meconium-induced ALI. These effects are correlated with prostaglandin E2 and COX-2 inhibition. PMID:26221218

  16. Role of β-catenin-regulated CCN matricellular proteins in epithelial repair after inflammatory lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zemans, Rachel L; McClendon, Jazalle; Aschner, Yael; Briones, Natalie; Young, Scott K; Lau, Lester F; Kahn, Michael; Downey, Gregory P

    2013-03-15

    Repair of the lung epithelium after injury is integral to the pathogenesis and outcomes of diverse inflammatory lung diseases. We previously reported that β-catenin signaling promotes epithelial repair after inflammatory injury, but the β-catenin target genes that mediate this effect are unknown. Herein, we examined which β-catenin transcriptional coactivators and target genes promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. Transmigration of human neutrophils across cultured monolayers of human lung epithelial cells resulted in a fall in transepithelial resistance and the formation of discrete areas of epithelial denudation ("microinjury"), which repaired via cell spreading by 96 h. In mice treated with intratracheal (i.t.) LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration was associated with increased permeability of the lung epithelium, as determined by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid albumin concentration, which decreased over 3-6 days. Activation of β-catenin/p300-dependent gene expression using the compound ICG-001 accelerated epithelial repair in vitro and in murine models. Neutrophil transmigration induced epithelial expression of the β-catenin/p300 target genes Wnt-induced secreted protein (WISP) 1 and cysteine-rich (Cyr) 61, as determined by real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunostaining. Purified neutrophil elastase induced WISP1 upregulation in lung epithelial cells, as determined by qPCR. WISP1 expression increased in murine lungs after i.t. LPS, as determined by ELISA of the BAL fluid and qPCR of whole lung extracts. Finally, recombinant WISP1 and Cyr61 accelerated repair, and Cyr61-neutralizing antibodies delayed repair of the injured epithelium in vitro. We conclude that β-catenin/p300-dependent expression of WISP1 and Cyr61 is critical for epithelial repair and represents a potential therapeutic target to promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury.

  17. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  18. Ibuprofen prevents oxidant lung injury and in vitro lipid peroxidation by chelating iron.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, T P; Rao, N V; Noah, W; Michael, J R; Jafri, M H; Gurtner, G H; Hoidal, J R

    1990-01-01

    Because ibuprofen protects from septic lung injury, we studied the effect of ibuprofen in oxidant lung injury from phosgene. Lungs from rabbits exposed to 2,000 ppm-min phosgene were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 50 ml/min for 60 min. Phosgene caused no increase in lung generation of cyclooxygenase metabolites and no elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure, but markedly increased transvascular fluid flux (delta W = 31 +/- 5 phosgene vs. 8 +/- 1 g unexposed, P less than 0.001), permeability to albumin (125I-HSA) lung leak index 0.274 +/- 0.035 phosgene vs. 0.019 +/- 0.001 unexposed, P less than 0.01; 125I-HSA lavage leak index 0.352 +/- 0.073 phosgene vs. 0.008 +/- 0.001 unexposed, P less than 0.01), and lung malondialdehyde (50 +/- 7 phosgene vs. 24 +/- 0.7 mumol/g dry lung unexposed, P less than 0.01). Ibuprofen protected lungs from phosgene (delta W = 10 +/- 2 g; lung leak index 0.095 +/- 0.013; lavage leak index 0.052 +/- 0.013; and malondialdehyde 16 +/- 3 mumol/g dry lung, P less than 0.01). Because iron-treated ibuprofen failed to protect, we studied the effect of ibuprofen in several iron-mediated reactions in vitro. Ibuprofen attenuated generation of .OH by a Fenton reaction and peroxidation of arachidonic acid by FeCl3 and ascorbate. Ibuprofen also formed iron chelates that lack the free coordination site required for iron to be reactive. Thus, ibuprofen may prevent iron-mediated generation of oxidants or iron-mediated lipid peroxidation after phosgene exposure. This suggests a new mechanism for ibuprofen's action. PMID:2173723

  19. Lung injury after cigarette smoking is particle-related

    EPA Science Inventory

    That specific component responsible and the mechanistic pathway for increased human morbidity and mortality after cigarette smoking have yet to be delineated. We propose that 1) injury and disease following cigarette smoking are associated with exposure and retention of particles...

  20. Assessing the association of oxytocin augmentation with obstetric anal sphincter injury in nulliparous women: a population-based, case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rygh, Astrid B; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Körner, Hartwig; Eggebø, Torbjørn M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of oxytocin augmentation with obstetric anal sphincter injury among nulliparous women. Design Population-based, case–control study. Setting Primary and secondary teaching hospital serving a Norwegian region. Population 15 476 nulliparous women with spontaneous start of labour, single cephalic presentation and gestation ≥37 weeks delivering vaginally between 1999 and 2012. Methods Based on the presence or absence of oxytocin augmentation, episiotomy, operative vaginal delivery and birth weight (<4000 vs ≥4000 g), we modelled in logistic regression the best fit for prediction of anal sphincter injury. Within the modified model of main exposures, we tested for possible confounding, and interactions between maternal age, ethnicity, occiput posterior position and epidural analgaesia. Main outcome measure Obstetric anal sphincter injury. Results Oxytocin augmentation was associated with a higher OR of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in women giving spontaneous birth to infants weighing <4000 g (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.2). Episiotomy was not associated with sphincter injuries in spontaneous births, but with a lower OR in operative vaginal deliveries. Spontaneous delivery of infants weighing ≥4000 g was associated with a threefold higher OR, and epidural analgaesia was associated with a 30% lower OR in comparison to no epidural analgaesia. Conclusions Oxytocin augmentation was associated with a higher OR of obstetric anal sphincter injuries during spontaneous deliveries of normal-size infants. We observed a considerable effect modification between the most important factors predicting anal sphincter injuries in the active second stage of labour. PMID:25059967

  1. Augmented Inhibition from Cannabinoid-Sensitive Interneurons Diminishes CA1 Output after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian N.; Palmer, Chris P.; Bourgeois, Elliot B.; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Putnam, Brendan J.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2014-01-01

    The neurological impairments associated with traumatic brain injury include learning and memory deficits and increased risk of seizures. The hippocampus is critically involved in both of these phenomena and highly susceptible to damage by traumatic brain injury. To examine network activity in the hippocampal CA1 region after lateral fluid percussion injury, we used a combination of voltage-sensitive dye, field potential, and patch clamp recording in mouse hippocampal brain slices. When the stratum radiatum (SR) was stimulated in slices from injured mice, we found decreased depolarization in SR and increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens (SO), together with a decrease in the percentage of pyramidal neurons firing stimulus-evoked action potentials. Increased hyperpolarization in SO persisted when glutamatergic transmission was blocked. However, we found no changes in SO responses when the alveus was stimulated to directly activate SO. These results suggest that the increased SO hyperpolarization evoked by SR stimulation was mediated by interneurons that have cell bodies and/or axons in SR, and form synapses in stratum pyramidale and SO. A low concentration (100 nM) of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2, restored CA1 output in slices from injured animals. These findings support the hypothesis that increased GABAergic signaling by cannabinoid-sensitive interneurons contributes to the reduced CA1 output following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25565968

  2. Neuronal modulation of lung injury induced by polymeric hexamethylene diisocyanate in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-T.; Poovey, Halet G.; Rando, Roy J.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2007-10-01

    1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate biuret trimer (HDI-BT) is a nonvolatile isocyanate that is a component of polyurethane spray paints. HDI-BT is a potent irritant that when inhaled stimulates sensory nerves of the respiratory tract. The role of sensory nerves in modulating lung injury following inhalation of HDI-BT was assessed in genetically manipulated mice with altered innervation of the lung. Knockout mice with a mutation in the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), which have decreased innervation by nociceptive nerve fibers, and transgenic mice expressing nerve growth factor (NGF) from the lung-specific Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter, which have increased innervation of the airways, were exposed to HDI-BT aerosol and evaluated at various times after exposure. NGFR knockout mice exhibited significantly more, and CCSP-NGF transgenic mice exhibited significantly less injury and inflammation compared with wild-type mice, indicative of a protective effect of nociceptive nerves on the lung following HDI-BT inhalation. Transgenic mice overexpressing the tachykinin 1 receptor (Tacr1) in lung epithelial cells also showed less severe injury and inflammation compared with wild-type mice after HDI-BT exposure, establishing a role for released tachykinins acting through Tacr1 in mediating at least part of the protective effect. Treatment of lung fragments from Tacr1 transgenic mice with the Tacr1 ligand substance P resulted in increased cAMP accumulation, suggesting this compound as a possible signaling mediator of protective effects on the lung following nociceptive nerve stimulation. The results indicate that sensory nerves acting through Tacr1 can exert protective or anti-inflammatory effects in the lung following isocyanate exposure.

  3. A Protective Hsp70-TLR4 Pathway in Lethal Oxidant Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xuchen; Shan, Peiying; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    Administering high levels of inspired oxygen, or hyperoxia, is commonly used as a life-sustaining measure in critically ill patients. However, prolonged exposures can exacerbate respiratory failure. Our previous study showed that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) confers protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury and mortality. Hsp70 has potent cytoprotective properties and has been described as a TLR4 ligand in cell lines. We sought to elucidate the relationship between TLR4 and Hsp70 in hyperoxia-induced lung injury in vitro and in vivo and to define the signaling mechanisms involved. Wild type, TLR4−/− and Trif−/− (a TLR4 adapter protein) murine lung endothelial cells (MLEC) were exposed to hyperoxia. We found markedly elevated levels of intracellular and secreted Hsp70 from mice lung and MLEC after hyperoxia. We confirmed that Hsp70 and TLR4 co-immunoprecipitate in lung tissue and MLEC. Hsp70-mediated NFκB activation appears to depend upon TLR4. In the absence of TLR4, Hsp70 loses its protective effects in endothelial cells. Furthermore, these protective properties of Hsp70 are TLR4 adapter Trif-dependent, MyD88-independent. Hsp70-deficient mice have increased mortality during hyperoxia and lung-targeted adenoviral delivery of Hsp70 effectively rescues both Hsp70-deficient and wild type mice. Our studies are the first to define an Hsp70-TLR4-Trif cytoprotective axis in the lung and endothelial cells. This pathway is a potential therapeutic target against a range of oxidant-induced lung injuries. PMID:23817427

  4. MATRILYSIN PARTICIPATES IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MATRILYSIN IN THE ACUTE LUNG INJURY INDUCED BY OIL COMBUSTION PARTICLES.

    K L Dreher1, WY Su2 and C L Wilson3. 1US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC; 2Duke University, Durham, NC;3Washington University, St. Louis, MO.

    Mechanisms by ...

  5. Interactive effects of mechanical ventilation, inhaled nitric oxide and oxidative stress in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Ferreira, Ana Lucia Anjos; Campos, Fabio Joly; Kurokawa, Cilmery Suemi; Carpi, Mario Ferreira; Moraes, Marcos Aurélio; Bonatto, Rossano Cesar; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Fioretto, Jose Roberto

    2014-01-01

    To compare conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), with/without inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), for oxygenation, inflammation, antioxidant/oxidative stress status, and DNA damage in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). Lung injury was induced by tracheal infusion of warm saline. Rabbits were ventilated at [Formula: see text] 1.0 and randomly assigned to one of five groups. Overall antioxidant defense/oxidative stress was assessed by total antioxidant performance assay, and DNA damage by comet assay. Ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters were recorded every 30min for 4h. ALI groups showed worse oxygenation than controls after lung injury. After 4h of mechanical ventilation, HFOV groups presented significant improvements in oxygenation. HFOV with and without iNO, and CMV with iNO showed significantly increased antioxidant defense and reduced DNA damage than CMV without iNO. Inhaled nitric oxide did not beneficially affect HFOV in relation to antioxidant defense/oxidative stress and pulmonary DNA damage. Overall, lung injury was reduced using HFOV or CMV with iNO. PMID:24148688

  6. TYLOXAPOL CONFERS DURABLE PROTECTION AGAINST HYPEROXIC LUNG INJURY IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that the non-lipid components of ExosurfR, tyloxapol (TY) and cetyl alcohol (CA), protect against hyperoxic lung injury by either 1) direct radical scavenging activity or 2) induction of the animals? endogenous anti-oxidant defenses. Adult rats were in...

  7. ROLE OF CELL SIGNALING IN PROTECTION FROM DIESEL AND LPS INDUCED ACUTE LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated in CD-1 mice that pre-administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB203580) reduces acute lung injury and inflammation following pulmonary exposures to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here ...

  8. A model of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury in Landrace-Large White Swine.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace-Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases-stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation-after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace-Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury.

  9. A Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Acute Lung Injury in Landrace–Large White Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace–Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases—stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation—after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace–Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury. PMID:21535927

  10. Biomarkers of asbestos-induced lung injury: the influence of fiber characteristics and exposure methodology

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATS 2013 Biomarkers of asbestos-induced lung injury: the influence of fiber characteristics and exposure methodology Urmila P Kodavanti, Debora Andrews, Mette C Schaldweiler, Jaime M Cyphert, Darol E Dodd, and Stephen H Gavett NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC; NIEH...

  11. Examining lethality risk for rodent studies of primary blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, William Brad; Hall, Christina; Siva Sai Suijith Sajja, Venkata; Lavik, Erink; VandeVord, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    While protective measures have been taken to mitigate injury to the thorax during a blast exposure, primary blast lung injury (PBLI) is still evident in mounted/in vehicle cases during military conflicts. Moreover, civilians, who are unprotected from blast exposure, can be severely harmed by terrorist attacks that use improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Since the lungs are the most susceptible organ due to their air-filled nature, PBLI is one of the most serious injuries seen in civilian blast cases. Determining lethality threshold for rodent studies is crucial to guide experimental designs centered on therapies for survival after PBLI or mechanistic understanding of the injury itself. Using an Advanced Blast Simulator, unprotected rats were exposed to a whole body blast to induce PBLI. The one-hour survival rate was assessed to determine operating conditions for a 50% lethality rate. Macroscopic and histological analysis of lung was conducted using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results demonstrated lethality risk trends based on static blast overpressure (BOP) for rodent models, which may help standardized animal studies and contribute to scaling to the human level. The need for a standardized method of producing PBLI is pressing and establishing standard curves, such as a lethality risk curve for lung blasts, is crucial for this condensing of BOP methods. PMID:25405409

  12. Postexposure aerosolized heparin reduces lung injury in chlorine-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Wagener, Brant M; Basappa, Susanna; Doran, Stephen; Rodriguez, Cilina A; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Pittet, Jean Francois; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly reactive oxidant gas that, when inhaled, may cause acute lung injury culminating in death from respiratory failure. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exposure of mice to Cl2 causes intra-alveolar and systemic activation of the coagulation cascade that plays an important role in development of lung injury. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to Cl2 (400 for 30 min or 600 ppm for 45 min) in environmental chambers and then returned to room air for 1 or 6 h. Native coagulation (NATEM) parameters such as blood clotting time and clot formation time were measured in whole blood by the viscoelastic technique. D-dimers and thrombin-anti-thrombin complexes were measured in both plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by ELISA. Our results indicate that mice exposed to Cl2 gas had significantly increased clotting time, clot formation time, and D-dimers compared with controls. The thrombin-anti-thrombin complexes were also increased in the BALF of Cl2 exposed animals. To test whether increased coagulation contributed to the development of acute lung injury, mice exposed to Cl2 and returned to room air were treated with aerosolized heparin or vehicle for 20 min. Aerosolized heparin significantly reduced protein levels and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF at 6 h postexposure. These findings highlight the importance of coagulation abnormities in the development of Cl2-induced lung injury. PMID:25038191

  13. Differential expression of forkhead box transcription factors following butylated hydroxytoluene lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, V V; Lim, L; Shin, B; Costa, R H

    2001-04-01

    The forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a growing family of transcription factors that have important roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation and in organ morphogenesis. The Fox family members hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-3beta (Foxa2) and HNF-3/forkhead homolog (HFH)-8 (FREAC-1, Foxf1) are expressed in adult pulmonary epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, but these cells display only low expression levels of the proliferation-specific HFH-11B gene (Trident, Foxm1b). The regulation of these Fox transcription factors in response to acute lung injury, however, has yet to be determined. We report here on the use of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-mediated lung injury to demonstrate that HFH-11 protein and RNA levels were markedly increased throughout the period of lung repair. The maximum levels of HFH-11 were observed by day 2 following BHT injury when both bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells were undergoing extensive proliferation. Although BHT lung injury did not alter epithelial cell expression of HNF-3beta, a 65% reduction in HFH-8 mRNA levels was observed during the period of mesenchymal cell proliferation. HFH-8-expressing cells were colocalized with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1-positive alveolar endothelial cells and with alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive peribronchiolar smooth muscle cells.

  14. Silencing of Paralemmin-3 Protects Mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Qian, Pin; Lv, Xuejun; Qian, Lanlan; Wang, Qin; Qian, Guisheng; Yao, Wei; Wu, Xueling

    2016-02-01

    Excessive inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a critical role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Paralemmin-3 (PALM3) is a novel protein that can modulate LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the progression of ALI in vivo. Therefore, we studied the role of PALM3 in the pathogenesis of ALI induced by LPS. ALI was induced by LPS peritoneal injection in C57BL/6J mice. Lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the mouse PALM3 gene and a negative control siRNA were intranasally administered to the mice. We found that the expression of PALM3 was up-regulated in the lung tissues obtained from the mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. The LPS-evoked inflammatory response (neutrophils and the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines [IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, MIP-2] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid [BALF]), histologic lung injury (lung injury score), permeability of the alveolar capillary barrier (lung wet/dry weight ratio and BALF protein concentration) and mortality rates were attenuated in the PALM3 siRNA-treated mice. These results indicate that PALM3 contributes to the development of ALI in mice challenged with LPS. Inhibiting PALM3 through the intranasal application of specific siRNA protected against LPS-induced ALI.

  15. Effect of ulinastatin on HMGB1 expression in rats with acute lung injury induced by sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Li, Z J; Wang, X; Li, W F; Lin, Z F

    2015-04-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ulinastatin (UTI) on high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 expression in acute lung injury (ALI) rats with sepsis caused by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery, as well as to examine the underlying biological mechanism. Thirty rats were randomly and evenly divided into sham (control), CLP, and CLP + UTI groups. Thirty minutes after the surgery, the rats in the CLP + UTI group received UTI via the caudal vein, while normal saline was administered to rats in the other groups. Blood, lung tissues, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected at different time points (6, 12, 24, and 48 h) after surgery for determination of related indicators. Compared with the CLP group, rats in the CLP + UTI group exhibited higher seven day survival rates, less lung injury, and decreased HMGB1 expression in the lung tissue, serum, and BALF. In addition, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 at 24 h in the CLP + UTI group were markedly lower than those in the CLP group. These results suggest that by deregulation, UTI might decrease the lung injury and increase the survival time of ALI rats by downregulating HMGB1 expression as well as by inhibiting TNF-α and IL-6 levels in serum and BALF.

  16. Viola yedoensis liposoluble fraction ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Xie, Jun-Yun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Cao, Jie; Cheng, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Viola yedoensis is a component of traditional Chinese herb medicine for inflammatory diseases. Chemical constituents of V. yedoensis have been shown to possess antibacterial, anti-HIV, and anticoagulant effects in experimental research; however, their anti-inflammatory properties remain to be demonstrated. In this study, a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury was used to investigate the effect of petroleum ether fraction of V. yedoensis (PEVY) on inflammation in vivo. After being shown to have anti-complementary activity in vitro, PEVY was orally administered to the mice at doses of 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg. Treatment with PEVY significantly decreased the wet-to-dry weight ratio of the lung, total cells, red blood cells, protein concentration, and myeloperoxidase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PEVY markedly attenuated lung injury with improved lung morphology and reduced complement deposition. In addition, PEVY suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Taken together, PEVY protects the lung from acute injury, potentially via inhibiting the activation of the complement system and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators.

  17. Treatment for sulfur mustard lung injuries; new therapeutic approaches from acute to chronic phase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the major potent chemical warfare and attractive weapons for terrorists. It has caused deaths to hundreds of thousands of victims in World War I and more recently during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–1988). It has ability to develop severe acute and chronic damage to the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Understanding the acute and chronic biologic consequences of SM exposure may be quite essential for developing efficient prophylactic/therapeutic measures. One of the systems majorly affected by SM is the respiratory tract that numerous clinical studies have detailed processes of injury, diagnosis and treatments of lung. The low mortality rate has been contributed to high prevalence of victims and high lifetime morbidity burden. However, there are no curative modalities available in such patients. In this review, we collected and discussed the related articles on the preventive and therapeutic approaches to SM-induced respiratory injury and summarized what is currently known about the management and therapeutic strategies of acute and long-term consequences of SM lung injuries. Method This review was done by reviewing all papers found by searching following key words sulfur mustard; lung; chronic; acute; COPD; treatment. Results Mustard lung has an ongoing pathological process and is active disorder even years after exposure to SM. Different drug classes have been studied, nevertheless there are no curative modalities for mustard lung. Conclusion Complementary studies on one hand regarding pharmacokinetic of drugs and molecular investigations are mandatory to obtain more effective treatments. PMID:23351279

  18. Indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles induce progressive lung injury distinct from lung injuries by copper oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiyoung; Kim, Jeongeun; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Cho, Wan-Seob

    2016-04-01

    Indium is an essential element in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays and other electronic devices, and several forms of indium compounds have been developed, including nanopowders, films, nanowires, and indium metal complexes. Although there are several reports on lung injury caused by indium-containing compounds, the toxicity of nanoscale indium oxide (In2O3) particles has not been reported. Here, we compared lung injury induced by a single exposure to In2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) to that caused by benchmark high-toxicity nickel oxide (NiO) and copper oxide (CuO) NPs. In2O3 NPs at doses of 7.5, 30, and 90 cm(2)/rat (50, 200, and 600 µg/rat) were administered to 6-week-old female Wistar rats via pharyngeal aspiration, and lung inflammation was evaluated 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after treatment. Neutrophilic inflammation was observed on day 1 and worsened until day 28, and severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) was observed on post-aspiration days 14 and 28. In contrast, pharyngeal aspiration of NiO NPs showed severe neutrophilic inflammation on day 1 and lymphocytic inflammation with PAP on day 28. Pharyngeal aspiration of CuO NPs showed severe neutrophilic inflammation on day 1, but symptoms were completely resolved after 14 days and no PAP was observed. The dose of In2O3 NPs that produced progressive neutrophilic inflammation and PAP was much less than the doses of other toxic particles that produced this effect, including crystalline silica and NiO NPs. These results suggest that occupational exposure to In2O3 NPs can cause severe lung injury.

  19. Serum copper concentration as an index of clinical lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Molteni, A.; Ward, W.F.; Kim, Y.T.; Shetty, R.; Brizio-Molteni, L.; Giura, R.; Ribner, H.; Lomont, M. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this ongoing study is to determine whether thoracic radiotherapy for lung cancer produces an early increase in serum copper (Cu) concentration, an increase which might predict clinical outcome. Copper and iron concentrations were measured in serum obtained from nonsmall cell lung cancer patients at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after the start of radiotherapy. Control groups included patients irradiated for breast cancer (low dose of radiation to the lung), for endometrial, cervical or prostatic cancer, and patients with congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cutaneous burns with or without smoke inhalation. Serum Cu concentration increased at least 10 micrograms/dl from the pretreatment level in approximately 75% of the adenocarcinoma and squamous cell lung cancer patients, but in only 1 of 4 undifferentiated lung cancer cases. In virtually all of these responders, serum Cu increased to a maximum at 2 weeks after the start of therapy, then plateaued or decreased slightly despite continuing irradiation. Within the subset of squamous cell lung cancers, there was a direct correlation between the degree of histologic differentiation and both baseline serum Cu concentration and the probability of an early increase therein. In contrast, only 33% of breast cancer patients and 15% of endometrial, cervical and prostate cancer patients exhibited an increase in serum Cu concentration at 2 weeks after the start of radiotherapy. Serum Cu concentration was within normal limits in virtually all patients with congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and COPD. Burn patients exhibited a significant reduction in serum Cu, although concomitant smoke inhalation increased serum Cu back to low-normal levels. Serum iron concentration did not change significantly in any category of patients.

  20. [Advances in the study of the relationship between autophagy and sepsis-induced lung injury].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingtong; Li, Hengyu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-08-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common pathogenetic causes of acute lung injury (ALI), and at present there is still a lack of effective targeted techniques and methods for its prevention and treatment. Autophagy is a homeostatic mecha- nism common to all eukaryotic cells, including adaption to environment, defense against invasion of pathogens, and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy is also involved in a variety of lung-related diseases. In septic lung injury, autophagy not only serves to dissipate dysfunctional organelles, but also inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines. This review aims at eliciting the role of autophagy in sepsis-induced ALI and further exploring the potential targets of autophagy in inhibiting inflammation, in an effort to provide a new perspective for clinical treatment of sepsis-induced ALI.

  1. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury in rats is greater after acid instillation than after sepsis-induced acute lung injury, but does not increase systemic inflammation: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To examine whether acute lung injury from direct and indirect origins differ in susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and resultant systemic inflammatory responses. Methods Rats were challenged by acid instillation or 24 h of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture, followed by mechanical ventilation (MV) with either a low tidal volume (Vt) of 6 mL/kg and 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; LVt acid, LVt sepsis) or with a high Vt of 15 mL/kg and no PEEP (HVt acid, HVt sepsis). Rats sacrificed immediately after acid instillation and non-ventilated septic animals served as controls. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were monitored. After 4 h, lung wet to dry (W/D) weight ratios, histological lung injury and plasma mediator concentrations were measured. Results Oxygenation and lung compliance decreased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. Additionally, W/D weight ratios and histological lung injury scores increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. MV increased W/D weight ratio and lung injury score, however this effect was mainly attributable to HVt ventilation after acid instillation. Similarly, effects of HVt on oxygenation were only observed after acid instillation. HVt during sepsis did not further affect oxygenation, compliance, W/D weight ratio or lung injury score. Plasma interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α concentrations were increased after acid instillation as compared to sepsis, but plasma intercellular adhesion molecule-1 concentration increased during sepsis only. In contrast to lung injury parameters, no additional effects of HVt MV after acid instillation on plasma mediator concentrations were observed. Conclusions During MV more severe lung injury develops after acid instillation as compared to sepsis. HVt causes VILI after acid instillation, but not during sepsis. However, this differential effect was not observed in the systemic release of mediators. PMID:22204611

  2. Lung Inflammation, Injury, and Proliferative Response after Repetitive Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Schwartz, Arnold M.; Damsker, Jesse M.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Ceryak, Susan M.; Patierno, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is implicated in the development of several human cancers, including lung cancer. Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are well-documented human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas, and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. Despite this, little is known about the pathologic injury and immune responses after repetitive exposure to particulate chromates. Objectives In this study we investigated the lung injury, inflammation, proliferation, and survival signaling responses after repetitive exposure to particulate chromate. Methods BALB/c mice were repetitively treated with particulate basic zinc chromate or saline using an intranasal exposure regimen. We assessed lungs for Cr(VI)-induced changes by bronchoalveolar lavage, histologic examination, and immunohistochemistry. Results Single exposure to Cr(VI) resulted in inflammation of lung tissue that persists for up to 21 days. Repetitive Cr(VI) exposure induced a neutrophilic inflammatory airway response 24 hr after each treatment. Neutrophils were subsequently replaced by increasing numbers of macrophages by 5 days after treatment. Repetitive Cr(VI) exposure induced chronic peribronchial inflammation with alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis dominated by lymphocytes and macrophages. Moreover, chronic toxic mucosal injury was observed and accompanied by increased airway pro-matrix metalloprotease-9. Injury and inflammation correlated with airways becoming immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt and the proliferation marker Ki-67. We observed a reactive proliferative response in epithelial cells lining airways of chromate-exposed animals. Conclusions These data illustrate that repetitive exposure to particulate chromate induces chronic injury and an inflammatory microenvironment that may promote Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. PMID:20049209

  3. Regulatory T cells reduce acute lung injury fibroproliferation by decreasing fibrocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; D'Alessio, Franco R; Mock, Jason R; Files, D Clark; Chau, Eric; Eto, Yoshiki; Drummond, M Bradley; Aggarwal, Neil R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; King, Landon S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Fibroproliferation in ALI results in worse outcomes, but the mechanisms governing fibroproliferation remain poorly understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in lung injury resolution. Their role in fibroproliferation is unknown. We sought to identify the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation, using a murine model of lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1(-/-) mice received intratracheal LPS. Fibroproliferation was characterized by histology and the measurement of lung collagen. Lung fibrocytes were measured by flow cytometry. To dissect the role of Tregs in fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice received CD4(+)CD25(+) (Tregs) or CD4(+)CD25(-) Tcells (non-Tregs) at the time of LPS injury. To define the role of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)-CXCR4 pathway in ALI fibroproliferation, Rag-1(-/-) mice were treated with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 to block fibrocyte recruitment. WT and Rag-1(-/-) mice demonstrated significant collagen deposition on Day 3 after LPS. WT mice exhibited the clearance of collagen, but Rag-1(-/-) mice developed persistent fibrosis. This fibrosis was mediated by the sustained epithelial expression of CXCL12 (or stromal cell-derived factor 1 [SDF-1]) that led to increased fibrocyte recruitment. The adoptive transfer of Tregs resolved fibroproliferation by decreasing CXCL12 expression and subsequent fibrocyte recruitment. Blockade of the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis with AMD3100 also decreased lung fibrocytes and fibroproliferation. These results indicate a central role for Tregs in the resolution of ALI fibroproliferation by reducing fibrocyte recruitment along the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. A dissection of the role of Tregs in ALI fibroproliferation may inform the design of new therapeutic tools for patients with ALI. PMID:23002097

  4. Molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide induced epithelial injury in the lung.

    PubMed

    Persinger, Rebecca L; Poynter, Matthew E; Ckless, Karna; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W

    2002-01-01

    The lung can be exposed to a variety of reactive nitrogen intermediates through the inhalation of environmental oxidants and those produced during inflammation. Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) include, nitrogen dioxide (.NO2) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-). Classically known as a major component of both indoor and outdoor air pollution, .NO2 is a toxic free radical gas. .NO2 can also be formed during inflammation by the decomposition of ONOO- or through peroxidase-catalyzed reactions. Due to their reactive nature, RNS may play an important role in disease pathology. Depending on the dose and the duration of administration, .NO, has been documented to cause pulmonary injury in both animal and human studies. Injury to the lung epithelial cells following exposure to .NO2 is characterized by airway denudation followed by compensatory proliferation. The persistent injury and repair process may contribute to airway remodeling, including the development of fibrosis. To better understand the signaling pathways involved in epithelial cell death by .NO2 or otherRNS, we routinely expose cells in culture to continuous gas-phase .NO2. Studies using the .NO2 exposure system revealed that lung epithelial cell death occurs in a density dependent manner. In wound healing experiments, .NO2 induced cell death is limited to cells localized in the leading edge of the wound. Importantly, .NO2-induced death does not appear to be dependent on oxidative stress per se. Potential cell signaling mechanisms will be discussed, which include the mitogen activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal Kinase and the Fas/Fas ligand pathways. During periods of epithelial loss and regeneration that occur in diseases such as asthma or during lung development, epithelial cells in the lung may be uniquely susceptible to death. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of epithelial cell death associated with the exposure to .NO2 will be important in designing therapeutics aimed at protecting the lung from

  5. Bixin protects mice against ventilation-induced lung injury in an NRF2-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Quijada, Hector; Wondrak, Georg T.; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a therapeutic intervention widely used in the clinic to assist patients that have difficulty breathing due to lung edema, trauma, or general anesthesia. However, MV causes ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), a condition characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier that results in edema, hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, leading to exacerbated lung inflammation and oxidative stress. This study explored the feasibility of using bixin, a canonical NRF2 inducer identified during the current study, to ameliorate lung damage in a murine VILI model. In vitro, bixin was found to activate the NRF2 signaling pathway through blockage of ubiquitylation and degradation of NRF2 in a KEAP1-C151 dependent manner; intraperitoneal (IP) injection of bixin led to pulmonary upregulation of the NRF2 response in vivo. Remarkably, IP administration of bixin restored normal lung morphology and attenuated inflammatory response and oxidative DNA damage following MV. This observed beneficial effect of bixin derived from induction of the NRF2 cytoprotective response since it was only observed in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− mice. This is the first study providing proof-of-concept that NRF2 activators can be developed into pharmacological agents for clinical use to prevent patients from lung injury during MV treatment. PMID:26729554

  6. 5-HT Receptor Antagonism Attenuates the Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury After Rabbit Lung Preservation.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Ramírez, J L; Alquicira-Mireles, J; Morales-Hernández, P E; Vargas, M H; Villalba-Caloca, J; Segura-Medina, P

    2015-01-01

    The success of lung transplantation is threatened by the appearance of ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is known to produce microvascular leakage in the systemic circulation, but its possible role in ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung preservation has not been reported. In this work we measured the release of 5-HT during a 24-hour rabbit lung preservation, and the effect of methiothepin (antagonist of the majority of 5-HT receptors) and SB204741 (antagonist of 5-HT2B/2C receptors) on the modified capillary filtration coefficient (mKf,c) was evaluated at the end of this period. Our results showed that the highest release rate of 5-HT occurred during the first 15 minutes after the lung harvesting and progressively decreased in the following time intervals. The baseline mKf,c greatly increased after 24 hours of lung preservation, and this increment was partially reduced by methiothepin and even more by SB204741. We concluded that 5-HT may play an important role in the ischemia-reperfusion process after lung preservation.

  7. XB130 deficiency enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced septic response and acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Tomankova, Tereza; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Cho, Hae-Ra; Guan, Zhehong; Adeyi, Oyedele A.; Tian, Feng; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    XB130 is a novel oncoprotein that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration. Its physiological function in vivo is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the role of XB130 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic responses and acute lung injury. LPS was intraperitoneally administrated to Xb130 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. There was a significant weight loss in KO mice at Day 2 and significantly higher disease scores during the 7 days of observation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in the serum were significantly higher in KO mice at Day 2. In KO mice there were a significantly higher lung injury score, higher wet/dry lung weight ratio, more apoptotic cells and less proliferative cells in the lung. Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in the lung of KO mice. There was significantly increased number of p-GSK-3β positive cells in KO mice, which were mainly neutrophils and macrophages. XB130 is expressed in alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung. The expression in these cells was significantly reduced after LPS challenge. XB130 deficiency delayed the recovery from systemic septic responses, and the presence of XB130 in the alveolar epithelial cells may provide protective mechanisms by reducing cell death and promoting cell proliferation, and reducing pulmonary permeability. PMID:27029000

  8. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  9. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  10. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  11. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection. PMID:27316442

  12. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  13. Ulinastatin reduces pathogenesis of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Gan, Zhengyi; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Liming; Xu, Guoxiong

    2014-10-01

    Phosgene (CG) is an industrial chemical used to make plastics, rubbers, dyestuff, and pesticides. Although the inhalation of CG is relatively uncommon, its accidental exposure can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). Ulinastatin, a urinary trypsin inhibitor, has been emerged to use for the treatment of acute inflammatory state of a number of organs including the lung. In this study, we examined the pathogenic changes in the lungs after the inhalation of CG gas and also examined the effect of ulinastatin treatment in reversing these changes in rats. We found that the rats exposed to CG gas at a dose of 5.0 g/m(3) for 5 min led to ALI after 6 h. The signs of lung injury include pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and cellular infiltration in pulmonary alveoli. In addition, interleukin-15 (IL-15) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased in CG-inhaled animals. Ulinastatin administration at 1 h postexposure significantly reduced the intensity of all the pathological changes in the lungs of these CG-exposed animals. Ulinastatin at a dose of 400 U/g was shown to decrease the total number of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the levels of IL-15 and ICAM-1 in the serum. We also found that the structure of the lung was protected by ulinastatin treatment. Thus, our data suggest that ulinastatin can be used as an effective drug for the treatment of CG-induced ALI. The serum levels of IL-15 and ICAM-1 can be used as the markers of lung injury after exposure to CG and may also serve as useful therapeutic targets at an early stage. The effects of long-term treatment of ulinastatin and the mechanisms by which ulinastatin decreases the infiltration of blood cells and reduces cytokines need further investigation.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging provides sensitive in vivo assessment of experimental ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kuethe, Dean O; Filipczak, Piotr T; Hix, Jeremy M; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Estépar, Raúl San José; Washko, George R; Baron, Rebecca M; Fredenburgh, Laura E

    2016-08-01

    Animal models play a critical role in the study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). One limitation has been the lack of a suitable method for serial assessment of acute lung injury (ALI) in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess ALI in real time in rat models of VILI. Sprague-Dawley rats were untreated or treated with intratracheal lipopolysaccharide or PBS. After 48 h, animals were mechanically ventilated for up to 15 h to induce VILI. Free induction decay (FID)-projection images were made hourly. Image data were collected continuously for 30 min and divided into 13 phases of the ventilatory cycle to make cinematic images. Interleaved measurements of respiratory mechanics were performed using a flexiVent ventilator. The degree of lung infiltration was quantified in serial images throughout the progression or resolution of VILI. MRI detected VILI significantly earlier (3.8 ± 1.6 h) than it was detected by altered lung mechanics (9.5 ± 3.9 h, P = 0.0156). Animals with VILI had a significant increase in the Index of Infiltration (P = 0.0027), and early regional lung infiltrates detected by MRI correlated with edema and inflammatory lung injury on histopathology. We were also able to visualize and quantify regression of VILI in real time upon institution of protective mechanical ventilation. Magnetic resonance lung imaging can be utilized to investigate mechanisms underlying the development and propagation of ALI, and to test the therapeutic effects of new treatments and ventilator strategies on the resolution of ALI.

  15. Effects of endotoxin induced lung injury and exercise in goats/sheep. Final report, 1 February 1992-2 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mundie, T.G.

    1993-06-02

    This study was designed the effects of exercise performed on animals already injured with E. coli endotoxin. This would tell us whether exercise makes the lung injury worse. It would also tell us how much exercise performance is impaired. These studies were designed to give further insights into the underlying causes of acute lung injury. Premature termination of the study prevented completion of the research project. It appeared from the limited experimentation conducted that maximal exercise was impaired by endotoxin-induced lung injury. Conclusions regarding exacerbation of endotoxin-induced lung injury cannot be made.... Acute lung injury, Maximal exercise, Endotoxin.

  16. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  17. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2015-12-04

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  18. Consecutive CT-guided core needle tissue biopsy of lung lesions in the same dog at different phases of radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Deng, Sisi; Liang, Zhiwen; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to set up a Beagle dog model of radiation-induced lung injury in order to supply fresh lung tissue samples in the different injury phases for gene and protein research. Three dogs received 18 Gy X-ray irradiation in one fraction, another three dogs received 8 Gy in each of three fractions at weekly intervals, and one control dog was not irradiated. Acute pneumonitis was observed during the first 3 months after radiation, and chronic lung fibrosis was found during the next 4–12 months in all the dogs exposed to radiation. CT-guided core needle lung lesion biopsies were extracted from each dog five times over the course of 1 year. The dogs remained healthy after each biopsy, and 50–100 mg fresh lung lesion tissues were collected in each operation. The incidence of pneumothorax and hemoptysis was 20% and 2.8%, respectively, in the 35 tissue biopsies. A successful and stable radiation-induced lung injury dog model was established. Lung lesion tissue samples from dogs in acute stage, recovery stage and fibrosis stage were found to be sufficient to support cytology, genomics and proteomics research. This model safely supplied fresh tissue samples that would allow future researchers to more easily explore and develop treatments for radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:27422930

  19. Systemic Metabolic Impairment and Lung Injury Following Acrolein Inhalation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single ozone exposure causes pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic alterations through neuronal and hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis activation. Metabolically impaired Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats with non-obese type-2 diabetes are more sensitive to ozone induced changes than h...

  20. Superoxide dismutase 3 dysregulation in a murine model of neonatal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Poonyagariyagorn, Hataya K; Metzger, Shana; Dikeman, Dustin; Mercado, Armando Lopez; Malinina, Alla; Calvi, Carla; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Neptune, Enid R

    2014-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a common chronic respiratory disease that occurs after premature birth, is believed to be secondary to oxidative damage from hyperoxia and inflammation, which leads to impaired alveolar formation and chronic lung dysfunction. We hypothesized that extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD)3, an antioxidant uniquely targeted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and alveolar fluid, might have a different response (down-regulation) to hyperoxic injury and recovery in room air (RA), thereby contributing to the persistent airspace injury and inflammation. We used a murine BPD model using postnatal hyperoxia (O2) (4 or 5 d) followed by short-term recovery (14 d) in RA, which mimics the durable effects after injury during alveolar development. This was associated with significantly increased mRNA expression for antioxidant genes mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) in the O2 (n = 4) versus RA group (n = 5). SOD3, an Nrf2-independent antioxidant, was significantly reduced in the O2-exposed mice compared with RA. Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased and disrupted SOD3 deposition in the alveolar ECM of O2-exposed mice. Furthermore, this distinct hyperoxic antioxidant and injury profile was reproducible in murine lung epithelial 12 cells exposed to O2. Overexpression of SOD3 rescued the injury measures in the O2-exposed cells. We establish that reduced SOD3 expression correlates with alveolar injury measures in the recovered neonatal hyperoxic lung, and SOD3 overexpression attenuates hyperoxic injury in an alveolar epithelial cell line. Such findings suggest a candidate mechanism for the pathogenesis of BPD that may lead to targeted interventions.

  1. Upregulated Tim-3/galectin-9 expressions in acute lung injury in a murine malarial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xiao, Siyu; Huang, Shiguang; Pei, Fuquan; Lu, Fangli

    2016-02-01

    Malaria is the most relevant parasitic disease worldwide, and severe malaria is characterized by cerebral edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and multiple organ dysfunctions; however, the mechanisms of lung damage need to be better clarified. In this study, we used Kunming outbred mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) to elucidate the profiles of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand galecin-9 (Gal-9) in the development of ALI. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10(6) PbANKA-infected red blood cells. The lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) were harvested at days 5, 10, 15, and 20 post infections (p.i.). The grade of lung injury was histopathologically evaluated. Tim-3- and Gal-9-positive cells in the lungs and MLNs were stained by immunohistochemistry, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of Tim-3, Gal-9, and related cytokines were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analyses were performed from days 18 to 20 p.i. The results showed that the pathological severities in the lungs were increased with times and the total protein level in the BALFs was significantly elevated in PbANKA-infected mice. The numbers of Gal-9(+) and Tim-3(+) cells in the lungs were significantly increased, and the mRNA levels of both Gal-9 and Tim-3 in the lungs and MLNs were over-expressed in PbANKA-infected mice. In conclusion, our data suggested that Tim-3/Gal-9 may play a role in PbANKA-induced ALI. PMID:26494364

  2. Upregulated Tim-3/galectin-9 expressions in acute lung injury in a murine malarial model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xiao, Siyu; Huang, Shiguang; Pei, Fuquan; Lu, Fangli

    2016-02-01

    Malaria is the most relevant parasitic disease worldwide, and severe malaria is characterized by cerebral edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and multiple organ dysfunctions; however, the mechanisms of lung damage need to be better clarified. In this study, we used Kunming outbred mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbANKA) to elucidate the profiles of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3) and its ligand galecin-9 (Gal-9) in the development of ALI. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10(6) PbANKA-infected red blood cells. The lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) were harvested at days 5, 10, 15, and 20 post infections (p.i.). The grade of lung injury was histopathologically evaluated. Tim-3- and Gal-9-positive cells in the lungs and MLNs were stained by immunohistochemistry, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of Tim-3, Gal-9, and related cytokines were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analyses were performed from days 18 to 20 p.i. The results showed that the pathological severities in the lungs were increased with times and the total protein level in the BALFs was significantly elevated in PbANKA-infected mice. The numbers of Gal-9(+) and Tim-3(+) cells in the lungs were significantly increased, and the mRNA levels of both Gal-9 and Tim-3 in the lungs and MLNs were over-expressed in PbANKA-infected mice. In conclusion, our data suggested that Tim-3/Gal-9 may play a role in PbANKA-induced ALI.

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew L.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J.; Huerter, Mary E.; Johnston, William F.; Kron, Irving L.; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Sharma, Ashish K; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J; Huerter, Mary E; Johnston, William F; Kron, Irving L; Lynch, Kevin R; Laubach, Victor E

    2015-06-15

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  5. The Effects of Dexamethasone and L-NAME on Acute Lung Injury in Rats with Lung Contusion.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Ahmet; Kilic, Nermin; Alacam, Hasan; Guzel, Ahmet; Guvenc, Tolga; Acikgoz, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    The therapeutic efficiency of an anti-inflammatory agent, dexamethasone (DXM), and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), in lung tissue injury after lung contusion was investigated. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), YKL-40, an inflammatory peptide, inducible NOS (iNOS), and Clara cell protein 16 (CC-16) were evaluated. Immunohistochemical analyses were also performed, and the lung tissue was examined histopathologically. The study consisted of eight groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group), weighing 250-300 g: (1) control, (2) contusion, (3) control + DXM, (4) contusion + DXM, (5) control + L-NAME (6) contusion + L-NAME, (7) control + DXM + L-NAME, and (8) contusion + DXM + L-NAME. A previously developed lung contusion model was used, in addition to the control group. The rats were administered DXM and L-NAME intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 15 and 60 mg/kg/day, respectively. DXM and L-NAME administration decreased the iNOS level in the contusion groups. DXM increased the levels of YKL-40 and IL-10 in both the control and contusion groups, with higher levels in the contusion groups. L-NAME increased the serum level of IL-10 in the lung contusion groups. DXM increased the synthesis of CC-16 in the control and contusion groups. The combined use of a high-dose steroid and NOS inhibitor resulted in the death of the rats. Steroids can increase the level of cytokines, such as YKL-40 and IL-10, and the synthesis of CC-16 and prevent pneumonia, ALI/ARDS, and sepsis in lung contusion.

  6. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  7. Antioxidant effects of selenium on lung injury in paraquat intoxicated rats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, K.S.; Suh, G.J.; Kwon, W.Y.; Kwak, Y.H.; Lee, Kenneth; Lee, H.J.; Jeong, K.Y.; Lee, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Paraquat (PQ) causes lethal intoxication by inducing oxidant injury to the lung. Selenium is a cofactor for glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which is one of the major endogenous antioxidant enzymes. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether selenium post-treatment activates GPx, decreases lung injury, and improves survival in PQ intoxicated rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Spraque-Dawley rats were categorized into three groups: sham (n = 6), PQ (n = 12), and PQ + Se (n = 12). In the PQ and PQ + Se groups, 50 mg/kg of PQ was administered intraperitoneally. After 10 minutes, 60 μg/kg of Se (PQ + Se) or saline (PQ) was administered via the tail vein. Six rats per group were euthanized 6 hours or 24 hours later. Lung tissues were harvested for the measurement of GPx activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and for histological analysis. Using separated set of rats, survival of PQ (n = 10) and PQ + Se (n = 10) were observed for 72 hours. RESULTS: GPx activity in the PQ group at the 6-hour and 24-hour time points was lower than in the sham group (p CONCLUSION: Single dose of selenium post-treatment activates GPx and attenuates lipid peroxidation and lung injury early after paraquat intoxication, but does not improve 72 hours of survival.

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cells attenuate early damage in a ventilated pig model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Yuben; Sturm, Marian; Shaw, Kathryn; Shimbori, Chiko; Tan, Dino B A; Kolb, Martin; Graham, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have shown promise in treating inflammatory lung conditions. We hypothesised that human MSC (hMSC) can improve ALI/ARDS through their anti-inflammatory actions. We subjected pigs (n=6) to intravenous oleic acid (OA) injury, ventilation and hMSC infusion, while the controls (n=5) had intravenous OA, ventilation and an infusion vehicle control. hMSC were infused 1h after the administration of OA. The animals were monitored for additional 4h. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), a transcription factor that mediates several inflammatory pathways was reduced in hMSC treated pigs compared to controls (p=0.04). There was no significant difference in lung injury, assessed by histological scoring in hMSC treated pigs versus controls (p=0.063). There was no difference in neutrophil counts between hMSC-treated pigs and controls. Within 4h, there was no difference in the levels of IL-10 and IL-8 pre- and post-treatment with hMSC. In addition, there was no difference in hemodynamics, lung mechanics or arterial blood gases between hMSC treated animals and controls. Subsequent studies are required to determine if the observed decrease in inflammatory transcription factors will translate into improvement in inflammation and in physiological parameters over the long term.

  9. Post-conditioning through lower limb ischemia-reperfusion can alleviate lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shi-Qiu; Gan, Hui-Li; Zhang, Jian-Qun; Feng, Lei; Sun, Jian-Chao; Wang, Sheng-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Operation on the infrarenal aorta could cause ischemic-reperfusion (IR) injury in local tissues and remote organs (e.g. the lung). We aim to explore the method of reducing lung ischemia-reperfusion damage after lower limb IR with post conditioning (LIPC). Methods: Bilateral lower limb ischemia was performed in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and then animals were divided into 4 groups: IR-Sham-operated, IR, post conditioned-IR (LIPC) and bilateral lower limb ischemia (LIR). The serum free radical, histological changes, Wet/Dry (W/D) ratio, levels of TNF-α, IL-6, cytokines and chemokines were tested and compared. Results: Post-conditioning could ameliorate histological injuries in the lung when compared to IR group. The serum free radical is significantly lower in LIPC group than IR groups. W/D ratio in LIPC groups is significantly lower. LIPC also could reduce the expression of cytokines and chemokines. Conclusion: post conditioning could reduce long-term damages of the lung after lower limb ischemic-reperfusion injury. PMID:26628977

  10. Pulmonary Resection for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Prior Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brunworth, Louis S; Dharmasena, Dharson; Virgo, Katherine S; Johnson, Frank E

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: We sought to determine the clinical course of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who subsequently developed bronchogenic carcinoma and underwent pulmonary resection. Methods: A nationwide retrospective study was conducted of all veterans at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers for fiscal years 1993–2002 who were diagnosed with SCI, subsequently developed non–small cell lung cancer, and were surgically treated with curative intent. Inclusion criteria included American Spinal Injury Association type A injury (complete loss of neural function distal to the injury site) and traumatic etiology. Data were compiled from national Department of Veterans Affairs data sets and supplemented by operative reports, pathology reports, progress notes, and discharge summaries. Results: Seven patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were considered evaluable. Five (71%) had one or more comorbid conditions in addition to their SCIs. All 7 underwent pulmonary lobectomy. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients (57%). Two patients died postoperatively on days 29 and 499, yielding a 30-day mortality rate of 14% and an in-hospital mortality rate of 29%. Conclusions: This seems to be the only case study in the English language literature on this topic. Patients with SCI who had resectable lung cancer had a high incidence of comorbid conditions. Those who underwent curative-intent surgery had high morbidity and mortality rates. Available evidence suggests that SCI should be considered a risk factor for adverse outcomes in major surgery of all types, including operations for primary lung cancer. PMID:16739556

  11. Intermedin Stabilized Endothelial Barrier Function and Attenuated Ventilator-induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger Christian; Kummer, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Uwe; Hellwig, Katharina; Will, Daniel; Paddenberg, Renate; Tabeling, Christoph; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Even protective ventilation may aggravate or induce lung failure, particularly in preinjured lungs. Thus, new adjuvant pharmacologic strategies are needed to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Intermedin/Adrenomedullin-2 (IMD) stabilized pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro. We hypothesized that IMD may attenuate VILI-associated lung permeability in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) monolayers were incubated with IMD, and transcellular electrical resistance was measured to quantify endothelial barrier function. Expression and localization of endogenous pulmonary IMD, and its receptor complexes composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1–3 were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence in non ventilated mouse lungs and in lungs ventilated for 6 h. In untreated and IMD treated mice, lung permeability, pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and cytokine levels were assessed after mechanical ventilation. Further, the impact of IMD on pulmonary vasoconstriction was investigated in precision cut lung slices (PCLS) and in isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lungs. IMD stabilized endothelial barrier function in HPMVECs. Mechanical ventilation reduced the expression of RAMP3, but not of IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1 and 2. Mechanical ventilation induced lung hyperpermeability, which was ameliorated by IMD treatment. Oxygenation was not improved by IMD, which may be attributed to impaired hypoxic vasoconstriction due to IMD treatment. IMD had minor impact on pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and did not reduce cytokine levels in VILI. Conclusions/Significance IMD may possibly provide a new approach to attenuate VILI. PMID:22563471

  12. CAF1-knockout mice are more susceptive to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Xin; Li, Jia-Shu; Hu, Rong; Li, Xiao-Min; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The carbon catabolite repressor protein 4 (CCR4)–negative on TATA (NOT) complex includes multiple subunits and is conserved in the eukaryotic cells. The CCR4–NOT complex can regulate gene expression at different levels. Two subunits of the CCR4–NOT complex, CCR4 and CCR4-associated factor 1 (CAF1), possess deadenylase activity. In yeast, the deadenylase activity is mainly provided by the CCR4 subunit; however, the deadenylase activity is provided by both CCR4 and CAF1 in other eukaryotes. A previous study reported that CAF1 but not CCR4 is required for the decay of a reporter mRNA with AU-rich elements. Our previous study showed that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. Both ICAM-1 and IL-8 play crucial roles in acute lung injury. In the present study, we examined the effects of CAF1 deficiency on IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression and acute lung injury in mice. Here we showed that there were no differences between the wild-type and CAF1-knockout mice on phenotypes. The lung histology and protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 and ICAM-1 in unstimulated wild-type mice were comparable to those in unstimulated CAF1-knockout mice. However, lipopolysaccharide stimulation led to more severe lung histological injury and greatly higher IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in CAF1-knockout mice compared to the wild-type mice. These results, together with our previous study, suggest that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in vivo and affects the progression of acute lung injury. PMID:27358572

  13. Inflammasome-regulated Cytokines Are Critical Mediators of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dolinay, Tamás; Kim, Young Sam; Howrylak, Judie; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Fredenburgh, Laura; Massaro, Anthony F.; Rogers, Angela; Gazourian, Lee; Nakahira, Kiichi; Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Landazury, Roberto; Eppanapally, Sabitha; Christie, Jason D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christiani, David C.; Ryter, Stefan W.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Despite advances in clinical management, there are currently no reliable diagnostic and therapeutic targets for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The inflammasome/caspase-1 pathway regulates the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-18). IL-18 is associated with injury in animal models of systemic inflammation. Objectives: We sought to determine the contribution of the inflammasome pathway in experimental acute lung injury and human ARDS. Methods: We performed comprehensive gene expression profiling on peripheral blood from patients with critical illness. Gene expression changes were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and IL-18 levels were measured in the plasma of the critically ill patients. Wild-type mice or mice genetically deficient in IL-18 or caspase-1 were mechanically ventilated using moderate tidal volume (12 ml/kg). Lung injury parameters were assessed in lung tissue, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Measurements and Main Results: In mice, mechanical ventilation enhanced IL-18 levels in the lung, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. IL-18–neutralizing antibody treatment, or genetic deletion of IL-18 or caspase-1, reduced lung injury in response to mechanical ventilation. In human patients with ARDS, inflammasome-related mRNA transcripts (CASP1, IL1B, and IL18) were increased in peripheral blood. In samples from four clinical centers, IL-18 was elevated in the plasma of patients with ARDS (sepsis or trauma-induced ARDS) and served as a novel biomarker of intensive care unit morbidity and mortality. Conclusions: The inflammasome pathway and its downstream cytokines play critical roles in ARDS development. PMID:22461369

  14. Inflammation and lung maturation from stretch injury in preterm fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Noah H; Polglase, Graeme R; Pillow, J Jane; Saito, Masatoshi; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H

    2011-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a risk factor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants. Fifteen minutes of high tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation induces inflammatory cytokine expression in small airways and lung parenchyma within 3 h. Our objective was to describe the temporal progression of cytokine and maturation responses to lung injury in fetal sheep exposed to a defined 15-min stretch injury. After maternal anesthesia and hysterotomy, 129-day gestation fetal lambs (n = 7-8/group) had the head and chest exteriorized. Each fetus was intubated, and airway fluid was gently removed. While placental support was maintained, the fetus received ventilation with an escalating V(T) to 15 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) for 15 min using heated, humidified 100% nitrogen. The fetus was then returned to the uterus for 1, 6, or 24 h. Control lambs received a PEEP of 2 cmH(2)O for 15 min. Tissue samples from the lung and systemic organs were evaluated. Stretch injury increased the early response gene Egr-1 and increased expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines within 1 h. The injury induced granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA and matured monocytes to alveolar macrophages by 24 h. The mRNA for the surfactant proteins A, B, and C increased in the lungs by 24 h. The airway epithelium demonstrated dynamic changes in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) over time. Serum cortisol levels did not increase, and induction of systemic inflammation was minimal. We conclude that a brief period of high V(T) ventilation causes a proinflammatory cascade, a maturation of lung monocytic cells, and an induction of surfactant protein mRNA.

  15. Inflammation and lung maturation from stretch injury in preterm fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Noah H; Polglase, Graeme R; Pillow, J Jane; Saito, Masatoshi; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H

    2011-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a risk factor for the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants. Fifteen minutes of high tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation induces inflammatory cytokine expression in small airways and lung parenchyma within 3 h. Our objective was to describe the temporal progression of cytokine and maturation responses to lung injury in fetal sheep exposed to a defined 15-min stretch injury. After maternal anesthesia and hysterotomy, 129-day gestation fetal lambs (n = 7-8/group) had the head and chest exteriorized. Each fetus was intubated, and airway fluid was gently removed. While placental support was maintained, the fetus received ventilation with an escalating V(T) to 15 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) for 15 min using heated, humidified 100% nitrogen. The fetus was then returned to the uterus for 1, 6, or 24 h. Control lambs received a PEEP of 2 cmH(2)O for 15 min. Tissue samples from the lung and systemic organs were evaluated. Stretch injury increased the early response gene Egr-1 and increased expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines within 1 h. The injury induced granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA and matured monocytes to alveolar macrophages by 24 h. The mRNA for the surfactant proteins A, B, and C increased in the lungs by 24 h. The airway epithelium demonstrated dynamic changes in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) over time. Serum cortisol levels did not increase, and induction of systemic inflammation was minimal. We conclude that a brief period of high V(T) ventilation causes a proinflammatory cascade, a maturation of lung monocytic cells, and an induction of surfactant protein mRNA. PMID:21131401

  16. Targeted Type 2 Alveolar Cell Depletion. A Dynamic Functional Model for Lung Injury Repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Orquidea; Hiatt, Michael J; Lundin, Amber; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Navarro, Sonia; Kikuchi, Alex; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) are regarded as the progenitor population of the alveolus responsible for injury repair and homeostatic maintenance. Depletion of this population is hypothesized to underlie various lung pathologies. Current models of lung injury rely on either uncontrolled, nonspecific destruction of alveolar epithelia or on targeted, nontitratable levels of fixed AEC2 ablation. We hypothesized that discrete levels of AEC2 ablation would trigger stereotypical and informative patterns of repair. To this end, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the surfactant protein-C promoter drives expression of a mutant SR39TK herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase specifically in AEC2. Because of the sensitivity of SR39TK, low doses of ganciclovir can be administered to these animals to induce dose-dependent AEC2 depletion ranging from mild (50%) to lethal (82%) levels. We demonstrate that specific levels of AEC2 depletion cause altered expression patterns of apoptosis and repair proteins in surviving AEC2 as well as distinct changes in distal lung morphology, pulmonary function, collagen deposition, and expression of remodeling proteins in whole lung that persist for up to 60 days. We believe SPCTK mice demonstrate the utility of cell-specific expression of the SR39TK transgene for exerting fine control of target cell depletion. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that specific levels of type 2 alveolar epithelial cell depletion produce characteristic injury repair outcomes. Most importantly, use of these mice will contribute to a better understanding of the role of AEC2 in the initiation of, and response to, lung injury.

  17. CB2 receptor activation ameliorates the proinflammatory activity in acute lung injury induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenning; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Hongyu; Zheng, Qiang; Xiao, Li; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Paraquat, a widely used herbicide, is well known to exhibit oxidative stress and lung injury. In the present study, we investigated the possible underlying mechanisms of cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) activation to ameliorate the proinflammatory activity induced by PQ in rats. JWH133, a CB2 agonist, was administered by intraperitoneal injection 1 h prior to PQ exposure. After PQ exposure for 4, 8, 24, and 72 h, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected to determine levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, and the arterial blood samples were collected for detection of PaO2 level. At 72 h after PQ exposure, lung tissues were collected to determine the lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, myeloperoxidase activity, lung histopathology, the protein expression level of CB2, MAPKs (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK1/2), and NF-κBp65. After rats were pretreated with JWH133, PQ-induced lung edema and lung histopathological changes were significantly attenuated. PQ-induced TNF-α and IL-1β secretion in BALF, increases of PaO2 in arterial blood, and MPO levels in the lung tissue were significantly reduced. JWH133 could efficiently activate CB2, while inhibiting MAPKs and NF-κB activation. The results suggested that activating CB2 receptor exerted protective activity against PQ-induced ALI, and it potentially contributed to the suppression of the activation of MAPKs and NF-κB pathways. PMID:24963491

  18. Recurrent Recruitment Manoeuvres Improve Lung Mechanics and Minimize Lung Injury during Mechanical Ventilation of Healthy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lucy Kathleen; Kowallik, Anke; Uhlig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) of mice is increasingly required in experimental studies, but the conditions that allow stable ventilation of mice over several hours have not yet been fully defined. In addition, most previous studies documented vital parameters and lung mechanics only incompletely. The aim of the present study was to establish experimental conditions that keep these parameters within their physiological range over a period of 6 h. For this purpose, we also examined the effects of frequent short recruitment manoeuvres (RM) in healthy mice. Methods Mice were ventilated at low tidal volume VT = 8 mL/kg or high tidal volume VT = 16 mL/kg and a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 2 or 6 cmH2O. RM were performed every 5 min, 60 min or not at all. Lung mechanics were followed by the forced oscillation technique. Blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (ECG), heart frequency (HF), oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. Blood gases, neutrophil-recruitment, microvascular permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood serum as well as histopathology of the lung were examined. Results MV with repetitive RM every 5 min resulted in stable respiratory mechanics. Ventilation without RM worsened lung mechanics due to alveolar collapse, leading to impaired gas exchange. HF and BP were affected by anaesthesia, but not by ventilation. Microvascular permeability was highest in atelectatic lungs, whereas neutrophil-recruitment and structural changes were strongest in lungs ventilated with high tidal volume. The cytokines IL-6 and KC, but neither TNF nor IP-10, were elevated in the BAL and serum of all ventilated mice and were reduced by recurrent RM. Lung mechanics, oxygenation and pulmonary inflammation were improved by increased PEEP. Conclusions Recurrent RM maintain lung mechanics in their physiological range during low tidal volume ventilation of healthy mice by preventing atelectasis and

  19. Effects of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu-Qing; Ma, Yong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is suggested as a vital pharmacologic target for inflammation. In this study, we determined whether a sEH inhibitor, AUDA, exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. Methods Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive AUDA or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 4 h after LPS or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intratracheal instillation. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS or PBS administration. Results AUDA administration decreased the pulmonary levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Improvement of oxygenation and lung edema were observed in AUDA treated group. AUDA significantly inhibited sEH activity, and elevated epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) levels in lung tissues. Moreover, LPS induced the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was markedly dampened in AUDA treated group. Conclusion Administration of AUDA after the onset of LPS-induced ALI increased pulmonary levels of EETs, and ameliorated lung injury. sEH is a potential pharmacologic target for ALI. PMID:27490848

  20. Genetic Targets of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury – A Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, Sashko; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Strosing, Karl; Ryter, Stefan; Hummel, Matthias; Faller, Simone; Hoetzel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that inhalation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study, we aimed to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms of H2S-dependent lung protection by analyzing gene expression profiles in mice. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to spontaneous breathing or mechanical ventilation in the absence or presence of H2S (80 parts per million). Gene expression profiles were determined by microarray, sqRT-PCR and Western Blot analyses. The association of Atf3 in protection against VILI was confirmed with a Vivo-Morpholino knockout model. Mechanical ventilation caused a significant lung inflammation and damage that was prevented in the presence of H2S. Mechanical ventilation favoured the expression of genes involved in inflammation, leukocyte activation and chemotaxis. In contrast, ventilation with H2S activated genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis, and inflammation. Amongst others, H2S administration induced Atf3, an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic regulator. Morpholino mediated reduction of Atf3 resulted in elevated lung injury despite the presence of H2S. In conclusion, lung protection by H2S during mechanical ventilation is associated with down-regulation of genes related to oxidative stress and inflammation and up-regulation of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Here we show that Atf3 is clearly involved in H2S mediated protection. PMID:25025333

  1. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax)

    MedlinePlus

    Air around the lung; Air outside the lung; Pneumothorax dropped lung; Spontaneous pneumothorax ... Collapsed lung can be caused by an injury to the lung. Injuries can include a gunshot or knife wound ...

  2. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 attenuates neutrophil migration and acute lung injury in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Giangola, Matthew D; Yang, Weng-Lang; Rajayer, Salil R; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Sepsis is an acute inflammatory condition that can result in multiple organ failure and acute lung injury. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6) is a broad regulator of the innate immune response involved with the nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. We hypothesized that Gas6 could have a protective role in attenuating the severity of acute lung injury and sepsis. Male mice were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) after which recombinant murine Gas6 (rmGas6; 5 μg/mouse) or normal saline (vehicle) was administered intravenously. Blood and lung tissues were collected at 20 h after CLP for various measurements. Treatment with rmGas6 significantly reduced serum levels of the injury markers aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, as well as proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-17, compared with the vehicle group (P < 0.05). The parenchyma of the lungs damaged by CLP was attenuated by rmGas6 treatment. Lung mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were decreased by 60%, 86%, 82%, 93%, and 82%, respectively, with rmGas6 treatment as determined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (P < 0.05). The degradation of IκB-α induced by CLP in the lungs was inhibited by rmGas6 treatment. The number of neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity in the lungs were significantly reduced in the rmGas6 group. Moreover, rmGas6 reduced the in vitro migration of differentiated human promyelocytic HL60 cells by 64%. Finally, the 10-day survival rate of mice subjected to CLP was increased from 31% in the vehicle group to 67% in the rmGas6 group (P < 0.05). Thus, Gas6 has potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent to treat patients with sepsis and acute lung injury.

  3. History of Mechanical Ventilation. From Vesalius to Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Arthur S

    2015-05-15

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy that catalyzed the development of modern intensive care units. The origins of modern mechanical ventilation can be traced back about five centuries to the seminal work of Andreas Vesalius. This article is a short history of mechanical ventilation, tracing its origins over the centuries to the present day. One of the great advances in ventilatory support over the past few decades has been the development of lung-protective ventilatory strategies, based on our understanding of the iatrogenic consequences of mechanical ventilation such as ventilator-induced lung injury. These strategies have markedly improved clinical outcomes in patients with respiratory failure. PMID:25844759

  4. History of Mechanical Ventilation. From Vesalius to Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Arthur S

    2015-05-15

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy that catalyzed the development of modern intensive care units. The origins of modern mechanical ventilation can be traced back about five centuries to the seminal work of Andreas Vesalius. This article is a short history of mechanical ventilation, tracing its origins over the centuries to the present day. One of the great advances in ventilatory support over the past few decades has been the development of lung-protective ventilatory strategies, based on our understanding of the iatrogenic consequences of mechanical ventilation such as ventilator-induced lung injury. These strategies have markedly improved clinical outcomes in patients with respiratory failure.

  5. Ultrastructural changes in the lung following exposure to perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) and potentiation of PFIB-induced lung injury by post-exposure exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Stavert, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors investigated the kinetics of development of the injurious effects of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in the lower respiratory tract of the rat as a function of inhaled mass concentration. We additionally examined if exercise performed after exposure to PFIB can potentiate the severity of expression of PFIB-induced lung injury, while also assessing how PFIB exposure may result in reductions in work performance capacity. The severity of PFIB-induced lung injury was found to be directly proportional to inhaled PFIB mass concentration whereas the post-exposure kinetics of development of the injurious response was inversely proportional to the mass concentration of PFIB, with post-exposure latency periods prior to the onset of detectable injury increasing with decreasing inhaled mass concentration. Exercise was found to potentiate PFIB-induced lung injury only after pulmonary edema was demonstrably present using lung gravimetric and light histopathologic criteria, even though ultrastructural observations indicated significant cellular changes occur during the latency period. Our collective findings suggest that pre-existing permeability changes in the lung are a necessary prerequisite for post-exposure exercise to exert a potentiating effect. Reductions in work performance capacity occurred only after the latency period, and such reductions proportionately scaled with the severity of pulmonary edema. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Hepatic Deficiency of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury and Promotes Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Rani, Richa; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2016-01-01

    Why only a subpopulation (about 15%) of humans develops liver cirrhosis due to alcohol is a critical as yet unanswered question. Liver-specific depletion of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protein in mice causes robust steatosis and hepatocyte apoptosis by 2 weeks; these pathologies regress subsequently with return of ALR expression even at lower than control levels, but the mice develop modest steatohepatitis by 8 weeks. We aimed to investigate whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes excessive hepatic fibrosis in these ALR-deficient mice. Liver-specific ALR-deficient and wild type (WT) female mice (8-10 weeks old) were placed on 4% alcohol-supplemented or isocaloric diet for 4 weeks. Liver sections were examined for histopathology, and parameters of steatosis and fibrosis were quantified. The mRNA expression of alcohol dehydrogenase-1, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-1 and cytochrome P450-2E1 increased in WT mice but decreased in ALR-deficient mice upon alcohol ingestion. While alcohol induced steatosis and mild inflammation in WT mice, ALR-deficient mice showed minimal steatosis, strong hepatocellular injury and inflammation, prominent ductular proliferation, and robust fibrosis. Compared to the WT mice, alcohol feeding of ALR-deficient mice resulted in significantly greater increase in hepatic TNFα and TGFβ, and oxidative stress; there was also hepatic iron accumulation, robust lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. Importantly, similar to ALR-deficient mice, lower hepatic ALR levels in human alcoholic liver cirrhosis were associated with increased iron content, reduced expression of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and elevated fibrogenic markers. We conclude that ALR deficiency or anomaly can play a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, mechanisms of which may involve dysregulation of alcohol metabolism and iron homeostasis, mitochondrial damage and oxidative injury. PMID:26808690

  7. Hepatic Deficiency of Augmenter of Liver Regeneration Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury and Promotes Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Wang, Jiang; Rani, Richa; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2016-01-01

    Why only a subpopulation (about 15%) of humans develops liver cirrhosis due to alcohol is a critical as yet unanswered question. Liver-specific depletion of augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protein in mice causes robust steatosis and hepatocyte apoptosis by 2 weeks; these pathologies regress subsequently with return of ALR expression even at lower than control levels, but the mice develop modest steatohepatitis by 8 weeks. We aimed to investigate whether chronic alcohol ingestion promotes excessive hepatic fibrosis in these ALR-deficient mice. Liver-specific ALR-deficient and wild type (WT) female mice (8–10 weeks old) were placed on 4% alcohol-supplemented or isocaloric diet for 4 weeks. Liver sections were examined for histopathology, and parameters of steatosis and fibrosis were quantified. The mRNA expression of alcohol dehydrogenase-1, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-1 and cytochrome P450-2E1 increased in WT mice but decreased in ALR-deficient mice upon alcohol ingestion. While alcohol induced steatosis and mild inflammation in WT mice, ALR-deficient mice showed minimal steatosis, strong hepatocellular injury and inflammation, prominent ductular proliferation, and robust fibrosis. Compared to the WT mice, alcohol feeding of ALR-deficient mice resulted in significantly greater increase in hepatic TNFα and TGFβ, and oxidative stress; there was also hepatic iron accumulation, robust lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. Importantly, similar to ALR-deficient mice, lower hepatic ALR levels in human alcoholic liver cirrhosis were associated with increased iron content, reduced expression of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and elevated fibrogenic markers. We conclude that ALR deficiency or anomaly can play a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis, mechanisms of which may involve dysregulation of alcohol metabolism and iron homeostasis, mitochondrial damage and oxidative injury. PMID:26808690

  8. Apios americana Medik Extract Alleviates Lung Inflammation in Influenza Virus H1N1- and Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Cui, Jun; Jang, Ho Hee; Kang, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jong-Keun; Kim, In-Kyoung; Lee, Deuk-Ki; Choi, Seulgi; Yoon, Il-Sub; Chung, Ji-Woo; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-12-28

    Apios americana Medik (hereinafter Apios) has been reported to treat diseases, including cancer, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. The therapeutic effect of Apios is likely to be associated with its anti-inflammatory activity. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of Apios in animal models of acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1). Mice were exposed to LPS or H1N1 for 2-4 days to induce acute lung injury. The treatment groups were administered Apios extracts via oral injection for 8 weeks before LPS treatment or H1N1 infection. To investigate the effects of Apios, we assessed the mice for in vivo effects of Apios on immune cell infiltration and the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and histopathological changes in the lung. After induction of acute lung injury, the numbers of neutrophils and total cells were lower in the Apios-treated groups than in the non-Apios-treated LPS and H1N1 groups. The Apios groups tended to have lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a and interleukin-6 in BAL fluid. In addition, the histopathological changes in the lungs were markedly reduced in the Apios-treated groups. These data suggest that Apios treatment reduces LPS- and H1N1-induced lung inflammation. These protective effects of Apios suggest that it may have therapeutic potential in acute lung injury.

  9. Calcitriol inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of sepsis in intensive care unit patients with an extremely high mortality. The present study investigated the effects of calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.0mg/kg) to establish the animal model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Some mice were i.p. injected with calcitriol (1.0μg/kg) before LPS injection. An obvious infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was observed beginning at 1h after LPS injection. Correspondingly, TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates were markedly elevated in LPS-treated mice. Interestingly, calcitriol obviously alleviated LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Moreover, calcitriol markedly attenuated LPS-induced elevation of TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates. Further analysis showed that calcitriol repressed LPS-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. In addition, calcitriol blocked LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and p50 subunit in the lungs. Taken together, these results suggest that calcitriol inhibits inflammatory cytokines production in LPS-induced acute lung injury.

  10. Calcitriol inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of sepsis in intensive care unit patients with an extremely high mortality. The present study investigated the effects of calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.0mg/kg) to establish the animal model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Some mice were i.p. injected with calcitriol (1.0μg/kg) before LPS injection. An obvious infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was observed beginning at 1h after LPS injection. Correspondingly, TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates were markedly elevated in LPS-treated mice. Interestingly, calcitriol obviously alleviated LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Moreover, calcitriol markedly attenuated LPS-induced elevation of TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates. Further analysis showed that calcitriol repressed LPS-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. In addition, calcitriol blocked LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and p50 subunit in the lungs. Taken together, these results suggest that calcitriol inhibits inflammatory cytokines production in LPS-induced acute lung injury. PMID:27216047

  11. Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  12. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  13. Major concerns regarding lung injury and related health conditions caused by the use of humidifier disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A total of 221 patients were evaluated to be humidifier disinfectant associated with lung injury (HDLI) through two rounds of programs through April 2015. The humidifier disinfectant (HD) brands most often associated with HDLI were found to be Oxy (n=151, 68 %) and Cefu (n=26, 17 %). Polyhexamethylene guanidine used for disinfectant for four types of HD brands including Oxy was found to be associated with the highest number of HDLI cases (n=188). Further programs are operating to identify various health effects including lung injury which may be associated with the use of HD. Not only national agencies, but also pertinent environmental health societies should cooperate in the necessary investigations so that this tragedy can be properly addressed and future incidents concerning chemicals and chemical-containing products can be prevented. PMID:27431912

  14. Involvement of Protein Kinase C-δ in Vascular Permeability in Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jong J; Jung, Jong P; Park, Soon E; Lee, Minhyun; Kwon, Byungsuk; Cho, Hong R

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary edema is a major cause of mortality due to acute lung injury (ALI). The involvement of protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) in ALI has been a controversial topic. Here we investigated PKC-δ function in ALI using PKC-δ knockout (KO) mice and PKC inhibitors. Our results indicated that although the ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS injury in PKC-δ KO mice was similar to that of control mice, they showed enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more severe pulmonary edema. PKC-δ inhibition promoted barrier dysfunction in an endothelial cell layer in vitro, and administration of a PKC-δ-specific inhibitor significantly increased steady state vascular permeability. A neutrophil transmigration assay indicated that the PKC-δ inhibition increased neutrophil transmigration through an endothelial monolayer. This suggests that PKC-δ inhibition induces structural changes in endothelial cells, allowing extravasation of proteins and neutrophils.

  15. The effect of age and emphysematous and fibrotic injury on the re-cellularization of de-cellularized lungs.

    PubMed

    Sokocevic, Dino; Bonenfant, Nicholas R; Wagner, Darcy E; Borg, Zachary D; Lathrop, Melissa J; Lam, Ying Wai; Deng, Bin; Desarno, Michael J; Ashikaga, Taka; Loi, Roberto; Hoffman, Andrew M; Weiss, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    Use of de-cellularized cadaveric lungs as 3-dimensional scaffolds for ex vivo lung tissue generation offers a new potential therapeutic approach for clinical lung transplantation. However, it is likely that some of the available cadaveric human lungs may be from older donors or from donors with previously existing structural lung diseases such as emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis. It is not known whether these lungs will be suitable for either de-cellularization or re-cellularization. To investigate this, we assessed the effects of advanced age, representative emphysematous and fibrotic injuries, and the combination of advanced age and emphysematous injury and found significant differences both in histologic appearance and in the retention of extracellular matrix (ECM) and other proteins, as assessed by immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry, between the different conditions. However, despite these differences, binding, retention and growth of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) over a 1-month period following intratracheal inoculation were similar between the different experimental conditions. In contrast, significant differences occurred in the growth of C10 mouse lung epithelial cells between the different conditions. Therefore, age, lung injury, and the cell type used for re-cellularization may significantly impact the usefulness of de-cellularized whole lungs for ex vivo lung tissue regeneration.

  16. Niacinamide abrogates the organ dysfunction and acute lung injury caused by endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang-Jyh; Liu, Demeral David; Su, Chain-Fa; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) synthabse (PARS) or polymerase (PARP) is a cytotoxic enzyme causing cellular damage. Niacinamide inhibits PARS or PARP. The present experiment tests the effects of niacinamide (NCA) on organ dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS was administered to anesthetized rats and to isolated rat lungs. In anesthetized rats, LPS caused systemic hypotension and increased biochemical factors, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), methyl guanidine (MG), tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In isolated lungs, LPS increased lung weight (LW) to body weight ratio, LW gain, protein and dye tracer leakage, and capillary permeability. The insult also increased NOx, MG, TNFalpha, and IL-1beta in lung perfusate, while decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with an increase in PARP activity in lung tissue. Pathological examination revealed pulmonary edema with inflammatory cell infiltration. These changes were abrogated by posttreatment (30 min after LPS) with NCA. Following LPS, the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased. NCA reduced the iNOS expression. Niacinamide exerts protective effects on the organ dysfunction and ALI caused by endotoxin. The mechanisms may be mediated through the inhibition on the PARP activity, iNOS expression and the subsequent suppression of NO, free radicals, and proinflammatory cytokines with restoration of ATP.

  17. The Role of Alveolar Epithelium in Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Celine; Nagarajan, Devipriya; Tian, Jian; Leal, Sofia Walder; Wheeler, Kenneth; Munley, Michael; Blackstock, William; Zhao, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11–13 Gy) and fractionated doses (24–36 Gy) of 137Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c), the number of pro-SP-c+ cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:23326473

  18. Therapeutic Effect of the Tuber of Alisma orientale on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Min Jung; Choi, Jun-Yong; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Lee, Yong Gyu; Christman, John W.; Sadikot, Ruxana T.

    2013-01-01

    Although Alisma orientale, an ethnic herb, has been prescribed for treating various diseases in Asian traditional medicine, experimental evidence to support its therapeutic effects is lacking. Here, we sought to determine whether A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury (ALI). Ethanol extract of the tuber of A. orientale (EEAO) was prepared and fingerprinted by HPLC for its constituents. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the induction of ALI. At 2 h after LPS treatment, mice received an intratracheal (i.t.) spraying of various amounts of EEAO to the lung. Bioluminescence imaging of transgenic NF-κB/luciferase reporter mice shows that i.t. EEAO posttreatment suppressed lung inflammation. In similar experiments with C57BL/6 mice, EEAO posttreatment significantly improved lung inflammation, as assessed by H&E staining of lung sections, counting of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and semiquantitative RT-PCR analyses of proinflammatory cytokines and Nrf2-dependent genes in the inflamed lungs. Furthermore, EEAO posttreatment enhanced the survival of mice that received a lethal dose of LPS. Together, our results provide evidence that A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on ALI induced by sepsis. PMID:23983806

  19. The role of endocrine mechanisms in ventilator-associated lung injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Galusova, A; Vigas, M; Vlcek, M; Imrich, R; Majek, M

    2012-07-01

    The critically ill subjects are represented by a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from a life-threatening event of different origin, e.g. trauma, cardiopulmonary failure, surgery or sepsis. The majority of these patients are dependent on the artificial lung ventilation, which means a life-saving chance for them. However, the artificial lung ventilation may trigger ventilation-associated lung injury (VALI). The mechanical ventilation at higher volumes (volutrauma) and pressure (barotrauma) can cause histological changes in the lungs including impairments in the gap and adherens junctions and desmosomes. The injured lung epithelium may lead to an impairment of the surfactant production and function, and this may not only contribute to the pathophysiology of VALI but also to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Other components of VALI are atelectrauma and toxic effects of the oxygen. Collectively, all these effects may result in a lung inflammation associated with a subsequent profibrotic changes, endothelial dysfunction, and activation of the local and systemic endocrine responses such as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present review is aimed to describe some of the pathophysiologic aspects of VALI providing a basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the critically ill patients. PMID:22808908

  20. Exposure to mechanical ventilation promotes tolerance to ventilator-induced lung injury by Ccl3 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Blázquez-Prieto, Jorge; López-Alonso, Inés; Amado-Rodríguez, Laura; Batalla-Solís, Estefanía; González-López, Adrián; Albaiceta, Guillermo M

    2015-10-15

    Inflammation plays a key role in the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Preconditioning with a previous exposure can damp the subsequent inflammatory response. Our objectives were to demonstrate that tolerance to VILI can be induced by previous low-pressure ventilation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. Intact 8- to 12-wk-old male CD1 mice were preconditioned with 90 min of noninjurious ventilation [peak pressure 17 cmH2O, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 2 cmH2O] and extubated. Seven days later, preconditioned mice and intact controls were submitted to injurious ventilation (peak pressure 20 cmH2O, PEEP 0 cmH2O) for 2 h to induce VILI. Preconditioned mice showed lower histological lung injury scores, bronchoalveolar lavage albumin content, and lung neutrophilic infiltration after injurious ventilation, with no differences in Il6 or Il10 expression. Microarray analyses revealed a downregulation of Calcb, Hspa1b, and Ccl3, three genes related to tolerance phenomena, in preconditioned animals. Among the previously identified genes, only Ccl3, which encodes the macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), showed significant differences between intact and preconditioned mice after high-pressure ventilation. In separate, nonconditioned animals, treatment with BX471, a specific blocker of CCR1 (the main receptor for MIP-1α), decreased lung damage and neutrophilic infiltration caused by high-pressure ventilation. We conclude that previous exposure to noninjurious ventilation induces a state of tolerance to VILI. Downregulation of the chemokine gene Ccl3 could be the mechanism responsible for this effect.

  1. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: Emerging Concepts in Pulmonary Edema and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Stephen R.; Blank, Randal S.; Deatherage, Lindy S.; Dull, Randal O.

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is a dynamic layer of macromolecules at the luminal surface of vascular endothelium that is involved in fluid homeostasis and regulation. Its role in vascular permeability and edema formation is emerging but is still not well understood. In this special article, we highlight key concepts of endothelial dysfunction with regards to the glycocalyx and provide new insights into the glycocalyx as a mediator of processes central to the development of pulmonary edema and lung injury. PMID:23835455

  2. Nanoparticles, Lung Injury, and the Role of Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Amy K.; Plummer, Laurel E.; Carosino, Christopher; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of engineered nanoscale materials has provided significant advancements in electronic, biomedical, and material science applications. Both engineered nanoparticles and nanoparticles derived from combustion or incidental processes exhibit a range of physical and chemical properties, which have been shown to induce inflammation and oxidative stress in biologic systems. Oxidative stress reflects the imbalance between the generation of reaction oxygen species (ROS) and the biochemical mechanisms to detoxify and repair resulting damage of reactive intermediates. This review examines current research incidental and engineered nanoparticles in terms of their health effects on the lungs and mechanisms by which oxidative stress via physicochemical characteristics influence toxicity or biocompatibility. Although oxidative stress has generally been thought of as an adverse biological outcome, this review will also briefly discuss some of the potential emerging technologies to use nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress to treat disease in a site specific fashion. PMID:24215442

  3. Augmentation of antimetastatic effect on Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) in C57BL/6 mice by priming with Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, T; Shimizu, Y; Yokokura, T

    1990-01-01

    The augmentation of the antimetastatic effect of heat-killed cells of Lactobacillus casei YIT9018 (LC9018) on Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) in C57BL/6 mice by presensitization (priming) with LC9018 was examined. Intralesional injection of LC9018 into 3LL-bearing mice inhibited both the growth of the primary tumors and the formation of lung metastases, and this effect was significantly augmented by subcutaneous injection of LC9018 before the tumor inoculation. In the LC9018-primed mice, intraperitoneal administration of LC9018 into syngeneic hosts after priming induced a high level of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the peritoneal cavity. At this time, T cells of the spleen cells from the LC9018-primed mice proliferated and produced IL-2 when co-cultured with LC9018 as antigen in vitro. Also, the phenotype of these T cells was found to be L3T4+ and Ly-2.2- T cells by analysis by flow cytometry. These results suggest that LC9018-reactive helper T (Th) cells were induced by the priming and subsequent challenge with LC9018, and that IL-2 or IFN-gamma, which was produced by the activated LC9018-reactive Th cells, augmented a host immune response resulting the antitumor activity.

  4. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in evaluating regional lung function in nonpenetrating injury to the chest.

    PubMed

    Van Eeden, S F; Klopper, J F; Alheit, B; Bardin, P G

    1989-03-01

    The extent of chest wall and lung injury after nonpenetrating injury to the chest (NIC) determine how aggressive and invasive management modalities should be. We investigated the value of ventilation (133Xe) and perfusion (99mTc) studies as indicators of extent of lung injury in 28 patients with moderate to severe unilateral NIC. The ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) abnormalities were compared with parameters conventionally used to evaluate NIC. All studies were carried out within 24 h of NIC and repeated 24 h later. Ventilation (p less than 0.001) and perfusion (p less than 0.01) abnormalities were more extensive soon after NIC than suggested by chest roentgenograms. Chest x-ray film changes lagged behind V/Q changes on admission and also after 24 h. The extent of ventilation, perfusion, and chest x-ray film abnormalities on admission were all predictors of increased morbidity. V/Q studies may be useful to define the extent as well as the changes in regional lung function following NIC.

  5. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  6. Protective effects of fenofibrate against acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiankun; He, Guizhen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yukang; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate whether pretreatment with fenofibrate could mitigate acute lung injury (ALI) in a mice model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6): sham, intestinal I/R + vehicle, and intestinal I/R + fenofibrate. Intestinal I/R was achieved by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 60 minutes before the ischemia. At the end of experiment, measurement of pathohistological score, inflammatory mediators and other markers were performed. In addition, a 24-hour survival experiment was conducted in intestinal I/R mice treated with fenofibrate or vehicle. The chief results were as anticipated. Pathohistological evaluation indicated that fenofibrate ameliorated the local intestine damage and distant lung injury. Pretreatment with fenofibrate significantly decreased inflammatory factors in both the intestine and the lung. Consistently, renal creatine levels and hepatic ALT levels were significantly decreased in the fenofibrate group. Moreover, serum systemic inflammatory response indicators were significantly alleviated in the fenofibrate group. In addition, fenofibrate administration significantly improved the survival rate. Collectively, our data indicated that pretreatment with fenofibrate prior to ischemia attenuated intestinal I/R injury and ALI. PMID:26902261

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: transfusion, platelets and biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may be induced by plasma, platelet concentrates and red blood cell concentrates. The mechanism leading to TRALI is thought to involve two steps. The priming step consists of previous inflammatory pathological conditions or external factors attracting leukocytes to lung vessels and creating conditions favorable for the second step, in which anti-HLA or anti-HNA antibodies or biologically active lipids, usually in transfused blood products, stress leukocytes and inflame lung epithelia. Platelets may be involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI because of their secretory potential and capacity to interact with other immune cells. There is no drug based-prophylaxis, but transfusion strategies are used to mitigate the risk of TRALI. PMID:26855042

  8. Histamine H1 antagonist levocetirizine as a potential cause of lung injury.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Minami, Yoshinori; Okumura, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Takaaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu

    2015-06-01

    Histamine H1 antagonists rarely cause drug-induced lung injury (DLI). A woman in her 60s, who had been taking antihistaminic levocetirizine for 2 months, presented with progressive cough and shortness of breath. A chest radiograph showed patchy infiltrations on both lower lung fields. Chest computed tomography findings were consistent with non-specific interstitial pneumonia. Serum markers associated with interstitial pneumonias were elevated. Room air arterial blood gas analysis revealed hypoxemia. Restrictive ventilatory impairment was noted with reduced diffusing capacity. Transbronchial lung biopsy specimens demonstrated unclassifiable alveolitis. Steroid pulse therapy was introduced for respiratory distress, but the initial response to treatment was poor. A drug lymphocyte stimulation test was positive for levocetirizine. The interstitial pneumonia improved following withdrawal of levocetirizine. Her illness has not recurred under steroid therapy and the discontinuation of levocetirizine. Antihistaminics may have a potential risk of DLI. PMID:26090114

  9. Regional pulmonary inflammation in an endotoxemic ovine acute lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bustamante, A; Easley, R B; Fuld, M; Mulreany, D; Chon, D; Lewis, J F; Simon, B A

    2012-08-15

    The regional distribution of inflammation during acute lung injury (ALI) is not well known. In an ovine ALI model we studied regional alveolar inflammation, surfactant composition, and CT-derived regional specific volume change (sVol) and specific compliance (sC). 18 ventilated adult sheep received IV lipopolysaccharide (LPS) until severe ALI was achieved. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from apical and basal lung regions were obtained at baseline and injury time points, for analysis of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β), BAL protein and surfactant composition. Whole lung CT images were obtained in 4 additional sheep. BAL protein and IL-1β were significantly higher in injured apical vs. basal regions. No significant regional surfactant composition changes were observed. Baseline sVol and sC were lower in apex vs. base; ALI enhanced this cranio-caudal difference, reaching statistical significance only for sC. This study suggests that apical lung regions show greater inflammation than basal ones during IV LPS-induced ALI which may relate to differences in regional mechanical events.

  10. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway. PMID:26551926

  11. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway.

  12. Lung Matrix Metalloproteinase Activation following Partial Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Rizzo, Vittoria; Tarantola, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Warm hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acute liver I/R does affect the function and/or structure of remote organs such as lung, kidney, and heart via modulation of extracellular matrix remodelling. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 30 min partial hepatic ischemia by clamping the hepatic artery and the portal vein. After a 60 min reperfusion, liver, lung, kidney, and heart biopsies and blood samples were collected. Serum hepatic enzymes, creatinine, urea, Troponin I and TNF-alpha, and tissue matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and morphology were monitored. Results. Serum levels of hepatic enzymes and TNF-alpha were concomitantly increased during hepatic I/R. An increase in hepatic MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities was substantiated by tissue morphology alterations. Notably, acute hepatic I/R affect the lung inasmuch as MMP-9 activity and MPO levels were increased. No difference in MMPs and MPO was observed in kidney and heart. Conclusions. Although the underlying mechanism needs further investigation, this is the first study in which the MMP activation in a distant organ is reported; this event is probably TNF-alpha-mediated and the lung appears as the first remote organ to be involved in hepatic I/R injury. PMID:24592193

  13. The protective effects of glutamine in a rat model of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Li, Chien-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background The mortality rate of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still high despite the use of protective ventilatory strategies. We sought to examine the pharmacological effects of glutamine (GLN) in a two-hit model of endotoxin-induced inflammation followed by ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that the administration of GLN ameliorates the VILI. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and given lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intratracheally as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, followed 24 h later by a second hit of mechanical ventilation (MV) with either low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) with 5 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volume (22 mL/kg) with zero PEEP for 4 h. GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution as the placebo was administered intravenously 15 min prior to MV. Results In the LPS-challenged rats ventilated with high tidal volume, the treatment with GLN improved lung injury indices, lung mechanics and cytokine responses compared with the placebo group. Conclusions The administration of GLN given immediately prior to MV may be beneficial in the context of reducing VILI. PMID:25589963

  14. Estradiol worsens the syndrome of ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental lung transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Llontop, Pedro; López, Ana; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Machín, Rubén P; Ponce, Miguel A; Fiuza, María D; García-Herrera, Ricardo; Brito, Yanira; Yordi, Nagib Atallah; Chirino, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common complication after lung transplantation. There is evidence that reactive oxygen species are involved in its pathogenesis. We designed an experimental study to evaluate whether the administration of antioxidants to lung transplantation recipients protects against IRI and early acute rejection (AR). Twenty-five rats received left lung transplants after 6 h of ischemia. Fifty minutes before the reperfusion, groups of five rats received a single dose of desferrioxamine (20 mg/kg), estradiol (25 mg/kg), or melatonin (10 mg/kg). The animals were killed 48 h after surgery and the postoperative outcome, IRI, and AR were evaluated. The frequency of severe injury and of moderate-to-severe edema was higher in animals treated with estradiol than in the control group (P = 0.022 and P = 0.026, respectively). No significant changes in the degree of IRI or AR were observed in the groups treated with desferrioxamine or melatonin. In our study, treatment with the antioxidants melatonin or desferrioxamine before reperfusion had no effects on IRI damage or on AR frequency or severity. However, treatment with estradiol resulted in a worse postoperative outcome and in severe edema. Therefore, despite the antioxidant capacity of estradiol, it is recommended that an evaluation of these adverse effects of estradiol in human lung transplant recipients be performed.

  15. Effects of methylene blue in acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cassiano Silveira, Ana Paula; Vento, Daniella Alves; Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rubens de Nadai, Tales; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto

    2016-01-01

    Background In acute lung injury (ALI), rupture of the alveolar-capillary barrier determines the protein-rich fluid influx into alveolar spaces. Previous studies have reported that methylene blue (MB) attenuates such injuries. This investigation was carried out to study the MB effects in pulmonary capillary permeability. Methods Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (I) Sham: saline bolus; (II) MB, MB infusion for 2 h; (III) oleic acid (OA), OA bolus; (IV) MB/OA, MB infusion for 2 h, and at 5 min after from the beginning, concurrently with an OA bolus; and (V) OA/MB, OA bolus, and after 2 h, MB infusion for 2 h. After 4 h, blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and lung tissue were collected from all groups for analysis of plasma and tissue nitric oxide, calculation of the wet weight to dry weight ratio (WW/DW), and histological examination of lung tissue. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric test. Results Although favourable trends have been observed for permeability improvement parameters (WW/WD and protein), the results were not statistically significant. However, histological analysis of lung tissue showed reduced lesion areas in both pre- and post-treatment groups. Conclusions The data collected using this experimental model was favourable only through macroscopic and histological analysis. These observations are valid for both MB infusions before or after induction of ALI. PMID:26855944

  16. Pathophysiological Approaches of Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome: Novel Bases for Study of Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, R.L; Carrasco Loza, R; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Experimental approaches have been implemented to research the lung damage related-mechanism. These models show in animals pathophysiological events for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), such as neutrophil activation, reactive oxygen species burst, pulmonary vascular hypertension, exudative edema, and other events associated with organ dysfunction. Moreover, these approaches have not reproduced the clinical features of lung damage. Lung inflammation is a relevant event in the develop of ARDS as component of the host immune response to various stimuli, such as cytokines, antigens and endotoxins. In patients surviving at the local inflammatory states, transition from injury to resolution is an active mechanism regulated by the immuno-inflammatory signaling pathways. Indeed, inflammatory process is regulated by the dynamics of cell populations that migrate to the lung, such as neutrophils and on the other hand, the role of the modulation of transcription factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources, such as nuclear factor kappaB and NADPH oxidase. These experimental animal models reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ALI/ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. PMID:26312099

  17. Protective effects of dexamethasone on early acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Dao-Xin; Deng, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Whether alveolar edema could be cleared by alveolar epithelial is a key to the treatment and prognosis of ALI (acute lung injury). In this study, oleic acid(OA)-induced ALI model was established, the expression of α1 Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) and β1 Na+/K+-ATPase were performed in vivo to investigate the mechanism of alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) in ALI and the effect of early low doses of dexamethasone on alveolar fluid clearance. Methods: In this study, Male rats were challenged by OA with or without dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, iv) post-treatment. Lung histopathology, blood gas, pulmonary vascular permeability, BALF IL-6, MPO and NKA activity of lung were examined. α1NKA and β1NKA mRNA and protein expression were detected. Results: The results indicated that compared with sham operated group, NKA activity, mRNA and protein expression of α1NKA and β1NKA were decreased in OA treated group, while wet/dry ratio, lung index, IL-6, and MPO activity were increased significantly. Pulmonary edema was obviously seen under light microscope. Those indexes were improved in dexamethasone treated group compared to OA treated group. Conclusion: The expression of NKA to decline for the lung injury is one important mechanism of pulmonary edema. Early low dose of dexamethasone treatment could suppress the expression of inflammatory mediators, improved lung epithelial-endothelial barrier permeability, increased the expressions of α1 NKA and β1 NKA mRNA, α1 NKA and β1 NKA protein level, stimulated NKA activity and decreased pulmonary edema. In conclusion, these observations suggest that early low dose of dexamethasone treatment has a protective effect on OA induced ALI. PMID:25663967

  18. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R. PMID:26974422

  19. TREM-1-accentuated lung injury via miR-155 is inhibited by LP17 nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhihong; Syed, Mansoor; Panchal, Dipti; Joo, Myungsoo; Bedi, Chetna; Lim, Sokbee; Onyuksel, Hayat; Rubinstein, Israel; Colonna, Marco; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2016-03-01

    Triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cell-1 (TREM-1) is a superimmunoglobulin receptor expressed on myeloid cells. Synergy between TREM-1 and Toll-like receptor amplifies the inflammatory response; however, the mechanisms by which TREM-1 accentuates inflammation are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of TREM-1 in a model of LPS-induced lung injury and neutrophilic inflammation. We show that TREM-1 is induced in lungs of mice with LPS-induced acute neutrophilic inflammation. TREM-1 knockout mice showed an improved survival after lethal doses of LPS with an attenuated inflammatory response in the lungs. Deletion of TREM-1 gene resulted in significantly reduced neutrophils and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, particularly IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. Physiologically deletion of TREM-1 conferred an immunometabolic advantage with low oxygen consumption rate (OCR) sparing the respiratory capacity of macrophages challenged with LPS. Furthermore, we show that TREM-1 deletion results in significant attenuation of expression of miR-155 in macrophages and lungs of mice treated with LPS. Experiments with antagomir-155 confirmed that TREM-1-mediated changes were indeed dependent on miR-155 and are mediated by downregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1) a key miR-155 target. These data for the first time show that TREM-1 accentuates inflammatory response by inducing the expression of miR-155 in macrophages and suggest a novel mechanism by which TREM-1 signaling contributes to lung injury. Inhibition of TREM-1 using a nanomicellar approach resulted in ablation of neutrophilic inflammation suggesting that TREM-1 inhibition is a potential therapeutic target for neutrophilic lung inflammation and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). PMID:26684249

  20. Neutralization of Osteopontin Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yohei; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Osteopontin (OPN), a glycoprotein secreted from immune-reactive cells, plays a deleterious role in various inflammatory diseases. Considering OPN as a pro-inflammatory molecule, we hypothesize that the treatment with its neutralizing antibody (anti-OPN Ab) protects mice against intestinal I/R-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Intestinal I/R was induced in mice by superior mesenteric artery occlusion with a vascular clip. After 45 min of occlusion, the clip was removed and anti-OPN Ab (25 μg/mouse) or normal IgG isotype control (25 μg/mouse) was immediately administrated intravenously. Blood, small intestine, and lung tissues were collected at 4 h after reperfusion for various analyses. After intestinal I/R, mRNA and protein levels of OPN were significantly induced in the small intestine, lungs, and blood relative to sham-operated animals. Compared with the IgG control group, treatment of anti-OPN Ab significantly reduced plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine (IL-6 and MIP-2) and organ injury markers (AST, ALT, and LDH). The histological architecture of the gut and lung tissues in anti-OPN Ab-treated intestinal I/R-induced mice showed significant improvement versus the IgG control mice. The lung inflammation measured by the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and MIP-2 was also significantly downregulated in the anti-OPN Ab-treated mice as compared with the IgG control mice. Besides, the lung MPO and neutrophil infiltration in anti-OPN Ab-treated mice showed significant reduction as compared with the IgG control animals. In conclusion, we have demonstrated beneficial outcomes of anti-OPN Ab treatment in protecting against ALI, implicating a novel therapeutic potential in intestinal I/R.

  1. Sustained inflation at birth did not protect preterm fetal sheep from lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Matthew W.; Noble, Peter B.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Sustained lung inflations (SI) at birth may recruit functional residual capacity (FRC). Clinically, SI increase oxygenation and decrease need for intubation in preterm infants. We tested whether a SI to recruit FRC would decrease lung injury from subsequent ventilation of fetal, preterm lambs. The preterm fetus (128 ± 1 day gestation) was exteriorized from the uterus, a tracheostomy was performed, and fetal lung fluid was removed. While maintaining placental circulation, fetuses were randomized to one of four 15-min interventions: 1) positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 8 cmH2O (n = 4), 2) 20 s SI to 50 cmH2O then PEEP 8 cmH2O (n = 10), 3) mechanical ventilation at tidal volume (VT) 7 ml/kg (n = 13), or 4) 20 s SI then ventilation at VT 7 ml/kg (n = 13). Lambs were ventilated with 95% N2/5% CO2 and PEEP 8 cmH2O. Volume recruitment was measured during SI, and fetal tissues were collected after an additional 30 min on placental support. SI achieved a mean FRC recruitment of 15 ml/kg (range 8–27). Fifty percent of final FRC was achieved by 2 s, 65% by 5 s, and 90% by 15 s, demonstrating prolonged SI times are needed to recruit FRC. SI alone released acute-phase proteins into the fetal lung fluid and increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase response genes in the lung. Mechanical ventilation further increased all markers of lung injury. SI before ventilation, regardless of the volume of FRC recruited, did not alter the acute-phase and proinflammatory responses to mechanical ventilation at birth. PMID:23873843

  2. Heat-killed Corynebacterium parvum enhances endotoxin lung injury with increased TNF production in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, S; Ishizaka, A; Sayama, K; Sakamaki, F; Nakamura, H; Terashima, T; Waki, Y; Soejima, K; Nakamura, M; Matsubara, H; Fujishima, S; Kanazawa, M

    1996-03-01

    Corynebacterium parvum (CP) is known to increase susceptibility to endotoxin, which is associated with increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We investigated the effect of CP-priming on the pathogenesis of acute lung injury caused by intratracheal Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). Guinea pigs were divided into four groups: (1) control (n=6), (2) CP-alone (n=6), (3) LPS-alone (n=6) and (4) CP + LPS (n=6). A CP dose of 4 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally 7 d before the study. Animals were observed for 4 h after intratracheal administration of 0.02 mg/kg of LPS. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D), [125I] albumin concentration ratio of lung tissue to plasma (T/P) and of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid to plasma (B/P) and differential cell count in BAL fluid were examined. In the LPS-alone group, neither excess lung water nor increased albumin leakage was observed. The CP + LPS group showed increased lung water and albumin leakage as compared with the other three groups (p<0.05). We also observed increased cell counts in BAL fluid (p<0.05), in the CP + LPS group. The spleen weight was increased in guinea pigs pretreated with CP, indicating reticuloendothelial system (RES) activation. In the CP + LPS group, the TNF level was increased in both plasma and BAL fluid. We conclude that pretreatment with CP enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury in parallel with increasing TNF production, which suggests that the activation of mononuclear phagocytes contributes to increased susceptibility to intratracheal endotoxin in guinea pigs. PMID:8630544

  3. Conflicting Physiological and Genomic Cardiopulmonary Effects of Recruitment Maneuvers in Murine Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Voiriot, Guillaume; Zhou, Tong; Marcos, Elisabeth; Dudek, Steven M.; Jacobson, Jeff R.; Machado, Roberto; Adnot, Serge; Brochard, Laurent; Maitre, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Low tidal volume ventilation, although promoting atelectasis, is a protective strategy against ventilator-induced lung injury. Deep inflation (DI) recruitment maneuvers restore lung volumes, but potentially compromise lung parenchymal and vascular function via repetitive overdistention. Our objective was to examine cardiopulmonary physiological and transcriptional consequences of recruitment maneuvers. C57/BL6 mice challenged with either PBS or LPS via aspiration were placed on mechanical ventilation (5 h) using low tidal volume inflation (TI; 8 μl/g) alone or in combination with intermittent DIs (0.75 ml twice/min). Lung mechanics during TI ventilation significantly deteriorated, as assessed by forced oscillation technique and pressure–volume curves. DI mitigated the TI-induced alterations in lung mechanics, but induced a significant rise in right ventricle systolic pressures and pulmonary vascular resistances, especially in LPS-challenged animals. In addition, DI exacerbated the LPS-induced genome-wide lung inflammatory transcriptome, with prominent dysregulation of a gene cluster involving vascular processes, as well as increases in cytokine concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. Gene ontology analyses of right ventricular tissue expression profiles also identified inflammatory signatures, as well as apoptosis and membrane organization ontologies, as potential elements in the response to acute pressure overload. Our results, although confirming the improvement in lung mechanics offered by DI, highlight a detrimental impact in sustaining inflammatory response and exacerbating lung vascular dysfunction, events contributing to increases in right ventricle afterload. These novel insights should be integrated into the clinical assessment of the risk/benefit of recruitment maneuver strategies. PMID:22135358

  4. Biomarkers for oxidative stress in acute lung injury induced in rabbits submitted to different strategies of mechanical ventilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative damage has been said to play an important role in pulmonary injury, which is associated with the development and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to identify biomarkers to determine the oxidative stress in an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) using ...

  5. Vascular Immunotargeting of Glucose Oxidase to the Endothelial Antigens Induces Distinct Forms of Oxidant Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Kennel, Stephen; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Pietra, Giuseppe G.; Murciano, Juan-Carlos; Shah, Sayed A.; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Albelda, Steven M.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative endothelial stress, leukocyte transmigration, and pulmonary thrombosis are important pathological factors in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Vascular immunotargeting of the H2O2-generating enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX) to the pulmonary endothelium causes an acute oxidative lung injury in mice. 1 In the present study we compared the pulmonary thrombosis and leukocyte transmigration caused by GOX targeting to the endothelial antigens platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) and thrombomodulin (TM). Both anti-PECAM and anti-TM delivered similar amounts of 125I-GOX to the lungs and caused a dose-dependent, tissue-selective lung injury manifested within 2 to 4 hours by high lethality, vascular congestion, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) sequestration in the pulmonary vasculature, severe pulmonary edema, and tissue oxidation, yet at an equal dose, anti-TM/GOX inflicted more severe lung injury than anti-PECAM/GOX. Moreover, anti-TM/GOX-induced injury was accompanied by PMN transmigration in the alveolar space, whereas anti-PECAM/GOX-induced injury was accompanied by PMN degranulation within vascular lumen without PMN transmigration, likely because of PECAM blockage. Anti-TM/GOX caused markedly more severe pulmonary thrombosis than anti-PECAM/GOX, likely because of TM inhibition. These results indicate that blocking of specific endothelial antigens by GOX immunotargeting modulates important pathological features of the lung injury initiated by local generation of H2O2 and that this approach provides specific and robust models of diverse variants of human ALI/ARDS in mice. In particular, anti-TM/GOX causes lung injury combining oxidative, prothrombotic, and inflammatory components characteristic of the complex pathological picture seen in human ALI/ARDS. PMID:11891211

  6. Loss of the intestinal mucus layer in the normal rat causes gut injury but not toxic mesenteric lymph nor lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Susan M; Qin, Xiaofa; Lu, Qi; Feketeova, Eleonora; Palange, David C; Dong, Wei; Sheth, Sharvil U; Lee, Marlon A; Reino, Diego; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2010-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that gut barrier failure is associated with distant organ injury and systemic inflammation. After major trauma or stress, the factors and mechanisms involved in gut injury are unknown. Our primary hypothesis is that loss of the intestinal mucus layer will result in injury of the normal gut that is exacerbated by the presence of luminal pancreatic proteases. Our secondary hypothesis is that the injury produced in the gut will result in the production of biologically active mesenteric lymph and consequently distant organ (i.e., lung) injury. To test this hypothesis, five groups of rats were studied: 1) uninstrumented naive rats; 2) control rats in which a ligated segment of distal ileum was filled with saline; 3) rats with pancreatic proteases placed in their distal ileal segments; 4) rats with the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) placed in their distal ileal segments; and 5) rats exposed to NAC and pancreatic proteases in their ileal segments. The potential systemic consequences of gut injury induced by NAC and proteases were assessed by measuring the biological activity of mesenteric lymph as well as gut-induced lung injury. Exposure of the normal intestine to NAC, but not saline or proteases, led to increased gut permeability, loss of mucus hydrophobicity, a decrease in the mucus layer, as well as morphological evidence of villous injury. Although proteases themselves did not cause gut injury, the combination of pancreatic proteases with NAC caused more severe injury than NAC alone, suggesting that once the mucus barrier is impaired, luminal proteases can injure the now vulnerable gut. Because comparable levels of gut injury caused by systemic insults are associated with gut-induced lung injury, which is mediated by biologically active factors in mesenteric lymph, we next tested whether this local model of gut injury would produce active mesenteric lymph or lead to lung injury. It did not, suggesting that gut injury by itself may not

  7. LOSS OF THE INTESTINAL MUCUS LAYER IN THE NORMAL RAT CAUSES GUT INJURY, BUT NOT TOXIC MESENTERIC LYMPH NOR LUNG INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Susan M.; Qin, Xiaofa; Lu, Qi; Feketeova, Eleonora; Palange, David C.; Dong, Wei; Sheth, Sharvil U.; Lee, Marlon A.; Reino, Diego; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims There is substantial evidence that gut barrier failure is associated with distant organ injury and systemic inflammation. After major trauma or stress, the factors and mechanisms involved in gut injury are unknown. Our primary hypothesis is that loss of the intestinal mucus layer will result in injury of the normal gut that is exacerbated by the presence of luminal pancreatic proteases. Our secondary hypothesis is that the injury produced in the gut will result in the production of biologically active mesenteric lymph and consequently distant organ (i.e., lung) injury. Methods To test this hypothesis, five groups of rats were studied: 1) un-instrumented naïve rats; 2) control rats, in which a ligated segment of distal ileum was filled with saline; 3) rats with pancreatic proteases placed in their distal ileal segments; 4) rats with the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) placed in their distal ileal segments and 5) rats exposed to NAC and pancreatic proteases in their ileal segments. The potential systemic consequences of gut injury induced by NAC and proteases were assessed by measuring the biologic activity of mesenteric lymph as well as gut-induced lung injury. Results Exposure of the normal intestine to NAC, but not saline or proteases, led to increased gut permeability, loss of mucus hydrophobicity, a decrease in the mucus layer as well as morphologic evidence of villous injury. Although proteases themselves did not cause gut injury, the combination of pancreatic proteases with NAC caused more severe injury than NAC alone, suggesting that once the mucus barrier is impaired, luminal proteases can injure the now vulnerable gut. Since comparable levels of gut injury caused by systemic insults are associated with gut-induced lung injury which is mediated by biologically active factors in mesenteric lymph, we next tested whether this local model of gut injury would produce active mesenteric lymph or lead to lung injury. It did not, suggesting that

  8. Loss of the intestinal mucus layer in the normal rat causes gut injury but not toxic mesenteric lymph nor lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Susan M; Qin, Xiaofa; Lu, Qi; Feketeova, Eleonora; Palange, David C; Dong, Wei; Sheth, Sharvil U; Lee, Marlon A; Reino, Diego; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2010-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that gut barrier failure is associated with distant organ injury and systemic inflammation. After major trauma or stress, the factors and mechanisms involved in gut injury are unknown. Our primary hypothesis is that loss of the intestinal mucus layer will result in injury of the normal gut that is exacerbated by the presence of luminal pancreatic proteases. Our secondary hypothesis is that the injury produced in the gut will result in the production of biologically active mesenteric lymph and consequently distant organ (i.e., lung) injury. To test this hypothesis, five groups of rats were studied: 1) uninstrumented naive rats; 2) control rats in which a ligated segment of distal ileum was filled with saline; 3) rats with pancreatic proteases placed in their distal ileal segments; 4) rats with the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) placed in their distal ileal segments; and 5) rats exposed to NAC and pancreatic proteases in their ileal segments. The potential systemic consequences of gut injury induced by NAC and proteases were assessed by measuring the biological activity of mesenteric lymph as well as gut-induced lung injury. Exposure of the normal intestine to NAC, but not saline or proteases, led to increased gut permeability, loss of mucus hydrophobicity, a decrease in the mucus layer, as well as morphological evidence of villous injury. Although proteases themselves did not cause gut injury, the combination of pancreatic proteases with NAC caused more severe injury than NAC alone, suggesting that once the mucus barrier is impaired, luminal proteases can injure the now vulnerable gut. Because comparable levels of gut injury caused by systemic insults are associated with gut-induced lung injury, which is mediated by biologically active factors in mesenteric lymph, we next tested whether this local model of gut injury would produce active mesenteric lymph or lead to lung injury. It did not, suggesting that gut injury by itself may not

  9. Humidifier disinfectant lung injury, how do we approach the issues?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang-Bum; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Seockhoon; Lee, Eun; Choi, Jihyun

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the Korean population has been exposed to toxic humidifier disinfectants (HDs), and considering that the majority of the victims are infants, the magnitude of the damage is expected to be considerably larger than what has currently been revealed. The current victims are voicing problems caused by various diseases, including but not limited to lung, upper respiratory tract, cardiovascular, kidney, musculoskeletal, eye, and skin diseases, etc. However, there has been difficulty in gaining validation for these health problems and identifying causal relationships due to lack of evidence proving that toxic HD is the specific causes of extrapulmonary diseases such as allergic rhinitis. Furthermore, the victims and bereaved families of the HD case have not received any support for psychological distress such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, feelings of injustice, and anger caused by the trauma. In addition, because the underlying mechanisms of the toxic materials within the HDs such as polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate, poly(oxyalkylene guanidine) hydrochloride, chloromethylisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone have yet to be determined, the demand for information regarding the HD issue is growing. The victims of the HD cases require support that goes beyond financial aid for medical costs and living expenses. There is a desperate need for government-led integrated support centers that provide individualized support through health screenings; in other words, we need an integrated facility that provides the appropriate social support to allow the victims to recover their physical and mental health, so as to well prepare them to return to a normal life. The implementation of such a plan requires not only the close cooperation between those departments already directly involved such as the Ministry of Environment and the Ministry of Health and Welfare, but also active support on a national scale from pan-governmental consultative bodies

  10. Plasma membrane stress failure in ventilator-injured lungs. A hypothesis about osmoregulation and the pharmacologic protection of the lungs against deformation injury.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Jose L; Rickman, Otis B; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2004-01-01

    Cell injury and repair are invariable consequences of mechanical ventilation with large tidal volumes. Rate and amplitude of deforming stress affect numerous cell metabolic functions including host defense and wound repair. Recently, we have focused on the role of plasma membrane stress failure as a trigger for a pro-inflammatory response in mechanically ventilated lungs. We have developed both cell- and organ-based models to study this problem. Alveolar epithelial cells that are exposed to deforming stresses seek to maintain sublytic plasma membrane tension and may activate mechanisms of cell surface area regulation to control membrane tension. Interventions which either increase the amount of excess plasma membrane or enhance lipid trafficking should be cytoprotective against deformation induced injury. Osmotic manipulation may be one such intervention. Preconditioning the lungs with anisosmotic solutions may allow the cells to recruit excess plasma membrane and thus be more resistant to ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:15218285

  11. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on acoustic wave propagation in experimental porcine lung injury.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on sound propagation through injured lungs, we injected a multifrequency broad-band sound signal into the airway of eight anesthetized, intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs, while recording transmitted sound at three locations bilaterally on the chest wall. Oleic acid injections effected a severe pulmonary oedema predominately in the dependent lung regions, with an average increase in venous admixture from 19 ± 15 to 59 ± 14% (P < 0.001), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 34 ± 7 to 14 ± 4 ml cmH2 O(-1) (P < 0.001). A concomitant decrease in sound transit time was seen in the dependent lung regions (P < 0.05); no statistically significant change occurred in the lateral or non-dependent areas. The application of PEEP resulted in a decrease in venous admixture, increase in respiratory system compliance and return of the sound transit time to pre-injury levels in the dependent lung regions. Our results indicate that sound transmission velocity increases in lung tissue affected by permeability-type pulmonary oedema in a manner reversible during alveolar recruitment with PEEP.

  12. Activation of Akt protects alveoli from neonatal oxygen-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Coltan, Lavinia; Eaton, Farah; Barr, Amy J; Dyck, Jason R B; Thébaud, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the main complication of extreme prematurity, resulting in part from mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy. Currently, no specific treatment exists for BPD. BPD is characterized by an arrest in alveolar development and increased apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Type 2 AECs are putative distal lung progenitor cells, capable of regenerating alveolar homeostasis after injury. We hypothesized that the protection of AEC2 death via the activation of the prosurvival Akt pathway prevents arrested alveolar development in experimental BPD. We show that the pharmacologic inhibition of the prosurvival factor Akt pathway with wortmannin during the critical period of alveolar development impairs alveolar development in newborn rats, resulting in larger and fewer alveoli, reminiscent of BPD. Conversely, in an experimental model of BPD induced by oxygen exposure of newborn rats, alveolar simplification is associated with a decreased activation of lung Akt. In vitro studies with rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells cultured in hyperoxia (95% O(2)) showed decreased apoptosis and improved cell survival after the forced expression of active Akt by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. In vivo, adenovirus-mediated Akt gene transfer preserves alveolar architecture in the newborn rat model of hyperoxia-induced BPD. We conclude that inhibition of the prosurvival factor Akt disrupts normal lung development, whereas the expression of active Akt in experimental BPD preserves alveolar development. We speculate that the modulation of apoptosis may have therapeutic potential in lung diseases characterized by alveolar damage. PMID:20348209

  13. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase(+) (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), YM-1(+), and arginase-II(+)antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1-3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b(-), CD43(-), and CD68(+) resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b(+)) macrophage subsets: immature CD43(+) M1 macrophages and mature CD43(-) M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM.

  14. Human Mesenchymal Stem (Stromal) Cells Promote the Resolution of Acute Lung Injury in Part through Lipoxin A4.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaohui; Abbott, Jason; Cheng, Linda; Colby, Jennifer K; Lee, Jae Woo; Levy, Bruce D; Matthay, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) reduce the severity of acute lung injury in animal models and in an ex vivo perfused human lung model. However, the mechanisms by which MSCs reduce lung injury are not well understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that human MSCs promote the resolution of acute lung injury in part through the effects of a specialized proresolving mediator lipoxin A4 (LXA4). Human alveolar epithelial type II cells and MSCs expressed biosynthetic enzymes and receptors for LXA4. Coculture of human MSCs with alveolar epithelial type II cells in the presence of cytomix significantly increased the production of LXA4 by 117%. The adoptive transfer of MSCs after the onset of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice led to improved survival (48 h), and blocking the LXA4 receptor with WRW4, a LXA4 receptor antagonist, significantly reversed the protective effect of MSCs on both survival and the accumulation of pulmonary edema. LXA4 alone improved survival in mice, and it also significantly decreased the production of TNF-α and MIP-2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In summary, these experiments demonstrated two novel findings: human MSCs promote the resolution of lung injury in mice in part through the proresolving lipid mediator LXA4, and LXA4 itself should be considered as a therapeutic for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak.

  16. Lineage-negative Progenitors Mobilize to Regenerate Lung Epithelium after Major Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Andrew E.; Brumwell, Alexis N.; Xi, Ying; Gotts, Jeffrey; Brownfield, Doug G.; Treutlein, Barbara; Tan, Kevin; Tan, Victor; Liu, Fengchun; Looney, Mark R.; Matthay, Michael; Rock, Jason R.; Chapman, Harold A.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly, tissue regeneration is achieved in two ways: by proliferation of common differentiated cells and/or by deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells. Which of these pathways applies is both organ and injury-specific1–4. Current paradigms in the lung posit that epithelial repair can be attributed to cells expressing mature lineage markers5–8. In contrast we here define the regenerative role of previously uncharacterized, rare lineage-negative epithelial stem/progenitor (LNEPs) cells present within normal distal lung. Quiescent LNEPs activate a ΔNp63/cytokeratin 5 (Krt5+) remodeling program after influenza or bleomycin injury. Activated cells proliferate and migrate widely to occupy heavily injured areas depleted of mature lineages, whereupon they differentiate toward mature epithelium. Lineage tracing revealed scant contribution of pre-existing mature epithelial cells in such repair, whereas orthotopic transplantation of LNEPs, isolated by a definitive surface profile identified through single cell sequencing, directly demonstrated the proliferative capacity and multipotency of this population. LNEPs require Notch signaling to activate the ΔNp63/Krt5+ program whereas subsequent Notch blockade promotes an alveolar cell fate. Persistent Notch signaling post-injury led to parenchymal micro-honeycombing, indicative of failed regeneration. Lungs from fibrosis patients show analogous honeycomb cysts with evidence of hyperactive Notch signaling. Our findings indicate distinct stem/progenitor cell pools repopulate injured tissue depending on the extent of injury, and the outcomes of regeneration or fibrosis may ride in part on the dynamics of LNEP Notch signaling. PMID:25533958

  17. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  18. Acute ozone-induced lung injury in rats: Structural-functional relationships of developing alveolar edema

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.F.; Hammond, M.D.; Montgomery, M.R.; Sharp, J.T.; Farrier, S.E.; Balis, J.U. )

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study on the effects of acute ozone stress on the lung surfactant system, we correlated morphometric, biochemical, and functional indices of lung injury using male rats exposed to 3 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr. Evaluation of lung mechanics, using the Pulmonary Evaluation and Diagnostic Laboratory System, revealed a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance (ml/cmH[sub 2]O/kg) from a control value of 0.84 [plus minus] 0.02 (SEM) to 0.72 [plus minus] 0.04 and 0.57 [plus minus] 0.06 at 4 and 8 hr, respectively. At 2 hr there was a transient increase in PaO[sub 2] to 116 torr (control = 92 torr) followed by a decrease at 4 hr (65 torr) and 8 hr (55 torr). Morphometry of lung tissue, fixed by perfusion of fixative via the pulmonary artery at 12 cm H[sub 2]O airway distending pressure, demonstrated an increase in the area of the intravascular compartment at 8 hr, in association with a 65 and 39% replacement of the alveolar area by fluid in ventral and dorsal lung regions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.966) between alveolar edema and transudated proteins in lavage fluid. A stepwise multiple regression model, with edema as the dependent variable, suggested that pulmonary vasodilatation, hypoxemia, and depletion of surfactant tubular myelin in lavage fluid were indices for predicting alveolar edema. In a second model, with lavage protein concentration as the dependent variable, decreasing dynamic compliance and hypoxemia were predictors of progressive, intraalveolar transudation of plasma proteins. The above structural-functional relationships support the concept that ozone-induced high-protein alveolar edema is pathogenetically linked to pulmonary hyperemia, deficiency of surfactant tubular myelin, and associated lung dysfunctions.

  19. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI.

  20. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI. PMID:26222277

  1. 17β-Estradiol administration attenuates seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qixin; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Jiahuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Xu, Min; Zhang, Yong; Mu, Deguang; Li, Wangping; Sun, Ruilin; Liu, Wei; Nan, Yandong; Zhang, Bo; Jin, Faguang; Li, Zhichao

    2011-12-01

    There is very little evidence on the value of administering estrogen in cases of seawater drowning which can induce acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment can attenuate seawater aspiration-induced ALI in rats. In the experiment, ALI was induced by endotracheal instillation of seawater (4mL/kg) and the rats were then given intraperitoneal injection of E2 (5mg/kg) 20min after seawater instillation. Finally, the changes of arterial blood gases which contained hydrogen ion concentration (pH), arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)) were measured and the measurement of extravascular lung water (EVLW) was observed. The pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin stain. The expression of aquaporins (AQPs) 1, AQP5, and estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) was measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that compared with normal saline water, seawater aspiration induced more serious ALI in rats which was markedly alleviated by E2 treatment. Meanwhile, the ERβ in lung tissues was activated after E2 administration. The seawater aspiration group also presented with severe pulmonary edema which was paralleled with over expressed AQP1 and AQP5. However, the up-regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 was suppressed by the administration of E2, resulting in an attenuation of lung edema. In conclusion, E2 treatment could effectively attenuate seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury in rats by the down-regulation of AQP1 and AQP5.

  2. Carvacrol and Pomegranate Extract in Treating Methotrexate-Induced Lung Oxidative Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Şen, Hadice Selimoğlu; Şen, Velat; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Türkçü, Gül; Güzel, Abdulmenap; Sezgi, Cengizhan; Abakay, Özlem; Kaplan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the effects of carvacrol (CRV) and pomegranate extract (PE) on methotrexate (MTX)-induced lung injury in rats. Material/Methods A total of 32 male rats were subdivided into 4 groups: control (group I), MTX treated (group II), MTX+CRV treated (group III), and MTX+PE treated (group IV). A single dose of 73 mg/kg CRV was administered intraperitoneally to rats in group III on Day 1 of the investigation. To group IV, a dose of 225 mg/kg of PE was administered via orogastric gavage once daily over 7 days. A single dose of 20 mg/kg of MTX was given intraperitoneally to groups II, III, and IV on Day 2. The total duration of experiment was 8 days. Malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were measured from rat lung tissues and cardiac blood samples. Results Serum and lung specimen analyses demonstrated that MDA, TOS, and OSI levels were significantly greater in group II relative to controls. Conversely, the TAC level was significantly reduced in group II when compared to the control group. Pre-administering either CRV or PE was associated with decreased MDA, TOS, and OSI levels and increased TAC levels compared to rats treated with MTX alone. Histopathological examination revealed that lung injury was less severe in group III and IV relative to group II. Conclusions MTX treatment results in rat lung oxidative damage that is partially counteracted by pretreatment with either CRV or PE. PMID:25326861

  3. A randomized trial of inhaled nitric oxide to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Meade, Maureen O; Granton, John T; Matte-Martyn, Andrea; McRae, Karen; Weaver, Bruce; Cripps, Paula; Keshavjee, Shaf H

    2003-06-01

    Inhalation of nitric oxide (NO) has been advocated as a method to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. We enrolled 84 patients into a concealed, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of inhaled NO (20 ppm NO or nitrogen) initiated 10 minutes after reperfusion on outcomes after lung transplantation. The groups (n = 42) were balanced with respect to age, sex, lung disease, procedure, and total ischemic times. PaO2/FIO2 ratios were similar on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) (NO 361 +/- 134; control patients 357 +/- 132), and over the duration of the study. There were no differences in hemodynamics between the two groups. Severe reperfusion injury (PaO2/FIO2 < 150) was present at the time of admission to the ICU in 14.6% NO patients versus 9.5% of control patients (p = 0.48). The groups had similar median times to first successful trial of unassisted breathing (25 vs. 27 hours; p = 0.76), successful extubation (32 vs. 34 hours; p = 0.65), ICU discharge (3.0 days for both groups), and hospital discharge (27 vs. 29 days; p = 0.563). Five NO versus six control patients died during their hospital stay. Adjusting for age, sex, lung disease etiology, presence of pulmonary hypertension, and total ischemic time did not alter these results. In conclusion, we did not detect a significant effect of inhaled NO administered 10 minutes after reperfusion on physiologic variables or outcomes in lung transplant patients.

  4. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  5. Choriodecidual Group B Streptococcal Inoculation Induces Fetal Lung Injury without Intra-Amniotic Infection and Preterm Labor in Macaca nemestrina

    PubMed Central

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Gravett, Michael G.; McAdams, Ryan M.; Paolella, Louis J.; Gough, G. Michael; Carl, David J.; Bansal, Aasthaa; Liggitt, H. Denny; Kapur, Raj P.; Reitz, Frederick B.; Rubens, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Early events leading to intrauterine infection and fetal lung injury remain poorly defined, but may hold the key to preventing neonatal and adult chronic lung disease. Our objective was to establish a nonhuman primate model of an early stage of chorioamnionitis in order to determine the time course and mechanisms of fetal lung injury in utero. Methodology/Principal Findings Ten chronically catheterized pregnant monkeys (Macaca nemestrina) at 118–125 days gestation (term = 172 days) received one of two treatments: 1) choriodecidual and intra-amniotic saline (n = 5), or 2) choriodecidual inoculation of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) 1×106 colony forming units (n = 5). Cesarean section was performed regardless of labor 4 days after GBS or 7 days after saline infusion to collect fetal and placental tissues. Only two GBS animals developed early labor with no cervical change in the remaining animals. Despite uterine quiescence in most cases, blinded review found histopathological evidence of fetal lung injury in four GBS animals characterized by intra-alveolar neutrophils and interstitial thickening, which was absent in controls. Significant elevations of cytokines in amniotic fluid (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6) and fetal plasma (IL-8) were detected in GBS animals and correlated with lung injury (p<0.05). Lung injury was not directly caused by GBS, because GBS was undetectable in amniotic fluid (∼10 samples tested/animal), maternal and fetal blood by culture and polymerase chain reaction. In only two cases was GBS cultured from the inoculation site in low numbers. Chorioamnionitis occurred in two GBS animals with lung injury, but two others with lung injury had normal placental histology. Conclusions/Significance A transient choriodecidual infection can induce cytokine production, which is associated with fetal lung injury without overt infection of amniotic fluid, chorioamnionitis or preterm labor. Fetal lung injury may, thus, occur silently

  6. Atorvastatin along with imipenem attenuates acute lung injury in sepsis through decrease in inflammatory mediators and bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Soumen; Kandasamy, Kannan; Maruti, Bhojane Somnath; Addison, M Pule; Kasa, Jaya Kiran; Darzi, Sazad A; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Parida, Subhashree; Dash, Jeevan Ranjan; Singh, Vishakha; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2015-10-15

    Lung is one of the vital organs which is affected during the sequential development of multi-organ dysfunction in sepsis. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem could attenuate sepsis-induced lung injury in mice. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture. Lung injury was assessed by the presence of lung edema, increased vascular permeability, increased inflammatory cell infiltration and cytokine levels in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Treatment with atorvastatin along with imipenem reduced the lung bacterial load and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) level in BALF. The markers of pulmonary edema such as microvascular leakage and wet-dry weight ratio were also attenuated. This was further confirmed by the reduced activity of MPO and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, indicating the lesser infiltration and adhesion of inflammatory cells to the lungs. Again, expression of mRNA and protein level of iNOS in lungs was also reduced in the combined treatment group. Based on the above findings it can be concluded that, combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem dampened the inflammatory response and reduced the bacterial load, thus seems to have promising therapeutic potential in sepsis-induced lung injury in mice. PMID:26375251

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Adrenomedullin on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Carrageenan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Talero; Rosanna, Di Paola; Emanuela, Mazzon; Esposito, Emanuela; Virginia, Motilva; Salvatore, Cuzzocrea

    2012-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52 amino acid peptide that has shown predominant anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of this peptide in an experimental model of acute inflammation, the carrageenan- (CAR-) induced pleurisy. Pleurisy was induced by injection of CAR into the pleural cavity of mice. AM (200 ng/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal route 1 h after CAR, and the animals were sacrificed 4 h after that. AM treatment attenuated the recruitment of leucocytes in the lung tissue and the generation and/or the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines as well as the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, AM inhibited the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby abating the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and prevented the oxidative and nitroxidative lung tissue injury, as shown by the reduction of nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Finally, we demonstrated that these anti-inflammatory effects of AM were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. All these parameters were markedly increased by intrapleural CAR in the absence of any treatment. We report that treatment with AM significantly reduces the development of acute lung injury by downregulating a broad spectrum of inflammatory factors. PMID:22685374

  8. Effect of tramadol on lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion: an experimental study*

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Jahanshahi, Amirali; Sotoudeh, Amir; Jahanshahi, Gholamreza; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Aslani, Kimia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tramadol has a protective effect against lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. METHODS: Twenty Wistar male rats were allocated to one of two groups: ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and ischemia-reperfusion + tramadol (IR+T). The animals were anesthetized with intramuscular injections of ketamine and xylazine (50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively). All of the animals underwent 2-h ischemia by occlusion of the femoral artery and 24-h reperfusion. Prior to the occlusion of the femoral artery, 250 IU heparin were administered via the jugular vein in order to prevent clotting. The rats in the IR+T group were treated with tramadol (20 mg/kg i.v.) immediately before reperfusion. After the reperfusion period, the animals were euthanized with pentobarbital (300 mg/kg i.p.), the lungs were carefully removed, and specimens were properly prepared for histopathological and biochemical studies. RESULTS: Myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the IR group than in the IR+T group (p = 0.001 for both). Histological abnormalities, such as intra-alveolar edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, were significantly more common in the IR group than in the IR+T group. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our histological and biochemical findings, we conclude that tramadol prevents lung tissue injury after skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24068264

  9. Leukotriene B4 receptor type 2 protects against pneumolysin-dependent acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, Misako; Koga, Tomoaki; Ishimori, Ayako; Saeki, Kazuko; Ishii, Yumiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Ohba, Mai; Jo-Watanabe, Airi; Okuno, Toshiaki; Harada, Norihiro; Harayama, Takeshi; Shindou, Hideo; Li, Jian-Dong; Murakami, Makoto; Hoka, Sumio; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Although pneumococcal infection is a serious problem worldwide and has a high mortality rate, the molecular mechanisms underlying the lethality caused by pneumococcus remain elusive. Here, we show that BLT2, a G protein-coupled receptor for leukotriene B4 and 12(S)-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT), protects mice from lung injury caused by a pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (PLY). Intratracheal injection of PLY caused lethal acute lung injury (ALI) in BLT2-deficient mice, with evident vascular leakage and bronchoconstriction. Large amounts of cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), classically known as a slow reactive substance of anaphylaxis, were detected in PLY-treated lungs. PLY-dependent vascular leakage, bronchoconstriction, and death were markedly ameliorated by treatment with a CysLT1 receptor antagonist. Upon stimulation by PLY, mast cells produced cysLTs that activated CysLT1 expressed in vascular endothelial cells and bronchial smooth muscle cells, leading to lethal vascular leakage and bronchoconstriction. Treatment of mice with aspirin or loxoprofen inhibited the production of 12-HHT and increased the sensitivity toward PLY, which was also ameliorated by the CysLT1 antagonist. Thus, the present study identifies the molecular mechanism underlying PLY-dependent ALI and suggests the possible use of CysLT1 antagonists as a therapeutic tool to protect against ALI caused by pneumococcal infection. PMID:27703200

  10. Withaferin A attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Li, H; Zhou, X-Q; You, J-B; Tu, D-N; Xia, G; Jiang, J-X; Xin, C

    2015-07-31

    Withaferin A (WFA) is an active compound from Withania somnifera and has been reported to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti—inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti—tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated the potential protective role of WFA on acute lung injury in neonatal rats induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that WFA significantly attenuated the pathological changes of lungs induced by LPS injection. Administration with WFA obviously decreased pulmonary neutrophil infiltration accompanied with decreased MPO concentrations. WFA also reduced the expression of pro—inflammatory cytokines including MIP—2, TNF—α, IL—1β and IL—6. Meanwhile, the expression levels of anti—inflammatory mediators such as TGF—β1 and IL—10 were significantly increased following WFA administration. Moreover, WFA protected LPS—treated rats from oxidative damage via up—regulation of TBARS and H2O2 concentrations and down—regulation of ROS contents. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that WFA administration attenuated LPS—induced lung injury through inhibition of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

  11. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  12. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-02-17

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  13. Pulmonary clearance of radiotracers after positive end-expiratory pressure or acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Barrowcliffe, M.P.; Zanelli, G.D.; Jones, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    In anesthetized rabbits we measured clearance from lung to blood of eight aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled compounds: diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA); cytochrome c; myoglobin; a myoglobin polymer; albumin; and anionic, cationic, and neutral dextrans of equivalent molecular size. We investigated the effect of applying positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and, on a subsequent occasion, of injecting oleic acid intravenously to produce acute lung injury on the pulmonary clearance rate. Base-line clearance rates were monoexponential and varied with the molecular weights of the radiotracers. For each tracer the rate of clearance was increased a similar degree by either PEEP or oleic acid. However, with PEEP, clearance remained monoexponential, whereas after oleic acid, smaller molecular-weight radiotracers had multiexponential clearance curves. This suggests that after oleic acid the alveolar epithelium breaks down in a nonuniform fashion. We conclude that differentiation of the effect of PEEP from that of severe lung injury caused by oleic acid is not readily accomplished by either increasing the size of the tracer molecule or by varying the molecular charge.

  14. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4 during Pneumococcal Pneumonia Reduces Inflammation and Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Luciana P; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vago, Juliana P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Galvão, Izabela; David, Bruna A; Rachid, Milene A; Silva, Patrícia M R; Russo, Remo C; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-07-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The inflammatory response to bacteria is necessary to control infection, but it may also contribute to tissue damage. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, such as rolipram (ROL), effectively reduce inflammation. Here, we examined the impact of ROL in a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model. Mice were infected intranasally with 10(5)-10(6) CFU of Streptococcus pneumoniae, treated with ROL in a prophylactic or therapeutic schedule in combination, or not, with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Inflammation and bacteria counts were assessed, and ex vivo phagocytosis assays were performed. ROL treatment during S. pneumoniae infection decreased neutrophil recruitment into lungs and airways and reduced lung injury. Prophylactic ROL treatment also decreased cytokine levels in the airways. Although modulation of inflammation by ROL ameliorated pneumonia, bacteria burden was not reduced. On the other hand, antibiotic therapy reduced bacteria without reducing neutrophil infiltration, cytokine level, or lung injury. Combined ROL and ceftriaxone treatment decreased lethality rates and was more efficient in reducing inflammation, by increasing proresolving protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) expression, and bacterial burden by enhancing phagocytosis. Lack of AnxA1 increased inflammation and lethality induced by pneumococcal infection. These data show that immunomodulatory effects of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors are useful during severe pneumococcal pneumonia and suggest their potential benefit as adjunctive therapy during infectious diseases. PMID:26677751

  15. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  16. Protective effect of Shenfu injection preconditioning on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Wan, Zhanhai; Yan, Xiang; Wang, De-Gui; Leng, Yufang; Liu, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Haijun; Han, Xuena

    2016-01-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury remains a problem in thoracic surgery, as minimal progress has been made concerning its prevention and control. In the present study, the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of Shenfu injection preconditioning on a rat lung ischemia-reperfusion model was investigated. Shenfu injection is a well-known Chinese traditional medicine, which is composed of Red Radix Ginseng and Radix Aconitum carmichaelii, with ginseng saponin and aconitum alkaloids as the active ingredients. A total of 72 specific pathogen-free, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, model and Shenfu injection (10 ml/kg injection prior to injury) groups and were assessed at the following points: Ischemia 45 min; reperfusion 60 min; and reperfusion 120 min. Blood collected from the aorta abdominalis was cryopreserved at −70°C for the analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Lung tissues were divided into three equal sections in order to assess the wet-to-dry (W/D) lung ratio, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, alveolar damage, total protein and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The results demonstrated that the lung W/D weight ratio, TNF-α expression levels and SOD activity in the Shenfu group were significantly lower at 120 min reperfusion (P<0.05), as compared with the model group. MPO and MDA activity significantly decreased following reperfusion at 60 and 120 min (P<0.05), as compared with the model group. In addition, the degree of alveolar damage in the Shenfu group was significantly decreased (P<0.05), as compared with the model group. In addition, compared with the model group, the degree of alveolar damage in the Shenfu group was significantly lower (P<0.05); however, no significant changes in total protein were observed. The extent of alveolar structural damage and the proportion of interstitial neutrophils and alveolar and interstitial red blood

  17. Protective effect of Shenfu injection preconditioning on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Wan, Zhanhai; Yan, Xiang; Wang, De-Gui; Leng, Yufang; Liu, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Haijun; Han, Xuena

    2016-01-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury remains a problem in thoracic surgery, as minimal progress has been made concerning its prevention and control. In the present study, the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of Shenfu injection preconditioning on a rat lung ischemia-reperfusion model was investigated. Shenfu injection is a well-known Chinese traditional medicine, which is composed of Red Radix Ginseng and Radix Aconitum carmichaelii, with ginseng saponin and aconitum alkaloids as the active ingredients. A total of 72 specific pathogen-free, healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, model and Shenfu injection (10 ml/kg injection prior to injury) groups and were assessed at the following points: Ischemia 45 min; reperfusion 60 min; and reperfusion 120 min. Blood collected from the aorta abdominalis was cryopreserved at −70°C for the analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Lung tissues were divided into three equal sections in order to assess the wet-to-dry (W/D) lung ratio, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, alveolar damage, total protein and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The results demonstrated that the lung W/D weight ratio, TNF-α expression levels and SOD activity in the Shenfu group were significantly lower at 120 min reperfusion (P<0.05), as compared with the model group. MPO and MDA activity significantly decreased following reperfusion at 60 and 120 min (P<0.05), as compared with the model group. In addition, the degree of alveolar damage in the Shenfu group was significantly decreased (P<0.05), as compared with the model group. In addition, compared with the model group, the degree of alveolar damage in the Shenfu group was significantly lower (P<0.05); however, no significant changes in total protein were observed. The extent of alveolar structural damage and the proportion of interstitial neutrophils and alveolar and interstitial red blood

  18. Therapeutic Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Models of Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; He, Hongli; Liu, Airan; Xu, Jingyuan; Han, Jibin; Chen, Qihong; Hu, Shuling; Xu, Xiuping; Huang, Yingzi; Guo, Fengmei; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer a promising therapy for acute lung injury (ALI). However, whether the same MSC treatments possess similar potential for different ALI models is not fully clear. The present study evaluated the distribution and therapeutic effects of intravenous MSC administration for the treatment of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intrapulmonary ALI and intravenous LPS/zymosan-induced extrapulmonary ALI, matched with lung injury severity, at 30 min and 1, 3, and 7 days. We found that MSC transplantation attenuated lung injury and inhibited lung inflammation in both ALI models. The benefits of MSCs were more significant in the intrapulmonary ALI mice. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging showed that MSCs primarily homed into the lung. However, more MSCs were recruited into the lungs of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice over the time course. A few MSCs were also detected in the liver and spleen at days 3 and 7. In addition, the two ALI models showed different extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. A lower percentage of cell apoptosis and SDF-1α levels was found in the liver and spleen of the intrapulmonary ALI mice than in those of the extrapulmonary ALI mice. These results suggested that the two ALI models were accompanied with different degrees of extrapulmonary organ damage, which resulted in differences in the trafficking and accumulation of MSCs to the injured lung and consequently accounted for different therapeutic effects of MSCs for lung repair in the two ALI models. These data suggest that intravenous administration of MSCs has a greater potential for the treatment of intrapulmonary ALI than extrapulmonary ALI matched with lung injury severity; these differences were due to more recruitment of MSCs in the lungs of intrapulmonary ALI mice than those of extrapulmonary ALI mice. This finding may contribute to the clinical use of MSCs for the treatment of ALI. PMID

  19. Visualization of Fra-1/AP-1 activation during LPS-induced inflammatory lung injury using fluorescence optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Tamatam, Chandramohan R.; Potteti, Haranatha R.; Raman, Venu; Lee, Jae-Woo; Matthay, Michael A.; Mehta, Dolly; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate lung inflammatory response following oxidant and toxicant exposure can lead to abnormal repair and disease pathogenesis, including fibrosis. Thus early detection of molecular and cellular processes and mediators promoting lung inflammation is necessary to develop better strategies for therapeutic intervention and disease management. Previously, we have shown that transcription factor Fra-1/AP-1 plays key roles in lung inflammatory response, as Fra-1-null mice are less susceptible than wild-type mice to LPS-induced lung injury and mortality. Herein, we developed a transgenic reporter mouse model expressing tdTomato under the control of FRA-1 (human) promoter (referred to as FRA-1TdTg mice) to monitor its activation during inflammatory lung injury using fluorescence protein-based optical imaging and molecular analysis in vivo and ex vivo. A higher red fluorescent signal was observed in the lungs of LPS-treated FRA-1TdTg mice compared with vehicle controls, and Western blot and qRT-PCR analyses revealed a significant correlation with the FRA-1-tdTomato reporter expression. Immunocolocalization demonstrated expression of FRA-1-tdTomato largely in lung alveolar macrophages and to some extent in epithelial cells. Moreover, we validated these results with a second reporter mouse model that expressed green fluorescent protein upon activation of endogenous Fra-1 promoter. Additionally, we demonstrated increased expression of FRA-1 in alveolar macrophages in human lung instilled with Escherichia coli ex vivo. Collectively, our data obtained from two independent reporter mouse models and from human samples underscore the significance of Fra-1 activation in alveolar macrophages during inflammatory lung injury and may aid in developing strategies to target this transcription factor in lung injury and repair. PMID:26071555

  20. The protective effect of infliximab against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Aysel; Tumkaya, Levent; Yuce, Suleyman; Turut, Hasan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Kalkan, Yildiray; Pusuroglu, Gokhan; Cure, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) causes pulmonary toxicity. Infliximab (Ib) is a potent inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We aimed to investigate whether Ib has a protective effect on CCl4 induced lung injury. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into control, CCl4, and CCl4+Ib groups. A single dose of 2 ml/kg CCI4 was administered to CCI4 group and a single dose of 7 mg/kg Ib was given to CCl4+Ib group 24 hr before applying CCI4. Results: TNF-α, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and caspase-3 levels of the CCl4 group were markedly higher than both the control and CCl4+Ib groups. The CCI4+Ib group had lower histopathological injury than the CCl4 group. Conclusion: Ib as a strong TNF-α blocker decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, MDA, and oxidative stress leading to a protective effect against CCl4 induced lung tissue injury. PMID:27482351

  1. Time- and compartment-resolved proteome profiling of the extracellular niche in lung injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Herbert B; Fernandez, Isis E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Schaab, Christoph; Scheltema, Richard A; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis and repair. However, its composition and architecture are not well characterized. Here, we monitor remodeling of the extracellular niche in tissue repair in the bleomycin-induced lung injury mouse model. Mass spectrometry quantified 8,366 proteins from total tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) over the course of 8 weeks, surveying tissue composition from the onset of inflammation and fibrosis to its full recovery. Combined analysis of proteome, secretome, and transcriptome highlighted post-transcriptional events during tissue fibrogenesis and defined the composition of airway epithelial lining fluid. To comprehensively characterize the ECM, we developed a quantitative detergent solubility profiling (QDSP) method, which identified Emilin-2 and collagen-XXVIII as novel constituents of the provisional repair matrix. QDSP revealed which secreted proteins interact with the ECM, and showed drastically altered association of morphogens to the insoluble matrix upon injury. Thus, our proteomic systems biology study assigns proteins to tissue compartments and uncovers their dynamic regulation upon lung injury and repair, potentially contributing to the development of anti-fibrotic strategies. PMID:26174933

  2. MicroRNA-7 Deficiency Ameliorates the Pathologies of Acute Lung Injury through Elevating KLF4

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Chen, Chao; Guo, Mengmeng; Tao, Yijin; Cui, PanPan; Zhou, Ya; Qin, Nalin; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Jidong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that microRNA-7 (miR-7) played an important role in the pathologies of lung-related diseases. However, the potential role of miR-7 in acute lung injury (ALI) still remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed the effect of miR-7 deficiency on the pathology of ALI. We, first, found that the expression of miR-7 was upregulated in lung tissue in murine LPS-induced ALI model. Notably, we generated miR-7 knock down mice by using miRNA-Sponge technique and found that miR-7 deficiency could ameliorate the pathologies of lung as evidenced by accelerated body weight recovery, reduced level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proinflammatory cytokines and decreased number of BAL cells in ALI mice. Moreover, the proportion and number of various immune cells in BAL, including innate immune cell F4/80+ macrophages, γδT cells, NK1.1+ T cells, and CD11c+DCs, as well as adaptive immune cell CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, also significantly changed, respectively. Mechanistic evidence showed that KLF4, a target molecule of miR-7, was upregulated in lung tissues in ALI model, accompanied by altered transduction of NF-κB, AKT, and ERK pathway. These data provided a previously unknown role of miR-7 in pathology of ALI, which could ultimately aid the understanding of development of ALI and the development of new therapeutic strategies against clinical inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27774091

  3. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sauler, Maor; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    The lung endothelium is a major target for inflammatory and oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction is a crucial defense mechanism during oxidant challenges, such as hyperoxia. The role of lung endothelial HO-1during hyperoxia in vivo is not well defined. We engineered lentiviral vectors with microRNA (miRNA) sequences controlled by vascular endothelium cadherin (VE-cad) to study the specific role of lung endothelial HO-1. Wild-type (WT) murine lung endothelial cells (MLECs) or WT mice were treated with lentivirus and exposed to hyperoxia (95% oxygen). We detected HO-1 knockdown (∼55%) specifically in the lung endothelium. MLECs and lungs showed approximately a 2-fold increase in apoptosis and ROS generation after HO-1 silencing. We also demonstrate for the first time that silencing endothelial HO-1 has the same effect on lung injury and survival as silencing HO-1 in multiple lung cell types and that HO-1 regulates caspase 3 activation and autophagy in endothelium during hyperoxia. These studies demonstrate the utility of endothelial-targeted gene silencing in vivo using lentiviral miRNA constructs to assess gene function and that endothelial HO-1 is an important determinant of survival during hyperoxia.—Zhang, Y., Jiang, G., Sauler, M., Lee, P. J. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury. PMID:23771928

  4. The pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx regulates neutrophil adhesion and lung injury during experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric P; Yang, Yimu; Janssen, William J; Gandjeva, Aneta; Perez, Mario J; Barthel, Lea; Zemans, Rachel L; Bowman, Joel C; Koyanagi, Dan E; Yunt, Zulma X; Smith, Lynelle P; Cheng, Sara S; Overdier, Katherine H; Thompson, Kathy R; Geraci, Mark W; Douglas, Ivor S; Pearse, David B; Tuder, Rubin M

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, commonly progresses to acute lung injury (ALI), an inflammatory lung disease with high morbidity. We postulated that sepsis-associated ALI is initiated by degradation of the pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx, leading to neutrophil adherence and inflammation. Using intravital microscopy, we found that endotoxemia in mice rapidly induced pulmonary microvascular glycocalyx degradation via tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-dependent mechanisms. Glycocalyx degradation involved the specific loss of heparan sulfate and coincided with activation of endothelial heparanase, a TNF-α–responsive, heparan sulfate–specific glucuronidase. Glycocalyx degradation increased the availability of endothelial surface adhesion molecules to circulating microspheres and contributed to neutrophil adhesion. Heparanase inhibition prevented endotoxemia-associated glycocalyx loss and neutrophil adhesion and, accordingly, attenuated sepsis-induced ALI and mortality in mice. These findings are potentially relevant to human disease, as sepsis-associated respiratory failure in humans was associated with higher plasma heparan sulfate degradation activity; moreover, heparanase content was higher in human lung biopsies showing diffuse alveolar damage than in normal human lung tissue. PMID:22820644

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ellagic Acid on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Acid in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cornélio Favarin, Daniely; Martins Teixeira, Maxelle; Lemos de Andrade, Ednéia; de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Artério Sorgi, Carlos; Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by alveolar edema and uncontrolled neutrophil migration to the lung, and no specific therapy is still available. Ellagic acid, a compound present in several fruits and medicinal plants, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the nonlethal acid aspiration model of ALI in mice to determine whether preventive or therapeutic administration of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) could interfere with the development or establishment of ALI inflammation. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. In both preventive and therapeutic treatments, ellagic acid reduced the vascular permeability changes and neutrophil recruitment to the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and to lung compared to the vehicle. In addition, the ellagic acid accelerated the resolution for lung neutrophilia. Moreover, ellagic acid reduced the COX-2-induced exacerbation of inflammation. These results were similar to the dexamethasone. However, while the anti-inflammatory effects of dexamethasone treatment were due to the reduced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, the ellagic acid treatment led to reduced BALF levels of IL-6 and increased levels of IL-10. In addition, dexamethasone treatment reduced IL-1β. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for ALI-associated inflammation. PMID:23533300

  6. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca(2+)- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  7. Metformin attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung injury in neonatal rats by reducing the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyu; Walther, Frans J.; Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Laghmani, El Houari; Salam, Asma; Folkerts, Gert; Pera, Tonio

    2015-01-01

    Because therapeutic options are lacking for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), there is an urgent medical need to discover novel targets/drugs to treat this neonatal chronic lung disease. Metformin, a drug commonly used to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients, may be a novel therapeutic option for BPD by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and improving vascularization. We investigated the therapeutic potential of daily treatment with 25 and 100 mg/kg metformin, injected subcutaneously in neonatal Wistar rats with severe experimental BPD, induced by continuous exposure to 100% oxygen for 10 days. Parameters investigated included survival, lung and heart histopathology, pulmonary fibrin and collagen deposition, vascular leakage, right ventricular hypertrophy, and differential mRNA expression in the lungs of key genes involved in BPD pathogenesis, including inflammation, coagulation, and alveolar development. After daily metformin treatment rat pups with experimental BPD had reduced mortality, alveolar septum thickness, lung inflammation, and fibrosis, demonstrated by a reduced influx of macrophages and neutrophils and hyperoxia-induced collagen III and fibrin deposition (25 mg/kg), as well as improved vascularization (100 mg/kg) compared with control treatment. However, metformin did not ameliorate alveolar enlargement, small arteriole wall thickening, vascular alveolar leakage, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In conclusion metformin prolongs survival and attenuates pulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation, coagulation, and fibrosis but does not affect alveolar development or prevent pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in neonatal rats with severe hyperoxia-induced experimental BPD. PMID:26047641

  8. The pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx regulates neutrophil adhesion and lung injury during experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric P; Yang, Yimu; Janssen, William J; Gandjeva, Aneta; Perez, Mario J; Barthel, Lea; Zemans, Rachel L; Bowman, Joel C; Koyanagi, Dan E; Yunt, Zulma X; Smith, Lynelle P; Cheng, Sara S; Overdier, Katherine H; Thompson, Kathy R; Geraci, Mark W; Douglas, Ivor S; Pearse, David B; Tuder, Rubin M

    2012-08-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, commonly progresses to acute lung injury (ALI), an inflammatory lung disease with high morbidity. We postulated that sepsis-associated ALI is initiated by degradation of the pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx, leading to neutrophil adherence and inflammation. Using intravital microscopy, we found that endotoxemia in mice rapidly induced pulmonary microvascular glycocalyx degradation via tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-dependent mechanisms. Glycocalyx degradation involved the specific loss of heparan sulfate and coincided with activation of endothelial heparanase, a TNF-α-responsive, heparan sulfate-specific glucuronidase. Glycocalyx degradation increased the availability of endothelial surface adhesion molecules to circulating microspheres and contributed to neutrophil adhesion. Heparanase inhibition prevented endotoxemia-associated glycocalyx loss and neutrophil adhesion and, accordingly, attenuated sepsis-induced ALI and mortality in mice. These findings are potentially relevant to human disease, as sepsis-associated respiratory failure in humans was associated with higher plasma heparan sulfate degradation activity; moreover, heparanase content was higher in human lung biopsies showing diffuse alveolar damage than in normal human lung tissue.

  9. Protective Effect of Isorhamnetin on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Li, Xiao-Ping; Ni, Yun-Feng; Du, Hong-Yin; Wang, Rong; Li, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Wen-Chen; Li, Ming-Ming; Wang, Xu-Hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Isorhamnetin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-proliferative effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of isorhamnetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The effects of isorhamnetin on LPS-induced lung pathological damage, wet/dry ratios and the total protein level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokine release, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were examined. In addition, the COX-2 activation in lung tissues was detected by Western blot. Isorhamnetin pretreatment improved the mice survival rates. Moreover, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly attenuated edema and the pathological changes in the lung and inhibited protein extravasation in BALF. Isorhamnetin also significantly decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in BALF. In addition, isorhamnetin markedly prevented LPS-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment significantly suppressed LPS-induced activation of COX-2. Isorhamnetin has been demonstrated to protect mice from LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting the expression of COX-2. PMID:26276127

  10. Thromboxane A2 exacerbates acute lung injury via promoting edema formation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koji; Horikami, Daiki; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Arisa; Maeda, Shingo; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is produced in the lungs of patients suffering from acute lung injury (ALI). We assessed its contribution in disease progression using three different ALI mouse models. The administration of hydrochloric acid (HCl) or oleic acid (OA)+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused tissue edema and neutrophil infiltration with TXA2 production in the lungs of the experimental mice. The administration of LPS induced only neutrophil accumulation without TXA2 production. Pretreatment with T prostanoid receptor (TP) antagonist attenuated the tissue edema but not neutrophil infiltration in these models. Intravital imaging and immunostaining demonstrated that administration of TP agonist caused vascular hyper-permeability by disrupting the endothelial barrier formation in the mouse ear. In vitro experiments showed that TP-stimulation disrupted the endothelial adherens junction, and it was inhibited by Ca2+ channel blockade or Rho kinase inhibition. Thus endogenous TXA2 exacerbates ALI, and its blockade attenuates it by modulating the extent of lung edema. This can be explained by the endothelial hyper-permeability caused by the activation of TXA2-TP axis, via Ca2+- and Rho kinase-dependent signaling. PMID:27562142

  11. Systematic review and meta-analysis of nasal potential difference in hypoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenlei; Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-08-04

    Nasal potential difference (NPD), a well-established in vivo clinical test for cystic fibrosis, reflects transepithelial cation and anion transport in the respiratory epithelium. To analyze whether NPD can be applied to diagnose hypoxic lung injury, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and analyzed data retrieved from eleven unbiased studies for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) using the software RevMan and R. There was a significant reduction in overall basal (WMD -5.27 mV, 95% CI: -6.03 to -4.52, P < 0.00001, I(2) = 42%), amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) (-2.87 mV, 95% CI: -4.02 to -1.72, P < 0.00001, I(2) = 51%), and -resistant fractions (-3.91 mV, 95% CI: -7.64 to -0.18, P = 0.04, I(2) = 95%) in lung injury patients. Further analysis of HAPE and RDS separately corroborated these observations. Moreover, SpO2 correlated with ENaC-associated NPD positively in patients only, but apparently related to CFTR-contributed NPD level inversely. These correlations were confirmed by the opposite associations between NPD values and altitude, which had a negative regression with SpO2 level. Basal NPD was significantly associated with amiloride-resistant but not ENaC fraction. Our analyses demonstrate that acute lung injury associated with systemic hypoxia is characterized by dysfunctional NPD.

  12. Ginkgolide B functions as a determinant constituent of Ginkgolides in alleviating lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fugen; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Guojun; Yao, Hongyi; Xu, Chengyun; Xiao, Weiqiang; Wu, Junsong; Wu, Ximei

    2016-07-01

    Ginkgolides are the major bioactive components of Ginkgo biloba extracts, however, the exact constituents of Ginkgolides contributing to their pharmacological effects remain unknown. Herein, we have determined the anti-inflammatory effects of Ginkgolide B (GB) and Ginkgolides mixture (GM) at equivalent dosages against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. RAW 264.7 cell culture model and mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury were used to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of GB and GM, respectively. In RAW 264.7 cells, GB and GM at equivalent dosages exhibit an identical capacity to attenuate LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein expression and subsequent NO production. Likewise, GB and GM possess almost the same potency in attenuating LPS-induced expression and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) and subsequent increases in tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA levels. In LPS-induced pulmonary injury, GB and GM at the equivalent dosages have equal efficiency in attenuating the accumulation of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages, and in improving the histological damage of lungs. Moreover, GB and GM at equivalent dosages decrease the exudation of plasma protein to the same degree, whereas GM is superior to GB in alleviating myeloperoxidase activities. Finally, though GB and GM at equivalent dosages appear to reduce LPS-induced IL-1β mRNA and protein levels and IL-10 protein levels to the same degree, GM is more potent than GB to attenuate the IL-10 mRNA levels. Taken together, this study demonstrates that GB functions as the determinant constituent of Ginkgolides in alleviating LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:27261579

  13. Systematic review and meta-analysis of nasal potential difference in hypoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenlei; Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Nasal potential difference (NPD), a well-established in vivo clinical test for cystic fibrosis, reflects transepithelial cation and anion transport in the respiratory epithelium. To analyze whether NPD can be applied to diagnose hypoxic lung injury, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and analyzed data retrieved from eleven unbiased studies for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) using the software RevMan and R. There was a significant reduction in overall basal (WMD -5.27 mV, 95% CI: -6.03 to -4.52, P < 0.00001, I(2) = 42%), amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) (-2.87 mV, 95% CI: -4.02 to -1.72, P < 0.00001, I(2) = 51%), and -resistant fractions (-3.91 mV, 95% CI: -7.64 to -0.18, P = 0.04, I(2) = 95%) in lung injury patients. Further analysis of HAPE and RDS separately corroborated these observations. Moreover, SpO2 correlated with ENaC-associated NPD positively in patients only, but apparently related to CFTR-contributed NPD level inversely. These correlations were confirmed by the opposite associations between NPD values and altitude, which had a negative regression with SpO2 level. Basal NPD was significantly associated with amiloride-resistant but not ENaC fraction. Our analyses demonstrate that acute lung injury associated with systemic hypoxia is characterized by dysfunctional NPD. PMID:27488696

  14. Systematic review and meta-analysis of nasal potential difference in hypoxia-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenlei; Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Nasal potential difference (NPD), a well-established in vivo clinical test for cystic fibrosis, reflects transepithelial cation and anion transport in the respiratory epithelium. To analyze whether NPD can be applied to diagnose hypoxic lung injury, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and analyzed data retrieved from eleven unbiased studies for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) using the software RevMan and R. There was a significant reduction in overall basal (WMD −5.27 mV, 95% CI: −6.03 to −4.52, P < 0.00001, I2 = 42%), amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) (−2.87 mV, 95% CI: −4.02 to −1.72, P < 0.00001, I2 = 51%), and -resistant fractions (−3.91 mV, 95% CI: −7.64 to −0.18, P = 0.04, I2 = 95%) in lung injury patients. Further analysis of HAPE and RDS separately corroborated these observations. Moreover, SpO2 correlated with ENaC-associated NPD positively in patients only, but apparently related to CFTR-contributed NPD level inversely. These correlations were confirmed by the opposite associations between NPD values and altitude, which had a negative regression with SpO2 level. Basal NPD was significantly associated with amiloride-resistant but not ENaC fraction. Our analyses demonstrate that acute lung injury associated with systemic hypoxia is characterized by dysfunctional NPD. PMID:27488696

  15. cAMP signaling inhibits radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation leading to the augmentation of apoptosis in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase plays a central role in coordinating the cellular response to radiation-induced DNA damage. cAMP signaling regulates various cellular responses including metabolism and gene expression. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism through which cAMP signaling regulates ATM activation and cellular responses to ionizing radiation in lung cancer cells. Methods Lung cancer cells were transfected with constitutively active stimulatory G protein (GαsQL), and irradiated with γ-rays. The phosphorylation of ATM and protein phosphatase 2A was analyzed by western blotting, and apoptosis was assessed by western blotting, flow cytometry, and TUNNEL staining. The promoter activity of NF-κB was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay. BALB/c mice were treated with forskolin to assess the effect in the lung tissue. Results Transient expression of GαsQL significantly inhibited radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation in H1299 human lung cancer cells. Treatment with okadaic acid or knock down of PP2A B56δ subunit abolished the inhibitory effect of Gαs on radiation-induced ATM phosphorylation. Expression of GαsQL increased phosphorylation of the B56δ and PP2A activity, and inhibition of PKA blocked Gαs-induced PP2A activation. GαsQL enhanced radiation-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and increased the number of early apoptotic cells. The radiation-induced apoptosis was increased by inhibition of NF-κB using PDTC or inhibition of ATM using KU55933 or siRNA against ATM. Pretreatment of BALB/c mice with forskolin stimulated phosphorylation of PP2A B56δ, inhibited the activation of ATM and NF-κB, and augmented radiation-induced apoptosis in the lung tissue. GαsQL expression decreased the nuclear levels of the p50 and p65 subunits and NF-κB-dependent activity after γ-ray irradiation in H1299 cells. Pretreatment with prostaglandin E2 or isoproterenol increased B56δ phosphorylation, decreased

  16. Maternal PUFA ω-3 Supplementation Prevents Neonatal Lung Injuries Induced by Hyperoxia in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dyuti; Subayi Nkembi, Armande; Aubry, Estelle; Houeijeh, Ali; Butruille, Laura; Houfflin-Debarge, Véronique; Besson, Rémi; Deruelle, Philippe; Storme, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most common complications of prematurity, occurring in 30% of very low birth weight infants. The benefits of dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 (PUFA ω-3) during pregnancy or the perinatal period have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation on lung injuries in newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia. Pregnant female Wistar rats (n = 14) were fed a control diet (n = 2), a PUFA ω-6 diet (n = 6), or a PUFA ω-3 diet (n = 6), starting with the 14th gestation day. At Day 1, female and newborn rats (10 per female) were exposed to hyperoxia (O2, n = 70) or to the ambient air (Air, n = 70). Six groups of newborns rats were obtained: PUFA ω-6/O2 (n = 30), PUFA ω-6/air (n = 30), PUFA ω-3/O2 (n = 30), PUFA ω-3/air (n = 30), control/O2 (n = 10), and control/air (n = 10). After 10 days, lungs were removed for analysis of alveolarization and pulmonary vascular development. Survival rate was 100%. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization and increased pulmonary vascular wall thickness in both control (n = 20) and PUFA ω-6 groups (n = 60). Maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation prevented the decrease in alveolarization caused by hyperoxia (n = 30) compared to PUFA ω-6/O2 (n = 30) or to the control/O2 (n = 10), but did not significantly increase the thickness of the lung vascular wall. Therefore, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation may protect newborn rats from lung injuries induced by hyperoxia. In clinical settings, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation during pregnancy and during lactation may prevent BPD development after premature birth. PMID:26389878

  17. Maternal PUFA ω-3 Supplementation Prevents Neonatal Lung Injuries Induced by Hyperoxia in Newborn Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dyuti; Nkembi, Armande Subayi; Aubry, Estelle; Houeijeh, Ali; Butruille, Laura; Houfflin-Debarge, Véronique; Besson, Rémi; Deruelle, Philippe; Storme, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most common complications of prematurity, occurring in 30% of very low birth weight infants. The benefits of dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 (PUFA ω-3) during pregnancy or the perinatal period have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation on lung injuries in newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia. Pregnant female Wistar rats (n = 14) were fed a control diet (n = 2), a PUFA ω-6 diet (n = 6), or a PUFA ω-3 diet (n = 6), starting with the 14th gestation day. At Day 1, female and newborn rats (10 per female) were exposed to hyperoxia (O₂, n = 70) or to the ambient air (Air, n = 70). Six groups of newborns rats were obtained: PUFA ω-6/O₂ (n = 30), PUFA ω-6/air (n = 30), PUFA ω-3/O₂ (n = 30), PUFA ω-3/air (n = 30), control/O₂ (n = 10), and control/air (n = 10). After 10 days, lungs were removed for analysis of alveolarization and pulmonary vascular development. Survival rate was 100%. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization and increased pulmonary vascular wall thickness in both control (n = 20) and PUFA ω-6 groups (n = 60). Maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation prevented the decrease in alveolarization caused by hyperoxia (n = 30) compared to PUFA ω-6/O₂ (n = 30) or to the control/O₂ (n = 10), but did not significantly increase the thickness of the lung vascular wall. Therefore, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation may protect newborn rats from lung injuries induced by hyperoxia. In clinical settings, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation during pregnancy and during lactation may prevent BPD development after premature birth. PMID:26389878

  18. Synergy between acid and endotoxin in an experimental model of aspiration-related lung injury progression.

    PubMed

    Tetenev, Konstantin; Cloutier, Mary E; von Reyn, Jessica A; Ather, Jennifer L; Candon, James; Allen, Gilman B

    2015-11-15

    Aspiration is a common cause of lung injury, but it is unclear why some cases are self-limited while others progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Sporadic exposure to more than one insult could account for this variable progression. We investigated whether synergy between airway acid and endotoxin (LPS) amplifies injury severity in mice and whether LPS levels in human patients could corroborate our experimental findings. C57BL/6 mice aspirated acid (pH 1.3) or normal saline (NS), followed by LPS aerosol or nothing. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained 2 to 49 h later. Mice were injected with FITC-dextran 25 h after aspiration and connected to a ventilator, and lung elastance (H) measured periodically following deep inflation (DI). Endotracheal and gastric aspirates were also collected from patients in the intensive care unit and assayed for pH and LPS. Lung instability (ΔH following DI) and pressure-volume hysteresis in acid- or LPS-exposed mice was greater than in controls but markedly greater in the combined acid/LPS group. BALF neutrophils, cytokines, protein, and FITC-dextran in the acid/LPS mice were geometrically higher than all other groups. BALF from acid-only mice markedly amplified LPS-induced TNF-α production in cultured macrophages. Human subjects had variable endotracheal LPS levels with the highest burden in those at higher risk of aspiration. Acid aspiration amplifies LPS signaling in mice to disrupt barrier function and lung mechanics in synergy. High variation in airway LPS and greater airway LPS burden in patients at higher risk of aspiration could help explain the sporadic progression of aspiration to ARDS. PMID:26408552

  19. Maternal PUFA ω-3 Supplementation Prevents Neonatal Lung Injuries Induced by Hyperoxia in Newborn Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dyuti; Nkembi, Armande Subayi; Aubry, Estelle; Houeijeh, Ali; Butruille, Laura; Houfflin-Debarge, Véronique; Besson, Rémi; Deruelle, Philippe; Storme, Laurent

    2015-09-14

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most common complications of prematurity, occurring in 30% of very low birth weight infants. The benefits of dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 (PUFA ω-3) during pregnancy or the perinatal period have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation on lung injuries in newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia. Pregnant female Wistar rats (n = 14) were fed a control diet (n = 2), a PUFA ω-6 diet (n = 6), or a PUFA ω-3 diet (n = 6), starting with the 14th gestation day. At Day 1, female and newborn rats (10 per female) were exposed to hyperoxia (O₂, n = 70) or to the ambient air (Air, n = 70). Six groups of newborns rats were obtained: PUFA ω-6/O₂ (n = 30), PUFA ω-6/air (n = 30), PUFA ω-3/O₂ (n = 30), PUFA ω-3/air (n = 30), control/O₂ (n = 10), and control/air (n = 10). After 10 days, lungs were removed for analysis of alveolarization and pulmonary vascular development. Survival rate was 100%. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization and increased pulmonary vascular wall thickness in both control (n = 20) and PUFA ω-6 groups (n = 60). Maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation prevented the decrease in alveolarization caused by hyperoxia (n = 30) compared to PUFA ω-6/O₂ (n = 30) or to the control/O₂ (n = 10), but did not significantly increase the thickness of the lung vascular wall. Therefore, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation may protect newborn rats from lung injuries induced by hyperoxia. In clinical settings, maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation during pregnancy and during lactation may prevent BPD development after premature birth.

  20. Therapeutic effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chengcheng; Chang, Pengyu; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Weiyan; Liu, Bin; Ding, Lijuan; Liu, Min; Gao, Ling; Dong, Lihua

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a fatal condition featured by interstitial pneumonitis and fibrosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used for treating RILI in rodent models. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether the therapeutic effects of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) on RILI were in a dose-dependent manner. A total of 100 mice were randomly divided into: a control group (n=25), subject to lung irradiation and injection of phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) via the tail vein; and the hBM-MSC group, subject to lung irradiation followed by injection of a low dose (1x103 hBM-MSCs/g), medium dose (5x103 hBM-MSCs/g) and high dose (1x104 hBM-MSCs/g) of hBM-MSCs in PBS through the tail vein, respectively. After sacrifice, the pulmonary tissues were subject to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemical staining to investigate the pathological changes. Immunofluorescent staining was performed to evaluate the differentiation capacity of hBM-MSCs in vivo by analyzing the expression of SPC and PECAM. hBM-MSCs improved the survival rate and histopathological features in the irradiated mice, especially in the low-dose group. Marked decrease in collagen deposition was noted in the irradiated mice treated using a low dose of hBM-MSCs. In addition, hBM-MSCs attenuated secretion and expression of IL-10 and increased the expression of TNF-α. Furthermore, hBM-MSCs had the potential to differentiate into functional cells upon lung injury. Low-dose hBM-MSCs contributed to functional recovery in mice with RILI. PMID:26717975

  1. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury in an era of TRALI risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, John C; Grant, Michelle L; Karp, Julie K

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare complication of transfusion, for which the true incidence remains obscure, since there are a number of factors that may lead to misdiagnosis. Despite this, it continues to be the leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality. Here we present a historical case of TRALI in an elderly female who received group AB plasma and discuss how current mitigation strategies would likely have prevented its occurrence. It is important to remember that both immune and non-immune factors play a role in TRALI pathogenesis, and although current preventative strategies may decrease TRALI's incidence, they likely will not eliminate it.

  3. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  4. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  5. C1P Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Preventing NF-κB Activation in Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Baudiß, Kristin; de Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Cicko, Sanja; Ayata, Korcan; Hossfeld, Madelon; Ehrat, Nicolas; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Eltzschig, Holger K; Idzko, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) has been shown to modulate acute inflammatory events. Acute lung injury (Arnalich et al. 2000. Infect. Immun. 68: 1942-1945) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, lung inflammation, induced cytokine production, neutrophil accumulation, and vascular leakage leading to lung edema. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C1P during LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. To evaluate the effect of C1P, we used a prophylactic and therapeutic LPS-induced ALI model in C57BL/6 male mice. Our studies revealed that intrapulmonary application of C1P before (prophylactic) or 24 h after (therapeutic) LPS instillation decreased neutrophil trafficking to the lung, proinflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and alveolar capillary leakage. Mechanistically, C1P inhibited the LPS-triggered NF-κB levels in lung tissue in vivo. In addition, ex vivo experiments revealed that C1P also attenuates LPS-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and IL-8 production in human neutrophils. These results indicate C1P playing a role in dampening LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and suggest that C1P could be a valuable candidate for treatment of ALI. PMID:26800872

  6. Effects of basic drugs on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liming; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Weiwei; Qi, Yuehong; Zheng, Lina; Guo, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basic drugs that alkalizes blood, on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice. Mice were randomized into three groups: Group normal saline, Group THAM, injected with 3.64% tri-(hydroxymethyl) methylamine (THAM), and Group NaHCO3, injected with 5% NaHCO3 (n=26, each group). The acute lung injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 mg/kg), followed by infusion of varying concentrations of the above solution into tail vein at the rate of 0.5 ml/h (controlled by micro pump) for over 2 h. Thirty minutes later, 6 mice from each group were randomly selected for blood gas analysis; then, the mice were killed and their lung tissues were sampled for detection of relative indicators, and the remaining mice were observed for signs of mortality for 72 h. Arterial pH, bicarbonate (HCO3 -), and BE and mortality of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly compared to the corresponding parameters of the group normal saline (P<0.05); compared to the group normal saline, group NaHCO3 had increased blood [Na+] and decreased [K+] and [Ca2+] (P<0.05). Blood [Na+] of group THAM decreased while the lactic acid concentration increased (P<0.05) compared to the corresponding values of the group normal saline. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly relative to group normal saline (P<0.05). Compared with the biopsy results of (A), pathological biopsy of (B) and (C) clearly revealed alveolar wall thickening, edema of alveolar epithelial cells, and infiltration of large neutrophils. Alkalizing blood could neither inhibit inflammatory reactions in LPS mouse model nor reduce the mortality rate of mice with acute lung injury, while excessive alkalization of blood could increase mice mortality. PMID:26770536

  7. Autologous transplantation of adipose-derived stromal cells ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are a good alternative to multipotent stem cells for regenerative medicine. Low tidal volume (LVT) has proved to be an effective ventilation strategy. However, it is not known if ADSCs and LVT can protect against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). This study was aimed to determine the potential of ADSCs and LVT to repair following VILI and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this section. Methods A total of 72 rats were randomly assigned into group I (sham group, n = 18), group II (1 h of high tidal volume-ventilated (HVT) 40 mL/kg to peak airway pressures of approximately 35 cm H2O and 100% oxygen, n = 18), group III (1 h of HVT followed by 6 h LVT 6 mL/kg to peak airway pressures of approximately 6 cm H2O and 100% oxygen, n = 18) and group IV (1 h of HVT followed by intravenous injection of 5 × 106 ADSCs, n = 18). All animals were sacrificed 7 after the experiments lasted for 7 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and lungs were harvested for analysis. Results High tidal volume-ventilated (HVT) rats exhibited typical VILI features compared with sham rats. Lung edema, histological lung injury index, concentrations of total protein, total cell counts, number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 in BALF were significantly increased in HVT rats. Additionally, gene and protein levels of Na+ channel subunits, Na-K-ATPase pump activity and alveolar fluid clearance were significantly decreased in HVT rats. All these indices of VILI were significantly improved in rats treated with ADSCs. However, compared with ADSCs treatment, LVT strategy had little therapeutic effect in the present study. Conclusion These results may provide valuable insights into the effects of ADSCs in acute lung injury. PMID:23890086

  8. Effects of basic drugs on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liming; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Weiwei; Qi, Yuehong; Zheng, Lina; Guo, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basic drugs that alkalizes blood, on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice. Mice were randomized into three groups: Group normal saline, Group THAM, injected with 3.64% tri-(hydroxymethyl) methylamine (THAM), and Group NaHCO3, injected with 5% NaHCO3 (n=26, each group). The acute lung injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 mg/kg), followed by infusion of varying concentrations of the above solution into tail vein at the rate of 0.5 ml/h (controlled by micro pump) for over 2 h. Thirty minutes later, 6 mice from each group were randomly selected for blood gas analysis; then, the mice were killed and their lung tissues were sampled for detection of relative indicators, and the remaining mice were observed for signs of mortality for 72 h. Arterial pH, bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), and BE and mortality of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly compared to the corresponding parameters of the group normal saline (P<0.05); compared to the group normal saline, group NaHCO3 had increased blood [Na(+)] and decreased [K(+)] and [Ca(2+)] (P<0.05). Blood [Na(+)] of group THAM decreased while the lactic acid concentration increased (P<0.05) compared to the corresponding values of the group normal saline. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly relative to group normal saline (P<0.05). Compared with the biopsy results of (A), pathological biopsy of (B) and (C) clearly revealed alveolar wall thickening, edema of alveolar epithelial cells, and infiltration of large neutrophils. Alkalizing blood could neither inhibit inflammatory reactions in LPS mouse model nor reduce the mortality rate of mice with acute lung injury, while excessive alkalization of blood could increase mice mortality. PMID:26770536

  9. Protective Ventilation of Preterm Lambs Exposed to Acute Chorioamnionitis Does Not Reduce Ventilation-Induced Lung or Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Samantha K.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Gill, Andrew W.; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y.; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Methods Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. Results LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02) and cell death (p<0.05) in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups. Conclusions Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor

  10. I-FABP as Biomarker for the Early Diagnosis of Acute Mesenteric Ischemia and Resultant Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khadaroo, Rachel G.; Fortis, Spyridon; Salim, Saad Y.; Streutker, Catherine; Churchill, Thomas A.; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening condition that can result in multiple organ injury and death. A timely diagnosis and treatment would have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality in high-risk patient population. The purpose of this study was to investigate if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) and α-defensins can be used as biomarkers for early AMI and resultant lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intestinal ischemia by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A time course of intestinal ischemia from 0.5 to 3 h was performed and followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Additional mice were treated with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) at 300 mg/kg given intraperitoneally prior to reperfusion. AMI resulted in severe intestinal injury characterized by neutrophil infiltrate, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, cytokine/chemokine levels, and tissue histopathology. Pathologic signs of ischemia were evident at 1 h, and by 3 h of ischemia, the full thickness of the intestine mucosa had areas of coagulative necrosis. It was noted that the levels of α-defensins in intestinal tissue peaked at 1 h and I-FABP in plasma peaked at 3 h after AMI. Intestinal ischemia also resulted in lung injury in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NAC decreased the levels of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP, as well as lung MPO and cytokines. In summary, the concentrations of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP predicted intestinal ischemia prior to pathological evidence of ischemia and I-FABP directly correlated with resultant lung injury. The antioxidant NAC reduced intestinal and lung injury induced by AMI, suggesting a role for oxidants in the mechanism for distant organ injury. I-FABP and α-defensins are promising biomarkers, and may guide the treatment with antioxidant in early intestinal and distal organ injury. PMID:25541714

  11. The Beta Agonist Lung Injury Trial Prevention. A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Simon; Park, Daniel; Gao, Fang; Knox, Chris; Holloway, Ben; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ryan, James; Marzouk, Joseph; Cooke, Matthew W.; Lamb, Sarah E.; Thickett, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Experimental studies suggest that pretreatment with β-agonists might prevent acute lung injury (ALI). Objectives: To determine if in adult patients undergoing elective esophagectomy, perioperative treatment with inhaled β-agonists effects the development of early ALI. Methods: We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled trial in 12 UK centers (2008–2011). Adult patients undergoing elective esophagectomy were allocated to prerandomized, sequentially numbered treatment packs containing inhaled salmeterol (100 μg twice daily) or a matching placebo. Patients, clinicians, and researchers were masked to treatment allocation. The primary outcome was development of ALI within 72 hours of surgery. Secondary outcomes were ALI within 28 days, organ failure, adverse events, survival, and health-related quality of life. An exploratory substudy measured biomarkers of alveolar-capillary inflammation and injury. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 179 patients were randomized to salmeterol and 183 to placebo. Baseline characteristics were similar. Treatment with salmeterol did not prevent early lung injury (32 [19.2%] of 168 vs. 27 [16.0%] of 170; odds ratio [OR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71–2.22). There was no difference in organ failure, survival, or health-related quality of life. Adverse events were less frequent in the salmeterol group (55 vs. 70; OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.39–0.99), predominantly because of a lower number of pneumonia (7 vs. 17; OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.16–0.96). Salmeterol reduced some biomarkers of alveolar inflammation and epithelial injury. Conclusion: Perioperative treatment with inhaled salmeterol was well tolerated but did not prevent ALI. Clinical trial registered with International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Register (ISRCTN47481946) and European Union database of randomized Controlled Trials (EudraCT 2007-004096-19). PMID:24392848

  12. Heme oxygenase-1, a critical arbitrator of cell death pathways in lung injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Morse, Danielle; Lin, Ling; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2009-07-01

    Increases in cell death by programmed (i.e., apoptosis, autophagy) or nonprogrammed mechanisms (i.e., necrosis) occur during tissue injury and may contribute to the etiology of several pulmonary or vascular disease states. The low-molecular-weight stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in various models of lung and vascular injury by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, and cell proliferation. HO-1 serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. The transcriptional induction of HO-1 occurs in response to multiple forms of chemical and physical cellular stress. The cytoprotective functions of HO-1 may be attributed to heme turnover, as well as to beneficial properties of its enzymatic reaction products: biliverdin-IXalpha, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 or CO inhibits stress-induced extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. A variety of signaling molecules have been implicated in the cytoprotection conferred by HO-1/CO, including autophagic proteins, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and others. Enhanced HO-1 expression or the pharmacological application of HO end-products affords protection in preclinical models of tissue injury, including experimental and transplant-associated ischemia/reperfusion injury, promising potential future therapeutic applications.

  13. Lung Injury and Lung Cancer Caused by Cigarette Smoke-Induced Oxidative Stress: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities Involving the Ceramide-Generating Machinery and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2149–2174. PMID:24684526

  14. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Huang, Yong; Sun, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Yutong; Gerhold, Lynnette M.; Siegler, Jessica; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Zaidi, Rafe; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Bittman, Robert; Chen, Chin Tu; LaRiviere, Patrick J.; Sammani, Saad; Lussier, Yves A.; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1−/−) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1+/−, S1PR2−/−, and S1PR3−/−) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2×/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2×/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.—Mathew, B., Jacobson, J. R., Berdyshev, E., Huang, Y., Sun, X., Zhao, Y., Gerhold, L. M., Siegler, J., Evenoski, C., Wang, T., Zhou, T., Zaidi, R., Moreno-Vinasco, L., Bittman, R., Chen, C. T., LaRiviere, P. J., Sammani, S., Lussier, Y. A., Dudek, S. M., Natarajan, V., Weichselbaum, R. R., Garcia, J. G. N. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs. PMID:21712494

  15. Protective effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on hypoxia-induced acute lung injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIJUN; CANG, JING; XUE, ZHANGGANG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on hypoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI) is currently unknown. In the present study, a rabbit acute lung injury model was established to investigate the effects of TEA on inflammatory factors, pulmonary surfactant and ultrastructure. A total of 56 rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups (n=14 per group): Control group (Group C), hypoxia group (Group H), sevoflurane group (Group S) and combined sevoflurane-epidural anesthesia group (Group ES). The ALI model was considered to have been successfully induced when the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen was <300. The correct placement of a catheter for TEA was confirmed using epidurography. ALI was maintained for 3 h. Arterial blood samples were collected from all groups during spontaneous breathing (T0) and at 3 h after ALI induction (T5) in order to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was harvested to determine the total phospholipid, saturated phosphatidylcholine and total protein levels. Furthermore, the dry/wet weight ratio and the mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the lung tissue were determined using ELISA. In addition, light and transmission electron microscopy and histological techniques were used to examine the morphology of alveolar type II cells in the rat lung tissue. The results indicate that changes of serum IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels following ALI were consistent with the changes in the mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 in the lung tissue. TEA attenuated these changes and thus reduced the severity of the ALI. In addition, TEA improved the alveolar structure, reduced the number of polymorphonuclear cells and mitigated the damage of lamellar bodies. In summary, the results of the present study indicate that TEA reduces lung tissue damage by inhibiting systemic and local inflammation, decreasing the

  16. Protective effects of ulinastatin and methylprednisolone against radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Du, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Sun, Ni; Li, Xiu-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of ulinastatin and methylprednisolone in treating pathological changes in mice with radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) was evaluated. Forty C57BL/6 female mice received whole-chest radiation (1.5 Gy/min for 12 min) and were randomly allocated into Group R (single radiation, n = 10), Group U (ulinastatin treatment, n = 10), Group M (methylprednisolone treatment, n = 10), or Group UM (ulinastatin and methylprednisolone treatment, n = 10). Another 10 untreated mice served as controls (Group C). Pathological changes in lung tissue, pulmonary interstitial area density (PIAD) and expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in lung tissue, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alleviation of pathological changes in lung tissue was observed in Groups U, M and UM. Treatment with ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both effectively delayed the development of fibrosis at 12 weeks after radiation. Ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both could alleviate the radiation-induced increase in the PIAD (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Treatment with ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both significantly reduced the expression of TNF-α, but not TGF-β1, at 9 weeks after radiation compared with Group R (P < 0.01). Ulinastatin and/or methylprednisolone effectively decreased the level of TNF-α in lung tissue after RILI and inhibited both the inflammatory response and the development of fibrosis. PMID:27342837

  17. Danaparoid sodium inhibits systemic inflammation and prevents endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Hidaka, Seigo; Hishiyama, Sohei; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Systemic inflammatory mediators, including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), play an important role in the development of sepsis. Anticoagulants, such as danaparoid sodium (DA), may be able to inhibit sepsis-induced inflammation, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. We hypothesised that DA would act as an inhibitor of systemic inflammation and prevent endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in a rat model. Methods We used male Wistar rats. Animals in the intervention arm received a bolus of 50 U/kg of DA or saline injected into the tail vein after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. We measured cytokine (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10) and HMGB1 levels in serum and lung tissue at regular intervals for 12 h following LPS injection. The mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was assessed following stimulation with LPS alone or concurrently with DA with identification of HMGB1 and other cytokines in the supernatant. Results Survival was significantly higher and lung histopathology significantly improved among the DA (50 U/kg) animals compared to the control rats. The serum and lung HMGB1 levels were lower over time among DA-treated animals. In the in vitro study, administration of DA was associated with decreased production of HMGB1. In the cell signalling studies, DA administration inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB. Conclusion DA decreases cytokine and HMGB1 levels during LPS-induced inflammation. As a result, DA ameliorated lung pathology and reduces mortality in endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through the inhibition of cytokines and HMGB1. PMID:18380908

  18. In vivo anti-inflammatory action of eugenol on lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Clarissa B; Riva, Douglas R; DePaula, Leonardo J; Brando-Lima, Aline; Koatz, Vera Lúcia G; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Zin, Walter A; Faffe, Débora S

    2010-04-01

    Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, suppresses cyclooxygenase-2 expression, while eugenol dimers prevent nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and inflammatory cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Our aim was to examine the in vivo anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline [0.05 ml intratracheally (it), control (Ctrl) and eugenol (Eug) groups] or Escherichia coli LPS (10 microg it, LPS and LPSEug groups). After 6 h, mice received saline (0.2 ml ip, Ctrl and LPS groups) or eugenol (160 mg/kg ip, Eug and LPSEug groups). Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, pulmonary resistive (DeltaP1) and viscoelastic (DeltaP2) pressures, static elastance (E(st)), and viscoelastic component of elastance (DeltaE) were measured. Lungs were prepared for histology. In parallel mice, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected 24 h after LPS injection. TNF-alpha was determined by ELISA. Lung tissue expression of NF-kappaB was determined by EMSA. DeltaP1, DeltaP2, E(st), and DeltaE were significantly higher in the LPS group than in the other groups. LPS mice also showed significantly more alveolar collapse, collagen fibers, and neutrophil influx and higher TNF-alpha levels and NF-kappaB expression than the other groups. Eugenol treatment reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation, improving lung function. Our results suggest that eugenol exhibits in vivo anti-inflammatory action in LPS-induced lung injury.

  19. Role of Nitric Oxide Isoforms in Vascular and Alveolar Development and Lung Injury in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Overexpressing Neonatal Mice Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Mansoor A.; Choo-Wing, Rayman; Homer, Robert J.; Bhandari, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced 3 different nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in lung development and injury in the newborn (NB) lung are not known. We hypothesized that VEGF-induced specific NOS pathways are critical regulators of lung development and injury. Methodology We studied NB wild type (WT), lung epithelial cell-targeted VEGF165 doxycycline-inducible overexpressing transgenic (VEGFTG), VEGFTG treated with a NOS1 inhibitor (L-NIO), VEGFTG x NOS2-/- and VEGFTG x NOS3+/- mice in room air (RA) for 7 postnatal (PN) days. Lung morphometry (chord length), vascular markers (Ang1, Ang2, Notch2, vWF, CD31 and VE-cadherin), cell proliferation (Ki67), vascular permeability, injury and oxidative stress markers (hemosiderin, nitrotyrosine and 8-OHdG) were evaluated. Results VEGF overexpression in RA led to increased chord length and vascular markers at PN7, which were significantly decreased to control values in VEGFTG x NOS2−/− and VEGFTG x NOS3+/- lungs. However, we found no noticeable effect on chord length and vascular markers in the VEGFTG / NOS1 inhibited group. In the NB VEGFTG mouse model, we found VEGF-induced vascular permeability in the NB murine lung was partially dependent on NOS2 and NOS3-signaling pathways. In addition, the inhibition of NOS2 and NOS3 resulted in a significant decrease in VEGF-induced hemosiderin, nitrotyrosine- and 8-OHdG positive cells at PN7. NOS1 inhibition had no significant effect. Conclusion Our data showed that the complete absence of NOS2 and partial deficiency of NOS3 confers protection against VEGF-induced pathologic lung vascular and alveolar developmental changes, as well as injury markers. Inhibition of NOS1 does not have any modulating role on VEGF-induced changes in the NB lung. Overall, our data suggests that there is a significant differential regulation in the NOS-mediated effects of VEGF overexpression in the developing mouse lung. PMID:26799210

  20. Pendrin, an anion exchanger on lung epithelial cells, could be a novel target for lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chun-E; Jiang, Dingyuan; Dai, Huaping; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of pendrin in acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and to explore whether pendrin expression existing on alveolar cells. Methods: ALI C57BL/6 mice model induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was established. The expression of pendrin in lung was analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting methods, the changes of lung inflammatory parameters and pathology were observed, the cellular distribution of pendrin in the lung was determined using immunofluorescence. Statistical comparisons between groups were made by two-tailed Student’s t-test. Results: Enhanced expression of the slc26a4 gene and production of pendrin in lungs of LPS-induced ALI mice were confirmed. In comparison with vehicle-control mice, methazolamide treatment mitigated lung inflammatory parameters and pathology. IL-6 and MCP-1 in lung tissues and BALF in methazolamide-treated mice were statistically decreased. Methazolamide treatment had significant effect on the total protein concentration in the BALF and the ratio of lung wet/dry weight. The percentage of macrophages in the BALF was increased. There was a low expression of pendrin in ATII. Conclusions: Pendrin may be involved in pathological process of LPS-induced ALI. Inhibition of the pendrin function could be used to treat ALI. Airway epithelial cell may be a valuable therapeutic target for discovering and developing new drugs and/or new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS. PMID:27158384

  1. Sustained Inflation at Birth Did Not Alter Lung Injury from Mechanical Ventilation in Surfactant-Treated Fetal Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Miura, Yuichiro; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sustained inflations (SI) are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. Hypothesis A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. Methods The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline). Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1) PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2) 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3) mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4) 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. Results SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. Conclusion In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation. PMID:25419969

  2. Sickle erythrocytes and platelets augment lung leukotriene synthesis with downregulation of anti-inflammatory proteins: relevance in the pathology of the acute chest syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Opene, Michael; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Husain, Sumair

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Initiation, progression, and resolution of vaso-occlusive pain episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) have been recognized as reperfusion injury, which provokes an inflammatory response in the pulmonary circulation. Some 5-lipoxygenase (5-lox) metabolites are potent vasoconstrictors in the pulmonary circulation. We studied stimulation of production of the inflammatory eicosanoids leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by isolated rat lungs perfused with sickle (HbSS) erythrocytes. Our hypothesis is that HbSS erythrocytes produce more LTs than normal (HbAA) erythrocytes, which can induce vaso-occlusive episodes in SCD patients. Lung perfusates were collected at specific time points and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and LTC4 and PGE2 contents were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Rat