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Sample records for augmented lung injury

  1. Macrophage A2A Adenosinergic Receptor Modulates Oxygen-Induced Augmentation of Murine Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Chau, Eric; Avalos, Claudia; Waickman, Adam T.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Files, Daniel C.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Powell, Jonathan; Horton, Maureen; King, Landon S.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Exacerbating factors increasing the risk of ARDS remain unknown. Supplemental oxygen is often necessary in both mild and severe lung disease. The potential effects of supplemental oxygen may include augmentation of lung inflammation by inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways in alveolar macrophages. We sought to determine oxygen-derived effects on the anti-inflammatory A2A adenosinergic (ADORA2A) receptor in macrophages, and the role of the ADORA2A receptor in lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and ADORA2A−/− mice received intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT LPS), followed 12 hours later by continuous exposure to 21% oxygen (control mice) or 60% oxygen for 1 to 3 days. We measured the phenotypic endpoints of lung injury and the alveolar macrophage inflammatory state. We tested an ADORA2A-specific agonist, CGS-21680 hydrochloride, in LPS plus oxygen-exposed WT and ADORA2A−/− mice. We determined the specific effects of myeloid ADORA2A, using chimera experiments. Compared with WT mice, ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to IT LPS and 60% oxygen demonstrated significantly more histologic lung injury, alveolar neutrophils, and protein. Macrophages from ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to LPS plus oxygen expressed higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and cosignaling molecules. CGS-21680 prevented the oxygen-induced augmentation of lung injury after LPS only in WT mice. Chimera experiments demonstrated that the transfer of WT but not ADORA2A−/− bone marrow cells into irradiated ADORA2A−/− mice reduced lung injury after LPS plus oxygen, demonstrating myeloid ADORA2A protection. ADORA2A is protective against lung injury after LPS and oxygen. Oxygen after LPS increases macrophage activation to augment lung injury by inhibiting the ADORA2A pathway. PMID:23349051

  2. Annexin A2 contributes to lung injury and fibrosis by augmenting factor Xa fibrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Schuliga, Michael; Jaffar, Jade; Berhan, Asres; Langenbach, Shenna; Harris, Trudi; Waters, David; Lee, Peter V S; Grainge, Christopher; Westall, Glen; Knight, Darryl; Stewart, Alastair G

    2017-05-01

    In lung injury and disease, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), extravascular factor X is converted into factor Xa (FXa), a coagulant protease with fibrogenic actions. Extracellular annexin A2 binds to FXa, augmenting activation of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). In this study, the contribution of annexin A2 in lung injury and fibrosis was investigated. Annexin A2 immunoreactivity was observed in regions of fibrosis, including those associated with fibroblasts in lung tissue of IPF patients. Furthermore, annexin A2 was detected in the conditioned media and an EGTA membrane wash of human lung fibroblast (LF) cultures. Incubation with human plasma (5% vol/vol) or purified FXa (15-50 nM) evoked fibrogenic responses in LF cultures, with FXa increasing interleukin-6 (IL-6) production and cell number by 270 and 46%, respectively (P < 0.05, n = 5-8). The fibrogenic actions of plasma or FXa were attenuated by the selective FXa inhibitor apixaban (10 μM, or antibodies raised against annexin A2 or PAR-1 (2 μg/ml). FXa-stimulated LFs from IPF patients (n = 6) produced twice as much IL-6 as controls (n = 10) (P < 0.05), corresponding with increased levels of extracellular annexin A2. Annexin A2 gene deletion in mice reduced bleomycin-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) IL-6 levels and cell number (*P < 0.05; n = 4-12). Lung fibrogenic gene expression and dry weight were reduced by annexin A2 gene deletion, but lung levels of collagen were not. Our data suggest that annexin A2 contributes to lung injury and fibrotic disease by mediating the fibrogenic actions of FXa. Extracellular annexin A2 is a potential target for the treatment of IPF. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. IL-10 deficiency augments acute lung but not liver injury in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kobbe, Philipp; Stoffels, Burkhard; Schmidt, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Takeshi; Gutkin, Dmitry W; Bauer, Anthony J; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2009-01-01

    In hemorrhagic shock and trauma, patients are prone to develop systemic inflammation with remote organ dysfunction, which is thought to be caused by pro-inflammatory mediators. This study investigates the role of the immuno-modulatory cytokine IL-10 in the development of organ dysfunction following hemorrhagic shock. Male C57/BL6 and IL-10 KO mice were subjected to volume controlled hemorrhagic shock for 3h followed by resuscitation. Animals were either sacrificed 3 or 24h after resuscitation. To assess systemic inflammation, serum IL-6, IL-10, KC, and MCP-1 concentrations were measured with the Luminex multiplexing platform; acute lung injury (ALI) was assessed by pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and lung histology and acute liver injury was assessed by hepatic MPO activity, hepatic IL-6 levels, and serum ALT levels. There was a trend towards increased IL-6 and KC serum levels 3h after resuscitation in IL-10 KO as compared to C57/BL6 mice; however this did not reach statistical significance. Serum MCP-1 levels were significantly increased in IL-10 KO mice 3 and 24 h following resuscitation as compared to C57/BL6 mice. In IL-10 KO mice, pulmonary MPO activity was significantly increased 3 h following resuscitation and after 24 h histological signs of acute lung injury were more apparent than in C57/BL6 mice. In contrast, no significant differences in any liver parameters were detected between IL-10 KO and C57/BL6 mice. Our data indicate that an endogenous IL-10 deficiency augments acute lung but not liver injury following hemorrhagic shock.

  4. Early-age-related changes in proteostasis augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2010-11-15

    The decline of proteasomal activity is known to be associated with the age-related disorders but the early events involved in this process are not apparent. To address this, we investigated the early-age-related (pediatric vs. adult) mechanisms that augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury. The 3-weeks (pediatric) and 6-months (adult) old C57BL/6 mice were selected as the study groups. Mice were subjected to 1×20 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mediated sepsis or intratracheal Psuedomonas aeruginosa (Pa)-LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI).We observed a significant increase in basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6 and neutrophil activity marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the adult mice compared to the pediatric indicating the age-related constitutive increase in inflammatory response. Next, we found that age-related decrease in PSMB6 (proteasomal subunit) expression in adult mice results in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins that triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). We identified that Pa-LPS induced activation of UPR modifier, p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) in the adult mice lungs correlates with increase in Pa-LPS induced NFκB levels. Moreover, we observed a constitutive increase in p-eIF2α indicating a protective ER stress response to accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins. We used MG-132 treatment of HBE cells as an in vitro model to standardize the efficacy of salubrinal (inhibitor of eIF2α de-phosphorylation) in controlling the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the NFκB levels. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of salubrinal to correct proteostasis-imbalance in the adult mice based on its ability to control CLP induced IL-6 secretion or recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells. Our data demonstrate the critical role of early-age-related proteostasis-imbalance as a novel mechanism that augments the NFκB mediated inflammation in sepsis and ALI. Moreover, our data suggest the therapeutic

  5. Early-Age-Related Changes in Proteostasis Augment Immunopathogenesis of Sepsis and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Background The decline of proteasomal activity is known to be associated with the age-related disorders but the early events involved in this process are not apparent. To address this, we investigated the early-age-related (pediatric vs. adult) mechanisms that augment immunopathogenesis of sepsis and acute lung injury. Methodology/Principal Findings The 3-weeks (pediatric) and 6-months (adult) old C57BL/6 mice were selected as the study groups. Mice were subjected to 1×20 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mediated sepsis or intratracheal Psuedomonas aeruginosa (Pa)-LPS induced acute lung injury (ALI).We observed a significant increase in basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6 and neutrophil activity marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the adult mice compared to the pediatric indicating the age-related constitutive increase in inflammatory response. Next, we found that age-related decrease in PSMB6 (proteasomal subunit) expression in adult mice results in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins that triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). We identified that Pa-LPS induced activation of UPR modifier, p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) in the adult mice lungs correlates with increase in Pa-LPS induced NFκB levels. Moreover, we observed a constitutive increase in p-eIF2α indicating a protective ER stress response to accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins. We used MG-132 treatment of HBE cells as an in vitro model to standardize the efficacy of salubrinal (inhibitor of eIF2α de-phosphorylation) in controlling the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the NFκB levels. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of salubrinal to correct proteostasis-imbalance in the adult mice based on its ability to control CLP induced IL-6 secretion or recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the critical role of early-age-related proteostasis-imbalance as a novel mechanism that augments the NFκB mediated

  6. Deficiency in the divalent metal transporter 1 augments bleomycin-induced lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to bleomycin can result in an inflammatory lung injury. The biological effect of this anti-neoplastic agent is dependent on its coordination of iron with subsequent oxidant generation. In lung cells, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) can participate in metal transport ...

  7. Deficiency in the divalent metal transporter 1 augments bleomycin-induced lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to bleomycin can result in an inflammatory lung injury. The biological effect of this anti-neoplastic agent is dependent on its coordination of iron with subsequent oxidant generation. In lung cells, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) can participate in metal transport ...

  8. Febrile-Range Hyperthermia Augments Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Injury by a Mechanism of Enhanced Alveolar Epithelial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lipke, Anne B.; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Herrero, Raquel; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu; Wong, Venus A.; Mongovin, Stephen M.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Fever is common in critically ill patients and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including increased intensive care unit mortality. In animal models, febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) worsens acute lung injury, but the mechanisms by which this occurs remain uncertain. We hypothesized that FRH augments the response of the alveolar epithelium to TNF-α receptor family signaling. We found that FRH augmented LPS-induced lung injury and increased LPS-induced mortality in mice. At 24 h, animals exposed to hyperthermia and LPS had significant increases in alveolar permeability without changes in inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung tissue as compared with animals exposed to LPS alone. The increase in alveolar permeability was associated with an increase in alveolar epithelial apoptosis and was attenuated by caspase inhibition with zVAD.fmk. At 48 h, the animals exposed to hyperthermia and LPS had an enhanced lung inflammatory response. In murine lung epithelial cell lines (MLE-15, LA-4) and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells, FRH enhanced apoptosis in response to TNF-α but not Fas ligand. The increase in apoptosis was caspase-8 dependent and associated with suppression of NF-κB activity. The FRH-associated NF-κB suppression was not associated with persistence of IκB-α, suggesting that FRH-mediated suppression of NF-κB occurs by means other than alteration of IκB-α kinetics. These data show for the first time that FRH promotes lung injury in part by increasing lung epithelial apoptosis. The enhanced apoptotic response might relate to FRH-mediated suppression of NF-κB activity in the alveolar epithelium with a resultant increase in susceptibility to TNF-α–mediated cell death. PMID:20200273

  9. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Zychowski, Katherine E; Lucas, Selita N; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-08-15

    Ozone (O3)-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O3 can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O3-induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O3 pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O3 exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O2) or hypoxia (10.0% O2), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1ppm O3 or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O3 exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O3 exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O3 exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O3-induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability.

  10. TRPV4 channels augment macrophage activation and ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Kazutoshi; Jian, Ming-Yuan; Townsley, Mary I.; King, Judy A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Weber, David S.; Eyal, Fabien G.; Clapp, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously implicated transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels and alveolar macrophages in initiating the permeability increase in response to high peak inflation pressure (PIP) ventilation. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from TRPV4−/− and TRPV4+/+ mice and instilled in the lungs of mice of the opposite genotype. Filtration coefficients (Kf) measured in isolated perfused lungs after ventilation with successive 30-min periods of 9, 25, and 35 cmH2O PIP did not significantly increase in lungs from TRPV4−/− mice but increased >2.2-fold in TRPV4+/+ lungs, TRPV4+/+ lungs instilled with TRPV4−/− macrophages, and TRPV4−/− lungs instilled with TRPV4+/+ macrophages after ventilation with 35 cmH2O PIP. Activation of TRPV4 with 4-α-phorbol didecanoate (4αPDD) significantly increased intracellular calcium, superoxide, and nitric oxide production in TRPV4+/+ macrophages but not TRPV4−/− macrophages. Cross-sectional areas increased nearly 3-fold in TRPV4+/+ macrophages compared with TRPV4−/− macrophages after 4αPDD. Immunohistochemistry staining of lung tissue for nitrotyrosine revealed increased amounts in high PIP ventilated TRPV4+/+ lungs compared with low PIP ventilated TRPV4+/+ or high PIP ventilated TRPV4−/− lungs. Thus TRPV4+/+ macrophages restored susceptibility of TRPV4−/− lungs to mechanical injury. A TRPV4 agonist increased intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in harvested TRPV4+/+ macrophages but not TRPV4−/− macrophages. Kf increases correlated with tissue nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite production. PMID:20562229

  11. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) augments acute lung injury via its neutrophil priming effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Chol; Jung, Jae Woo; Kwak, Hee Won; Song, Ju Han; Jeon, Eun Ju; Shin, Jong Wook; Park, In Won; Choi, Byoung Whui; Kim, Jae Yeol

    2008-04-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has immuno-stimulatory effects. We hypothesized that GM-CSF plays an important role both in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hemorrhage-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We also postulated that GM-CSF augments LPS-induced inflammation by priming neutrophils. ALI was induced in GM-CSF-/- or control C57BL mice either by LPS injection or by hemorrhage. Lung inflammation (by lung expression for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin- 6 (IL-6), and keratinocyte-derived chemokine) and lung injury (by myeloperoxidase and Evans blue dye assay) were evaluated after ALI. Incremental doses of LPS (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) and GM-CSF (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) were added to bone marrow neutrophils. The expression of TNF-alpha, MIP-2, and IL-1beta was evaluated with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA expression of three cytokines, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa-B) were evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. GM-CSF -/- mice showed decreased neutrophil infiltration, less leakage, and lower expression of cytokines in the lung after LPS or hemorrhage. GM-CSF augmented LPS-induced protein and mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, MIP-2 and IL-1beta, which was mediated by increased intra-nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. GM-CSF plays an important role in high-dose LPS and hemorrhage-induced ALI, which appears to be mediated by its priming effect on neutrophils.

  12. Trichostatin A attenuates ventilation-augmented epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mice with bleomycin-induced acute lung injury by suppressing the Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Fu; Lee, Chung-Shu; Lin, Chang-Wei; Chen, Ning-Hung; Chuang, Li-Pang; Hung, Chen-Yiu; Liu, Yung-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can cause diffuse lung inflammation, an effect termed ventilator-induced lung injury, which may produce profound pulmonary fibrogenesis. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and serine/threonine kinase/protein kinase B (Akt) are crucial in modulating the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) during the reparative phase of ARDS; however, the mechanisms regulating the interactions among MV, EMT, HDACs, and Akt remain unclear. We hypothesized that trichostatin A (TSA), a HDAC inhibitor, can reduce MV-augmented bleomycin-induced EMT by inhibiting the HDAC4 and Akt pathways. Methods Five days after bleomycin treatment to mimic acute lung injury (ALI), wild-type or Akt-deficient C57BL/6 mice were exposed to low-tidal-volume (low-VT, 6 mL/kg) or high-VT (30 mL/kg) MV with room air for 5 h after receiving 2 mg/kg TSA. Nonventilated mice were examined as controls. Results Following bleomycin exposure in wild-type mice, high-VT MV induced substantial increases in microvascular leaks; matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 proteins; free radical production; Masson’s trichrome staining; fibronectin, MMP-9, and collagen 1a1 gene expression; EMT (identified by increased localized staining of α-smooth muscle actin and decreased staining of E-cadherin); total HDAC activity; and HDAC4 and Akt activation (P < 0.05). In Akt-deficient mice, the MV-augmented lung inflammation, profibrotic mediators, EMT profiles, Akt activation, and pathological fibrotic scores were reduced and pharmacologic inhibition of HDAC4 expression was triggered by TSA (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our data indicate that TSA treatment attenuates high-VT MV-augmented EMT after bleomycin-induced ALI, in part by inhibiting the HDAC4 and Akt pathways. PMID:28234968

  13. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Deficiency Augments Visceral Mesothelial Organization, Intrapleural Coagulation, and Lung Restriction in Mice with Carbon Black/Bleomycin–Induced Pleural Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeffers, Ann; Alvarez, Alexia; Owens, Shuzi; Koenig, Kathleen; Quaid, Brandon; Komissarov, Andrey A.; Florova, Galina; Kothari, Hema; Pendurthi, Usha; Mohan Rao, L. Vijaya; Idell, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Local derangements of fibrin turnover and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pleural injury. However, their role in the control of pleural organization has been unclear. We found that a C57Bl/6j mouse model of carbon black/bleomycin (CBB) injury demonstrates pleural organization resulting in pleural rind formation (14 d). In transgenic mice overexpressing human PAI-1, intrapleural fibrin deposition was increased, but visceral pleural thickness, lung volumes, and compliance were comparable to wild type. CBB injury in PAI-1−/− mice significantly increased visceral pleural thickness (P < 0.001), elastance (P < 0.05), and total lung resistance (P < 0.05), while decreasing lung compliance (P < 0.01) and lung volumes (P < 0.05). Collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, and tissue factor were increased in the thickened visceral pleura of PAI-1−/− mice. Colocalization of α-smooth muscle actin and calretinin within pleural mesothelial cells was increased in CBB-injured PAI-1−/− mice. Thrombin, factor Xa, plasmin, and urokinase induced mesothelial–mesenchymal transition, tissue factor expression, and activity in primary human pleural mesothelial cells. In PAI-1−/− mice, D-dimer and thrombin–antithrombin complex concentrations were increased in pleural lavage fluids. The results demonstrate that PAI-1 regulates CBB-induced pleural injury severity via unrestricted fibrinolysis and cross-talk with coagulation proteases. Whereas overexpression of PAI-1 augments intrapleural fibrin deposition, PAI-1 deficiency promotes profibrogenic alterations of the mesothelium that exacerbate pleural organization and lung restriction. PMID:24024554

  14. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  15. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  16. Mild loss of lung aeration augments stretch in healthy lung regions.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Kadlecek, Stephen; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Profka, Harrilla; Kavanagh, Brian P; Rizi, Rahim R

    2016-02-15

    Inspiratory stretch by mechanical ventilation worsens lung injury. However, it is not clear whether and how the ventilator damages lungs in the absence of preexisting injury. We hypothesized that subtle loss of lung aeration during general anesthesia regionally augments ventilation and distension of ventilated air spaces. In eight supine anesthetized and intubated rats, hyperpolarized gas MRI was performed after a recruitment maneuver following 1 h of volume-controlled ventilation with zero positive end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP), FiO2 0.5, and tidal volume 10 ml/kg, and after a second recruitment maneuver. Regional fractional ventilation (FV), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of (3)He (a measurement of ventilated peripheral air space dimensions), and gas volume were measured in lung quadrants of ventral and dorsal regions of the lungs. In six additional rats, computed tomography (CT) images were obtained at each time point. Ventilation with ZEEP decreased total lung gas volume and increased both FV and ADC in all studied regions. Increases in FV were more evident in the dorsal slices. In each lung quadrant, higher ADC was predicted by lower gas volume and by increased mean values (and heterogeneity) of FV distribution. CT scans documented 10% loss of whole-lung aeration and increased density in the dorsal lung, but no macroscopic atelectasis. Loss of pulmonary gas at ZEEP increased fractional ventilation and inspiratory dimensions of ventilated peripheral air spaces. Such regional changes could help explain a propensity for mechanical ventilation to contribute to lung injury in previously uninjured lungs.

  17. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  18. Mild loss of lung aeration augments stretch in healthy lung regions

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yi; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Kadlecek, Stephen; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Profka, Harrilla; Kavanagh, Brian P.; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2015-01-01

    Inspiratory stretch by mechanical ventilation worsens lung injury. However, it is not clear whether and how the ventilator damages lungs in the absence of preexisting injury. We hypothesized that subtle loss of lung aeration during general anesthesia regionally augments ventilation and distension of ventilated air spaces. In eight supine anesthetized and intubated rats, hyperpolarized gas MRI was performed after a recruitment maneuver following 1 h of volume-controlled ventilation with zero positive end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP), FiO2 0.5, and tidal volume 10 ml/kg, and after a second recruitment maneuver. Regional fractional ventilation (FV), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of 3He (a measurement of ventilated peripheral air space dimensions), and gas volume were measured in lung quadrants of ventral and dorsal regions of the lungs. In six additional rats, computed tomography (CT) images were obtained at each time point. Ventilation with ZEEP decreased total lung gas volume and increased both FV and ADC in all studied regions. Increases in FV were more evident in the dorsal slices. In each lung quadrant, higher ADC was predicted by lower gas volume and by increased mean values (and heterogeneity) of FV distribution. CT scans documented 10% loss of whole-lung aeration and increased density in the dorsal lung, but no macroscopic atelectasis. Loss of pulmonary gas at ZEEP increased fractional ventilation and inspiratory dimensions of ventilated peripheral air spaces. Such regional changes could help explain a propensity for mechanical ventilation to contribute to lung injury in previously uninjured lungs. PMID:26662053

  19. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  20. Aortic homograft for pulmonary artery augmentation in single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Pablo; Morales, Jose; Guzman, Enrique; Tellez, Jose L; Niebla, Benito A; Avalos, Alejandro; Patiño, Hilda

    2005-06-01

    We present a case of unilateral lung transplantation in which a segment of the donor's descending aorta was used as a homograft for pulmonary artery augmentation in the donor lung. This technique can be used when the donor's lung artery has been cut at the base of the hilum during the harvesting procedure.

  1. Brain injury requires lung protection

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Aguilar, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    The paper entitled “The high-mobility group protein B1-Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (HMGB1-RAGE) axis mediates traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation” published recently in Science Translational Medicine links lung failure after transplantation with alterations in the axis HMGB1-RAGE after TBI, opening a new field for exploring indicators for the early detection of patients at risk of developing acute lung injury (ALI). The lung is one of the organs most vulnerable to the inflammatory cascade triggered by TBI. HMGB1 is an alarm in that can be released from activated immune cells in response to tissue injury. Increased systemic HMGB1 concentration correlates with poor lung function before and after lung transplant, confirming its role in acute ALI after TBI. HMGB1 exerts its influence by interacting with several receptors, including the RAGE receptor. RAGE also plays an important role in the onset of innate immune inflammatory responses, and systemic levels of RAGE are strongly associated with ALI and clinical outcomes in ventilator-induced lung injury. RAGE ligation to HMGB1 triggers the amplification of the inflammatory cascade involving nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Identifying early biomarkers that mediate pulmonary dysfunction will improve outcomes not only in lung transplantation, but also in other scenarios. These novel findings show that upregulation of the HMGB1-RAGE axis plays an important role in brain-lung crosstalk. PMID:26046092

  2. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  3. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  4. Inhibiting Glutathione Metabolism in Lung Lining Fluid as a Strategy to Augment Antioxidant Defense.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Brady, Martin; Hiratake, Jun

    2011-07-01

    Glutathione is abundant in the lining fluid that bathes the gas exchange surface of the lung. On the one hand glutathione in this extracellular pool functions in antioxidant defense to protect cells and proteins in the alveolar space from oxidant injury; on the other hand, it functions as a source of cysteine to maintain cellular glutathione and protein synthesis. These seemingly opposing functions are regulated through metabolism by gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, EC 2.3.2.2). Even under normal physiologic conditions, lung lining fluid (LLF) contains a concentrated pool of GGT activity exceeding that of whole lung by about 7-fold and indicating increased turnover of glutathione at the epithelial surface of the lung. With oxidant stress LLF GGT activity is amplified even further as glutathione turnover is accelerated to meet the increased demands of cells for cysteine. Mouse models of GGT deficiency confirmed this biological role of LLF GGT activity and revealed the robust expansiveness and antioxidant capacity of the LLF glutathione pool in the absence of metabolism. Acivicin, an irreversible inhibitor of GGT, can be utilized to augment LLF fluid glutathione content in normal mice and novel GGT inhibitors have now been defined that provide advantages over acivicin. Inhibiting LLF GGT activity is a novel strategy to selectively augment the extracellular LLF glutathione pool. The enhanced antioxidant capacity can maintain lung epithelial cell integrity and barrier function under oxidant stress.

  5. Rtp801 Suppression of Epithelial mTORC1 Augments Endotoxin-Induced Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nadon, Aaron M.; Perez, Mario J.; Hernandez-Saavedra, Daniel; Smith, Lynelle P.; Yang, Yimu; Sanders, Linda A.; Gandjeva, Aneta; Chabon, Jacob; Koyanagi, Daniel E.; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Schmidt, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cellular responses to environmental stress. mTOR (and its primary complex mTORC1) is, therefore, ideally positioned to regulate lung inflammatory responses to an environmental insult, a function directly relevant to disease states such as the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Our previous work in cigarette smoke–induced emphysema identified a novel protective role of pulmonary mTORC1 signaling. However, studies of the impact of mTORC1 on the development of acute lung injury are conflicting. We hypothesized that Rtp801, an endogenous inhibitor of mTORC1, which is predominantly expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells, is activated during endotoxin-induced lung injury and functions to suppress anti-inflammatory epithelial mTORC1 responses. We administered intratracheal lipopolysaccharide to wild-type mice and observed a significant increase in lung Rtp801 mRNA. In lipopolysaccharide-treated Rtp801−/− mice, epithelial mTORC1 activation significantly increased and was associated with an attenuation of lung inflammation. We reversed the anti-inflammatory phenotype of Rtp801−/− mice with the mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, reassuring against mTORC1-independent effects of Rtp801. We confirmed the proinflammatory effects of Rtp801 by generating a transgenic Rtp801 overexpressing mouse, which displayed augmented inflammatory responses to intratracheal endotoxin. These data suggest that epithelial mTORC1 activity plays a protective role against lung injury, and its inhibition by Rtp801 exacerbates alveolar injury caused by endotoxin. PMID:25016184

  6. Visualizing the Propagation of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Jiang, YunQing; Hamedani, Hooman; Profka, Harrilla; Kadlecek, Stephen; Clapp, Justin; Deshpande, Charuhas G.; Wu, Jue; Gee, James C.; Kavanagh, Brian P.; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation worsens acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but this secondary ‘ventilator-associated’ injury is variable and difficult to predict. We aimed to visualize the propagation of such ventilator-induced injury, in the presence (and absence) of a primary underlying lung injury, and to determine the predictors of propagation. Methods Anesthetized rats (n=20) received acid aspiration (HCl) followed by ventilation with moderate tidal volume (VT). In animals surviving ventilation for at least two hours, propagation of injury was quantified using serial computed tomography (CT). Baseline lung status was assessed by oxygenation, lung weight, and lung strain (VT/expiratory lung volume). Separate groups of rats without HCl aspiration were ventilated with large (n=10) or moderate (n=6) VT. Results In 15 rats surviving longer than two hours, CT opacities spread outwards from the initial site of injury. Propagation was associated with higher baseline strain (propagation vs. no propagation, mean ± SD: 1.52 ± 0.13 vs. 1.16 ± 0.20, p<0.01), but similar oxygenation and lung weight. Propagation did not occur where baseline strain <1.29. In healthy animals, large VT caused injury that was propagated inwards from the lung periphery; in the absence of preexisting injury, propagation did not occur where strain was <2.0. Conclusions Compared with healthy lungs, underlying injury causes propagation to occur at a lower strain threshold and, it originates at the site of injury; this suggests that tissue around the primary lesion is more sensitive. Understanding how injury is propagated may ultimately facilitate a more individualized monitoring or management. PMID:26536308

  7. NOS-2 Inhibition in Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Filipczak, Piotr T; Senft, Albert P; Seagrave, JeanClare; Weber, Waylon; Kuehl, Philip J; Fredenburgh, Laura E; McDonald, Jacob D; Baron, Rebecca M

    2015-07-01

    Phosgene exposure via an industrial or warfare release produces severe acute lung injury (ALI) with high mortality, characterized by massive pulmonary edema, disruption of epithelial tight junctions, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidative stress. There are no targeted treatments for phosgene-induced ALI. Previous studies demonstrated that nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) is upregulated in the lungs after phosgene exposure; however, the role of NOS-2 in the pathogenesis of phosgene-induced ALI remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that NOS-2 expression in lung epithelium exacerbates inhaled endotoxin-induced ALI in mice, mediated partially through downregulation of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that a selective NOS-2 inhibitor delivered to the lung epithelium by inhalation would mitigate phosgene-induced ALI. Inhaled phosgene produced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, histologic lung injury, and lung NOS-2 expression at 24 h. Administration of the selective NOS-2 inhibitor 1400 W via inhalation, but not via systemic delivery, significantly attenuated phosgene-induced ALI and preserved epithelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, aerosolized 1400 W augmented expression of SP-B and prevented downregulation of tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), both critical for maintenance of normal lung physiology and barrier integrity. We also demonstrate for the first time that NOS-2-derived nitric oxide downregulates the ZO-1 expression at the transcriptional level in human lung epithelial cells, providing a novel target for ameliorating vascular leak in ALI. Our data demonstrate that lung NOS-2 plays a critical role in the development of phosgene-induced ALI and suggest that aerosolized NOS-2 inhibitors offer a novel therapeutic strategy for its treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  8. NOS-2 Inhibition in Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Filipczak, Piotr T.; Senft, Albert P.; Seagrave, JeanClare; Weber, Waylon; Kuehl, Philip J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosgene exposure via an industrial or warfare release produces severe acute lung injury (ALI) with high mortality, characterized by massive pulmonary edema, disruption of epithelial tight junctions, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidative stress. There are no targeted treatments for phosgene-induced ALI. Previous studies demonstrated that nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) is upregulated in the lungs after phosgene exposure; however, the role of NOS-2 in the pathogenesis of phosgene-induced ALI remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that NOS-2 expression in lung epithelium exacerbates inhaled endotoxin-induced ALI in mice, mediated partially through downregulation of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that a selective NOS-2 inhibitor delivered to the lung epithelium by inhalation would mitigate phosgene-induced ALI. Inhaled phosgene produced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, histologic lung injury, and lung NOS-2 expression at 24 h. Administration of the selective NOS-2 inhibitor 1400 W via inhalation, but not via systemic delivery, significantly attenuated phosgene-induced ALI and preserved epithelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, aerosolized 1400 W augmented expression of SP-B and prevented downregulation of tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), both critical for maintenance of normal lung physiology and barrier integrity. We also demonstrate for the first time that NOS-2-derived nitric oxide downregulates the ZO-1 expression at the transcriptional level in human lung epithelial cells, providing a novel target for ameliorating vascular leak in ALI. Our data demonstrate that lung NOS-2 plays a critical role in the development of phosgene-induced ALI and suggest that aerosolized NOS-2 inhibitors offer a novel therapeutic strategy for its treatment. PMID:25870319

  9. Augmented versus non-augmented open surgical repair of fresh tendo-achilles injury: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Partha Sarathi; Latif, Abdul; Bhattacharyya, Arunangsu

    2012-11-01

    Injuries to the tendo-achilles in our country are mostly open injuries due to fall or slippage into the Indian type of lavatory pan. After thorough debridement open repair of the tendoachilles is done by non-augmented or augmented method. We studied about the augmented versus non-augmented open surgicalrepair of fresh tendo-achilles injuries. This was a prospective randomised study. It is evaluated from the study that the mean operative time was about 29 minutes longer (p < 0.001) and there was about 7 cm longer (p < 0.001) incision needed in augmented repair group which is statistically significant. The study shows that, the functional outcome of non-augmented repair group is better at 6 months follow-up but at 9 months follow-up functional outcomes are comparable in both non-augmented and augmented repair groups. The time for full functional recovery is more in augmented repair group. So, it is safer to use non-augmented repair technique in the treatment of fresh cases of tendo-achilles injuries due to less operative time, smaller incision, less complications and early functional recovery.

  10. A biomechanical model of pendelluft induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-07-16

    Lung ventilation using high frequency oscillatory techniques have been documented to attain adequate gas exchange through various gas transport mechanisms. Among them, the pendelluft flow is considered one of the most crucial mechanisms. In this work, we computationally investigate the induction of abnormal mechanical stresses and a regionally trapped volume of gas due to pendelluft flow. Large eddy simulation was used to model the turbulence in an upper tracheobronchial lung geometry that was derived from CT scans. The pendelluft flow was captured by modeling physiological boundary conditions at the truncated level of the lung model that is sensitive to the coupled resistance and compliance of individual patients. The flow-volume and volume-pressure loops are characterized by irregular shapes and suggest abnormal regional lung ventilation. Incomplete loops were observed indicating gas trapping in these regions signifying a potential for local injury due to incomplete ventilation from a residual volume build-up at the end of the expiration phase. In addition, the gas exchange between units was observed to create a velocity gradient causing a region of high wall shear stress surrounding the carina ridges. The recurrence of the pendelluft flow could cause a rupture to the lung epithelium layer. The trapped gas and wall shear stress were observed to amplify with increasing compliance asymmetry and ventilator operating frequency. In general, despite the significant contribution of the pendelluft flow to the gas exchange augmentation there exists significant risks of localized lung injury, phenomena we describe as pendelluft induced lung injury or PILI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gennai, Stéphane; Pison, Christophe; Briot, Raphaël

    2014-09-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage arising from the first hours after transplantation. The first etiology of the primary graft dysfunction in lung is ischemia-reperfusion. It is burdened by an important morbi-mortality. Lung ischemia-reperfusion increases the oxidative stress, inactivates the sodium pump, increases the intracellular calcium, leads to cellular death and the liberation of pro-inflammatory mediators. Researches relative to the reduction of the lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries are numerous but few of them found a place in common clinical practice, because of an insufficient level of proofs. Ex vivolung evaluation is a suitable technique in order to evaluate therapeutics supposed to limit lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries.

  12. In vitro fusion of lung lamellar bodies and plasma membrane is augmented by lung synexin.

    PubMed

    Chander, A; Wu, R D

    1991-11-05

    Lamellar bodies of lung epithelial type II cells undergo fusion with plasma membrane prior to exocytosis of surfactant into the alveolar lumen. Since synexin from adrenal glands promotes aggregation and fusion of chromaffin granules, we purified synexin-like proteins from bovine lung cytosolic fraction, and evaluated their effect on the fusion of isolated lamellar bodies and plasma membrane fractions. Synexin activity, which co-purified with an approx. 47 kDa protein (pI 6.8), was assessed by following calcium-dependent aggregation of liposomes prepared from a mixture of phosphatidylcholine:phosphatidylserine (PC:PS, 3:1, mol/mol). Lung synexin caused aggregation of liposomes approximating lung surfactant lipid-like composition, isolated lamellar bodies, or isolated plasma membrane fraction. Lung synexin promoted fusion only in the presence of calcium. It augmented fusion between lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, lamellar bodies and liposomes, or between two populations of liposomes. However, selectivity with regard to synexin-mediated fusion was observed as synexin did not promote fusion between plasma membrane and liposomes, or between liposomes of surfactant lipid-like composition and other liposomes. These observations support a role for lung synexin in membrane fusion between the plasma membrane and lamellar bodies during exocytosis of lung surfactant, and suggest that such fusion is dependent on composition of interacting membranes.

  13. Lung epithelial cell focal adhesion kinase signaling inhibits lung injury and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Amanda K; Agarwal, Manisha; Jia, Shijing; Kim, Kevin K

    2017-05-01

    Progressive pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating consequence of many acute and chronic insults to the lung. Lung injury leads to alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) death, destruction of the basement membrane, and activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). There is subsequent resolution of the injury and a coordinated and concurrent initiation of fibrosis. Both of these processes may involve activation of similar intracellular signaling pathways regulated in part by dynamic changes to the extracellular matrix. Matrix signaling can augment the profibrotic fibroblast response to TGF-β. However, similar matrix/integrin signaling pathways may also be involved in the inhibition of ongoing TGF-β-induced AEC apoptosis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an integrin-associated signaling molecule expressed by many cell types. We used mice with AEC-specific FAK deletion to isolate the epithelial aspect of integrin signaling in the bleomycin model of lung injury and fibrosis. Mice with AEC-specific deletion of FAK did not exhibit spontaneous lung injury but did have significantly greater terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nick-end labeling-positive cells (18.6 vs. 7.1) per ×200 field, greater bronchoalveolar lavage protein (3.2 vs. 1.8 mg/ml), and significantly greater death (77 vs. 19%) after bleomycin injury compared with littermate control mice. Within primary AECs, activated FAK directly associates with caspase-8 and inhibits activation of the caspase cascade resulting in less apoptosis in response to TGF-β. Our studies support a model in which dynamic changes to the extracellular matrix after injury promote fibroblast activation and inhibition of epithelial cell apoptosis in response to TGF-β through FAK activation potentially complicating attempts to nonspecifically target this pathway for antifibrotic therapy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jawa, Randeep S; Anillo, Sergio; Kulaylat, Mahmoud N

    2008-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) refers to a clinical syndrome of acute lung injury that occurs in a temporal relationship with the transfusion of blood products. Because of the difficulty in making its diagnosis, TRALI is often underreported. Three not necessarily mutually exclusive hypotheses have been described to explain its etiogenesis: antibody mediated, non-antibody mediated, and two hit mechanisms. Treatment is primarily supportive and includes supplemental oxygen. Diuretics are generally not indicated, as hypovolemia should be avoided. Compared with many other forms of acute lung injury, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome, TRALI is generally transient, reverses spontaneously, and carries a better prognosis. A variety of prevention strategies have been proposed, ranging from restrictive transfusion strategies to using plasma derived only from males.

  15. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  16. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  17. Endothelin antagonists: new bullets against lung injury?

    PubMed

    Leeman, Marc

    2005-06-01

    Acute lung injury is a syndrome of inflammation and of increased permeability of the blood-gas barrier. Endothelins are thought to exert proinflammatory effects. Kuklin and colleagues show that the endothelin receptor antagonist tezosentan reduces pulmonary edema in endotoxemic sheep, in parallel with a prevention of protein kinase C-alpha activation. In turn, the level of some cytokines increased after tezosentan treatment. Whether these contrasting effects of endothelin blockade on inflammatory mechanisms have clinical relevance and whether these agents might benefit patients with acute lung injury is unknown.

  18. Biomarkers of Lung Injury in Cardiothoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; van Oeveren, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of pulmonary dysfunction is currently almost entirely based on a vast series of physiological changes, but comprehensive research is focused on determining biomarkers for early diagnosis of pulmonary dysfunction. Here we discuss the use of biomarkers of lung injury in cardiothoracic surgery and their ability to detect subtle pulmonary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Degranulation products of neutrophils are often used as biomarker since they have detrimental effects on the pulmonary tissue by themselves. However, these substances are not lung specific. Lung epithelium specific proteins offer more specificity and slowly find their way into clinical studies. PMID:25866435

  19. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  20. Smoke Inhalation Lung Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Demling, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to present a multifaceted, definitive review of the past and current status of smoke inhalation injury. History along with current understanding of anatomical, physiology, and biologic components will be discussed. Methods: The literature has been reviewed from the early onset of the concept of smoke inhalation in the 1920s to our current understanding as of 2007. Results: The results indicate that the current pathophysiologic concept is of a disease process that leads to immediate and delayed pulmonary injury best managed by aggressive physiologic support. Management approaches for the biochemical changes have not kept up with current knowledge. The lung injury process is activated by toxins in the smoke's gas and particle components and perpetuated by a resulting lung inflammation. This inflammatory process becomes self-perpetuating through the activation of a large number of inflammatory cascades. In addition, smoke injury leads to significant systemic abnormalities injuring other organs and accentuating the burn injury process and subsequently leading to mediator-induced cellular injury leading potentially to multisystem organ failure. Conclusions: Smoke inhalation injury results in the anatomic finding of denuded and sometimes sloughed airways mucosa. Physiologic findings include small airways containing fibrin casts of mucosa and neutrophils. Airway hyper-reactivity results as well, leading to further decreased collapse, causing obstruction. PMID:18552974

  1. Potential Biochemical Mechanisms of Lung Injury in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that the lung is one of the target organs for microangiopathy in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Diabetes is associated with physiological and structural abnormalities in the diabetic lung concurrent with attenuated lung function. Despite intensive investigations in recent years, the pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic lung injury remain largely elusive. In this review, we summarize currently postulated mechanisms of diabetic lung injury. We mainly focus on the pathogenesis of diabetic lung injury that implicates key pathways, including oxidative stress, non-enzymatic protein glycosylation, polyol pathway, NF-κB pathway, and protein kinase c pathway. We also highlight that while numerous studies have mainly focused on tissue or cell damage in the lung, studies focusing on mitochondrial dysfunction in the diabetic lung have remained sketchy. Hence, further understanding of mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic lung injury should provide invaluable insights into future therapeutic approaches for diabetic lung injury. PMID:28203478

  2. Neurological outcome after experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Biener, Ingeborg; Czaplik, Michael; Nolte, Kay; Dembinski, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Fries, Michael

    2011-12-15

    We examined the influences of acute lung injury and hypoxia on neurological outcome. Functional performance was assessed using a neurocognitive test and a neurologic deficit score (NDS) five days before. On experimental day, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to hypoxia only (HO group, n=5) or to acute lung injury (ALI group, n=5). Hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, systemic cytokines and further physiologic variables were obtained at baseline, at the time of ALI, 2, 4 and 8h thereafter. Subsequently, injured lungs were recruited and animals weaned from the ventilator. Neurocognitive testing was re-examined for five days. Then, brains were harvested for neurohistopathology. After the experiment, neurocognitive performance was significantly worsened and the NDS increased in the ALI group. Histopathology revealed no significant differences. Oxygenation was comparable between groups although significantly higher inspiratory pressures occured after ALI. Cytokines showed a trend towards higher levels after ALI. Neurocognitive compromise after ALI seems due to a more pronounced inflammatory response and complex mechanical ventilation.

  3. Surfactant for Pediatric Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Willson, Douglas F.; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS, including the multifaceted pathology of inflammatory lung injury, the effectiveness of surfactant delivery in injured lungs, and composition-based activity differences among clinical exogenous surfactant preparations. PMID:18501754

  4. Atelectasis causes alveolar injury in nonatelectatic lung regions.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Shinya; Engelberts, Doreen; Peltekova, Vanya; Hopkins, Natalie; Frndova, Helena; Babyn, Paul; McKerlie, Colin; Post, Martin; McLoughlin, Paul; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2006-08-01

    Many authors have suggested that the mechanism by which atelectasis contributes to injury is through the repetitive opening and closing of distal airways in lung regions that are atelectatic. However, neither the topographic nor mechanistic relationships between atelectasis and distribution of lung injury are known. To investigate how atelectasis contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury. Surfactant depletion was performed in anesthetized rats that were then allocated to noninjurious or injurious ventilation for 90 min. Lung injury was quantified by gas exchange, compliance, histology, wet-to-dry weight, and cytokine expression, and its distribution by histology, stereology, cytokine mRNA expression, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Functional residual capacity, percent atelectasis, and injury-induced lung water accumulation were measured using gravimetric and volumetric techniques. Atelectasis occurred in the dependent lung regions. Injurious ventilation was associated with alveolar and distal airway injury, while noninjurious ventilation was not. With injurious ventilation, alveolar injury (i.e., histology, myeloperoxidase protein expression, quantification, and localization of cytokine mRNA expression) was maximal in nondependent regions, whereas distal airway injury was equivalent in atelectatic and nonatelectatic regions. These data support the notion that lung injury associated with atelectasis involves trauma to the distal airways. We provide topographic and biochemical evidence that such distal airway injury is not localized solely to atelectatic areas, but is instead generalized in both atelectatic and nonatelectatic lung regions. In contrast, alveolar injury associated with atelectasis does not occur in those areas that are atelectatic but occurs instead in remote nonatelectatic alveoli.

  5. Influenza lung injury: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gregory, David J; Kobzik, Lester

    2015-11-15

    In this Perspectives, we discuss some recent developments in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury following influenza infection, with an emphasis on promising therapeutic leads. Damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier has been quantified in mice, and agents have been identified that can help to preserve barrier integrity, such as vasculotide, angiopoietin-like 4 neutralization, and sphingosine 1-phosphate mimics. Results from studies using mesenchymal stem cells have been disappointing, despite promising data in other types of lung injury. The roles of fatty acid binding protein 5, prostaglandin E2, and the interplay between IFN-γ and STAT1 in epithelial signaling during infection have been addressed in vitro. Finally, we discuss the role of autophagy in inflammatory cytokine production and the viral life cycle and the opportunities this presents for intervention.

  6. Alcohol and lung injury and immunity.

    PubMed

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Chen, Michael M; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Sisson, Joseph H; Burnham, Ellen L; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Annually, excessive alcohol use accounts for more than $220 billion in economic costs and 80,000 deaths, making excessive alcohol use the third leading lifestyle-related cause of death in the US. Patients with an alcohol-use disorder (AUD) also have an increased susceptibility to respiratory pathogens and lung injury, including a 2-4-fold increased risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This review investigates some of the potential mechanisms by which alcohol causes lung injury and impairs lung immunity. In intoxicated individuals with burn injuries, activation of the gut-liver axis drives pulmonary inflammation, thereby negatively impacting morbidity and mortality. In the lung, the upper airway is the first checkpoint to fail in microbe clearance during alcohol-induced lung immune dysfunction. Brief and prolonged alcohol exposure drive different post-translational modifications of novel proteins that control cilia function. Proteomic approaches are needed to identify novel alcohol targets and post-translational modifications in airway cilia that are involved in alcohol-dependent signal transduction pathways. When the upper airway fails to clear inhaled pathogens, they enter the alveolar space where they are primarily cleared by alveolar macrophages (AM). With chronic alcohol ingestion, oxidative stress pathways in the AMs are stimulated, thereby impairing AM immune capacity and pathogen clearance. The epidemiology of pneumococcal pneumonia and AUDs is well established, as both increased predisposition and illness severity have been reported. AUD subjects have increased susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia infections, which may be due to the pro-inflammatory response of AMs, leading to increased oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Xanthine oxidase inhibition attenuates ischemic-reperfusion lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.J.; Grum, C.M.; Gallagher, K.P.; Bolling, S.F.; Deeb, G.M.; Morganroth, M.L.

    1988-05-01

    Ischemic-reperfusion lung injury is a factor potentially limiting the usefulness of distant organ procurement for heart-lung transplantation. Toxic oxygen metabolites are considered a major etiologic factor in reperfusion injury. Although oxygen-free radicals may be generated by many mechanisms, we investigated the role of xanthine oxidase in this injury process by using lodoxamide, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, to inhibit ischemic-reperfusion injury in an isolated rat lung model. Isolated rat lungs were perfused with physiologic salt solution (PSS) osmotically stabilized with Ficoll until circulating blood elements were nondetectable in the pulmonary venous effluent. Lungs were rendered ischemic by interrupting ventilation and perfusion for 2 hr at 37/sup 0/C. After the ischemic interval, the lungs were reperfused with whole blood and lung injury was determined by measuring the accumulation of /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin in lung parenchyma and alveolar lavage fluid as well as by gravimetric measurements. Lung effluent was collected immediately pre- and postischemia for analysis of uric acid by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lodoxamide (1 mM) caused significant attenuation of postischemic lung injury. Uric acid levels in the lung effluent confirmed inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Protection from injury was not complete, however, implying that additional mechanisms may contribute to ischemic-reperfusion injury in the lung.

  8. Lung Injury After One-Lung Ventilation: A Review of the Pathophysiologic Mechanisms Affecting the Ventilated and the Collapsed Lung.

    PubMed

    Lohser, Jens; Slinger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Lung injury is the leading cause of death after thoracic surgery. Initially recognized after pneumonectomy, it has since been described after any period of 1-lung ventilation (OLV), even in the absence of lung resection. Overhydration and high tidal volumes were thought to be responsible at various points; however, it is now recognized that the pathophysiology is more complex and multifactorial. All causative mechanisms known to trigger ventilator-induced lung injury have been described in the OLV setting. The ventilated lung is exposed to high strain secondary to large, nonphysiologic tidal volumes and loss of the normal functional residual capacity. In addition, the ventilated lung experiences oxidative stress, as well as capillary shear stress because of hyperperfusion. Surgical manipulation and/or resection of the collapsed lung may induce lung injury. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung at the conclusion of OLV invariably induces duration-dependent, ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inflammatory cytokines are released in response to localized injury and may promote local and contralateral lung injury. Protective ventilation and volatile anesthesia lessen the degree of injury; however, increases in biochemical and histologic markers of lung injury appear unavoidable. The endothelial glycocalyx may represent a common pathway for lung injury creation during OLV, because it is damaged by most of the recognized lung injurious mechanisms. Experimental therapies to stabilize the endothelial glycocalyx may afford the ability to reduce lung injury in the future. In the interim, protective ventilation with tidal volumes of 4 to 5 mL/kg predicted body weight, positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 to 10 cm H2O, and routine lung recruitment should be used during OLV in an attempt to minimize harmful lung stress and strain. Additional strategies to reduce lung injury include routine volatile anesthesia and efforts to minimize OLV duration and hyperoxia.

  9. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  10. Mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury in healthy lungs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro Leme; Negrini, Daniela; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macêdo

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an essential method of patient support, but it may induce lung damage, leading to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is the result of a complex interplay among various mechanical forces that act on lung structures, such as type I and II epithelial cells, endothelial cells, macrophages, peripheral airways, and the extracellular matrix (ECM), during mechanical ventilation. This article discusses ongoing research focusing on mechanisms of VILI in previously healthy lungs, such as in the perioperative period, and the development of new ventilator strategies for surgical patients. Several experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of mechanotransduction in each cell type and in the ECM, as well as the role of different ventilator parameters in inducing or preventing VILI. VILI may be attenuated by reducing the tidal volume; however, the use of higher or lower levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers during the perioperative period is a matter of debate. Many questions concerning the mechanisms of VILI in surgical patients remain unanswered. The optimal threshold value of each ventilator parameter to reduce VILI is also unclear. Further experimental and clinical studies are necessary to better evaluate ventilator settings during the perioperative period in different types of surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Paraquat lung injury in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Seidenfeld, J J; Wycoff, D; Zavala, D C; Richerson, H B

    1978-01-01

    An aerosol model for the study of paraquat (PQ) toxicity was developed using a 134 litre chamber and an ultrasonic nebuliser. Three groups of New Zealand white rabbits weighing 2-3 kg were studied. Group I (n = 6) was exposed to 10 g PQ/100 ml double-distilled water (DDW), Group II (n = 24) was exposed to 200 mg PQ/100 Ml DDW and a control group (n = 6) was exposed to 100 ml DDW. In a second experiment ten animals (Group III) were exposed to 10 mg PQ/100 ML DDW over a three-month period together with a control group (n = 5). Group I animals died with extensive haemorrhagic pneumonitis 38 hours after the last challenge. Most animals in Group II surviving more than three exposures had a significant reduction (P less than 0.001) in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) and an increase (P less than 0.001) in the alveolar-arterial O2 gradient. Specific compliance decreased (P less than 0.005) and functional residual capacity and breathing frequency increased (P less than 0.05). Tissue PQ values showed even pulmonary distribution, with evidence of PQ accumulation after repeated inhalation. The lungs showed focal interstitial fibrosis, interstitial thickening, proliferation of macrophages in the alveoli, epithelioid changes in the interstitium, Type II cell hyperplasia, and foci of acute inflammation with consolidation. Controls and Group III animals were normal. This indicates that repeated inhalation of paraquat aerosol induces dose-related interstitial pneumonitis and fibrosis in rabbits. Images PMID:698141

  12. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  13. Smoked marijuana as a cause of lung injury.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, D P

    2005-06-01

    In many societies, marijuana is the second most commonly smoked substance after tobacco. While delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is unique to marijuana and nicotine to tobacco, the smoke of marijuana, like that of tobacco, consists of a toxic mixture of gases and particulates, many of which are known to be harmful to the lung. Although far fewer marijuana than tobacco cigarettes are generally smoked on a daily basis, the pulmonary consequences of marijuana smoking may be magnified by the greater deposition of smoke particulates in the lung due to the differing manner in which marijuana is smoked. Whereas THC causes modest short-term bronchodilation, regular marijuana smoking produces a number of long-term pulmonary consequences, including chronic cough and sputum, histopathologic evidence of widespread airway inflammation and injury and immunohistochemical evidence of dysregulated growth of respiratory epithelial cells, that may be precursors to lung cancer. The THC in marijuana could contribute to some of these injurious changes through its ability to augment oxidative stress, cause mitochondrial dysfunction, and inhibit apoptosis. On the other hand, physiologic, clinical or epidemiologic evidence that marijuana smoking may lead to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or respiratory cancer is limited and inconsistent. Habitual use of marijuana is also associated with abnormalities in the structure and function of alveolar macrophages, including impairment in microbial phagocytosis and killing that is associated with defective production of immunostimulatory cytokines and nitric oxide, thereby potentially predisposing to pulmonary infection. In view of the growing interest in medicinal marijuana, further epidemiologic studies are needed to clarify the true risks of regular marijuana smoking on respiratory health.

  14. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  15. Cigarette smoke augments asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell injury: role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Kamp, D W; Greenberger, M J; Sbalchierro, J S; Preusen, S E; Weitzman, S A

    1998-10-01

    Cigarette smoke augments asbestos-induced bronchogenic carcinoma by mechanisms that are not established. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury due to oxidant-induced DNA damage and depletion of glutathione (GSH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) may be one important mechanism. We previously showed that amosite asbestos-induces hydroxyl radical production and DNA damage to cultured AEC and that phytic acid, an iron chelator, is protective. We hypothesized that whole cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) augment amosite asbestos-induced AEC injury by generating iron-induced free radicals that damage DNA and reduce cellular GSH and ATP levels. Asbestos or CSE each caused dose-dependent toxicity to AEC (WI-26 and rat alveolar type I-like cells) as assessed by 51chromium release. The combination of asbestos (5 microg/cm2) and CSE (0.O1-0.1%) caused synergistic injury whereas higher doses of each agent primarily had an additive toxic effect. Asbestos (5 microg/cm2) augmented CSE-induced (0.01-1.0%) AEC DNA damage over a 4 h exposure period as assessed by an alkaline unwinding, ethidium bromide fluorometric technique. These effects were synergistic in A549 cells and additive in WI-26 cells. Asbestos (5 microg/cm2) and CSE (0.5-1.0%) reduced A549 and WI-26 cell GSH levels as assessed spectrophotometrically and ATP levels as assessed by luciferin/luciferase chemiluminescence but a synergistic interaction was not detected. Phytic acid (500 microM) and catalase (100 microg/ml) each attenuated A549 cell DNA damage and depletion of ATP caused by asbestos and CSE. However, neither agent attenuated WI-26 cell DNA damage nor the reductions in GSH levels in WI-26 and A549 cells exposed to asbestos and CSE. We conclude that CSE enhance asbestos-induced DNA damage in cultured alveolar epithelial cells. These data provide additional support that asbestos and cigarette smoke are genotoxic to relevant target cells in the lung and that iron-induced free radicals may in part cause these effects.

  16. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Schweisfurth, H; Sopivnik, I; Moog, R

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is primarily caused by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma or platelet concentrates and occurs by definition within 6 hours after transfusion with acute shortness of breath, hypoxemia and radiographically detectable bilateral infiltrates of the lung. Mostly leucocyte antibodies in the plasma of the blood donor (immunogenic TRALI) are responsible. Apart from antibodies, other substances such as biologically active lipids, mainly arising from the storage of platelet and red blood cell concentrates, can activate neutrophilic granulocytes and trigger a non-immunogenic TRALI. Pathophysiologically, granulocytes in the capillaries of the lung vessels release oxygen radicals and enzymes which damage the endothelial cells and cause pulmonary edema. Therapeutically, nasal oxygen administration may be sufficient. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and fluid intake are required. Diuretics should be avoided. The administration of glucocorticoids is controversial. Antibody-related TRALI reactions occurred mainly after transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, which had been obtained from womenimmunized during pregnancy against leukocyte antigens. Therefore, in Germany, since 2009 only plasma from female donors without a history of prior or current pregnancy or negative testing for antibodies against HLA I, II or HNA has been used with the result that since then no TRALI-related death has been registered.

  17. Prevention of lung injury in cardiac surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory lung injury is an inevitable consequence of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The lungs are particularly susceptible to the effects of the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. This insult is further exacerbated by a pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury after termination of bypass. Older patients and those with pre-existing lung disease will clearly be less tolerant of any lung injury and more likely to develop respiratory failure in the postoperative period. A requirement for prolonged ventilation has implications for morbidity, mortality, and cost of treatment. This review contains a summary of recent interventions and changes of practice that may reduce inflammatory lung injury after cardiac surgery. The review also focuses on a number of general aspects of perioperative management, which may exacerbate such injury, if performed poorly.

  18. Acute Lung Injury: Making Injured Lungs Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    systemic inflammatory response in patients with acute lung injury. Int Care Med 2002; 28: 834-841. 5. Grasso S, Stripoli T, De Michele M. ARDS Net...Chairs Jonathan Woodson, M.D. (Chair) (617) 638-8488 Louis Vachon , M.D. (Vice-Chair) (617) 638-8173 Sanford Auerbach, M.D. (Chair) (617) 638

  19. Acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure following paracetamol poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, S. V.; Howdle, P.; O'Grady, J. G.; Webster, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is little information on the incidence of acute lung injury or changes in the pulmonary circulation in acute liver failure. The aim of this study was to record the incidence of acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, to document the associated pulmonary circulatory changes, and to assess the impact of lung injury on patient outcome. METHODS--The degree of lung injury was retrospectively assessed by a standard scoring system (modified from Murray) in all patients with fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, admitted to the intensive care unit over a one year period. The severity of liver failure and illness, other organ system failure, and patient outcome were also analysed. RESULTS--Twenty four patients with paracetamol-induced liver failure were admitted and nine developed lung injury of whom eight (33%) had severe injury (Murray score > 2.5). In two patients hypoxaemia contributed to death. Patients with lung injury had higher median encephalopathy grades (4 v 2 in the non-injured group) and APACHE II scores (29 v 16). Circulatory failure, requiring vasoconstrictor support, occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 40% of those without. Cerebral oedema, as detected by abnormal rises in intracranial pressure, also occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 27% of the non-injured patients. The incidence of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy was similar in both groups (67% and 47%). Pulmonary artery occlusion pressures were normal in the lung injury group. Cardiac output was high (median 11.2 1/min), systemic vascular resistance low (median 503 dynes/s/cm-5), and pulmonary vascular resistance low (median 70 dynes/s/cm-5), but not significantly different from the group without lung injury. Mortality was much higher in the lung injury group than in the non-injured group (89% v 13%). CONCLUSIONS--Acute lung injury was common in patients with paracetamol

  20. Induced hypernatraemia is protective in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Lawrence, Mark D; Bersten, Andrew D

    2016-06-15

    Sucrose induced hyperosmolarity is lung protective but the safety of administering hyperosmolar sucrose in patients is unknown. Hypertonic saline is commonly used to produce hyperosmolarity aimed at reducing intra cranial pressure in patients with intracranial pathology. Therefore we studied the protective effects of 20% saline in a lipopolysaccharide lung injury rat model. 20% saline was also compared with other commonly used fluids. Following lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury, male Sprague Dawley rats received either 20% hypertonic saline, 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, 20% albumin, 5% glucose or 20% albumin with 5% glucose, i.v. During 2h of non-injurious mechanical ventilation parameters of acute lung injury were assessed. Hypertonic saline resulted in hypernatraemia (160 (1) mmol/l, mean (SD)) maintained through 2h of ventilation, and in amelioration of lung oedema, myeloperoxidase, bronchoalveolar cell infiltrate, total soluble protein and inflammatory cytokines, and lung histological injury score, compared with positive control and all other fluids (p ≤ 0.001). Lung physiology was maintained (conserved PaO2, elastance), associated with preservation of alveolar surfactant (p ≤ 0.0001). Independent of fluid or sodium load, induced hypernatraemia is lung protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Vasoconstriction is required for edema of contralateral lung after reperfusion injury of one lung].

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Alejandro; Castro, Ignacio; Trejo, Humberto; Urich, Daniela; Caraballo, Juan; Gutiérrez, Jeydith; Cano, Camilo; Sánchez de León, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) lung injury is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in certain clinical scenarios that include transplantation, thromboendarterectomy and reexpansion injury of the lung. Edema of the contralateral lung after IR injury of one lung has been reported and this study was aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of this phenomenon. One-lung ischemia/hypoxia followed by reperfusion with either blood or an acellular plasma substitute was achieved in an isolated rabbit lung model by hilum clamping. After reperfusion, we studied the isolated effects of vasoconstriction and inflammation on contralateral lung injury by using papaverine or hydrocortisone as vasodilator and anti-inflammatory, respectively. We observed that IR of one lung induces edema of the contralateral lung. Absence of leukocytes and platelets in the perfusate or use of hydrocortisone completely inhibits IR injury. Moreover, papaverine suppresses edema of the contralateral, but not that of the reperfused lung. We concluded that IR of one lung produces edema in the contralateral lung that requires vasoconstriction of the latter.

  2. Pretreatment with perfluorohexane vapor attenuates fMLP-induced lung injury in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Bleyl, Jörg U; Heller, Axel R; Fehrenbach, Antonia; Heintz, Manuel; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Klenz, Gesa; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Hübler, Matthias; Spieth, Peter M; Koch, Thea

    2010-08-01

    The authors investigated the protective effects and dose dependency of perfluorohexane (PFH) vapor on leukocyte-mediated lung injury in isolated, perfused, and ventilated rabbit lungs. Lungs received either 18 vol.% (n = 7), 9 vol.% (n = 7), or 4.5 vol.% (n = 7) PFH. Fifteen minutes after beginning of PFH application, lung injury was induced with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Control lungs (n = 7) received fMLP only. In addition 5 lungs (PFH-sham) remained uninjured receiving 18 vol.% PFH only. Pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), peak inspiratory pressure (P(max)), and lung weight were monitored for 90 minutes. Perfusate samples were taken at regular intervals for analysis and representative lungs were fixed for histological analysis. In the control, fMLP application led to a significant increase of mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediators. Pretreatment with PFH attenuated the rise in these parameters. This was accompanied by preservation of the structural integrity of the alveolar architecture and air-blood barrier. In uninjured lungs, mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediator formation remained uneffected in the presence of PFH. The authors concluded that pretreatment with PFH vapor leads to an attenuation of leukocyte-mediated lung injury. Vaporization of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) offers new therapeutic options, making use of their protective and anti-inflammatory properties in prophylaxis or in early treatment of acute lung injury.

  3. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

  4. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Federico, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Approximately one person in 5,000 will experience an episode of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in conjunction with the transfusion of whole blood or blood components. Its hallmarks include hypoxemia, dyspnea, fever, hypotension, and bilateral pulmonary edema (noncardiogenic). The mortality for reported cases is 16.3%. The incidence and mortality may be even higher than estimated because of under-recognition and under-reporting. Although TRALI was identified as a clinical entity in the 1980s, a lack of consensus regarding a definition was present until 2004. An exact cause has yet to be identified; however, there are two theories regarding the etiology: the "antibody" and the "two-hit" theories. These theories involve both donor and recipient factors. Further education and research are needed to assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of TRALI.

  5. Acute Lung Injury after Phosgene Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung-Chul; Yang, Ju-Yeoul; Jang, An-Soo; Park, Yong-Uk; Kim, Young-Chul; Choi, In-Seon; Park, Kyung-Ok

    1996-01-01

    Phosgene (COCl2) is a colorless oxidant gas which is heavier than air and the lethal exposure dose (LC50) in humans is 500 ppm/min. This gas was originally manufactured as an agent for chemical warfare during World War I and there had been a great deal of studies on phosgene poisoning during the early years of industrial use. It is still widely used in the synthesis of chemicals and plastics. In the modern era, however, phosgene poisoning is relatively uncommon except in accidental exposures. In Korea, there has been no report about lung injury from phosgene inhalation. We present a clinical experience with six patients accidentally exposed to phosgene. PMID:8882481

  6. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury Following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Obervational Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studi...

  7. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury Following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Obervational Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studi...

  8. Acute lung injury, overhydration or both?

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, A B Johan; Polderman, Kees H

    2005-04-01

    Acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in the course of sepsis is thought to result from increased pulmonary capillary permeability and resultant edema. However, when the edema is assessed at the bedside by measuring the extravascular thermal volume by transpulmonary dilution, some ALI/ARDS patients with sepsis may have normal extravascular lung water (EVLW). Conversely, a raised EVLW may be present even when criteria for ALI/ARDS are not met, according to GS Martin and colleagues in this issue of Critical Care. This commentary puts the findings into a broader perspective and focuses on the difficulty, at the bedside, in recognizing and separating various types of pulmonary edema. Some of these forms of edema, classically differentiated on the basis of increased permeability and cardiogenic/hydrostatic factors, may overlap, whereas the criteria for ALI/ARDS may be loose, poorly reproducible, relatively insensitive and nonspecific, and highly therapy-dependent. Overhydration is particularly difficult to recognize. Additional diagnostics may be required to improve the delineation of pulmonary edema so as to redirect or redefine treatment and improve patient morbidity and, perhaps, mortality. Monitoring EVLW by single transpulmonary thermal dilution, for instance, might have a future role in this process.

  9. Platelets protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuhua; Wang, Yabo; An, Qi; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Wentong; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses can severely injure lungs, prompting efforts to explore how to attenuate such injury. Here we explored whether platelets can help attenuate lung injury in mice resulting from extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-induced systemic inflammatory responses. Mice were subjected to ECC for 30 min, then treated with phosphate-buffered saline, platelets, the GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban, or the combination of platelets and Tirofiban. Blood and lung tissues were harvested 60 min later, and lung injury and inflammatory status were assessed. As expected, ECC caused systemic inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction, and platelet transfusion resulted in significantly milder lung injury and higher lung function. It also led to greater numbers of circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates and greater platelet accumulation in the lung. Platelet transfusion was associated with higher production of transforming growth factor-β and as well as lower levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and neutrophil elastase in plasma and lung. None of these platelet effects was observed in the presence of Tirofiban. Our results suggest that, at least under certain conditions, platelets can protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:28155889

  10. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, DanDan; Han, JianZhong; Huang, YanHong; Luo, SiWei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang, XiaoTing; Luo, ZiQiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me), BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation. Results BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker) in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils. Conclusions Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice. PMID:25942563

  11. Enhanced fibrinolysis protects against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christine L; Zhao, Yunge; Kim, Jiyoun; Kron, Irving L; Sharma, Ashish; Yang, Zequan; Laubach, Victor E; Linden, Joel; Ailawadi, Gorav; Pinsky, David J

    2009-05-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury continues to plague the field of lung transplantation, resulting in suboptimal outcomes. In acute lung injury, processes such as ventilator-induced injury, sepsis, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, extravascular fibrin has been shown to promote lung dysfunction and the acute inflammatory response. This study investigates the role of the fibrinolytic cascade in lung ischemia-reperfusion injury and investigates the interplay between the fibrinolytic system and the inflammatory response. Mice lacking the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene (PAI-1 knock out, PAI-1 KO; and thus increased lysis of endogenous fibrin) and wild-type mice underwent in situ left lung ischemia and reperfusion. Fibrin content in the lung was evaluated by immunoblotting. Reperfusion injury was assessed by histologic and physiologic parameters. Proinflammatory mediators were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Ischemia-reperfusion causes fibrin deposition in murine lungs. Less fibrin was seen in PAI-1 KO mice than in wild-type mice subjected to the same ischemia-reperfusion conditions. By histologic criteria, more evidence of ischemia-reperfusion injury was noted (thickening of the interstium, cellular infiltration in the alveoli) in the wild-type than in PAI-1 KO mice. Physiologic parameters also revealed more ischemia-reperfusion injury in the wild-type than in PAI-1 KO mice. Cytokine and chemokines were elevated more in the wild-type group than the PAI-1 KO group. Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury triggers fibrin deposition in the murine lungs and fibrin creates a proinflammatory environment. Preventing fibrin deposition may reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation. This finding may lead to novel treatment strategies for ischemia-reperfusion.

  12. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  13. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Renata Salatti; Andrade, Cristiano Feijó

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is directly related to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endothelial cell injury, increased vascular permeability, and the activation of neutrophils and platelets, cytokines, and the complement system. Several studies have confirmed the destructiveness of the toxic oxygen metabolites produced and their role in the pathophysiology of different processes, such as oxygen poisoning, inflammation, and ischemic injury. Due to the different degrees of tissue damage resulting from the process of ischemia and subsequent reperfusion, several studies in animal models have focused on the prevention of IR injury and methods of lung protection. Lung IR injury has clinical relevance in the setting of lung transplantation and cardiopulmonary bypass, for which the consequences of IR injury may be devastating in critically ill patients. PMID:26161240

  15. Amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stromal cells augment fetal lung growth in a nitrofen explant model.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, Julie; Maiden, Michael M; Hershenson, Marc B; Kunisaki, Shaun M

    2014-06-01

    Recent experimental work suggests the therapeutic role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) during lung morphogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential paracrine effects of amniotic fluid-derived MSCs (AF-MSCs) on fetal lung growth in a nitrofen explant model. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were gavage fed nitrofen on gestational day 9.5 (E9.5). E14.5 lung explants were subsequently harvested and cultured ex vivo for three days on filter membranes in conditioned media from rat AF-MSCs isolated from control (AF-Ctr) or nitrofen-exposed (AF-Nitro) dams. The lungs were analyzed morphometrically and by quantitative gene expression. Although there were no significant differences in total lung surface area among hypoplastic lungs, there were significant increases in terminal budding among E14.5+3 nitrofen explants exposed to AF-Ctr compared to explants exposed to medium alone (58.8±8.4 vs. 39.0±10.0 terminal buds, respectively; p<0.05). In contrast, lungs cultured in AF-Nitro medium failed to augment terminal budding. Nitrofen explants exposed to AF-Ctr showed significant upregulation of surfactant protein C to levels observed in normal fetal lungs. AF-MSCs can augment branching morphogenesis and lung epithelial maturation in a fetal explant model of pulmonary hypoplasia. Cell therapy using donor-derived AF-MSCs may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of fetal congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Body temperature control in sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Giueng-Chueng; Chi, Wei-Ming; Perng, Wan-Cherng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2003-12-31

    Body temperature is precisely regulated to maintain homeostasis in homeothermic animals. Although it remains unproved whether change of body temperature constitutes a beneficial or a detrimental component of the septic response, temperature control should be an important entity in septic experiments. We investigated the effect of body temperature control on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Acute lung injury in rats was induced by intratracheal spray of LPS and body temperature was either clamped at 37 degrees C for 5 hours or not controlled. The severity of lung injury was evaluated at the end of the experiment. Intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS caused a persistent decline in body temperature and a significant lung injury as indicated by an elevation of protein-concentration and LDH activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of lungs. Administration of LPS also caused neutrophil sequestration and lipid peroxidation in the lung tissue as indicated by increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, respectively. Control of body temperature at 37 degrees C after LPS (LPS/BT37, n = 11) significantly reduced acute lung injury as evidenced by decreases in BAL fluid protein concentration (983 +/- 189 vs. 1403 +/- 155 mg/L) and LDH activity (56 +/- 10 vs. 123 +/- 17 deltamAbs/min) compared with the LPS group (n = 11). Although the W/D ratio of lung and MDA level were lower in the rats received temperature control compared with those received LPS only, the differences were not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS induced a hypothermic response and acute lung injury in rats and controlling body temperature at a normal range may alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury.

  17. Adenosine promotes vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jonathan; Karmouty‐Quintana, Harry; Le, Thuy T.; Chen, Ning‐Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Molina, Jose; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hyperoxic lung injury is characterized by cellular damage from high oxygen concentrations that lead to an inflammatory response in the lung with cellular infiltration and pulmonary edema. Adenosine is a signaling molecule that is generated extracellularly by CD73 in response to injury. Extracellular adenosine signals through cell surface receptors and has been found to be elevated and plays a protective role in acute injury situations. In particular, ADORA2B activation is protective in acute lung injury. However, little is known about the role of adenosine signaling in hyperoxic lung injury. We hypothesized that hyperoxia‐induced lung injury leads to CD73‐mediated increases in extracellular adenosine, which is protective through ADORA2B signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we exposed C57BL6, CD73−/−, and Adora2B−/− mice to 95% oxygen or room air and examined markers of pulmonary inflammation, edema, and monitored lung histology. Hyperoxic exposure caused pulmonary inflammation and edema in association with elevations in lung adenosine levels. Loss of CD73‐mediated extracellular adenosine production exacerbated pulmonary edema without affecting inflammatory cell counts. Furthermore, loss of the ADORA2B had similar results with worsening of pulmonary edema following hyperoxia exposure without affecting inflammatory cell infiltration. This loss of barrier function correlated with a decrease in occludin in pulmonary vasculature in CD73−/− and Adora2B−/− mice following hyperoxia exposure. These results demonstrate that exposure to a hyperoxic environment causes lung injury associated with an increase in adenosine concentration, and elevated adenosine levels protect vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury through the ADORA2B‐dependent regulation of occludin. PMID:25263205

  18. Reversal of dependent lung collapse predicts response to lung recruitment in children with early acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gerhard K; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Kheir, John N; Zurakowski, David; Walsh, Brian K; Adler, Andy; Arnold, John H

    2012-09-01

    To describe the resolution of regional atelectasis and the development of regional lung overdistension during a lung-recruitment protocol in children with acute lung injury. Prospective interventional trial. Pediatric intensive care unit. Ten children with early (<72 hrs) acute lung injury. Sustained inflation maneuver (positive airway pressure of 40 cm H2O for 40 secs), followed by a stepwise recruitment maneuver (escalating plateau pressures by 5 cm H2O every 15 mins) until physiologic lung recruitment, defined by PaO2 + PaCO2 ≥400 mm Hg, was achieved. Regional lung volumes and mechanics were measured using electrical impedance tomography. Patients that responded to the stepwise lung-recruitment maneuver had atelectasis in 54% of the dependent lung regions, while nonresponders had atelectasis in 10% of the dependent lung regions (p = .032). In the pressure step preceding physiologic lung recruitment, a significant reversal of atelectasis occurred in 17% of the dependent lung regions (p = .016). Stepwise recruitment overdistended 8% of the dependent lung regions in responders, but 58% of the same regions in nonresponders (p < .001). Lung compliance in dependent lung regions increased in responders, while compliance in nonresponders did not improve. In contrast to the stepwise recruitment maneuver, the sustained inflation did not produce significant changes in atelectasis or oxygenation: atelectasis was only reversed in 12% of the lung (p = .122), and there was only a modest improvement in oxygenation (27 ± 14 mm Hg, p = .088). Reversal of atelectasis in the most dependent lung region preceded improvements in gas exchange during a stepwise lung-recruitment strategy. Lung recruitment of dependent lung areas was accompanied by considerable overdistension of nondependent lung regions. Larger amounts of atelectasis in dependent lung areas were associated with a positive response to a stepwise lung-recruitment maneuver.

  19. DAP12 expression in lung macrophages mediates ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Jessica H.; Li, Wenjun; Bribriesco, Alejandro C.; Liu, Jie; Shen, Hua; Ibricevic, Aida; Pan, Jiehong; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Brody, Steven L.; Goldstein, Daniel R.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Miller, Mark J.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical mediators of innate immune responses and contribute to tissue injury. However, immune pathways that regulate neutrophil recruitment to injured tissues during noninfectious inflammation remain poorly understood. DAP12 is a cell-membrane associated protein that is expressed in myeloid cells and can either augment or dampen innate inflammatory responses during infections. To elucidate the role of DAP12 in pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury, we took advantage of a clinically relevant mouse model of transplant-mediated lung ischemia reperfusion injury. This technique allowed us to dissect the importance of DAP12 in tissue-resident cells and those that infiltrate injured tissue from the periphery during noninfectious inflammation. Macrophages in both mouse and human lungs that have been subjected to cold ischemic storage express DAP12. We found that donor, but not recipient deficiency in DAP12 protected against pulmonary ischemia reperfusion injury. Analysis of the immune response showed that DAP12 promotes the survival of tissue-resident alveolar macrophages and contributes to local production of neutrophil chemoattractants. Intravital imaging demonstrated a transendothelial migration defect into DAP12-deficient lungs, which can be rescued by local administration of the neutrophil chemokine CXCL2. We have uncovered a previously unrecognized role for DAP12 expression in tissue-resident alveolar macrophages in mediating acute noninfectious tissue injury through regulation of neutrophil trafficking. PMID:25762783

  20. Management of noninfectious lung injury following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Gregory; Kitko, Carrie

    2013-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, tremendous strides have been made to decrease treatment-related morbidity and mortality following allogeneic transplant, including management of acute and chronic lung injury. Within this context, three distinct entities are recognized, idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), and bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). Management options for each of these disorders are now reviewed. A recent pilot study and subsequent phase II trial suggest that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors hold promise in treating IPS. A randomized phase III trial ended prematurely, without a definitive conclusion regarding TNF inhibitors established. Few prospective trials for BOS have been performed, with current therapy based on observational studies and small case reports. Therapy for BOOP is based upon minimal clinical evidence. Although corticosteroids remain the backbone of therapy for IPS, BOS, and BOOP, TNF inhibition may augment management of IPS and potentially BOS as well. Diagnostic criteria for IPS and BOS have been established, although optimal treatment strategies will ultimately require consensus monitoring and response criteria, coupled with an improved understanding of the pathophysiology underlying each disorder. For BOS and BOOP in particular, therapy has been based upon a paucity of data and anecdotal experiences.

  1. Reduced ischemia-reperfusion injury with isoproterenol in non-heart-beating donor lungs.

    PubMed

    Jones, D R; Hoffmann, S C; Sellars, M; Egan, T M

    1997-05-01

    Transplantation of lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors could expand the donor pool. Recent studies suggest that the ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to the lung can be attenuated by increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of IRI on capillary permeability, as measured by Kfc, in lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors and reperfused with or without isoproterenol (iso). Using an in situ isolated perfused lung model, lungs were retrieved from non-heart-beating donor rats ventilated with O2 or not at varying intervals after death. The lungs were reperfused with or without iso (10 microM). Kfc, lung viability, and pulmonary hemodynamics were measured, and tissue levels of adenine nucleotides and cAMP were measured by HPLC. Iso-reperfusion decreased Kfc significantly (P < 0.05) compared to non-iso-reperfused groups at all postmortem ischemic times, irrespective of preharvest ventilation status. Pulmonary arterial pressures and resistances increased and venous resistances decreased with iso-reperfusion. Total adenine nucleotide (TAN) levels correlated with Kfc in non-iso-reperfused (r = 0.65) and iso-perfused (r = 0.84) lungs. cAMP levels increased significantly with iso-reperfusion. cAMP levels correlated with Kfc (r = 0.87) in iso-reperfused lungs. Iso-reperfusion of lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donor rats results in decreased capillary permeability and increased lung tissue cAMP levels. Pharmacologic augmentation of tissue TAN and cAMP levels may further ameliorate the increased capillary permeability seen in lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors.

  2. Oleic Acid Induces Lung Injury in Mice through Activation of the ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; de Moraes, Isabel Matos Medeiros; Oliveira, Flora Magno de Jesus; Younes-Ibrahim, Mauricio; dos Santos, Maria da Conceição Batista; D'Ávila, Heloísa; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Faria Neto, Hugo Caire de Castro; de Castro Faria, Mauro Velho

    2012-01-01

    Oleic acid (OA) can induce acute lung injury in experimental models. In the present work, we used intratracheal OA injection to show augmented oedema formation, cell migration and activation, lipid mediator, and cytokine productions in the bronchoalveolar fluids of Swiss Webster mice. We also demonstrated that OA-induced pulmonary injury is dependent on ERK1/2 activation, since U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, blocked neutrophil migration, oedema, and lipid body formation as well as IL-6, but not IL-1β production. Using a mice strain carrying a null mutation for the TLR4 receptor, we proved that increased inflammatory parameters after OA challenges were not due to the activation of the TLR4 receptor. With OA being a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, we suggest the possible involvement of this enzyme as an OA target triggering lung inflammation. PMID:23209347

  3. [Positive end-expiratory pressure : adjustment in acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Dembinski, R

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from acute lung injury is a challenge for the treating physician. In recent years ventilation of patients with acute hypoxic lung injury has changed fundamentally. Besides the use of low tidal volumes, the most beneficial setting of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been in the focus of researchers. The findings allow adaption of treatment to milder forms of acute lung injury and severe forms. Additionally computed tomography techniques to assess the pulmonary situation and recruitment potential as well as bed-side techniques to adjust PEEP on the ward have been modified and improved. This review gives an outline of recent developments in PEEP adjustment for patients suffering from acute hypoxic and hypercapnic lung injury and explains the fundamental pathophysiology necessary as a basis for correct treatment.

  4. Disruption of Cytochrome P4501A2 in mice leads to increased susceptibility to hyperoxic lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Welty, Stephen E.; Shivanna, Binoy; Barrios, Roberto; Wang, Gangduo; Khan, M. Firoze; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Roberts, L Jackson; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to acute lung injury (ALI) in diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A enzymes have been implicated in hyperoxic lung injury, but the mechanistic role(s) of CYP1A2 in pulmonary injury is not known. We hypothesized that mice lacking the gene for Cyp1a2 (which is predominantly expressed in the liver) will be more sensitive to lung injury and inflammation mediated by hyperoxia, and that CYP1A2 will play a protective role by attenuating lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in the lung. Eight to ten week old WT (C57BL/6) or Cyp1a2(−/−) mice were exposed to hyperoxia (>95% O2) or maintained in room air for 24–72 h. Lung injury was assessed by determining the ratios of lung weight/body weight (LW/BW), and by histology. Extent of inflammation was determined by measuring the number of neutrophils in the lung as well as cytokine expression. The Cyp1a2(−/−) mice under hyperoxic conditions showed increased LW/BW ratios, lung injury, neutrophil infiltration, IL-6 and TNF-α levels, and augmented lipid peroxidation, as evidenced by increased formation of malondialdehyde (MDA)- and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-protein adducts, and pulmonary isofurans compared to those of WT mice. In vitro experiments showed that the F2-isoprostane PGF2-α is metabolized by CYP1A2 to a dinor metabolite, providing evidence for a catalytic role for CYP1A2 in the metabolism of F2-isoprostanes. In summary, our results support the hypothesis that hepatic CYP1A2 plays a critical role in the attenuation against hyperoxic lung injury by decreasing lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:25680282

  5. RAGE inhibition reduces acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Blondonnet, Raiko; Audard, Jules; Belville, Corinne; Clairefond, Gael; Lutz, Jean; Bouvier, Damien; Roszyk, Laurence; Gross, Christelle; Lavergne, Marilyne; Fournet, Marianne; Blanchon, Loic; Vachias, Caroline; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Sapin, Vincent; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Jabaudon, Matthieu

    2017-08-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is involved in inflammatory response during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Growing body of evidence support strategies of RAGE inhibition in experimental lung injury, but its modalities and effects remain underinvestigated. Anesthetised C57BL/6JRj mice were divided in four groups; three of them underwent orotracheal instillation of acid and were treated with anti-RAGE monoclonal antibody (mAb) or recombinant soluble RAGE (sRAGE), acting as a decoy receptor. The fourth group served as a control. Lung injury was assessed by the analysis of blood gases, alveolar permeability, histology, AFC, and cytokines. Lung expression and distribution epithelial channels ENaC, Na,K-ATPase, and aquaporin (AQP)-5 were assessed. Treatment with either anti-RAGE mAb or sRAGE improved lung injury, arterial oxygenation and decreased alveolar inflammation in acid-injured animals. Anti-RAGE therapies were associated with restored AFC and increased lung expression of AQP-5 in alveolar cell. Blocking RAGE had potential therapeutic effects in a translational mouse model of ARDS, possibly through a decrease in alveolar type 1 epithelial cell injury as shown by restored AFC and lung AQP-5 expression. Further mechanistic studies are warranted to describe intracellular pathways that may control such effects of RAGE on lung epithelial injury and repair.

  6. Adrenomedullin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takefumi; Obata, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kaoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2007-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), an endogenous peptide, has been shown to have a variety of protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of AM on acute lung injury remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated whether AM infusion ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were randomized to receive continuous intravenous infusion of AM (0.1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or vehicle through a microosmotic pump. The animals were intratracheally injected with either LPS (1 mg/kg) or saline. At 6 and 18 h after intratracheal instillation, we performed histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage and assessed the lung wet/dry weight ratio as an index of acute lung injury. Then we measured the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we evaluated BALF total protein and albumin levels as indexes of lung permeability. LPS instillation caused severe acute lung injury, as indicated by the histological findings and the lung wet/dry weight ratio. However, AM infusion attenuated these LPS-induced abnormalities. AM decreased the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of TNF-alpha and CINC in BALF. AM also reduced BALF total protein and albumin levels. In addition, AM significantly suppressed apoptosis of alveolar wall cells as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. In conclusion, continuous infusion of AM ameliorated LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of AM on acute lung injury may be mediated by inhibition of inflammation, hyperpermeability, and alveolar wall cell apoptosis.

  7. Linking lung function and inflammatory responses in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Hantos, Zoltan; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury are poorly understood. We used strain-dependent responses to mechanical ventilation in mice to identify associations between mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129/Sv mice were ventilated using a protective [low tidal volume and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers] or injurious (high tidal volume and zero PEEP) ventilation strategy. Lung mechanics and lung volume were monitored using the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography, respectively. Inflammation was assessed by measuring numbers of inflammatory cells, cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) levels, and protein content of the BAL. Principal components factor analysis was used to identify independent associations between lung function and inflammation. Mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung were dependent on ventilation strategy and mouse strain. Three factors were identified linking 1) pulmonary edema, protein leak, and macrophages, 2) atelectasis, IL-6, and TNF-α, and 3) IL-1β and neutrophils, which were independent of responses in lung mechanics. This approach has allowed us to identify specific inflammatory responses that are independently associated with overstretch of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung volume. These data provide critical insight into the mechanical responses in the lung that drive local inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury and the basis for future mechanistic studies in this field.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase 3 contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaporidi, Katerina; Francis, Roland C.; Bloch, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) depletion or inhibition reduces ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), but the responsible mechanisms remain incompletely defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of endothelial NOS, NOS3, in the pathogenesis of VILI in an in vivo mouse model. Wild-type and NOS3-deficient mice were ventilated with high-tidal volume (HVT; 40 ml/kg) for 4 h, with and without adding NO to the inhaled gas. Additional wild-type mice were pretreated with tetrahydrobiopterin and ascorbic acid, agents that can prevent NOS-generated superoxide production. Arterial blood gas tensions, histology, and lung mechanics were evaluated after 4 h of HVT ventilation. The concentration of protein, IgM, cytokines, malondialdehyde, and 8-isoprostane were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Myeloperoxidase activity, total and oxidized glutathione levels, and NOS-derived superoxide production were measured in lung tissue homogenates. HVT ventilation induced VILI in wild-type mice, as reflected by decreased lung compliance, increased concentrations of protein and cytokines in BALF, and oxidative stress. All indices of VILI were ameliorated in NOS3-deficient mice. Augmenting pulmonary NO levels by breathing NO during mechanical ventilation did not increase lung injury in NOS3-deficient mice. HVT ventilation increased NOS-inhibitable superoxide production in lung extracts from wild-type mice but not in those from NOS3-deficient mice. Administration of tetrahydrobiopterin and ascorbic acid ameliorated VILI in wild-type mice. Our results indicate that NOS3 contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury via increased production of superoxide. PMID:20453164

  9. Coagulation, fibrinolysis, and fibrin deposition in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Idell, Steven

    2003-04-01

    To review: a) the role of extravascular fibrin deposition in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury; b) the abnormalities in the coagulation and fibrinolysis pathways that promote fibrin deposition in the acutely injured lung; and c) the pathways that contribute to the regulation of the fibrinolytic system via the lung epithelium, including newly recognized posttranscriptional and urokinase-dependent pathways. Another objective was to determine how novel anticoagulant or fibrinolytic strategies may be used to protect against acute inflammation or accelerated fibrosis in acute lung injury. Published medical literature. Alveolar fibrin deposition is characteristic of diverse forms of acute lung injury. Intravascular thrombosis or disseminated intravascular coagulation can also occur in the acutely injured lung. Extravascular fibrin deposition promotes lung dysfunction and the acute inflammatory response. In addition, transitional fibrin in the alveolar compartment undergoes remodeling leading to accelerated pulmonary fibrosis similar to the events associated with wound healing, or desmoplasia associated with solid neoplasms. In acute lung injury, alveolar fibrin deposition is potentiated by consistent changes in endogenous coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. Procoagulant activity is increased in conjunction with depression of fibrinolytic activity in the alveolar compartment. Initiation of the procoagulant response occurs as a result of local overexpression of tissue factor associated with factor VII. Depression of fibrinolytic activity occurs as a result of inhibition of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) by plasminogen activators, or series inhibition of plasmin by antiplasmins. Locally increased amplification of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is largely responsible for this fibrinolytic defect. Newly described pathways by which lung epithelial cells regulate expression of uPA, its receptor uPAR, and PAI-1 at the posttranscriptional level have been

  10. High flow nasal heliox improves work of breathing and attenuates lung injury in a newborn porcine lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Jassar, R K; Vellanki, H; Zhu, Yan; Hesek, A M; Wang, J; Rodriguez, E; Wolfson, M R; Shaffer, T H

    2015-01-01

    High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has been shown to improve ventilation and oxygenation and reduce work of breathing in newborns with respiratory distress. Heliox, decreases resistance to airflow, reduces the work of breathing, facilitates the distribution of inspired gas, and has been shown to attenuate lung inflammation during the treatment of acute lung injury. Heliox delivered by HFNC will decrease resistive load, decrease work of breathing, improve ventilation and attenuate lung inflammation during spontaneous breathing following acute lung injury in the newborn pig. Spontaneously breathing neonatal pigs received Nitrox or Heliox by HFNC and studied over 4 hrs following oleic acid injury. Gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics and systemic inflammation were measured serially. Lung inflammation biomarkers were assessed at termination. Heliox breathing animals demonstrated lower work of breathing reflected by lower tracheal pressure, phase angle and phase relationship. Ventilation efficiency index was greater compared to Nitrox. Heliox group showed less lung inflammation reflected by lower tissue interleukin-6 and 8. High flow nasal Heliox decreased respiratory load, reduced resistive work of breathing indices and attenuated lung inflammatory profile while ventilation was supported at less pressure effort in the presence of acute lung injury.

  11. High-frequency oscillation combined with arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist reduces lung injury.

    PubMed

    Muellenbach, Ralf M; Kredel, Markus; Wilhelm, Jochen; Küstermann, Julian; Fink, Ludger; Siebenlist, Gregor; Siebenliest, Gregor; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Foerster, Carola Y; Kranke, Peter; Wunder, Christian; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Jörg

    2010-04-01

    In order to optimize the lung-protective potential of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), it is currently recommended to maximize oscillatory frequencies. However, very high frequencies may lead to insufficient CO(2) elimination with severe respiratory acidosis. Arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist (av-ECLA) allows near total CO(2) removal, thereby allowing for maximization of the lung-protective potential of HFOV. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HFOV and av-ECLA on lung inflammation and function compared to conventional lung-protective ventilation. In a porcine surfactant depletion model of lung injury, the authors randomly assigned 16 female pigs to conventional lung-protective ventilation and HFOV/ECLA. Both strategies were combined with an "open-lung" approach. Gas exchange and hemodynamic parameters were measured at intervals during the 24-hour study period. Postmortem, lung tissue was analyzed to determine histological damage and lung inflammation. The authors found that the combination of HFOV and av-ECLA (1) allows significant reductions in mean and peak airway pressures; and (2) reduces histological signs of lung inflammation in the basal regions of the lung. HFOV/av-ECLA reduces histological signs of lung inflammation compared to conventional lung-protective ventilation strategies. Thus, combination of HFOV and av-ECLA might be a further lung-protective tool if conventional ventilation strategies are failing.

  12. Role of mesenchymal cell death in lung remodeling after injury.

    PubMed Central

    Polunovsky, V A; Chen, B; Henke, C; Snover, D; Wendt, C; Ingbar, D H; Bitterman, P B

    1993-01-01

    Repair after acute lung injury requires elimination of granulation tissue from the alveolar airspace. We hypothesized that during lung repair, signals capable of inducing the death of the two principal cellular elements of granulation tissue, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, would be present at the air-lung interface. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from patients during lung repair induced both fibroblast and endothelial cell death, while fluid obtained at the time of injury or from patient controls did not. The mode of cell death for endothelial cells was apoptosis. Fibroblast death, while morphologically distinct from necrosis, also differed from typical apoptosis. Only proliferating cells were susceptible to the bioactivities in lavage fluid, which were trypsin sensitive and lipid insoluble. Histological examination of lung tissue from patients after lung injury revealed evidence of apoptotic cells within airspace granulation tissue. Our results suggest that cell death induced by peptide(s) present at the air-lung interface may participate in the remodeling process that accompanies tissue repair after injury. Images PMID:8326006

  13. The Field of Tissue Injury in the Lung and Airway

    PubMed Central

    Steiling, Katrina; Ryan, John; Brody, Jerome S.; Spira, Avrum

    2009-01-01

    The concept of field cancerization was first introduced over six decades ago in the setting of oral cancer. Later, field cancerization involving histologic and molecular changes of neoplasms and adjacent tissue began to be characterized in smokers with or without lung cancer. Investigators also described a diffuse, non-neoplastic field of molecular injury throughout the respiratory tract that is attributable to cigarette smoking and susceptibility to smoking-induced lung disease. The potential molecular origins of field cancerization and the field of injury following cigarette smoke exposure in lung and airway epithelia are critical to understanding the impact of the field of injury on clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:19138985

  14. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  15. Lung computed tomography during a lung recruitment maneuver in patients with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro; Hernández, Glenn; Rojas, Gonzalo; Varela, Cristián; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Castillo, Luis

    2003-02-01

    To assess the acute effect of a lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) on lung morphology in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Ten patients with ALI/ARDS on mechanical ventilation. Prospective clinical study. Computed tomography (CT) scan facility in a teaching hospital. An LRM performed by stepwise increases in positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of up to 30-40 cm H(2)O. Lung basal CT sections were taken at end-expiration (patients 1 to 5), and at end-expiration and end-inspiration (patients 6 to 10). Arterial blood gases and static compliance (C(st)) were measured before, during and after the LRM. Poorly aerated and non-aerated tissue at PEEP 10 cm H(2)O accounted for 60.0+/-29.1% of lung parenchyma, while only 1.1+/-1.8% was hyperinflated. Increasing PEEP to 20 and 30 cm H(2)O, compared to PEEP 10 cm H(2)O, decreased poorly aerated and non-aerated tissue by 16.2+/-28.0% and 33.4+/-13.8%, respectively ( p<0.05). This was associated with an increase in PaO(2) and a decrease in total static compliance. Inspiration increased alveolar recruitment at all PEEP levels. Hyperinflated tissue increased up to 2.9+/-4.0% with PEEP 30 cm H(2)O, and to a lesser degree with inspiration. No barotrauma or severe hypotension occurred. Lung recruitment maneuvers improve oxygenation by expanding collapsed alveoli without inducing too much hyperinflation in ALI/ARDS patients. An LRM during the CT scan gives morphologic and functional information that could be useful in setting ventilatory parameters.

  16. Serum copper concentration as an index of experimental lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'ao, C.; Ischiropoulos, H. )

    1989-01-01

    Serum copper (Cu) concentration was evaluated as an index of lung injury in two rat models of pneumotoxicity: hemithoracic irradiation and monocrotaline ingestion. In both models there was a dose- and time-dependent increase in serum Cu concentration. This hypercupremia paralleled the development of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction (decreased lung plasminogen activator activity and increased prostacyclin production) and pulmonary fibrosis (hydroxyproline accumulation). In the radiation model, lung injury and hypercupremia persisted for at least 6 months, and were spared similarly when the total dose was delivered in multiple daily fractions as compared to single doses. In irradiated rats, the elevated serum Cu concentration was accompanied by increases in plasma ceruloplasmin, lung Cu concentration, and lung Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In monocrotaline-treated rats, lung damage and hypercupremia also were accompanied by a reduction in liver Cu concentration, and by a direct correlation between the concentrations of Cu and SGOT in the serum. In both models, some but not all modifiers of lung damage (penicillamine, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, pentoxifylline) also partially prevented the insult-induced hypercupremia. In contrast, serum iron concentration was largely independent of treatment in all experiments. These data suggest that elevated serum copper concentration is an accurate and minimally invasive index of lung injury in irradiated and monocrotaline-treated rats.

  17. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  18. Ethanol-induced hyponatremia augments brain edema after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katada, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Atsushi; Mizuo, Keisuke; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Alcohol consumption augments brain edema by expression of brain aquaporin-4 after traumatic brain injury. However, how ethanol induces brain aquaporin-4 expression remains unclear. Aquaporin-4 can operate with some of ion channels and transporters. Therefore, we hypothesized that ethanol may affect electrolytes through regulating ion channels, leading to express aquaporin-4. To clarify the hypothesis, we examined role of AQP4 expression in ethanol-induced brain edema and changes of electrolyte levels after traumatic brain injury in the rat. In the rat traumatic brain injury model, ethanol administration reduced sodium ion concentration in blood significantly 24 hr after injury. An aquaporin-4 inhibitor recovered sodium ion concentration in blood to normal. We observed low sodium ion concentration in blood and the increase of brain aquaporin-4 in cadaver with traumatic brain injury. Therefore, ethanol increases brain edema by the increase of aquaporin-4 expression with hyponatremia after traumatic brain injury.

  19. Metallothionein-induced zinc partitioning exacerbates hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min; McLaughlin, Joseph N.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Zhu, Lin; Thambiayya, Kalidasan; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Kaminski, Iris; Pearce, Linda L.; Peterson, Jim; Li, Jin; Latoche, Joseph D.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Fattman, Cheryl L.; Alcorn, John F.; Oury, Tim D.; Angus, Derek C.; Pitt, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypozincemia, with hepatic zinc accumulation at the expense of other organs, occurs in infection, inflammation, and aseptic lung injury. Mechanisms underlying zinc partitioning or its impact on extrahepatic organs are unclear. Here we show that the major zinc-binding protein, metallothionein (MT), is critical for zinc transmigration from lung to liver during hyperoxia and preservation of intrapulmonary zinc during hyperoxia is associated with an injury-resistant phenotype in MT-null mice. Particularly, lung-to-liver zinc ratios decreased in wild-type (WT) and increased significantly in MT-null mice breathing 95% oxygen for 72 h. Compared with female adult WT mice, MT-null mice were significantly protected against hyperoxic lung injury indicated by reduced inflammation and interstitial edema, fewer necrotic changes to distal airway epithelium, and sustained lung function at 72 h hyperoxia. Lungs of MT-null mice showed decreased levels of immunoreactive LC3, an autophagy marker, compared with WT mice. Analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the lungs revealed similar levels of manganese-SOD activity between strains under normoxia and hyperoxia. Lung extracellular SOD activity decreased significantly in both strains at 72 h of hyperoxia, although there was no difference between strains. Copper-zinc-SOD activity was ∼4× higher under normoxic conditions in MT-null compared with WT mice but was not affected in either group by hyperoxia. Collectively the data suggest that genetic deletion of MT-I/II in mice is associated with compensatory increase in copper-zinc-SOD activity, prevention of hyperoxia-induced zinc transmigration from lung to liver, and hyperoxia-resistant phenotype strongly associated with differences in zinc homeostasis during hyperoxic acute lung injury. PMID:23275622

  20. Angiotensin receptor blockade attenuates cigarette smoke-induced lung injury and rescues lung architecture in mice.

    PubMed

    Podowski, Megan; Calvi, Carla; Metzger, Shana; Misono, Kaori; Poonyagariyagorn, Hataya; Lopez-Mercado, Armando; Ku, Therese; Lauer, Thomas; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Berger, Alan; Cheadle, Christopher; Tuder, Rubin; Dietz, Harry C; Mitzner, Wayne; Wise, Robert; Neptune, Enid

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent smoking-related disease for which no disease-altering therapies currently exist. As dysregulated TGF-β signaling associates with lung pathology in patients with COPD and in animal models of lung injury induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), we postulated that inhibiting TGF-β signaling would protect against CS-induced lung injury. We first confirmed that TGF-β signaling was induced in the lungs of mice chronically exposed to CS as well as in COPD patient samples. Importantly, key pathological features of smoking-associated lung disease in patients, e.g., alveolar injury with overt emphysema and airway epithelial hyperplasia with fibrosis, accompanied CS-induced alveolar cell apoptosis caused by enhanced TGF-β signaling in CS-exposed mice. Systemic administration of a TGF-β-specific neutralizing antibody normalized TGF-β signaling and alveolar cell death, conferring improved lung architecture and lung mechanics in CS-exposed mice. Use of losartan, an angiotensin receptor type 1 blocker used widely in the clinic and known to antagonize TGF-β signaling, also improved oxidative stress, inflammation, metalloprotease activation and elastin remodeling. These data support our hypothesis that inhibition of TGF-β signaling through angiotensin receptor blockade can attenuate CS-induced lung injury in an established murine model. More importantly, our findings provide a preclinical platform for the development of other TGF-β-targeted therapies for patients with COPD.

  1. Angiotensin receptor blockade attenuates cigarette smoke–induced lung injury and rescues lung architecture in mice

    PubMed Central

    Podowski, Megan; Calvi, Carla; Metzger, Shana; Misono, Kaori; Poonyagariyagorn, Hataya; Lopez-Mercado, Armando; Ku, Therese; Lauer, Thomas; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Berger, Alan; Cheadle, Christopher; Tuder, Rubin; Dietz, Harry C.; Mitzner, Wayne; Wise, Robert; Neptune, Enid

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent smoking-related disease for which no disease-altering therapies currently exist. As dysregulated TGF-β signaling associates with lung pathology in patients with COPD and in animal models of lung injury induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), we postulated that inhibiting TGF-β signaling would protect against CS-induced lung injury. We first confirmed that TGF-β signaling was induced in the lungs of mice chronically exposed to CS as well as in COPD patient samples. Importantly, key pathological features of smoking-associated lung disease in patients, e.g., alveolar injury with overt emphysema and airway epithelial hyperplasia with fibrosis, accompanied CS-induced alveolar cell apoptosis caused by enhanced TGF-β signaling in CS-exposed mice. Systemic administration of a TGF-β–specific neutralizing antibody normalized TGF-β signaling and alveolar cell death, conferring improved lung architecture and lung mechanics in CS-exposed mice. Use of losartan, an angiotensin receptor type 1 blocker used widely in the clinic and known to antagonize TGF-β signaling, also improved oxidative stress, inflammation, metalloprotease activation and elastin remodeling. These data support our hypothesis that inhibition of TGF-β signaling through angiotensin receptor blockade can attenuate CS-induced lung injury in an established murine model. More importantly, our findings provide a preclinical platform for the development of other TGF-β–targeted therapies for patients with COPD. PMID:22182843

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  3. Influence of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) inhibition on lung epithelial cell injury: role of oxidative stress and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Marianne E; Boshier, Piers R; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Keun, Hector C; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Kirkham, Paul A; Adcock, Ian M; Barton, Paul J; Takata, Masao; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-06-15

    Oxidant-mediated tissue injury is key to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with toxic oxidant compounds and are associated with acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that attenuation of cellular GST enzymes would augment intracellular oxidative and metabolic stress and induce lung cell injury. Treatment of murine lung epithelial cells with GST inhibitors, ethacrynic acid (EA), and caffeic acid compromised lung epithelial cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitors also potentiated cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl-hydroperoxide, and hypoxia and reoxygenation (HR). SiRNA-mediated attenuation of GST-π but not GST-μ expression reduced cell viability and significantly enhanced stress (H2O2/HR)-induced injury. GST inhibitors also induced intracellular oxidative stress (measured by dihydrorhodamine 123 and dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), caused alterations in overall intracellular redox status (as evidenced by NAD(+)/NADH ratios), and increased protein carbonyl formation. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely prevented EA-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Whereas EA had no effect on mitochondrial energetics, it significantly altered cellular metabolic profile. To explore the physiological impact of these cellular events, we used an ex vivo mouse-isolated perfused lung model. Supplementation of perfusate with EA markedly affected lung mechanics and significantly increased lung permeability. The results of our combined genetic, pharmacological, and metabolic studies on multiple platforms suggest the importance of GST enzymes, specifically GST-π, in the cellular and whole lung response to acute oxidative and metabolic stress. These may have important clinical implications. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Extravascular lung water index improves the diagnostic accuracy of lung injury in patients with shock.

    PubMed

    Chew, Michelle S; Ihrman, Lilian; During, Joachim; Bergenzaun, Lill; Ersson, Anders; Undén, Johan; Ryden, Jörgen; Åkerman, Eva; Larsson, Marina

    2012-01-03

    The diagnosis of acute lung injury (ALI) may be more robust if more accurate physiological markers can be identified. Extravascular lung water (EVLW) is one possible marker, and it has been shown to correlate with respiratory function and mortality in patients with sepsis. Whether EVLW confers diagnostic value in a general population with shock, as well as which index performs best, is unclear. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of various EVLW indices in patients with shock. We studied a prospective, observational cohort of 51 patients with shock admitted to a tertiary ICU. EVLW was measured within 6 hours of ICU admission and indexed to actual body weight (EVLW/ABW), predicted body weight (EVLW/PBW) and pulmonary blood volume (EVLW/PBV). The relationship of these indices to the diagnosis and severity of lung injury and ICU mortality were studied. Positive and negative likelihood ratios, pre- and posttest odds for diagnosis of lung injury and mortality were calculated. All EVLW indices were higher among patients with lung injury and significantly correlated with respiratory parameters. Furthermore, all EVLW indices were significantly higher in nonsurvivors. The use of EVLW improves the posttest OR for the diagnosis of ALI, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severe lung injury (sLI) by up to eightfold. Combining increased EVLW and a diagnosis of ALI, ARDS or sLI increases the posttest odds of ICU mortality. EVLW/ABW and EVLW/PBV demonstrated the best diagnostic performance in this population. EVLW was associated with degree of lung injury and mortality, regardless of the index used, confirming that it may be used as a bedside indicator of disease severity. The use of EVLW as a bedside test conferred added diagnostic value for the identification of patients with lung injury.

  5. Extravascular lung water index improves the diagnostic accuracy of lung injury in patients with shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The diagnosis of acute lung injury (ALI) may be more robust if more accurate physiological markers can be identified. Extravascular lung water (EVLW) is one possible marker, and it has been shown to correlate with respiratory function and mortality in patients with sepsis. Whether EVLW confers diagnostic value in a general population with shock, as well as which index performs best, is unclear. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of various EVLW indices in patients with shock. Methods We studied a prospective, observational cohort of 51 patients with shock admitted to a tertiary ICU. EVLW was measured within 6 hours of ICU admission and indexed to actual body weight (EVLW/ABW), predicted body weight (EVLW/PBW) and pulmonary blood volume (EVLW/PBV). The relationship of these indices to the diagnosis and severity of lung injury and ICU mortality were studied. Positive and negative likelihood ratios, pre- and posttest odds for diagnosis of lung injury and mortality were calculated. Results All EVLW indices were higher among patients with lung injury and significantly correlated with respiratory parameters. Furthermore, all EVLW indices were significantly higher in nonsurvivors. The use of EVLW improves the posttest OR for the diagnosis of ALI, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severe lung injury (sLI) by up to eightfold. Combining increased EVLW and a diagnosis of ALI, ARDS or sLI increases the posttest odds of ICU mortality. EVLW/ABW and EVLW/PBV demonstrated the best diagnostic performance in this population. Conclusions EVLW was associated with degree of lung injury and mortality, regardless of the index used, confirming that it may be used as a bedside indicator of disease severity. The use of EVLW as a bedside test conferred added diagnostic value for the identification of patients with lung injury. PMID:22214612

  6. Lung injury and recovery after exposure to blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Prusaczyk, W Keith; McCarron, Richard M

    2006-10-01

    A critical immediate determinant of survival after exposure to blast overpressure (BOP) is pulmonary damage, but mechanisms of injury and the course of recovery are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the progression of oxidative and inflammatory responses in lungs as well as the activation of consequent protective mechanisms after exposure to medium intensity BOP. Rats were exposed to a moderate (approximately 120 kPa) level of BOP in a pneumatically driven shock tube. At different times (2-192 hours) after exposure, lungs were examined for pathologic signs of injury, markers of inflammatory responses, and indicators of oxidative and nitrative damage. The results showed a postblast activation of inflammatory response (increase of myeloperoxidase activity, CINC-1, ICAM-1, and iNOS), increase in protein oxidation and nitration, and development of gross diffused hemorrhage in lungs. The initial phase of lung damage that peaked at 24 to 48 hours after exposure to BOP was followed by gradual dissolution of inflammation and oxidation that were complete by 192 hours. Resolution of morphologic damage and inflammation in lungs concurred with activation of expression of antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Plasma level of gelsolin, a marker of acute lung damage was decreased at 24 hours postblast and later returned to the control level. The study shows the role of adaptive anti-oxidant and anti- inflammatory mechanisms in lung recovery after injury caused by exposure to BOP.

  7. Adiponectin protects against hyperoxic lung injury and vascular leak

    PubMed Central

    Sliman, Sean M.; Patel, Rishi B.; Cruff, Jason P.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Newland, Christie A.; Schrader, Carrie A.; Sherwani, Shariq I.; Gurney, Travis O.; Magalang, Ulysses J.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin (Ad), an adipokine exclusively secreted by the adipose tissue, has emerged as a paracrine metabolic regulator as well as a protectant against oxidative stress. Pharmacological approaches of protecting against clinical hyperoxic lung injury during oxygen therapy/treatment are limited. Earlier, we have reported that Ad inhibits the NADPH oxidase-catalyzed formation of superoxide from molecular oxygen in human neutrophils. Having this as the premise, we conducted studies to determine whether (i) exogenous Ad would protect against the hyperoxia-induced barrier dysfunction in the lung endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro and (ii) endogenously synthesized Ad would protect against hyperoxic lung injury in wild type (WT) and Ad-overexpressing transgenic (AdTg) mice in vivo. The results demonstrated that exogenous Ad protected against the hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress, loss of glutathione (GSH), cytoskeletal reorganization, barrier dysfunction, and leak in the lung ECs in vitro. Furthermore, the hyperoxia-induced lung injury, vascular leak, and lipid peroxidation were significantly attenuated in AdTg mice in vivo. Also, AdTg mice exhibited elevated levels of total thiols and GSH in the lungs as compared to WT mice. For the first time, our studies demonstrated that Ad protected against the hyperoxia-induced lung damage apparently through attenuation of oxidative stress and modulation of thiol-redox status. PMID:22183615

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 abrogates bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rey-Parra, G J; Vadivel, A; Coltan, L; Hall, A; Eaton, F; Schuster, M; Loibner, H; Penninger, J M; Kassiri, Z; Oudit, G Y; Thébaud, B

    2012-06-01

    Despite substantial progress, mortality and morbidity of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), remain unacceptably high. There is no effective treatment for ARDS/ALI. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) through Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-generated Angiotensin II contributes to lung injury. ACE2, a recently discovered ACE homologue, acts as a negative regulator of the RAS and counterbalances the function of ACE. We hypothesized that ACE2 prevents Bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung injury. Fourteen to 16-week-old ACE2 knockout mice-male (ACE2(-/y)) and female (ACE2(-/-))-and age-matched wild-type (WT) male mice received intratracheal BLM (1.5U/kg). Male ACE2(-/y) BLM injured mice exhibited poorer exercise capacity, worse lung function and exacerbated lung fibrosis and collagen deposition compared with WT. These changes were associated with increased expression of the profibrotic genes α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Transforming Growth Factor ß1. Compared with ACE2(-/y) exposed to BLM, ACE2(-/-) exhibited better lung function and architecture and decreased collagen deposition. Treatment with intraperitoneal recombinant human (rh) ACE2 (2 mg/kg) for 21 days improved survival, exercise capacity, and lung function and decreased lung inflammation and fibrosis in male BLM-WT mice. Female BLM WT mice had mild fibrosis and displayed a possible compensatory upregulation of the AT2 receptor. We conclude that ACE2 gene deletion worsens BLM-induced lung injury and more so in males than females. Conversely, ACE2 protects against BLM-induced fibrosis. rhACE2 may have therapeutic potential to attenuate respiratory morbidity in ALI/ARDS.

  9. Metabotyping Patients’ Journeys Reveals Early Predisposition to Lung Injury after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maltesen, Raluca Georgiana; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Pedersen, Shona; Hanifa, Munsoor Ali; Kucheryavskiy, Sergey; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and patients with severe symptoms undergo cardiac surgery. Even after uncomplicated surgeries, some patients experience postoperative complications such as lung injury. We hypothesized that the procedure elicits metabolic activity that can be related to the disease progression, which is commonly observed two-three days postoperatively. More than 700 blood samples were collected from 50 patients at nine time points pre-, intra-, and postoperatively. Dramatic metabolite shifts were observed during and immediately after the intervention. Prolonged surgical stress was linked to an augmented anaerobic environment. Time series analysis showed shifts in purine-, nicotinic acid-, tyrosine-, hyaluronic acid-, ketone-, fatty acid, and lipid metabolism. A characteristic ‘metabolic biosignature’ was identified correlating with the risk of developing postoperative complications two days before the first clinical signs of lung injury. Hence, this study demonstrates the link between intra- and postoperative time-dependent metabolite changes and later postoperative outcome. In addition, the results indicate that metabotyping patients’ journeys early, during or just after the end of surgery, may have potential impact in hospitals for the early diagnosis of postoperative lung injury, and for the monitoring of therapeutics targeting disease progression. PMID:28074924

  10. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  11. Obesity-induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-03-09

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in DIO mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins including PERK, IREα and ATF6, in whole lung and in lung endothelial cells isolated from DIO mice. Further, we found that lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of DIO mice. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation; indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-PBA, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in DIO mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the endoplasmic reticulum of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against ARDS in obese individuals.

  12. Augmented multisensory feedback enhances locomotor adaptation in humans with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Landry, Jill M; Wu, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Different forms of augmented feedback may engage different motor learning pathways, but it is unclear how these pathways interact with each other, especially in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to test whether augmented multisensory feedback could enhance aftereffects following short term locomotor training (i.e., adaptation) in patients with incomplete SCI. A total of 10 subjects with incomplete SCI were recruited to perform locomotor adaptation. Three types of augmented feedback were provided during the adaptation: (a) computerized visual cues showing the actual and target stride length (augmented visual feedback); (b) a swing resistance applied to the leg (augmented proprioceptive feedback); (c) a combination of the visual cues and resistance (augmented multisensory feedback). The results showed that subjects' stride length increased in all conditions following the adaptation, but the increase was greater and retained longer in the multisensory feedback condition. The multisensory feedback provided in this study may engage both explicit and implicit learning pathways during the adaptation and in turn enhance the aftereffect. The results implied that multisensory feedback may be used as an adjunctive approach to enhance gait recovery in humans with SCI.

  13. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  14. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  15. Cardiotrophin-1 attenuates endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Pulido, E J; Shames, B D; Pennica, D; O'leary, R M; Bensard, D D; Cain, B S; McIntyre, R C

    1999-06-15

    Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) is a recently discovered member of the gp130 cytokine family, which includes IL-6, IL-11, leukemia inhibitory factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and oncostatin M. Recent evidence suggests that, like other members of this family, CT-1 may possess anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that in vivo CT-1 administration would attenuate endotoxin (ETX)-induced acute lung injury. We studied the effects of CT-1 (100 microgram/kg ip, 10 min prior to ETX) in a rat model of ETX-induced acute lung injury (Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide, 20 mg/kg ip). Six hours after ETX, lungs were harvested for determination of neutrophil accumulation (myeloperoxidase, MPO, assay) and lung edema (wet-to-dry weight ratio). Mechanisms of pulmonary vasorelaxation were examined in isolated pulmonary artery rings at 6 h by interrogating endothelium-dependent (response to acetylcholine) and endothelium-independent (response to sodium nitroprusside) relaxation following alpha-adrenergic (phenylephrine)-stimulated preconstriction. CT-1 abrogated the endotoxin-induced lung neutrophil accumulation: 2.3 +/- 0.2 units MPO/g wet lung (gwl) vs 6. 3 +/- 0.3 units MPO/gwl in the ETX group (P < 0.05 vs ETX, P > 0.05 vs control). Similarly, CT-1 prevented ETX-induced lung edema: wet-to-dry-weight ratio, 4.473 +/- 0.039 vs 4.747 +/- 0.039 in the ETX group (P < 0.05 vs ETX, P > 0.05 vs control). Endotoxin caused significant impairment of both endothelium-dependent and -independent pulmonary vasorelaxation, and CT-1 attenuated this injury. Thus, cardiotrophin-1 possesses significant anti-inflammatory properties in a model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Hydrogen water alleviates lung injury induced by one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qifei; Zhang, Jingyao; Wan, Yong; Song, Sidong; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Guangjian; Liu, Chang; Fu, Junke

    2015-12-01

    With the development of thoracic surgeries, one-lung ventilation (OLV) has been routinely used to facilitate surgical exposure. However, OLV can cause lung injury during the surgical process and becomes an important factor affecting the outcomes. To date, effective treatments for the prevention of lung injury caused by OLV are lacking. Hydrogen has been demonstrated to have effective protection against tissue injuries caused by oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This study investigated the efficacy of hydrogen water consumption on the prevention of lung injury induced by OLV in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32, 240-260 g) were divided randomly into the following four groups: sham group, sham + H2 group, OLV group, OLV + H2 group. The rats drank hydrogen water or degassed hydrogen water for 4 wk before the operation and received OLV for 60 min and two-lung ventilation for 60 min. Lung tissues were assayed for wet-to-dry ratio, oxidative stress variables, proinflammatory cytokines, and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Hydrogen water consumption reduced wet-to-dry weight ratio, malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase activity and decreased the concentration of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the lung tissues compared with sham group and sham + H2 group. Hydrogen water consumption further attenuated NF-κB activation and caused histopathologic alterations. Our data demonstrated that hydrogen water consumption ameliorated OLV-induced lung injury, and it may exert its protective role by its anti-inflammation, antioxidation and reducing NF-κB activity in the lung tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ozone therapy ameliorates paraquat-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaldirim, Umit; Uysal, Bulent; Yuksel, Ramazan; Macit, Enis; Eyi, Yusuf E; Toygar, Mehmet; Tuncer, Salim K; Ardic, Sukru; Arziman, Ibrahim; Aydin, Ibrahim; Oztas, Yesim; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Topal, Turgut

    2014-12-01

    Paraquat (PQ) overdose can cause acute lung injury and death. Ozone therapy (OT) was previously demonstrated to alleviate inflammation and necrosis in various pathologies. We therefore hypothesized that OT has ameliorative and preventive effects on PQ-induced lung damage due to anti-inflammatory and antioxidants properties. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 24) were separated into three groups: sham, PQ, and PQ+OT groups. 15 mg/kg PQ was administered intraperitoneally in PQ and PQ+OT groups to induce experimental lung injury. One hour after PQ treatment, PQ+OT group was administered a single dose of ozone-oxygen mixture (1 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal route for four consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed on fifth day after PQ administration. Blood samples and lung tissues were collected to evaluate the inflammatory processes, antioxidant defense and pulmonary damage. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and neopterin levels, tissue oxidative stress parameters, total TGF-β1 levels, and histological injury scores in PQ+OT group were significantly lower than PQ group (P<0.05, PQ vs. PQ+OT). Total antioxidant capacity in PQ+OT group was significantly higher than PQ group (P < 0.05, PQ+OT vs. PQ). These findings suggest that outcome in PQ-induced lung injury may be improved by using OT as an adjuvant therapy.

  18. Effect of dexmedetomidine on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, LILI; LI, LI; SHEN, JINMEI; QI, ZEYOU; GUO, LIANG

    2014-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a specific selective α2-adrenergic agonist, does not only have the characteristics of being a sedative and analgesic, but also exhibits a protective role in brain ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammation in animals with sepsis. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether dexmedetomidine is capable of attenuating rat pulmonary damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is a type of acute sterile lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into six groups: The sham-operated (sham) group, the lung ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group, intravenous injection of dexmedetomidine 2.5 μg/kg/h (Dex2.5) or 5 μg/kg/h (Dex5) for 1 h prior to ischemia, combination of α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine prior to dexmedetomidine pre-treatment (Dex+Yoh) and pre-administration of yohimbine alone (Yoh) prior to ischemia. Lung injury was assessed by the histopathological changes, arterial blood gas, wet/dry (w/d) weight ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the lung. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) mRNA in the lung were determined by quantitative PCR, and phosphorylated levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were determined by western blotting. Pre-treatment with dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the lung injury, w/d weight ratio and MPO activity, and decreased the concentration of TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 in BALF compared with the I/R group. The expression of TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA and the levels of phosphorylated JNK and ERK1/2 in the lung tissue were markedly downregulated by intravenous injection of dexmedetomidne for 1 h prior to lung I/R. The protective effects of dexmedetomidine

  19. Sports-related lung injury during breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-12-01

    The number of people practising recreational breath-hold diving is constantly growing, thereby increasing the need for knowledge of the acute and chronic effects such a sport could have on the health of participants. Breath-hold diving is potentially dangerous, mainly because of associated extreme environmental factors such as increased hydrostatic pressure, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hypothermia and strenuous exercise.In this article we focus on the effects of breath-hold diving on pulmonary function. Respiratory symptoms have been reported in almost 25% of breath-hold divers after repetitive diving sessions. Acutely, repetitive breath-hold diving may result in increased transpulmonary capillary pressure, leading to noncardiogenic oedema and/or alveolar haemorrhage. Furthermore, during a breath-hold dive, the chest and lungs are compressed by the increasing pressure of water. Rapid changes in lung air volume during descent or ascent can result in a lung injury known as pulmonary barotrauma. Factors that may influence individual susceptibility to breath-hold diving-induced lung injury range from underlying pulmonary or cardiac dysfunction to genetic predisposition.According to the available data, breath-holding does not result in chronic lung injury. However, studies of large populations of breath-hold divers are necessary to firmly exclude long-term lung damage. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  20. First-pass studies of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Sidhu, N; Basmadjian, G; Burow, R; Allen, E W

    1993-10-01

    Mild hydrochloric acid was introduced to a caudal lung section in each of eight dogs to induce injury. Transits of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells (RBC) and [123I]iodoantipyrine (IAP) injected intravenously were recorded by a scintillation camera. Lungs and blood samples were analyzed post-mortem. Peak-to-equilibrium ratios (P/E) of RBC time-activity curves were computed to be 3.83 +/- 0.54 for the control lung, 2.58 +/- 0.55 for the injured lung and 2.23 +/- 0.58 for the injured caudal section. For IAP, the respective results were 3.78 +/- 0.29, 2.02 +/- 0.18 and 1.77 +/- 0.17. The decrease of P/E in injured areas was attributed to reduced blood flow. Using mean transit times of the tracers, we computed extravascular lung water per unit blood volume to be 0.35 +/- 0.18 for the control lungs and an increased value of 0.68 +/- 0.24 for the injured lungs. These results displayed sensitivity to injury, but were gross underestimates relative to the corresponding values of 2.04 +/- 0.54 and 4.56 +/- 1.85 in post-mortem analyses.

  1. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has

  2. Glycyrrhetinic acid alleviates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmei; Zhang, Weijian; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Jiemin; Chen, Xiuying; Yang, Meichun; Chen, Ting; Hong, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication of thoracic radiotherapy, but efficacious therapy for RILI is lacking. This study ascertained whether glycyrrhetinic acid (GA; a functional hydrolyzed product of glycyrrhizic acid, which is extracted from herb licorice) can protect against RILI and investigated its relationship to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smads signaling pathway. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: a control group, a GA group and two irradiation (IR) groups. IR groups were exposed to a single fraction of X-rays (12 Gy) to the thorax and administered normal saline (IR + NS group) or GA (IR + GA group). Two days and 17 days after irradiation, histologic analyses were performed to assess the degree of lung injury, and the expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was recorded. GA administration mitigated the histologic changes of lung injury 2 days and 17 days after irradiation. Protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3, and the mRNA level of Smad7, in lung tissue were significantly elevated after irradiation. GA decreased expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3 in lung tissue, but did not increase Smad7 expression. GA can protect against early-stage RILI. This protective effect may be associated with inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway. PMID:27672101

  3. Curcumin protects bleomycin-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, N; Punithavathi, V; Chandrakasan, G

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective effects of curcumin against bleomycin (BLM)-induced inflammatory and oxidant lung injury. The data indicate that BLM-mediated lung injury resulted in increases in lung lavage fluid biomarkers such as total protein, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), lipid peroxidation (LPO) products, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Bleomycin administration also resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells and greater amounts of alveolar macrophage (AM) superoxide dismutase activity. By contrast, lower levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were observed in lung lavage fluid, BAL cells and AM. Stimulated superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide release by AM from BLM rats were found to be higher. Curcumin treatment resulted in a significant reduction in lavage fluid biomarkers. In addition, curcumin treatment resulted in the restoration of antioxidant status in BLM rats. These data suggest that curcumin treatment reduces the development of BLM-induced inflammatory and oxidant activity. Therefore, curcumin offers the potential for a novel pharmacological approach in the suppression of drug or chemical-induced lung injury.

  4. [Transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI): obvious and incomprehensible].

    PubMed

    Bulanov, A Iu

    2009-01-01

    Acute transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI) is an acute lung injury associated with and develops within 6 hours after the transfusion of components and blood preparations. Today there are no uniform views on the pathogenesis of TRALI. The discussion of immune and non-immune mechanisms is relevant. The key link of the former is that the presence of anti-leukocytic antibodies in a donor or a recipient and their interaction during transfusion with the leukocytes of the recipient or the donor, respectively; that of the latter link is the accumulation of biologically active substances in the transfusion media during storage and their passive administration to the recipient during transfusion. In both cases, the total link is drastic increased pulmonary capillary permeability. The clinical presentation of TRALI is nonspecific and generally similar to that of the adult respiratory distress syndrome and lung injuries of another genesis. It is necessary to make its differential diagnosis with allergic reactions, the transfusion of bacterially contaminated media and mainly with circulatory overload. Specific treatments for transfusion-associated lung injury are unavailable. Diferent variants of respiratory therapy are effective. Prevention of TRALI is mainly based on its immune mechanism. The leading direction of its prevention is to select donors.

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) INDUCED LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress participates in particulate matter (PM) induced acute lung injury.
    Elizabeth S. Roberts1, Judy L. Richards2, Kevin L. Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    Epidemiol...

  6. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) INDUCED LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress participates in particulate matter (PM) induced acute lung injury.
    Elizabeth S. Roberts1, Judy L. Richards2, Kevin L. Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    Epidemiol...

  7. Betulin attenuates lung and liver injuries in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Zhenning; Liu, Wei; Han, Xinfei; Zhao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a complex condition with unacceptable mortality. Betulin is a natural extract with multiple bioactivities. This study aims to evaluate the potential effects of betulin on lung and liver injury in sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture was used to establish the rat model of sepsis. A single dose of 4mg/kg or 8mg/kg betulin was injected intraperitoneally immediately after the model establishment. The survival rate was recorded every 12h for 96h. The organ injury was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and serum biochemical test. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and high mobility group box 1 in the serum were measured using ELISA. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of proteins in NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Betulin treatment significantly improved the survival rate of septic rats, and attenuated lung and liver injury in sepsis, including the reduction of lung wet/dry weight ratio and activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase in the serum. In addition, levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and high mobility group box 1 in the serum were also lowered by betulin treatment. Moreover, sepsis-induced activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway was inhibited by betulin as well. Our findings demonstrate the protective effect of betulin in lung and liver injury in sepsis. This protection may be mediated by its anti-inflammatory and NF-κB and MAPK inhibitory effects.

  8. Efficacy of Methylprednisolone in Preventing Lung Injury Following Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Auger, William R.; Marsh, James J.; Devendra, Gehan; Spragg, Roger G.; Kim, Nick H.; Channick, Richard N.; Jamieson, Stuart W.; Madani, Michael M.; Manecke, Gerard R.; Roth, David M.; Shragg, Gordon P.; Fedullo, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We sought to determine the efficacy and safety of perioperative treatment with methylprednisolone on the development of lung injury after pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Methods: This was a randomized, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 98 adult patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who were undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy at a single institution. The patients received either placebo (n = 47) or methylprednisolone (n = 51) (30 mg/kg in the cardiopulmonary bypass prime, 500 mg IV bolus following the final circulatory arrest, and 250 mg IV bolus 36 h after surgery). The primary end point was the presence of lung injury as determined by two independent, blinded physicians using prospectively defined criteria. The secondary end points included ventilator-free, ICU-free, and hospital-free days and selected levels of cytokines in the blood and in BAL fluid. Results: The incidence of lung injury was similar in both treatment groups (45% placebo, 41% steroid; P = .72). There were no statistical differences in the secondary clinical end points between treatment groups. Treatment with methylprednisolone, compared with placebo, was associated with a statistically significant reduction in plasma IL-6 and IL-8, a significant increase in plasma IL-10, and a significant reduction in postoperative IL-1ra and IL-6, but not IL-8 in BAL fluid obtained 1 day after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative methylprednisolone does not reduce the incidence of lung injury following pulmonary thromboendarterectomy surgery despite having an antiinflammatory effect on plasma and lavage cytokine levels. PMID:21835900

  9. Preventive Effects of Carnosine on Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Sugizaki, Toshifumi; Kanda, Yuki; Tamura, Fumiya; Niino, Tomomi; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute lung injury, which involves neutrophilic inflammation and pulmonary cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in ARDS development. New compounds for inhibiting the onset and progression of ARDS are required. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a small di-peptide with numerous activities, including antioxidant effects, metal chelation, proton buffering capacity and the inhibition of protein carbonylation and glycoxidation. We have examined the preventive effects of carnosine on tissue injury, oedema and inflammation in a murine model for ARDS. Oral administration of carnosine suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular permeability, tissue injury and inflammation in the lung. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that LPS administration increased the level of ROS and that this increase was inhibited by carnosine administration. Carnosine also suppressed LPS-induced neutrophilic inflammation (evaluated by activation of myeloperoxidase in the lung and increased extracellular DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Furthermore, carnosine administration suppressed the LPS-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response in vivo. These results suggest that the oral administration of carnosine suppresses LPS-induced lung injury via carnosine’s ROS-reducing activity. Therefore, carnosine may be beneficial for suppressing the onset and progression of ARDS. PMID:28205623

  10. L-arginine attenuates acute lung injury after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Yu, Yong-Ming; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David; Traber, Daniel L

    2007-10-01

    Thermal injury results in reduced plasma levels of arginine (Arg). With reduced Arg availability, NOS produces superoxide instead of NO. We hypothesized that Arg supplementation after burn and smoke inhalation (B + S) injury would attenuate the acute insult to the lungs and, thus, protect pulmonary function. Seventeen Suffolk ewes (n = 17) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) sham injury group (n = 6), (2) B + S injury plus saline treatment (n = 6), and (3) B + S injury plus L-ARG infusion at 57 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) (n = 5). Burn and smoke inhalation injury was induced by standardized procedures, including a 40% area full thickness flame burn combined with 48 breaths of smoke from burning cottons. All animals were immediately resuscitated by Ringer solution and supported by mechanical ventilation for 48 h, during which various variables of pulmonary function were monitored. The results demonstrated that Arg treatment attenuated the decline of plasma Arg concentration after B + S injury. A higher plasma Arg concentration was associated with a less decline in Pao2/Fio2 ratio and a reduced extent of airway obstruction after B + S injury. Histopathological examinations also indicated a remarkably reduced histopathological scores associated with B + S injury. Nitrotyrosine stain in lung tissue was positive after B + S injury, but was significantly reduced in the group with Arg. Therefore, L-Arg supplementation improved gas exchange and pulmonary function in ovine after B + S injury via its, at least in part, effect on reduction of oxidative stress through the peroxynitrite pathway.

  11. Maintenance of cAMP in non-heart-beating donor lungs reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S C; Bleiweis, M S; Jones, D R; Paik, H C; Ciriaco, P; Egan, T M

    2001-06-01

    Studies suggest that pulmonary vascular ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) can be attenuated by increasing intracellular cAMP concentrations. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of IRI on capillary permeability, assessed by capillary filtration coeficient (Kfc), in lungs retrieved from non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) and reperfused with the addition of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (iso), and rolipram (roli), a phosphodiesterase (type IV) inhibitor. Using an in situ isolated perfused lung model, lungs were retrieved from NHBD rats at varying intervals after death and either ventilated with O(2) or not ventilated. The lungs were reperfused with Earle's solution with or without a combination of iso (10 microM) and roli (2 microM). Kfc, lung viability, and pulmonary hemodynamics were measured. Lung tissue levels of adenine nucleotides and cAMP were measured by HPLC. Combined iso and roli (iso/roli) reperfusion decreased Kfc significantly (p < 0.05) compared with non-iso/roli-reperfused groups after 2 h of postmortem ischemia. Total adenine nucleotide (TAN) levels correlated with Kfc in non-iso/roli-reperfused (r = 0.89) and iso/roli-reperfused (r = 0.97) lungs. cAMP levels correlated with Kfc (r = 0.93) in iso/roli-reperfused lungs. Pharmacologic augmentation of tissue TAN and cAMP levels might ameliorate the increased capillary permeability observed in lungs retrieved from NHBDs.

  12. Susceptibility of the Aging Lung to Environmental Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Green, Francis H.Y.; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette M.

    2015-01-01

    With an ever increasing number of elderly individuals in the world, a better understanding of the issues associated with aging and the environment is needed. The respiratory system is one of the primary interfaces between the body and the external environment. An expanding number of studies suggest that the aging pulmonary system (>65 years) is at increased risk for adverse health effects from environmental insult, such as by air pollutants, infection, and climate change. However, the mechanism(s) for increased susceptibility in this subpopulation is not well understood. In this review, we provide a limited, but comprehensive overview of how the lung ages, examples of environmental exposures associated with injury to the aging lung and potential mechanisms underlining the increased vulnerability of the aging lung to injury from environmental factors. PMID:20941655

  13. Phosphatidic acid signaling mediates lung cytokine expression and lung inflammatory injury after hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Bursten, S; Shenkar, R; Allbee, J; Tuder, R; Woodson, P; Guidot, D M; Rice, G; Singer, J W; Repine, J E

    1995-02-01

    Because phosphatidic acid (PA) pathway signaling may mediate many basic reactions involving cytokine-dependent responses, we investigated the effects of CT1501R, a functional inhibitor of the enzyme lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) which converts lysophosphatidic acid (Lyso-PA) to PA. We found that CT1501R treatment not only prevented hypoxia-induced PA increases and lyso-PA consumption in human neutrophils, but also prevented neutrophil chemotaxis and adherence in vitro, and lung injury and lung neutrophil accumulation in mice subjected to hemorrhage and resuscitation. In addition, CT1501R treatment prevented increases in mRNA levels and protein production of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines in multiple lung cell populations after blood loss and resuscitation. Our results indicate the fundamental role of PA metabolism in the development of acute inflammatory lung injury after blood loss.

  14. TLR4 signaling induces TLR3 up-regulation in alveolar macrophages during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Tong, Yao; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Zhixia; Mei, Shuya; Zhang, Liming; Billiar, Timothy R.; Li, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening inflammatory response caused by severe infection. Toll-like receptors in alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) recognize the molecular constituents of pathogens and activate the host’s innate immune responses. Numerous studies have documented the importance of TLR-TLR cross talk, but few studies have specifically addressed the relationship between TLR4 and TLR3. We explored a novel mechanism of TLR3 up-regulation that is induced by LPS-TLR4 signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner in AMΦ from C57BL/6 mice, while the LPS-induced TLR3 expression was significantly reduced in TLR4−/− and Myd88−/− mice and following pretreatment with a NF-κB inhibitor. The enhanced TLR3 up-regulation in AMΦ augmented the expression of cytokines and chemokines in response to sequential challenges with LPS and Poly I:C, a TLR3 ligand, which was physiologically associated with amplified AMΦ-induced PMN migration into lung alveoli. Our study demonstrates that the synergistic effect between TLR4 and TLR3 in macrophages is an important determinant in acute lung injury and, more importantly, that TLR3 up-regulation is dependent on TLR4-MyD88-NF-κB signaling. These results raise the possibility that bacterial infections can induce sensitivity to viral infections, which may have important implications for the therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune system. PMID:28198368

  15. Role of toxicological interactions in lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.; Hakkinen, P.J.

    1984-04-01

    Interactions between two or more toxic agents can produce lung damage by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-receptor interactions or by modification, by a first agent, of the cell and tissue response to a second agent. Interactions may occur by simultaneous exposure and if exposure to two agents is separated in time. Chemical-chemical interactions have been mostly studied in the toxicology of air pollutants, where it was shown that the untoward effect of certain oxidants may be enhanced in the presence of other aerosols. Interactions at the receptor site have been found in isolated perfused lung experiments. Oxygen tolerance may be an example, when pre-exposure to one concentration of oxygen mitigates later exposure to 100% oxygen by modifying cellular and enzymatic composition of the lung. Damage of the alveolar zone by the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) can be greatly enhanced by subsequent exposure to oxygen concentration which, otherwise, would have little if any demonstrable effect. The synergistic interaction between BHT and oxygen results in a resulting interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Acute or chronic lung disease may then be caused not only by one agent, but very likely in many instances by the interaction of several agents. 121 references.

  16. Thioredoxin-Related Mechanisms in Hyperoxic Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tipple, Trent E.; Welty, Stephen E.; Rogers, Lynette K.; Hansen, Thomas N.; Choi, Young-Eun; Kehrer, James P.; Smith, Charles V.

    2007-01-01

    Reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to glutathione (GSH) by glutathione reductase (GR) enhances the efficiency of GSH-dependent antioxidant activities. However, GR-deficient (a1Neu) mice are less susceptible to acute lung injury from continuous exposure to > 95% O2 (96 h: 6.9 ± 0.1 g right lung/kg body versus room air 3.6 ± 0.3) than are C3H/HeN control mice (10.6 ± 1.3 versus 4.2 ± 0.3, P < 0.001). a1Neu mice have greater hepatic thioredoxin (Trx)1 and Trx2 levels than do C3H/HeN mice, suggesting compensation for the absence of GR. a1Neu mice exposed to hyperoxia for 96 hours showed lower levels of inflammatory infiltrates in lungs than did similarly exposed C3H/HeN mice. Pretreatment with aurothioglucose (ATG), a thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitor, exacerbated the effects of hyperoxia on lung injury in a1Neu mice (11.6 ± 0.8, P < 0.001), but attenuated hyperoxic lung edema and inflammation in C3H/HeN mice (6.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.001). No consistent alterations were observed in lung GSH contents or liver GSH or GSSG levels after ATG pretreatment. The data suggest that modulation of Trx/TrxR systems might provide therapeutically useful alterations of cellular resistance to oxidant stresses. The protective effects of ATG against hyperoxic lung injury could prove to be particularly useful therapeutically. PMID:17575077

  17. Lung inflation with hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase decreases lung graft injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Fang, Xianhai; Meng, Chao; Xing, Jingchun; Liu, Jinfeng; Yang, Wanchao; Li, Wenzhi; Zhou, Huacheng

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury when it is inhaled by donor or/and recipient. This study examined the effects of lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase on lung graft function in rats. The donor lung was inflated with 3% hydrogen, 40% oxygen, and 57% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg, and the gas was replaced every 20 min during the cold ischemia phase for 2 h. In the control group, the donor lung was inflated with 40% oxygen and 60% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg. The recipient was euthanized 2 h after orthotropic lung transplantation. The hydrogen concentration in the donor lung during the cold ischemia phase was 1.99-3%. The oxygenation indices in the arterial blood and pulmonary vein blood were improved in the hydrogen group. The inflammation response indices, including lung W/D ratio, the myeloperoxidase activity in the grafts, and the levels of IL-8 and TNF-α in serum, were significantly lower in the hydrogen group (5.2 ± 0.8, 0.76 ± 0.32 U/g, 340 ± 84 pg/mL, and 405 ± 115 pg/mL, respectively) than those in the control group (6.5 ± 0.7, 1.1 ± 0.5 U/g, 443 ± 94 pg/mL, and 657 ± 96 pg/mL, respectively (P < 0.05), and the oxidative stress indices, including the superoxide dismutase activity and the level of malonaldehyde in lung grafts were improved after hydrogen application. Furthermore, the lung injury score determined by histopathology, the cell apoptotic index, and the caspase-3 protein expression in lung grafts were decreased after hydrogen treatment, and the static pressure-volume curve of lung graft was improved by hydrogen inflation. In conclusion, lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase alleviated lung graft injury and improved graft function.

  18. Lung inflation with hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase decreases lung graft injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rongfang; Fang, Xianhai; Meng, Chao; Xing, Jingchun; Liu, Jinfeng; Yang, Wanchao

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on lung ischemia–reperfusion injury when it is inhaled by donor or/and recipient. This study examined the effects of lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase on lung graft function in rats. The donor lung was inflated with 3% hydrogen, 40% oxygen, and 57% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg, and the gas was replaced every 20 min during the cold ischemia phase for 2 h. In the control group, the donor lung was inflated with 40% oxygen and 60% nitrogen at 5 mL/kg. The recipient was euthanized 2 h after orthotropic lung transplantation. The hydrogen concentration in the donor lung during the cold ischemia phase was 1.99–3%. The oxygenation indices in the arterial blood and pulmonary vein blood were improved in the hydrogen group. The inflammation response indices, including lung W/D ratio, the myeloperoxidase activity in the grafts, and the levels of IL-8 and TNF-α in serum, were significantly lower in the hydrogen group (5.2 ± 0.8, 0.76 ± 0.32 U/g, 340 ± 84 pg/mL, and 405 ± 115 pg/mL, respectively) than those in the control group (6.5 ± 0.7, 1.1 ± 0.5 U/g, 443 ± 94 pg/mL, and 657 ± 96 pg/mL, respectively (P < 0.05), and the oxidative stress indices, including the superoxide dismutase activity and the level of malonaldehyde in lung grafts were improved after hydrogen application. Furthermore, the lung injury score determined by histopathology, the cell apoptotic index, and the caspase-3 protein expression in lung grafts were decreased after hydrogen treatment, and the static pressure–volume curve of lung graft was improved by hydrogen inflation. In conclusion, lung inflation with 3% hydrogen during the cold ischemia phase alleviated lung graft injury and improved graft function. PMID:25662956

  19. Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline attenuates lung ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mamoru; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Saito, Masao; Tanaka, Satona; Miyamoto, Ei; Ohata, Keiji; Kondo, Takeshi; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen have been reported in studies examining ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline on lung IRI. Lewis rats were divided into three groups: (i) sham, (ii) normal saline and (iii) hydrogen-rich saline. In the first experiment, the left thoracic cavity was filled with either normal saline or hydrogen-rich saline for 1 h. Then, we measured the hydrogen concentration in the left lung using a sensor gas chromatograph ( N = 3 per group). In the second experiment, lung IRI was induced by occlusion of the left pulmonary hilum for 1 h, followed by reperfusion for 3 h. During the ischaemic period, the left thoracic cavity was filled with either normal saline or hydrogen-rich saline. After reperfusion, we assessed lung function, histological changes and cytokine production ( N = 5-7 per group). Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline resulted in an elevated hydrogen concentration in the lung (6.9 ± 2.9 μmol/1 g lung). After IRI, pulmonary function (pulmonary compliance and oxygenation levels) was significantly higher in the hydrogen-rich saline group than in the normal saline group ( P  < 0.05). Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (interleukin-1β and interleukin-6) in the left lung were significantly lower in the hydrogen-rich saline group than in the normal saline group ( P  < 0.05). Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline delivered hydrogen into the lung and consequently attenuated lung IRI. Hydrogen-rich solution appears to be a promising approach to managing lung IRI.

  20. New insights into experimental evidence on atelectasis and causes of lung injury.

    PubMed

    Muders, Thomas; Wrigge, Hermann

    2010-06-01

    Development of atelectasis is common in both patients with and without lung injury during mechanical ventilation. Atelectasis might contribute to or attenuate lung injury by different possible mechanisms. Possible direct effects of atelectasis include inflammatory activation or infection of the affected regional lung tissues. In addition, the loss of aerated lung volume due to atelectasis in mechanically ventilated patients indirectly results in increased mechanical strain of the reduced number of ventilated lung regions, if ventilation is not adequately decreased. This study discusses possible mechanisms and interactions between atelectasis formation in the lungs and the development or aggravation of acute lung injury.

  1. Death receptors mediate the adverse effects of febrile-range hyperthermia on the outcome of lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Herrero, Raquel; Wong, Venus A.; Mongovin, Stephen M.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    We have shown that febrile-range hyperthermia enhances lung injury and mortality in mice exposed to inhaled LPS and is associated with increased TNF-α receptor activity, suppression of NF-κB activity in vitro, and increased apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells in vivo. We hypothesized that hyperthermia enhances lung injury and mortality in vivo by a mechanism dependent on TNF receptor signaling. To test this, we exposed mice lacking the TNF-receptor family members TNFR1/R2 or Fas (TNFR1/R2−/− and lpr) to inhaled LPS with or without febrile-range hyperthermia. For comparison, we studied mice lacking IL-1 receptor activity (IL-1R−/−) to determine the role of inflammation on the effect of hyperthermia in vivo. TNFR1/R2−/− and lpr mice were protected from augmented alveolar permeability and mortality associated with hyperthermia, whereas IL-1R−/− mice were susceptible to augmented alveolar permeability but protected from mortality associated with hyperthermia. Hyperthermia decreased pulmonary concentrations of TNF-α and keratinocyte-derived chemokine after LPS in C57BL/6 mice and did not affect pulmonary inflammation but enhanced circulating markers of oxidative injury and nitric oxide metabolites. The data suggest that hyperthermia enhances lung injury by a mechanism that requires death receptor activity and is not directly associated with changes in inflammation mediated by hyperthermia. In addition, hyperthermia appears to enhance mortality by generating a systemic inflammatory response and not by a mechanism directly associated with respiratory failure. Finally, we observed that exposure to febrile-range hyperthermia converts a modest, survivable model of lung injury into a fatal syndrome associated with oxidative and nitrosative stress, similar to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. PMID:21515659

  2. Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde-adducted protein inhalation causes lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Todd A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; McCaskill, Michael L; Tuma, Dean J; Yanov, Daniel; DeVasure, Jane; Sisson, Joseph H

    2012-02-01

    that the lung surfactant protein is a biologically relevant target for malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde adduction. These data further implicate MAA-adduct formation as a potential mechanism for smoke- and alcohol-induced lung injury.

  3. Xanthine oxidase is increased and contributes to paraquat-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Waintrub, M L; Terada, L S; Beehler, C J; Anderson, B O; Leff, J A; Repine, J E

    1990-04-01

    Two lines of investigation suggested that xanthine oxidase- (XO) derived O2 metabolites contribute to paraquat- (PQ) induced acute lung injury. First, PQ treatment increased lung XO activity and decreased lung xanthine dehydrogenase activity. Second, lung albumin uptake increased compared with control values in untreated XO-replete but not tungsten-treated XO-depleted lungs in rats treated with PQ.

  4. Lung injury in dimethyl sulfate poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, M.; Wong, K.L.; Wong, K.F.; So, S.Y.

    1989-02-01

    Two manual laborers were exposed to dimethyl sulfate during work and sustained mucosal injury to the eyes and respiratory tract. In one of them, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurred and improved with high-dose methylprednisolone. On follow-up for 10 months, this patient developed persistent productive cough with no evidence of bronchiectasis or bronchial hyperreactivity.

  5. Tranilast ameliorates cyclophosphamide-induced lung injury and nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Said, Eman; Elkashef, Wagdi F; Abdelaziz, Rania R

    2016-04-01

    The world-wide increase in cancer incidence imposes a corresponding significant increase in the use of chemotherapeutic agents. Nephrotoxicity is a side effect frequently encountered with cyclophosphamide (CP), which is also well-known to cause acute and chronic lung toxicities. The current study focuses on the evaluation of the potential protective efficacy of tranilast against acute and subacute CP-induced lung and kidney injuries in male Swiss Albino mice. Intraperitoneal CP significantly impaired oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and increased inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, with significant impairment of lung and kidney architectures. Tranilast taken orally for 8 and 14 days significantly enhanced mice anti-oxidant defense mechanisms; it increased lung and kidney SOD activity, GSH content and reduced lipid peroxidation. Tranilast significantly reduced serum creatinine and BUN. Furthermore, it decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Serum TNF-α, LDH, total lung and kidney protein contents significantly declined as well. Histopathological examination revealed concomitant significant tissue recovery. Such results show a significant protective potential of tranilast against deleterious lung and kidney damage induced by CP, probably by enhancing host antioxidant defense mechanism, decreasing cytotoxicity, and decreasing expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  6. Nitrofurantoin: evidence for the oxidant injury of lung parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, W J

    1983-04-01

    Nitrofurantoin, a commonly used urinary antiseptic, is associated with significant pulmonary toxicity. This study used a 51Cr rat lung explant cytotoxicity assay to demonstrate that nitrofurantoin (10(-3) M), when incubated with lung parenchymal cells for 12 h at 37 degrees C, resulted in significant lung cell injury (cytotoxic index of 43 +/- 2). This injury could be reduced (p less than 0.05) by several antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, 300 U/ml (37 +/- 2); catalase, 1,100 U/ml (27 +/- 2); alpha tocopherol, 10 micrograms/ml (30 +/- 2); ascorbic acid 50 micrograms/ml (37 +/- 2); ethanol, 0.1% (35 +/- 2); dimethyl sulfoxide, 1.0% (37 +/- 2). Additionally, the nitrofurantoin-induced injury could be accelerated in the presence of hyperoxia (95% O2) from 45 +/- 2 to 62 +/- 1, p less than 0.01. These data suggest that nitrofurantoin can directly injure lung parenchymal cells, probably through oxidant mechanisms, and this might suggest alternative approaches in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disorder.

  7. Acute lung injury after inhalation of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shih Ling; Yap, Eng Soo; Khoo, See Meng; Lim, Tow Keang; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Teo, Sylvia Tzu Li

    2008-12-01

    We report two cases of acute lung injury after the inhalation of nitric acid fumes in an industrial accident. The first patient, who was not using a respirator and standing in close proximity to the site of spillage of concentrated nitric acid, presented within 12 h with worsening dyspnea and required noninvasive ventilation for type 1 respiratory failure. The second case presented 1 day later with similar symptoms, but only required supportive treatment with high-flow oxygen. Both patients' chest radiographs showed widespread bilateral airspace shadows consistent with acute lung injury. Both received treatment with systemic steroids. They were discharged from hospital 5 days postexposure. Initial lung function test showed a restrictive pattern that normalized by 3 weeks postexposure. This case series describes the natural history after acute inhalation of nitric acid fumes, and demonstrates that the severity of lung injury is directly dependent on the exposure level. It also highlights the use of noninvasive ventilatory support in the management of such patients.

  8. A micro-CT analysis of murine lung recruitment in bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shofer, Scott; Badea, Cristian; Qi, Yi; Potts, Erin; Foster, W. Michael; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-01-01

    The effects of lung injury on pulmonary recruitment are incompletely understood. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been a valuable tool in assessing changes in recruitment during lung injury. With the development of preclinical CT scanners designed for thoracic imaging in rodents, it is possible to acquire high-resolution images during the evolution of a pulmonary injury in living mice. We quantitatively assessed changes in recruitment caused by intratracheal bleomycin at 1 and 3 wk after administration using micro-CT in 129S6/SvEvTac mice. Twenty female mice were administered 2.5 U of bleomycin or saline and imaged with micro-CT at end inspiration and end expiration. Mice were extubated and allowed to recover from anesthesia and then reevaluated in vivo for quasi-static compliance measurements, followed by harvesting of the lungs for collagen analysis and histology. CT images were converted to histograms and analyzed for mean lung attenuation (MLA). MLA was significantly greater for bleomycin-exposed mice at week 1 for both inspiration (P < 0.0047) and exhalation (P < 0.0377) but was not significantly different for week 3 bleomycin-exposed mice. However, week 3 bleomycin-exposed mice did display significant increases in MLA shift from expiration to inspiration compared with either group of control mice (P < 0.005), suggesting increased lung recruitment at this time point. Week 1 bleomycin-exposed mice displayed normal shifts in MLA with inspiration, suggesting normal lung recruitment despite significant radiographic and histological changes. Lung alveolar recruitment is preserved in a mouse model of bleomycin-induced parenchymal injury despite significant changes in radiographic and physiological parameters. PMID:18566189

  9. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Chih; Hsieh, Nan-Kuang; Liou, Huey Ling; Chen, Hsing I

    2012-03-01

    Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI). Niacinamide (NAC) is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC) on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g), PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight), cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight). There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate) and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose) polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS). The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental role in the PMA-induced lung injury. ATP is beneficial

  10. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI). Niacinamide (NAC) is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC) on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. Methods The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g), PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight), cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight). There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate) and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose) polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS). The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. Results PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Conclusions Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental role in the PMA

  11. Circulating Histones Are Mediators of Trauma-associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Simon T.; Zhang, Nan; Manson, Joanna; Liu, Tingting; Dart, Caroline; Baluwa, Florence; Wang, Susan Siyu; Brohi, Karim; Kipar, Anja; Yu, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury is a common complication after severe trauma, which predisposes patients to multiple organ failure. This syndrome largely accounts for the late mortality that arises and despite many theories, the pathological mechanism is not fully understood. Discovery of histone-induced toxicity in mice presents a new dimension for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To investigate the pathological roles of circulating histones in trauma-induced lung injury. Methods: Circulating histone levels in patients with severe trauma were determined and correlated with respiratory failure and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores. Their cause–effect relationship was studied using cells and mouse models. Measurements and Main Results: In a cohort of 52 patients with severe nonthoracic blunt trauma, circulating histones surged immediately after trauma to levels that were toxic to cultured endothelial cells. The high levels were significantly associated with the incidence of acute lung injury and SOFA scores, as well as markers of endothelial damage and coagulation activation. In in vitro systems, histones damaged endothelial cells, stimulated cytokine release, and induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase release. Cellular toxicity resulted from their direct membrane interaction and resultant calcium influx. In mouse models, cytokines and markers for endothelial damage and coagulation activation significantly increased immediately after trauma or histone infusion. Pathological examinations showed that lungs were the predominantly affected organ with edema, hemorrhage, microvascular thrombosis, and neutrophil congestion. An anti-histone antibody could reduce these changes and protect mice from histone-induced lethality. Conclusions: This study elucidates a new mechanism for acute lung injury after severe trauma and proposes that circulating histones are viable therapeutic targets for improving survival

  12. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  13. Stevioside protects LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yingkun, Nie; Zhenyu, Wang; Jing, Lin; Xiuyun, Lu; Huimin, Yu

    2013-02-01

    Stevioside, a diterpene glycoside component of Stevia rebaudiana, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. To evaluate the effect and the possible mechanism of stevioside in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury, male BALB/c mice were pretreated with stevioside or dexamethasone 1 h before intranasal instillation of LPS. Seven hours later, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in the BALF were also determined. The right lung was excised for histological examination and analysis of myeloperoxidase activity and nitrate/nitrite content. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B protein were detected by western blot. The results showed that stevioside markedly attenuated the LPS-induced histological alterations in the lung. Stevioside inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the expression of COX-2 and iNOS induced by LPS. In addition, not only was the wet-to-dry weight ratio of lung tissue significantly decreased, the number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in the BALF were also significantly reduced after treatment with stevioside. Moreover, western blotting showed that stevioside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB caused by LPS. Taken together, our results suggest that anti-inflammatory effect of stevioside against the LPS-induced acute lung injury may be due to its ability of inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Stevioside may be a promising potential therapeutic reagent for acute lung injury treatment.

  14. Fibrogenic Lung Injury Induces Non-Cell-Autonomous Fibroblast Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Neil; Grasberger, Paula E; Mugo, Brian M; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés; Lagares, David; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis appears to depend on their invasion through basement membranes and extracellular matrices. Fibroblasts from the fibrotic lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been demonstrated to acquire a phenotype characterized by increased cell-autonomous invasion. Here, we investigated whether fibroblast invasion is further stimulated by soluble mediators induced by lung injury. We found that bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from bleomycin-challenged mice or patients with IPF contain mediators that dramatically increase the matrix invasion of primary lung fibroblasts. Further characterization of this non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion suggested that the mediators driving this process are produced locally after lung injury and are preferentially produced by fibrogenic (e.g., bleomycin-induced) rather than nonfibrogenic (e.g., LPS-induced) lung injury. Comparison of invasion and migration induced by a series of fibroblast-active mediators indicated that these two forms of fibroblast movement are directed by distinct sets of stimuli. Finally, knockdown of multiple different membrane receptors, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, lysophosphatidic acid 1, epidermal growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, mitigated the non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion induced by bronchoalveolar lavage from bleomycin-injured mice, suggesting that multiple different mediators drive fibroblast invasion in pulmonary fibrosis. The magnitude of this mediator-driven fibroblast invasion suggests that its inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. Further elaboration of the molecular mechanisms that drive non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion consequently may provide a rich set of novel drug targets for the treatment of IPF and other fibrotic lung diseases.

  15. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  16. M2A and M2C Macrophage Subsets Ameliorate Inflammation and Fibroproliferation in Acute Lung Injury Through Interleukin 10 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Chunmei; Li, Hongqiang; Zhang, Qian; Bai, Jianwen

    2016-12-09

    The role of M2 macrophages in the resolution and fibroproliferation of acute lung injury (ALI) is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of two M2 macrophage subtypes, M2a induced by interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13 and M2c induced by IL-10/transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, on the pathogenesis of ALI. M2a and M2c were adoptively transferred into LPS-induced ALI mice model. Data showed that Vybrant-labeled macrophages appeared in the lungs of ALI mice. Subsequently, we observed that both subsets significantly reduced lung inflammation and injury including a reduction of neutrophil influx into the lung and an augmentation of apoptosis. Interestingly, M2c macrophages more effectively suppressed indices of lung injury than M2a macrophages. M2c macrophages were also more effective than M2a in reduction of lung fibrosis. In addition, we found that M2c but not M2a macrophages increased IL-10 level in lung tissues of the recipient ALI mice partially mediated by activating the JAK1/STAT3/SOCS3 signaling pathway. After blocking IL-10, these superior effects of M2c over M2a were abolished. These data imply that M2c are more potent than M2a macrophages in protecting against lung injury and subsequent fibrosis due to their ability to produce IL-10. Therefore, reprogramming macrophages to M2c subset may be a novel treatment modality with transitional potential.

  17. Hepatic cryoablation-induced acute lung injury: histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Washington, K; Debelak, J P; Gobbell, C; Sztipanovits, D R; Shyr, Y; Olson, S; Chapman, W C

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that hepatic cryoablation (cryo), but not partial hepatectomy, induces a systemic inflammatory response, with distant organ injury and overproduction of NF-kappaB-dependent cytokines. Serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) levels are markedly increased 1 h and beyond after cryo compared with partial hepatectomy where no elevation occurs. NF-kappaB activation (by electrophoretic mobility shift assay) is strikingly increased in the noncryo liver (but not in the lung) at 30 min and in both the liver and lung tissue 1 h after cryo, returning to the baseline by 2 h and beyond. The current study investigated the histopathologic changes associated with cryoablation-induced acute lung injury. Animals underwent 35% hepatic resection or a similar volume hepatic cryo and were sacrificed at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h. Pulmonary histologic features were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and immunoperoxidase staining with a macrophage-specific antibody (anti-lysozyme, 1:200 dilution, Dako, Carpinteria, CA). The following features were graded semiquantitatively (0-3): perivascular lymphoid cuffs, airspace edema and hemorrhage, margination of neutrophils within pulmonary vasculature, and the presence of macrophages with foamy cytoplasm in the pulmonary interstitium. Hepatic resection (n = 21) resulted in slight perivascular edema at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h post-resection, but there were no other significant changes. Pulmonary findings after hepatic cryo (n = 22) included prominent perivascular lymphoid cuffs 1 and 2 h following hepatic injury that were not present at any other time point (P 0.01). Marginating PMNs and foamy macrophages were more common after cryo at all time points (P<0.05, cryo vs resection). Severe lung injury, as evidenced by airspace edema and parenchymal hemorrhage, was present in four of six (67%) animals at 24 h (P 0.03). In follow-up studies immediate resection (n = 15) of the cryo

  18. Chronic hypertension impairs flow-induced vasodilation and augments the myogenic response in fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Storme, Laurent; Parker, Thomas A; Kinsella, John P; Rairigh, Robyn L; Abman, Steven H

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that altered vasoreactivity in perinatal pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by abnormal responses to hemodynamic stress, including the loss of flow-induced vasodilation and an augmented myogenic response. Therefore, we studied the acute hemodynamic effects of brief compression of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in control fetal lambs and in lambs during exposure to chronic PH. In both groups, acute DA compression decreased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) by 20% at baseline (day 0). After 2 days of hypertension, acute DA compression paradoxically increased PVR by 50% in PH lambs, whereas PVR decreased by 25% in controls. During the 8-day study period, PVR increased during acute DA compression in PH lambs, whereas acute DA compression continued to cause vasodilation in controls. Brief treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) increased basal PVR in control but not PH lambs, suggesting decreased NO production in PH lambs. Chronic hypertension increased the myogenic response after L-NA in PH lambs, whereas the myogenic response remained unchanged in controls. The myogenic response was inhibited by nifedipine in PH lambs, suggesting that the myogenic response is dependent upon the influx of extracellular calcium. We conclude that chronic PH impairs flow-induced vasodilation and increases the myogenic response in fetal lung. We speculate that decreased NO signaling and an augmented myogenic response contributes to abnormal vasoreactivity in PH.

  19. PEEP decreases atelectasis and extravascular lung water but not lung tissue volume in surfactant-washout lung injury.

    PubMed

    Luecke, Thomas; Roth, Harry; Herrmann, Peter; Joachim, Alf; Weisser, Gerald; Pelosi, Paolo; Quintel, Michael

    2003-11-01

    To examine the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on extravascular lung water (EVLW), lung tissue, and lung volume. Experimental animal study at a university research facility. Fifteen adult sheep. All animals were studied before and after saline washout-induced lung injury while ventilated with sequentially increasing PEEP (0, 7, 14, or 21 cmH(2)O). Lung volume was determined by computed tomography and EVLW by the thermal dye dilution technique. Saline washout significantly increased lung tissue volume (21+/-3 to 37+/-5 ml/kg) and EVLW (9+/-2 to 36+/-9 ml/kg). While increasing levels of PEEP reduced EVLW (30+/-7, 24+/-8, and 18+/-4 ml/kg), lung tissue volume remained constant. Total lung volume significantly increased (50+/-8 ml/kg at PEEP 0 to 77+/-12 ml/kg at PEEP 21). Nonaerated lung volume significantly decreased and was closely correlated with the changes in EVLW ( r=0.67). In addition, a highly significant correlation was found between PEEP-induced decrease in nonaerated lung volume and decrease in transpulmonary shunt ( r=0.83). The main findings are as follows: (a) PEEP effectively decreases EVLW. (b) The decrease in EVLW is closely correlated with the PEEP-induced decrease in nonaerated lung volume, making EVLW a valuable bedside parameter indicating alveolar recruitment, similar to measurements of transpulmonary shunt. (c) As excess tissue volume remained constant, however, EVLW may not be suitable to reflect overall severity of lung disease

  20. Role of heme in bromine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lam, Adam; Vetal, Nilam; Matalon, Sadis; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    Bromine (Br2 ) gas inhalation poses an environmental and occupational hazard resulting in high morbidity and mortality. In this review, we underline the acute lung pathology (within 24 h of exposure) and potential therapeutic interventions that may be utilized to mitigate Br2 -induced human toxicity. We discuss our latest published data, which suggest that an increase in heme-dependent tissue injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Our study was based on previous findings that demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which converts toxic heme into bilverdin. Interestingly, following Br2 inhalation, heme levels were indeed elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, plasma, and whole lung tissue in C57BL/6 mice. High heme levels correlated with increased lung oxidative stress, lung inflammation, respiratory acidosis, lung edema, higher airway resistance, and mortality. However, therapeutic reduction of heme levels, by either scavenging with hemopexin or degradation by HO-1, improved lung function and survival. Therefore, heme attenuation may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients after Br2 exposure. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. [Current concept of TRALI (transfusion-related acute lung injury)].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko; Okazai, Hitoshi

    2007-11-01

    It is only 20 years since TRALI was clinically recognized. As it is gradually recognized among Japanese medical community, the number of cases reported is increasing gradually. In the past nine years (1997-2005), Japanese Red Cross confirmed 118 TRALI cases and 38 possible TRALI cases in Japan. Twelve TRALI cases among them occurred during or after anesthesia on the day of operation. Since acute lung injury is caused by multiple pathological factors, it is difficult to identify its main cause as transfusion. Therefore, TRALI has been underdiagnosed and underreported. Several mechanisms have been proposed. Although anti-HLA antibody, anti-HNA antibody, or other immunoreactive substances appear to be involved in developing TRALI, underlying conditions like systemic inflammation may be required for igniting TRALI Although TRALI developed in the operating theater seems to be a small fraction of whole TRALI cases, anesthesiologists should be aware of TRALI, and remember it as one of the causes of acute lung injury.

  2. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  3. Cardiac dysfunction in pneumovirus-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; van den Berg, Elske; Suidgeest, Ernst; van der Weerd, Louise; van Woensel, Job B M; Grotenhuis, Heynric B

    2013-06-01

    To determine biventricular cardiac function in pneumovirus-induced acute lung injury in spontaneously breathing mice. Experimental animal study. Animal laboratory. C57Bl/6 mice. Mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice. Pneumonia virus of mice-infected mice were studied for right and left ventricular function variables by high-field strength (7 Tesla) cardiac MRI at specific time points during the course of disease compared with baseline. One day before and at peak disease severity, pneumonia virus of mice-infected mice showed significant right and left ventricular systolic and diastolic volume changes, with a progressive decrease in stroke volume and ejection fraction. No evidence for viral myocarditis or viral presence in heart tissue was found. These findings show adverse pulmonary-cardiac interaction in pneumovirus-induced acute lung injury, unrelated to direct virus-mediated effects on the heart.

  4. Prolonged Injury and Altered Lung Function after Ozone Inhalation in Mice with Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Angela M.; Gow, Andrew J.; Massa, Christopher B.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant protein–D (Sftpd) is a pulmonary collectin important in down-regulating macrophage inflammatory responses. In these experiments, we analyzed the effects of chronic macrophage inflammation attributable to loss of Sftpd on the persistence of ozone-induced injury, macrophage activation, and altered functioning in the lung. Wild-type (Sftpd+/+) and Sftpd−/− mice (aged 8 wk) were exposed to air or ozone (0.8 parts per million, 3 h). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and tissue were collected 72 hours later. In Sftpd−/− mice, but not Sftpd+/+ mice, increased BAL protein and nitrogen oxides were observed after ozone inhalation, indicating prolonged lung injury and oxidative stress. Increased numbers of macrophages were also present in BAL fluid and in histologic sections from Sftpd−/− mice. These cells were enlarged and foamy, suggesting that they were activated. This conclusion was supported by findings of increased BAL chemotactic activity, and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung macrophages. In both Sftpd+/+ and Sftpd−/− mice, inhalation of ozone was associated with functional alterations in the lung. Although these alterations were limited to central airway mechanics in Sftpd+/+ mice, both central airway and parenchymal mechanics were modified by ozone exposure in Sftpd−/− mice. The most notable changes were evident in resistance and elastance spectra and baseline lung function, and in lung responsiveness to changes in positive end-expiratory pressure. These data demonstrate that a loss of Sftpd is associated with prolonged lung injury, oxidative stress, and macrophage accumulation and activation in response to ozone, and with more extensive functional changes consistent with the loss of parenchymal integrity. PMID:22878412

  5. Ellagic acid ameliorates lung injury after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Böyük, Abdullah; Önder, Akin; Kapan, Murat; Gümüş, Metehan; Fιrat, Uğur; Başaralι, Mustafa Kemal; Alp, Harun

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of antioxidant treatment with ellagic acid (EA) on lung injury after intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury using biochemical and histopatological approaches. Materials and Methods: Forty rats were divided into four groups as control, control + EA, I/R, and I/R + EA. The control and control + EA groups were also anesthetized and subjected to laparotomy, but without clamp application. The control + EA and I/R + EA groups were given EA (85 mg/kg) orally prior to experiment. The I/R and I/R + EA groups underwent 30 minutes of intestinal ischemia and 1 hour of reperfusion. In all groups, serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined. TAC, total oxidative status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) in lung tissue were measured. Lung tissue histopathology was also evaluated by light microscopy. Results: TAC levels were higher in control, EA, and I/R + EA groups while TOS, OSI, and MDA levels were lower in these groups compared with I/R group. Serum MDA levels were significantly higher in I/R + EA group than that of control group. Lung tissue TAC levels were lower in I/R + EA group while OSI values were higher in that groups compared with EA group. Histological tissue damage was milder in the EA treatment group than in the I/R group. Conclusion: These results suggest that EA treatment protected the rats lung tissue against intestinal I/R injury. PMID:21969793

  6. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review.

    PubMed

    Menitove, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury, or TRALI, denotes the most frequently reported fatal complication of blood transfusion. TRALI accounted for 34% of transfusion associated mortalities reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. TRALI caused more deaths than those attributed to hemolytic reactions following incorrect blood administration or sepsis resulting from bacterial contamination of platelet and red cell components. (Holness, Leslie. Food and Drug Administration. Personal Communication, 2006) This paper reviews TRALI for the clinical physician.

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that are related to retinoid, steroid and thyroid hormone receptors. The PPAR subfamily comprises three members: PPAR-alpha, PPAR-beta and PPAR-gamma. PPARs have recently been implicated as regulators of cellular proliferation and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha reduce lung injury associated with inflammation and shock.

  8. Budesonide inhalation ameliorates endotoxin-induced lung injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious clinical problem that has a 30–50% mortality rate. Budesonide has been used to reduce lung injury. This study aims to investigate the effects of nebulized budesonide on endotoxin-induced ARDS in a rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbits were randomized into three groups. Rabbits in the control and budesonide groups were injected with endotoxin. Thereafter, budesonide or saline was instilled, ventilated for four hours, and recovered spontaneous respiratory. Peak pressure, compliance, and PaO2/FiO2 were monitored for 4 h. After seven days, PaO2/FiO2 ratios were measured. Wet-to-dry weight ratios, total protein, neutrophil elastase, white blood cells, and percentage of neutrophils in BALF were evaluated. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-10 in BALF were detected. Lung histopathologic injury and seven-day survival rate of the three groups were recorded. Peak pressure was downregulated, but compliance and PaO2/FiO2 were upregulated by budesonide. PaO2/FiO2 ratios significantly increased due to budesonide. Wet-to-dry weight ratios, total protein, neutrophil elastase, white blood cells and percentage of neutrophils in BALF decreased in the budesonide group. TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 levels decreased in BALF, while IL-10 levels increased in the budesonide group. Lung injuries were reduced and survival rate was upregulated by budesonide. Budesonide effectively ameliorated respiratory function, attenuated endotoxin-induced lung injury, and improved the seven-day survival rate. PMID:25956681

  9. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-04-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury.

  10. Chronic nicotine exposure augments renal oxidative stress and injury through transcriptional activation of p66shc.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Clark, Jeb; Reed, Dustin K; Juncos, Luis A

    2013-06-01

    Chronic nicotine (Ch-NIC) exposure exacerbates ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced oxidative stress and acute kidney injury (AKI), and mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs). Because Ser36-phosphorylated p66shc modulates mitochondrial ROS production and injury of RPTCs, we hypothesized that Ch-NIC exacerbates AKI by increasing stress-induced phosphorylation of p66shc. We first tested whether Ch-NIC augments I/R-AKI-induced expression and phosphorylation of p66shc in vivo. We then examined whether knocking down p66shc, or impairing its Ser36 phosphorylation or binding to cytochrome c, alters the effects of Ch-NIC on oxidative stress (H₂O₂)-induced production of ROS, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs in vitro. We found that Ch-NIC increased the expression of p66shc in the control and ischemic kidneys, but only increased its Ser36 phosphorylation after renal I/R. Knocking down p66shc or impairing phosphorylation of its Ser36 residue, via the S36A mutation (but not the phosphomimetic S36D mutation), blunted Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs. Additionally, Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent binding of p66shc to mitochondrial cytochrome c was attenuated by S36A mutation of p66shc, and impairing cytochrome c binding (via W134F mutation) abolished ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury, while ectopic overexpression of p66shc (which mimics Ch-NIC treatment) augmented oxidant injury. We determined that Ch-NIC stimulates the p66shc promoter through p53- and epigenetic modification (promoter hypomethylation). Ch-NIC worsens oxidative stress-dependent acute renal injury by increasing expression and consequent oxidative stress-dependent Ser36 phosphorylation of p66shc. Thus, targeting this pathway may have therapeutic relevance in preventing/ameliorating tobacco-related kidney injury.

  11. Chronic nicotine exposure augments renal oxidative stress and injury through transcriptional activation of p66shc

    PubMed Central

    Arany, Istvan; Clark, Jeb; Reed, Dustin K.; Juncos, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nicotine (Ch-NIC) exposure exacerbates ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced oxidative stress and acute kidney injury (AKI), and mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs). Because Ser36-phosphorylated p66shc modulates mitochondrial ROS production and injury of RPTCs, we hypothesized that Ch-NIC exacerbates AKI by increasing stress-induced phosphorylation of p66shc. Methods We first tested whether Ch-NIC augments I/R-AKI-induced expression and phosphorylation of p66shc in vivo. We then examined whether knocking down p66shc, or impairing its Ser36 phosphorylation or binding to cytochrome c, alters the effects of Ch-NIC on oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced production of ROS, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs in vitro. Results We found that Ch-NIC increased the expression of p66shc in the control and ischemic kidneys, but only increased its Ser36 phosphorylation after renal I/R. Knocking down p66shc or impairing phosphorylation of its Ser36 residue, via the S36A mutation (but not the phosphomimetic S36D mutation), blunted Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs. Additionally, Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent binding of p66shc to mitochondrial cytochrome c was attenuated by S36A mutation of p66shc, and impairing cytochrome c binding (via W134F mutation) abolished ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury, while ectopic overexpression of p66shc (which mimics Ch-NIC treatment) augmented oxidant injury. We determined that Ch-NIC stimulates the p66shc promoter through p53- and epigenetic modification (promoter hypomethylation). Conclusions Ch-NIC worsens oxidative stress-dependent acute renal injury by increasing expression and consequent oxidative stress-dependent Ser36 phosphorylation of p66shc. Thus, targeting this pathway may have therapeutic relevance in preventing/ameliorating tobacco-related kidney injury. PMID:23328708

  12. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  13. Pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Price, Laura C.; McAuley, Danny F.; Marino, Philip S.; Finney, Simon J.; Griffiths, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by protein rich alveolar edema, reduced lung compliance, and acute severe hypoxemia. A degree of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is also characteristic, higher levels of which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload causes RV dysfunction and failure in some patients, with associated adverse effects on oxygen delivery. Although the introduction of lung protective ventilation strategies has probably reduced the severity of PH in ALI, a recent invasive hemodynamic analysis suggests that even in the modern era, its presence remains clinically important. We therefore sought to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiology of PH in ALI. PMID:22246001

  14. Diabetes, insulin, and development of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Honiden, Shyoko; Gong, Michelle N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Recently, many studies have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of insulin and glucose control in critical illness. This review examines evidence regarding the relationship between diabetes and the development of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), reviews studies of lung injury related to glycemic and nonglycemic metabolic features of diabetes, and examines the effect of diabetic therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection A MEDLINE/PubMed search from inception to August 1, 2008, was conducted using the search terms acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, hyperglycemia, diabetes mellitus, insulin, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, including combinations of these terms. Bibliographies of retrieved articles were manually reviewed. Data Extraction and Synthesis Available studies were critically reviewed, and data were extracted with special attention to the human and animal studies that explored a) diabetes and ALI; b) hyperglycemia and ALI; c) metabolic nonhyperglycemic features of diabetes and ALI; and d) diabetic therapies and ALI. Conclusions Clinical and experimental data indicate that diabetes is protective against the development of ALI/ARDS. The pathways involved are complex and likely include effects of hyperglycemia on the inflammatory response, metabolic abnormalities in diabetes, and the interactions of therapeutic agents given to diabetic patients. Multidisciplinary, multifaceted studies, involving both animal models and clinical and molecular epidemiology techniques, are essential. PMID:19531947

  15. IL-13 is a therapeutic target in radiation lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Su I; Horton, Jason A; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; White, Ayla O; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn E; Scroggins, Bradley T; Arron, Joseph R; Wynn, Thomas A; Citrin, Deborah E

    2016-12-22

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal late adverse event of thoracic irradiation. Prior research indicates that unrestrained TGF-β1 and/or type 2 cytokine-driven immune responses promote fibrosis following radiation injury, but the full spectrum of factors governing this pathology remains unclear. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) is a key factor in fibrotic disease associated with helminth infection, but it is unclear whether it plays a similar role in radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Using a mouse model, we tested the hypothesis that IL-13 drives the progression of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Irradiated lungs from wild-type c57BL/6NcR mice accumulated alternatively-activated macrophages, displayed elevated levels of IL-13, and extensive fibrosis, whereas IL-13 deficient mice were resistant to these changes. Furthermore, plasma from irradiated wild-type mice showed a transient increase in the IL-13 saturated fraction of the circulating decoy receptor IL-13Rα2. Finally, we determined that therapeutic neutralization of IL-13, during the period of IL-13Rα2 saturation was sufficient to protect mice from lung fibrosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IL-13 is a major regulator of radiation-induced lung injury and demonstrates that strategies focusing on IL-13 may be useful in screening for timely delivery of anti-IL-13 therapeutics.

  16. Effects of body temperature on ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Akinci, Ozkan I; Celik, Mehmet; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Martino, Janice M; Tugrul, Simru; Ozcan, Perihan E; Yilmazbayhan, Dilek; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Turkoz, Kemal H; Kiran, Bayram; Telci, Lütfi; Cakar, Nahit

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of body temperature on ventilator-induced lung injury. Thirty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 6 groups based on their body temperature (normothermia, 37 +/- 1 degrees C; hypothermia, 31 +/- 1 degrees C; hyperthermia, 41 +/- 1 degrees C). Ventilator-induced lung injury was achieved by ventilating for 1 hour with pressure-controlled ventilation mode set at peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) of 30 cmH2O (high pressure, or HP) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 0 cmH2O. In control subjects, PIP was set at 14 cmH2O (low pressure, or LP) and PEEP set at 0 cmH2O. Systemic chemokine and cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha , interleukin 1 beta , interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) levels were measured. The lungs were assessed for histological changes. Serum chemokines and cytokines were significantly elevated in the hyperthermia HP group compared with all 3 groups, LP (control), normothermia HP, and hypothermia HP. Oxygenation was better but not statistically significant in hypothermia HP compared with other HP groups. Cumulative mean histology scores were higher in hyperthermia HP and normothermia HP groups compared with control and normothermia HP groups. Concomitant hyperthermia increased systemic inflammatory response during HP ventilation. Although hypothermia decreased local inflammation in the lung, it did not completely attenuate systemic inflammatory response associated with HP ventilation.

  17. IL-13 is a therapeutic target in radiation lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Su I.; Horton, Jason A.; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R.; White, Ayla O.; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn E.; Scroggins, Bradley T.; Arron, Joseph R.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Citrin, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal late adverse event of thoracic irradiation. Prior research indicates that unrestrained TGF-β1 and/or type 2 cytokine-driven immune responses promote fibrosis following radiation injury, but the full spectrum of factors governing this pathology remains unclear. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) is a key factor in fibrotic disease associated with helminth infection, but it is unclear whether it plays a similar role in radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Using a mouse model, we tested the hypothesis that IL-13 drives the progression of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Irradiated lungs from wild-type c57BL/6NcR mice accumulated alternatively-activated macrophages, displayed elevated levels of IL-13, and extensive fibrosis, whereas IL-13 deficient mice were resistant to these changes. Furthermore, plasma from irradiated wild-type mice showed a transient increase in the IL-13 saturated fraction of the circulating decoy receptor IL-13Rα2. Finally, we determined that therapeutic neutralization of IL-13, during the period of IL-13Rα2 saturation was sufficient to protect mice from lung fibrosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IL-13 is a major regulator of radiation-induced lung injury and demonstrates that strategies focusing on IL-13 may be useful in screening for timely delivery of anti-IL-13 therapeutics. PMID:28004808

  18. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  19. Acute lung injury after instillation of human breast milk or infant formula into rabbits' lungs.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, B; Lerman, J; Endo, J; Cutz, E

    1996-06-01

    Recent interest in shortening the fasting interval after ingestion of milk products demonstrated large volumes of breast milk in the stomach 2 h after breastfeeding. Although aspiration is a rare event, if it were to occur with human breast milk, it is important to understand the extent of the lung injury that might occur. Therefore, the response to instillation of acidified breast milk and infant formula in the lungs of adult rabbits was studied. In 18 anesthetized adult rabbits, 1 of 3 fluids (in a volume of 0.8 ml.kg-1 and pH level of 1.8, acidified with hydrochloric acid); saline, breast milk, or infant formula (SMA, Wyeth, Windsor, Ontario), was instilled into the lungs via a tracheotomy. The lungs were ventilated for 4 h after instillation. Alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient and dynamic compliance were measured before and at hourly intervals after instillation. After 4 h, the rabbits were killed and the lungs were excised. Neutrophil infiltration was quantitated by a pathologist blinded to the instilled fluid. A histologic control group of four rabbits was ventilated under study conditions without any intratracheal fluid instillation. Alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient increased and dynamic compliance decreased significantly during the 4 h after instillation of both breast milk and infant formula compared with baseline measurements and with saline controls (P < 0.05). The neutrophil counts in the lungs from the saline, breast milk, and formula rabbits were significantly greater than those in the control group. Instillation of acidified breast milk or infant formula (in a volume of 0.8 ml.kg-1 and pH level of 1.8) into rabbits' lungs induces acute lung injury of similar intensity that lasts at least 4 h.

  20. The Lung Alveolar Lipofibroblast: An Evolutionary Strategy Against Neonatal Hyperoxic Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen, the main mode of support for premature infants with immature lungs, can cause toxicity by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt homeostasis; yet, these same molecules were entrained to promote vertebrate lung phylogeny. By providing a deeper understanding of this paradox, we propose physiologically rational strategies to prevent chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity. Recent Advances: To prevent neonatal hyperoxic lung damage biologically, we have exploited the alveolar defense mechanism(s) that evolutionarily evolved to combat increased atmospheric oxygen during the vertebrate water to land transition. Critical Issues: Over the course of vertebrate lung evolution, ROS promoted the formation of lipofibroblasts, specialized adepithelial cells, which protect the alveoli against oxidant injury; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the master switch for lipofibroblast differentiation, prevents such oxidant lung injury, both by directly promoting mesodermal differentiation and its antioxidant defenses, and indirectly by stimulating the developmental epithelial–mesenchymal paracrine interactions that have physiologically determined lung surfactant production in accord with the lung's phylogenetic adaptation to atmospheric oxygen, preventing Respiratory Distress Syndrome at birth. Future Directions: The molecular strategy (PPARγ agonists) to prevent CLD of prematurity, proposed by us, although seems to be robust, effective, and safe under experimental conditions, it awaits detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies for its safe and effective clinical translation to human infants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1893–1904. “I have procured air [oxygen]…between five and six times as good as the best common air that I have ever met with.” —Joseph Priestley, 1775 PMID:24386954

  1. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  2. Lung injury and respiratory mechanics in rugby union.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Angus; Bernard, Angelique; Davidson, Shaun M; Redmond, Daniel P; Chiew, Yeong S; Pretty, Christopher; Chase, J Geoffrey; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Gieseg, Steven P; Draper, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Rugby is a highly popular team contact sport associated with high injury rates. Specifically, there is a chance of inducing internal lung injuries as a result of the physical nature of the game. Such injuries are only identified with the use of specific invasive protocols or equipment. This study presents a model-based method to assess respiratory mechanics of N=11 rugby players that underwent a low intensity experimental Mechanical Ventilation (MV) Test before and after a rugby game. Participants were connected to a ventilator via a facemask and their respiratory mechanics estimated using a time-varying elastance model. All participants had a respiratory elastance <10 cmH2O/L with no significant difference observed between pre and postgame respiratory mechanics (P>0.05). Model-based respiratory mechanics estimation has been used widely in the treatment of the critically ill in intensive care. However, the application of a ventilator to assess the respiratory mechanics of healthy human beings is limited. This method adapted from ICU mechanical ventilation can be used to provide insight to respiratory mechanics of healthy participants that can be used as a more precise measure of lung inflammation/injury that avoids invasive procedures. This is the first study to conceptualize the assessment of respiratory mechanics in healthy athletes as a means to monitor postexercise stress and therefore manage recovery.

  3. Lung contusion: inflammatory mechanisms and interaction with other injuries.

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Notter, Robert H; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Kunkel, Steven L; Knight, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    This article reviews current animal models and laboratory studies investigating the pathophysiology of lung contusion (LC), a common and severe condition in patients with blunt thoracic trauma. Emphasis is on studies elucidating cells, mediators, receptors, and processes important in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response that contribute to LC injury. Surfactant dysfunction in the pathogenesis of LC is also discussed, as is the potential role of epithelial cell or neutrophil apoptosis. Studies examining combination injuries where LC is exacerbated by secondary insults such as gastric aspiration in trauma patients are also noted. The need for continuing mechanism-based research to further clarify the pathophysiology of LC injury, and to define and test potential therapeutic interventions targeting specific aspects of inflammation or surfactant dysfunction to improve clinical outcomes in patients with LC, is also emphasized.

  4. Lung Contusion: Inflammatory Mechanisms and Interaction with Other Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Notter, Robert H.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Helinski, Jadwiga D.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Knight, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews current animal models and laboratory studies investigating the pathophysiology of lung contusion (LC), a common and severe condition in patients with blunt thoracic trauma. Emphasis is on studies elucidating cells, mediators, receptors and processes important in the innate pulmonary inflammatory response that contribute to LC injury. Surfactant dysfunction in the pathogenesis of LC is also discussed, as is the potential role of epithelial cell or neutrophil apoptosis. Studies examining combination injuries where LC is exacerbated by secondary insults like gastric aspiration in trauma patients are also noted. The need for continuing mechanism-based research to further clarify the pathophysiology of LC injury, and to define and test potential therapeutic interventions targeting specific aspects of inflammation or surfactant dysfunction to improve clinical outcomes in patients with LC, is also emphasized. PMID:19174738

  5. Computerized tomography versus perfusion lung scanning in canine radiation lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, I.H.; Logus, J.W.; El-Khatib, E.; Battista, J.J.; Ferri, H.; Lentle, B.C.; Man, G.C.; Man, S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Computerized tomographic (CT) measurements of lung density were obtained before and serially after thoracic irradiation in dogs to detect the alterations caused by radiation therapy. Fourteen mongrel dogs were given either 2000 cGy (Group A, 10 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), 1000 cGy (Group B, 2 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), or 500 cGy (Group C, 2 dogs, right lung irradiation) in one fraction. Once before and bi-weekly after irradiation, the anesthetized dogs had thoracic CT scans. CT numbers for the irradiated area were compared to their preirradiation control values. Macro-aggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scans were also obtained before and at weekly intervals after irradiation and were evaluated visually and quantitatively for abnormalities. When both these tests were abnormal, or at the end of the scheduled study, the dogs were sacrificed to confirm radiation lung injury histologically. Our results showed that CT numbers (as a measure of tissue density) were higher with higher doses of radiation. Among all the techniques used, only the quantitative assessment of macro-aggregated albumin perfusion scan detected abnormalities in all the dogs given 2000 cGy. Their abnormalities correlated well with the presence of radiation lung damage histologically, however, the applicability of these methods in the detection of early injury has to be further evaluated.

  6. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-04

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  7. Open Tracheostomy Gastric Acid Aspiration Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury Results in Maximal Acute Nonlethal Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Alluri, Ravi; Kutscher, Hilliard L; Mullan, Barbara A; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R

    2017-02-26

    Acid pneumonitis is a major cause of sterile acute lung injury (ALI) in humans. Acid pneumonitis spans the clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by neutrophilic alveolitis, and injury to both alveolar epithelium and vascular endothelium. Clinically, ARDS is defined by acute onset of hypoxemia, bilateral patchy pulmonary infiltrates and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Human studies have provided us with valuable information about the physiological and inflammatory changes in the lung caused by ARDS, which has led to various hypotheses about the underling mechanisms. Unfortunately, difficulties determining the etiology of ARDS, as well as a wide range of pathophysiology have resulted in a lack of critical information that could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies. Translational animal models are valuable when their pathogenesis and pathophysiology accurately reproduce a concept proven in both in vitro and clinical settings. Although large animal models (e.g., sheep) share characteristics of the anatomy of human trachea-bronchial tree, murine models provide a host of other advantages including: low cost; short reproductive cycle lending itself to greater data acquisition; a well understood immunologic system; and a well characterized genome leading to the availability of a variety of gene deletion and transgenic strains. A robust model of low pH induced ARDS requires a murine ALI that targets mainly the alveolar epithelium, secondarily the vascular endothelium, as well as the small airways leading to the alveoli. Furthermore, a reproducible injury with wide differences between different injurious and non-injurious insults is important. The murine gastric acid aspiration model presented here using hydrochloric acid employs an open tracheostomy and recreates a pathogenic scenario that reproduces the low pH pneumonitis injury in humans. Additionally, this model can be used to examine interaction of a

  8. Prospective study on the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury*.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Roubinian, Nareg; Gajic, Ognjen; Gropper, Michael A; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Lowell, Clifford A; Bacchetti, Peter; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna C; Wu, Ping; Grimes, Barbara; Norris, Philip J; Murphy, Edward L; Gandhi, Manish J; Winters, Jeffrey L; Mair, David C; Schuller, Randy M; Hirschler, Nora V; Rosen, Rosa Sanchez; Matthay, Michael A; Toy, Pearl

    2014-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A prospective study using electronic surveillance was conducted at two academic medical centers in the United States with the objective to define the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury cases. Prospective case study with controls. University of California, San Francisco and Mayo Clinic, Rochester. We prospectively enrolled 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 164 transfused controls, and 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury. None. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension, and prolonged hypoxemia compared with controls. Of the patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 29 of 37 patients (78%) required initiation of mechanical ventilation and 13 of 53 (25%) required initiation of vasopressors. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury had an increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased days in the ICU and hospital compared with controls. There were 15 of 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury (17%) who died, whereas 61 of 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (42%) died and 7 of 164 of controls (4%) died. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had evidence of more systemic inflammation with increases in circulating neutrophils and a decrease in platelets compared with controls. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury also had a statistically significant increase in plasma interleukin-8, interleukin-10, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist posttransfusion compared with controls. In conclusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury produced a condition resembling the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and was associated with

  9. Betulin protects mice from bacterial pneumonia and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianchao; Li, Hongyu; Qiu, Jiaming; Feng, Haihua

    2014-10-01

    Betulin, a naturally occurring triterpene, has shown anti-HIV activity, but details on the anti-inflammatory activity are scanty. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of Betulin on LPS-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LPS or viable Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vivo. In vitro, Betulin inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and (interleukin) IL-6 levels and up-regulated the level of IL-10. Also Betulin suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. In vivo, Betulin alleviated LPS-induced acute lung injury. Treatment with Betulin diminished pro-inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity and bacterial loads in lung tissue during gram-negative pneumonia. Our findings demonstrated that Betulin inhibits pro-inflammatory responses induced by the gram-negative stimuli LPS and E. coli, suggesting that Betulin may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of lung inflammation.

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junjie; Moldobaeva, Nurgul

    2011-01-01

    Lung inflammation and alterations in endothelial cell (EC) permeability are key events to development of acute lung injury (ALI). Protective effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been shown against inflammatory signaling and endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by gram-negative bacterial wall liposaccharide. We hypothesized that ANP may possess more general protective effects and attenuate lung inflammation and EC barrier dysfunction by suppressing inflammatory cascades and barrier-disruptive mechanisms shared by gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. C57BL/6J wild-type or ANP knockout mice (Nppa−/−) were treated with gram-positive bacterial cell wall compounds, Staphylococcus aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PepG) and/or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (intratracheal, 2.5 mg/kg each), with or without ANP (intravenous, 2 μg/kg). In vitro, human pulmonary EC barrier properties were assessed by morphological analysis of gap formation and measurements of transendothelial electrical resistance. LTA and PepG markedly increased pulmonary EC permeability and activated p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Rho/Rho kinase signaling. EC barrier dysfunction was further elevated upon combined LTA and PepG treatment, but abolished by ANP pretreatment. In vivo, LTA and PepG-induced accumulation of protein and cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tissue neutrophil infiltration, and increased Evans blue extravasation in the lungs was significantly attenuated by intravenous injection of ANP. Accumulation of bronchoalveolar lavage markers of LTA/PepG-induced lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction was further augmented in ANP−/− mice and attenuated by exogenous ANP injection. These results strongly suggest a protective role of ANP in the in vitro and in vivo models of ALI associated with gram-positive infection. Thus ANP may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and ALI-induced gram-positive bacterial

  11. Mechanical Power and Development of Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Cressoni, Massimo; Gotti, Miriam; Chiurazzi, Chiara; Massari, Dario; Algieri, Ilaria; Amini, Martina; Cammaroto, Antonio; Brioni, Matteo; Montaruli, Claudia; Nikolla, Klodiana; Guanziroli, Mariateresa; Dondossola, Daniele; Gatti, Stefano; Valerio, Vincenza; Vergani, Giordano Luca; Pugni, Paola; Cadringher, Paolo; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-05-01

    The ventilator works mechanically on the lung parenchyma. The authors set out to obtain the proof of concept that ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) depends on the mechanical power applied to the lung. Mechanical power was defined as the function of transpulmonary pressure, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate. Three piglets were ventilated with a mechanical power known to be lethal (TV, 38 ml/kg; plateau pressure, 27 cm H2O; and respiratory rate, 15 breaths/min). Other groups (three piglets each) were ventilated with the same TV per kilogram and transpulmonary pressure but at the respiratory rates of 12, 9, 6, and 3 breaths/min. The authors identified a mechanical power threshold for VILI and did nine additional experiments at the respiratory rate of 35 breaths/min and mechanical power below (TV 11 ml/kg) and above (TV 22 ml/kg) the threshold. In the 15 experiments to detect the threshold for VILI, up to a mechanical power of approximately 12 J/min (respiratory rate, 9 breaths/min), the computed tomography scans showed mostly isolated densities, whereas at the mechanical power above approximately 12 J/min, all piglets developed whole-lung edema. In the nine confirmatory experiments, the five piglets ventilated above the power threshold developed VILI, but the four piglets ventilated below did not. By grouping all 24 piglets, the authors found a significant relationship between the mechanical power applied to the lung and the increase in lung weight (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) and lung elastance (r = 0.33, P < 0.01) and decrease in PaO2/FIO2 (r = 0.40, P < 0.001) at the end of the study. In piglets, VILI develops if a mechanical power threshold is exceeded.

  12. Acute kidney injury after ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP).

    PubMed

    Hauck, J; Osho, A; Castleberry, A; Hartwig, M; Reddy, L; Phillips-Bute, B; Swaminathan, M; Mathew, J; Stafford-Smith, M

    2014-12-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) identifies viability for marginal organs but complicates and lengthens lung transplantation surgery. Preliminary evidence supports equivalency for EVLP-assisted versus traditional (non-EVLP) procedures regarding graft function, postoperative course, mortality, and survival. However, acute kidney injury (AKI), a common serious complication of lung transplantation, has not been assessed. We tested the hypothesis that EVLP-assisted and non-EVLP lung transplantations are associated with different AKI rates. Demographic, procedural, and renal data were gathered for 13 EVLP-viable lung transplantations and a non-EVLP group matched 4:1 for single versus double, pulmonary disease, and age. AKI was defined by AKI Network (AKIN) criteria and peak creatinine rise relative to baseline (Δ%Cr) during the 1st 10 postoperative days. Chi-square was performed for AKIN and 2-tailed t test for %ΔCr. Patient and procedural characteristics were similar between the groups. One non-EVLP patient required postoperative dialysis. AKI rates were also similar, as assessed by both AKIN (EVLP 7/13 (54%) vs non-EVLP 32/52 (62%); P = .61) and %ΔCr (EVLP 91 ± 81% vs non-EVLP 72 ± 62%; P = .63). We did not observe different AKI rates between EVLP-assisted and traditional lung transplant procedures. Although 1 non-EVLP patient required dialysis, AKI rates were otherwise similar. These findings further support EVLP as a strategy to expand the organ pool and reduce concerns for high-renal risk recipients. The small sample size and retrospective design are limitations. However, our sample size is similar to other reports, and it is the first to analyze AKI after EVLP-assisted lung transplantation. Larger multicenter prospective studies are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Manipulations of core temperatures in ischemia-reperfusion lung injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung; Huang, Kun-Lun; Li, Min-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Wang; Tsai, Shih-Hung; Chu, Shi-Jye

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of various core temperatures on acute lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in our isolated rabbit lung model. Typical acute lung injury was successfully induced by 30 min of ischemia followed by 90 min of reperfusion observation. The I/R elicited a significant increase in pulmonary arterial pressure, microvascular permeability (measured by using the capillary filtration coefficient, Kfc), Delta Kfc ratio, lung weight gain and the protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Mild hypothermia significantly attenuated acute lung injury induced by I/R, all parameters having decreased significantly (p<0.05); conversely, mild hyperthermia did not further exacerbate acute lung injury. These experimental data suggest that mild hypothermia significantly ameliorated acute lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rabbits.

  14. [Expression of various matrix metalloproteinases in mice with hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-feng; Ding, Shao-fang; Gao, Yuan-ming; Liang, Ying; Foda, Hussein D

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hyperoxia. Fifty four mice were exposed in sealed cages to >98% oxygen (for 24-72 hours), and another 18 mice to room air. The severity of lung injury was assessed, and the expression of mRNA and protein of MMP-2, MMP-9 and EMMPRIN in lung tissue, after exposure for 24, 48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Hyperoxia caused acute lung injury; this was accompanied by increased expression of an upregulation of MMP-2, MMP-9 and EMMPRIN mRNA and protein in lung tissues. Hyperoxia causes acute lung injury in mice; increases in MMP-2, MMP-9 and EMMPRIN may play an important role in the development of hyperoxia induced lung injury in mice.

  15. Static inflation attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury in an isolated rat lung in situ.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Wang, David; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Hsu, Kang; Hsu, Yung Hsiang; Chen, Hsing I

    2004-08-01

    Ischemia (I)/reperfusion (R) lung injury is an important clinical issue in lung transplantation. In the present study, we observed the effects of lung static inflation, different perfusates, and ventilatory gas with nitrogen or oxygen on the I/R-induced pulmonary damage. A total of 96 male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The lung was isolated in situ. In an isolated lung, the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), lung weight gain (LWG), lung weight (LW)/body weight (BW) ratio, and protein concentration in BAL fluid (PCBAL) were measured or calculated to evaluate the degree of lung injury. Histologic examinations with hematoxylin-eosin staining were performed. I/R caused lung injury, as reflected by increases in Kfc, LWG, LW/BW, and PCBAL. The histopathologic picture revealed the presence of hyaline membrane formation and the infiltration of inflammatory cells. These values were significantly attenuated by static lung inflation. The I/R lung damage appeared to be less in the lung perfused with whole blood than in the lung perfused with an isotonic solution. Therapy with ventilatory air (ie, nitrogen or oxygen) did not alter the I/R lung damage. The data suggest that lung inflation is protective to I/R injury, irrespective of the type of ventilatory air used for treatment. The preservation of the lung for transplantation is better kept at a static inflation state and perfused with whole blood instead of an isotonic physiologic solution.

  16. Interleukin-33 potentiates bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Luzina, Irina G; Kopach, Pavel; Lockatell, Virginia; Kang, Phillip H; Nagarsekar, Ashish; Burke, Allen P; Hasday, Jeffrey D; Todd, Nevins W; Atamas, Sergei P

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms of interstitial lung disease (ILD) remain incompletely understood, although recent observations have suggested an important contribution by IL-33. Substantial elevations in IL-33 expression were found in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and scleroderma lung disease, as well as in the bleomycin injury mouse model. Most of the observed IL-33 expression was intracellular and intranuclear, suggesting involvement of the full-length (fl) protein, but not of the proteolytically processed mature IL-33 cytokine. The effects of flIL-33 on mouse lungs were assessed independently and in combination with bleomycin injury, using recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene delivery. Bleomycin-induced changes were not affected by gene deficiency of the IL-33 receptor T1/ST2. Combined flIL-33 expression and bleomycin injury exerted a synergistic effect on pulmonary lymphocyte and collagen accumulation, which could be explained by synergistic regulation of the cytokines transforming growth factor-β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein\\x{2013}1α, and tumor necrosis factor-α. By contrast, no increase in the levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, or IL-13 was evident. Moreover, flIL-33 was found to increase the expression of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) significantly, and in particular HSP70, which is known to be associated with ILD. Thus, flIL-33 is a synergistic proinflammatory and profibrotic regulator that acts by stimulating the expression of several non-Th2 cytokines, and activates the expression of HSP70.

  17. Augmented meaningful use criteria to identify patients eligible for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Raz, Dan J; Dunham, Rachel; Tiep, Brian; Sandoval, Argelia; Grannis, Frederic; Rotter, Arnold; Kim, Jae Y

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer screening (LCS) with low-dose-radiation (low-dose computed tomography [LDCT]) saves lives. Despite recent US Preventive Services Task Force (USPTF) draft endorsement of LCS, a minority of eligible patients get screened. Meaningful use is a set of standards for electronic health records (EHR) established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and includes reporting of smoking status. We sought to improve rates of LCS among patients treated at our institution by identifying eligible patients using augmented smoking-related meaningful use criteria. We launched an LCS program at our institution, a National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) cancer center, in January 2013. We developed a "tobacco screen," administered by clinic staff to all adult outpatients every 6 months and entered into the EHR. This contained smoking-related meaningful use criteria as well as a pack-year calculation and quit date if applicable. Weekly electronic reports of patients who met eligibility criteria for LCS were generated, and EHR review excluded patients who had had chest computed tomography (CT) within 12 months or who were undergoing cancer treatment. We then contacted eligible patients to review eligibility for LCS and communicated with the primary treating physician regarding the plan for LCS. During the first 3 months of the program, 4 patients were enrolled, 2 by physician referral and 2 by self-referral. We then began to use the tobacco screen reports and identified 418 patients potentially eligible for LCS. Over the next 7 months, we enrolled a total of 110 patients. Fifty-eight (53%) were identified from the tobacco screen, 32 (29%) were self-referred, and 20 (18%) were physician referrals. Three stage I lung cancers were detected and treated. The tobacco screen was easily implemented by clinic staff and took a median time of 2 minutes to enter for current and former smokers. Lack of response to attempts at telephone contact and objection to paying out

  18. Nicotinamide Exacerbates Hypoxemia in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury Independent of Neutrophil Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Heather D.; Yoo, Jeena; Crother, Timothy R.; Kyme, Pierre; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Khalafi, Ramtin; Tseng, Ching W.; Parks, William C.; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventilator-induced lung injury is a form of acute lung injury that develops in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation and has a high degree of mortality. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is an enzyme that is highly upregulated in ventilator-induced lung injury and exacerbates the injury when given exogenously. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) directly inhibits downstream pathways activated by Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and is protective in other models of acute lung injury. Methods We administered nicotinamide i.p. to mice undergoing mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes to study the effects of nicotinamide on ventilator-induced lung injury. Measures of injury included oxygen saturations and bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophil counts, protein, and cytokine levels. We also measured expression of nicotinamide phosophoribosyltransferase, and its downstream effectors Sirt1 and Cebpa, Cebpb, Cebpe. We assessed the effect of nicotinamide on the production of nitric oxide during ventilator-induced lung injury. We also studied the effects of ventilator-induced lung injury in mice deficient in C/EBPε. Results Nicotinamide treatment significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during ventilator-induced lung injury, but did not affect protein leakage or cytokine production. Surprisingly, mice treated with nicotinamide developed significantly worse hypoxemia during mechanical ventilation. This effect was not linked to increases in nitric oxide production or alterations in expression of Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase, Sirt1, or Cebpa and Cebpb. Cebpe mRNA levels were decreased with either nicotinamide treatment or mechanical ventilation, but mice lacking C/EBPε developed the same degree of hypoxemia and ventilator-induced lung injury as wild-type mice. Conclusions Nicotinamide treatment during VILI inhibits neutrophil infiltration of the lungs consistent with a strong anti-inflammatory effect, but

  19. Transpulmonary hypothermia: a novel method of rapid brain cooling through augmented heat extraction from the lungs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Matthew M; Goldberg, Andrew D; Kashiouris, Markos; Keenan, Lawrence R; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Afessa, Bekele; Johnson, Larry D; Atkinson, John L D; Nayagam, Vedha

    2014-10-01

    Delay in instituting neuroprotective measures after cardiac arrest increases death and decreases neuronal recovery. Current hypothermia methods are slow, ineffective, unreliable, or highly invasive. We report the feasibility of rapid hypothermia induction in swine through augmented heat extraction from the lungs. Twenty-four domestic crossbred pigs (weight, 50-55kg) were ventilated with room air. Intraparenchymal brain temperature and core temperatures from pulmonary artery, lower esophagus, bladder, rectum, nasopharynx, and tympanum were recorded. In eight animals, ventilation was switched to cooled helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) and perfluorocarbon (PFC) aerosol and continued for 90min or until target brain temperature of 32°C was reached. Eight animals received body-surface cooling with water-circulating blankets; eight control animals continued to be ventilated with room air. Brain and core temperatures declined rapidly with cooled heliox-PFC ventilation. The brain reached target temperature within the study period (mean [SD], 66 [7.6]min) in only the transpulmonary cooling group. Cardiopulmonary functions and poststudy histopathological examination of the lungs were normal. Transpulmonary cooling is novel, rapid, minimally invasive, and an effective technique to induce therapeutic hypothermia. High thermal conductivity of helium and vaporization of PFC produces rapid cooling of alveolar gases. The thinness and large surface area of alveolar membrane facilitate rapid cooling of the pulmonary circulation. Because of differences in thermogenesis, blood flow, insulation, and exposure to the external environment, the brain cools at a different rate than other organs. Transpulmonary hypothermia was significantly faster than body surface cooling in reaching target brain temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitation of nitrotyrosine levels in lung sections of patients and animals with acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, I Y; Pataki, G; Hu, P; Galliani, C; Beckman, J S; Matalon, S

    1994-01-01

    Activated alveolar macrophages and epithelial type II cells release both nitric oxide and superoxide which react at near diffusion-limited rate (6.7 x 10(9) M-1s-1) to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant capable of damaging the alveolar epithelium and pulmonary surfactant. Peroxynitrite, but not nitric oxide or superoxide, readily nitrates phenolic rings including tyrosine. We quantified the presence of nitrotyrosine in the lungs of patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and in the lungs of rats exposed to hyperoxia (100% O2 for 60 h) using quantitative immunofluorescence. Fresh frozen or paraffin-embedded lung sections were incubated with a polyclonal antibody to nitrotyrosine, followed by goat anti-rabbit IgG coupled to rhodamine. Sections from patients with ARDS (n = 5), or from rats exposed to hyperoxia (n = 4), exhibited a twofold increase of specific binding over controls. This binding was blocked by the addition of an excess amount of nitrotyrosine and was absent when the nitrotyrosine antibody was replaced with nonimmune IgG. In additional experiments we demonstrated nitrotyrosine formation in rat lung sections incubated in vitro with peroxynitrite, but not nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species. These data suggest that toxic levels of peroxynitrite may be formed in the lungs of patients with acute lung injury. Images PMID:7989597

  1. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  2. Escin attenuates acute lung injury induced by endotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenyu; Zhang, Leiming; Fan, Huaying; Jiang, Na; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-01-18

    Endotoxin causes multiple organ dysfunctions, including acute lung injury (ALI). The current therapeutic strategies for endotoxemia are designed to neutralize one or more of the inflammatory mediators. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that escin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of escin on ALI induced by endotoxin in mice. ALI was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravenously. The mice were given dexamethasone or escin before injection of LPS. The mortality rate was recorded. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Pulmonary superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were also determined. The expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level was detected by Western blotting. Pretreatment with escin could decrease the mortality rate, attenuate lung injury resulted from LPS, down-regulate the level of the inflammation mediators, including NO, TNF-α, and IL-1β, enhance the endogenous antioxidant capacity, and up-regulating the GR expression in lung. The results suggest that escin may have potent protective effect on the LPS-induced ALI by inhibiting of the inflammatory response, and its mechanism involves in up-regulating the GR and enhancing the endogenous antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex-specific Differences in Hyperoxic Lung Injury in Mice: Implications for Acute and Chronic Lung Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2014-01-01

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO2>0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2 alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC-MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. CytochromeP450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F>M) and VEGF (M>F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. PMID:23792423

  4. Experimental lung injury promotes alterations in energy metabolism and respiratory mechanics in the lungs of rats: prevention by exercise.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Maira J; da Cunha, Aline A; Scherer, Emilene B S; Machado, Fernanda Rossato; Loureiro, Samanta O; Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Guma, Fátima; Lago, Pedro Dal; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of lung injury on energy metabolism (succinate dehydrogenase, complex II, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP levels), respiratory mechanics (dynamic and static compliance, elastance and respiratory system resistance) in the lungs of rats, as well as on phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The protective effect of physical exercise on the alterations caused by lung injury, including lung edema was also evaluated. Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise. After this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide. Adult Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise and after this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide in dose 100 μg/100 g body weight. The sham group received isotonic saline instillation. Twelve hours after the injury was performed the respiratory mechanical and after the rats were decapitated and samples were collected. The rats subjected to lung injury presented a decrease in activities of the enzymes of the electron transport chain and ATP levels in lung, as well as the formation of pulmonary edema. A decreased lung dynamic and static compliance, as well as an increase in respiratory system resistance, and a decrease in phospholipids content were observed. Physical exercise was able to totally prevent the decrease in succinate dehydrogenase and complex II activities and the formation of pulmonary edema. It also partially prevented the increase in respiratory system resistance, but did not prevent the decrease in dynamic and static compliance, as well as in phospholipids content. These findings suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction may be one of the important contributors to lung damage and that physical exercise may be beneficial in this pathology, although it did not prevent all changes present in lung injury.

  5. Gene Expression Analysis to Assess the Relevance of Rodent Models to Human Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Lofgren, Shane; Khatri, Purvesh; Rogers, Angela J

    2017-08-01

    The relevance of animal models to human diseases is an area of intense scientific debate. The degree to which mouse models of lung injury recapitulate human lung injury has never been assessed. Integrating data from both human and animal expression studies allows for increased statistical power and identification of conserved differential gene expression across organisms and conditions. We sought comprehensive integration of gene expression data in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) in rodents compared with humans. We performed two separate gene expression multicohort analyses to determine differential gene expression in experimental animal and human lung injury. We used correlational and pathway analyses combined with external in vitro gene expression data to identify both potential drivers of underlying inflammation and therapeutic drug candidates. We identified 21 animal lung tissue datasets and three human lung injury bronchoalveolar lavage datasets. We show that the metasignatures of animal and human experimental ALI are significantly correlated despite these widely varying experimental conditions. The gene expression changes among mice and rats across diverse injury models (ozone, ventilator-induced lung injury, LPS) are significantly correlated with human models of lung injury (Pearson r = 0.33-0.45, P < 1E(-16)). Neutrophil signatures are enriched in both animal and human lung injury. Predicted therapeutic targets, peptide ligand signatures, and pathway analyses are also all highly overlapping. Gene expression changes are similar in animal and human experimental ALI, and provide several physiologic and therapeutic insights to the disease.

  6. Effects of sevoflurane on ventilator induced lung injury in a healthy lung experimental model.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Moreno, A; García, J; Sánchez, C; Santos, M; García, J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) causes a systemic inflammatory response in tissues, with an increase in IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α in blood and tissues. Cytoprotective effects of sevoflurane in different experimental models are well known, and this protective effect can also be observed in VILI. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of sevoflurane in VILI. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was designed. Twenty female rats were studied. The animals were mechanically ventilated, without sevoflurane in the control group and sevoflurane 3% in the treated group (SEV group). VILI was induced applying a maximal inspiratory pressure of 35 cmH2O for 20 min without any positive end-expiratory pressure for 20 min (INJURY time). The animals were then ventilated 30 min with a maximal inspiratory pressure of 12 cmH2O and 3 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (time 30 min POST-INJURY), at which time the animals were euthanized and pathological and biomarkers studies were performed. Heart rate, invasive blood pressure, pH, PaO2, and PaCO2 were recorded. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was used as an index of lung edema. No differences were found in the blood gas analysis parameters or heart rate between the 2 groups. Blood pressure was statistically higher in the control group, but still within the normal clinical range. The percentage of pulmonary edema and concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 in lung tissue in the SEV group were lower than in the control group. Sevoflurane attenuates VILI in a previous healthy lung in an experimental subclinical model in rats. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  8. Heliox attenuates lung inflammation and structural alterations in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nawab, Ursula S; Touch, Suzanne M; Irwin-Sherman, Tami; Blackson, Thomas J; Greenspan, Jay S; Zhu, Guangfa; Shaffer, Thomas H; Wolfson, Marla R

    2005-12-01

    Low-density gas mixtures, such as heliox, were shown to reduce the work of breathing and facilitate the distribution of inspired gas. Since supplemental ventilatory and oxygen requirements may lead to pulmonary inflammation and structural alterations, we hypothesized that by reducing these requirements, heliox breathing may attenuate the acute inflammatory and structural changes associated with acute lung injury. Spontaneously breathing neonatal pigs were anesthetized, instrumented, supported with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), injured with oleic acid, and randomized to nitrox (n = 6) or heliox (n = 5).F(I)O(2) was titrated for pulse oximetry (SpO(2)) 95 +/- 2% for 4 hr. Gas exchange and pulmonary mechanics were measured. Lungs were analyzed for myeloperoxidase (MPO), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and histomorphometery. Relationships between physiologic indices and cumulative lung structure and inflammatory indices were evaluated. With heliox, compliance was significantly greater, while tidal volume, frequency, minute ventilation, F(I)O(2), arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)), MPO, and IL-8 were significantly lower compared to nitrox. The expansion index and number of exchange units were significantly greater with heliox, while the exchange unit area (EUA) was smaller. MPO was significantly and positively correlated with F(I)O(2) (r = 0.76) and EUA (r = 0.63), and negatively correlated with number of open exchange units/field (r = -0.73). Compared to breathing nitrox, these data indicate that heliox improved the distribution of inspired gas, thereby recruiting more gas exchange units, improving gas exchange efficiency, reducing ventilatory and oxygen requirements, and attenuating lung inflammation. These data suggest that heliox breathing may have the combined therapeutic benefits of attenuating lung inflammation by reducing mechanical and oxidative stress in the clinical management of acute lung injury. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Peptide nanomedicines for treatment of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a heterogenous group of lung disease in critically ill patients. Despite the increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ARDS, the mortality remains unacceptably high, ranging from 34% to 64%. Hence, ARDS represents an unmet medical need with an urgency to develop effective pharmacotherapies. Several promising targets that have been identified as potential therapies for ARDS have been limited because of difficulty with delivery. In particular, delivery of peptides and proteins to the lung is an ongoing challenge. Nanobiotechnology and nanoscience are the basis of innovative techniques to deliver drugs targeted to the site of inflamed organs, such as the lungs. Nanoscale drug delivery systems have the ability to improve the pharmacokinetics and pharmakodynamics of agents allowing an increase in the biodistribution of therapeutic agents to target organs, resulting in improved efficacy with reduction in drug toxicity. These systems are exploited for therapeutic purpose to carry the drug in the body in a controlled manner from the site of administration to the therapeutic target. Hence, it is an attractive strategy to test potential targets for ALI/ARDS using nanotechnology. To this end, we have identified several potential targets and proposed the delivery of these agents using nanomicelles to improve the drug delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in acute hyperoxic mouse lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Barazzone, C; Belin, D; Piguet, P F; Vassalli, J D; Sappino, A P

    1996-01-01

    Hyperoxia-induced lung disease is associated with prominent intraalveolar fibrin deposition. Fibrin turnover is tightly regulated by the concerted action of proteases and antiproteases, and inhibition of plasmin-mediated proteolysis could account for fibrin accumulation in lung alveoli. We show here that lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia overproduce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and that PAI-1 upregulation impairs fibrinolytic activity in the alveolar compartment. To explore whether increased PAI-1 production is a causal or only a correlative event for impaired intraalveolar fibrinolysis and the development of hyaline membrane disease, we studied mice genetically deficient in PAI-1. We found that these mice fail to develop intraalveolar fibrin deposits in response to hyperoxia and that they are more resistant to the lethal effects of hyperoxic stress. These observations provide clear and novel evidence for the pathogenic contribution of PAI-1 in the development of hyaline membrane disease. They identify PAI-1 as a major deleterious mediator of hyperoxic lung injury. PMID:8981909

  11. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis.

  12. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  13. Role of Nrf2 and Autophagy in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Montserrat Rojo; Dodson, Matthew; Gross, Christine; Manzour, Heidi; Lantz, R. Clark; Chapman, Eli; Wang, Ting; Black, Stephen M.; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the clinical manifestations of severe lung damage and respiratory failure. Characterized by severe inflammation and compromised lung function, ALI/ARDS result in very high mortality of affected individuals. Currently, there are no effective treatments for ALI/ARDS, and ironically, therapies intended to aid patients (specifically mechanical ventilation, MV) may aggravate the symptoms. Key events contributing to the development of ALI/ARDS are: increased oxidative and proteotoxic stresses, unresolved inflammation, and compromised alveolar-capillary barrier function. Since the airways and lung tissues are constantly exposed to gaseous oxygen and airborne toxicants, the bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells are under higher oxidative stress than other tissues. Cellular protection against oxidative stress and xenobiotics is mainly conferred by Nrf2, a transcription factor that promotes the expression of genes that regulate oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism and excretion, inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and cellular bioenergetics. Numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of Nrf2 activation in the protection against ALI/ARDS, as pharmacological activation of Nrf2 prevents the occurrence or mitigates the severity of ALI/ARDS. Another promising new therapeutic strategy in the prevention and treatment of ALI/ARDS is the activation of autophagy, a bulk protein and organelle degradation pathway. In this review, we will discuss the strategy of concerted activation of Nrf2 and autophagy as a preventive and therapeutic intervention to ameliorate ALI/ARDS. PMID:27313980

  14. Dietary advanced glycation end-products, its pulmonary receptor, and high mobility group box 1 in aspiration lung injury.

    PubMed

    Smit, Peter J; Guo, Weidun A; Davidson, Bruce A; Mullan, Barbara A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Knight, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Gastric aspiration is a significant cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Environmental risk factors, such as a diet high in proinflammatory advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), may render some patients more susceptible to lung injury after aspiration. We hypothesized that high dietary AGEs increase its pulmonary receptor, RAGE, producing an amplified pulmonary inflammatory response in the presence of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a RAGE ligand and an endogenous signal of epithelial cell injury after aspiration. CD-1 mice were fed either a low AGE or high AGE diet for 4 wk. After aspiration injury with acidified small gastric particles, bronchoalveolar lavage and whole-lung tissue samples were collected at 5 min, 1 h, 5 h, and 24 h after injury. RAGE, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), HMGB1, cytokine and chemokine concentrations, albumin levels, neutrophil influx, and lung myeloperoxidase activity were measured. We observed that high AGE-fed mice exhibited greater pulmonary RAGE levels before aspiration and increased bronchoalveolar lavage sRAGE levels after aspiration compared with low AGE-fed mice. Lavage HMGB1 levels rose immediately after aspiration, peaking at 1 h, and strongly correlated with sRAGE levels in both dietary groups. High AGE-fed mice demonstrated higher cytokine and chemokine levels with increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity over 24 h versus low AGE-fed mice. This study indicates that high dietary AGEs can increase pulmonary RAGE, augmenting the inflammatory response to aspiration in the presence of endogenous damage signals such as HMGB1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of ozone-induced lung injury by exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Mautz, W.J.; McClure, T.R.; Reischl, P.; Phalen, R.F.; Crocker, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    Rats were exposed for up to 3.75 h to 0.20-0.80 ppm O/sub 3/ under conditions of rest and treadmill exercise up to 30 m/min, 20% grade, to assess the importance of exposure duration, O/sub 3/ concentration, and exercise on lung tissue injury. Focal lung parenchymal lesions increased in abundance and severity in response to the three variables; however, exercise was the most important. Lesion response to exercise was greater than that predicted by a simple proportion to estimated effective dose of O/sub 3/. The results emphasize the importance of including exercise in assessment of possible adverse health effects of exposure to airborne pollutants.

  16. Determinants of Lung Volumes in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Evan L.; Brown, Robert; Tun, Carlos G.; Gagnon, David R.; Jain, Nitin B.; Garshick, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Objective To characterize determinants of lung volumes in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional. Setting VA Boston Healthcare System. Participants White men (N=330) with chronic SCI. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Questionnaire responses and measurements of lung volumes. Results Adjusted for SCI severity and stature, greater body mass index (BMI) was associated (all P<.05) with lower total lung capacity (TLC) (−38.7mL·kg−1·m2), functional residual capacity (FRC) (−73.9mL·kg−1·m2), residual volume (RV) (−40.4mL·kg−1·m2), and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) (−32.2mL·kg−1·m2). The effect of BMI on RV was most pronounced in quadriplegia (−72mL·kg−1·m2). Lifetime smoking was associated with a greater FRC (5.3mL/pack a year) and RV (3.1mL/pack a year). The effects of lifetime smoking were also greatest in quadriplegia (11mL/pack a year for FRC; 7.8mL/pack a year for RV). Time since injury, independent of age, was associated with a decrease in TLC, FRC, ERV, and RV (P<.05). Age was not a predictor of TLC once time since injury was considered. Conclusions Determinants of FRC, TLC, ERV, and RV in chronic SCI include factors related and unrelated to SCI. The mechanisms remain to be determined but likely involve the elastic properties and muscle function of the respiratory system and perhaps the effects of systemic inflammation related to adiposity. Addressing modifiable factors such as obesity, muscle stiffness, and smoking may improve respiratory morbidity and mortality in SCI by improving pulmonary function. PMID:18674986

  17. Concurrent Inflammation Augments Antimalarial Drugs-Induced Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Niknahad, Hossein; Heidari, Reza; Firuzi, Roya; Abazari, Farzaneh; Ramezani, Maral; Azarpira, Negar; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Najibi, Asma; Saeedi, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accumulating evidence suggests that drug exposure during a modest inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) might increase the risk of drug-induced liver injury. The current investigation was designed to test if antimalarial drugs hepatotoxicity is augmented in LPS‑treated animals. Methods: Rats were pre-treated with LPS (100 µg/kg, i.p). Afterward, non-hepatotoxic doses of amodiaquine (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, oral) and chloroquine (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, oral) were administered. Results: Interestingly, liver injury was evident only in animals treated with both drug and LPS as estimated by pathological changes in serum biochemistry (ALT, AST, LDH, and TNF-α), and liver tissue (severe hepatitis, endotheliitis, and sinusoidal congestion). An increase in liver myeloperoxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation, along with tissue glutathione depletion were also detected in LPS and drug co-treated animals. Conclusion: Antimalarial drugs rendered hepatotoxic in animals undergoing a modest inflammation. These results indicate a synergistic liver injury from co-exposure to antimalarial drugs and inflammation. PMID:28101469

  18. Efferent vagal nerve stimulation attenuates acute lung injury following burn: The importance of the gut-lung axis

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Michael J.; Peterson, Carrie Y.; Cheadle, Gerald; Loomis, William; Wolf, Paul; Kennedy, Vince; Putnam, James G.; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian; Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess acute lung injury when protection to the gut mucosal barrier offered by vagus nerve stimulation is eliminated by an abdominal vagotomy. Methods Male balb/c mice were subjected to 30% total body surface area steam burn with and without electrical stimulation to the right cervical vagus nerve. A cohort of animals were subjected to abdominal vagotomy. Lung histology, myeloperoxidase and ICAM-1 immune staining, myeloperoxidase enzymatic assay, and tissue KC levels were analyzed 24 hours after burn. Additionally, lung IkB-α, NF-kB immunoblots, and NF-kB-DNA binding measured by photon emission analysis using NF-kB-luc transgenic mice were performed. Results Six hours post burn, phosphorylation of both NF-kB p65 and IkB-α were observed. Increased photon emission signal was seen in the lungs of NF-kB-luc transgenic animals. Vagal nerve stimulation blunted NF-kB activation similar to sham animals whereas abdominal vagotomy eliminated the anti-inflammatory effect. After burn, MPO positive cells and ICAM-1 expression in the lung endothelium was increased, and lung histology demonstrated significant injury at 24 hours. Vagal nerve stimulation markedly decreased neutrophil infiltration as demonstrated by MPO immune staining and enzyme activity. Vagal stimulation also markedly attenuated acute lung injury at 24 hours. The protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation were reversed by performing an abdominal vagotomy. Conclusion Vagal nerve stimulation is an effective strategy to protect against acute lung injury following burn. Moreover, the protective effects of vagal nerve stimulation in the prevention of acute lung injury are eliminated by performing an abdominal vagotomy. These results establish the importance of the gut-lung axis after burn in the genesis of acute lung injury. PMID:21783215

  19. Inhaled nitric oxide exacerbated phorbol-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hen I; Chu, Shi Jye; Hsu, Kang; Wang, David

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in isolated rat lung. Typical acute lung injury was induced successfully by PMA during 60 min of observation. PMA (2 microg/kg) elicited a significant increase in microvascular permeability, (measured using the capillary filtration coefficient Kfc), lung weight gain, lung weight/body weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pretreatment with inhaled NO (30 ppm) significantly exacerbated acute lung injury. All of the parameters reflective of lung injury increased significantly except PAP (P<0.05). Coadministration of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (5 mM) attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO in PMA-induced lung injury, except for PAP. In addition, L-NAME (5 mM) significantly attenuated PMA-induced acute lung injury except for PAP. These experimental data suggest that inhaled NO significantly exacerbated acute lung injury induced by PMA in rats. L-NAME attenuated the detrimental effect of inhaled NO.

  20. Protective effects of edaravone combined puerarin on inhalation lung injury induced by black gunpowder smog.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengguan; Li, Ruibing; Liu, Yifan; Liu, Xiaoting; Chen, Wenyan; Xu, Shumin; Guo, Yuni; Duan, Jinyang; Chen, Yihong; Wang, Chengbin

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the combined effects of puerarin with edaravone on inhalation lung injury induced by black gunpowder smog. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (control group, edaravone group, puerarin group, edaravone combined with puerarin group and inhalation group). The severity of pulmonary injuries was evaluated after inducing acute lung injury. Arterial blood gas, inflammatory cytokines, biochemical, parameters, cell counting, W/D weight ratio and histopathology were analyzed. Results in lung tissues, either edaravone or puerarin treatment alone showed significant protective effects against neutrophil infiltration and tissue injury, as demonstrated by myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis (all p<0.05). In addition, combined treatment with both edaravone and puerarin demonstrated additive protective effects on smog-induced lung injury, compared with single treatment. Combination of edaravone and puerarin shows promise as a new treatment option for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation of MTOR in pulmonary epithelium promotes LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Lou, Jian; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Lai, Tian-Wen; Liu, Li-Yao; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Juan; Li, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Fan; Li, Wen; Ying, Song-Min; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-12-01

    MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin [serine/threonine kinase]) plays a crucial role in many major cellular processes including metabolism, proliferation and macroautophagy/autophagy induction, and is also implicated in a growing number of proliferative and metabolic diseases. Both MTOR and autophagy have been suggested to be involved in lung disorders, however, little is known about the role of MTOR and autophagy in pulmonary epithelium in the context of acute lung injury (ALI). In the present study, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induced MTOR phosphorylation and decreased the expression of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β)-II, a hallmark of autophagy, in mouse lung epithelium and in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The activation of MTOR in HBE cells was mediated by TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) signaling. Genetic knockdown of MTOR or overexpression of autophagy-related proteins significantly attenuated, whereas inhibition of autophagy further augmented, LPS-induced expression of IL6 (interleukin 6) and IL8, through NFKB signaling in HBE cells. Mice with specific knockdown of Mtor in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells exhibited significantly attenuated airway inflammation, barrier disruption, and lung edema, and displayed prolonged survival in response to LPS exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that activation of MTOR in the epithelium promotes LPS-induced ALI, likely through downregulation of autophagy and the subsequent activation of NFKB. Thus, inhibition of MTOR in pulmonary epithelial cells may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing ALI induced by certain bacteria.

  2. Augmentation of lung liquid clearance via adenovirus-mediated transfer of a Na,K-ATPase beta1 subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Factor, P; Saldias, F; Ridge, K; Dumasius, V; Zabner, J; Jaffe, H A; Blanco, G; Barnard, M; Mercer, R; Perrin, R; Sznajder, J I

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alveolar Na,K-ATPases play an important role in active Na+ transport and lung edema clearance. We reasoned that overexpression of Na,K-ATPase subunit genes could increase Na,K-ATPase function in lung epithelial cells and edema clearance in rat lungs. To test this hypothesis we produced replication deficient human type 5 adenoviruses containing cDNAs for the rat alpha1 and beta1 Na,K-ATPase subunits (adMRCMValpha1 and adMRCMVbeta1, respectively). As compared to controls, adMRCMVbeta1 increased beta1 subunit expression and Na,K-ATPase function by 2. 5-fold in alveolar type 2 epithelial cells and rat airway epithelial cell monolayers. No change in Na,K-ATPase function was noted after infection with adMRCMValpha1. Rat lungs infected with adMRCMVbeta1, but not adMRCMValpha1, had increased beta1 protein levels and lung liquid clearance 7 d after tracheal instillation. Alveolar epithelial permeability to Na+ and mannitol was mildly increased in animals infected with adMRCMVbeta1 and a similar Escherichia coli lacZ-expressing virus. Our data shows, for the first time, that transfer of the beta1 Na,K-ATPase subunit gene augments Na,K-ATPase function in epithelial cells and liquid clearance in rat lungs. Conceivably, overexpression of Na,K-ATPases could be used as a strategy to augment lung liquid clearance in patients with pulmonary edema. PMID:9769335

  3. Effects of budesonide on the lung functions, inflammation and apoptosis in a saline-lavage model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Kosutova, P; Balentova, S; Adamkov, M; Mikolka, P; Mokry, J; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A

    2016-12-01

    Diffuse alveolar injury, edema, and inflammation are fundamental signs of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Whereas the systemic administration of corticosteroids previously led to controversial results, this study evaluated if corticosteroids given intratracheally may improve lung functions and reduce edema formation, migration of cells into the lung and their activation in experimentally-induced ALI. In oxygen-ventilated rabbits, ALI was induced by repetitive saline lung lavage, until PaO2 decreased to < 26.7 kPa in FiO2 1.0. Then, one group of animals was treated with corticosteroid budesonide (Pulmicort susp inh, AstraZeneca; 0.25 mg/kg) given intratracheally by means of inpulsion regime of high-frequency jet ventilation, while another group was non-treated, and both groups were oxygen-ventilated for following 5 hours. Another group of animals served as healthy controls. After sacrifice of animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and protein content was measured and cells in the lavage fluid were determined microscopically. Right lung tissue was used for estimation of edema formation (expressed as wet/dry weight ratio), for histomorphological investigation, immunohistochemical determination of apoptosis of lung cells, and for determination of markers of inflammation and lung injury (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IFNγ, esRAGE, caspase-3) by ELISA methods. Levels of several cytokines were estimated also in plasma. Repetitive lung lavage worsened gas exchange, induced lung injury, inflammation and lung edema and increased apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Budesonide reduced lung edema, cell infiltration into the lung and apoptosis of epithelial cells and decreased concentrations of proinflammatory markers in the lung and blood. These changes resulted in improved ventilation. Concluding, curative intratracheal treatment with budesonide alleviated lung injury, inflammation, apoptosis of lung epithelial cells and lung edema and

  4. Oxidative stress and lung injury induced by short-term exposure to wood smoke in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Becerril, C; Cisneros, J; González-Ávila, G; Rivera-Rosales, R; Sommer, B; Medina-Campos, O N; Montaño, M

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative stress and lung injury induced by short-term exposure to wood smoke were evaluated in guinea pigs through cell profile, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), conventional histology and immunohistochemistry (4-hydroxynonenal, 3-nitrotyrosine, Mn-superoxide dismutase, heme oxygenase-1); malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal concentration, Mn-superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities in plasma, lung and BAL. Total cells increased in BAL, and the percentage of macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes augmented (72-96 h). Histopathological examination of lung tissues showed mild thickening of membranous bronchiole walls, infiltration of foamy macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in bronchial, bronchiolar and intraalveolar spaces. Goblet cell hyperplasia was also observed in bronchial and bronchiolar epithelia. Plasma malondialdehyde concentration was increased at all times, while 4-hydroxynonenal was increased only in plasma and BAL after 24 h. Plasma glutathione reductase activity increased at 24 and 72 h, BAL glutathione peroxidase activity decreased at 72 and 96 h, whereas catalase activity increased in plasma at 72 h, and decreased in BAL at 24 h. Immunostaining intensity to 4-hydroxynonenal, 3-nitrotyrosine, Mn-superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase-1 was enhanced mainly in macrophages, bronchial/bronchiolar epithelial cells and type II pneumocytes after 72-96 h of wood smoke exposure. Overall, short-term exposure to wood smoke induces alterations in oxidative/antioxidant state in lung and airway injury, similar to those observed in humans with domestic exposure.

  5. Augmented Feedback Supports Skill Transfer and Reduces High-Risk Injury Landing Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Stroube, Benjamin W.; DiCesare, Christopher A.; Brent, Jensen L.; Ford, Kevin R.; Heidt, Robert S.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a current need to produce a simple, yet effective method for screening and targeting possible deficiencies related to increased anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. Hypothesis Frontal plane knee angle (FPKA) during a drop vertical jump will decrease upon implementing augmented feedback into a standardized sport training program. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Thirty-seven female participants (mean ± SD: age, 14.7 ±1.5 years; height, 160.9 ± 6.8 cm; weight, 54.5 ± 7.2 kg) were trained over 8 weeks. During each session, each participant received standardized training consisting of strength training, plyometrics, and conditioning. They were also videotaped running on a treadmill at a standardized speed and performing a repeated tuck jump for 10 seconds. Study participants were randomized into 2 groups and received augmented feedback on either their jumping (AF) or sprinting (CTRL) form. Average (mean of 3 trials) and most extreme (trial with greatest knee abduction) FPKA were calculated from 2-dimensional video captured during performance of the drop vertical jump. Results After testing, a main effect of time was noted, with the AF group reducing their FPKA average by 37.9% over the 3 trials while the CTRL group demonstrated a 26.7% reduction average across the 3 trials (P < .05). Conversely, in the most extreme drop vertical jump trial, a significant time-by-group interaction was noted (P < .05). The AF group reduced their most extreme FPKA by 6.9° (pretest, 18.4° ± 12.3°; posttest, 11.4° ± 10.1°) on their right leg and 6.5° (pretest, 16.3° ± 14.5°; posttest, 9.8° ± 10.7°) on their left leg, which represented a 37.7% and 40.1 % reduction in FPKA, respectively. In the CTRL group, no similar changes were noted in the right (pretest, 16.9° ± 14.3°; posttest, 14.0° ± 12.3°) or left leg (pretest, 9.8° ± 11.1°; posttest, 7.2° ± 9.2°) after training. Conclusion Providing athletes with augmented

  6. Stressed lungs: unveiling the role of circulating stress hormones in ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone, a major component of smog generated through the interaction of light and anthropogenic emissions, induces adverse pulmonary, cardiovascular, and systemic health effects upon inhalation. It is generally accepted that ozone-induced lung injury is mediated by its interaction ...

  7. Stressed lungs: unveiling the role of circulating stress hormones in ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone, a major component of smog generated through the interaction of light and anthropogenic emissions, induces adverse pulmonary, cardiovascular, and systemic health effects upon inhalation. It is generally accepted that ozone-induced lung injury is mediated by its interaction ...

  8. Circadian clock function is disrupted by environmental tobacco/cigarette smoke, leading to lung inflammation and injury via a SIRT1-BMAL1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae-Woong; Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T.; Rahman, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung diseases display abnormal circadian rhythms in lung function. We determined the mechanism whereby environmental tobacco/cigarette smoke (CS) modulates expression of the core clock gene BMAL1, through Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) deacetylase during lung inflammatory and injurious responses. Adult C57BL6/J and various mice mutant for SIRT1 and BMAL1 were exposed to both chronic (6 mo) and acute (3 and 10 d) CS, and we measured the rhythmic expression of clock genes, circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, lung function, and inflammatory and emphysematous responses in the lungs. CS exposure (100–300 mg/m3 particulates) altered clock gene expression and reduced locomotor activity by disrupting the central and peripheral clocks and increased lung inflammation, causing emphysema in mice. BMAL1 was acetylated and degraded in the lungs of mice exposed to CS and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), compared with lungs of the nonsmoking controls, linking it mechanistically to CS-induced reduction of SIRT1. Targeted deletion of Bmal1 in lung epithelium augmented inflammation in response to CS, which was not attenuated by the selective SIRT1 activator SRT1720 (EC50=0.16 μM) in these mice. Thus, the circadian clock, specifically the enhancer BMAL1 in epithelium, plays a pivotal role, mediated by SIRT1-dependent BMAL1, in the regulation of CS-induced lung inflammatory and injurious responses.— Hwang, J.-W., Sundar, I. K., Yao, H., Sellix, M. T., Rahman, I. Circadian clock function is disrupted by environmental tobacco/cigarette smoke, leading to lung inflammation and injury via a SIRT1-BMAL1 pathway. PMID:24025728

  9. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  10. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A; Matthay, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is an underreported complication of transfusion therapy, and it is the third most common cause of transfusion-associated death. TRALI is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy. The diagnosis of TRALI relies on excluding other diagnoses such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Supportive diagnostic evidence includes identifying neutrophil or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in the donor or recipient plasma. All plasma-containing blood products have been implicated in TRALI, with the majority of cases linked to whole blood, packed RBCs, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of TRALI may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, with the first "hit" being a predisposing inflammatory condition commonly present in the operating room or ICU. The second hit may involve the passive transfer of neutrophil or HLA antibodies from the donor or the transfusion of biologically active lipids from older, cellular blood products. Treatment is supportive, with a prognosis substantially better than most causes of clinical acute lung injury.

  11. Lung protective mechanical ventilation and two year survival in patients with acute lung injury: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Dinglas, Victor D; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R; Desai, Sanjay V; Shanholtz, Carl; Brower, Roy G; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of volume limited and pressure limited (lung protective) mechanical ventilation with two year survival in patients with acute lung injury. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 13 intensive care units at four hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Participants 485 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury. Main outcome measure Two year survival after onset of acute lung injury. Results 485 patients contributed data for 6240 eligible ventilator settings, as measured twice daily (median of eight eligible ventilator settings per patient; 41% of which adhered to lung protective ventilation). Of these patients, 311 (64%) died within two years. After adjusting for the total duration of ventilation and other relevant covariates, each additional ventilator setting adherent to lung protective ventilation was associated with a 3% decrease in the risk of mortality over two years (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 0.99, P=0.002). Compared with no adherence, the estimated absolute risk reduction in two year mortality for a prototypical patient with 50% adherence to lung protective ventilation was 4.0% (0.8% to 7.2%, P=0.012) and with 100% adherence was 7.8% (1.6% to 14.0%, P=0.011). Conclusions Lung protective mechanical ventilation was associated with a substantial long term survival benefit for patients with acute lung injury. Greater use of lung protective ventilation in routine clinical practice could reduce long term mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00300248. PMID:22491953

  12. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure titration and recruitment maneuver on lung inflammation and hyperinflation in experimental acid aspiration-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Aline M; Luo, Rubin; Fantoni, Denise T; Gutierres, Claudia; Lu, Qin; Gu, Wen-Jie; Otsuki, Denise A; Malbouisson, Luiz M S; Auler, Jose O C; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2012-12-01

    In acute lung injury positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuver are proposed to optimize arterial oxygenation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of such a strategy on lung histological inflammation and hyperinflation in pigs with acid aspiration-induced lung injury. Forty-seven pigs were randomly allocated in seven groups: (1) controls spontaneously breathing; (2) without lung injury, PEEP 5 cm H2O; (3) without lung injury, PEEP titration; (4) without lung injury, PEEP titration + recruitment maneuver; (5) with lung injury, PEEP 5 cm H2O; (6) with lung injury, PEEP titration; and (7) with lung injury, PEEP titration + recruitment maneuver. Acute lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid. PEEP titration was performed by incremental and decremental PEEP from 5 to 20 cm H2O for optimizing arterial oxygenation. Three recruitment maneuvers (pressure of 40 cm H2O maintained for 20 s) were applied to the assigned groups at each PEEP level. Proportion of lung inflammation, hemorrhage, edema, and alveolar wall disruption were recorded on each histological field. Mean alveolar area was measured in the aerated lung regions. Acid aspiration increased mean alveolar area and produced alveolar wall disruption, lung edema, alveolar hemorrhage, and lung inflammation. PEEP titration significantly improved arterial oxygenation but simultaneously increased lung inflammation in juxta-diaphragmatic lung regions. Recruitment maneuver during PEEP titration did not induce additional increase in lung inflammation and alveolar hyperinflation. In a porcine model of acid aspiration-induced lung injury, PEEP titration aimed at optimizing arterial oxygenation, substantially increased lung inflammation. Recruitment maneuvers further improved arterial oxygenation without additional effects on inflammation and hyperinflation.

  13. Riboflavin supplementation does not attenuate hyperoxic lung injury in transgenic spc–mthGR mice

    PubMed Central

    Heyob, Kathryn M.; Rogers, Lynette K.; Tipple, Trent E.; Welty, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that mice expressing mitochondrially targeted human glutathione reductase (GR) driven by a surfactant protein C promoter (spc–mthGR) are functionally riboflavin deficient and that this deficiency exacerbates hyperoxic lung injury. The authors further hypothesized that dietary supplementation with riboflavin (FADH) will improve the bioactivity of GR, thus enhancing resistance to hyperoxic lung injury. Transgenic mt–spchGR mice and their nontransgenic littermates were fed control or riboflavin-supplemented diets upon weaning. At 6 weeks of age the mice were exposed to either room air (RA) or >95% O2 for up to 84 hours. GR activities (with and without exogenous FADH) and GR protein levels were measured in lung tissue homogenates. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations were assayed to identify changes in GR activity in vivo. Lung injury was assessed by right lung to body weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations. The data showed that enhanced GR activity in the mitochondria of lung type II cells does not protect adult mice from hyperoxic lung injury. Furthermore, the addition of riboflavin to the diets of spc–mthGR mice neither enhances GR activities nor offers protection from hyperoxic lung injury. The results indicated that modulation of mitochondrial GR activity in lung type II cells is not an effective therapy to minimize hyperoxic lung injury. PMID:21128861

  14. Riboflavin supplementation does not attenuate hyperoxic lung injury in transgenic (spc-mt)hGR mice.

    PubMed

    Heyob, Kathryn M; Rogers, Lynette K; Tipple, Trent E; Welty, Stephen E

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that mice expressing mitochondrially targeted human glutathione reductase (GR) driven by a surfactant protein C promoter ((spc-mt)hGR) are functionally riboflavin deficient and that this deficiency exacerbates hyperoxic lung injury. The authors further hypothesized that dietary supplementation with riboflavin (FADH) will improve the bioactivity of GR, thus enhancing resistance to hyperoxic lung injury. Transgenic (mt-spc)hGR mice and their nontransgenic littermates were fed control or riboflavin-supplemented diets upon weaning. At 6 weeks of age the mice were exposed to either room air (RA) or >95% O(2) for up to 84 hours. GR activities (with and without exogenous FADH) and GR protein levels were measured in lung tissue homogenates. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations were assayed to identify changes in GR activity in vivo. Lung injury was assessed by right lung to body weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentrations. The data showed that enhanced GR activity in the mitochondria of lung type II cells does not protect adult mice from hyperoxic lung injury. Furthermore, the addition of riboflavin to the diets of (spc-mt)hGR mice neither enhances GR activities nor offers protection from hyperoxic lung injury. The results indicated that modulation of mitochondrial GR activity in lung type II cells is not an effective therapy to minimize hyperoxic lung injury.

  15. Treatment of acute lung injury by targeting MG53-mediated cell membrane repair

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Gissela; Nishi, Miyuki; Yan, Rosalie; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Li, Yu; Whitson, Bryan A.; Duann, Pu; Li, Haichang; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhu, Hua; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hunter, John C.; McLeod, Robbie L.; Weisleder, Noah; Zeng, Chunyu; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-01-01

    Injury to lung epithelial cells has a role in multiple lung diseases. We previously identified mitsugumin 53 (MG53) as a component of the cell membrane repair machinery in striated muscle cells. Here we show that MG53 also has a physiological role in the lung and may be used as a treatment in animal models of acute lung injury. Mice lacking MG53 show increased susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion and over-ventilation induced injury to the lung when compared with wild type mice. Extracellular application of recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein protects cultured lung epithelial cells against anoxia/reoxygenation-induced injuries. Intravenous delivery or inhalation of rhMG53 reduces symptoms in rodent models of acute lung injury and emphysema. Repetitive administration of rhMG53 improves pulmonary structure associated with chronic lung injury in mice. Our data indicate a physiological function for MG53 in the lung and suggest that targeting membrane repair may be an effective means for treatment or prevention of lung diseases. PMID:25034454

  16. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  17. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  18. Traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI): report of one case.

    PubMed

    Liang, K; Gan, X; Deng, Z

    2012-07-01

    One case of traumatic forequarter amputation associated acute lung injury (ALI) was presented. A discussion reviewing the treatment guidelines for this devastating injury, and pointing out the importance of supporting the lung and preventing the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was included.

  19. Creation of Lung-Targeted Dexamethasone Immunoliposome and Its Therapeutic Effect on Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Jin-Fu; Li, Xia; Ren, Jie; Su, Bo; Yuan, Wei-Zhong; Teng, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Rong-Xuan; Jiang, Dian-hua; Mulet, Xavier; Li, Hui-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute lung injury (ALI), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, which is routinely treated with the administration of systemic glucocorticoids. The current study investigated the distribution and therapeutic effect of a dexamethasone(DXM)-loaded immunoliposome (NLP) functionalized with pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) antibody (SPA-DXM-NLP) in an animal model. Methods DXM-NLP was prepared using film dispersion combined with extrusion techniques. SP-A antibody was used as the lung targeting agent. Tissue distribution of SPA-DXM-NLP was investigated in liver, spleen, kidney and lung tissue. The efficacy of SPA-DXM-NLP against lung injury was assessed in a rat model of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury. Results The SPA-DXM-NLP complex was successfully synthesized and the particles were stable at 4°C. Pulmonary dexamethasone levels were 40 times higher with SPA-DXM-NLP than conventional dexamethasone injection. Administration of SPA-DXM-NLP significantly attenuated lung injury and inflammation, decreased incidence of infection, and increased survival in animal models. Conclusions The administration of SPA-DXM-NLP to animal models resulted in increased levels of DXM in the lungs, indicating active targeting. The efficacy against ALI of the immunoliposomes was shown to be superior to conventional dexamethasone administration. These results demonstrate the potential of actively targeted glucocorticoid therapy in the treatment of lung disease in clinical practice. PMID:23516459

  20. Caveolin-1: a critical regulator of lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Jin; Minshall, Richard D.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (cav-1), a 22-kDa transmembrane scaffolding protein, is the principal structural component of caveolae. Cav-1 regulates critical cell functions including proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, and transcytosis via diverse signaling pathways. Abundant in almost every cell type in the lung, including type I epithelial cells, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, macrophages, and neutrophils, cav-1 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). ALI and its severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, despite improvement in ventilation strategies. The pathogenesis of ARDS is still poorly understood, and therapeutic options remain limited. In this article, we summarize recent data regarding the regulation and function of cav-1 in lung biology and pathology, in particular as it relates to ALI. We further discuss the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms by which cav-1 expression contributes to ALI. Investigating the cellular functions of cav-1 may provide new insights for understanding the pathogenesis of ALI and provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions in the future. PMID:21097526

  1. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Bux, Jürgen; Sachs, Ulrich J H

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion-related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress, non-cardiogenic lung oedema temporal association with transfusion and hypoxaemia. Histological findings reveal lung oedema, capillary leucostasis and neutrophil extravasation. However, the pathogenesis of TRALI remains controversial. Leucocyte antibodies, present in fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates from multiparous donors, and neutrophil priming agents released in stored cellular blood components have been considered to be causative. As neutrophils and endothelial cells are pivotal in the pathogenesis of TRALI, a threshold model was established to try to unify the various reported findings on pathogenesis. This model comprises the priming of neutrophils and/or endothelium by the patient's co-morbidity, neutrophil and/or endothelial cell activation by the transfused blood component, and the severity of the TRALI reaction.

  2. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  3. Toxic Inhalational Injury-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kim, Hyung Young; Yu, Jinho; Jhang, Won-Kyoung; Park, Seong-Jong; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Kim, Sun-A; Jang, Se Jin

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease in children (chILD) is a group of disorders characterized by lung inflammation and interstitial fibrosis. In the past recent years, we noted an outbreak of child in Korea, which is possibly associated with inhalation toxicity. Here, we report a series of cases involving toxic inhalational injury-associated chILD with bronchiolitis obliterans pattern in Korean children. This study included 16 pediatric patients confirmed by lung biopsy and chest computed tomography, between February 2006 and May 2011 at Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital. The most common presenting symptoms were cough and dyspnea. The median age at presentation was 26 months (range: 12-47 months), with high mortality (44%). Histopathological analysis showed bronchiolar destruction and centrilobular distribution of alveolar destruction by inflammatory and fibroproliferative process with subpleural sparing. Chest computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities and consolidation in the early phase and diffuse centrilobular nodular opacity in the late phase. Air leak with severe respiratory difficulty was associated with poor prognosis. Although respiratory chemicals such as humidifier disinfectants were strongly considered as a cause of this disease, further studies are needed to understand the etiology and pathophysiology of the disease to improve the prognosis and allow early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23772158

  4. Endothelial dysfunction and lung capillary injury in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco; Phillips, Shane A; Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction of both systolic and diastolic origins leads to increased left atrial pressure, lung capillary injury and increased resistance to gas transfer. Acutely, pressure-induced trauma disrupts the endothelial and alveolar anatomical configuration and definitively causes an impairment of cellular pathways involved in fluid-flux regulation and gas exchange efficiency, a process well identified as stress failure of the alveolar-capillary membrane. In chronic heart failure (HF), additional stimuli other than pressure may trigger the true remodeling process of capillaries and small arteries characterized by endothelial dysfunction, proliferation of myofibroblasts, fibrosis and extracellular matrix deposition. In parallel there is a loss of alveolar gas diffusion properties due to the increased path from air to blood (thickening of extracellular matrix) and loss of fine molecular mechanism involved in fluid reabsorption and clearance. Deleterious changes in gas transfer not only reflect the underlying lung tissue damage but also portend independent prognostic information and may play a role in the pathogenesis of exercise limitation and ventilatory abnormalities observed in these patients. Few currently approved treatments for chronic HF have the potential to positively affect structural remodeling of the lung capillary network; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are one of the few currently established options. Recently, more attention has been paid to novel therapies specifically targeting the nitric oxide pathway as a suitable target to improve endothelial function and permeability as well as alveolar gas exchange properties.

  5. Ventilator-related causes of lung injury: the mechanical power.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, L; Tonetti, T; Cressoni, M; Cadringher, P; Herrmann, P; Moerer, O; Protti, A; Gotti, M; Chiurazzi, C; Carlesso, E; Chiumello, D; Quintel, M

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that the ventilator-related causes of lung injury may be unified in a single variable: the mechanical power. We assessed whether the mechanical power measured by the pressure-volume loops can be computed from its components: tidal volume (TV)/driving pressure (∆P aw), flow, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and respiratory rate (RR). If so, the relative contributions of each variable to the mechanical power can be estimated. We computed the mechanical power by multiplying each component of the equation of motion by the variation of volume and RR: [Formula: see text]where ∆V is the tidal volume, ELrs is the elastance of the respiratory system, I:E is the inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio, and R aw is the airway resistance. In 30 patients with normal lungs and in 50 ARDS patients, mechanical power was computed via the power equation and measured from the dynamic pressure-volume curve at 5 and 15 cmH2O PEEP and 6, 8, 10, and 12 ml/kg TV. We then computed the effects of the individual component variables on the mechanical power. Computed and measured mechanical powers were similar at 5 and 15 cmH2O PEEP both in normal subjects and in ARDS patients (slopes = 0.96, 1.06, 1.01, 1.12 respectively, R (2) > 0.96 and p < 0.0001 for all). The mechanical power increases exponentially with TV, ∆P aw, and flow (exponent = 2) as well as with RR (exponent = 1.4) and linearly with PEEP. The mechanical power equation may help estimate the contribution of the different ventilator-related causes of lung injury and of their variations. The equation can be easily implemented in every ventilator's software.

  6. Omeprazole Attenuates Pulmonary Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation and Potentiates Hyperoxia-Induced Developmental Lung Injury in Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Binoy; Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in human preterm infants and a similar lung phenotype characterized by alveolar simplification in newborn mice. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury (HLI) in adult mice. Whether OM activates pulmonary AhR and protects C57BL/6J newborn mice against hyperoxia-induced developmental lung (alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, inflammation, and oxidative stress) injury (HDLI) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will activate pulmonary AhR and mitigate HDLI in newborn mice. Newborn mice were treated daily with i.p. injections of OM at doses of 10 (OM10) or 25 (OM25) mg/kg while being exposed to air or hyperoxia (FiO2 of 85%) for 14 days, following which their lungs were harvested to determine alveolarization, pulmonary vascularization, inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular injury, and AhR activation. To our surprise, hyperoxia-induced alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, inflammation, oxidative stress, and vascular injury were augmented in OM25-treated animals. These findings were associated with attenuated pulmonary vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression and decreased pulmonary AhR activation in the OM25 group. We conclude that contrary to our hypothesis, OM decreases functional activation of pulmonary AhR and potentiates HDLI in newborn mice. These observations are consistent with our previous findings, which suggest that AhR activation plays a protective role in HDLI in newborn mice. PMID:26272953

  7. Alveolar recruitment prevents rapid-reperfusion-induced injury of lung transplants.

    PubMed

    DeCampos, K N; Keshavjee, S; Slutsky, A S; Liu, M

    1999-11-01

    Physical factors play an important role in ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury of lung transplants. For example, rapid restoration of reperfusion resulted in severe pulmonary edema and deterioration of pulmonary function of lung explants in an ex vivo reperfusion system. This type of injury can be prevented by a stepwise increase in the perfusion flow rate, or by adding prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) to the blood perfusate during the first 10 minutes. However, the mechanisms of these protective effects are unknown. We noted a dramatic decrease in airway pressure rather than pulmonary arterial pressure in these studies, suggesting that lung recruitment may be an important factor in minimizing injury. In the present study, we examined the importance of alveolar recruitment in preventing rapid-reperfusion-induced lung injury. Rat lungs were flushed preserved with low potassium dextran solution for 12 hours at 4 degrees C. Lung explants were randomly divided into three groups: 1) untreated control; 2) lungs inflated to total lung capacity for 2 minutes; and 3) lungs ventilated for 10 minutes prior to reperfusion. Postpreservation lung function was assessed in an isolated rat lung reperfusion model. Rapid initiation of reperfusion led to severe pulmonary edema and significant pulmonary dysfunction. In inflation or ventilation groups, the injury was significantly attenuated. The PaO2 and shunt fractions in these lungs were comparable to normal lungs. A significant drop in airway pressure was observed in these two groups and the lung compliance in the inflation group was significantly better than other two groups. These results suggest that overcoming alveolar collapse with inflation or ventilation, may protect the lung from mechanical-stress-induced injury during reperfusion.

  8. Protective effects of imipramine in murine endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Qu, Jie-ming; Summah, Hanssa; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Ying-gang; Jiang, Hong-ni

    2010-07-25

    The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine has recently emerged as a cytoprotective agent, exerting beneficial effects in inflammatory tissue injury. The present study aimed to investigate therapeutic effects of imipramine in murine model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Mice were administrated intraperitoneally with LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from Escherichia coli or vehicle. Imipramine was administrated intraperitoneally 30 min before LPS challenge. Pretreatment of mice with imipramine reduced lethality. Impramine also significantly attenuated lung inflammation, lung edema, MPO (myeloperoxidase) activity, lung tissue pathological changes and nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding activity. The results of this study suggest that imipramine can exert protective effects in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury by suppressing nuclear factor-kappaB-mediated expression of inflammatory genes. Thus, imipramine could be a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment for acute lung injury.

  9. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3–V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents. PMID:25957290

  10. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Poroyko, Valeriy; Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3-V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents.

  11. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI.

  12. Stem cell factor improves lung recovery in rats following neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Luis F.; Rodrigues, Claudia O.; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Klim, Jammie; Hehre, Dorothy; McNiece, Ian; Hare, Joshua M.; Suguihara, Cleide Y.; Young, Karen C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stem cell factor (SCF) and its receptor, c-kit, are modulators of angiogenesis. Neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury (HILI) is characterized by disordered angiogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether exogenous SCF improves recovery from neonatal HILI by improving angiogenesis. METHODS Newborn rats assigned to normoxia (RA: 20.9% O2) or hyperoxia (90% O2) from postnatal day (P) 2 to 15, received daily injections of SCF 100 µg/kg or placebo (PL) from P15 to P21. Lung morphometry was performed at P28. Capillary tube formation in SCF-treated hyperoxia-exposed pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) was determined by Matrigel assay. RESULTS As compared with RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had decrease in alveolarization and in lung vascular density, and this was associated with increased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling. In contrast, SCF-treated hyperoxic pups had increased angiogenesis, improved alveolarization, and attenuation of pulmonary hypertension as evidenced by decreased RVSP, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling. Moreover, in an in vitro model, SCF increased capillary tube formation in hyperoxia-exposed HPMECs. CONCLUSION Exogenous SCF restores alveolar and vascular structure in neonatal rats with HILI by promoting neoangiogenesis. These findings suggest a new strategy to treat lung diseases characterized by dysangiogenesis. PMID:24153399

  13. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  14. Hydrogen gas reduces hyperoxic lung injury via the Nrf2 pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Shigemura, Norihisa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yugo; Noda, Kentaro; Peng, Ximei; Takahashi, Toru; Billiar, Timothy R.; Okumura, Meinoshin; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoxic lung injury is a major concern in critically ill patients who receive high concentrations of oxygen to treat lung diseases. Successful abrogation of hyperoxic lung injury would have a huge impact on respiratory and critical care medicine. Hydrogen can be administered as a therapeutic medical gas. We recently demonstrated that inhaled hydrogen reduced transplant-induced lung injury and induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To determine whether hydrogen could reduce hyperoxic lung injury and investigate the underlying mechanisms, we randomly assigned rats to four experimental groups and administered the following gas mixtures for 60 h: 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% nitrogen; 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% hydrogen; 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% nitrogen; and 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% hydrogen. We examined lung function by blood gas analysis, extent of lung injury, and expression of HO-1. We also investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2, which regulates HO-1 expression, by examining the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes and the ability of hydrogen to reduce hyperoxic lung injury in Nrf2-deficient mice. Hydrogen treatment during exposure to hyperoxia significantly improved blood oxygenation, reduced inflammatory events, and induced HO-1 expression. Hydrogen did not mitigate hyperoxic lung injury or induce HO-1 in Nrf2-deficient mice. These findings indicate that hydrogen gas can ameliorate hyperoxic lung injury through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as HO-1. The findings suggest a potentially novel and applicable solution to hyperoxic lung injury and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms and actions of hydrogen. PMID:23475767

  15. Mechanical ventilation injury and repair in extremely and very preterm lungs.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Hooper, Stuart B; Zahra, Valerie; Wallace, Megan; Harding, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Extremely preterm infants often receive mechanical ventilation (MV), which can contribute to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). However, the effects of MV alone on the extremely preterm lung and the lung's capacity for repair are poorly understood. To characterise lung injury induced by MV alone, and mechanisms of injury and repair, in extremely preterm lungs and to compare them with very preterm lungs. Extremely preterm lambs (0.75 of term) were transiently exposed by hysterotomy and underwent 2 h of injurious MV. Lungs were collected 24 h and at 15 d after MV. Immunohistochemistry and morphometry were used to characterise injury and repair processes. qRT-PCR was performed on extremely and very preterm (0.85 of term) lungs 24 h after MV to assess molecular injury and repair responses. 24 h after MV at 0.75 of term, lung parenchyma and bronchioles were severely injured; tissue space and myofibroblast density were increased, collagen and elastin fibres were deformed and secondary crest density was reduced. Bronchioles contained debris and their epithelium was injured and thickened. 24 h after MV at 0.75 and 0.85 of term, mRNA expression of potential mediators of lung repair were significantly increased. By 15 days after MV, most lung injury had resolved without treatment. Extremely immature lungs, particularly bronchioles, are severely injured by 2 h of MV. In the absence of continued ventilation these injured lungs are capable of repair. At 24 h after MV, genes associated with injurious MV are unaltered, while potential repair genes are activated in both extremely and very preterm lungs.

  16. Relationship of Acute Lung Inflammatory Injury to Fas/FasL System

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Thomas A.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Neff, Simona B.; Sarma, J. Vidya; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Gao, Hongwei; Bernacki, Kurt D.; Huber-Lang, Markus; McGuire, Stephanie; Hoesel, L. Marco; Riedemann, Niels C.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Zetoune, Firas S.; Ward, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that apoptosis plays a significant role in tissue damage during acute lung injury. To evaluate the role of the apoptosis mediators Fas and FasL in acute lung injury, Fas (lpr)- or FasL (gld)-deficient and wild-type mice were challenged with intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. Lung injury parameters (125I-albumin leak, accumulation of myeloperoxidase, and wet lung weights) were measured and found to be consistently reduced in both lpr and gld mice. In wild-type mice, lung injury was associated with a marked increase in Fas protein in lung. Inflamed lungs of wild-type mice showed striking evidence of activated caspase-3, which was much diminished in inflamed lungs from lpr mice. Intratracheal administration of a monoclonal Fas-activating antibody (Jo2) in wild-type mice induced MIP-2 and KC production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and a murine alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S) showed significantly increased MIP-2 production after incubation with this antibody. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content of MIP-2 and KC was substantially reduced in lpr mice after lung injury when compared to levels in wild-type mice. These data suggest that the Fas/FasL system regulates the acute lung inflammatory response by positively affecting CXC-chemokine production, ultimately leading to enhanced neutrophil influx and tissue damage. PMID:15743781

  17. Pulmonary vs Nonpulmonary Sepsis and Mortality in Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sevransky, Jonathan E.; Martin, Greg S.; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro; Shanholtz, Carl; Brower, Roy; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a frequent complication of sepsis. It is unclear if a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis affects mortality in patients with sepsis-induced ALI. Methods Two hundred eighty-eight consecutive patients with sepsis-induced ALI from 14 ICUs at four hospitals in Baltimore,MDwere prospectively classified as having a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the independent association of a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis with inpatient mortality. Results In an unadjusted analysis, in-hospital mortality was lower for pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis (42% vs 66%, p < 0.0001). Patients with pulmonary sepsis had lower acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores, shorter ICU stays prior to the development of ALI, and higher lung injury scores. In the adjusted analysis, several factors were predictive of mortality: age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.06), Charlson comorbidity index (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.30), ICU length of stay prior to ALI diagnosis (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.39), APACHE II score (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.12), lung injury score (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.43), SOFA score (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.26), and cumulative fluid balance in the first 7 days after ALI diagnosis (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.10). A pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis was not independently associated with mortality (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.38 to 1.35). Conclusions Although lower mortality was observed for ALI patients with a pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis, this finding is likely due to a lower severity of illness in those with pulmonary sepsis. Pulmonary vs nonpulmonary source of sepsis was not independently predictive of mortality for patients with ALI. PMID:18641112

  18. Lower torso ischemia-induced lung injury is leukocyte dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Klausner, J M; Anner, H; Paterson, I S; Kobzik, L; Valeri, C R; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1988-01-01

    Lower torso ischemia leads on reperfusion to sequestration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the lungs and increased permeability. This study tests the role of circulating leukocytes (WBC) in mediating this lung injury. Anesthetized sheep prepared with chronic lung lymph fistulae underwent 2 hours of bilateral hind limb tourniquet ischemia. In untreated controls (n = 7), 1 minute after reperfusion there were transient increases in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) from 13 to 38 mmHg (p less than 0.05) and pulmonary microvascular pressure (Pmv) from 7 to 18 mmHg (p less than 0.05), changes temporally related to a rise in plasma thromboxane (Tx) B2 levels from 211 to 735 pg/ml (p less than 0.05). Lung lymph TxB2 levels rose from 400 to 1005 pg/ml at 30 minutes (p less than 0.05), and remained elevated longer than plasma levels. Lung lymph flow (QL) rose from 4.3 to 8.3 ml/30 minutes (p less than 0.05) after 30 minutes of reperfusion and remained elevated for 2 hours. The lymph/plasma (L/P) protein ratio was unchanged from 0.6, while the lymph protein clearance increased from 2.6 to 4.6 ml/30 minutes (p less than 0.05), suggesting increased microvascular permeability. WBC counts decreased within the first hour of reperfusion from 6853 to 3796/mm3 (p less than 0.05), and lung histology after 2 hours showed proteinaceous exudates and leukosequestration of 62 PMN/10 high-powered fields (HPF), higher than the 22 PMN/10 HPF (p less than 0.05) in sham animals (n = 3). Recruitment of the pulmonary vasculature by left atrial balloon inflation (n = 3) resulted in a rise in MPAP to 20 mmHg. After 3 hours of balloon inflation, QL stabilized at 9.8 ml/15 minutes, and a pressure-independent L/P protein ratio of 0.3 was achieved. During reperfusion, QL increased further to 11.2 ml/15 minutes, the L/P ratio rose to 0.56 and the calculated osmotic reflection coefficient decreased from 0.70 to 0.44, documenting an increase in lung microvascular permeability. In contrast

  19. Guanylyl cyclase activation reverses resistive breathing-induced lung injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Glynos, Constantinos; Toumpanakis, Dimitris; Loverdos, Konstantinos; Karavana, Vassiliki; Zhou, Zongmin; Magkou, Christina; Dettoraki, Maria; Perlikos, Fotis; Pavlidou, Athanasia; Kotsikoris, Vasilis; Topouzis, Stavros; Theocharis, Stamatios E; Brouckaert, Peter; Giannis, Athanassios; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros

    2015-06-01

    Inspiratory resistive breathing (RB), encountered in obstructive lung diseases, induces lung injury. The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway is down-regulated in chronic and acute animal models of RB, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Our objectives were to: (1) characterize the effects of increased concurrent inspiratory and expiratory resistance in mice via tracheal banding; and (2) investigate the contribution of the sGC/cGMP pathway in RB-induced lung injury. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice underwent RB achieved by restricting tracheal surface area to 50% (tracheal banding). RB for 24 hours resulted in increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cellularity and protein content, marked leukocyte infiltration in the lungs, and perturbed respiratory mechanics (increased tissue resistance and elasticity, shifted static pressure-volume curve right and downwards, decreased static compliance), consistent with the presence of acute lung injury. RB down-regulated sGC expression in the lung. All manifestations of lung injury caused by RB were exacerbated by the administration of the sGC inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxodiazolo[4,3-]quinoxalin-l-one, or when RB was performed using sGCα1 knockout mice. Conversely, restoration of sGC signaling by prior administration of the sGC activator BAY 58-2667 (Bayer, Leverkusen, Germany) prevented RB-induced lung injury. Strikingly, direct pharmacological activation of sGC with BAY 58-2667 24 hours after RB reversed, within 6 hours, the established lung injury. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological targeting of the sGC-cGMP axis could be used to ameliorate lung dysfunction in obstructive lung diseases.

  20. Therapeutic treatments of phosgene-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Alfred M; Hurt, Holcombe H

    2004-07-01

    A series of studies was performed to address treatment against the former chemical warfare edemagenic gas phosgene. Both in situ and in vivo models were used to assess the efficacy of postexposure treatment of phosgene-induced lung injury using clinically existing drugs. The degree of efficacy was judged by examining treatment effects on pulmonary edema formation (PEF) as measured by wet/dry weight (WW/DW) ratios, real-time (in situ) lung weight gain (LWG), survival rates (SR), odds ratios, and glutathione (GSH) redox states. Drugs included N-acetylcysteine (NAC), ibuprofen (IBU), aminophylline (AMIN), and isoproterenol (ISO). Using the in situ isolated perfused rabbit lung model (IPRLM), intratracheal (IT) NAC (40 mg/kg bolus) delivered 45-60 min after phosgene exposure (650 mg/m(3)) for10 min lowered pulmonary artery pressure, LWG, leukotrienes (LT) C(4)/D(4)/E(4), lipid peroxidation, and oxidized GSH. We concluded that NAC protected against phosgene-induced lung injury by acting as an antioxidant by maintaining protective levels of GSH, reducing both lipid peroxidation and production of arachidonic acid metabolites. Also in IPRLM, administration of AMIN (30 mg/kg) 80-90 min after phosgene exposure significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and perfusate LTC(4)/D(4)/E(4), reduced LWG, and prevented phosgene-induced decreases in lung tissue cAMP. These data suggest that protective mechanisms observed with AMIN involve decreased LTC(4)/D(4)/E(4) mediated pulmonary capillary permeability and attenuated lipid peroxidation. Direct antipermeability effects of AMIN-induced upregulation of cAMP on cellular contraction may also be important in protection against phosgene-induced lung injury. Posttreatment with ISO in the IPRLM by either combined intravascular (iv; infused into pulmonary artery at 24 microg/min infused) + IT (24 microg bolus) or IT route alone 50-60 min after phosgene exposure significantly lowered pulmonary artery pressure, tracheal pressure, and LWG. ISO

  1. Inhalation Lung Injury Associated with Humidifier Disinfectants in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We recently established a novel disease entity presented as progressive respiratory failure associated with the inhalation of humidifier disinfectants. In April 2011, we encountered a series of peripartum patients with complaints of respiratory distress of unknown etiology, which was an uncommon phenomenon. Accordingly, we created a multidisciplinary team comprising intensivists, radiologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). Further, we defined the disease entity and performed a case-control study, epidemiologic investigation, and animal study to determine the etiology. The study findings indicated that the lung injury outbreak was related to the inhalation of humidifier disinfectants and showed that household chemical inhalation can cause severe respiratory failure. Following the withdrawal of humidifier disinfectants from the Korean market in 2012, no such cases were reported. This tragic event is a warning that appropriate safety regulations and monitoring for potential toxic household chemicals are critical to protect public health. PMID:27822921

  2. Furosemide in the treatment of phosgene induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grainge, C; Smith, A J; Jugg, B J; Fairhall, S J; Mann, T; Perrott, R; Jenner, J; Millar, T; Rice, P

    2010-12-01

    Using previously validated methods, 16 anaesthetised large white pigs were exposed to phosgene (target inhaled dose 0.3 mg kg(-1)), established on mechanical ventilation and randomised to treatment with either nebulised furosemide (4 ml of 10 mg x ml(-1) solution) or saline control. Treatments were given at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16 and 20 hours post phosgene exposure; the animals were monitored to 24 hours following phosgene exposure. Furosemide treatment had no effect on survival, and had a deleterious effect on PaO2: FiO2 ratio between 19 and 24 hours. All other measures investigated were unaffected by treatment. Nebulised furosemide treatment following phosgene induced acute lung injury does not improve survival and worsens PaO2: FiO2 ratio. Nebulised furosemide should be avoided following phosgene exposure.

  3. Modelling primary blast lung injury: current capability and future direction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Timothy; Hulse, E; Haque, M; Kirkman, E; Hardman, J; Mahoney, P

    2017-04-01

    Primary blast lung injury frequently complicates military conflict and terrorist attacks on civilian populations. The fact that it occurs in areas of conflict or unpredictable mass casualty events makes clinical study in human casualties implausible. Research in this field is therefore reliant on the use of some form of biological or non-biological surrogate model. This article briefly reviews the modelling work undertaken in this field until now and describes the rationale behind the generation of an in silico physiological model. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Inhalation Lung Injury Associated with Humidifier Disinfectants in Adults.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jin Won; Hong, Sang Bum; Do, Kyung Hyun; Koo, Hyun Jung; Jang, Se Jin; Lee, Moo Song; Paek, Domyung; Park, Dong Uk; Lim, Chae Man; Koh, Younsuck

    2016-12-01

    We recently established a novel disease entity presented as progressive respiratory failure associated with the inhalation of humidifier disinfectants. In April 2011, we encountered a series of peripartum patients with complaints of respiratory distress of unknown etiology, which was an uncommon phenomenon. Accordingly, we created a multidisciplinary team comprising intensivists, radiologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). Further, we defined the disease entity and performed a case-control study, epidemiologic investigation, and animal study to determine the etiology. The study findings indicated that the lung injury outbreak was related to the inhalation of humidifier disinfectants and showed that household chemical inhalation can cause severe respiratory failure. Following the withdrawal of humidifier disinfectants from the Korean market in 2012, no such cases were reported. This tragic event is a warning that appropriate safety regulations and monitoring for potential toxic household chemicals are critical to protect public health.

  5. Lung vascular injury with protease infusion. Relationship to plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Cohler, L F; Saba, T M; Lewis, E P

    1985-01-01

    Fibronectin exists in a soluble form in plasma and in an insoluble form in tissues. Plasma fibronectin can modulate phagocytic function as well as incorporate into the tissue matrix where it is believed to influence microvascular integrity and tissue repair. The temporal alterations in plasma and lung lymph fibronectin were studied in relation to increased pulmonary vascular permeability induced by protease infusion. The acute sheep lung lymph fistula model was used. A 39% decrease in plasma fibronectin (control = 421 +/- 67 micrograms/ml) was observed 2.5 hours (255 +/- 43 micrograms/ml) after protease infusion. There was an elevation of lymph fibronectin early after protease infusion, followed by a progressive decline. Concomitant with the decrease in plasma fibronectin, an increase in lymph flow (QL) of greater than 200% (from a control of 6.7 +/- 1.0 ml/hr to 13.9 +/- 1.4 ml/hr) was observed within 2.5 hours. Also, there was a sustained elevation in the total protein lymph/plasma concentration (L/P) ratio, which was maximal at 2.5 hours. The transvascular protein clearance (TVPC = QL X L/P) was 4.5 +/- 0.7 ml/hr at the control period and 13.1 +/- 2.0 ml/hr by 2.5 hours. This was indicative of increased flux of protein-rich fluid across the pulmonary endothelial barrier. Lung vascular permeability stabilized after 2.5 hours as manifested by a slowly declining L/P ratio. Thus, plasma fibronectin deficiency may contribute to the etiology of increased lung vascular permeability with protease infusion. Since the progressive decline in plasma fibronectin was not reflected in a proportional increase in lymph fibronectin, plasma fibronectin may have sequestered in tissues such as the lung, or perhaps in reticuloendothelial cells during the injury phase. Whether the progressive decrease in plasma fibronectin reflects its incorporation into the endothelial barrier matrix where it may mediate stabilization of the pulmonary microvascular barrier remains to be determined

  6. Depletion of tissue plasminogen activator attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury via inhibition of neutrophil extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunge; Sharma, Ashish K.; LaPar, Damien J.; Kron, Irving L.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Liu, Yuan; Jones, David R.; Laubach, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury following lung transplantation remains a major source of early morbidity and mortality. Histologically, this inflammatory process is characterized by neutrophil infiltration and activation. We previously reported that lung IR injury was significantly attenuated in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient mice. In this study, we explored the potential role of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in a mouse lung IR injury model. As a result, tPA knockout (KO) mice were significantly protected from lung IR injury through several mechanisms. At the cellular level, tPA KO specifically blocked neutrophil extravasation into the interstitium, and abundant homotypic neutrophil aggregation (HNA) was detected in the lung microvasculature of tPA KO mice after IR. At the molecular level, inhibition of neutrophil extravasation was associated with reduced expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 mediated through the tPA/ LDL receptor-related protein/NF-κB signaling pathway, whereas increased P-selectin triggered HNA. At the functional level, tPA KO mice incurred significantly decreased vascular permeability and improved lung function following IR. Protection from lung IR injury in tPA KO mice occurs through a fibrinolysis-independent mechanism. These results suggest that tPA could serve as an important therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of acute IR injury after lung transplantation. PMID:21378024

  7. Methylene blue attenuates ischemia--reperfusion injury in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Marcus da Matta; Pazetti, Rogerio; Almeida, Francine Maria de; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Parra, Edwin Roger; Silva, Laís Pereira da; Vieira, Rodolfo de Paula; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is one of the principal obstacles for the lung transplantation (LTx) success. Several strategies have been adopted to minimize the effects of IRI in lungs, including ex vivo conditioning of the grafts and the use of antioxidant drugs, such as methylene blue (MB). We hypothesized that MB could minimize the effects of IRI in a LTx rodent model. Forty rats were divided into four groups (n = 10) according to treatment (saline solution or MB) and graft cold ischemic time (3 or 6 h). All animals underwent unilateral LTx. Recipients received 2 mL of saline or MB intraperitoneally before transplantation. After 2 h of reperfusion, arterial blood and exhaled nitric oxide samples were collected and bronchoalveolar lavage performed. Then animals were euthanized, and histopathology analysis as well as cell counts and cytokine levels measurements in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were performed. There was a significant decrease in exhaled nitric oxide, neutrophils, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in MB-treated animals. PaO2 and uric acid levels were higher in MB group. MB was able in attenuating IRI in this LTx model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  9. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  10. High Bias Gas Flows Increase Lung Injury in the Ventilated Preterm Lamb

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Katinka P.; Kuschel, Carl A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Bertram, Jean; McKnight, Sue; Peachey, Shirley E.; Zahra, Valerie A.; Flecknoe, Sharon J.; Oliver, Mark H.; Wallace, Megan J.; Bloomfield, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation of preterm babies increases survival but can also cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), leading to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). It is not known whether shear stress injury from gases flowing into the preterm lung during ventilation contributes to VILI. Methods Preterm lambs of 131 days’ gestation (term = 147 d) were ventilated for 2 hours with a bias gas flow of 8 L/min (n = 13), 18 L/min (n = 12) or 28 L/min (n = 14). Physiological parameters were measured continuously and lung injury was assessed by measuring mRNA expression of early injury response genes and by histological analysis. Control lung tissue was collected from unventilated age-matched fetuses. Data were analysed by ANOVA with a Tukey post-hoc test when appropriate. Results High bias gas flows resulted in higher ventilator pressures, shorter inflation times and decreased ventilator efficiency. The rate of rise of inspiratory gas flow was greatest, and pulmonary mRNA levels of the injury markers, EGR1 and CTGF, were highest in lambs ventilated with bias gas flows of 18 L/min. High bias gas flows resulted in increased cellular proliferation and abnormal deposition of elastin, collagen and myofibroblasts in the lung. Conclusions High ventilator bias gas flows resulted in increased lung injury, with up-regulation of acute early response genes and increased histological lung injury. Bias gas flows may, therefore, contribute to VILI and BPD. PMID:23056572

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Injury Is Independent of Serum Vitamin D Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Klaff, Lindy S.; Gill, Sean E.; Wisse, Brent E.; Mittelsteadt, Kristen; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Chen, Peter; Altemeier, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is increasing in incidence around the world. Vitamin D, a fat-soluble vitamin, has documented effects on the innate and adaptive immune system, including macrophage and T regulatory (Treg) cell function. Since Treg cells are important in acute lung injury resolution, we hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency increases the severity of injury and delays injury resolution in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury. Vitamin D deficient mice were generated, using C57BL/6 mice, through diet modification and limited exposure to ultraviolet light. At 8 weeks of age, vitamin D deficient and sufficient mice received 2.5 g/kg of LPS or saline intratracheal. At 1 day, 3 days and 10 days, mice were anesthetized and lung elastance measured. Mice were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs and serum were collected. Ex vivo neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated, using neutrophils from vitamin D sufficient and deficient mice exposed to the chemoattractants, KC/CXCL1 and C5a, and to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from LPS-exposed mice. We found no difference in the degree of lung injury. Leukocytes were mildly decreased in the bronchoalveolar fluid of vitamin D deficient mice at 1 day. Ex-vivo, neutrophils from vitamin D deficient mice showed impaired chemotaxis to KC but not to C5a. Vitamin D deficiency modestly impairs neutrophil chemotaxis; however, it does not affect lung injury or its resolution in an LPS model of acute lung injury. PMID:23185294

  12. Evaluation report on the causal association between humidifier disinfectants and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES As of November 2011, the Korean government recalled and banned humidifier disinfectants (HDs) from the market, because four case-control studies and one retrospective epidemiological study proved the association between HDs and lung injury of unknown cause. The report reviewed the causal role of HDs in lung injury based on scientific evidences. METHODS A careful examination on the association between the HDs and lung injury was based on the criteria of causality inference by Hill and the US Surgeon General Expert Committee. RESULTS We found that all the evidences on the causality fulfilled the criteria (strength of association, consistency, specificity, temporality, biologic gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, consideration of alternative explanations, and cessation of exposure), which proved the unknown cause lung injury reported in 2011 was caused by the HDs. In particular, there was no single reported case of lung injury since the ban in selling HDs in November 2011 as well as before the HDs were sold in markets. CONCLUSIONS Although only a few epidemiological studies in Korea have evaluated the association between lung injury and the use of HDs, those studies contributed to proving the strong association between the use of the HDs and lung injury, based on scientific evidence. PMID:27733036

  13. Evaluation report on the causal association between humidifier disinfectants and lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mina; Lee, Soon Young; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Park, Hyesook; Sheen, Seungsoo; Cheong, Hae Kwan; Choi, Bo Youl

    2016-01-01

    As of November 2011, the Korean government recalled and banned humidifier disinfectants (HDs) from the market, because four case-control studies and one retrospective epidemiological study proved the association between HDs and lung injury of unknown cause. The report reviewed the causal role of HDs in lung injury based on scientific evidences. A careful examination on the association between the HDs and lung injury was based on the criteria of causality inference by Hill and the US Surgeon General Expert Committee. We found that all the evidences on the causality fulfilled the criteria (strength of association, consistency, specificity, temporality, biologic gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, consideration of alternative explanations, and cessation of exposure), which proved the unknown cause lung injury reported in 2011 was caused by the HDs. In particular, there was no single reported case of lung injury since the ban in selling HDs in November 2011 as well as before the HDs were sold in markets. Although only a few epidemiological studies in Korea have evaluated the association between lung injury and the use of HDs, those studies contributed to proving the strong association between the use of the HDs and lung injury, based on scientific evidence.

  14. Red blood cells augment transport of reactive metabolites of monocrotaline from liver to lung in isolated and tandem liver and lung preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.C.; Lame, M.W.; Morin, D.; Wilson, D.W.; Segall, H.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that causes pulmonary hypertension in rats by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. MCT is thought to be activated in the liver to a reactive intermediate that is transported to the lung where it causes endothelial injury. The authors previous pharmacokinetic work demonstrated significant sequestration of radioactivity in red blood cells (RBCs) of rats treated with (14C)MCT. To determine whether this RBC sequestration might be important in the transport of reactive MCT metabolites, they compared the effect of inclusion of RBCs in the perfusion buffer on the extent of covalent binding of (14C)MCT to rat lungs in tandem liver-lung preparations. The potential effect of RBCs in stabilizing reactive intermediates was evaluated by preperfusion of isolated liver preparations with (14C)MCT with and without RBCs, separation and washing of the RBC fraction, and subsequent (90 min later) perfusion of washed RBCs or buffer alone in isolated perfused lungs. Covalent binding to lung tissues was determined by exhaustive methanol/chloroform extractions of unbound label from homogenized lung tissue followed by scintillation counting of residual 14C. Covalent binding was expressed as picomole MCT molecular weight equivalents/mg protein. Comparison of the relative capability of these isolated organ preparations for conversion of MCT to polar metabolites was done by extraction and HPLC analysis of perfusate at the end of the experiment. Isolated livers converted 65-85% of MCT to polar metabolites compared with less than 5% conversion in the isolated lungs. Inclusion of RBCs in the buffer of tandem lung liver preparations perfused with 400 microM (14C)MCT increased the covalent binding to the lung from 97 {plus minus} 25 (buffer alone) to 182 {plus minus} 36 (buffer + RBC) pmol/mg protein.

  15. Does airway pressure release ventilation alter lung function after acute lung injury?

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Smith, D B

    1995-03-01

    During airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), tidal ventilation occurs between the increased lung volume established by the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the relaxation volume of the respiratory system. Concern has been expressed that release of CPAP may cause unstable alveoli to collapse and not reinflate when airway pressure is restored. To compare pulmonary mechanics and oxygenation in animals with acute lung injury during CPAP with and without APRV. Experimental, subject-controlled, randomized crossover investigation. Anesthesiology research laboratory, University of South Florida College of Medicine Health Sciences Center. Ten pigs of either sex. Acute lung injury was induced with an intravenous infusion of oleic acid (72 micrograms/kg) followed by randomly alternated 60-min trials of CPAP with and without APRV. Continuous positive airway pressure was titrated to produce an arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation of at least 95% (FIO2 = 0.21). Airway pressure release ventilation was arbitrarily cycled to atmospheric pressure 10 times per minute with a release time titrated to coincide with attainment of respiratory system relaxation volume. Cardiac output, arterial and mixed venous pH, blood gas tensions, hemoglobin concentration and oxyhemoglobin saturation, central venous pressure, pulmonary and systemic artery pressures, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, airway gas flow, airway pressure, and pleural pressure were measured. Tidal volume (VT), dynamic lung compliance, intrapulmonary venous admixture, pulmonary vascular resistance, systemic vascular resistance, oxygen delivery, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction ratio were calculated. Central venous infusion of oleic acid reduced PaO2 from 94 +/- 4 mm Hg to 52 +/- 9 mm Hg (mean +/- 1 SD) (p < 0.001) and dynamic lung compliance from 40 +/- 6 mL/cm H2O to 20 +/- 6 mL/cm H2O (p = 0.002) and increased venous admixture from 13 +/- 3% to 32 +/- 7% (p < 0.001) in ten swine

  16. Macrophages mediate lung inflammation in a mouse model of ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Christopher; Andres-Hernando, Ana; McMahan, Rachel H.; Ahuja, Nilesh; He, Zhibin; Rivard, Chris J.; Edelstein, Charles Louis; Barthel, Lea; Janssen, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Serum IL-6 is increased in acute kidney injury (AKI) and inhibition of IL-6 reduces AKI-mediated lung inflammation. We hypothesized that circulating monocytes produce IL-6 and that alveolar macrophages mediate lung inflammation after AKI via chemokine (CXCL1) production. To investigate systemic and alveolar macrophages in lung injury after AKI, sham operation or 22 min of renal pedicle clamping (AKI) was performed in three experimental settings: 1) systemic macrophage depletion via diphtheria toxin (DT) injection to CD11b-DTR transgenic mice, 2) DT injection to wild-type mice, and 3) alveolar macrophage depletion via intratracheal (IT) liposome-encapsulated clodronate (LEC) administration to wild-type mice. In mice with AKI and systemic macrophage depletion (CD11b-DTR transgenic administered DT) vs. vehicle-treated AKI, blood monocytes and lung interstitial macrophages were reduced, renal function was similar, serum IL-6 was increased, lung inflammation was improved, lung CXCL1 was reduced, and lung capillary leak was increased. In wild-type mice with AKI administered DT vs. vehicle, serum IL-6 was increased. In mice with AKI and alveolar macrophage depletion (IT-LEC) vs. AKI with normal alveolar macrophage content, blood monocytes and lung interstitial macrophages were similar, alveolar macrophages were reduced, renal function was similar, lung inflammation was improved, lung CXCL1 was reduced, and lung capillary leak was increased. In conclusion, administration of DT in AKI is proinflammatory, limiting the use of the DTR-transgenic model to study systemic effects of AKI. Mice with AKI and either systemic mononuclear phagocyte depletion or alveolar macrophage depletion had reduced lung inflammation and lung CXCL1, but increased lung capillary leak; thus, mononuclear phagocytes mediate lung inflammation, but they protect against lung capillary leak after ischemic AKI. Since macrophage activation and chemokine production are key events in the development of acute

  17. Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) response and regulation during acute and chronic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Hansen, Soren

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in BAL increased within 6 h, peaked at 51 h (4,518 ng/ml), and returned to base level at 99 h (612 ng/ml). Serum levels of SP-D increased immediately (8.6 ng/ml), peaked at 51 h (16 ng/ml), and returned to base levels at 99 h (3.8 ng/ml). In a subacute bleomycin inflammation model, SP-D levels were 4,625 and 367 ng/ml in BAL and serum, respectively, 8 days after exposure. In a chronic Pc inflammation model, the highest level of SP-D was observed 6 weeks after inoculation, with BAL and serum levels of 1,868 and 335 ng/ml, respectively. We conclude that serum levels of SP-D increase during lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically. The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation.

  18. How Useful is Extravascular Lung Water Measurement in Managing Lung Injury in Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Pradhan, Debasis; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Dey, Samarjit; Chhunthang, Daniala; Handique, Akash; Barman, Angkita; Yunus, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    The primary goal of septic shock management is optimization of organ perfusion, often at the risk of overloading the interstitium and causing pulmonary edema. The conventionally used end points of resuscitation do not generally include volumetric parameters such as extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI). This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of EVLWI and PVPI by calculating their correlation with the severity of lung injury. This prospective observational study included twenty mechanically ventilated critically ill patients with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score (APACHE II) >20. EVLWI and PVPI were measured using transpulmonary thermodilution, and simultaneously, PaO2:FiO2 ratio, alveolar-arterial gradient of oxygen (AaDO2), and chest radiograph scores from two radiologists were obtained. The correlation of EVLWI and PVPI with chest radiograph scores, PaO2:FiO2 ratio, and AaDO2 were calculated. The inter-observer agreement between the two radiologists was tested using kappa test. EVLWI and PVPI correlated modestly with PaO2:FiO2 (r = -0.32, P = 0.0004; r = -0.39, P = 0.0001). There was a better correlation of EVLWI and PVPI with PaO2:FiO2 ratio (r = -0.71, P < 0.0001; r = -0.58, P = 0.0001) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) subgroup. The EVLWI values correlated significantly with corresponding chest radiograph scores (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001 for observer 1 and r = 0.68, P < 0.0001 for observer 2). EVLWI and PVPI may have a prognostic significance in the assessment of lung injury in septic shock patients with ARDS. Further research is required to reveal the usefulness of EVLWI as an end point of fluid resuscitation in the management of septic shock with ARDS.

  19. Subcutaneous administration of bovine superoxide dismutase protects lungs from radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Antonic, Vlado; Rabbani, Zahid N; Jackson, Isabel L; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether single administration of the antioxidant enzyme bovine superoxide dismutase (bSOD) after radiation therapy (RT) mitigates development of pulmonary toxicity in rats. Female F344 rats (n = 60) were divided among six experimental groups: (1) RT, single dose of 21 Gy to the right hemithorax; (2) RT + 5 mg/kg bSOD; (3) RT + 15 mg/kg bSOD; (4) No RT; (5) sham RT + 5 mg/kg bSOD; and (6) sham RT + 15 mg/kg bSOD. A single subcutaneous injection of bSOD (5 or 15 mg/kg) was administered 24 h post-radiation. The effects of bSOD on radiation-induced lung injury were assessed by measurement of body weight, breathing frequency, and histopathological changes. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate oxidative stress (8-OHdG(+), NOX4(+), nitrotyrosine(+), and 4HNE(+) cells), macrophage activation (ED1(+)), and expression of profibrotic transforming growth factor-β or TGF-β in irradiated tissue. Radiation led to an increase in all the evaluated parameters. Treatment with 15 mg/kg bSOD significantly decreased levels of all the evaluated parameters including tissue damage and breathing frequency starting 6 weeks post-radiation. Animals treated with 5 mg/kg bSOD trended toward a suppression of radiation-induced lung damage but did not reach statistical significance. The single application of bSOD (15 mg/kg) ameliorates radiation-induced lung injury through suppression of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species or ROS/RNS-dependent tissue damage.

  20. Tanshinone IIA attenuates seawater aspiration-induced lung injury by inhibiting macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Dun-Quan; Li, Wang-Ping; Xu, Min; Li, Jia-Huan; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Fan, Qi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Mu, De-Guang; Dong, Hai-Ying; Wang, Yan-Xia; Nan, Yan-Dong; Li, Zhi-Chao; Jin, Fa-Guang

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation takes responsibility for the seawater aspiration-induced lung injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) can protect lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in mice through the inhibition of inflammation, but it is not reported whether TIIA have a protective effect on lung injury induced by seawater aspiration. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays an important role in acute lung injury. In this study, we observed the effect of TIIA on the seawater aspiration-induced lung injury and the role of MIF in it. Seawater was aspirated into trachea of rats to make the lung injury model. TIIA was administered to investigate its beneficial effect on seawater-induced acute lung injury. The results showed that seawater aspiration led to hyoxemia, pulmonary edema, neutrophil infiltration, and lung histopathologic changes, with the elevated MIF expression in the lung tissues and plasma. However, these changes were attenuated by TIIA. In macrophage cells we also demonstrated that TIIA could inhibit MIF expression, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced by seawater. Besides, pretreatment with (S,R)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid (ISO-1), the MIF antagonist, elevated NF-κB and cytokines induced by seawater were also reduced markedly. Furthermore, rMIF treatment alone increased the phosphorylation level of NF-κB and release of cytokines, which was almost abolished by TIIA. Taken together, our results suggested that TIIA exert a protective effect on the seawater aspiration-induced lung injury partly through downregulation of MIF and the subsequent NF-κB activity, as well as expression of IL-6 and TNF-α.

  1. Induction of cellular antioxidant defense by amifostine improves ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Fu, Panfeng; Murley, Jeffrey S; Grdina, David J; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2011-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that preconditioning animals with amifostine improves ventilator-induced lung injury via induction of antioxidant defense enzymes. Mechanical ventilation at high tidal volume induces reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress in the lung, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Amifostine attenuates oxidative stress and improves lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury by acting as a direct scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This study tested effects of chronic amifostine administration on parameters of oxidative stress, lung barrier function, and inflammation associated with ventilator-induced lung injury. Randomized and controlled laboratory investigation in mice and cell culture. University laboratory. C57BL/6J mice. Mice received once-daily dosing with amifostine (10-100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) 3 days consecutively before high tidal volume ventilation (30 mL/kg, 4 hrs) at day 4. Pulmonary endothelial cell cultures were exposed to pathologic cyclic stretching (18% equibiaxial stretch) and thrombin in a previously verified two-hit model of in vitro ventilator-induced lung injury. Three-day amifostine preconditioning before high tidal volume attenuated high tidal volume-induced protein and cell accumulation in the alveolar space judged by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, decreased Evans Blue dye extravasation into the lung parenchyma, decreased biochemical parameters of high tidal volume-induced tissue oxidative stress, and inhibited high tidal volume-induced activation of redox-sensitive stress kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B inflammatory cascade. These protective effects of amifostine were associated with increased superoxide dismutase 2 expression and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities in the animal and endothelial cell culture models of ventilator-induced lung injury. Amifostine preconditioning activates lung tissue

  2. Effect on extrapulmonary sepsis-induced acute lung injury by hemoperfusion with neutral microporous resin column.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhao; Wang, Si-rong; Yang, Zi-li; Liu, Ji-yun

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neutral microporous resin hemoperfusion on oxygenation improvement, removal of inflammatory cytokines in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage, and mortality in acute lung injury induced by extrapulmonary sepsis. Forty-six patients with acute lung injury induced by extrapulmonary sepsis were randomized to HA type hemoperfusion treatment (N=25) or standard therapy (N=21). Those undergoing hemoperfusion treatment received HA330 hemoperfusion. We measured the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1, and the following parameters were compared between the control group and the hemoperfusion group on days 0, 3 and 7: lung injury measurements (arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen ratio, lung injury score, chest X-ray score); interstitial edema of lung (extravascular lung water). Duration of mechanical ventilation, hospital, 28-day, and intensive care unit mortality were also observed. Patients treated with HA hemoperfusion showed a significant removal of plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage TNF-α and IL-1 over time while in the study. Patients in the HA group also demonstrated not only significant improvement of PaO2 /FiO2 , but also decreased Lung Injury Score and chest X-ray score at days 3 and 7. Furthermore, the measurements of the arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen ratio, lung injury score and extravascular lung water (EVLWI) significantly correlated with and the concentration of cytokines in the plasma (all P<0.05). The HA hemoperfusion treatment group had a significant reduction in duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and intensive care unit mortality. Significant removal of inflammatory cytokines from circulation and lung by hemoperfusion treatment using the HA type cartridge may contribute to the improvement of lung injury and intensive care unit outcome in extrapulmonary septic patients. © 2012 The Authors. Therapeutic

  3. Glutathione reductase targeted to type II cells does not protect mice from hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Heyob, Kathryn M; Rogers, Lynette K; Welty, Stephen E

    2008-12-01

    Exposure of the lung epithelium to reactive oxygen species without adequate antioxidant defenses leads to airway inflammation, and may contribute to lung injury. Glutathione peroxidase catalyzes the reduction of peroxides by oxidation of glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which can in turn be reduced by glutathione reductase (GR). Increased levels of GSSG have been shown to correlate negatively with outcome after oxidant exposure, and increased GR activity has been protective against hyperoxia in lung epithelial cells in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that increased GR expression targeted to type II alveolar epithelial cells would improve outcome in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Human GR with a mitochondrial targeting sequence was targeted to mouse type II cells using the SPC promoter. Two transgenic lines were identified, with Line 2 having higher lung GR activities than Line 1. Both transgenic lines had lower lung GSSG levels and higher GSH/GSSG ratios than wild-type. Six-week-old wild-type and transgenic mice were exposed to greater than 95% O2 or room air (RA) for 84 hours. After exposure, Line 2 mice had higher right lung/body weight ratios and lavage protein concentrations than wild-type mice, and both lines 1 and 2 had lower GSSG levels than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GSSG accumulation in the lung may not play a significant role in the development of hyperoxic lung injury, or that compensatory responses to unregulated GR expression render animals more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury.

  4. Effect of Ergothioneine on Acute Lung Injury and Inflammation in Cytokine Insufflated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Repine, John E.; Elkins, Nancy D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), the most severe form of Acute Lung Injury (ALI), is a highly-fatal, diffuse non-cardiogenic edematous lung disorder. The pathogenesis of ARDS is unknown but lung inflammation and lung oxidative stress are likely contributing factors. Since no specific pharmacologic intervention exists for ARDS, our objective was to determine the effect of treatment with ergothioneine---a safe agent with multiple anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties on the development of lung injury and inflammation in rats insufflated with cytokines found in lung lavages of ARDS patients. Method Sprague-Dawley rats (3-10/group) were given 15 mg/kg or 150 mg/kg L-ergothioneine intravenously 1 hour before or 18 hours after cytokine (IL-1 and IFNγ) insufflation. Lung injury (lavage LDH levels) and lung inflammation (lavage neutrophil numbers) were measured 24 hours after cytokine insufflation. Results Ergothioneine pre- and post- treatment generally decreased lung injury and lung inflammation in cytokine insufflated rats. Conclusion Ergothioneine should be considered for additional testing as a potential therapy for treating and preventing ARDS. PMID:22197759

  5. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation.

  6. [Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): an unrecognised pathology].

    PubMed

    Moalic, V; Vaillant, C; Ferec, C

    2005-03-01

    Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but potentially severe complication of blood transfusion, manifested by pulmonary oedema, fever and hypotension. The signs and symptoms are often attributed to other clinical aspects of a patient's condition, and therefore, TRALI may go unrecognised. It has been estimated to be the third cause of transfusion related mortality, so it should be better diagnosed. Cases are related to multiple blood units, such as white blood cells, red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets or intravenous immunoglobulins. Physiopathology of TRALI is poorly understood, and still controversial. It is often due to an immunological conflict between transfused plasma antibodies and recipients' blood cells. These antibodies are either HLA (class I or II) or granulocyte-specific. They appear to act as mediators, which result in granulocytes aggregation, activation and micro vascular pulmonary injury. Lipids or cytokines in blood units are also involved as TRALI priming agents. Diagnosis is based on antibody screening in blood components and on specific-antigen detection in the recipient. The screening of anti-HLA or anti-granulocytes is recommended as part of prevention for female donors who had been pregnant. Preventative measures should also include leucoreduction and measures to decrease the amount of priming agents in blood components. In this article, we summarise what is known about TRALI, and we focus attention on unanswered questions and controversial issues related to TRALI.

  7. Mustard Vesicant-induced Lung Injury: Advances in Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant. PMID:27212445

  8. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant.

  9. Lung injury after cigarette smoking is particle related.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rahul G; Ghio, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    The specific component responsible and the mechanistic pathway for increased human morbidity and mortality after cigarette smoking are yet to be delineated. We propose that 1) injury and disease following cigarette smoking are associated with exposure to and retention of particles produced during smoking and 2) the biological effects of particles associated with cigarette smoking share a single mechanism of injury with all particles. Smoking one cigarette exposes the human respiratory tract to between 15,000 and 40,000 μg particulate matter; this is a carbonaceous product of an incomplete combustion. There are numerous human exposures to other particles, and these vary widely in composition, absolute magnitude, and size of the particle. Individuals exposed to all these particles share a common clinical presentation with a loss of pulmonary function, increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness, pathologic changes of emphysema and fibrosis, and comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cancers. Mechanistically, all particle exposures produce an oxidative stress, which is associated with a series of reactions, including an activation of kinase cascades and transcription factors, release of inflammatory mediators, and apoptosis. If disease associated with cigarette smoking is recognized to be particle related, then certain aspects of the clinical presentation can be predicted; this would include worsening of pulmonary function and progression of pathological changes and comorbidity (eg, emphysema and carcinogenesis) after smoking cessation since the particle is retained in the lung and the exposure continues.

  10. Glutathione deficient C57BL/6J mice are not sensitized to ozone-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Elisabet; Wesselkamper, Scott C; Shertzer, Howard G; Leikauf, George D; Dalton, Timothy P; Chen, Ying

    2010-05-28

    In this study we examined the role of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in pulmonary susceptibility to ozone toxicity, utilizing GSH deficient C57BL/6J mice that lack the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Gclm(-/-) knockout mice had 70% GSH depletion in the lung. Gclm(+/+) wild-type and Gclm(-/-) mice were exposed to either 0.3 ppm ozone or filtered air for 48h. Ozone-induced lung hyperpermeability, as measured by total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was surprisingly lower in Gclm(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Lung hyperpermeability did not correlate with the degree of neutrophilia or with inflammatory gene expression. Pulmonary antioxidant response to ozone, assessed by increased mRNA levels of metallothionein 1 and 2, alpha-tocopherol transporter protein, and solute carrier family 23 member 2 (sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter) was greater in Gclm(-/-) mice than in Gclm(+/+) mice. These results suggest that compensatory augmentation of antioxidant defenses in Gclm(-/-) mice may confer increased resistance to ozone-induced lung injury.

  11. Management of phosgene-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grainge, Christopher; Rice, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Phosgene is a substance of immense importance in the chemical industry. Because of its widespread industrial use, there is potential for small-scale exposures within the workplace, large-scale accidental release, or even deliberate release into a built-up area. This review aims to examine all published studies concerning potential treatments for phosgene-induced acute lung injury and incorporate them into up-to-date clinical guidance. In addition, it aims to contrast the approaches when dealing with small numbers of patients known to be exposed (possibly with dose information) with the presentation of a large and heterogeneous population of casualties following a significant industrial accident or deliberate release; no published guidelines have specifically addressed this second problem. PubMed and Embase were searched for all available years till April 2010 and 584 papers were identified and considered. Because of the nature of the injury, there have been no human trials of patients exposed to phosgene. Multiple small and large animal studies have been performed to examine potential treatments of phosgene-induced acute lung injury, but many of these used isolated organ models, pretreatment regimens, or clinically improbable doses. Recent studies in large animals using both realistic time frames and dosing regimens have improved our knowledge, but clinical guidance remains based on incomplete data. Management of a small-scale, confirmed exposure. In the circumstance of a small-scale, confirmed industrial release where a few individuals are exposed and present rapidly, an intravenous bolus of high-dose corticosteroid (e.g., methylprednisolone 1 g) should be considered, although there are no experimental data to support this recommendation. The evidence is that there is no benefit from nebulized steroid even when administered 1 h after exposure, or methylprednisolone if administered intravenously ≥6 h after exposure. Consideration should also be given to

  12. Effect of partial liquid ventilation and nebulized perfluorocarbon on CT lung density distribution: randomized controlled study of experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K P; Stenson, B J; Drummond, G B

    2005-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) liquid can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury. How PFC aerosol is distributed in the lung is unknown. We induced lung injury in rabbits with saline lavage, followed by mechanical ventilation in the supine position. The animals were divided into three groups: a control group, a group treated with partial liquid ventilation and a group given nebulized perfluorocarbon (PF 5080). We made CT image slices of the excised lungs. In the apical, middle and caudal slices we defined three regions of interest, from anterior to posterior, and noted the mean attenuation of each area. We also studied two rabbits which had not received lung injury or mechanical ventilation. Group means were different between the normal rabbits and all three study groups. There was a difference between the control and partial liquid ventilation groups, and between the partial liquid ventilation and nebulized groups, but no difference between the nebulized and control groups. Within each treatment group, there was no regional difference in the distribution of density. PF 5080 is not deposited in large amounts by aerosol. Less PFC was found in the lungs after partial liquid ventilation than expected. Within treatment groups, lung densities indicate less gravitational and regional differences than found in other studies.

  13. Mice Deficient in the Gene for Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 Are More Susceptible Than Wild-Type to Hyperoxic Lung Injury: Evidence for Protective Role of CYP1A1 Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Wang, Gangduo; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Shivanna, Binoy; Welty, Stephen E.; Barrios, Roberto; Khan,  M. Firoze; Nebert, Daniel W.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to acute lung injury in diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 has been shown to modulate hyperoxic lung injury. The mechanistic role(s) of CYP1A1 in hyperoxic lung injury in vivo is not known. In this investigation, we hypothesized that Cyp1a1(–/–) mice would be more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than wild-type (WT) mice, and that the protective role of CYP1A1 is in part due to CYP1A1-mediated decrease in the levels of reactive oxygen species-mediated lipid hydroperoxides, e.g., F2-isoprostanes/isofurans, leading to attenuation of oxidative damage. Eight- to ten-week-old male WT (C57BL/6J) or Cyp1a1(–/–) mice were exposed to hyperoxia (>95% O2) or room air for 24–72 h. The Cyp1a1(–/–) mice were more susceptible to oxygen-mediated lung damage and inflammation than WT mice, as evidenced by increased lung weight/body weight ratio, lung injury, neutrophil infiltration, and augmented expression of IL-6. Hyperoxia for 24–48 h induced CYP1A expression at the mRNA, protein, and enzyme levels in liver and lung of WT mice. Pulmonary F2-isoprostane and isofuran levels were elevated in WT mice after hyperoxia for 24 h. On the other hand, Cyp1a1(–/–) mice showed higher levels after 48–72 h of hyperoxia exposure compared to WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that CYP1A1 protects against hyperoxic lung injury by decreasing oxidative stress. Future research could lead to the development of novel strategies for prevention and/or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24893714

  14. The serpentine path to a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of acute inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Comroe lecture on which this review is based described my research path during the past 45 years, beginning with studies of oxidant stress (hyperoxia) and eventuating in the discovery of a synthetic inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activity (called MJ33) that prevents acute lung injury in mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide. In between were studies of lung ischemia, lung surfactant metabolism, the protein peroxiredoxin 6 and its phospholipase A2 activity, and mechanisms for NADPH oxidase activation. These seemingly unrelated research activities provided the nexus for identification of a novel target and a potentially novel therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24744383

  15. Propofol attenuates oxidant-induced acute lung injury in an isolated perfused rabbit-lung model.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Masato; Nishida, Osamu; Nakamura, Fujio; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Some animal studies suggest that free radical scavengers inhibit the onset of oxidant-induced ALI. Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is chemically similar to phenol-based free radical scavengers such as the endogenous antioxidant vitamin E. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have suggested that propofol has antioxidant potential. We hypothesized that propofol may attenuate ALI by acting as a free-radical scavenger. We investigated the effects of propofol on oxidant-induced ALI induced by purine and xanthine oxidase (XO), in isolated perfused rabbit lung, in two series of experiments. In series 1, we examined the relationship between the severity of ALI and the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In series 2, we evaluated the effects of propofol on attenuating ALI and the dose dependence of these effects. The lungs were perfused for 90 min, and we evaluated the effects on the severity of ALI by monitoring the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa), and the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure (Ppc). In series 1, treatment with catalase (an H2O2 scavenger) prior to the addition of purine and XO resulted in complete prevention of ALI, suggesting that H2O2 may be involved closely in the pathogenesis of ALI. In series 2, pretreatment with propofol at concentrations in excess of 0.5 mM significantly inhibited the increases in the Kfc values, and that in excess of 0.75 mM significantly inhibited the increase in the Ppa values. Propofol attenuates oxidant-induced ALI in an isolated perfused rabbit lung model, probably due to its antioxidant action.

  16. Decreased lung compliance increases preload dynamic tests in a pediatric acute lung injury model.

    PubMed

    Erranz, Benjamín; Díaz, Franco; Donoso, Alejandro; Salomón, Tatiana; Carvajal, Cristóbal; Torres, María Fernanda; Cruces, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Preload dynamic tests, pulse pressure variation (PPV) and stroke volume variation (SVV) have emerged as powerful tools to predict response to fluid administration. The influence of factors other than preload in dynamic preload test is currently poorly understood in pediatrics. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of tidal volume (VT) on PPV and SVV in the context of normal and reduced lung compliance in a piglet model. Twenty large-white piglets (5.2±0.4kg) were anesthetized, paralyzed and monitored with pulse contour analysis. PPV and SVV were recorded during mechanical ventilation with a VT of 6 and 12mL/kg (low and high VT, respectively), both before and after tracheal instillation of polysorbate 20. Before acute lung injury (ALI) induction, modifications of VT did not significantly change PPV and SVV readings. After ALI, PPV and SVV were significantly greater during ventilation with a high VT compared to a low VT (PPV increased from 8.9±1.2 to 12.4±1.1%, and SVV from 8.5±1.0 to 12.7±1.2%, both P<0.01). This study found that a high VT and reduced lung compliance due to ALI increase preload dynamic tests, with a greater influence of the latter. In subjects with ALI, lung compliance should be considered when interpreting the preload dynamic tests. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. CXCR4 Blockade Attenuates Hyperoxia Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Shelley; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Suguihara, Cleide; Young, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) modulate the inflammatory response. Whether antagonism of CXCR4 will alleviate lung inflammation in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury is unknown. Objective To determine whether CXCR4 antagonism would attenuate lung injury in rodents with experimental BPD by decreasing pulmonary inflammation. Methods Newborn rats exposed to normoxia (RA) or hyperoxia (FiO2=0.9) from postnatal day 2 (P2)-P16 were randomized to receive the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 or placebo (PL) from P5 to P15. Lung alveolarization, angiogenesis, and inflammation were evaluated at P16. Results As compared to RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had a decrease in alveolarization, reduced lung vascular density and increased lung inflammation. In contrast, AMD3100-treated hyperoxic pups had improved alveolarization and increased angiogenesis. This improvement in lung structure was accompanied by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid macrophage and neutrophil count and reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion CXCR4 antagonism decreases lung inflammation and improves alveolar as well as vascular structure in neonatal rats with experimental BPD. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate lung injury in preterm infants with BPD. PMID:25825119

  18. Clusterin protects the lung from leukocyte-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R; Fiedler, Fritz; Braun, Philipp; Stehr, Sebastian N; Bödeker, Hans; Koch, Thea

    2003-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional 75- to 80-kDa glycoprotein that is upregulated during cellular stress and might represent a defense mechanism during local cellular damage. Mechanisms discussed are antiapoptotic, antioxidative, and anticomplement properties as well as chaperone-like features protecting stressed proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate potential protective effects of CLU on pulmonary vasculature after in situ PMN activation in isolated rabbit lungs. The experiments were performed on 24 isolated and ventilated rabbit lungs that were perfused with 200 mL of Krebs-Henseleit-10% blood buffer with a constant flow of 150 mL/min in a recirculating system. It was tested whether pretreatment with CLU (2.5 microg/ml; n = 8) or catalase (CAT, 5000 U/ml; n = 8) before N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP; 10(-8) M) injection influenced pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) peak airway pressures (PAW) and edema formation as compared with controls (n = 8). Baseline values of PAP were 9-11 mmHg and PAW 11-13 cm H2O. Application of fMLP resulted in an acute significant (P < 0.01) increase of PAP (48 +/- 29 mmHg) within 2 min in the control group and PAW increased to 35 +/- 7 cm H2O within 30 min. Pretreatment with CLU completely suppressed the PAP and PAW response as a result of the fMLP challenge (P < 0.001), whereas a transient PAW increase up to 27 +/- 15 mmHg was observed after CAT. Complement factor C3a release was suppressed by CAT, whereas CLU blocked the complement cascade at the level of C5b-9 formation. Moreover, generation of thromboxane A(2) was reduced after CLU and CAT. Lung edema occurred in the fMLP group but was absent (P < 0.001) after CLU and CAT treatment. Both CLU and CAT prevented fMLP-induced lung injury. Stabilizing effects of CLU, point towards complement regulating features at the level of the terminal complement sequence. Elevated levels of CLU during inflammation could reflect a compensatory organ protective mechanism. Further studies are

  19. Amelioration of superoxide dismutase on ventilator-induced lung injury by suppressing leukocyte in the lungs and systemic circulation.

    PubMed

    Su, Chien-Ling; Du, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lee, Hui-Ling; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jiun-; Wang, David

    2013-08-31

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a free radical scavenger and a broad-spectrum antioxidant. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects have recently been noted. We studied the effects of this antioxidant on lung damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using 8- to 12-wk-old Sprange-Dawley rats (n = 40). Animals were randomized and evenly divided into two experimental groups, low tidal volume (V(T)) ventilation (V(T) = 9 ml/kg) and high V(T) ventilation (V(T) = 28 ml/kg). Each group was evenly divided into two subgroups: ten animals were treated with superoxide dismutase (SOD; 10,000 U/kg i.v., 2 h prior to the ventilation) and the rests were treated with vehicle. Lung injury was evaluated by histological examination, and cells counts of red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) in the alveoli and the septal wall thickness in lung tissues and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The lung permeability was assessed by the wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D), lung weight to body weight ratio (LW/BW) and protein concentration in broncholavage fluid (BALF). Levels of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the lungs were evaluated by tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and methylguanidine (MG) in BALF, respectively. SOD pretreatment significantly decreased WBC counts in systemic circulation and in alveoli, and effectively attenuated high V(T) ventilation induced lung injury by reducing hyaline membrane development, septal wall thickness, lung W/D and LW/BW and serum LDH in relation to those of the control. In addition, lung tissues MDA and MG in BALF were also notably reduced.

  20. Preemptive hemodynamic intervention restricting the administration of fluids attenuates lung edema progression in oleic acid-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gil Cano, A; Gracia Romero, M; Monge García, M I; Guijo González, P; Ruiz Campos, J

    2017-04-01

    A study is made of the influence of preemptive hemodynamic intervention restricting fluid administration upon the development of oleic acid-induced lung injury. A randomized in vivo study in rabbits was carried out. University research laboratory. Sixteen anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rabbits. Hemodynamic measurements obtained by transesophageal Doppler signal. Respiratory mechanics computed by a least square fitting method. Lung edema assessed by the ratio of wet weight to dry weight of the right lung. Histological examination of the left lung. Animals were randomly assigned to either the early protective lung strategy (EPLS) (n=8) or the early protective hemodynamic strategy (EPHS) (n=8). In both groups, lung injury was induced by the intravenous infusion of oleic acid (OA) (0.133mlkg(-1)h(-1) for 2h). At the same time, the EPLS group received 15mlkg(-1)h(-1) of Ringer lactate solution, while the EPHS group received 30mlkg(-1)h(-1). Measurements were obtained at baseline and 1 and 2h after starting OA infusion. After 2h, the cardiac index decreased in the EPLS group (p<0.05), whereas in the EPHS group it remained unchanged. Lung compliance decreased significantly only in the EPHS group (p<0.05). Lung edema was greater in the EPHS group (p<0.05). Histological damage proved similar in both groups (p=0.4). In this experimental model of early lung injury, lung edema progression was attenuated by preemptively restricting the administration of fluids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulmonary Epithelial TLR4 Activation Leads to Lung Injury in Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongpeng; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Martin, Laura Y; Good, Misty; Zhou, Qinjie; Sung, Jungeun; Fulton, William B; Nino, Diego F; Prindle, Thomas; Ozolek, John A; Hackam, David J

    2016-08-01

    We seek to define the mechanisms leading to the development of lung disease in the setting of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a life-threatening gastrointestinal disease of premature infants characterized by the sudden onset of intestinal necrosis. NEC development in mice requires activation of the LPS receptor TLR4 on the intestinal epithelium, through its effects on modulating epithelial injury and repair. Although NEC-associated lung injury is more severe than the lung injury that occurs in premature infants without NEC, the mechanisms leading to its development remain unknown. In this study, we now show that TLR4 expression in the lung gradually increases during postnatal development, and that mice and humans with NEC-associated lung inflammation express higher levels of pulmonary TLR4 than do age-matched controls. NEC in wild-type newborn mice resulted in significant pulmonary injury that was prevented by deletion of TLR4 from the pulmonary epithelium, indicating a role for pulmonary TLR4 in lung injury development. Mechanistically, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation induced high-mobility group box 1 release from the intestine, which activated pulmonary epithelial TLR4, leading to the induction of the neutrophil recruiting CXCL5 and the influx of proinflammatory neutrophils to the lung. Strikingly, the aerosolized administration of a novel carbohydrate TLR4 inhibitor prevented CXCL5 upregulation and blocked NEC-induced lung injury in mice. These findings illustrate the critical role of pulmonary TLR4 in the development of NEC-associated lung injury, and they suggest that inhibition of this innate immune receptor in the neonatal lung may prevent this devastating complication of NEC.

  2. Correlation between sPLA2-IIA and phosgene-induced rat acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-li; Hai, Chun-xu; Liang, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-di; Liu, Riu; Qin, Xu-jun

    2009-02-01

    Secreted phospholipase A(2) of group IIA (sPLA(2)-IIA) has been involved in a variety of inflammatory diseases, including acute lung injury. However, the specific role of sPLA(2)-IIA in phosgene-induced acute lung injury remains unidentified. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between sPLA(2)-IIA activity and the severity of phosgene-induced acute lung injury. Adult male rats were randomly exposed to either normal room air (control group) or a concentration of 400 ppm phosgene (phosgene-exposed group) for there are 5 phosgene-exposed groups altogether. For the time points of 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h post-exposure, one phosgene-exposed group was sacrificed at each time point. The severity of acute lung injury was assessed by Pa(O2)/F(IO2) ratio, wet-to-dry lung-weight ratio, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid protein concentration. sPLA(2)-IIA activity in BAL fluid markedly increased between 1 h and 12 h after phosgene exposure, and reached its highest level at 6 h. Moreover, the trend of this elevation correlated well with the severity of lung injury. These results indicate that sPLA(2)-IIA probably participates in phosgene-induced acute lung injury.

  3. Detrimental role of the airway mucin Muc5ac during ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, M; McNamee, EN; Brodsky, KS; Aherne, CM; Faigle, M; Downey, GP; Colgan, SP; Evans, CM; Schwartz, DA; Eltzschig, HK

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. At present, the functional contribution of airway mucins to ALI is unknown. We hypothesized that excessive mucus production could be detrimental during lung injury. Initial transcriptional profiling of airway mucins revealed a selective and robust induction of MUC5AC upon cyclic mechanical stretch exposure of pulmonary epithelia (Calu-3). Additional studies confirmed time- and stretch-dose-dependent induction of MUC5AC transcript or protein during cyclic mechanical stretch exposure in vitro or during ventilator-induced lung injury in vivo. Patients suffering from ALI showed a 58-fold increase in MUC5AC protein in their bronchoalveolar lavage. Studies of the MUC5AC promoter implicated nuclear factor κB in Muc5ac induction during ALI. Moreover, mice with gene-targeted deletion of Muc5ac−/− experience attenuated lung inflammation and pulmonary edema during injurious ventilation. We observed that neutrophil trafficking into the lungs of Muc5ac−/− mice was selectively attenuated. This implicates that endogenous Muc5ac production enhances pulmonary neutrophil trafficking during lung injury. Together, these studies reveal a detrimental role for endogenous Muc5ac production during ALI and suggest pharmacological strategies to dampen mucin production in the treatment of lung injury. PMID:23187315

  4. Lung injury, inflammation and Akt signaling following inhalation of particulate hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G.; Gigley, Jason P.; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D.

    2009-02-15

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0-24 h) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-{alpha} levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis.

  5. LUNG INJURY, INFLAMMATION AND AKT SIGNALING FOLLOWING INHALATION OF PARTICULATE HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G.; Gigley, Jason P.; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D.; Ceryak, Susan M.; Patierno, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0–24 hours) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-α levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis. PMID:19109987

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-02-12

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs.

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J.; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs. PMID:26869337

  8. THE 5-LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Eun, John C.; Moore, Ernest E.; Mauchley, David C.; Johnson, Chris A.; Meng, Xianzhong; Banerjee, Anirban; Wohlauer, Max V.; Zarini, Simona; Gijón, Miguel A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and biochemical mechanisms leading to acute lung injury and subsequent multiple organ failure are only partially understood. In order to study the potential role of eicosanoids, particularly leukotrienes, as possible mediators of acute lung injury, we used a murine experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock after blood removal via cardiac puncture. Neutrophil sequestration as shown by immunofluorescence, and protein leakage into the alveolar space, were measured as markers of injury. We used liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify several eicosanoids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of experimental animals. MK886, a specific inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, as well as transgenic mice deficient in 5-lipoxygenase, were used to determine the role of this enzymatic pathway in this model. Leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 were consistently elevated in shock-treated mice compared to sham-treated mice. MK886 attenuated neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation induced by hemorrhagic shock. 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice showed reduced neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation after shock treatment, indicating greatly reduced lung injury. These results support the hypothesis that 5-lipoxygenase, most likely through the generation of leukotrienes, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock in mice. This pathway could represent a new target for pharmacological intervention to reduce lung damage following severe primary injury. PMID:22392149

  9. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  10. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD.

  11. CD11b+ Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Treuting, Piper M.; Manicone, Anne M.; Ziegler, Steven F.; Parks, William C.; McGuire, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45+ F4/80+ CD11b+, Ly6Glo-int CD71+ population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b+ mononuclear cells using CD11b–diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b–DT receptor–negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b+ mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD. PMID:26192732

  12. Inhibition of pulmonary surfactants synthesis during N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Li, Lian; She, Hua; Yue, Shaojie; Li, Chen; Luo, Ziqiang

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors widely distributed in the central nervous system, and have been extensively investigated for their roles in embryonic development, synaptic plasticity and neuroexcitoxicity. Their functions in the peripheral nervous system and non-neural tissues have caught much attention recently. Over-activation of NMDA receptors induces excitotoxic lung injury. But the endogenous cell types in the lungs that express NMDA receptors remains elusive and the molecular mechanism underlies NMDA-induced lung injury has not been fully characterized. In this work, we reported that functional NMDA receptors were expressed in alveolar type II cells in the lungs. Over-activation of these receptors led to down-regulation of pulmonary surfactants synthesis. We further demonstrated that decreased cellular choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase alpha expression induced by NMDA treatment accounted for the decreased pulmonary surfactants synthesis. Our results provided important clues for treatment of glutamate lung injury by modulating pulmonary surfactants system.

  13. Development and assessment of countermeasure formulations for treatment of lung injury induced by chlorine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gary W; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A; Carson, Kenneth H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation.

  14. Development and Assessment of Countermeasure Formulations for Treatment of Lung Injury Induced by Chlorine Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Gary W.; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F.; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M.; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A.; Carson, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation. PMID:26952014

  15. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fredenburgh, Laura E; Kraft, Bryan D; Hess, Dean R; Harris, R Scott; Wolf, Monroe A; Suliman, Hagir B; Roggli, Victor L; Davies, John D; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M; Thompson, B Taylor; Choi, Augustine M; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2015-10-15

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (10(8)-10(9) CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100-300 ppm × 60-90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6-8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model.

  16. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Bryan D.; Hess, Dean R.; Harris, R. Scott; Wolf, Monroe A.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Davies, John D.; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Choi, Augustine M.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (108-109 CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100–300 ppm × 60–90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6–8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model. PMID:26320156

  17. [Radiation induced lung injuries secondary to radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Toma, Claudia Lucia; Ciprut, Tudor; Bugarin, Svetlana; Roşca, Dorina; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy decreased the number and severity of the effects of irradiation on the lung. Yet, the increased cancer incidence makes the related radiation injuries to remain actual, radiotherapy being frequently used in cancer treatment. Aim of the study consists in analysis of the radiological pattern of radiation induced lung disease due to radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-eight female patients were evaluated for clinical and radiological suspicion of radiation pneumonitis after radiotherapy for breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 in "Marius Nasta" Institute of Pneumophtiziology, Bucharest. The following procedures were performed: medical history, physical examination, chest radiography and CT-scan (in a subgroup of 27 patients). Radiotherapy toxicity was evaluated based on the RTOG/EORTC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) classification and radiological lesions based on Arriagada classification. Fifty patients (73.5%) were symptomatic (fever, dry cough, dyspnea, chest pain, fatigability), the other 18 were asymptomatic. Symptoms were mild to moderate corresponding to grade 1 (27 patients, 39.7%) or grade 2 (23 patients, 33.8%) according to RTOG/EORTC scale. All patients had radiological lesions: 25 patients (36.7%) had grade 2 lesions (linear opacities), 25 patients (36.7%) had grade 3 lesions (patchy opacities) and 18 patients (26.5%) had grade 4 lesions (dense opacities), according to Arriagada classification. Symptoms were more frequent in patients with extensive lesions on chest radiography. CT-scan, performed in 27 patients, showed more accurate images. Chest radiography remains the simplest method in screening for radiation pneumonitis and monitoring its outcome. Adverse effects secondary to radiotherapy are usually mild and self-limited, and the most difficult task remains the differential diagnosis with infections and cancer relapse.

  18. Measuring dead-space in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kallet, R H

    2012-11-01

    Several recent studies have advanced our understanding of dead-space ventilation in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). They have demonstrated the utility of measuring physiologic dead-space-to-tidal volume ratio (VD/VT) and related variables in assessing outcomes as well as therapeutic interventions. These studies have included the evaluation of mortality risk, pulmonary perfusion, as well as the effectiveness of drug therapy, prone positioning, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration, and inspiratory pattern in improving gas exchange. In patients with ALI/ARDS managed with lung-protective ventilation a significant relationship between elevated VD/VT and increased mortality continues to be reported in both early and intermediate phases of ALI/ARDS. Some clinical evidence now supports the suggestion that elevated VD/VT in part reflects the severity of pulmonary vascular endothelial damage. Monitoring VD/VT also appears useful in assessing alveolar recruitment when titrating PEEP and may be a particularly expedient method for assessing the effectiveness of prone positioning. It also has revealed how subtle manipulations of inspiratory time and pattern can improve CO(2) excretion. Much of this has been accomplished using volumetric capnography. This allows for more sophisticated measurements of pulmonary gas exchange function including: alveolar VD/VT, the volume of CO(2) excretion and the slope of the alveolar plateau which reflects ventilation: perfusion heterogeneity. Many of these measurements now can be made non-invasively which should only increase the research and clinical utility of volumetric capnography in studying and managing patients with ALI/ARDS.

  19. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Villar, Jesus; Flores, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The 'response to microorganisms' was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the 'neuron projection morphogenesis' process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection morphogenesis

  20. Critical modifier role of membrane-CFTR dependent ceramide signaling in lung injury and emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Mazur, Steven; Vij, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Ceramide accumulation mediates the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive lung diseases. Although, an association between lack of CFTR and ceramide accumulation has been described, it is unclear how membrane-CFTR may modulate ceramide signaling in lung injury and emphysema. The Cftr+/+- and Cftr−/−- mice and cells were used to evaluate the CFTR-dependent ceramide signaling in lung injury. Lung tissue from control and COPD patients was used to verify the role of CFTR-dependent ceramide signaling in pathogenesis of chronic emphysema. Our data reveals a novel finding that CFTR expression inversely correlates with severity of emphysema and ceramide-accumulation in COPD subjects compared to controls. We found that chemical inhibition of de novo- ceramide-synthesis controls Pa-LPS induced lung injury in Cftr+/+-mice, while its efficacy was significantly lower in Cftr−/−-mice indicating that membrane-CFTR is required for controlling lipid-raft ceramide levels. Inhibition of membrane-ceramide release showed enhanced protective effect in controlling Pa-LPS induced lung injury in Cftr−/−- mice as compared to the Cftr+/+, confirming our observation that CFTR regulates lipid-raft ceramide- levels and signaling. Our results indicate that inhibition of de novo- ceramide-synthesis may be effective in disease states with low-CFTR expression like emphysema and chronic lung injury but not in complete absence of lipid-raft CFTR as in ΔF508-CF. In contrast, inhibiting membrane ceramide release has the potential of a more effective drug candidate for ΔF508-CF but may not be effectual in treating lung injury and emphysema. Our data demonstrates the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating ceramide-accumulation and inflammatory-signaling in lung injury and emphysema. PMID:21135173

  1. Effect of Human and Sheep Lung Orientation on Primary Blast Injury Induced by Single Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    may be injured by m ore than one of these mechanisms in any given event. Primary blast in juries ( PBI ) are exclusively caused by the blast...overpressure. A PBI usually affects air-containing organs such as t he lung, ears and gastrointestinal tract. Secon dary blast injuries are caused by...orientation on blast injuries predicted in human and sheep models. From th is study, it is predicted that the greatest reduction in lung PBI may be

  2. Riboflavin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Imam, Faisal; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Korashy, Hesham M; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohammed M; Hafez, Mohamed M; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Nagi, Mahmoud N; Bahashwan, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is an easily absorbed micronutrient with a key role in maintaining health in humans and animals. It is the central component of the cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and is therefore required by all flavoproteins. Riboflavin also works as an antioxidant by scavenging free radicals. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of riboflavin against acute lungs injury induced by the administration of a single intranasal dose (20 μg/rat) of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in experimental rats. Administration of LPS resulted in marked increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level (p < 0.01) and MPO activity (p < 0.001), whereas marked decrease in glutathione (GSH) content (p < 0.001), glutathione reductase (GR) (p < 0.001) and glutathione peroxidase (p < 0.01) activity. These changes were significantly (p < 0.001) improved by treatment with riboflavin in a dose-dependent manner (30 and 100 mg/kg, respectively). Riboflavin (100 mg/kg, p.o.) showed similar protective effects as dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, p.o.). Administration of LPS showed marked cellular changes including interstitial edema, hemorrhage, infiltration of PMNs, etc., which were reversed by riboflavin administration. Histopathological examinations showed normal morphological structures of lungs tissue in the control group. These biochemical and histopathological examination were appended with iNOS and CAT gene expression. The iNOS mRNA expression was increased significantly (p < 0.001) and levels of CAT mRNA expression was decreased significantly (p < 0.001) in the animals exposed to LPS, while treatment with riboflavin significantly (p < 0.01) improved expression of both gene. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrated that riboflavin caused a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI. These results suggest that riboflavin may be used to protect against toxic effect of LPS in lungs.

  3. N-acetylcysteine attenuates lung injury in a rodent model of fracture.

    PubMed

    Timlin, Marcus; Condron, Claire; Toomey, Deirdre; Power, Colm; Thornes, Brian; Kearns, Stephen; Street, John; Murray, Paraic; Bouchier-Hayes, David

    2004-02-01

    Neutrophil-mediated lung injury is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in patients with multiple injuries. We have shown previously that fracture hematoma can activate neutrophils and is thus a putative mediator of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) in those patients with severe skeletal trauma. Our aim was to establish a rodent model of fracture which caused lung injury and subsequently to administer a drug following fracture to attenuate the lung injury. The drug we chose was N-acetylcysteine, a potent antioxidant. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 4 groups: (1) general anesthetic only, (2) general anesthetic with bilateral femur fractures and nailing, (3) general anesthetic and N-acetylcysteine, (4) general anesthetic with bilateral femur fractures and nailing and N-acetylcysteine after the injury (n = 6 in each group). The dose of N-acetylcysteine was 0.5 mg/kg which was given intraperitoneally after injury to the treated groups. The rats were killed 24 hours after injury and some parameters of lung injury were evaluated--i.e., bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung tissue myeloperoxidase levels (MPO) and wet/dry ratios of lung tissue. The results were analyzed, using one-way analysis of variance. Bilateral femur fracture produced a significant lung injury, measured by increases in MPO (25-43 microg/g tissue) and BAL protein (460-605 microg/mL). This effect was attenuated by treatment with N-acetylcysteine (MPO 43-9 microg/mL, BAL protein 605-198 microg/mL). N-acetyl cysteine, if given after skeletal trauma, is of potential therapeutic benefit, in preventing SIRS, ARDS and MOF.

  4. Claudin 4 knockout mice: normal physiological phenotype with increased susceptibility to lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kage, Hidenori; Flodby, Per; Gao, Danping; Kim, Yong Ho; Marconett, Crystal N.; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction proteins that regulate paracellular ion permeability of epithelium and endothelium. Claudin 4 has been reported to function as a paracellular sodium barrier and is one of three major claudins expressed in lung alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). To directly assess the role of claudin 4 in regulation of alveolar epithelial barrier function and fluid homeostasis in vivo, we generated claudin 4 knockout (Cldn4 KO) mice. Unexpectedly, Cldn4 KO mice exhibited normal physiological phenotype although increased permeability to 5-carboxyfluorescein and decreased alveolar fluid clearance were noted. Cldn4 KO AEC monolayers exhibited unchanged ion permeability, higher solute permeability, and lower short-circuit current compared with monolayers from wild-type mice. Claudin 3 and 18 expression was similar between wild-type and Cldn4 KO alveolar epithelial type II cells. In response to either ventilator-induced lung injury or hyperoxia, claudin 4 expression was markedly upregulated in wild-type mice, whereas Cldn4 KO mice showed greater degrees of lung injury. RNA sequencing, in conjunction with differential expression and upstream analysis after ventilator-induced lung injury, suggested Egr1, Tnf, and Il1b as potential mediators of increased lung injury in Cldn4 KO mice. These results demonstrate that claudin 4 has little effect on normal lung physiology but may function to protect against acute lung injury. PMID:25106430

  5. Mitochondrial Biogenesis in the Pulmonary Vasculature During Inhalational Lung Injury and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CARRAWAY, MARTHA S.; SULIMAN, HAGIR B.; KLIMENT, CORRINE; WELTY-WOLF, KAREN E.; OURY, TIM D.; PIANTADOSI, CLAUDE A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. By using reporter mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) exclusively in mitochondria, we tracked mitochondrial biogenesis and correlated it with histologic lung injury, proliferation, and fibrosis. At 72 hours after acute LPS or continuous exposure to hyperoxia (Fio2, 1.0), the lungs showed diffuse infiltration by inflammatory cells in the alveolar region. In reporter mice, patchy new mitochondrial fluorescence was found in the alveolar region but was most prominent and unexpected in perivascular regions. At 14 days after instillation of asbestos or bleomycin, diffuse chronic inflammation had developed, and green fluorescence appeared in inflammatory cells in the expanded interstitium and was most intense in smooth muscle cells of pulmonary vessels. In all four lung injuries, mitochondrial fluorescence colocalized with mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, but not with proliferating cell nuclear antigen. These data indicate that vascular mitochondrial biogenesis is activated in diverse inhalational lung injuries along with oxidative stress. This finding indicates a unique and unexpected mechanism of metabolic adaptation to pulmonary fibrotic injuries. PMID:17999632

  6. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwu; Liu, Kehuan; Ma, Chunqing; Yu, Jiangang; Peng, Zhaoyun; Huang, Guoyang; Cai, Zhiyu; Li, Runping; Xu, Weigang; Sun, Xuejun; Liu, Kan; Zheng, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is one of the most widely used clinical interventions to counteract insufficient pulmonary oxygen delivery in patients with severe lung injury. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia leads to inflammation and acute lung injury. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) at 28 μmol/kg immediately before hyperoxia exposure and then exposed to pure oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) with continuous ventilation for six hours, Immediately after hyperoxia exposure, rats were sacrificed via anesthesia. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was harvested for the detection of protein concentration and IL-1 content, and the lungs were collected for HE staining, TUNEL staining and detection of wet/dry weight ratio. Our results showed hyperbaric hyperoixa exposure could significantly damage the lung (HE staining), increase the protein and IL-13 in the BALF, elevate the wet/dry Weight ratio and raise the TUNEL positive cells. However, pre-treatment with hydrogen sulfide improved the lung morphology, reduced the TUNEL positive cells and attenuated the lung inflammation (reduction in IL-13 of BALF and HE staining). Taken together, our findings indicate that hydrogen sulfide pretreatment may exert protective effects on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  7. Autophagy in pulmonary macrophages mediates lung inflammatory injury via NLRP3 inflammasome activation during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Gongjian; Dull, Randal O; Schwartz, David E; Hu, Guochang

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response is a primary mechanism in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury. Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process by which cells break down their own components. We explored the role of autophagy in the mechanisms of mechanical ventilation-induced lung inflammatory injury. Mice were subjected to low (7 ml/kg) or high (28 ml/kg) tidal volume ventilation for 2 h. Bone marrow-derived macrophages transfected with a scrambled or autophagy-related protein 5 small interfering RNA were administered to alveolar macrophage-depleted mice via a jugular venous cannula 30 min before the start of the ventilation protocol. In some experiments, mice were ventilated in the absence and presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (15 mg/kg ip) or trichostatin A (1 mg/kg ip). Mechanical ventilation with a high tidal volume caused rapid (within minutes) activation of autophagy in the lung. Conventional transmission electron microscopic examination of lung sections showed that mechanical ventilation-induced autophagy activation mainly occurred in lung macrophages. Autophagy activation in the lungs during mechanical ventilation was dramatically attenuated in alveolar macrophage-depleted mice. Selective silencing of autophagy-related protein 5 in lung macrophages abolished mechanical ventilation-induced nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation and lung inflammatory injury. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also significantly attenuated the inflammatory responses caused by lung hyperinflation. The activation of autophagy in macrophages mediates early lung inflammation during mechanical ventilation via NLRP3 inflammasome signaling. Inhibition of autophagy activation in lung macrophages may therefore provide a novel and promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of ventilator-induced lung injury.

  8. Nitric Oxide as a Mediator of Oxidant Lung Injury Due to Paraquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1994-08-01

    At low concentrations, nitric oxide is a physiological transmitter, but in excessive concentrations it may cause cell and tissue injury. We report that in acute oxidant injury induced by the herbicide paraquat in isolated guinea pig lungs, nitric oxide synthesis was markedly stimulated, as evidenced by increased levels of cyclic GMP in lung perfusate and of nitrite and L-citrulline production in lung tissue. All signs of injury, including increased airway and perfusion pressures, pulmonary edema, and protein leakage into the airspaces, were dose-dependently attenuated or totally prevented by either N^G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or N^ω-nitro-L-arginine, selective and competitive inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. Protection was reversed by excess L-arginine but not by its enantiomer D-arginine. When blood was added to the lung perfusate, the paraquat injury was moderated or delayed as it was when paraquat was given to anesthetized guinea pigs. The rapid onset of injury and its failure to occur in the absence of Ca2+ suggest that constitutive rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase was responsible for the stimulated nitric oxide synthesis. The findings indicate that nitric oxide plays a critical role in the production of lung tissue injury due to paraquat, and it may be a pathogenetic factor in other forms of oxidant tissue injury.

  9. Soluble transition metals mediate residual oil fly ash induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dreher, K L; Jaskot, R H; Lehmann, J R; Richards, J H; McGee, J K; Ghio, A J; Costa, D L

    1997-02-21

    Identification of constituents responsible for the pulmonary toxicity of fugitive combustion emission source particles may provide insight into the adverse health effects associated with exposure to these particles as well as ambient air particulate pollution. Herein, we describe results of studies conducted to identify constituents responsible for the acute lung injury induced by residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and to assess physical-chemical factors that influence the pulmonary toxicity of these constituents. Biochemical and cellular analyses performed on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from rats following intratracheal instillation of ROFA suspension demonstrated the presence of severe inflammation, an indicator of pulmonary injury, which included recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes into the airway. A leachate prepared from ROFA, containing predominantly Fe, Ni, V, Ca, Mg, and sulfate, produced similar lung injury to that induced by ROFA suspension. Depletion of Fe, Ni, and V from the ROFA leachate abrogated its pulmonary toxicity. Correspondingly, minimal lung injury was observed in animals exposed to saline-washed ROFA particles. A surrogate transition metal sulfate solution containing Fe, V, and Ni largely reproduced the lung injury induced by ROFA. Metal interactions and pH were found to influence the severity and kinetics of lung injury induced by ROFA and soluble transition metals. These findings provide direct evidence for the role of soluble transition metals in the pulmonary injury induced by the combustion emission source particulate, ROFA.

  10. Pattern Recognition Receptor–Dependent Mechanisms of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Meng; Fan, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that clinically manifests as acute respiratory distress syndrome is caused by an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response resulting from clinical events including sepsis, major surgery and trauma. Innate immunity activation plays a central role in the development of ALI. Innate immunity is activated through families of related pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize conserved microbial motifs or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Toll-like receptors were the first major family of PRRs discovered in mammals. Recently, NACHT–leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptors and retinoic acid–inducible gene–like receptors have been added to the list. It is now understood that in addition to recognizing infectious stimuli, both Toll-like receptors and NACHT-LRR receptors can also respond to endogenous molecules released in response to stress, trauma and cell damage. These molecules have been termed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). It has been clinically observed for a long time that infectious and noninfectious insults initiate inflammation, so confirmation of overlapping receptor-signal pathways of activation between PAMPs and DAMPs is no surprise. This review provides an overview of the PRR-dependent mechanisms of ALI and clinical implication. Modification of PRR pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:19949486

  11. Science review: searching for gene candidates in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Finigan, James H; Hassoun, Paul; Garcia, Joe G N

    2004-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complex and devastating illness, often occurring within the setting of sepsis, and carries an annual mortality rate of 30-50%. Although the genetic basis of ALI has not been fully established, an increasing body of evidence suggests that genetic predisposition contributes to disease susceptibility and severity. Significant difficulty exists, however, in defining the exact nature of these genetic factors, including large phenotypic variance, incomplete penetrance, complex gene-environment interactions, and strong potential for locus heterogeneity. We utilized the candidate gene approach and an ortholog gene database to provide relevant gene ontologies and insights into the genetic basis of ALI. We employed a Medline search of selected basic and clinical studies in the English literature and studies sponsored by the HopGene National Institutes of Health sponsored Program in Genomic Applications. Extensive gene expression profiling studies in animal models of ALI (rat, murine, canine), as well as in humans, were performed to identify potential candidate genes http://www.hopkins-genomics.org/. We identified a number of candidate genes for ALI, with blood coagulation and inflammation gene ontologies being the most highly represented. The candidate gene approach coupled with extensive gene profiling and novel bioinformatics approaches is a valuable way to identify genes that are involved in ALI.

  12. Pathology consultation on transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Adamski, Jill

    2012-10-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious condition characterized by respiratory distress, hypoxia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, which occur within 6 hours of transfusion. Several theories have been proposed to explain the underlying pathologic mechanisms of TRALI. Immune-mediated TRALI accounts for over 80% of reported cases and is mediated by donor antibodies to HLAs and/or human neutrophil antigens (HNA). Immune-mediated TRALI is most commonly associated with donor plasma transfusion or other blood products from multiparous women, which has led many countries to reduce or exclude women from donating high-volume plasma products. This policy change has resulted in a decrease in the incidence of TRALI and highlighted the importance of nonimmune-mediated TRALI, which is thought to be caused by bioreactive lipids and other biologic response modifiers that accumulate during storage of blood products. When TRALI is suspected, clinical consultation with a transfusion medicine specialist helps differentiate it from other transfusion reactions with similar characteristics.

  13. Permissive hypercapnia to decrease lung injury in ventilated preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Thome, Ulrich H; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2009-02-01

    Lung injury in ventilated premature infants occurs primarily through the mechanism of volutrauma, often due to the combination of high tidal volumes in association with a high end-inspiratory volume and occasionally end-expiratory alveolar collapse. Tolerating a higher level of arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) is considered as 'permissive hypercapnia' and when combined with the use of low tidal volumes may reduce volutrauma and lead to improved pulmonary outcomes. Permissive hypercapnia may also protect against hypocapnia-induced brain hypoperfusion and subsequent periventricular leukomalacia. However, extreme hypercapnia may be associated with an increased risk of intracranial hemorrhage. It may therefore be important to avoid large fluctuations in PaCO2 values. Recent randomized clinical trials in preterm infants have demonstrated that mild permissive hypercapnia is safe, but clinical benefits are modest. The optimal PaCO2 goal in clinical practice has not been determined, and the available evidence does not currently support a general recommendation for permissive hypercapnia in preterm infants.

  14. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios.

  15. Transfusion-related acute lung injury risk mitigation: an update.

    PubMed

    Otrock, Z K; Liu, C; Grossman, B J

    2017-09-25

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening complication of transfusion. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome has much improved during the last two decades. Plasma-containing components from female donors with leucocyte antibodies were responsible for the majority of TRALI fatalities before mitigation strategies were implemented. Over the past 15 years, measures to mitigate risk for TRALI have been implemented worldwide and they continued to evolve with time. The AABB requires that all plasma containing components and whole blood for transfusion must be collected from men, women who have not been pregnant, or women who have tested negative for human leucocyte antigen antibodies. Although the incidence of TRALI has decreased following the institution of TRALI mitigation strategies, TRALI is still the most common cause of transfusion-associated death in the United States. In this review, we focus on TRALI risk mitigation strategies. We describe the measures taken by blood collection facilities to reduce the risk of TRALI in the United States, Canada and European countries. We also review the literature for the effectiveness of these measures. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. [Penetrating injury of the lungs and multiple injuries of lower extremities caused by aircraft bombs splinters].

    PubMed

    Golubović, Zoran; Stanić, Vojkan; Trenkić, Srbobran; Stojiljković, Predrag; Stevanović, Goran; Lesić, Aleksandar; Golubović, Ivan; Milić, Dragan; Visnjić, Aleksandar; Najman, Stevo

    2010-08-01

    Injuries caused by aircraft bombs cause severe damages to the human body. They are characterized by massive destruction of injured tissues and organs, primary contamination by polymorph bacterial flora and modified reactivity of the body. Upon being wounded by aircraft bombs projectiles a victim simultaneously sustains severe damages of many organs and organ systems due to the fact that a large number of projectiles at the same time injure the chest, stomach, head and extremities. We presented a patient, 41 years of age, injured by aircraft bomb with hemo-pneumothorax and destruction of the bone and soft tissue structures of the foot, as well as the treatment result of such heavy injuries. After receiving thoracocentesis and short reanimation, the patient underwent surgical procedure. The team performed thoracotomy, primary treatment of the wound and atypical resection of the left lung. Thoracic drains were placed. The wounds on the lower leg and feet were treated primarily. Due to massive destruction of bone tissue of the right foot by cluster bomb splinters, and impossibility of reconstruction of the foot, guillotine amputation of the right lower leg was performed. Twelve days after the wounding caused by cluster bomb splinters, soft tissue of the left lower leg was covered by Tirsch free transplant and the defect in the area of the left foot was covered by dorsalis pedis flap. The transplant and flap were accepted and the donor sites were epithelized. Twenty-six days following the wounding reamputation was performed and amputation stump of the right lower leg was closed. The patient was given a lower leg prosthesis with which he could move. Upon being wounded by aircraft bomb splinters, the injured person sustains severe wounds of multiple organs and organ systems due to simultaneous injuries caused by a large number of projectiles. It is necessary to take care of the vital organs first because they directly threaten the life of the wounded patient. Despite

  17. Protective effect of sodium aescinate on lung injury induced by methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuan; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Ren, Ru-Tong; Zhao, De-Lu; Li, Chong; Fu, Feng-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is a high venenosus insecticide. It has been used in pest control of agriculture for several years. The present study is performed to investigate the protective effect of sodium aescinate (SA) on lung injury induced by MP. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats are randomly divided into five groups, with 8 animals in each group: control group, MP administration group, MP plus SA at doses of 0.45 mg/kg, 0.9 mg/kg and 1.8 mg/kg groups. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) level in plasma, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, NO level, and antioxidative parameters in lung tissue are assayed. Histopathological examination of lung is also performed. The results show that SA has no effect on AChE. Treatment with SA decreases the activity of MPO in lung and the level of NO in plasma and lung. The level of malondialdehyde in lung is decreased after SA treatments. SA increases the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and the content of glutathione in lung. SA administration also ameliorates lung injury induced by MP. The findings indicate that SA could protect lung injury induced by MP and the mechanism of action is related to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect of SA.

  18. A unified approach for EIT imaging of regional overdistension and atelectasis in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Arnold, John H; Wolf, Gerhard K

    2012-03-01

    Patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) are vulnerable to ventilator-induced lung injury. Although this syndrome affects the lung heterogeneously, mechanical ventilation is not guided by regional indicators of potential lung injury. We used electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to estimate the extent of regional lung overdistension and atelectasis during mechanical ventilation. Techniques for tidal breath detection, lung identification, and regional compliance estimation were combined with the Graz consensus on EIT lung imaging (GREIT) algorithm. Nine ALI/ARDS patients were monitored during stepwise increases and decreases in airway pressure. Our method detected individual breaths with 96.0% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. The duration and volume of tidal breaths erred on average by 0.2 s and 5%, respectively. Respiratory system compliance from EIT and ventilator measurements had a correlation coefficient of 0.80. Stepwise increases in pressure could reverse atelectasis in 17% of the lung. At the highest pressures, 73% of the lung became overdistended. During stepwise decreases in pressure, previously-atelectatic regions remained open at sub-baseline pressures. We recommend that the proposed approach be used in collaborative research of EIT-guided ventilation strategies for ALI/ARDS.

  19. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  20. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-04

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production.

  1. Changes in breath sound power spectra during experimental oleic acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute lung injury on the frequency spectra of breath sounds, we made serial acoustic recordings from nondependent, midlung and dependent regions of both lungs in ten 35- to 45-kg anesthetized, intubated, and mechanically ventilated pigs during development of acute lung injury induced with intravenous oleic acid in prone or supine position. Oleic acid injections rapidly produced severe derangements in the gas exchange and mechanical properties of the lung, with an average increase in venous admixture from 16 ± 12 to 62 ± 16% (P < 0.01), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 25 ± 4 to 14 ± 4 ml/cmH2O (P < 0.01). A concomitant increase in sound power was seen in all lung regions (P < 0.05), predominantly in frequencies 150-800 Hz. The deterioration in gas exchange and lung mechanics correlated best with concurrent spectral changes in the nondependent lung regions. Acute lung injury increases the power of breath sounds likely secondary to redistribution of ventilation from collapsed to aerated parts of the lung and improved sound transmission in dependent, consolidated areas.

  2. Suppression of lung inflammation in an LPS-induced acute lung injury model by the fruit hull of Gleditsia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Kwun, Min Jung; Han, Chang Woo; Ha, Ki-Tae; Choi, Jun-Yong; Joo, Myungsoo

    2014-10-15

    The fruit hull of Gleditsia sinensis (FGS) used in traditional Asian medicine was reported to have a preventive effect on lung inflammation in an acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. Here, we explored FGS as a possible therapeutics against inflammatory lung diseases including ALI, and examined an underlying mechanism for the effect of FGS. The decoction of FGS in water was prepared and fingerprinted. Mice received an intra-tracheal (i.t.) FGS 2 h after an intra-peritoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The effect of FGS on lung inflammation was determined by chest imaging of NF-κB reporter mice, counting inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, analyzing lung histology, and performing semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of lung tissue. Impact of Nrf2 on FGS effect was assessed by comparing Nrf2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice that were treated similarly. Bioluminescence from the chest of the reporter mice was progressively increased to a peak at 16 h after an i.p. LPS treatment. FGS treatment 2 h after LPS reduced the bioluminescence and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in the lung. While suppressing the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the lungs of WT mice, FGS post-treatment failed to reduce lung inflammation in Nrf2 KO mice. FGS activated Nrf2 and induced Nrf2-dependent gene expression in mouse lung. FGS post-treatment suppressed lung inflammation in an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, which was mediated at least in part by Nrf2. Our results suggest a therapeutic potential of FGS on inflammatory lung diseases.

  3. Injury and repair in the very immature lung following brief mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Hooper, Stuart B; Allison, Beth J; Wallace, Megan J; Harding, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) of very premature infants contributes to lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the effects of which can be long-lasting. Little is currently known about the ability of the very immature lung to recover from ventilator-induced lung injury. Our objective was to determine the ability of the injured very immature lung to repair in the absence of continued ventilation and to identify potential mechanisms. At 125 days gestational age (days GA, 0.85 of term), fetal sheep were partially exposed by hysterotomy under anesthesia and aseptic conditions; they were intubated and ventilated for 2 h with an injurious MV protocol and then returned to the uterus to continue development. Necropsy was performed at either 1 day (short-term group, 126 days GA, n = 6) or 15 days (long-term group, 140 days GA, n = 5) after MV; controls were unventilated (n = 7-8). At 1 day after MV, lungs displayed signs of injury, including hemorrhage, disorganized elastin and collagen deposition in the distal airspaces, altered morphology, significantly reduced secondary septal crest density, and decreased airspace. Bronchioles had thickened epithelium with evidence of injury and sloughing. Relative mRNA levels of early response genes (connective tissue growth factor, cysteine-rich 61, and early growth response-1) and proinflammatory cytokines [interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β] were not different between groups 1 day after MV. At 15 days after MV, lung structure was normal with no evidence of injury. We conclude that 2 h of MV induces severe injury in the very immature lung and that these lungs have the capacity to repair spontaneously in the absence of further ventilation.

  4. Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Jiu; Li, Jing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Guang; Kong, Huan-Yu; Jin, Hong; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Li, Zhong-Huang; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Jia-Jie; Wu, Shu-Guang

    2013-06-15

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality rate worldwide. The dry root of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn has been long used to treat respiratory diseases in China. In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. However, PD and PE significantly inhibited the infiltration of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the same dose. There was no statistically significant difference between PD and PE group. Further study demonstrated that PD and PE suppressed protein extravasations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, attenuated myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the pathological changes in the lung. Both PD and PE suppressed LPS induced Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in the lung by decreasing the cytoplasmic loss of Inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) protein and inhibiting the translocation of p65 from cytoplasm to nucleus. We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. Taken together, these results suggested that PD and PE might be useful in the therapy of lung injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prophylactic erythropoietin exacerbates ventilation-induced lung inflammation and injury in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Polglase, Graeme R; Barton, Samantha K; Melville, Jacqueline M; Zahra, Valerie; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Tolcos, Mary; Moss, Timothy J M

    2014-05-01

    Ventilation-induced lung injury (VILI) of preterm neonates probably contributes to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Erythropoietin (EPO) has been suggested as a therapy for BPD. The aim of this study was to determine whether prophylactic administration of EPO reduces VILI in preterm newborn lambs. Lambs at 126 days of gestation (term is 147 days) were delivered and ventilated with a high tidal volume strategy for 15 min to cause lung injury, then received gentle ventilation until 2 h of age. Lambs were randomized to receive intravenous EPO (5000 IU kg(-1): Vent+EPO; n = 6) or phosphate-buffered saline (Vent; n = 7) soon after birth: unventilated controls (UVC; n = 8) did not receive ventilation or any treatment. Physiological parameters were recorded throughout the experimental procedure. Samples of lung were collected for histological and molecular assessment of inflammation and injury. Samples of liver were collected to assess the systemic acute phase response. Vent+EPO lambs received higher F IO 2, P aO 2 and oxygenation during the first 10 min than Vent lambs. There were no differences in physiological indices beyond this time. Total lung injury score, airway wall thickness, inflammation and haemorrhage were higher in Vent+EPO lambs than in Vent lambs. Lung inflammation and early markers of lung and systemic injury were elevated in ventilated lambs relative to unventilated lambs; EPO administration further increased lung inflammation and markers of lung and systemic injury. Prophylactic EPO exacerbates VILI, which may increase the incidence and severity of long-term respiratory disease. More studies are required before EPO can be used for lung protection in preterm infants.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury in Thermal Injury Rat Model: Protective Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiqi; Xu, Fei; Si, Si; Zhao, Xueshan; Bi, Siwei; Cen, Ying

    Lungs are easily damaged by the inflammatory responses induced after extensive burns. The aim here was to investigate the protective role of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-mediated inflammatory responses and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a rat model of thermal injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups. In the first experiment, a full-thickness thermal injury or control procedure, covering 30% of the TBSA, was inflicted on three groups designated as the thermal injury, EGCG, and sham control groups. In the second experiment, another two groups were established by transfusion with either mtDNA (mtDNA group) or phosphate-buffered saline (phosphate-buffered saline group). Blood samples and lung tissue from all five groups were collected and the plasma concentrations of mtDNA and inflammatory mediators were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected and histological analysis of the lung tissue was performed to evaluate the severity of ARDS. Significant increases in mtDNA and inflammatory mediator plasma concentrations were seen in the thermal injury and EGCG groups when compared with controls (P < .05). The plasma concentrations of mtDNA and inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased after the administration of EGCG (P < .05). EGCG also significantly reduced the severity of acute lung injury (P < .05). Intravenous administration of mtDNA significantly increased concentrations of inflammatory mediators and caused severe ARDS (P < .05). Our results suggest that mtDNA is important for thermal injury-induced inflammation and associated ARDS. EGCG possesses anti-inflammatory and lung-protective properties, and might act by limiting mtDNA release after thermal injury.

  7. DEPLETION OF IRON AND ASCORBATE IN RODENTS DIMINISHES LUNG INJURY AFTER SILICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures of the lung to iron chelates can be associated with an injury. The catalysis of oxygen-based free radicals is postulated to participate in this injury. Such oxidant generation by mineral oxide particles can be dependent on availability of both iron and a reductant. We t...

  8. DEPLETION OF IRON AND ASCORBATE IN RODENTS DIMINISHES LUNG INJURY AFTER SILICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures of the lung to iron chelates can be associated with an injury. The catalysis of oxygen-based free radicals is postulated to participate in this injury. Such oxidant generation by mineral oxide particles can be dependent on availability of both iron and a reductant. We t...

  9. N-acetylcysteine abrogates acute lung injury induced by endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Wang, David; Lin, Hen I; Chen, Hsing I

    2006-01-01

    1. Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious clinical problem with high mortality. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is an anti-oxidant and a free radical scavenger. It has been reported recently that NAC ameliorates organ damage induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) in conscious rats. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of NAC on LPS-induced ALI and other changes in anaesthetized rats. 2. Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, i.p.). Endotracheal intubation was performed to provide artificial ventilation. Arterial pressure and heart rate were monitored. The extent of ALI was evaluated with the lung weight (LW)/bodyweight ratio, LW gain, exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage (PCBAL). Haematocrit, white blood cells, plasma nitrate/nitrite, methyl guanidine (MG), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1b were measured. Pathological changes in the lung were examined and evaluated. 3. Endotoxaemia was produced by injection of 10 mg/kg, i.v., LPS (Escherichia coli). Animals were randomly divided into three groups. In the vehicle group, rats received an i.v. drip of physiological saline solution (PSS) at a rate of 0.3 mL/h. The LPS group received an i.v. drip of PSS for 1 h, followed by LPS (10 mg/kg by slow blous injection, i.v., over 1-2 min). Rats in the LPS + NAC group received NAC by i.v. drip at a rate of 150 mg/kg per h (0.3 mL/h) for 60 min starting 10 min before LPS administration (10 mg/kg by slow blous injection, i.v., over 1-2 min). Each group was observed for a period of 6 h. 4. N-Acetylcysteine treatment improved the LPS-induced hypotension and leukocytopenia. It also reduced the extent of ALI, as evidenced by reductions in LW changes, exhaled NO, PCBAL and lung pathology. In addition, NAC diminished the LPS-induced increases in nitrate/nitrite, MG, TNF-a and IL-1b. 5. In another series of experiments, LPS increased the

  10. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Laboratory assays on the bronchial lavage samples...at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours from exposure to development of ARDS , a...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0673 TITLE : Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of

  11. Influence of long-term drinking alcohol on the cytokines in the rats with endogenous and exogenous lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y D; Liu, W; Liu, Z

    2013-02-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are syndromes of acute respiratory failure. Exploration of the impacts of long-term drinking alcohol on the cytokines of rats with endogenous and exogenous lung injuries. Through giving the model rats long-term drinking alcohol or water, we acquired the changes of the cytokines in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of these rats with lung injuries due to different incentives. The partial pressure of oxygen in rats with lung damage after long-term drinking alcohol were significantly lower than those drinking water group (p < 0.05); W/D values of groups drinking alcohol were significantly higher than those drinking water (p < 0.05); The levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 in the serum and BALF were significantly higher in the group drinking alcohol (p < 0.01). While the cytokine levels in the serum of the rats with exogenous lung injury were higher than those of rats with endogenous lung injury (p < 0.05), the cytokines in the BALF of the rats with endogenous lung injury were higher than those with exogenous lung injury (p < 0.05). Long-term drinking alcohol can aggravate the inflammatory response induced by the exogenous lung injury. The expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 are different according to the different ways that lead to the acute lung injury.

  12. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E; Chen, Alex F; Gladwin, Mark T; McVerry, Bryan J

    2014-12-15

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature.

  13. The Epidemiology of Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury Varies According to the Applied Definition of Lung Injury Onset Time

    PubMed Central

    Vande Vusse, Lisa K.; Caldwell, Ellen; Tran, Edward; Hogl, Laurie; Dinwiddie, Steven; López, José A.; Maier, Ronald V.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Research that applies an unreliable definition for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may draw false conclusions about its risk factors and biology. The effectiveness of preventive strategies may decrease as a consequence. However, the reliability of the consensus TRALI definition is unknown. Objectives: To prospectively study the effect of applying two plausible definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time on TRALI epidemiology. Methods: We studied 316 adults admitted to the intensive care unit and transfused red blood cells within 24 hours of blunt trauma. We identified patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and defined acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time two ways: (1) the time at which the first radiographic or oxygenation criterion was met, and (2) the time both criteria were met. We categorized two corresponding groups of TRALI cases transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We used Cohen’s kappa to measure agreement between the TRALI cases and implicated blood components identified by the two acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definitions. In a nested case-control study, we examined potential risk factors for each group of TRALI cases, including demographics, injury severity, and characteristics of blood components transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Measurements and Main Results: Forty-two of 113 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were TRALI cases per the first acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition and 63 per the second definition. There was slight agreement between the two groups of TRALI cases (κ = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, −0.01 to 0.33) and between the implicated blood components (κ = 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.20). Age, Injury Severity Score, high plasma-volume components, and transfused plasma volume were risk factors for TRALI when applying

  14. The Epidemiology of Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury Varies According to the Applied Definition of Lung Injury Onset Time.

    PubMed

    Vande Vusse, Lisa K; Caldwell, Ellen; Tran, Edward; Hogl, Laurie; Dinwiddie, Steven; López, José A; Maier, Ronald V; Watkins, Timothy R

    2015-09-01

    Research that applies an unreliable definition for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may draw false conclusions about its risk factors and biology. The effectiveness of preventive strategies may decrease as a consequence. However, the reliability of the consensus TRALI definition is unknown. To prospectively study the effect of applying two plausible definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time on TRALI epidemiology. We studied 316 adults admitted to the intensive care unit and transfused red blood cells within 24 hours of blunt trauma. We identified patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and defined acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time two ways: (1) the time at which the first radiographic or oxygenation criterion was met, and (2) the time both criteria were met. We categorized two corresponding groups of TRALI cases transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We used Cohen's kappa to measure agreement between the TRALI cases and implicated blood components identified by the two acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definitions. In a nested case-control study, we examined potential risk factors for each group of TRALI cases, including demographics, injury severity, and characteristics of blood components transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Forty-two of 113 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were TRALI cases per the first acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition and 63 per the second definition. There was slight agreement between the two groups of TRALI cases (κ = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, -0.01 to 0.33) and between the implicated blood components (κ = 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.20). Age, Injury Severity Score, high plasma-volume components, and transfused plasma volume were risk factors for TRALI when applying the second acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition

  15. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs resolve experimental lung injury in mice and are present in humans with acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Aggarwal, Neil R.; West, Erin E.; Willett, Matthew H.; Britos, Martin F.; Pipeling, Matthew R.; Brower, Roy G.; Tuder, Rubin M.; McDyer, John F.; King, Landon S.

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, inflammation, cytokine induction, and neutrophil accumulation. Although early events in the pathogenesis of ALI have been defined, the mechanisms underlying resolution are unknown. As a model of ALI, we administered intratracheal (i.t.) LPS to mice and observed peak lung injury 4 days after the challenge, with resolution by day 10. Numbers of alveolar lymphocytes increased as injury resolved. To examine the role of lymphocytes in this response, lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1–/– and C57BL/6 WT mice were exposed to i.t. LPS. The extent of injury was similar between the groups of mice through day 4, but recovery was markedly impaired in the Rag-1–/– mice. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that infusion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs as late as 24 hours after i.t. LPS normalized resolution in Rag-1–/– mice. Similarly, Treg depletion in WT mice delayed recovery. Treg transfer into i.t. LPS–exposed Rag-1–/– mice also corrected the elevated levels of alveolar proinflammatory cytokines and increased the diminished levels of alveolar TGF-β and neutrophil apoptosis. Mechanistically, Treg-mediated resolution of lung injury was abrogated by TGF-β inhibition. Moreover, BAL of patients with ALI revealed dynamic changes in CD3+CD4+CD25hiCD127loFoxp3+ cells. These results indicate that Tregs modify innate immune responses during resolution of lung injury and suggest potential targets for treating ALI, for which there are no specific therapies currently available. PMID:19770521

  16. [Increased expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 in lungs of preterm rats after hyperoxic lung injury].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cui, Zhi-Rui; Cai, Li-Xia; Luo, Xiao-Ping

    2014-11-01

    To study the expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of preterm rats exposed to 60% O2 and to elucidate the relationship between the changes of FABP4 expression and the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Hyperoxic lung injury was induced by exposing to 60% O2 in Spraque-Dawley rats within 6 hours after birth. Rats exposed to air were used as the control group. The lungs from groups aged postnatal days 3, 7 and 14 were removed and dissected from the main bronchi for analysis. Eight rats of each group were used to assess expression of FABP4 in lungs by immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Lung FABP4 mRNA levels were measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The levels of FABP4 in BALF were measured using ELISA. FABP4 immunoreactivity was detected in the majority of alveolar macrophages, bronchial epithelial cells and endothelial cells. FABP4 protein levels in lung tissues in the hyperoxic exposure group increased significantly compared with the control group on days 3, 7 and 14 after birth (P<0.05), and FABP4 mRNA levels in lung tissues also increased significantly in the hyperoxic exposure group compared with the control group on days 7 and 14 after birth (P<0.05). The hyperoxic exposure group demonstrated increased FABP4 levels in BALF compared with the control group on days 7 and 14 after birth (P<0.05). FABP4 levels increase in preterm rat lungs after hyperoxic lung injury, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of BPD.

  17. Therapy with Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Protects Lungs from Radiation-Induced Injury and Reduces the Risk of Lung Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Diana; Schmetter, Alexandra; Imsak, Roze; Wirsdörfer, Florian; Unger, Kristian; Jastrow, Holger; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-01-10

    Previous thorax irradiation promotes metastatic spread of tumor cells to the lung. We hypothesized that vascular damage facilitates lung metastasis after thorax irradiation and that therapeutically applied multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with reported repair activity may prevent these adverse effects of ionizing radiation by protecting lung endothelia from radiation-induced damage. Previous whole-thorax irradiation (WTI) with 15 Gy significantly enhanced seeding and metastatic growth of tumor cells in the lung. WTI was further associated with endothelial cell damage, senescence of lung epithelial cells, and upregulation of invasion- and inflammation-promoting soluble factors, for example, endothelial matrix metalloproteinase 2 (Mmp2), its activator Mmp14, the cofactor tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (Timp2), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (Plau/uPA), and recruitment of CD11b+CD11c- myelomonocytic cells. Inhibition of Mmp2 counteracted radiation-induced vascular dysfunction without preventing increased metastasis. In contrast, therapy with bone marrow or aorta-derived MSCs within 2 weeks postirradiation antagonized radiation-induced damage to resident cells as well as the resulting secretome changes and abrogated the metastasis-promoting effects of WTI. Therapy with MSCs protects lungs from radiation-induced injury and reduces the risk of lung metastasis. MSC-mediated inhibition of Mmp2 mediates their protective effects at the vasculature. Furthermore, local and systemic effects such as inhibition of radiation-induced senescence of bronchial epithelial cells and associated secretion of immunomodulatory factors may participate in the inhibitory effect of MSCs on lung metastasis. MSC therapy is a promising strategy to prevent radiation-induced lung injury and the resulting increased risk of metastasis.

  18. Polymer-surfactant treatment of meconium-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, K W; William Taeusch, H; Robertson, B; Goerke, J; Clements, J A

    2000-08-01

    Substances (for example, serum proteins or meconium) that interfere with the activity of pulmonary surfactant in vitro may also be important in the pathogenesis or progression of acute lung injury. Addition of polymers such as dextran or polyethylene glycol (PEG) to surfactants prevents and reverses surfactant inactivation. The purpose of this study was to find out whether surfactant/polymer mixtures are more effective for treating one form of acute lung injury than is surfactant alone. Acute lung injury in adult rats was created by tracheal instillation of human meconium. Injured animals, which were anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated with 100% oxygen and not treated with surfactant mixtures, remained hypoxic and required high ventilator pressures to maintain Pa(CO(2)) in the normal range over the 3 h of the experiment. Uninjured animals maintained normal values for oxygen and compliance of the respiratory system. The greatest improvement in both oxygenation (178%) and compliance (42%) occurred in animals with lung injury that were treated with Survanta and PEG (versus untreated control animals; p < 0.01), whereas little improvement was found after treatment with Survanta alone. Similar results were found when postmortem pulmonary pressure-volume curves and histology were examined. We conclude that adding PEG to Survanta improves gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, and histologic appearance of the lungs in a rat model of acute lung injury caused by meconium.

  19. Leptin attenuates lipopolysaccharide or oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hai-Ying; Xu, Min; Ji, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Yan-Xia; Dong, Ming-Qing; Liu, Man-Ling; Xu, Dun-Quan; Zhao, Peng-Tao; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jing; Li, Zhi-Chao

    2013-12-01

    Leptin is reported to be involved in acute lung injury (ALI). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of leptin in ALI remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether leptin deficiency promoted the development of ALI. LPS or oleic acid (OA) were administered to wild-type and leptin deficient (ob/ob) mice to induce ALI. Leptin level, survival rate, and lung injury were examined. Results showed that leptin levels were predominantly increased in the lung, but also in the heart, liver, kidney, and adipose tissue after LPS adminiatration. Compared with wild-type mice, LPS- or OA-induced lung injury was worse and the survival rate was lower in ob/ob mice. Moreover, leptin deficiency promoted the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Exogenous administration of leptin reduced lethality in ob/ob mice and ameliorated lung injury partly through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, p38, and ERK pathways. These results indicated that leptin deficiency contributed to the development of lung injury by enhancing inflammatory response, and a high level of leptin improved survival and protected against ALI.

  20. Atelectasis Induced by Thoracotomy Causes Lung Injury during Mechanical Ventilation in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kun Young; Kim, Jin Mo; Quinn, Deborah A.; Hales, Charles A.; Seo, Jeong Wook

    2008-01-01

    Atelectasis can impair arterial oxygenation and decrease lung compliance. However, the effects of atelectasis on endotoxemic lungs during ventilation have not been well studied. We hypothesized that ventilation at low volumes below functional residual capacity (FRC) would accentuate lung injury in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-pretreated rats. LPS-pretreated rats were ventilated with room air at 85 breaths/min for 2 hr at a tidal volume of 10 mL/kg with or without thoracotomy. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was applied to restore FRC in the thoracotomy group. While LPS or thoracotomy alone did not cause significant injury, the combination of endotoxemia and thoracotomy caused significant hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The injury was observed along with a marked accumulation of inflammatory cells in the interstitium of the lungs, predominantly comprising neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry showed increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in mononuclear cells accumulated in the interstitium in the injury group. Pretreatment with PEEP or an iNOS inhibitor (1400 W) attenuated hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung. In conclusion, the data suggest that atelectasis induced by thoracotomy causes lung injury during mechanical ventilation in endotoxemic rats through iNOS expression. PMID:18583875

  1. Atelectasis induced by thoracotomy causes lung injury during mechanical ventilation in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Kwon, Kun Young; Kim, Jin Mo; Quinn, Deborah A; Hales, Charles A; Seo, Jeong Wook

    2008-06-01

    Atelectasis can impair arterial oxygenation and decrease lung compliance. However, the effects of atelectasis on endotoxemic lungs during ventilation have not been well studied. We hypothesized that ventilation at low volumes below functional residual capacity (FRC) would accentuate lung injury in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-pretreated rats. LPS-pretreated rats were ventilated with room air at 85 breaths/min for 2 hr at a tidal volume of 10 mL/kg with or without thoracotomy. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was applied to restore FRC in the thoracotomy group. While LPS or thoracotomy alone did not cause significant injury, the combination of endotoxemia and thoracotomy caused significant hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The injury was observed along with a marked accumulation of inflammatory cells in the interstitium of the lungs, predominantly comprising neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry showed increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in mononuclear cells accumulated in the interstitium in the injury group. Pretreatment with PEEP or an iNOS inhibitor (1400 W) attenuated hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung. In conclusion, the data suggest that atelectasis induced by thoracotomy causes lung injury during mechanical ventilation in endotoxemic rats through iNOS expression.

  2. Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage induces distant inflammatory lung injury in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Arruza, Luis; Pazos, M Ruth; Mohammed, Nagat; Escribano, Natalia; Lafuente, Hector; Santos, Martín; Alvarez-Díaz, Francisco J; Martínez-Orgado, Jose

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to investigate whether neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury induces inflammatory lung damage. Thus, hypoxic (HYP, FiO2 10% for 30 min), ischemic (ISC, bilateral carotid flow interruption for 30 min), or HI event was performed in 1-2-d-old piglets. Dynamic compliance (Cdyn), oxygenation index (OI), and extravascular lung water (EVLW) were monitored for 6 h. Then, histologic damage was assessed in brain and lung (lung injury severity score). Total protein content (TPC) was determined in broncoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and IL-1β concentration was measured in lung and brain tissues and blood. Piglets without hypoxia or ischemia served as controls (SHM). HI-induced brain damage was associated with decreased Cdyn, increased OI and EVLW, and histologic lung damage (interstitial leukocyte infiltration, congestive hyperemia, and interstitial edema). BALF TPC was increased, suggesting inflammatory damage. In agreement, tissue IL-1β concentration increased in the brain and lung, in correspondence with increased IL-1β serum concentration. Neither HYP nor ISC alone led to brain or lung damage. HI brain damage in newborn piglets led to inflammatory lung damage, suggesting an additional mechanism accounting for the development of lung dysfunction after neonatal HI encephalopathy.

  3. Effect of partial liquid ventilation on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema after experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, N R; Kozlowski, J K; Gust, R; Shapiro, S D; Schuster, D P

    2000-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with two different dosages of the perfluorocarbon LiquiVent (perflubron) on pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation after oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury in dogs. We used imaging with positron emission tomography to measure fractional pulmonary blood flow, lung water concentration (LWC), and the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) of (68)Ga-labeled transferrin at 5 and 21 h after lung injury in five dogs undergoing conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV), five dogs undergoing low-dose PLV (perflubron at 10 ml/kg), and four dogs undergoing high dose PLV (perflubron at 30 ml/kg). A positive end-expiratory pressure of 7.5 cm H(2)O was used in all dogs. After OA (0.08 ml/kg)- induced lung injury, there were no significant differences or trends for PTCER or LWC at any time when the PLV groups were compared with the CMV group. However, lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity was significantly lower in the combined PLV group than in the CMV group (p = 0.016). We conclude that after OA-induced lung injury, the addition of PLV to CMV does not directly attenuate pulmonary vascular leak or lung water accumulation. Rather, the benefits of such treatment may be due to modifications of the inflammatory response.

  4. Resolution of experimental lung injury by Monocyte-derived inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Tsushima, Kenji; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Mock, Jason R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Files, Daniel C.; Avalos, Claudia R.; Rodriguez, Jackie V.; Waickman, Adam T.; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Pearse, David B.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Crow, Michael T.; King, Landon S.

    2012-01-01

    While early events in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) have been defined, little is known about mechanisms mediating resolution. To search for determinants of resolution, we exposed wild type (WT) mice to intratracheal lipopolysacaccharide (i.t. LPS) and assessed the response at intervals to day 10, when injury had resolved. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was significantly upregulated in the lung at day 4 after LPS. When iNOS−/− mice were exposed to i.t. LPS, early lung injury was attenuated, however recovery was markedly impaired compared to wild type (WT) mice. iNOS−/− mice had increased mortality and sustained increases in markers of lung injury. Adoptive transfer of WT (iNOS+/+) bone marrow-derived monocytes or direct adenoviral gene delivery of iNOS into injured iNOS−/− mice restored resolution of ALI. Irradiated bone marrow chimeras confirmed the protective effects of myeloid-derived iNOS, but not of epithelial iNOS. Alveolar macrophages exhibited sustained expression of co-signalling molecule CD86 in iNOS−/− mice compared to WT mice. Antibody-mediated blockade of CD86 in iNOS−/− mice improved survival and enhanced resolution of lung inflammation. Our findings show that monocyte-derived iNOS plays a pivotal role in mediating resolution of ALI by modulating lung immune responses, thus facilitating clearance of alveolar inflammation and promoting lung repair. PMID:22844117

  5. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Seno, Takahiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Kida, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Amane; Kukida, Yuji; Fujioka, Kazuki; Fujii, Wataru; Murakami, Ken; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a protein expressed by macrophages infiltrating the area around the coronary arteries of rats with an ectopic cardiac allograft. Some studies have shown that expression of AIF-1 increased in a mouse model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced acute colitis and in acute cellular rejection of human cardiac allografts. These results suggest that AIF-1 is related to acute inflammation. The current study used bleomycin-induced acute lung injury to analyze the expression of AIF-1 and to examine its function in acute lung injury. Results showed that AIF-1 was significantly expressed in lung macrophages and increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice with bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in comparison to control mice. Recombinant AIF-1 increased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α from RAW264.7 (a mouse macrophage cell line) and primary lung fibroblasts, and it also increased the production of KC (CXCL1) from lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AIF-1 plays an important role in the mechanism underlying acute lung injury.

  6. beta2 adrenergic agonists in acute lung injury? The heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae W

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research into its pathophysiology, acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) remains a devastating syndrome with mortality approaching 40%. Pharmacologic therapies that reduce the severity of lung injury in vivo and in vitro have not yet been translated to effective clinical treatment options, and innovative therapies are needed. Recently, the use of beta2 adrenergic agonists as potential therapy has gained considerable interest due to their ability to increase the resolution of pulmonary edema. However, the results of clinical trials of beta agonist therapy for ALI/ARDS have been conflicting in terms of benefit. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Briot and colleagues present evidence that may help clarify the inconsistent results. The authors demonstrate that, in oleic acid lung injury in dogs, the inotropic effect of beta agonists may recruit damaged pulmonary capillaries, leading to increased lung endothelial permeability.

  7. Inhaled nitric oxide aggravates phosgene model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Li; Hai, Chun-Xu; Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    The principal acute mode of action of inhaled phosgene gas is related to an increase alveolar fluid exudation under pathologic conditions. This paper considers some aspects in modeling phosgene-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in an acute rat bioassay and whether edema formation can be modulated by inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). Protein analysis in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is amongst the most sensitive method to quantify the phosgene-induced non-cardiogenic, pulmonary high-permeability edema following acute inhalation exposure. Maximum concentrations in BAL-protein occur within one day postexposure, typically within a latency period up to about 15 h as a consequence of an increasingly exhausted lymphatic drainage. An almost similar sensitivity was given by the functional endpoint 'enhanced pause (Penh)' when measured by non-invasive whole-body barometric plethysmography over a time period of 20 h. The magnitude of edema formation follows a concentration x time (C¹xt) relationship, although animal model-specific deviations may occur at very short exposure durations (1-20 min) due to a rodent-specific, reflexively induced transient decreased ventilation. This has to be accounted for when simulating accidental exposure scenarios to study the mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of fluid transport in this type of ALI. Therefore, a special focus has to be given to the dosimetry of inhaled phosgene, otherwise any change in effect magnitude, as a result of under-dosing of phosgene, may be misconceived as promising therapy. This study demonstrates that accidental exposures can be modeled best in rats by exposure durations of at least 20-30 min. Lung function measurements (Penh) show that pathophysiological effects appear to occur concomitant with the exposure to phosgene; however, its full clinical manifestation requires a gross imbalance of pulmonary fluid clearance. When applying this concept, post-phosgene exposure iNO at 1.5 ppm × 6 h or

  8. Lung Protective Ventilation (ARDSNet) versus APRV: Ventilatory Management in a Combined Model of Acute Lung and Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen W.; Leonard, Kenji L.; Falls, Randall K.; Mageau, Ronald P.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Hollowell, Joseph P.; Trainor, Wayne E.; Kanaan, Hilal A.; Hickner, Robert C.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Poulin, Nathaniel R.; Waibel, Brett H.; Toschlog, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concomitant lung/brain traumatic injury, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Lung protective ventilation (ARDSNet) has become the standard for managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, the resulting permissive hypercapnea may compound traumatic brain injury (TBI). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) offers an alternative strategy for management of this patient population. APRV was hypothesized to retard the progression of acute lung/brain injury to a greater degree than ARDSNet in a swine model. Methods Yorkshire swine were randomized to ARDSNet, APRV, or sham. Ventilatory settings and pulmonary parameters, vitals, blood gases, quantitative histopathology, and cerebral microdialysis were compared between groups using chi-square, Fisher’s exact, Student’s t-test, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and mixed effects repeated measures modeling. Results 22 swine (17 male, 5 female), weighing 25±6.0kg, were randomized to APRV (n=9), ARDSNet (n=12), or sham (n=1). PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio dropped significantly while intracranial pressure increased significantly for all three groups immediately following lung and brain injury. Over time, peak inspiratory pressure, mean airway pressure, and P/F ratio significantly increased, while total respiratory rate significantly decreased within the APRV group compared to the ARDSNet group. Histopathology did not show significant differences between groups in overall brain or lung tissue injury; however, cerebral microdialysis trends suggested increased ischemia within the APRV group compared to ARDSNet over time. Conclusion Previous studies have not evaluated the effects of APRV in this population. While our macroscopic parameters and histopathology did not observe a significant difference between groups, microdialysis data suggest a trend toward increased cerebral ischemia associated with APRV over time. Additional and future studies should focus on extending the time interval for observation to

  9. PGE2 produced by the lung augments the effector phase of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Church, Rachel J.; Jania, Leigh A.; Koller, Beverly H.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated PGE2 is a hallmark of most inflammatory lesions. This lipid mediator can induce the cardinal signs of inflammation, and the beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are attributed to inhibition of cyclooxygenase COX-1 and COX-2, enzymes essential in the biosynthesis of PGE2 from arachidonic acid. However, both clinical studies and rodent models suggest that, in the asthmatic lung, PGE2 acts to restrain the immune response and limit physiological change secondary to inflammation. To directly address the role of PGE2 in the lung, we examined the development of disease in mice lacking microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES1), which converts COX-1/COX-2 derived PGH2 to PGE2. We show that mPGES1 determines PGE2 levels in the naïve lung and is required for increases in PGE2 after ovalbumin (OVA) induced allergy. While loss of either COX-1 or COX-2 increases the disease severity, surprisingly mPGES1 −/− mice show reduced inflammation. However, an increase in serum IgE is still observed in the mPGES1 −/− mice, suggesting that loss of PGE2 does not impair induction of a TH2 response. Furthermore, mPGES1 −/− mice expressing a transgenic OVA-specific T cell receptor are also protected, indicating that PGE2 acts primarily after challenge with inhaled antigen. PGE2 produced by the lung plays the critical role in this response, as loss of lung mPGES1 is sufficient to protect against disease. Together this supports a model in which mPGES1-dependent PGE2 produced by populations of cells native to the lung contributes to the effector phase of some allergic responses. PMID:22412193

  10. Early Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Augmentation with Phenylephrine after Traumatic Brain Injury may be Neuroprotective in a Pediatric Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Stuart H.; Smith, Colin; Kilbaugh, Todd J.; Frangos, Suzanne G.; Ralston, Jill; Helfaer, Mark A; Margulies, Susan S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) less than 40 mm Hg following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with increased mortality independent of age, and current guidelines recommend maintaining CPP between 40–60 mm Hg. Although adult TBI studies have observed an increased risk of complications associated with targeting a CPP > 70, we hypothesize that targeting a CPP of 70 mm Hg with the use of phenylephrine early after injury in the immature brain will be neuroprotective. Design Animals were randomly assigned to injury with CPP = 70 mm Hg (CPP70) or CPP = 40 mm Hg (CPP40). Diffuse TBI was produced by a single rapid rotation of the head in the axial plane. Cerebral microdialysis, brain tissue oxygen, intracranial pressure, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured 30 min – 6 h post-injury. One hour after injury, CPP was manipulated with the vasoconstrictor phenylephrine. Animals were euthanized 6 h post-TBI, brains fixed, and stained to assess regions of cell injury and axonal dysfunction. Setting University center. Subject 21 four week-old female swine. Measurements and Main Results Augmentation of CPP to 70 mm Hg resulted in no change in axonal dysfunction, but significantly smaller cell injury volumes at 6 hours post injury compared to CPP40 (1.1% vs. 7.4%, p < 0.05). Microdialysis lactate/pyruvate ratios were improved at CPP70 compared to CPP40. CBF was higher in the CPP70 group but did not reach statistical significance. Phenylephrine was well tolerated and there were no observed increases in serum lactate or intracranial pressure in either group. Conclusions Targeting a CPP of 70 mm Hg resulted in a greater reduction in metabolic crisis and cell injury volumes compared to a CPP of 40 mm Hg in an immature swine model. Early aggressive CPP augmentation to a CPP of 70 mm Hg in pediatric TBI before severe intracranial hypertension has the potential to be neuroprotective, and further investigations are needed. PMID:22809910

  11. PARP inhibitor, olaparib ameliorates acute lung and kidney injury upon intratracheal administration of LPS in mice.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Kunal; Singla, Esha; Sahu, Bijayani; Naura, Amarjit S

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that PARP-1 inhibition provides protection against lung inflammation in the context of asthma and acute lung injury. Olaparib is a potent new generation PARP inhibitor that has been approved for human testing. The present work was designed to evaluate its beneficial potential against LPS-induced acute lung injury and acute kidney injury upon intratracheal administration of the endotoxin in mice. Administration of olaparib at different doses, 30 min after LPS treatment showed that single intraperitoneal injection of the drug at 5 mg/kg b.wt. reduced the total number of inflammatory cells particularly neutrophils in the lungs. This was associated with reduced pulmonary edema as the total protein content in the bronchoalveolar fluid was found to be decreased substantially. Olaparib provided strong protection against LPS-mediated secondary kidney injury as reflected by restoration of serum levels of urea, creatinine, and uric acid toward normal. The drug restored the LPS-mediated redox imbalance toward normal in lung and kidney tissues as assessed by measuring malondialdehyde and GSH levels. Finally, RT-PCR data revealed that olaparib downregulates the LPS-induced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes namely TNF-α, IL-1β, and VCAM-1 in the lungs without altering the expression of total p65NF-κB. Overall, the data suggest that olaparib has a strong potential to protect against LPS-induced lung injury and associated dysfunctioning of kidney in mice. Given the fact that olaparib is approved by FDA for human testing, our findings can pave the way for testing of the drug on humans inflicted with acute lung injury.

  12. Antenatal and postnatal corticosteroid and resuscitation induced lung injury in preterm sheep

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Initiation of ventilation using high tidal volumes in preterm lambs causes lung injury and inflammation. Antenatal corticosteroids mature the lungs of preterm infants and postnatal corticosteroids are used to treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Objective To test if antenatal or postnatal corticosteroids would decrease resuscitation induced lung injury. Methods 129 d gestational age lambs (n = 5-8/gp; term = 150 d) were operatively delivered and ventilated after exposure to either 1) no medication, 2) antenatal maternal IM Betamethasone 0.5 mg/kg 24 h prior to delivery, 3) 0.5 mg/kg Dexamethasone IV at delivery or 4) Cortisol 2 mg/kg IV at delivery. Lambs then were ventilated with no PEEP and escalating tidal volumes (VT) to 15 mL/kg for 15 min and then given surfactant. The lambs were ventilated with VT 8 mL/kg and PEEP 5 cmH20 for 2 h 45 min. Results High VT ventilation caused a deterioration of lung physiology, lung inflammation and injury. Antenatal betamethasone improved ventilation, decreased inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and alveolar protein leak, but did not prevent neutrophil influx. Postnatal dexamethasone decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, but had no beneficial effect on ventilation, and postnatal cortisol had no effect. Ventilation increased liver serum amyloid mRNA expression, which was unaffected by corticosteroids. Conclusions Antenatal betamethasone decreased lung injury without decreasing lung inflammatory cells or systemic acute phase responses. Postnatal dexamethasone or cortisol, at the doses tested, did not have important effects on lung function or injury, suggesting that corticosteroids given at birth will not decrease resuscitation mediated injury. PMID:20003512

  13. Gas density alters expiratory time constants before and after experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William R; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Dominelli, Paolo B; Brasher, Penelope M A; Griesdale, Donald E G; Foster, Glen E; Yacyshyn, Alexandra; Ayas, Najib T; Sheel, A William

    2015-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does the induction of a model of lung injury affect the expiratory time constant (τE) in terms of either total duration or morphology? Does ventilation with gases of different densities alter the duration or morphology of τE either before or after injury? What is the main finding and its importance? The use of sulfur hexafluoride in ventilating gas mixtures lengthens total expiratory time constants before and after lung injury compared with both nitrogen and helium mixtures. Sulfur hexafluoride mixtures also decrease the difference and variability of τE between fast- and slow-emptying compartments before and after injury when compared with nitrogen and helium mixtures. Acute lung injury is characterized by regional heterogeneity of lung resistance and elastance that may lead to regional heterogeneity of expiratory time constants (τE). We hypothesized that increasing airflow resistance by using inhaled sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) would lengthen time constants and decrease their heterogeneity in an experimental model of lung injury when compared with nitrogen or helium mixtures. To overcome the limitations of a single-compartment model, we employed a multisegment model of expiratory gas flow. An experimental model of lung injury was created using intratracheal injection of sodium polyacrylate in anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated female Yorkshire-cross pigs (n = 7). The animals were ventilated with 50% O2 and the remaining 50% as nitrogen (N2), helium (He) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Values for τE decreased with injury and were more variable after injury than before (P < 0.001). Values for τE increased throughout expiration both before and after injury, and the rate of increase in τE was lessened by SF6 (P < 0.001 when compared with N2 both before and after injury). Altering the inhaled gas density did not affect indices of oxygenation, dead space or shunt. The use of SF6 in ventilating gas mixtures lengthens

  14. Neutrophils as early immunologic effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Carmody, A; Shenkar, R; Arcaroli, J

    2000-12-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by accumulation of neutrophils in the lungs, accompanied by the development of interstitial edema and an intense inflammatory response. To assess the role of neutrophils as early immune effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced lung injury, mice were made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide or anti-neutrophil antibodies. Endotoxemia- or hemorrhage-induced lung edema was significantly reduced in neutropenic animals. Activation of the transcriptional regulatory factor nuclear factor-kappaB after hemorrhage or endotoxemia was diminished in the lungs of neutropenic mice compared with nonneutropenic controls. Hemorrhage or endotoxemia was followed by increases in pulmonary mRNA and protein levels for interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Endotoxin-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression were greater than those found after hemorrhage. The amounts of mRNA or protein for IL-1beta, MIP-2, and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after hemorrhage in the lungs of neutropenic versus nonneutropenic mice. Neutropenia was associated with significant reductions in IL-1beta and MIP-2 but not in TNF-alpha expression in the lungs after endotoxemia. These experiments show that neutrophils play a central role in initiating acute inflammatory responses and causing injury in the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia.

  15. Hydrogen inhalation decreases lung graft injury in brain-dead donor rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huacheng; Fu, Zhijie; Wei, Yuting; Liu, Jinfeng; Cui, Xiaoguang; Yang, Wanchao; Ding, Wengang; Pan, Peng; Li, Wenzhi

    2013-02-01

    The process of brain death induces acute lung injury in donors and aggravates ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in grafts. Hydrogen, a new anti-oxidant, attenuates IRI in several organ transplant models. We examined whether 2% inhaled hydrogen would show favorable effects on lung grafts from brain-dead donor rats. Brain-dead donor rats inhaled mixed gases with either 50% oxygen and 50% nitrogen or mixed gases with 2% hydrogen, 50% oxygen and 48% nitrogen for 2 hours. The recipients inhaled the same gas as the donors and were euthanized 2 hours after lung transplantation. Hydrogen improved PaO(2)/FIO(2) and PVO(2)/FIO(2) from the arterial and pulmonary venous blood in recipients and decreased the lung injury score in grafts from brain-dead donors. Hydrogen decreased the amount of IL-8 and TNF-α in serum, inhibited the activity of malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase, and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in the lung grafts from brain-dead donors. Furthermore, hydrogen decreased the apoptotic index of the cells and inhibited the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and caspase-3 in lung grafts from brain-dead donors. Hydrogen can exert protective effects on lung grafts from brain-dead donors through anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ischemia-reperfusion injury in the isolated rat lung. Role of flow and endogenous leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Seibert, A F; Haynes, J; Taylor, A

    1993-02-01

    Microvascular lung injury caused by ischemia-reperfusion (IR) may occur via leukocyte-dependent and leukocyte-independent pathways. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion may be a rate-limiting step in IR lung injury. Leukocyte adhesion to microvascular endothelium occurs when the attractant forces between leukocyte and endothelium are greater than the kinetic energy of the leukocyte and the vascular wall shear rate. We hypothesized (1) that isolated, buffer-perfused rat lungs are not free of endogenous leukocytes, (2) that endogenous leukocytes contribute to IR-induced microvascular injury as measured by the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), and (3) that a reduction of perfusate flow rate would potentiate leukocyte-dependent IR injury. Sixty lungs were divided into four groups: (1) low-flow controls, (2) high-flow controls, (3) low-flow IR, and (4) high-flow IR. Microvascular injury was linearly related to baseline perfusate leukocyte concentrations at both low (r = 0.78) and high (r = 0.82) flow rates. Kfc in the high-flow IR group (0.58 +/- 0.03 ml/min/cm H2O/100 g) was less (p < 0.05) than Kfc in the low-flow IR group (0.82 +/- 0.07), and in both groups Kfc values were significantly greater than low-flow (0.34 +/- 0.03) and high-flow (0.31 +/- 0.01) control Kfc values after 75 min. Retention of leukocytes in the lung, evaluated by a tissue myeloperoxidase assay, was greatest in the low-flow IR group. We conclude (1) that isolated, buffer-perfused rat lungs contain significant quantities of leukocytes and that these leukocytes contribute to IR lung injury, and (2) that IR-induced microvascular injury is potentiated by low flow.

  17. Mitigation of chlorine gas lung injury in rats by postexposure administration of sodium nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Amit K.; Doran, Stephen F.; Samal, Andrey A.; Sharma, Ruchita; Vedagiri, Kokilavani; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrite (NO2−) has been shown to limit injury to the heart, liver, and kidneys in various models of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Potential protective effects of systemic NO2− in limiting lung injury or enhancing repair have not been documented. We assessed the efficacy and mechanisms by which postexposure intraperitoneal injections of NO2− mitigate chlorine (Cl2)-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were exposed to Cl2 (400 ppm) for 30 min and returned to room air. NO2− (1 mg/kg) or saline was administered intraperitoneally at 10 min and 2, 4, and 6 h after exposure. Rats were killed at 6 or 24 h. Injury to airway and alveolar epithelia was assessed by quantitative morphology, protein concentrations, number of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measurement of lung F2-isoprostanes. Rats developed severe, but transient, hypoxemia. A significant increase of protein concentration, neutrophil numbers, airway epithelia in the BAL, and lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was evident at 6 h after Cl2 exposure. Quantitative morphology revealed extensive lung injury in the upper airways. Airway epithelial cells stained positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), but not caspase-3. Administration of NO2− resulted in lower BAL protein levels, significant reduction in the intensity of the TUNEL-positive cells, and normal lung wet-to-dry weight ratios. F2-isoprostane levels increased at 6 and 24 h after Cl2 exposure in NO2−- and saline-injected rats. This is the first demonstration that systemic NO2− administration mitigates airway and epithelial injury. PMID:21148791

  18. [Prophylactic effect of ambroxol on acute hydrochloric acid aspiration - induced lung injury].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang-ping; Guo, Qu-lian; Ai, Yu-hang; Wang, Rui-ke; Wang, E; He, Min

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of ambroxol, a muco-active drug, on acute hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in rats. Thirty pathogen-free SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: group A (n=10) and group B (n=10) were injected normal saline (NS) intraperitoneally (6.7 ml/kg), and group C with ambroxol (50 mg/kg), once a day for 3 consecutive days. Then animals received in tracheal instillation of NS (group A, pH 5.3, 1.2 ml/kg) or hydrochloric acid/NS (group B and C, pH 1.25, 1.2 ml/kg). Five hours after instillation of the injury vehicle, the arterial gas was determined, and the extent of lung injury was assessed by measuring the ratio of wet to dry weight (W/D) and evaluation of pathological change in lung tissue. (1)Partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO(2)) was significantly lower in group B than in groups A and C, although pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO(2)) in three groups showed little difference (all P<0.01). (2)The W/D was the highest in group B and the lowest in group A. (3)Severe acute lung injuries were detected in group B by pathological examination, the extent of injury was less in group C than in group B, but more severe than in group A (group A vs. B and B vs. C in mean pathologic score, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). Hydrochloric-acid aspiration may induce an acute and diffuse lung injury, with manifestations of hyperpnea, lower PaO(2) and severe pathological changes in lung tissues. Ambroxol may have a protective effect against lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid.

  19. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D.; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a−/−) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a−/− mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt+/− mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a−/− mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a−/− mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically. PMID:26498248

  20. Pivotal Role of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Lung Injury after Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T.; Soledade, Erico; Pinheiro, Carla S.; Dellatorre-Teixeira, Ludmilla; Oliveira, Gisele P.; Oliveira, Mariana G.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Benjamim, Claudia F.

    2014-01-01

    Postsepsis lung injury is a common clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Leukotrienes (LTs) are important lipid mediators of infection and inflammation derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism of arachidonate with the potential to contribute to lung damage after sepsis. To test the hypothesis that LTs are mediators of lung injury after sepsis, we assessed lung structure, inflammatory mediators, and mechanical changes after cecal ligation and puncture surgery in wild-type (WT) and 5-LO knockout (5-LO−/−) mice and in WT mice treated with a pharmacologic LT synthesis inhibitor (MK886) and LT receptor antagonists (CP105,696 and montelukast). Sixteen hours after surgery, WT animals exhibited severe lung injury (by histological analysis), substantial mechanical impairment (i.e., an increase in static lung elastance), an increase in neutrophil infiltration, and high levels of LTB4, cysteinyl-LTs (cys-LTs), prostaglandin E2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, KC (CXCL1), and monocyte chemotactic protein–1 (CCL2) in lung tissue and plasma. 5-LO−/− mice and WT mice treated with a pharmacologic 5-LO inhibitor were significantly protected from lung inflammation and injury. Selective antagonists for BLT1 or cys-LT1, the high-affinity receptors for LTB4 and cys-LTs, respectively, were insufficient to provide protection when used alone. These results point to an important role for 5-LO products in sepsis-induced lung injury and suggest that the use of 5-LO inhibitors may be of therapeutic benefit clinically. PMID:23947598

  1. Pivotal role of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in lung injury after experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Soledade, Erico; Pinheiro, Carla S; Dellatorre-Teixeira, Ludmilla; Oliveira, Gisele P; Oliveira, Mariana G; Peters-Golden, Marc; Rocco, Patricia R M; Benjamim, Claudia F; Canetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Postsepsis lung injury is a common clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Leukotrienes (LTs) are important lipid mediators of infection and inflammation derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism of arachidonate with the potential to contribute to lung damage after sepsis. To test the hypothesis that LTs are mediators of lung injury after sepsis, we assessed lung structure, inflammatory mediators, and mechanical changes after cecal ligation and puncture surgery in wild-type (WT) and 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice and in WT mice treated with a pharmacologic LT synthesis inhibitor (MK886) and LT receptor antagonists (CP105,696 and montelukast). Sixteen hours after surgery, WT animals exhibited severe lung injury (by histological analysis), substantial mechanical impairment (i.e., an increase in static lung elastance), an increase in neutrophil infiltration, and high levels of LTB4, cysteinyl-LTs (cys-LTs), prostaglandin E2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, KC (CXCL1), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2) in lung tissue and plasma. 5-LO(-/-) mice and WT mice treated with a pharmacologic 5-LO inhibitor were significantly protected from lung inflammation and injury. Selective antagonists for BLT1 or cys-LT1, the high-affinity receptors for LTB4 and cys-LTs, respectively, were insufficient to provide protection when used alone. These results point to an important role for 5-LO products in sepsis-induced lung injury and suggest that the use of 5-LO inhibitors may be of therapeutic benefit clinically.

  2. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-15

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a(-/-)) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a(-/-) mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt(+/-) mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a(-/-) mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically.

  3. Hypertonic saline up-regulates A3 adenosine receptors expression of activated neutrophils and increases acute lung injury after sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yu; Pauzenberger, Reinhard; Mark, Hirsh I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hypertonic saline resuscitation reduces tissue damage by inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Hypertonic saline triggers polymorphonuclear neutrophils to release adenosine triphosphate that is converted to adenosine, inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils through A2a adenosine receptors. polymorphonuclear neutrophils also express A3 adenosine receptors that enhance polymorphonuclear neutrophils functions. Here we investigated whether A3 receptors may diminish the efficacy of hypertonic saline in a mouse model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized animal study and laboratory investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Interventions The effect of A3 receptors on the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation was assessed in A3 receptor knockout and wild-type mice. Animals were treated with hypertonic saline (7.5% NaCl, 4 mL/kg) before or after cecal ligation and puncture, and acute lung injury and mortality were determined. The effect of timing of hypertonic saline exposure on A3 receptor expression and degranulation was studied in vitro with isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Measurements and main results Treatment of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with hypertonic saline before stimulation with formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine inhibited A3 receptor expression and degranulation, whereas hypertonic saline-treatment after formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulation augmented A3 receptor expression and degranulation. Acute lung injury in wild-type mice treated with hypertonic saline after cecal ligation and puncture was significantly greater than in wild-type mice pretreated with hypertonic saline. This aggravating effect of delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was absent in A3 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, mortality in wild-type mice with delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was significantly higher (88%) than in animals treated with hypertonic saline before cecal ligation and puncture (50%). Mortality in A3

  4. General anxiety symptoms after acute lung injury: Predictors and correlates

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Jennifer E.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Sricharoenchai, Thiti; Wozniak, Amy; Shanholtz, Carl; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Needham, Dale M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute lung injury (ALI) is common in the intensive care unit (ICU), typically requiring life support ventilation. Survivors often experience anxiety after hospital discharge. We evaluated general anxiety symptoms 3 months after ALI for: (1) associations with patient characteristics and ICU variables, and (2) cross-sectional associations with physical function and quality of life (QOL). Methods General anxiety was assessed as part of a prospective cohort study recruiting patients from 13 ICUs at four hospitals in Baltimore, MD using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale — Anxiety Subscale (HAD-A), with associations evaluated using multivariable linear and logistic regression models. Results Of 152 patients, 38% had a positive screening test for general anxiety (HAD-A ≥ 8). Pre-ICU body mass index and psychiatric comorbidity were associated with general anxiety (OR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06 (1.00, 1.13) and 3.59 (1.25, 10.30), respectively). No ICU-related variables were associated with general anxiety. General anxiety was associated with the number of instrumental ADL dependencies (Spearman's rho = 0.22; p = 0.004) and worse overall QOL as measured by EQ-5D visual analog scale (VAS) (rho = −0.34; p < 0.001) and utility score (rho = −0.30; p < 0.001), and by the SF-36 mental health domain (rho = −0.70; p < 0.001) and Mental Component Summary score (rho = −0.73; p < 0.001). Conclusion Many patients have substantial general anxiety symptoms 3 months after ALI. General anxiety was associated with patient characteristics and impaired physical function and quality of life. Early identification and treatment of general anxiety may enhance physical and emotional function in patients surviving critical illnesses. PMID:23972420

  5. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Survivors of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jason B.; Yang, Andrew; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Needham, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) and other critical illnesses often experience substantial posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. However, most questionnaires have not been validated against a PTSD diagnostic reference standard in this patient population. Hence, in the current study of survivors of ALI, we evaluated the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), a questionnaire measure of PTSD symptoms, against the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), the current state-of-the-art PTSD diagnostic reference standard, which also provides a quantitative assessment of PTSD symptoms. Methods: We evaluated the IES-R questionnaire vs the CAPS diagnostic interview in 60 of 77 consecutively recruited survivors of ALI from two prospective cohort studies of patients 1 to 5 years after ALI. Results: The IES-R total score (range: 0.0-3.2) and the CAPS total severity score (range: 0-70) were strongly related (Pearson r = 0.80, Spearman ρ = 0.69). Using CAPS data, eight of the 60 patients (13%) had PTSD at the time of assessment, and an additional eight patients had partial PTSD (total prevalence, 27%). In a receiver operating characteristics curve analysis with CAPS PTSD or partial PTSD as criterion variables, the area under the curve ranged from 95% (95% CI, 88%-100%) to 97% (95% CI, 92%-100%). At an IES-R threshold of 1.6, with the same criterion variables, sensitivities ranged from 80% to 100%, specificities 85% to 91%, positive predictive values 50% to 75%, negative predictive values 93% to 100%, positive likelihood ratios 6.5 to 9.0, negative likelihood ratios 0.0 to 0.2, and efficiencies 87% to 90%. Conclusions: The IES-R appears to be an excellent brief PTSD symptom measure and screening tool in ALI survivors. PMID:23699588

  6. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  7. Ameliorative effect of Leflunomide on lung injury following an aspiration.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, M Z; Torun, A C; Guzel, A; Murat, N; Okuyucu, A; Yilmaz, N; Gacar, A; Guvenc, T; Guzel, A

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of leflunomide (LEF) in lung injury after an aspiration of unknown pathophysiology. Forty-two healthy Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized and allocated to six experimental groups: saline (S) aspirated, S+LEF, hydrochloric acid (HCl) aspirated, HCl+LEF, formula aspirated (FOR), and FOR+LEF. The treatment groups (S+LEF, HCl+LEF, and FOR+LEF) received 20 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LEF for seven days. At the end of the seven days, blood and tissue samples were taken from the rats for histopathological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical examination. There was a significant increase in serum levels of YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein, in the HCl group after the aspiration (p<0.01). The increase in serum YKL-40 levels decreased significantly with LEF treatment (p<0.01). There was no significant difference in serum YKL-40 levels in the FOR group compared to the control group at pretreatment and in the FOR+LEF group at post-treatment. There was a significant increase in serum thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) values in the HCl and FOR groups compared to the control group (p=0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). In both treatment groups, the serum TBARS values significantly decreased after treatment with LEF (p=0.001 and p<0.05, respectively). There was a significant improvement in the histopathological scores, which deteriorated after the aspiration, and in the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells after treatment with LEF.

  8. Bioinformatic approaches to augment study of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Tim N.; Chikwem, Adaeze J.; Solanki, Nehal R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatic approaches are intended to provide systems level insight into the complex biological processes that underlie serious diseases such as cancer. In this review we describe current bioinformatic resources, and illustrate how they have been used to study a clinically important example: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and is often diagnosed at advanced stages, leading to limited therapeutic success. While EMT is essential during development and wound healing, pathological reactivation of this program by cancer cells contributes to metastasis and drug resistance, both major causes of death from lung cancer. Challenges of studying EMT include its transient nature, its molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity, and the complicated networks of rewired signaling cascades. Given the biology of lung cancer and the role of EMT, it is critical to better align the two in order to advance the impact of precision oncology. This task relies heavily on the application of bioinformatic resources. Besides summarizing recent work in this area, we use four EMT-associated genes, TGF-β (TGFB1), NEDD9/HEF1, β-catenin (CTNNB1) and E-cadherin (CDH1), as exemplars to demonstrate the current capacities and limitations of probing bioinformatic resources to inform hypothesis-driven studies with therapeutic goals. PMID:25096367

  9. Positron emission tomographic comparison of diffuse and lobar oleic acid lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D.P.; Haller, J.W.; Velazquez, M.

    1988-06-01

    We tested whether severity of injury measured from the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate for transferrin (PTCER), lung water accumulation, and changes in regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF) would be similar after oleic acid (OA) injection into either all lung lobes or directly into the pulmonary artery feeding the left caudal lobe (LCL) only. Measurements were made with positron emission tomography. After 0.015 ml/kg OA was injected into the LCL (Lobar, n = 5), lung water increased in the left dorsal region from 37 +/- 5 to 50 +/- 8 ml/100 ml lung (P less than 0.05), PTCER was 533 +/- 59 10(-4)/min, and regional PBF decreased 62%. No significant change occurred in the uninjured right dorsal lung where PTCER was 85 +/- 32. In the left ventral region PTCER was 357 +/- 60, PBF decreased only 31%, and the increase in lung water was less (25 +/- 3 to 30 +/- 6). In contrast after 0.08 ml/kg OA was injected via the right atrium (Diffuse, n = 6), PTCER (283 +/- 94) was lower in the left dorsal region of this group than in the corresponding region of the Lobar group (P less than 0.05). The increase in lung water, however, was the same, but no change occurred in PBF distribution. These results indicate important differences between the two methods of causing lung injury with OA. After injury lung water accumulates primarily in dependent portions of lung and is not always accompanied by a decrease in regional PBF. These decreases, when they occur, may instead indicate severe vascular injury.

  10. Experimental chronic kidney disease attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo rat lung model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun-Lun; Lan, Chou-Chin; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Wu, Geng-Chin; Peng, Chia-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Lung ischemia reperfusion injury (LIRI) is one of important complications following lung transplant and cardiopulmonary bypass. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, increased organ demand has led us to evaluate the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on LIRI. A CKD model was induced by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an adenine-rich (0.75%) diet for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and an isolated rat lung in situ model was used to evaluate ischemia reperfusion (IR)-induced acute lung injury. The clinicopathological parameters of LIRI, including pulmonary edema, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry changes, chemokine CXCL1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, heat shock protein expression, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation were determined. Our results indicated that adenine-fed rats developed CKD as characterized by increased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and the deposition of crystals in the renal tubules and interstitium. IR induced a significant increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung edema, lung injury scores, the expression of CXCL1 mRNA, iNOS level, and protein concentration of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the BALF and perfusate; the interleukin-10 level in the perfusate; and the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and perfusate were also significantly increased by LIRI. Counterintuitively, adenine-induced CKD significantly attenuated the severity of lung injury induced by IR. CKD rats exhibited increased heat shock protein 70 expression and decreased activation of NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD attenuated LIRI by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:28291795

  11. Airway pressure release ventilation reduces conducting airway micro-strain in lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Emr, Bryanna; Smith, Bradford; Ruiz, Cynthia; Roy, Shreyas; Meng, Qinghe; Jain, Sumeet; Satalin, Joshua; Snyder, Kathy; Ghosh, Auyon; Marx, William H; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Nieman, Gary F; Gatto, Louis A

    2014-11-01

    Improper mechanical ventilation can exacerbate acute lung damage, causing a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that VILI can be reduced by modifying specific components of the ventilation waveform (mechanical breath), and we studied the impact of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) and controlled mandatory ventilation (CMV) on the lung micro-anatomy (alveoli and conducting airways). The distribution of gas during inspiration and expiration and the strain generated during mechanical ventilation in the micro-anatomy (micro-strain) were calculated. Rats were anesthetized, surgically prepared, and randomized into 1 uninjured control group (n = 2) and 4 groups with lung injury: APRV 75% (n = 2), time at expiration (TLow) set to terminate appropriately at 75% of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR); APRV 10% (n = 2), TLow set to terminate inappropriately at 10% of PEFR; CMV with PEEP 5 cm H2O (PEEP 5; n = 2); or PEEP 16 cm H2O (PEEP 16; n = 2). Lung injury was induced in the experimental groups by Tween lavage and ventilated with their respective settings. Lungs were fixed at peak inspiration and end expiration for standard histology. Conducting airway and alveolar air space areas were quantified and conducting airway micro-strain was calculated. All lung injury groups redistributed inspired gas away from alveoli into the conducting airways. The APRV 75% minimized gas redistribution and micro-strain in the conducting airways and provided the alveolar air space occupancy most similar to control at both inspiration and expiration. In an injured lung, APRV 75% maintained micro-anatomic gas distribution similar to that of the normal lung. The lung protection demonstrated in previous studies using APRV 75% may be due to a more homogeneous distribution of gas at the micro-anatomic level as well as a reduction in conducting airway micro-strain. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatiotemporal Aeration and Lung Injury Patterns Are Influenced by the First Inflation Strategy at Birth.

    PubMed

    Tingay, David G; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Black, Don; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Lavizzari, Anna; Frerichs, Inéz; Zahra, Valerie A; Davis, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    Ineffective aeration during the first inflations at birth creates regional aeration and ventilation defects, initiating injurious pathways. This study aimed to compare a sustained first inflation at birth or dynamic end-expiratory supported recruitment during tidal inflations against ventilation without intentional recruitment on gas exchange, lung mechanics, spatiotemporal regional aeration and tidal ventilation, and regional lung injury in preterm lambs. Lambs (127 ± 2 d gestation), instrumented at birth, were ventilated for 60 minutes from birth with either lung-protective positive pressure ventilation (control) or as per control after either an initial 30 seconds of 40 cm H2O sustained inflation (SI) or an initial stepwise end-expiratory pressure recruitment maneuver during tidal inflations (duration 180 s; open lung ventilation [OLV]). At study completion, molecular markers of lung injury were analyzed. The initial use of an OLV maneuver, but not SI, at birth resulted in improved lung compliance, oxygenation, end-expiratory lung volume, and reduced ventilatory needs compared with control, persisting throughout the study. These changes were due to more uniform inter- and intrasubject gravity-dependent spatiotemporal patterns of aeration (measured using electrical impedance tomography). Spatial distribution of tidal ventilation was more stable after either recruitment maneuver. All strategies caused regional lung injury patterns that mirrored associated regional volume states. Irrespective of strategy, spatiotemporal volume loss was consistently associated with up-regulation of early growth response-1 expression. Our results show that mechanical and molecular consequences of lung aeration at birth are not simply related to rapidity of fluid clearance; they are also related to spatiotemporal pressure-volume interactions within the lung during inflation and deflation.

  13. Aerosolized alpha-tocopherol ameliorates acute lung injury following combined burn and smoke inhalation injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Morita, Naoki; Traber, Maret G; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Westphal, Martin; Murakami, Kazunori; Leonard, Scott W; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Herndon, David; Traber, Lillian D; Traber, Daniel L

    2006-03-01

    Victims of fire accidents who sustain both thermal injury to the skin and smoke inhalation have gross evidence of oxidant injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that delivery of vitamin E, an oxygen superoxide scavenger, directly into the airway would attenuate acute lung injury postburn and smoke inhalation. Sheep (N = 17 female, 35 +/- 5 kg) were divided into 3 groups: (1) injured, then nebulized with vitamin E (B&S, Vitamin E, n = 6); (2) injured, nebulized with saline (B&S, Saline, n = 6); and (3) not injured, not treated (Sham, n = 5). While under deep anesthesia with isoflurane, the sheep were subjected to a flame burn (40% total body surface area, 3rd degree) and inhalation injury (48 breaths of cotton smoke, <40 degrees C). All groups were resuscitated with Ringer lactate solution (4 mL/kg/%burn/24 h) and placed on a ventilator [positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 5 cm H2O, tidal volume = 15 mL/kg] for 48 h. B&S injury halved the lung alpha-tocopherol concentrations (0.9 +/- 0.1 nmol/g) compared with sham-injured animals (1.5 +/- 0.3), whereas vitamin E treatment elevated the lung alpha-tocopherol concentrations (7.40 +/- 2.61) in the injured animals. B&S injury decreased pulmonary gas exchange (PaO2/FiO2 ratios) from 517 +/- 15 at baseline to 329 +/- 49 at 24 h and to 149 +/- 32 at 48 h compared with sham ratios of 477 +/- 14, 536 +/- 48, and 609 +/- 49, respectively. Vitamin E treatment resulted in a significant improvement of pulmonary gas exchange; ratios were 415 +/- 34 and 283 +/- 42 at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Vitamin E nebulization therapy improved the clinical responses to burn and smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

  14. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hummler, Helmut D.; Banke, Katharina; Wolfson, Marla R.; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Ebsen, Michael; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Fuchs, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor. Objectives To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency. Methods 30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O) and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN)-group: tidal volume (Vt) = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH)-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH)-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology. Results PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05), with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8) resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group. Conclusion Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone. PMID:26840779

  15. Contributions of TRPV1, endovanilloids, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cell death in vitro and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Karen C.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Romero, Erin G.; Dull, Randal O.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (endovanilloids) are implicated as mediators of lung injury during inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that endovanilloids produced following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment activate TRPV1 and cause endoplasmic reticulum stress/GADD153 expression in lung cells, representing a mechanistic component of lung injury. The TRPV1 agonist nonivamide induced GADD153 expression and caused cytotoxicity in immortalized and primary human bronchial, bronchiolar/alveolar, and microvascular endothelial cells, proportional to TRPV1 mRNA expression. In CF-1 mice, Trpv1 mRNA was most abundant in the alveoli, and intratracheal nonivamide treatment promoted Gadd153 expression in the alveolar region. Treatment of CF-1 mice with LPS increased Gadd153 in the lung, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and lung wet-to-dry weight ratio. Cotreating mice with LPS and the TRPV1 antagonist LJO-328 reduced Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL but did not inhibit increases in lung wet-to-dry ratio. In Trpv1−/− mice treated with LPS, Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL were reduced relative to wild-type mice, and the wet-to-dry weight ratios of lungs from both wild-type and Trpv1−/− mice decreased. Organic extracts of blood collected from LPS-treated mice were more cytotoxic to TRPV1-overexpressing cells compared with BEAS-2B cells and extracts from control mice, however, most pure endovanilloids did not produce cytotoxicity in a characteristic TRPV1-dependent manner. Collectively, these data indicate a role for TRPV1, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists, in ER stress and cytotoxicity in lung cells but demonstrate that ER stress and cytotoxicity are not essential for pulmonary edema. PMID:21949157

  16. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:26240569

  17. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury.

  18. C5L2, the Second C5a Anaphylatoxin Receptor, Suppresses LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruobing; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Gerard, Norma P

    2016-11-01

    LPS-induced lung injury in the mouse is one of the most robust experimental models used for studies of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome in humans. Prior clinical and experimental studies support an important role for complement activation, particularly production of C5a, in the pathophysiology of human ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome. In the mouse model, however, the precise role of C5a and its receptors is unclear. C5L2, an enigmatic second receptor for C5a, has been characterized, and results have generated substantial debate regarding its in vivo function. Our previous work with human neutrophils revealed a unique role for C5L2 in negatively modulating C5a-C5a receptor (C5aR)-mediated cellular activation, in which antibody-mediated blockade of C5L2 resulted in augmented C5a-C5aR responses. Here, we demonstrate that C5L2(-/-) mice (BALB/c background) administered intranasal LPS exhibit significantly more airway edema and hemorrhage than do wild-type animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenates have significantly more neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity, as well as proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. When a blocking antibody against the C5aR was administered before LPS administration, the increased neutrophilic infiltration and cytokine levels were reversed. Thus, our data show not only that C5a contributes significantly to LPS-induced ALI in the mouse, but also that C5L2 plays an important antiinflammatory role in this model through actions resulting at least in part from negative modulation of C5a receptor activation.

  19. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection.

  20. Effect of corticosteroid treatment on cell recovery by lung lavage in acute radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wesselius, L.J.; Floreani, A.A.; Kimler, B.F.; Papasian, C.J.; Dixon, A.Y. )

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate cell populations recovered by lung lavage up to 6 weeks following thoracic irradiation (24 Gy) as an index of the acute inflammatory response within lung structures. Additionally, rats were treated five times weekly with intraperitoneal saline (0.3 cc) or methylprednisolone (7.5 mg/kg/week). Lung lavage of irradiated rats recovered increased numbers of total cells compared to controls beginning 3 weeks after irradiation (P less than 0.05). The initial increase in number of cells recovered was attributable to an influx of neutrophils (P less than 0.05), and further increases at 4 and 6 weeks were associated with increased numbers of recovered macrophages (P less than 0.05). Lung lavage of steroid-treated rats at 6 weeks after irradiation recovered increased numbers of all cell populations compared to controls (P less than 0.05); however, numbers of recovered total cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes were all significantly decreased compared to saline-treated rats (P less than 0.05). The number of inflammatory cells recovered by lung lavage during acute radiation-induced lung injury is significantly diminished by corticosteroid treatment. Changes in cells recovered by lung lavage can also be correlated with alteration in body weight and respiration rate subsequent to treatment with thoracic irradiation and/or corticosteroids.

  1. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  2. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibitor Is a Novel Therapeutic Candidate in Murine Models of Inflammatory Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Quijada, Hector; Sammani, Saad; Siegler, Jessica; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Deaton, Ryan; Saadat, Laleh; Zaidi, Rafe S.; Messana, Joe; Gann, Peter H.; Machado, Roberto F.; Camp, Sara M.; Wang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified the intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (iNAMPT, aka pre–B-cell colony enhancing factor) as a candidate gene promoting acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) with circulating nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase potently inducing NF-κB signaling in lung endothelium. iNAMPT also synthesizes intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (iNAD) in response to extracellular oxidative stress, contributing to the inhibition of apoptosis via ill-defined mechanisms. We now further define the role of iNAMPT activity in the pathogenesis of ARDS/VILI using the selective iNAMPT inhibitor FK-866. C57/B6 mice were exposed to VILI (40 ml/kg, 4 h) or LPS (1.5 mg/kg, 18 h) after osmotic pump delivery of FK-866 (100 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneally). Assessment of total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) levels, cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α), lung iNAD levels, and injury scores revealed that FK-866–mediated iNAMPT inhibition successfully reduced lung tissue iNAD levels, BAL injury indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and lung injury scores in LPS- and VILI-exposed mice. FK-866 further increased lung PMN apoptosis, as reflected by caspase-3 activation in BAL PMNs. These findings support iNAMPT inhibition via FK-866 as a novel therapeutic agent for ARDS via enhanced apoptosis in inflammatory PMNs. PMID:24588101

  3. Granzyme A- and B-cluster deficiency delays acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B M; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F; Bos, Albert P

    2010-01-15

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating proapoptotic caspase activity and proinflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A- and B-cluster single- and double-knockout mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3, and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A- and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury.

  4. Supplementation of parenteral nutrition with fish oil attenuates acute lung injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kohama, Keisuke; Nakao, Atsunori; Terashima, Mariko; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Harada, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Yamashita, Hayato; Fujiwara, Mayu; Kotani, Joji

    2014-01-01

    Fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has diverse immunomodulatory properties and attenuates acute lung injury when administered in enternal nutrition. However, enteral nutrition is not always feasible. Therefore, we investigated the ability of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil to ameliorate acute lung injury. Rats were infused with parenteral nutrition solutions (without lipids, with soybean oil, or with soybean oil and fish oil) for three days. Lipopolysaccharide (15 mg/kg) was then administered intratracheally to induce acute lung injury, characterized by impaired lung function, polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment, parenchymal tissue damage, and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Administration of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil prior to lung insult improved gas exchange and inhibited neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil also prolonged survival. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene B5 secretion was measured in neutrophils from the peritoneal cavity. The neutrophils from rats treated with fish oil-rich parenteral nutrition releas