Science.gov

Sample records for augmented nerve-mediated relaxation

  1. Development of a low risk augmentation system for an energy efficient transport having relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizlo, T. R.; Berg, R. A.; Gilles, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    An augmentation system for a 230 passenger, twin engine aircraft designed with a relaxation of conventional longitudinal static stability was developed. The design criteria are established and candidate augmentation system control laws and hardware architectures are formulated and evaluated with respect to reliability, flying qualities, and flight path tracking performance. The selected systems are shown to satisfy the interpreted regulatory safety and reliability requirements while maintaining the present DC 10 (study baseline) level of maintainability and reliability for the total flight control system. The impact of certification of the relaxed static stability augmentation concept is also estimated with regard to affected federal regulations, system validation plan, and typical development/installation costs.

  2. High calcium diet augments vascular potassium relaxation in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pörsti, I; Arvola, P; Wuorela, H; Vapaatalo, H

    1992-01-01

    The effects of increased dietary calcium on the development of hypertension and vascular smooth muscle responses were studied in spontaneously hypertensive rats and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Both hypertensive and normotensive animals were divided into two groups; the calcium content of the normal diet was 1.1% and that of the high calcium diet 3.1%. During the 12-week study, calcium supplementation significantly attenuated the increase in systolic blood pressure in the hypertensive rats but did not affect blood pressure in the normotensive rats. The contractile responses of endothelium-denuded mesenteric arterial rings to potassium chloride were similar in all study groups. The contractions to norepinephrine were not altered by the high calcium diet either, but smooth muscle sensitivity to this agonist was lower in the normotensive than in the hypertensive rats. Potassium relaxation was used to evaluate the activity of vascular smooth muscle Na+,K(+)-ATPase. The maximal rate of potassium relaxation was fastest in the normotensive groups but was also clearly faster in calcium-treated hypertensive rats when compared with hypertensive rats on a normal diet. Platelets were used as a cell model for the analysis of intracellular free calcium concentration, which was measured by the fluorescent indicator quin-2. Intracellular free calcium was significantly reduced in the hypertensive rats by calcium supplementation and was not affected in the normotensive rats. In conclusion, a reduction of intracellular free calcium concentration indicating improved calcium regulation and a concomitant alteration in vascular relaxation probably reflecting increased activity of smooth muscle Na+,K(+)-ATPase may contribute to the blood pressure-lowering effect of a high calcium diet.

  3. Development and flight test evaluation of a pitch stability augmentation system for a relaxed stability L-1011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The L-1011 has been flight tested to demonstrate the relaxed static stability concept as a means of obtaining significant drag benefits to achieve a more energy efficient transport. Satisfactory handling qualities were maintained with the design of an active control horizontal tail for stability and control augmentation to allow operation of the L-1011 at centers of gravity close to the neutral point. Prior to flight test, a motion base visual flight simulator program was performed to optimize the augmentation system. The system was successfully demonstrated in a test program totaling forty-eight actual flight hours.

  4. Augmentation pressure is influenced by ventricular contractility/relaxation dynamics: novel mechanism of reduction of pulse pressure by nitrates.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Li, Ye; Brett, Sally; Shah, Ajay; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Augmentation pressure (AP), the increment in aortic pressure above its first systolic shoulder, is thought to be determined mainly by pressure wave reflection but could be influenced by ventricular ejection characteristics. We sought to determine the mechanism by which AP is selectively reduced by nitroglycerin (NTG). Simultaneous measurements of aortic pressure and flow were made at the time of cardiac catheterization in 30 subjects (11 women; age, 61±13 years [mean±SD]) to perform wave intensity analysis and calculate forward and backward components of AP generated by the ventricle and arterial tree, respectively. Measurements were made at baseline and after NTG given systemically (800 μg sublingually, n=20) and locally by intracoronary infusion (1 μg/min; n=10). Systemic NTG had no significant effect on first shoulder pressure but reduced augmentation (and central pulse pressure) by 12.8±3.1 mm Hg (P<0.0001). This resulted from a reduction in forward and backward wave components of AP by 7.0±2.4 and 5.8±1.3 mm Hg, respectively (each P<0.02). NTG had no significant effect on the ratio of amplitudes of either backward/forward waves or backward/forward compression wave energies, suggesting that effects on the backward wave were largely secondary to those on the forward wave. Time to the forward expansion wave was reduced (P<0.05). Intracoronary NTG decreased AP by 8.3±3.6 mm Hg (P<0.05) with no significant effect on the backward wave. NTG reduces AP and central pulse pressure by a mechanism that is, at least in part, independent of arterial reflections and relates to ventricular contraction/relaxation dynamics with enhanced myocardial relaxation.

  5. Impaired parasympathetic augmentation under relaxation in patients with depression as assessed by a novel non-contact microwave radar system.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Kakisaka, Kota; Shinba, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    In order to conduct objective screening of major depressive disorder (MDD), a chair-based system was developed which measures alteration of parasympathetic activation induced by relaxing audio-visual exposure in a non-contact way using dual compact-radars attached to a chair back. The system determines autonomic activation by calculating low (LF) and high frequency (HF) components of heart rate variability (HRV) before and after relaxation. Forty-one subjects (28 normal subjects, 13 MDD subjects) were exposed to relaxing natural sounds and images for 10 min. In order to determine the possibility of MDD from autonomic alteration induced by relaxing, linear discriminant analysis was conducted using LF and HF before and after relaxation. F-test revealed the significance of derived linear discriminant function (p < 0.001). The Mahalanobis distance and U value were 3.2 and 0.89, respectively. The derived linear discriminant function achieved 85% sensitivity (11 out of 13 MDD patients) and 89% specificity (25 out of 28 normal subjects).

  6. Adrenergic stimulation-released 5-HT stored in adrenergic nerves inhibits CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hirohito; Takatori, Shingo; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Miyake, Natsuki; Tangsucharit, Panot; Mio, Mitsunobu; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 5-HT is taken up by and stored in adrenergic nerves and periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) releases 5-HT to cause vasoconstriction in rat mesenteric arteries. The present study investigated whether PNS-released 5-HT stored in adrenergic nerves affects the function of perivascular calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing (CGRPergic) nerves. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rat mesenteric vascular beds without endothelium and with active tone were perfused with Krebs solution. Changes in perfusion pressure in response to PNS and CGRP injection were measured before (control) and after perfusion of Krebs solution containing 5-HT (10 µM) for 20 min. Distributions of 5-HT- and TH-immunopositive fibres in mesenteric arteries were studied using immunohistochemical methods. KEY RESULTS PNS (1–4 Hz) frequency dependently caused adrenergic nerve-mediated vasoconstriction followed by CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation. 5-HT treatment inhibited PNS-induced vasodilatation without affecting exogenous CGRP-induced vasodilatation, while it augmented PNS-induced vasoconstriction. Guanethidine (adrenergic neuron blocker), methysergide (non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist) and BRL15572 (selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist) abolished inhibition of PNS-induced vasodilatation in 5-HT-treated preparations. Combined treatment with 5-HT and desipramine (catecholamine transporter inhibitor), but not fluoxetine (selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor), did not inhibit PNS-induced vasodilatation. Exogenous 5-HT inhibited PNS-induced vasodilatation, which was antagonized by methysergide. In immunohistochemical experiments, 5-HT-immunopositive nerves, colocalized with adrenergic TH-immunopositive nerves, were observed only in 5-HT-treated mesenteric arteries, but not in control preparations or arteries co-treated with desipramine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that 5-HT can be taken up by and released from adrenergic nerves in vitro by PNS to inhibit

  7. Endothelin A (ET(A)) receptors are involved in augmented adrenergic vasoconstriction and blunted nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of penile arteries from insulin-resistant obese zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ana; Contreras, Cristina; Martínez, Pilar; Muñoz, Mercedes; Martínez, Ana Cristina; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2014-06-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1) levels and receptors are up-regulated in the erectile tissue of diabetic patients and animal models of erectile dysfunction (ED). The present study assessed the role of ET-1 receptors in the impaired adrenergic vasoconstriction and nitrergic relaxation of penile arteries from a rat model of insulin resistance. The effect of ET receptor antagonists was evaluated on the contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) of penile arteries from obese Zucker rats (OZRs) compared with lean Zucker rats (LZRs). ET receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Changes in neural nitrergic relaxation and adrenergic vasoconstriction and the expression of ET receptors in perivascular nerves were assessed. ET-1 (10(-10)  M) enhanced EFS-induced vasoconstriction, and treatment with the adrenergic neurotoxin guanethidine reduced the contractions induced by ET-1 in penile arteries from both LZRs and OZRs, thus supporting the hypothesis that ET-1 releases noradrenaline from adrenergic nerves. ET-1 antagonized neural nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxant responses in LZR arteries, antagonizing relaxations induced by the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine to a larger extent in arteries from OZRs. ET(A) and ET(B) receptors were expressed in perivascular fibers colocalized with the neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 in penile arteries from OZRs. The ET(A) receptor antagonist BQ-123 reversed the enhancing effect of ET-1 on the vasoconstriction elicited by EFS and the ET-1-induced inhibition of nitrergic relaxations in LZRs, restoring them to control levels in penile arteries of OZRs. ET-1 enhances adrenergic vasoconstriction through presynaptic ET(A) receptors and antagonizes neural NO-mediated relaxation through postsynaptic smooth muscle ET(A) receptors in penile arteries from OZRs, which likely contributes to the augmented vasoconstriction and blunted nitrergic relaxation of erectile tissue under conditions of insulin resistance

  8. Biomechanics in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Wang, X; Zeng, Y; Wu, W

    2005-01-01

    During the past 6 years, we have treated 406 patients with classical silicone augmentation rhinoplasty. The types and incidence of complications after subcutaneous or subfascial implantation were examined. We have proposed that most complications are related to the depth of the implant and the character of the tissues. In order to improve our operation and prove our hypothesis, we performed subperiosteal augmentation rhinoplasty in 22 cases with satisfactory results. In order to determine scientifically which layer the silicone implant should be inserted into, we investigated the biomechanics of human nasal periosteum and fascia, including tensile strength, stress-strain relationship and stress relaxation characters under uniaxial tension. Although having less failure strain, the periosteum has more tensile strength than the fascia. So, in the view of biomechanics, the periosteum is thicker, tougher and stiffer than the fascia, thus is more suitable for covering silicone implants.

  9. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  10. Relaxed heaps

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.R. ); Gabow, H.N.; Shrairman, R. ); Tarjan, R.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The relaxed heap is a priority queue data structure that achieves the same amortized time bounds as the Fibonacci heap - a sequence of m decrease key and n delete min operations takes time O(m + n log n). A variant of relaxed heaps achieves similar bounds in the worst case - O(1) time for decrease key and O(log n) for delete min. Relaxed heaps give a processor-efficient parallel implementation of Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and hence other algorithms in network optimization. A relaxed heap is a type of binomial queue that allows heap order to be violated.

  11. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  12. Relaxation Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    FUNDING/SPONSORING 18b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable) 8c ADDRESS f( t’, State and ZIP Code) 10...inhaling and exhaling to promote a feeling of relaxation that is used in yoga, LaMaze childbirth, and hypnosis . The sccond is progressive muscle

  13. Changes in nerve-mediated contractility of the lower urinary tract in a mouse model of premature ageing

    PubMed Central

    Triguero, D; Lafuente-Sanchis, A; Garcia-Pascual, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A high incidence of lower urinary tract disorders is associated with ageing. In the senescent-accelerated prone (SAMP8) mouse strain and the senescent-accelerated resistant (SAMR1) strain, we compared smooth muscle contractility in responses to intrinsic neurotransmitters, both in the bladder and urethra. Experimental Approach We analysed micturition frequency, the changes in muscle tension induced by electrical field stimulation or agonist administration, the density of nerves (adrenergic, cholinergic and nitrergic) and interstitial cells (ICs), as well as cGMP accumulation in bladder and urethral preparations. Key Results Senescent mice of the SAMP8 strain displayed increased micturition frequency and excitatory contractility of neurogenic origin in the bladder. While cholinergic nerve density remained unchanged, there was a mild sensitization to ACh in male mice. Potentiation in the detrusor may be also provoked by the stronger contribution of ATP, together with reduced adrenergic innervation in males and COX-derived prostanoid production in females. The greater excitatory contractility in the urethra was probably due to the sensitization to noradrenaline, in conjunction with attenuated nitrergic relaxation. There were also fewer neuronal NOS immunoreactive (ir) nerves and vimentin-positive ICs, although the sildenafil-and diethylamine-NONOate-induced relaxations and cGMP-ir remained unchanged. Conclusions and Implications Premature senescent mice exhibit bladder and urethral hyperexcitability, coupled with reduced urethral relaxation of neurogenic origin, which could model the impaired urinary function in elderly humans. We propose that senescence-accelerated mice provide a useful tool to analyse the basic mechanisms of age-related changes in bladder and urethral function. PMID:24372152

  14. Silicone implants in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yanjun; Wu, Weihua; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Guangshen

    2002-01-01

    During the past six years, we have treated 406 patients with classical silicon augmentation rhinoplasty. The types and incidence of complications after subcutaneous or subfascial implantation were examined and discussed. We proposed that most complications are related to the depth of the implant and the character of the tissues. In order to improve our operation and prove our hypothesis, we performed subperiosteal augmentation rhinoplasty in 22 cases with satisfactory results. At the same time, we investigated the biomechanical properties of human nasal periosteum and fascia, including tensile strength, stress-strain relationship and stress relaxation characters under uniaxial tension. Although less elastic, the periosteum has more tensile strength than fascia. So, in the view of biomechanics, the periosteum is thicker, tougher, and stiffer than fascia, thus more suitable for covering silicon implants.

  15. Silicone implant in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yanjun; Wu, Weihua; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Guangshen

    2002-11-01

    During the past 6 years the authors have treated 406 patients with classic silicone augmentation rhinoplasty. The types and incidence of complications after subcutaneous or subfascial implantation are examined and discussed. They propose that most complications are related to the depth of the implant and the character of the tissues. To improve their operation and to prove their hypothesis, they performed subperiosteal augmentation rhinoplasty in 22 patients with satisfactory results. At the same time, they investigated the biomechanical properties of human nasal periosteum and fascia, including tensile strength, the stress-strain relationship, and stress relaxation characteristics under uniaxial tension. Although it has less failure strain, the periosteum has more tensile strength than fascia. So, in the view of biomechanics, the periosteum is thicker, tougher, and stiffer than fascia, and thus more suitable for covering silicone implants.

  16. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  17. An Augmented Lagrangian Approach for Scheduling Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tatsushi; Konishi, Masami

    The paper describes an augmented Lagrangian decomposition and coordination approach for solving single machine scheduling problems to minimize the total weighted tardiness. The problem belongs to the class of NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem. We propose an augmented Lagrangian decomposition and coordination approach, which is commonly used for continuous optimization problems, for solving scheduling problems despite the fact that the problem is nonconvex and non-differentiable. The proposed method shows a good convergence to a feasible solution without heuristically constructing a feasible solution. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of an ordinary Lagrangian relaxation.

  18. La relaxation en pedagogie (Relaxation in Teaching).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufeu, Bernard

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the use of relaxation techniques in the language classroom outlines the reasons for their use and specifies procedures for relaxation either lying down or seated as a prelude to instruction. (MSE)

  19. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  20. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  1. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  2. The efficacy of relaxation training with children.

    PubMed

    Richter, N C

    1984-06-01

    This paper reviews studies that have examined the efficacy of relaxation training techniques in the treatment of childhood disorders. Methodological problems encountered in doing research in this area resemble those found in working with an adult population: imprecise definitions of subject populations and use of a variety of dependent variables from one study to another. Findings suggest that relaxation training is at least as effective as other treatment approaches for a variety of learning, behavioral, and physiological disorders when it is continued over an extended period of time and is augmented by other supportive measures. Needs for future research include better follow-up studies and further investigations with a behaviorally disruptive population.

  3. Augmented Reality in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Shingles, Luke J.

    2013-09-01

    Augmented Reality consists of merging live images with virtual layers of information. The rapid growth in the popularity of smartphones and tablets over recent years has provided a large base of potential users of Augmented Reality technology, and virtual layers of information can now be attached to a wide variety of physical objects. In this article, we explore the potential of Augmented Reality for astrophysical research with two distinct experiments: (1) Augmented Posters and (2) Augmented Articles. We demonstrate that the emerging technology of Augmented Reality can already be used and implemented without expert knowledge using currently available apps. Our experiments highlight the potential of Augmented Reality to improve the communication of scientific results in the field of astrophysics. We also present feedback gathered from the Australian astrophysics community that reveals evidence of some interest in this technology by astronomers who experimented with Augmented Posters. In addition, we discuss possible future trends for Augmented Reality applications in astrophysics, and explore the current limitations associated with the technology. This Augmented Article, the first of its kind, is designed to allow the reader to directly experiment with this technology.

  4. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  5. Subfascial gluteal augmentation.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, J Abel; Rubio, Omar V; Cano, Jacobo P; Cedillo, Mariana C; Garcés, Miriam T

    2006-07-01

    Developing the concept of gluteal augmentation through the past 17 years has been an academic adventure. During these years my coworkers and I have progressively improved surgical technique and devised an anatomical system for gluteal augmentation that includes an ideal implant design and templates to assist in evaluating patients in the preoperative period and to identify the most appropriate implant size.

  6. Equating of Augmented Subscores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Haberman, Shelby J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing level of interest in subscores for their potential diagnostic value. Haberman (2008b) suggested reporting an augmented subscore that is a linear combination of a subscore and the total score. Sinharay and Haberman (2008) and Sinharay (2010) showed that augmented subscores often lead to more accurate…

  7. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  8. The Augmentation System Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbart, Doug; Hooper, Kristina

    1986-01-01

    Augmentation systems are composed of things that will add to what the human is genetically endowed with in order to extend the net capabilities that a human or human organization can apply to the problems or goals of human society. A broad brush categorization of the components of an augmentation system includes three distinct though interacting…

  9. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  10. Augmented reality: a review.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  11. Chin augmentation - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100009.htm Chin augmentation - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  12. Breast augmentation - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100205.htm Breast augmentation - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  13. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  14. Augmenting computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

  15. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  16. Relaxation of magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-thermodynamic model is presented for the relaxation of magnetotail plasmas during substorms, followed by quiet times. It is proposed that the plasma relaxes to a state of low-potential energy subject to a small number of global constraints. The constraints are exactly preserved by all ideal motions and, approximately, by a wide class of motions of the plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection. A variational principle which minimizes the free energy predicts the relaxed state. Exact, two-dimensional solutions of the relaxed state are obtained. A universal feature of the exact solutions is a chain of magnetic islands along the tail axis. Sufficient conditions for the stability of relaxed states are obtained from the second variation of the free-energy functional.

  17. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  18. Augmentative & Alternative Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patti

    2007-01-01

    There is no definitive recipe for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) success, but its universal ingredients can be found at home. The main ones are: (1) Understanding that all children need to express themselves, however outgoing or shy they may be; (2) Willingness to embrace the technology that may help your child regardless of your…

  19. Augmented Reality Binoculars.

    PubMed

    Oskiper, Taragay; Sizintsev, Mikhail; Branzoi, Vlad; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present an augmented reality binocular system to allow long range high precision augmentation of live telescopic imagery with aerial and terrain based synthetic objects, vehicles, people and effects. The inserted objects must appear stable in the display and must not jitter and drift as the user pans around and examines the scene with the binoculars. The design of the system is based on using two different cameras with wide field of view and narrow field of view lenses enclosed in a binocular shaped shell. Using the wide field of view gives us context and enables us to recover the 3D location and orientation of the binoculars much more robustly, whereas the narrow field of view is used for the actual augmentation as well as to increase precision in tracking. We present our navigation algorithm that uses the two cameras in combination with an inertial measurement unit and global positioning system in an extended Kalman filter and provides jitter free, robust and real-time pose estimation for precise augmentation. We have demonstrated successful use of our system as part of information sharing example as well as a live simulated training system for observer training, in which fixed and rotary wing aircrafts, ground vehicles, and weapon effects are combined with real world scenes.

  20. Augmented thermal bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurity of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pump to maintain isothermality in the source.

  1. Augmented Thermal Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurality of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pumps to maintain isothermality in the source.

  2. Computer Augmented Video Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes project CAVE (Computer Augmented Video Education), an ongoing effort at the U.S. Naval Academy to present lecture material on videocassette tape, reinforced by drill and practice through an interactive computer system supported by a 12 channel closed circuit television distribution and production facility. (RAO)

  3. Computer Augmented Video Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes project CAVE (Computer Augmented Video Education), an ongoing effort at the U.S. Naval Academy to present lecture material on videocassette tape, reinforced by drill and practice through an interactive computer system supported by a 12 channel closed circuit television distribution and production facility. (RAO)

  4. Relaxation Techniques for Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... for posttraumatic stress disorder have had inconsistent results. Rheumatoid Arthritis There’s limited evidence that biofeedback or other relaxation ... might be valuable additions to treatment programs for rheumatoid arthritis. Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus) Only a few ...

  5. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease ...

  6. Intelligent Filtering for Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    1 Intelligent Filtering for Augmented Reality Sabrina Sestito*, Simon Julier, Marco Lanzagorta and Larry Rosenblum Advanced Information Technology...Technology Organisation, Melbourne, Australia) KEYWORDS: Augmented Reality , Intelligent Systems, Databases ABSTRACT: Recent developments in computing...hardware have begun to make mobile and wearable Augmented Reality (AR) systems a reality . With this new freedom, AR systems can now be used in a very wide

  7. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  8. A quantum relaxation-time approximation for finite fermion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2015-03-15

    We propose a relaxation time approximation for the description of the dynamics of strongly excited fermion systems. Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory at the level of the local density approximation. This mean-field picture is augmented by collisional correlations handled in relaxation time approximation which is inspired from the corresponding semi-classical picture. The method involves the estimate of microscopic relaxation rates/times which is presently taken from the well established semi-classical experience. The relaxation time approximation implies evaluation of the instantaneous equilibrium state towards which the dynamical state is progressively driven at the pace of the microscopic relaxation time. As test case, we consider Na clusters of various sizes excited either by a swift ion projectile or by a short and intense laser pulse, driven in various dynamical regimes ranging from linear to strongly non-linear reactions. We observe a strong effect of dissipation on sensitive observables such as net ionization and angular distributions of emitted electrons. The effect is especially large for moderate excitations where typical relaxation/dissipation time scales efficiently compete with ionization for dissipating the available excitation energy. Technical details on the actual procedure to implement a working recipe of such a quantum relaxation approximation are given in appendices for completeness.

  9. Batten augmented triangular beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Louis R.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The BAT (Batten-Augmented Triangular) BEAM is characterized by battens which are buckled in the deployed state, thus preloading the truss. The preload distribution is determined, and the effects of various external loading conditions are investigated. The conceptual design of a deployer is described and loads are predicted. The influence of joint imperfections on effective member stiffness is investigated. The beam is assessed structurally.

  10. Augmented reality in surgery.

    PubMed

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the history and current knowledge of computer-augmented reality in the field of surgery and its potential goals in education, surgeon training, and patient treatment. National Library of Medicine's database and additional library searches. Only articles suited to surgical sciences with a well-defined aim of study, methodology, and precise description of outcome were included. Augmented reality is an effective tool in executing surgical procedures requiring low-performance surgical dexterity; it remains a science determined mainly by stereotactic registration and ergonomics. Strong evidence was found that it is an effective teaching tool for training residents. Weaker evidence was found to suggest a significant influence on surgical outcome, both morbidity and mortality. No evidence of cost-effectiveness was found. Augmented reality is a new approach in executing detailed surgical operations. Although its application is in a preliminary stage, further research is needed to evaluate its long-term clinical impact on patients, surgeons, and hospital administrators. Its widespread use and the universal transfer of such technology remains limited until there is a better understanding of registration and ergonomics.

  11. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  12. Analysis of Aeroheating Augmentation due to Reaction Control System Jets on Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Buck, Gregory M.; Decaro, Anthony D.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of effects of the reaction control system jet plumes on aftbody heating of Orion entry capsule is presented. The analysis covered hypersonic continuum part of the entry trajectory. Aerothermal environments at flight conditions were evaluated using Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) code and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) algorithm code. Results show a marked augmentation of aftbody heating due to roll, yaw and aft pitch thrusters. No significant augmentation is expected due to forward pitch thrusters. Of the conditions surveyed the maximum heat rate on the aftshell is expected when firing a pair of roll thrusters at a maximum deceleration condition.

  13. Mutually Augmented Cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesdorf, Florian; Pangercic, Dejan; Bubb, Heiner; Beetz, Michael

    In mac, an ergonomic dialog-system and algorithms will be developed that enable human experts and companions to be integrated into knowledge gathering and decision making processes of highly complex cognitive systems (e.g. Assistive Household as manifested further in the paper). In this event we propose to join algorithms and methodologies coming from Ergonomics and Artificial Intelligence that: a) make cognitive systems more congenial for non-expert humans, b) facilitate their comprehension by utilizing a high-level expandable control code for human experts and c) augment representation of such cognitive system into “deep representation” obtained through an interaction with human companions.

  14. History of gluteal augmentation.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, J Abel; Rubio, Omar V; Cano, Jacobo P; Cedillo, Mariana C; Garcés, Miriam T

    2006-07-01

    The concept of female beauty has changed throughout time, but the form and size of the breasts and gluteal region have remained constant as symbols of maximum femininity. Sculptures and prints show us feminine figures that are voluminous and reflect human history's interest in fertility. The early years of gluteal augmentation saw few published reports that described the procedure technique, follow-up, or possible complications. But developments continued as surgeons began experimenting with different anatomical planes for implant placement. The most important goal in plastic surgery is meeting a patient's expectations. It is important for the surgeon to thoroughly explain to patients what can realistically be achieved with a procedure.

  15. Radiative Augmented Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    PbLFICE SY 7a NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION M.L. ENERGIA , Inc. AFOSR/NA 6r. ADDRESS (City. State. anW ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City State, and ZIPCode...27 -00 N ’fPECTED 0 6I FOREWORD This is the Final Report on research on Radiative Augmented Combustion conducted at M. L. ENERGIA , Inc. It was a...the first two annual reports prior to this one. The entire research program was performed at ENERGIA , Inc., Princeton, New Jersey, with Dr. Moshe Lavid

  16. Radiative Augmented Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-12

    86-0085 In 00I to RADIATIVE AUGMENTED COMBUSTION MOSHE LAVID M.L. ENERGIA , INC. P.O. BOX 1468 1 PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 AUGUST 1985 *.. plo...Combustion conducted at M.L. ENERGIA . It is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract No. F49620-83-C-0133, with Dr. J.M...reported. It covers the second year of the contract, from July 15, 1984 through July 14, 1985. The work was performed at ENERGIA , Princeton, New Jersey

  17. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  18. [History of augmentation mammaplasty].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2005-10-01

    The history of breast augmentation started effectively after World War II. Until then, this surgery was almost irrelevant because the indications were considered very rare and technical possibilities limited. During about two decades after 1945, two types of procedures were proposed. The first ones used autologous tissue especially fat in the form of dermofatty grafts taken from the buttocks. The results were very bad and sometimes disastrous for both techniques. At the beginning of the sixties, under the impulse of the Dow Corning Company, two surgeons: Frank Gerow and Thomas Cronin from Houston (Texas, USA) proposed an implant with a sheath filled with silicone gel. This new prosthesis had an immediate success and the number of breast augmentations growed very quickly. After an optimistic period, it had to be admitted that the results were sometimes deceiving or frankly bad. The breasts were often too firm, sometimes hard and even deformed. Capsular contracture occurred around the implants. During the 70's and 80's both consistency and envelops of the implants were regularly modified. The incision and the positioning were changed. At the end of the 80's, the problem of capsular contracture seemed to be resolved with the implants used, meanwhile a controversy took place about silicone in USA. Some cases of autoimmune diseases were attributed to silicone. In spite of scientific studies that proved the contrary, silicone implants were prohibited in the United States, Canada and temporarily in France.

  19. Hearing Loss: Hearing Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Atcherson, Samuel R; Moreland, Christopher; Zazove, Philip; McKee, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Etiologies of hearing loss vary. When hearing loss is diagnosed, referral to an otology subspecialist, audiology subspecialist, or hearing aid dispenser to discuss treatment options is appropriate. Conventional hearing aids provide increased sound pressure in the ear canal for detection of sounds that might otherwise be soft or inaudible. Hearing aids can be used for sensorineural, conductive, or mixed hearing loss by patients with a wide range of hearing loss severity. The most common type of hearing loss is high-frequency, which affects audibility and perception of speech consonants, but not vowels. As the severity of hearing loss increases, the benefit of hearing aids for speech perception decreases. Implantable devices such as cochlear implants, middle ear implants, and bone-anchored implants can benefit specific patient groups. Hearing assistive technology devices provide auditory, visual, or tactile information to augment hearing and increase environmental awareness of sounds. Hearing assistive devices include wireless assistive listening device systems, closed captioning, hearing aid-compatible telephones, and other devices. For some patients, financial barriers and health insurance issues limit acquisition of hearing aids, implantable devices, and hearing assistive devices. Physicians should be aware that for some patients and families, hearing augmentation may not be desired for cultural reasons.

  20. Advanced intellect-augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbart, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    User experience in applying our augmentation tools and techniques to various normal working tasks within our center is described so as to convey a subjective impression of what it is like to work in an augmented environment. It is concluded that working-support, computer-aid systems for augmenting individuals and teams, are undoubtedly going to be widely developed and used. A very special role in this development is seen for multi-access computer networks.

  1. Pilot-optimal augmentation synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    An augmentation synthesis method usable in the absence of quantitative handling qualities specifications, and yet explicitly including design objectives based on pilot-rating concepts, is presented. The algorithm involves the unique approach of simultaneously solving for the stability augmentation system (SAS) gains, pilot equalization and pilot rating prediction via optimal control techniques. Simultaneous solution is required in this case since the pilot model (gains, etc.) depends upon the augmented plant dynamics, and the augmentation is obviously not a priori known. Another special feature is the use of the pilot's objective function (from which the pilot model evolves) to design the SAS.

  2. NASA Communications Augmentation network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.; Laios, Straton C.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom Augmentation (NAUG) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), and other projects. The NAUG is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The NAUG network development will be based on the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). This paper describes the NAUG network architecture, subsystems, topology, and services; addresses issues of internetworking the Nascom network with other elements of the Space Station Information System (SSIS); discusses the operations environment. This paper also notes the areas of related research and presents the current conception of how the network will provide broadband services in 1998.

  3. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  4. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past several years, efforts have been under way to design and develop an operationally flexible research facility for investigating the use of cross-field MHD accelerators as a potential thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. The baseline configuration for this high-power experimental facility utilizes a 1.5-MWe multi-gas arc-heater as a thermal driver for a 2-MWe MHD accelerator, which resides in a large-bore 2-tesla electromagnet. A preliminary design study using NaK seeded nitrogen as the working fluid led to an externally diagonalized segmented MHD channel configuration based on an expendable heat-sink design concept. The current status report includes a review of engineering/design work and performance optimization analyses and summarizes component hardware fabrication and development efforts, preliminary testing results, and recent progress toward full-up assembly and testing

  6. Augmented reality system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  7. Pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rebouças, Rafael B; Monteiro, Rodrigo C; Souza, Thiago N S de; Aragão, Augusto J de; Burity, Camila R T; Nóbrega, Júlio C de A; Oliveira, Natália S C de; Abrantes, Ramon B; Dantas Júnior, Luiz B; Cartaxo Filho, Ricardo; Negromonte, Gustavo R P; Sampaio, Rafael da C R; Britto, Cesar A

    2014-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute neuropathy that rarely compromises bladder function. Conservative management including clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy is the primary approach for hypocompliant contracted bladder. Surgical treatment may be used in refractory cases to improve bladder compliance and capacity in order to protect the upper urinary tract. We describe a case of pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty in a patient affected by Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 15-year-old female, complaining of voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infection and worsening renal function for three months. A previous history of Guillain-Barre syndrome on childhood was related. A voiding cystourethrography showed a pine-cone bladder with moderate post-void residual urine. The urodynamic demonstrated a hypocompliant bladder and small bladder capacity (190 mL) with high detrusor pressure (54 cmH2O). Nonsurgical treatments were attempted, however unsuccessfully.

  8. Augmented nonlinear differentiator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xingling; Liu, Jun; Yang, Wei; Tang, Jun; Li, Jie

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a sigmoid function based augmented nonlinear differentiator (AND) for calculating the noise-less time derivative from a noisy measurement. The prominent advantages of the present differentiation technique are: (i) compared to the existing tracking differentiators, better noise suppression ability can be achieved without appreciable delay; (ii) the enhanced noise-filtering mechanism not only can be applied to the designed differentiator, but also can be extended for improving noise-tolerance capability of the available differentiators. In addition, the convergence property and robustness performance against noises are investigated via singular perturbation theory and describing function method, respectively. Also, comparison with several classical differentiators is given to illustrate the superiority of AND in noise suppression. Finally, applications on autopilot design and displacement following for nonlinear mass spring mechanical system are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed AND technique.

  9. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  10. Relaxation in Physical Education Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coville, Claudia A.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical framework for incorporating relaxation instruction in the physical education curriculum is presented based on the assumption that relaxation is a muscular-skeletal skill benefitting general motor skill acquisition. Theoretical principles, a definition of relaxation, and an analysis of stages of skill development are also used in the…

  11. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  12. Relaxation from particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  13. Relaxation from particle production

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-20

    Here, we consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a “Relaxion” solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  14. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  15. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  16. BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010892 TITLE: BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System DISTRIBUTION...component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP010865 thru. ADP010894 UNCLASSIFIED 27-1 BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System Simon Julier... future military operations are expected to occur overload, we have developed an intelligent filter which in urban environments. These complex, 3D

  17. Advanced Intellect-Augmentation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbart, D. C.

    This progress report covers a two-year project which is part of a program that is exploring the value of computer aids in augmenting human intellectual capability. The background and nature of the program, its resources, and the activities it has undertaken are outlined. User experience in applying augmentation tools and techniques to various…

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  20. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two-dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  1. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W. . Applied Mechanics Div. III)

    1989-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  2. Augmented Likelihood Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stille, Maik; Kleine, Matthias; Hägele, Julian; Barkhausen, Jörg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2016-01-01

    The presence of high-density objects remains an open problem in medical CT imaging. Data of projections passing through objects of high density, such as metal implants, are dominated by noise and are highly affected by beam hardening and scatter. Reconstructed images become less diagnostically conclusive because of pronounced artifacts that manifest as dark and bright streaks. A new reconstruction algorithm is proposed with the aim to reduce these artifacts by incorporating information about shape and known attenuation coefficients of a metal implant. Image reconstruction is considered as a variational optimization problem. The afore-mentioned prior knowledge is introduced in terms of equality constraints. An augmented Lagrangian approach is adapted in order to minimize the associated log-likelihood function for transmission CT. During iterations, temporally appearing artifacts are reduced with a bilateral filter and new projection values are calculated, which are used later on for the reconstruction. A detailed evaluation in cooperation with radiologists is performed on software and hardware phantoms, as well as on clinically relevant patient data of subjects with various metal implants. Results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm is able to outperform contemporary metal artifact reduction methods such as normalized metal artifact reduction.

  3. Abstraction Augmented Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Caragea, Cornelia; Silvescu, Adrian; Caragea, Doina; Honavar, Vasant

    2010-12-13

    High accuracy sequence classification often requires the use of higher order Markov models (MMs). However, the number of MM parameters increases exponentially with the range of direct dependencies between sequence elements, thereby increasing the risk of overfitting when the data set is limited in size. We present abstraction augmented Markov models (AAMMs) that effectively reduce the number of numeric parameters of k(th) order MMs by successively grouping strings of length k (i.e., k-grams) into abstraction hierarchies. We evaluate AAMMs on three protein subcellular localization prediction tasks. The results of our experiments show that abstraction makes it possible to construct predictive models that use significantly smaller number of features (by one to three orders of magnitude) as compared to MMs. AAMMs are competitive with and, in some cases, significantly outperform MMs. Moreover, the results show that AAMMs often perform significantly better than variable order Markov models, such as decomposed context tree weighting, prediction by partial match, and probabilistic suffix trees.

  4. Phenobarbital Augments Hypothermic Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Barks, John D.; Liu, Yi-Qing; Shangguan, Yu; Silverstein, Faye S.

    2010-01-01

    Seizures are associated with adverse outcome in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that early administration of the anticonvulsant phenobarbital after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia could enhance the neuroprotective efficacy of delayed-onset hypothermia. We tested this hypothesis in a neonatal rodent model. Seven-day-old rats (n=104) underwent right carotid ligation, followed by 90 min 8%O2 exposure; 15 min later, they received injections of phenobarbital (40 mg/kg) or saline. One or 3h later, all were treated with hypothermia (30°C, 3h). Function and neuropathology were evaluated after 7 days (“early outcomes”) or 1 month (“late outcomes”). Early outcome assessment demonstrated better sensorimotor performance and less cortical damage in phenobarbital-treated groups; there were no differences between groups in which the hypothermia delay was shortened from 3h to 1h. Late outcome assessment confirmed sustained benefits of phenobarbital+hypothermia treatment; sensorimotor performance was better (persistent attenuation of contralateral forepaw placing deficits and absence of contralateral forepaw neglect); neuropathology scores were lower (medians, phenobarbital 2, saline 8.5, p<0.05), and less ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere %Damage (mean±SD, 11±17 vs. 28±22, p<0.05). These results suggest that early post-hypoxia-ischemia administration of phenobarbital may augment the neuroprotective efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20098339

  5. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  6. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

  7. Scale and Rotation Invariant Matching Using Linearly Augmented Trees.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Tian, Tai-Peng; Sclaroff, Stan

    2015-12-01

    We propose a novel linearly augmented tree method for efficient scale and rotation invariant object matching. The proposed method enforces pairwise matching consistency defined on trees, and high-order constraints on all the sites of a template. The pairwise constraints admit arbitrary metrics while the high-order constraints use L1 norms and therefore can be linearized. Such a linearly augmented tree formulation introduces hyperedges and loops into the basic tree structure. But, different from a general loopy graph, its special structure allows us to relax and decompose the optimization into a sequence of tree matching problems that are efficiently solvable by dynamic programming. The proposed method also works on continuous scale and rotation parameters; we can match with a scale up to any large value with the same efficiency. Our experiments on ground truth data and a variety of real images and videos show that the proposed method is efficient, accurate and reliable.

  8. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  9. Differentiable McCormick relaxations

    DOE PAGES

    Khan, Kamil A.; Watson, Harry A. J.; Barton, Paul I.

    2016-05-27

    McCormick's classical relaxation technique constructs closed-form convex and concave relaxations of compositions of simple intrinsic functions. These relaxations have several properties which make them useful for lower bounding problems in global optimization: they can be evaluated automatically, accurately, and computationally inexpensively, and they converge rapidly to the relaxed function as the underlying domain is reduced in size. They may also be adapted to yield relaxations of certain implicit functions and differential equation solutions. However, McCormick's relaxations may be nonsmooth, and this nonsmoothness can create theoretical and computational obstacles when relaxations are to be deployed. This article presents a continuously differentiablemore » variant of McCormick's original relaxations in the multivariate McCormick framework of Tsoukalas and Mitsos. Gradients of the new differentiable relaxations may be computed efficiently using the standard forward or reverse modes of automatic differentiation. Furthermore, extensions to differentiable relaxations of implicit functions and solutions of parametric ordinary differential equations are discussed. A C++ implementation based on the library MC++ is described and applied to a case study in nonsmooth nonconvex optimization.« less

  10. Differentiable McCormick relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Kamil A.; Watson, Harry A. J.; Barton, Paul I.

    2016-05-27

    McCormick's classical relaxation technique constructs closed-form convex and concave relaxations of compositions of simple intrinsic functions. These relaxations have several properties which make them useful for lower bounding problems in global optimization: they can be evaluated automatically, accurately, and computationally inexpensively, and they converge rapidly to the relaxed function as the underlying domain is reduced in size. They may also be adapted to yield relaxations of certain implicit functions and differential equation solutions. However, McCormick's relaxations may be nonsmooth, and this nonsmoothness can create theoretical and computational obstacles when relaxations are to be deployed. This article presents a continuously differentiable variant of McCormick's original relaxations in the multivariate McCormick framework of Tsoukalas and Mitsos. Gradients of the new differentiable relaxations may be computed efficiently using the standard forward or reverse modes of automatic differentiation. Furthermore, extensions to differentiable relaxations of implicit functions and solutions of parametric ordinary differential equations are discussed. A C++ implementation based on the library MC++ is described and applied to a case study in nonsmooth nonconvex optimization.

  11. Grueneisen Relaxation Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-10-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images nonradiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a microsecond-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. When the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced, owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two colocated photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the nonradiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 μm to 2.3 μm and, at the same time, slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 μm to 0.41 μm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration.

  12. Augmenter of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2012-07-09

    'Augmenter of liver regeneration' (ALR) (also known as hepatic stimulatory substance or hepatopoietin) was originally found to promote growth of hepatocytes in the regenerating or injured liver. ALR is expressed ubiquitously in all organs, and exclusively in hepatocytes in the liver. ALR, a survival factor for hepatocytes, exhibits significant homology with ERV1 (essential for respiration and viability) protein that is essential for the survival of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ALR comprises 198 to 205 amino acids (approximately 22 kDa), but is post-translationally modified to three high molecular weight species (approximately 38 to 42 kDa) found in hepatocytes. ALR is present in mitochondria, cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. Mitochondrial ALR may be involved in oxidative phosphorylation, but also functions as sulfhydryl oxidase and cytochrome c reductase, and causes Fe/S maturation of proteins. ALR, secreted by hepatocytes, stimulates synthesis of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide in Kupffer cells via a G-protein coupled receptor. While the 22 kDa rat recombinant ALR does not stimulate DNA synthesis in hepatocytes, the short form (15 kDa) of human recombinant ALR was reported to be equipotent as or even stronger than TGF-α or HGF as a mitogen for hepatocytes. Altered serum ALR levels in certain pathological conditions suggest that it may be a diagnostic marker for liver injury/disease. Although ALR appears to have multiple functions, the knowledge of its role in various organs, including the liver, is extremely inadequate, and it is not known whether different ALR species have distinct functions. Future research should provide better understanding of the expression and functions of this enigmatic molecule.

  13. Augmentation strategies: focus on anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Joffe, R T; Levitt, A J; Sokolov, S T

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 20% to 40% of patients will fail to respond to the first antidepressant used for their current major depressive episode. Furthermore, it has been suggested that a further 20% to 30% of patients will have only a partial response. There are four main options to consider in the treatment of these patients: optimization, substitution, augmentation, and combination therapy. Several combination antidepressant treatments have been used in treatment-refractory depression. Moreover, various augmentation strategies have also proved to be successful. Although the empirical data to support these treatment options are limited, augmentation treatment has several potential advantages over the other clinical options available, particularly substitution. These data are reviewed and clinical applications discussed. Particular attention is paid to the role of anxiolytics as augmentation agents in the treatment of major depression.

  14. Mersiline mesh in premaxillary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    Premaxillary retrusion may distort the aesthetic appearance of the columella, lip, and nasal tip. This defect is characteristically seen in, but not limited to, patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. This study investigated 60 patients presenting with premaxillary deficiencies in which Mersiline mesh was used to augment the premaxilla. All the cases had surgery using the external rhinoplasty technique. Two methods of augmentation with Mersiline mesh were used: the Mersiline roll technique, for the cases with central symmetric deficiencies, and the Mersiline packing technique, for the cases with asymmetric deficiencies. Premaxillary augmentation with Mersiline mesh proved to be simple technically, easy to perform, and not associated with any complications. Periodic follow-up evaluation for a mean period of 32 months (range, 12-98 months) showed that an adequate degree of premaxillary augmentation was maintained with no clinically detectable resorption of the mesh implant.

  15. Ultrafast Relaxation in Conjugated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * Samples * Femtosecond experimental apparatus * RESULTS AND DISCUSSION * Poly(phenylacetylenes) * Blue-phase PDA-3BCMU * Red-phase PDA-4BCMU * Blue-phase PDA-DFMP * P3MT * P3DT * PTV * RELAXATION MECHANISMS * Review of the previous works * Symmetry of the lower electronic excited states * Primary relaxation processes * Theoretical studies of nonlinear excitations * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a weakly nondegenerate ground state (poly(phenylacetylene)s) * Dual peak component with power-law decay * Single-peak component with an exponential decay * Hot self-trapped exciton * Transition to the electron-hole threshold * Transition to a biexciton state * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a strongly or moderately nondegenerate ground state * Classifications of polymers * Femtosecond relaxation * Picosecond relaxation * CONCLUSION * Acknowledgments * REFERENCES

  16. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  17. The Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Introduction The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Sciences Campaign calls out the topic of Virtual /Mixed and Augmented Reality as one of the...type of virtual environment. In virtual reality (VR), the totality of the environment is computer generated. In AR, the real world is augmented by...effectively. 20 17. References Alexander T. Visualisation of geographic data in virtual environments - what is essential for virtual reality systems

  18. ABC relaxation theory and the factor structure of relaxation states, recalled relaxation activities, dispositions, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Wedell, A B; Kolotylo, C J; Lewis, J E; Byers, K Y; Segin, C M

    2000-06-01

    ABC Relaxation Theory proposes 15 psychological relaxation-related states (R-States): Sleepiness, Disengagement, Physical Relaxation, Mental Quiet, Rested/Refreshed, At Ease/At Peace, Energized, Aware, Joy, Thankfulness and Love, Prayerfulness, Childlike Innocence, Awe and Wonder, Mystery, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. The present study summarizes the results of 13 separate factor analyses of immediate relaxation-related states, states associated with recalled relaxation activities, relaxation dispositions, and relaxation motivations on a combined sample of 1,904 individuals (group average ages ranged from 28-40 yr.). Four exploratory factor analyses of Smith Relaxation Inventories yielded 15 items that most consistently and exclusively load (generally at least .70) on six replicated factors. These items included happy, joyful, energized, rested, at peace, warm, limp, silent, quiet, dozing, drowsy, prayerful, mystery, distant, and indifferent. Subsequent factor analyses restricted to these items and specifying six factors were performed on 13 different data sets. Each yielded the same six-factor solution: Factor 1: Centered Positive Affect, Factor 2: Sleepiness, Factor 3: Disengagement, Factor 4: Physical Relaxation, Factor 5: Mental Quiet, and Factor 6: Spiritual. Implications for ABC Relaxation Theory are discussed.

  19. Relaxation Techniques for Trauma.

    PubMed

    Scotland-Coogan, Diane; Davis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Physiological symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifest as increased arousal and reactivity seen as anger outburst, irritability, reckless behavior with no concern for consequences, hypervigilance, sleep disturbance, and problems with focus (American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). In seeking the most beneficial treatment for PTSD, consideration must be given to the anxiety response. Relaxation techniques are shown to help address the physiological manifestations of prolonged stress. The techniques addressed by the authors in this article include mindfulness, deep breathing, yoga, and meditation. By utilizing these techniques traditional therapies can be complemented. In addition, those who are averse to the traditional evidence-based practices or for those who have tried traditional therapies without success; these alternative interventions may assist in lessening physiological manifestations of PTSD. Future research studies assessing the benefits of these treatment modalities are warranted to provide empirical evidence to support the efficacy of these treatments.

  20. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  1. How does Vorticella utilize its stalk contraction-relaxation cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiazhong; Admiraal, David; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-03-01

    Vorticella is a sessile ciliate living in water, and it coils its slender stalk to pull the cell body (zooid) towards the substrate at a maximum speed of ~ 1 cm/s. After stalk contraction is completed, the stalk slowly relaxes to its extended state. Although this ultrafast stalk contraction has been studied in terms of cell motility, it is poorly understood how Vorticella utilizes its stalk contraction. Here we propose a hypothesis that Vorticella can augment transport of particles near the substrate relying on water flow induced by the stalk contraction-relaxation cycle. We investigated our hypothesis using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model which models Vorticella as a solid sphere moving normal to a solid surface in water. Having simulated water flow caused by Vorticella, we calculated motions of particles near Vorticella, and then quantified the transport effect of Vorticella's stalk contraction using microfluidic mixing indices. Supported by Laymann Seed grant from UNL.

  2. Bayesian Alternation during Tactile Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Goeke, Caspar M.; Planera, Serena; Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well-described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study, we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC) task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition), rotation only (native condition), and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition). Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants' responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND). Then, we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67) than the Bayesian integration model (χred2 = 4.34). Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all (WTA) model (χred2 = 1.64), which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However, the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2 = 1.09) utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  3. Bayesian Alternation during Tactile Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Goeke, Caspar M; Planera, Serena; Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well-described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study, we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC) task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition), rotation only (native condition), and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition). Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants' responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND). Then, we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred(2) = 1.67) than the Bayesian integration model (χred(2) = 4.34). Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all (WTA) model (χred(2) = 1.64), which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However, the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred(2) = 1.09) utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  4. Development of relaxation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Relaxation turbulence models have been intensively studied. The complete time dependent mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for flow into a two dimensional compression corner. A new numerical scheme has been incorporated into the developed computed code with an attendant order of magnitude reduction in computation time. Computed solutions are compared with experimental measurements of Law for supersonic flow. Details of the relaxation process have been studied; several different relaxation models, including different relaxation processes and varying relaxation length, are tested and compared. Then a parametric study has been conducted in which both Reynolds number and wedge angle are varied. To assess effects of Reynolds number and wedge angle, the parametric study includes the comparison of computed separation location and upstream extent of pressure rise; numerical results are also compared with the measurements of surface pressure, skin friction and mean velocity field.

  5. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  6. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  7. Therapeutic options for lip augmentation.

    PubMed

    Segall, Lorne; Ellis, David A F

    2007-11-01

    Aesthetic ideals vary with emerging fashion trends and within different cultures. However, over the past few decades, fuller lips have been considered a desirable trait. Many younger patients are presenting for lip augmentation to achieve the sought-after look commonly seen in many fashion magazines. In addition, as individuals age, they lose lip volume, with a thinning of the red lip, some effacement of the vermillion border, and elongation and flattening of the white portion of the lip. Rejuvenation of the lips plays a key role in restoring a more youthful appearance. As a result, lip augmentation appeals to a wide spectrum of patients who present with various different aesthetic goals and expectations. Numerous therapeutic options exist for aesthetic lip augmentation, ranging from temporary and permanent injectable fillers to implants and other surgical techniques.

  8. Augmentation-related brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self

  9. Augmented reality for anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rhys Gethin; John, Nigel William; Delieu, John Michael

    2010-03-01

    The use of Virtual Environments has been widely reported as a method of teaching anatomy. Generally such environments only convey the shape of the anatomy to the student. We present the Bangor Augmented Reality Education Tool for Anatomy (BARETA), a system that combines Augmented Reality (AR) technology with models produced using Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology, to provide the student with stimulation for touch as well as sight. The principal aims of this work were to provide an interface more intuitive than a mouse and keyboard, and to evaluate such a system as a viable supplement to traditional cadaver based education.

  10. Combustion-augmented laser ramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Tamada, Kazunobu; Kimura, Itsuro

    2006-05-01

    A preliminary study of combustion-augmented laser-ramjets was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in combustion-augmented operation.

  11. Progressive muscle relaxation, breathing exercises, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Smith, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and breathing exercises. Forty-two students were divided randomly into two groups and taught PMR or breathing exercises. Both groups practiced for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, PMR practitioners displayed greater increments in relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement, while breathing practitioners displayed higher levels of R-State Strength and Awareness. Slight differences emerged at Weeks 1 and 2; major differences emerged at Weeks 4 and 5. A delayed and potentially reinforcing aftereffect emerged for PMR only after five weeks of training--increased levels of Mental Quiet and Joy. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  12. Quasiparticle relaxation in superconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savich, Yahor; Glazman, Leonid; Kamenev, Alex

    2017-09-01

    We examine energy relaxation of nonequilibrium quasiparticles in "dirty" superconductors with the electron mean free path much shorter than the superconducting coherence length. Relaxation of low-energy nonequilibrium quasiparticles is dominated by phonon emission. We derive the corresponding collision integral and find the quasiparticle relaxation rate. The latter is sensitive to the breaking of time reversal symmetry (TRS) by a magnetic field (or magnetic impurities). As a concrete application of the developed theory, we address quasiparticle trapping by a vortex and a current-biased constriction. We show that trapping of hot quasiparticles may predominantly occur at distances from the vortex core, or the constriction, significantly exceeding the superconducting coherence length.

  13. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  14. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  15. Stress Relaxation of Interim Restoratives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-18

    unmodified zinc oxide- eugenol cement were more favorable than those of IRM and Cavit. The plastic behavior of gutta-percha temporary stopping precluded assessment of its relaxation at temperatures in excess of 22P C. (Author)

  16. Relaxation Pathways in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    At temperatures below the glass transition temperature, physical properties of metallic glasses, such as density, viscosity, electrical resistivity or enthalpy, slowly evolve with time. This is the process of physical aging that occurs among all types of glasses and leads to structural changes at the microscopic level. Even though the relaxation pathways are ruled by thermodynamics as the glass attempts to re-attain thermodynamic equilibrium, they are steered by sluggish kinetics at the microscopic level. Understanding the structural and dynamic pathways of the relaxing glassy state is still one of the grand challenges in materials physics. We review some of the recent experimental advances made in understanding the nature of the relaxation phenomenon in metallic glasses and its implications to the macroscopic and microscopic properties changes of the relaxing glass.

  17. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  18. Relaxation behavior of glassy selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Roman; Pustková, Pavla; Málek, Jiří

    2007-05-01

    The dynamics of the glass transition of amorphous selenium was investigated by using differential scanning calorimeter. The heat capacity data were analyzed applying the phenomenological Tool Narayanaswamy Moynihan (TNM) model in order to describe the relaxation behavior of a-Se. The TNM parameters were evaluated by fitting the enthalpic cycles and also one isothermal experiment. Furthermore, peak-shift method and several other methods of evaluating the TNM parameters were applied to confirm the results of curve fitting. The results are compared with the other published enthalpy and viscosity data, volume and enthalpy relaxation are compared on account of our previous mercury dilatometry measurements. We found out that the pre-exponential factor A and the apparent activation energy Δh* of structural relaxation are similar for volume and enthalpy relaxation and Δh* is very close to the activation energy of viscous flow.

  19. Relaxation Dynamics in Heme Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Reinhard Wilhelm

    A protein molecule possesses many conformational substates that are likely arranged in a hierarchy consisting of a number of tiers. A hierarchical organization of conformational substates is expected to give rise to a multitude of nonequilibrium relaxation phenomena. If the temperature is lowered, transitions between substates of higher tiers are frozen out, and relaxation processes characteristic of lower tiers will dominate the observational time scale. This thesis addresses the following questions: (i) What is the energy landscape of a protein? How does the landscape depend on the environment such as pH and viscosity, and how can it be connected to specific structural parts? (ii) What relaxation phenomena can be observed in a protein? Which are protein specific, and which occur in other proteins? How does the environment influence relaxations? (iii) What functional form best describes relaxation functions? (iv) Can we connect the motions to specific structural parts of the protein molecule, and are these motions important for the function of the protein?. To this purpose, relaxation processes after a pressure change are studied in carbonmonoxy (CO) heme proteins (myoglobin-CO, substrate-bound and substrate-free cytochrome P450cam-CO, chloroperoxidase-CO, horseradish peroxidase -CO) between 150 K and 250 K using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the CO bound to the heme iron. Two types of p -relaxation experiments are performed: p-release (200 to ~eq40 MPa) and p-jump (~eq40 to 200 MPa) experiments. Most of the relaxations fall into one of three groups and are characterized by (i) nonexponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM1( nu), FIM1(Gamma)); (ii) exponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM0(A_{i}to A_{j})); exponential time dependence and Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIMX( nu)). The influence of pH is studied in myoglobin-CO and shown to have a strong influence on the substate population of the

  20. "Basic MR Relaxation Mechanisms & Contrast Agent Design"

    PubMed Central

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M.; Martins, André F.; Pinho, Marco; Rofsky, Neil; Sherry, A. Dean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have undergone continuous and substantial evolution by virtue of hardware and software innovations and the development and implementation of exogenous contrast media. Thirty years since the first MRI contrast agent was approved for clinical use, a reliance on MR contrast media persists largely to improve image quality with higher contrast resolution and to provide additional functional characterization of normal and abnormal tissues. Further development of MR contrast media is an important component in the quest for continued augmentation of diagnostic capabilities. In this review we will detail the many important considerations when pursuing the design and use of MR contrast media. We will offer a perspective on the importance of chemical stability, particularly kinetic stability, and how this influences one's thinking about the safety of metal-ligand based contrast agents. We will discuss the mechanisms involved in magnetic resonance relaxation in the context of probe design strategies. A brief description of currently available contrast agents will be accompanied by an in-depth discussion that highlights promising MRI contrast agents in development for future clinical and research applications. Our intention is to give a diverse audience an improved understanding of the factors involved in developing new types of safe and highly efficient MR contrast agents and, at the same time, provide an appreciation of the insights into physiology and disease that newer types of responsive agents can provide. PMID:25975847

  1. Relaxation processes in Aeolian transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmani, Houssem; Valance, Alexandre; Ould El Moctar, Ahmed; Dupont, Pascal; Zegadi, Rabah

    2017-06-01

    We investigate experimentally the relaxation process toward the equilibrium regime of saltation transport in the context of spatial inhomogeneous conditions. The relaxation length associated to this process is an important length in aeolian transport. This length stands for the distance needed for the particle flux to adapt to a change in flow conditions or in the boundary conditions at the bed. Predicting the value of this length under given conditions of transport remains an open and important issue. We conducted wind tunnel experiments to document the influence of the upstream particle flux and wind speed on the relaxation process toward the saturated transport state. In the absence of upstream particle flux, data show that the relaxation length is independent of the wind strength (except close to the threshold of transport). In contrast, in the case of a finite upstream flux, the relaxation length exhibits a clear increase with increasing air flow velocity. Moreover, in the latter the relaxation is clearly non-monotonic and presents an overshoot.

  2. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  3. Augmented assessment as a means to augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Rigorous scientific assessment of educational technologies typically lags behind the availability of the technologies by years because of the lack of validated instruments and benchmarks. Even when the appropriate assessment instruments are available, they may not be applied because of time and monetary constraints. Work in augmented reality, instrumented mannequins, serious gaming, and similar promising educational technologies that haven't undergone timely, rigorous evaluation, highlights the need for assessment methodologies that address the limitations of traditional approaches. The most promising augmented assessment solutions incorporate elements of rapid prototyping used in the software industry, simulation-based assessment techniques modeled after methods used in bioinformatics, and object-oriented analysis methods borrowed from object oriented programming.

  4. [Augmentation technique on the proximal humerus].

    PubMed

    Scola, A; Gebhard, F; Röderer, G

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic fractures is still a challenge. The advantages of augmentation with respect to primary in vitro stability and the clinical use for the proximal humerus are presented in this article. In this study six paired human humeri were randomized into an augmented and a non-augmented group. Osteosynthesis was performed with a PHILOS plate (Synthes®). In the augmented group the two screws finding purchase in the weakest cancellous bone were augmented. The specimens were tested in a 3-part fracture model in a varus bending test. The augmented PHILOS plates withstood significantly more load cycles until failure. The correlation to bone mineral density (BMD) showed that augmentation could partially compensate for low BMD. The augmentation of the screws in locked plating in a proximal humerus fracture model is effective in improving the primary stability in a cyclic varus bending test. The targeted augmentation of two particular screws in a region of low bone quality within the humeral head was almost as effective as four screws with twice the amount of bone cement. Screw augmentation combined with a knowledge of the local bone quality could be more effective in enhancing the primary stability of a proximal humerus locking plate because the effect of augmentation can be exploited more effectively limiting it to the degree required. The technique of augmentation is simple and can be applied in open and minimally invasive procedures. When the correct procedure is used, complications (cement leakage into the joint) can be avoided.

  5. Measuring patient outcomes in breast augmentation: introducing the BREAST-Q Augmentation module.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Reavey, Patrick L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie; McCarthy, Colleen; Cano, Stefan J

    2009-01-01

    The Breast-Q Augmentation module is a new and unique questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes following breast augmentation. It has undergone a rigorous development and validation process and is currently the only questionnaire for breast augmentation that meets international and federal standards for questionnaire development. The Breast-Q Augmentation module covers a comprehensive set of concerns of breast augmentation patients, including satisfaction with breasts and impact on quality of life. With its excellent psychometric properties, the Breast-Q Augmentation module can provide clinicians and researchers with a wealth of essential data to improve the field of breast augmentation from the perspectives of both surgeons and patients.

  6. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  7. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-01-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value. PMID:27165120

  8. Augmented reality building operations tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  9. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-05-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value.

  10. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  11. TDRSS Augmentation System for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems(GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  12. Military Applications of Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    NOTES book chapter in Handbook of Augmented Reality, 2011. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...real ob- jects by simply not rendering graphics where they are computed to be hidden from view; this is a standard property of the depth buffer in...Adam Lederer, Jason Jerald, Erik Tomlin, Eric Burns, Donald Char- ity, Joshua Eliason, Jesus Arango, and Scott Frees. In addition, the authors would like

  13. Photon management for augmented photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Dinh, Cao Thang; Sargent, Edward H.; Sinton, David

    2016-09-01

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria are some of nature's finest examples of solar energy conversion systems, effortlessly transforming inorganic carbon into complex molecules through photosynthesis. The efficiency of energy-dense hydrocarbon production by photosynthetic organisms is determined in part by the light collected by the microorganisms. Therefore, optical engineering has the potential to increase the productivity of algae cultivation systems used for industrial-scale biofuel synthesis. Herein, we explore and report emerging and promising material science and engineering innovations for augmenting microalgal photosynthesis.

  14. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  15. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  16. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  17. Lamotrigine augmentation in unipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fabio Lopes; Hara, Claudia

    2003-03-01

    A significant number of patients with unipolar depression fail to achieve remission after one or a series of antidepressants. We present the results of a retrospective chart review of the efficacy and tolerability of lamotrigine as an augmentation drug in treatment-resistant unipolar depression. A previous absence of a response was defined as the clinically significant presence of depressive symptomatology after 6 weeks of treatment with an antidepressant, with at least 3 weeks at the maximum dose tolerated by the patient. The patients were rated retrospectively using the Clinical Global Impression rating scale. Seventy-six percent of the patients improved. Gender, age, basal severity of the episode and degree of previous non response were not statistically significantly associated with response to lamotrigine augmentation. Comorbidity showed a tendency to be negatively related with response to lamotrigine. Three patients abandoned the treatment with lamotrigine due to side-effects. Complaints were excessive somnolence, headache, dizziness, nausea and malaise. Data suggest that lamotrigine is a promising drug for treatment-refractory unipolar depression. Double-blind studies are necessary to confirm its use as an augmentation agent.

  18. Striae distensae after breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Basile, Filipe Volpe; Basile, Arthur Volpe; Basile, Antonio Roberto

    2012-08-01

    One known but not fully understood complication after breast augmentation is the new onset of stretch marks (striae distensae) on the surgically treated breast. To date, all publications on this subject have been case reports. No report has fully described the actual incidence, risk factors, or management of striae distensae after breast surgery. This study prospectively followed patients who underwent primary breast augmentation using silicone implants in a single group practice from 2007 to 2011. New-onset striae distensae were actively investigated. Time from surgery to the moment of striae onset, patient age, nulliparity, use of oral contraceptives, overweight, personal history of stretch marks, and other variables were evaluated. A total of 409 patients were included in the study. In 19 cases (4.6%), new-onset striae distensae after breast augmentation were observed. The population with striae distensae was significantly younger than the total population (29.56 vs 20.91 years; p=0.012). Striae distensae also were more common in nulliparous than in multiparous women (8.29 vs 0.52%; p=0.006), overweight women (17.77 vs 3.02%; p=0.016), women using oral contraceptives (7.89 vs 0.55%; p=0.008), and women with a personal history of stretch marks (8.97 vs 3.36%; p=0.031). No relation was shown regarding implant pocket type, size, or profile. Striae distensae may be a common but underreported complication after breast augmentation. In this series, striae distensae developed in 4.6% of the patients within 1 year after breast augmentation. Severity may vary from inconspicuous small marks (classifications 1 and 2) to wide red and active striae rubra (classifications 3 and 4). Nulliparity, use of oral contraceptives, overweight, personal history of stretch marks, and younger age were related to a higher incidence of striae distensae. The increased rates in these groups may be associated with their exposure to higher estrogen levels and the important role of this hormone

  19. Economic evaluation of flying-qualities design criteria for a transport configured with relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Direct constrained parameter optimization was used to optimally size a medium range transport for minimum direct operating cost. Several stability and control constraints were varied to study the sensitivity of the configuration to specifying the unaugmented flying qualities of transports designed to take maximum advantage of relaxed static stability augmentation systems. Additionally, a number of handling qualities related design constants were studied with respect to their impact on the design.

  20. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  1. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  2. Multigrid Methods for Mesh Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J

    2006-06-12

    When generating a mesh for the initial conditions for a computer simulation, you want the mesh to be as smooth as possible. A common practice is to use equipotential mesh relaxation to smooth out a distorted computational mesh. Typically a Laplace-like equation is set up for the mesh coordinates and then one or more Jacobi iterations are performed to relax the mesh. As the zone count gets really large, the Jacobi iteration becomes less and less effective and we are stuck with our original unrelaxed mesh. This type of iteration can only damp high frequency errors and the smooth errors remain. When the zone count is large, almost everything looks smooth so relaxation cannot solve the problem. In this paper we examine a multigrid technique which effectively smooths out the mesh, independent of the number of zones.

  3. Peeling mode relaxation ELM model

    SciTech Connect

    Gimblett, C. G.

    2006-11-30

    This paper discusses an approach to modelling Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in which toroidal peeling modes are envisaged to initiate a constrained relaxation of the tokamak outer region plasma. Relaxation produces both a flattened edge current profile (which tends to further destabilise a peeling mode), and a plasma-vacuum negative current sheet which has a counteracting stabilising influence; the balance that is struck between these two effects determines the radial extent (rE) of the ELM relaxed region. The model is sensitive to the precise position of the mode rational surfaces to the plasma surface and hence there is a 'deterministic scatter' in the results that has an accord with experimental data. The toroidal peeling stability criterion involves the edge pressure, and using this in conjunction with predictions of rE allows us to evaluate the ELM energy losses and compare with experiment. Predictions of trends with the edge safety factor and collisionality are also made.

  4. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  5. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  6. Leptogenesis via Higgs condensate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Louis; Pearce, Lauren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    An epoch of Higgs relaxation may occur in the early universe during or immediately following postinflationary reheating. It has recently been pointed out that leptogenesis may occur in minimal extensions of the standard model during this epoch [A. Kusenko, L. Pearce, and L. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061302 (2015)]. We analyze Higgs relaxation taking into account the effects of perturbative and nonperturbative decays of the Higgs condensate, and we present a detailed derivation of the relevant kinetic equations and of the relevant particle interaction cross sections. We identify the parameter space in which a sufficiently large asymmetry is generated.

  7. Analog circuits for relaxation networks.

    PubMed

    Card, H

    1993-12-01

    Selected examples are presented of recent advances, primarily from the U.S. and Canada, in analog circuits for relaxation networks. Relaxation networks having feedback connections exhibit potentially greater computational power per neuron than feedforward networks. They are also more poorly understood especially with respect to learning algorithms. Examples are described of analog circuits for (i) supervised learning in deterministic Boltzmann machines, (ii) unsupervised competitive learning and feature maps and (iii) networks with resistive grids for vision and audition tasks. We also discuss recent progress on in-circuit learning and synaptic weight storage mechanisms.

  8. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  9. Augmented reality in intraventricular neuroendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Finger, T; Schaumann, A; Schulz, M; Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2017-06-01

    Individual planning of the entry point and the use of navigation has become more relevant in intraventricular neuroendoscopy. Navigated neuroendoscopic solutions are continuously improving. We describe experimentally measured accuracy and our first experience with augmented reality-enhanced navigated neuroendoscopy for intraventricular pathologies. Augmented reality-enhanced navigated endoscopy was tested for accuracy in an experimental setting. Therefore, a 3D-printed head model with a right parietal lesion was scanned with a thin-sliced computer tomography. Segmentation of the tumor lesion was performed using Scopis NovaPlan navigation software. An optical reference matrix is used to register the neuroendoscope's geometry and its field of view. The pre-planned ROI and trajectory are superimposed in the endoscopic image. The accuracy of the superimposed contour fitting on endoscopically visualized lesion was acquired by measuring the deviation of both midpoints to one another. The technique was subsequently used in 29 cases with CSF circulation pathologies. Navigation planning included defining the entry points, regions of interests and trajectories, superimposed as augmented reality on the endoscopic video screen during intervention. Patients were evaluated for postoperative imaging, reoperations, and possible complications. The experimental setup revealed a deviation of the ROI's midpoint from the real target by 1.2 ± 0.4 mm. The clinical study included 18 cyst fenestrations, ten biopsies, seven endoscopic third ventriculostomies, six stent placements, and two shunt implantations, being eventually combined in some patients. In cases of cyst fenestrations postoperatively, the cyst volume was significantly reduced in all patients by mean of 47%. In biopsies, the diagnostic yield was 100%. Reoperations during a follow-up period of 11.4 ± 10.2 months were necessary in two cases. Complications included one postoperative hygroma and one insufficient

  10. Augmented-plane-wave forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, José M.; Williams, Arthur R.

    1990-11-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of a calculational method of electronic-structure theory. The method combines the power (tractable basis-set size) and flexibility (transition and first-row elements) of the augmented-plane-wave method with the computational efficiency of the Car-Parrinello method of molecular dynamics and total-energy minimization. Equilibrium geometry and vibrational frequencies in agreement with experiment are presented for Si, to demonstrate agreement with existing methods and for Cu, N2, and H2O to demonstrate the broader applicability of the approach.

  11. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  12. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  13. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  14. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  15. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  16. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  17. Relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turik, A. V.; Bogatin, A. S.; Andreev, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    The specific features of the relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics have been investigated. The nature of the difference between the relaxation frequencies of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss (conductivity) has been explained. It has been shown that the average relaxation frequency of the conductivity is considerably (in some cases, by several orders of magnitude) higher than the relaxation frequency of the dielectric constant owing to an increase in the conductivity spectra of the statistical weight of the relaxation processes with short relaxation times.

  18. (-)epicatechin induces and modulates endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated rat mesenteric artery rings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yao, Xiao-Qiang; Chan, Franky Leung; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu

    2002-12-01

    The present study was aimed to examine the role of endothelial nitric oxide in the relaxant response to green tea (-)epicatechin and its modulation of endothelium-mediated relaxation in the isolated rat mesenteric artery rings. Changes in the isometric tension were measured with Grass force-displacement transducers. The (-)epicatechin-induced relaxation was largely dependent on the presence of intact endothelium and was reversed by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester 10 micromol/L or methylene blue 10 micromol/L, the inhibitors of nitric oxide-mediated relaxation. L-Arginine at 1 mmol/L antagonized the effect of L-NAME or methylene blue. Pretreatment of endothelium-intact rings with (-)epicatechin 10 micromol/L enhanced the relaxation induced by endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine, while this concentration did not influence the endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside in the endothelium-denuded artery rings. The results indicate that the endothelium-dependent vasodilation by (-)epicatechin is mainly mediated through nitric oxide and low concentration of (-)epicatechin augments endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the rat mesenteric arteries.

  19. Relaxed Linearized Algorithms for Faster X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nien, Hung; Fessler, Jeffrey

    2015-12-17

    Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods are studied extensively for X-ray computed tomography (CT) due to the potential of acquiring CT scans with reduced X-ray dose while maintaining image quality. However, the longer reconstruction time of SIR methods hinders their use in X-ray CT in practice. To accelerate statistical methods, many optimization techniques have been investigated. Over-relaxation is a common technique to speed up convergence of iterative algorithms. For instance, using a relaxation parameter that is close to two in alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) has been shown to speed up convergence significantly. This paper proposes a relaxed linearized augmented Lagrangian (AL) method that shows theoretical faster convergence rate with over-relaxation and applies the proposed relaxed linearized AL method to X-ray CT image reconstruction problems. Experimental results with both simulated and real CT scan data show that the proposed relaxed algorithm (with ordered-subsets [OS] acceleration) is about twice as fast as the existing unrelaxed fast algorithms, with negligible computation and memory overhead.

  20. Relaxed Linearized Algorithms for Faster X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nien, Hung; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods are studied extensively for X-ray computed tomography (CT) due to the potential of acquiring CT scans with reduced X-ray dose while maintaining image quality. However, the longer reconstruction time of SIR methods hinders their use in X-ray CT in practice. To accelerate statistical methods, many optimization techniques have been investigated. Over-relaxation is a common technique to speed up convergence of iterative algorithms. For instance, using a relaxation parameter that is close to two in alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) has been shown to speed up convergence significantly. This paper proposes a relaxed linearized augmented Lagrangian (AL) method that shows theoretical faster convergence rate with over-relaxation and applies the proposed relaxed linearized AL method to X-ray CT image reconstruction problems. Experimental results with both simulated and real CT scan data show that the proposed relaxed algorithm (with ordered-subsets [OS] acceleration) is about twice as fast as the existing unrelaxed fast algorithms, with negligible computation and memory overhead.

  1. Left ventricular responses to acute changes in late systolic pressure augmentation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sweitzer, Nancy K; Hetzel, Scott J; Skalski, Joseph; Velez, Mauricio; Eggleston, Kevin; Mitchell, Gary F

    2013-07-01

    Changes in the cardiovascular system with age may predispose older persons to development of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Vascular stiffening, aortic pressure augmentation, and ventricular-vascular coupling have been implicated. We explored the potential for acute reductions in late systolic pressure augmentation to impact left ventricular relaxation in older persons without heart failure. Sixteen older persons free of known cardiovascular disease with the exception of hypertension had noninvasive tonometry and cardiac ultrasound to evaluate central augmentation index (AI) and diastolic function at baseline and after randomized, blinded administration of intravenous B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and hydralazine in a crossover design. AI was significantly reduced after BNP (11.4±8.9 to -0.2±14.7%; P = 0.02) and nonsignificantly reduced after hydralazine (14.7±8.4% to 11.5±8.8%; P = 0.39). With decreased AI during BNP, a trend toward worsened myocardial relaxation by tissue Doppler imaging occurred (E' velocity pre- and post-BNP: 10.0±2.5 and 8.8±2.0cm/s, respectively; P = 0.06). There was a significant fall in stroke volume with BNP (68.5±18.3 to 60.9±18.1ml; P = 0.02), suggesting that changes in preload overwhelmed effects of afterload reduction on ventricular performance. With hydralazine, neither relaxation nor stroke volume changed. Acute changes in late systolic aortic pressure augmentation do not necessarily lead to improved systolic or diastolic function in older people. Preload may be a more important determinant of cardiac performance than afterload in older people with compensated ventricular function. The potential for changes in preload to impair rather than enhance left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in older people warrants further study. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00204984.

  2. Psychotherapy Augmentation through Preconscious Priming

    PubMed Central

    Borgeat, François; O’Connor, Kieron; Amado, Danielle; St-Pierre-Delorme, Marie-Ève

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that repeated preconscious (masked) priming of personalized positive cognitions could augment cognitive change and facilitate achievement of patients’ goals following a therapy. Methods: Twenty social phobic patients (13 women) completed a 36-weeks study beginning by 12 weeks of group behavioral therapy. After the therapy, they received 6 weeks of preconscious priming and 6 weeks of a control procedure in a randomized cross-over design. The Priming condition involved listening twice daily with a passive attitude to a recording of individualized formulations of appropriate cognitions and attitudes masked by music. The Control condition involved listening to an indistinguishable recording where the formulations had been replaced by random numbers. Changes in social cognitions were measured by the Social Interaction Self Statements Test (SISST). Results: Patients improved following therapy. The Priming procedure was associated with increased positive cognitions and decreased negative cognitions on the SISST while the Control procedure was not. The Priming procedure induced more cognitive change when applied immediately after the group therapy. Conclusion: An effect of priming was observed on social phobia related cognitions in the expected direction. This self administered addition to a therapy could be seen as an augmentation strategy. PMID:23508724

  3. PRP Augmentation for ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Current research is investigating new methods to enhance tissue healing to speed up recovery time and decrease the risk of failure in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Biological augmentation is one of the most exploited strategies, in particular the application of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP). Aim of the present paper is to systematically review all the preclinical and clinical papers dealing with the application of PRP as a biological enhancer during ACL reconstructive surgery. Thirty-two studies were included in the present review. The analysis of the preclinical evidence revealed that PRP was able to improve the healing potential of the tendinous graft both in terms of histological and biomechanical performance. Looking at the available clinical evidence, results were not univocal. PRP administration proved to be a safe procedure and there were some evidences that it could favor the donor site healing in case of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft and positively contribute to graft maturation over time, whereas the majority of the papers did not show beneficial effects in terms of bony tunnels/graft area integration. Furthermore, PRP augmentation did not provide superior functional results at short term evaluation. PMID:26064903

  4. Augmented reality in medical education?

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality.

  5. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  6. Urban Terrain Modeling for Augmented Reality Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in wearable computers have begun to make mobile augmented reality systems a reality (Feiner, 1997; Piekarski, 1999, Julier, 2000...Augmented Reality Applications 3 Figure 1. A wearable augmented reality system. The large size of the system is the result of the fact that it is...for the light to travel out to the target and back to the LIDAR is used to determine the range of the target. LIDAR operates in the ultraviolet , visible

  7. Striae distensae after subfascial breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos; Rodopoulou, Stavroula

    2008-03-01

    Striae distensae or stretch marks after breast augmentation are a rare complication. To date, 10 cases have been published. In seven of these cases, the implant was placed in a subglandular position and in the other three cases, placement was submuscular. Two cases of stretch marks in two young nulliparous women who underwent subfacial breast augmentation are presented. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of striae distensae after subfascial breast augmentation.

  8. A Tracker Alignment Framework for Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    A Tracker Alignment Framework for Augmented Reality Yohan Baillot and Simon J. Julier ITT Advanced Engineering & Sciences 2560 Huntington Ave...with as few as three measurements. 1. Introduction Almost all Augmented Reality (AR) systems use a track- ing system to capture motion of objects in...DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Tracker Alignment Framework for Augmented Reality 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  9. Augmented Reality for Maintenance and Repair (ARMAR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this research, Augmented Reality for Maintenance and Repair (ARMAR), was to research the design and development of experimental... augmented reality systems for maintenance job aiding. The goal was to explore and evaluate the feasibility of developing prototype adaptive augmented ... reality systems that can be used to investigate how real time computer graphics, overlaid on and registered with the actual equipment being maintained, can

  10. Developing a New Medical Augmented Reality System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    Augmented reality is a technique for combining supplementary imagery such that it appears as part of the scene and can be used for guidance, training...and locational aids. In the medical domain, augmented reality can be used to combine medical imagery to the physician’s view of a patient to help...the physician establish a direct relation between the imagery and the patient. This project report will examine medical augmented reality systems for

  11. Eyekon: Distributed Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Eyekon: Distributed Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams TOPIC: Information Superiority/Information Operations and Information Age... Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...by ANSI Std Z39-18 Eyekon: Distributed Augmented Reality for Soldier Teams Abstract The battlefield is a place of violence ruled by

  12. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    PubMed

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  13. Strategies and Challenges in Simultaneous Augmentation Mastopexy.

    PubMed

    Spring, Michelle A; Hartmann, Emily C; Stevens, W Grant

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous breast augmentation and mastopexy is a common procedure often considered to be one of the most difficult cosmetic breast surgeries. One-stage augmentation mastopexy was initially described more than 50 years ago. The challenge lies in the fact that the surgery has multiple opposing goals: to increasing the volume of a breast, enhance the shape, and simultaneously decrease the skin envelope. Successful outcomes in augmentation can be expected with proper planning, technique, and patient education. This article focuses on common indications for simultaneous augmentation mastopexy, techniques for safe and effective combined procedures, challenges of the procedure, and potential complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Challenges associated with reentry maxillary sinus augmentation.

    PubMed

    Mardinger, Ofer; Moses, Ofer; Chaushu, Gavriel; Manor, Yifat; Tulchinsky, Ze'ev; Nissan, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    This study was a retrospective assessment of reentry sinus augmentation compared with sinus augmentation performed for the first time. There were 38 subjects who required sinus augmentation. The study group (17 patients, 21 sinuses) included subjects following failure of a previous sinus augmentation procedure that required reentry augmentation. The control group (21 patients, 21 sinuses) included subjects in which sinus augmentation was performed for the first time. Patients' medical files were reviewed. A preformed questionnaire was used to collect data regarding demographic parameters, medical and dental health history, habits, and intra- and postoperative data. Operative challenges in the study group included adhesions of the buccal flap to the Schneiderian membrane (62%, 13/21, P<.001), bony fenestration of the lateral wall with adhesions (71%, 15/21, P<.001), limited mobility of a clinical fibrotic Schneiderian membrane (71%, 15/21, P<.001), and increased incidence of membrane perforations (47%, 10/21, versus 9.5%, 2/21, P=.03). In the control group the Schneiderian membrane was thin and flexible. Sinus augmentation succeeded in all cases of both groups. Implant failure was significantly higher in the study group (11% versus 0%, P<.001). Clinical success of reentry sinus augmentation is predictable despite its complexity. Clinicians should be aware of anatomical changes caused by previous failure of this procedure. Patients should be informed about the lower success rate of implants when reentry sinus augmentation is required. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Organic semiconductors: What makes the spin relax?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbert, Peter A.

    2010-04-01

    Spin relaxation in organic materials is expected to be slow because of weak spin-orbit coupling. The effects of deuteration and coherent spin excitation show that the spin-relaxation time is actually limited by hyperfine fields.

  16. Relaxation and Distraction in Experimental Desensitization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, R. O.; Marshall, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Compared experimental desensitization with a procedure that replaced relaxation with a distraction task and with an approach that combined both relaxation and distraction. Desensitization generally was more effective than the other two procedures. (Author)

  17. Relaxation as a Factor in Semantic Desensitization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechtel, James E.; McNamara, J. Regis

    1975-01-01

    Relaxation and semantic desensitization were used to alleviate the fear of phobic females. Results showed that semantic desensitization, alone or in combination with relaxation, failed to modify the evaluative meanings evoked by the feared object. (SE)

  18. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  19. Demonstration of relaxed static stability on a commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Cokeley, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Increasing jet aircraft fuel costs from 25 percent to nearly 60 percent of the aircraft direct operating costs have led to a heavy emphasis on the development of transport aircraft with significantly improved aerodynamic performance. The application of the concept of relaxed static stability (RSS) and the utilization of an active control stability augmentation system make it possible to design an aircraft with reduced aerodynamic trim drag due to a farther-aft cg balance. Reduced aerodynamic parasite drag and lower structural weight due to a smaller horizontal tail surface can also be obtained. The application of RSS has been studied under a NASA-sponsored program to determine ways of improving the energy efficiency in current and future transport aircraft. Attention is given to a near-term pitch active control system, an advanced pitch active control system, and an operational overview.

  20. Demonstration of relaxed static stability on a commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Cokeley, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Increasing jet aircraft fuel costs from 25 percent to nearly 60 percent of the aircraft direct operating costs have led to a heavy emphasis on the development of transport aircraft with significantly improved aerodynamic performance. The application of the concept of relaxed static stability (RSS) and the utilization of an active control stability augmentation system make it possible to design an aircraft with reduced aerodynamic trim drag due to a farther-aft cg balance. Reduced aerodynamic parasite drag and lower structural weight due to a smaller horizontal tail surface can also be obtained. The application of RSS has been studied under a NASA-sponsored program to determine ways of improving the energy efficiency in current and future transport aircraft. Attention is given to a near-term pitch active control system, an advanced pitch active control system, and an operational overview.

  1. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  2. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  3. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  4. Fractional relaxations in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    A quantum dot interacting with the radiation field of a photonic crystal is considered. An analytical description of the dynamics and the coherence between the two states of the quantum dot is provided. Besides the well-known trapping, a fractional nature of the dynamics appears via relaxations of the Mittag-Leffler type. Furthermore, coherence exhibits a transition from the decay {{t}-3/2} to {{t}-1/2} if the transition frequency of the quantum dot is exactly in the middle of the band gap. Similarly, the population of the excited level undergoes a transition from the relaxation 1/{{t}3} to 1/t. These resonances and transitions belong also to the context of matter-wave emissions in optical lattices.

  5. Slow relaxation in granular compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Knight, J. B.; Nowak, E. R.; Jaeger, H. M.; Nagel, S. R.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental studies show that the density of a vibrated granular material evolves from a low density initial state into a higher density final steady state. The relaxation towards the final density follows an inverse logarithmic law. As the system approaches its final state, a growing number of beads have to be rearranged to enable a local density increase. A free volume argument shows that this number grows as N = {ϱ}/{(1-ϱ)}. The time scale associated with such events increases exponentially ∼ e N, and as a result a logarithmically slow approach to the final state is found ϱ ∞ - ϱ(t) ∼ {1}/{lnt }. Furthermore, a one-dimensional toy model that captures this relaxation dynamics as well as the observed density fluctuations is discussed.

  6. Models of violently relaxed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Tremaine, Scott; Johnstone, Doug

    1989-02-01

    The properties of spherical self-gravitating models derived from two distribution functions that incorporate, in a crude way, the physics of violent relaxation are investigated. The first distribution function is identical to the one discussed by Stiavelli and Bertin (1985) except for a change in the sign of the 'temperature', i.e., e exp(-aE) to e exp(+aE). It is shown that these 'negative temperature' models provide a much better description of the end-state of violent relaxation than 'positive temperature' models. The second distribution function is similar to the first except for a different dependence on angular momentum. Both distribution functions yield single-parameter families of models with surface density profiles very similar to the R exp 1/4 law. Furthermore, the central concentration of models in both families increases monotonically with the velocity anisotropy, as expected in systems that formed through cold collapse.

  7. Relaxation: A Fourth "R" for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    Relaxation training helps the individual handle tension through concentrating upon efficient use of muscles. A program of progressive relaxation can be easily incorporated into elementary and secondary schools. Objectives of such a program include the following: (a) to learn to relax technically for purposes of complete rest (deep muscle…

  8. Brief relaxation training program for hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Balk, Judith L; Chung, Sheng-Chia; Beigi, Richard; Brooks, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Employee stress leads to attrition, burnout, and increased medical costs. We aimed to assess if relaxation training leads to decreased stress levels based on questionnaire and thermal biofeedback. Thirty-minute relaxation training sessions were conducted for hospital employees and for cancer patients. Perceived Stress levels and skin temperature were analyzed before and after relaxation training.

  9. Domain relaxation in Langmuir films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, James C.; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Mann, J. Adin; Wintersmith, Jacob R.; Zou, Lu

    We report on theoretical studies of molecularly thin Langmuir films on the surface of a quiescent subfluid and qualitatively compare the results to both new and previous experiments. The film covers the entire fluid surface, but domains of different phases are observed. In the absence of external forcing, the compact domains tend to relax to circles, driven by a line tension at the phase boundaries. When stretched (by a transient applied stagnation-point flow or by stirring), a compact domain elongates, creating a bola consisting of two roughly circular reservoirs connected by a thin tether. This shape will then relax slowly to the minimum-energy configuration of a circular domain. The tether is never observed to rupture, even when it is more than a hundred times as long as it is wide. We model these experiments by taking previous descriptions of the full hydrodynamics, identifying the dominant effects via dimensional analysis, and reducing the system to a more tractable form. The result is a free boundary problem for an inviscid Langmuir film whose motion is driven by the line tension of the domain and damped by the viscosity of the subfluid. Using this model we derive relaxation rates for perturbations of a uniform strip and a circular patch. We also derive a boundary integral formulation which allows an efficient numerical solution of the problem. Numerically this model replicates the formation of a bola and the subsequent relaxation observed in the experiments. Finally, we suggest physical properties of the system (such as line tension) that can be deduced by comparison of the theory and numerical simulations to the experiment. Two movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  10. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  11. Unilateral galactocele following augmentation mammoplasty.

    PubMed

    Deloach, E D; Lord, S A; Ruf, L E

    1994-07-01

    Development of unilateral galactoceles following breast augmentation is reported in 2 young females. Both galactoceles were drained and cultured. In 1 patient the implant was removed and a delayed reinsertion was undertaken. In the second patient the implant was replaced at the time of the drainage procedure. Culture and sensitivity in 1 patient showed no growth and in the second patient revealed Staphylococcus aureus. Although the cause is unknown, galactocele formation may be due to manipulation of breast tissue during surgery. The use of oral contraceptives may also play a role in this process. Hormonal suppression of lactation and removal of the implants may be indicated in these patients. Consideration should be also given to the use of systemic antibiotics directed toward skin pathogens.

  12. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  13. Structural relaxation of acetaminophen glass.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Lina; Johari, G P; Shanker, Ravi M

    2006-05-01

    The aim is to determine the structural stability of acetaminophen glass with time and temperature change, and to examine the merits of adapting the structural relaxation models of the glassy state for pharmaceuticals. Differential scanning calorimetry technique has been used to study the acetaminophen glass after keeping the samples for various periods at fixed temperatures and after keeping at various temperatures for fixed periods. A general formalism for thermodynamic changes during storage in a temperature fluctuating environment is given and the kinetics of the enthalpy and entropy decrease determined. At a fixed temperature, the decrease occurs according to a non-exponential kinetics. For the same storage time, but at different temperatures, the enthalpy and entropy decrease rises to a maximum value at a certain temperature and then declines. The peak appears at the temperature at which the internally equilibrated state of the sample is reached for a fixed storage time. The change in the normalized heat capacity during the heating of acetaminophen has been analysed in terms of a non-exponential, non-linear enthalpy relaxation model. A single set of parameters that fit the data for unannealed acetaminophen glass does not fit the calorimetric data for annealed glass. Since acetaminophen molecules form intermolecular hydrogen-bonds in the crystal state and likely to form such bonds more easily in the disordered state, effect of such bonds on structural relaxation is likely to be significant.

  14. Spin relaxation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.

    2011-02-01

    The Elliott theory of spin relaxation in metals and semiconductors is extended to metallic ferromagnets. Our treatment is based on the two-current model of Fert, Campbell, and Jaoul. The d→s electron-scattering process involved in spin relaxation is the inverse of the s→d process responsible for the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). As a result, spin-relaxation rate 1/τsr and AMR Δρ are given by similar formulas, and are in a constant ratio if scattering is by solute atoms. Our treatment applies to nickel- and cobalt-based alloys which do not have spin-up 3d states at the Fermi level. This category includes many of the technologically important magnetic materials. And we show how to modify the theory to apply it to bcc iron-based alloys. We also treat the case of Permalloy Ni80Fe20 at finite temperature or in thin-film form, where several kinds of scatterers exist. Predicted values of 1/τsr and Δρ are plotted versus resistivity of the sample. These predictions are compared to values of 1/τsr and Δρ derived from ferromagnetic-resonance and AMR experiments in Permalloy.

  15. Relaxation response in femoral angiography.

    PubMed

    Mandle, C L; Domar, A D; Harrington, D P; Leserman, J; Bozadjian, E M; Friedman, R; Benson, H

    1990-03-01

    Immediately before they underwent femoral angiography, 45 patients were given one of three types of audiotapes: a relaxation response tape recorded for this study, a tape of contemporary instrumental music, or a blank tape. All patients were instructed to listen to their audiotape during the entire angiographic procedure. Each audiotape was played through earphones. Radiologists were not told the group assignment or tape contents. The patients given the audiotape with instructions to elicit the relaxation response (n = 15) experienced significantly less anxiety (P less than .05) and pain (P less than .001) during the procedure, were observed by radiology nurses to exhibit significantly less pain (P less than .001) and anxiety (P less than .001), and requested significantly less fentanyl citrate (P less than .01) and diazepam (P less than .01) than patients given either the music (n = 14) or the blank (n = 16) control audiotapes. Elicitation of the relaxation response is a simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and practical method to reduce pain, anxiety, and medication during femoral angiography and may be useful in other invasive procedures.

  16. Sensory Augmentation for the Blind

    PubMed Central

    Kärcher, Silke M.; Fenzlaff, Sandra; Hartmann, Daniela; Nagel, Saskia K.; König, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Common navigational aids used by blind travelers during large-scale navigation divert attention away from important cues of the immediate environment (i.e., approaching vehicles). Sensory augmentation devices, relying on principles similar to those at work in sensory substitution, can potentially bypass the bottleneck of attention through sub-cognitive implementation of a set of rules coupling motor actions with sensory stimulation. We provide a late blind subject with a vibrotactile belt that continually signals the direction of magnetic north. The subject completed a set of behavioral tests before and after an extended training period. The tests were complemented by questionnaires and interviews. This newly supplied information improved performance on different time scales. In a pointing task we demonstrate an instant improvement of performance based on the signal provided by the device. Furthermore, the signal was helpful in relevant daily tasks, often complicated for the blind, such as keeping a direction over longer distances or taking shortcuts in familiar environments. A homing task with an additional attentional load demonstrated a significant improvement after training. The subject found the directional information highly expedient for the adjustment of his inner maps of familiar environments and describes an increase in his feeling of security when exploring unfamiliar environments with the belt. The results give evidence for a firm integration of the newly supplied signals into the behavior of this late blind subject with better navigational performance and more courageous behavior in unfamiliar environments. Most importantly, the complementary information provided by the belt lead to a positive emotional impact with enhanced feeling of security. The present experimental approach demonstrates the positive potential of sensory augmentation devices for the help of handicapped people. PMID:22403535

  17. Effects of Various Forms of Relaxation Training on Physiological and Self-Report Measures of Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Richard H.; Kohl, Marilyn L.

    1975-01-01

    Examines relative effectiveness of four types of relaxation training including Jacobson-Wolpe and electromyograph (EMG) feedback. Dependent measures are EMG recordings and self-report measures of relaxation. All groups reported increased relaxation, but EMG groups were superior in EMG measures of speed of learning and depth of relaxation.…

  18. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  19. Effects of Various Forms of Relaxation Training on Physiological and Self-Report Measures of Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Richard H.; Kohl, Marilyn L.

    1975-01-01

    Examines relative effectiveness of four types of relaxation training including Jacobson-Wolpe and electromyograph (EMG) feedback. Dependent measures are EMG recordings and self-report measures of relaxation. All groups reported increased relaxation, but EMG groups were superior in EMG measures of speed of learning and depth of relaxation.…

  20. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  1. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  2. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  3. Vertebral Augmentation for Osteoporotic Compression Fractures.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Bradford J

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral augmentation procedures such as vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty were developed to reduce pain and improve quality of life for patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. However, the use of vertebral augmentation has been debated and questioned since its inception. This article addresses some of these issues.

  4. Embedding Augmentative Communication within Early Childhood Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia; Banajee, Meher; Stricklin, Sarintha Buras

    2000-01-01

    This article first describes various augmentative communication systems including sign language, picture symbols, and voice output communication devices. It then explains ways to embed augmentative communication within four types of early childhood classroom activities: (1) special or planned activities, (2) meal time, (3) circle time, and (4)…

  5. Enhancing Education through Mobile Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author has discussed about the Mobile Augmented Reality and enhancing education through it. The aim of the present study was to give some general information about mobile augmented reality which helps to boost education. Purpose of the current study reveals the mobile networks which are used in the institution campus as well…

  6. Nonsteady-Flow Thrust Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foa, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Ejector augmenters in which the transfer of mechanical energy from the primary to the secondary flow takes place through the work of interface pressure forces are investigated. Nonsteady flow processes are analyzed from the standpoint of energy transfer efficiency and a comparison of a rotary jet augmenter to an ejector is presented.

  7. Information Filtering for Mobile Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Augmented reality is a potentially powerful paradigm for annotating the environment with computer-generated material. These benefits will be even...greater when augmented reality systems become mobile and wearable. However, to minimize the problem of clutter and maximize the effectiveness of the

  8. Information Filtering for Mobile Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-02

    Augmented Reality (AR) has the potential to revolutionise the way in which information is delivered to a user. By tracking the user s position and...on the problem of developing mobile augmented reality systems which can be worn by an individual user operating in a large, complicated environment

  9. Outcomes of labours augmented with oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Bugg, George J; Stanley, Eleanor; Baker, Philip N; Taggart, Michael J; Johnston, Tracey A

    2006-01-01

    To highlight the differences in mode of delivery between women augmented with intravenous oxytocin because of failure to progress in labour with those who labour without the need for augmentation. An incidence study over a 5-year-period in a tertiary referral hospital comparing 1097 nulliparous women who were augmented in labour with 2745 nulliparous women who did not need augmentation. Only labours of spontaneous onset in the pregnancies of women at term were studied. The incidence of pregnancy outcomes were assessed by presenting estimates of relative risk (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Only 51.1% of women who received augmentation achieved a normal vaginal delivery compared with 76.5% of women who did not need augmentation (RR 0.67; CI 0.63-0.71). Contributory factors to this disparity included a greater number of Caesarean sections (14.4% versus 6.6%; RR 2.18 CI 1.74-2.67), forcep deliveries (12.8% versus 5.3%; RR 2.41 CI 1.93-3.01) and ventouse deliveries (21.7% versus 11.5%; RR 1.89 CI 1.62-2.21) being performed among augmented labours as compared to normal progressive labours. Significant improvements in the management of labours which fail to progress are needed if normal vaginal delivery rates are to approach those seen in labours which progress without the need for augmentation.

  10. Hyperprolactinemia and galactocele formation after augmentation mammoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chun, Yoon S; Taghinia, Amir

    2009-02-01

    Galactorrhea and galactocele formation are rare complications of augmentation mammoplasty. A number of case reports have been published in the literature; however, the etiology remains unclear. A case is presented of a unilateral galactocele associated with transient hyperprolactinemia after augmentation mammoplasty.

  11. Augmented Reality for Close Quarters Combat

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a state-of-the-art augmented reality training system for close-quarters combat (CQB). This system uses a wearable augmented reality system to place the user in a real environment while engaging enemy combatants in virtual space (Boston Dynamics DI-Guy). Umbra modeling and simulation environment is used to integrate and control the AR system.

  12. Augmented Reality for Close Quarters Combat

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-20

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a state-of-the-art augmented reality training system for close-quarters combat (CQB). This system uses a wearable augmented reality system to place the user in a real environment while engaging enemy combatants in virtual space (Boston Dynamics DI-Guy). Umbra modeling and simulation environment is used to integrate and control the AR system.

  13. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  14. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  15. Relaxing consistency in recoverable distributed shared memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssens, Bob; Fuchs, W. K.

    1993-01-01

    Relaxed memory consistency models have recently been proposed to tolerate memory access latency in both hardware and software distributed shared memory systems. In recoverable shared memory multiprocessors, relaxing consistency has the added benefit of reducing the number of checkpoints needed to avoid rollback propagation. In this paper, we introduce new checkpointing algorithms that take advantage of relaxed consistency to reduce the performance overhead of checkpointing. We also introduce a scheme based on lazy relaxed consistency, that reduces both checkpointing overhead and the overhead of avoiding error propagation in systems with error latency. Multiprocessor address traces are used to evaluate the relaxed consistency approach to checkpointing with distributed shared memory.

  16. Relaxing consistency in recoverable distributed shared memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssens, Bob; Fuchs, W. K.

    1993-01-01

    Relaxed memory consistency models tolerate increased memory access latency in both hardware and software distributed shared memory systems. In recoverable systems, relaxing consistency has the added benefit of reducing the number of checkpoints needed to avoid rollback propagation. In this paper, we introduce new checkpointing algorithms that take advantage of relaxed consistency to reduce the performance overhead of checkpointing. We also introduce a scheme based on lazy relaxed consistency, that reduces both checkpointing overhead and the overhead of avoiding error propagation in systems with error latency. We use multiprocessor address traces to evaluate the relaxed consistency approach to checkpointing with distributed shared memory.

  17. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  18. Performance of a self-augmented railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.L.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Goldstein, S.A. )

    1991-10-01

    The accelerating force of a railgun 1/2{ital L}{prime}{ital I}{sup 2}{sub {ital a}} can be increased by augmenting the self-induced magnetic field created by the armature current. Augmentation fields can be produced by external current coils or, as is done here, by shorting the railgun muzzle, and using the gun rails as the augmentation coil. Experimental results are presented for a 3.6-m railgun operated in this self-augmented mode, and effective inductance gradients are achieved which are as much as 9.3 times that of the unaugmented gun. A circuit model is presented which explains features of the measured shunt current and voltage. It is concluded that self-augmentation is an effective way to reduce ohmic heating in the armature of a railgun.

  19. Performance of a self-augmented railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Rodney L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Goldstein, Shyke A.

    1991-10-01

    The accelerating force of a railgun can be increased by augmenting the self-induced magnetic field created by the armature current. Augmentation fields can be produced by external current coils or, as is done here, by shorting the railgun muzzle, and using the gun rails as the augmentation coil. Experimental results are presented for a 3.6-m railgun operated in this self-augmented mode, and effective inductance gradients are achieved which are as much as 9.3 times that of the unaugmented gun. A circuit model is presented which explains features of the measured shunt current and voltage. It is concluded that self-augmentation is an effective way to reduce ohmic heating in the armature of a railgun.

  20. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  1. Unusual fast secondary relaxation in metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, S.T.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.D.; Liu, C.T.; Lu, J.

    2015-01-01

    The relaxation spectrum of glassy solids has long been used to probe their dynamic structural features and the fundamental deformation mechanisms. Structurally complicated glasses, such as molecular glasses, often exhibit multiple relaxation processes. By comparison, metallic glasses have a simple atomic structure with dense atomic packing, and their relaxation spectra were commonly found to be simpler than those of molecular glasses. Here we show the compelling evidence obtained across a wide range of temperatures and frequencies from a La-based metallic glass, which clearly shows two peaks of secondary relaxations (fast versus slow) in addition to the primary relaxation peak. The discovery of the unusual fast secondary relaxation unveils the complicated relaxation dynamics in metallic glasses and, more importantly, provides us the clues which help decode the structural features serving as the ‘trigger' of inelasticity on mechanical agitations. PMID:26204999

  2. Augmented reality: past, present, future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzerillo, Laura

    2013-03-01

    A great opportunity has permitted to carry out a cultural, historical, architectural and social research with great impact factor on the international cultural interest. We are talking about the realization of a museum whose the main theme is the visit and the discovery of a monument of great prestige: the monumental building the "Steri" in Palermo. The museum is divided into sub themes including the one above all, that has aroused the international interest so much that it has been presented the instance to include the museum in the cultural heritage of UNESCO. It is the realization of a museum path that regards the cells of the Inquisition, which are located just inside of some buildings of the monumental building. The project, as a whole, is faced, in a total view, between the various competences implicated: historic, chemic, architectonic, topographic, drawing, representation, virtual communication, informatics. The birth of the museum will be a sum of the results of all these disciplines involved. Methodology, implementation, fruition, virtual museum, goals, 2D graphic restitution, effects on the cultural heritage and landscape environmental, augmented reality, Surveying 2D and 3D, hi-touch screen, Photogrammetric survey, Photographic survey, representation, drawing 3D and more than this has been dealt with this research.

  3. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  4. Experience with transumbilical breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Sudarsky, L

    2001-05-01

    Transumbilical breast augmentation (TUBA), an endoscopicassisted procedure in which saline breast prostheses are inserted through the umbilicus, is a patient-driven, frequently performed procedure that remains controversial. The author describes the operative technique and results in 90 patients who underwent TUBA between October 1996 and July 2000 by the same surgeon in a community practice. A total of 85 patients underwent submammary TUBA and 5 patients underwent submuscular TUBA. Seventy patients were available for follow-up. Postoperative results of the 70 patients were graded as very good in 56 (80%), good in 12 (17%), and fair in 2 (2.9%). Complications were conversion to an open approach in 1 patient and an accidental submuscular entry into the pocket in 1 patient. There were four capsular contractures (5.7%), 5 patients (7.1%) were reoperated: 2 for capsulectomies, 1 for implant buckling, 1 for scar revision, and 1 for removal of the implants. There were no implant ruptures, hematomas, or infections. Advantages of TUBA include minimal scarring, remote incision, short operating time, low capsular contracture rate, and rapid recovery. These results of this evolving procedure suggest that in select patients TUBA provides a high level of patient satisfaction and low complication rates. As TUBA techniques for submuscular placement continue to develop, more patients may become TUBA candidates.

  5. Postauricular fascia in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Aldo Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Ten rhinoplasty operations performed using postauricular fascia for the purpose of augmenting the radix and dorsum of the nose were analyzed retrospectively. All the operations were performed over a 1-year period, between 2005 and 2006. The fascia of the postauricular area has been used as a source of pliable soft-tissue grafts in primary and revision rhinoplasty. It may be easily accessed using a single sulcus incision that also enables harvesting of ear cartilage grafts. Deficiency in the radix is an overlooked abnormality seen in many patients undergoing primary as well as revision rhinoplasty after aggressive hump removal. Recent trends in rhinoplasty have been to avoid the overly reduced nasal skeleton and to create a more balanced nasal surgery result. This article presents the use of the postauricular fascia as a radix graft that has been found to be simple to carry out, reliable, and long lasting. In addition, the fascia graft is useful in the camouflage of various nasal deformities in the dorsum and sidewalls. The average patient follow-up for the study was 24 months.

  6. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  7. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  8. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 potentiates EDH-type relaxations in the mesenteric artery of the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoming; Wang, Yu; Man, Ricky Y K; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2013-11-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO) converts heme to carbon monoxide, bilirubin, and free iron. The present study investigated whether or not HO-1 induction improves vascular relaxations attributable to endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). Thirty-six-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with the HO-1 inducer hemin, the HO inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (II) (ZnPP), the antioxidant apocynin, or combinations of these compounds. Isolated mesenteric arteries were prepared for measurement of isometric tension, protein presence, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hemin potentiated acetylcholine-evoked EDH-type relaxations in the presence of N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and indomethacin, while the combined treatment with ZnPP plus hemin prevented these improvements. The intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (IKCa) blocker TRAM-34 and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker ouabain significantly impaired these hemin-potentiated relaxations. NS309-induced TRAM-34- and ouabain-sensitive relaxations were enhanced by hemin. K(+)-induced ouabain-sensitive relaxations and the expression of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase were increased by hemin. Thus HO-1 induction improves EDH-type relaxations by augmented activation of IKCa and the downstream Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Treatment with apocynin showed a similar effect as hemin in impairing ROS production, enhancing K(+)-induced relaxations, and increasing Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase expression, without affecting the expression of HO-1. The effects of hemin and apocynin were not additive. These observations suggest that the effect of HO-1 induction on EDH-type relaxations is possibly due to its antioxidant properties. In vitro treatment with bilirubin, but not carbon monoxide, enhanced EDH-type relaxations and K(+)-induced ouabain-sensitive relaxations, suggesting that the production of bilirubin may be also involved. The present findings reveal that HO-1 may be a potential vascular-specific therapeutic strategy

  9. Malignancy after gastrointestinal augmentation in childhood.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Douglas A

    2009-04-01

    To review the incidence and risks of bladder cancer following gastrointestinal augmentations done for congenial anomalies in childhood. A literature search using PubMed and Ovid Medline search engines was performed. MeSH terms evaluated were; bladder augmentations, enterocystoplasty, gastrocystoplasty, spina bifida, spinal dysraphism, myelodysplasia, neural tube defects, posterior urethral valves and bladder exstrophy were cross referenced with the terms, bladder cancer and urinary bladder neoplasm. All patients who developed a bladder cancer following a bladder augmentation for a congenital anomaly were reviewed. A total of 20 cases of bladder cancer following augmentations for congential anomalies, were identified, 9 arose following ileal cystoplasty, 3 following colocystolasty and 8 following gastrocystoplasty. The incidence of cancer developing per decade following surgery was 1.5% for ileal/colonic and 2.8% for gastric bladder augmentations. The majority of cancers developing within the augmented bladder are at advanced stages at the time of diagnosis (60%; 12/20 cases were ≥T3 at diagnosis). Several of the cases that developed occurred in patients exposed to known carcinogenic stimuli and/or arose in bladders with a known predisposition to carcinoma. Patients augmented with ileal or colonic segment for a congenital bladder anomaly have a 7-8 fold and gastric augments a 14-15 fold increased risk for the development of bladder cancer over standard norms. Published data is however unable to determine if gastrointestinal bladder augmentation is an independent risk factor for cancer over the inherent risk of cancer arising from a congenitally abnormal bladder.

  10. Concepts and analysis for Milsatcom augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Keith D.; Davis, John C.

    1992-03-01

    An account is given of the options being considered by the USAF Space Systems Division to meet emerging operational requirements; these options encompass polar coverage for intelligence-gathering and tactical-augmentation coverage, using satellites that can be launched by either existing or planned launch vehicles smaller than Titan IV. Attention is presently given to the terminal and mission-control aspects of these concepts. The augmentation options are intended to facilitate triservice, operational theater-wide services. The communications services needed for augmentation are primarily data lines trunked together. Integrated simulation is the essential means to successful system development.

  11. Augmented railgun using a permanent magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H.; Eguchi, N.; Sueda, T.; Soejima, M.; Maeda, S.; Sato, K.N.

    1995-08-01

    The use of a permanent magnet instead of an electromagnet has been proposed for the augmentation of the magnetic field of a railgun driven by a current of approximately 20 kA. A permanent magnet has the following advantages in comparison with conventional augmentations using additional turns: (1) simple configuration of the system, (2) temporally and spatially constant magnetic fields, and (3) high efficiency. Here, the operation of a conventional railgun and that of an augmented railgun using a permanent magnet are compared experimentally, and the usefulness of the permanent magnet is described. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Augmented Reality in Architecture: Rebuilding Archeological Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Prieto, J.; Castaño Perea, E.; Labrador Arroyo, F.

    2017-02-01

    With the development in recent years of augmented reality and the appearance of new mobile terminals and storage bases on-line, we find the possibility of using a powerful tool for transmitting architecture. This paper analyzes the relationship between Augmented Reality and Architecture. Firstly, connects the theoretical framework of both disciplines through the Representation concept. Secondly, describes the milestones and possibilities of Augmented Reality in the particular field of archaeological reconstruction. And lastly, once recognized the technology developed, we face the same analysis from a critical point of view, assessing their suitability to the discipline that concerns us is the architecture and within archeology.

  13. Augmentation of craniofacial defects using alloplastic material.

    PubMed

    Osunde, O D; Adebola, R A; Ver-or, N; Amole, I O; Akhiwu, B I; Jinjiri, N; Ladeinde, A; Ajike, S O; Efunkoya, A

    2013-09-01

    Alloplastic materials are increasingly being used in augmentation of craniofacial defects because of its ready availability, good aesthetic outcome and absence of donor site morbidity. This paper highlights experience in the use of heat-cured acrylic in augmentation cranioplasty. The management of three patients with anterior skull defect who presented at the Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic of the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital over a five-year period is presented. There was good aesthetic outcome in all the patients and no complications were recorded. Augmentation of craniofacial defects using customized prefabricated heat-cured acrylic provides patients with a durable, stable and structural repair of craniofacial defects with good aesthetic outcome.

  14. Treatment algorithm of galactorrhea after augmentation mammoplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Jung; Lee, Kyeong Tae; Pyon, Jai-Kyong; Bang, Sa-Ik

    2012-09-01

    Galactorrhea is a known complication of breast surgery, particularly reduction mammoplasty. However, in augmentation mammoplasty, it is a rare event. There are only a few case reports concerning galactorrhea after augmentation mammoplasty. In this report, we present a case of galactorrhea that occurred at 2 weeks postoperatively in a 34-year-old woman who had undergone augmentation mammoplasty with silicone implants via a transaxillary approach. Endocrinologic tests including serum prolactin level, routine blood work, and breast ultrasonography were all normal. The authors decided to manage conservatively with close observation. After 1 month, the symptom resolved without sequelae, and no recurrence has been reported.

  15. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  16. Domain Relaxation in Polymer Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernoff, Andrew J.; Alexander, James C.; Mann, J. R.; Mann, Elizabeth K.

    2004-11-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of a polymer monolayer on the surface of a subfluid. When stretched (by a transient applied flow), the monolayer takes the form of a bola consisting of two roughly circular reservoirs connected by a thin tether. This shape relaxes to the minimum energy configuration of a circular domain. The tether is never observed to rupture, even when it is more than a hundred times as long as it is thin. We model these experiments by taking previous descriptions of the hydrodynamics (primarily those of Stone & McConnell and Lubensky & Goldstein ), identifying the dominant effects, and reducing the system to a more tractable form. The result is a free boundary problem where motion is driven by the line tension of the domain and damped by the viscosity of the subfluid. Using this model we derive relaxation rates for perturbations of a uniform strip and a circular patch. Lubrication theory for the tether evolution yields the thin film equation HT = -(H^2H_XXX)_X. This evolution equation appears not to manifest rupture, in agreement with the experiments. Finally, we speculate on which physical properties of the system (such as line tension) can be deduced by comparison of theory to experiment.

  17. Violent relaxation of ellipsoidal clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaiem, David; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    An isolated, initially cold and ellipsoidal cloud of self-gravitating particles represents a relatively simple system in which to study the effects of deviations from spherical symmetry in the mechanism of violent relaxation. Initial deviations from spherical symmetry are shown to play a dynamical role that is equivalent to that of density fluctuations in the case of an initially spherical cloud. Indeed, these deviations control the amount of particle-energy change and thus determine the properties of the final energy distribution, particularly the appearance of two species of particles: bound and free. Ejection of mass and energy from the system, together with the formation of a density profile decaying as ρ(r) ˜ r-4 and a Keplerian radial velocity dispersion profile, are prominent features similar to those observed after the violent relaxation of spherical clouds. In addition, we find that ejected particles are characterized by highly non-spherical shapes, the features of which can be traced in the initial deviations from spherical symmetry that are amplified during the dynamical evolution: particles can indeed form anisotropic configurations, like bars and/or discs, even though the initial cloud was very close to spherical.

  18. Dimensionless number is central to stress relaxation and expansive growth of the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Joseph K E

    2017-06-07

    Experiments demonstrate that both plastic and elastic deformation of the cell wall are necessary for wall stress relaxation and expansive growth of walled cells. A biophysical equation (Augmented Growth Equation) was previously shown to accurately model the experimentally observed wall stress relaxation and expansive growth rate. Here, dimensional analysis is used to obtain a dimensionless Augmented Growth Equation with dimensionless coefficients (groups of variables, or Π parameters). It is shown that a single Π parameter controls the wall stress relaxation rate. The Π parameter represents the ratio of plastic and elastic deformation rates, and provides an explicit relationship between expansive growth rate and the wall's mechanical properties. Values for Π are calculated for plant, algal, and fungal cells from previously reported experimental results. It is found that the Π values for each cell species are large and very different from each other. Expansive growth rates are calculated using the calculated Π values and are compared to those measured for plant and fungal cells during different growth conditions, after treatment with IAA, and in different developmental stages. The comparison shows good agreement and supports the claim that the Π parameter is central to expansive growth rate of walled cells.

  19. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiangen; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Guo; Huang, Yingzhou; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  20. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI -dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We , are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We , the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI -dependent.

  1. Barnett relaxation in non-symmetric grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasi, Erald; Weingartner, Joseph C.

    2017-10-01

    Barnett relaxation, first described by Purcell in 1979, appears to play a major role in the alignment of grains with the interstellar magnetic field. In 1999, Lazarian and Draine proposed that Barnett relaxation and its relative, nuclear relaxation, can induce grains to flip. If this thermal flipping is rapid then the dynamical effect of torques that are fixed relative to the grain body can be greatly reduced. To date, detailed studies of Barnett relaxation have been confined to grains exhibiting dynamic symmetry. In 2009, Weingartner argued that internal relaxation cannot induce flips in any grains, whether they exhibit dynamic symmetry or not. In this work, we develop approximate expressions for the dissipation rate and diffusion coefficient for Barnett relaxation. We revisit the issue of internally induced thermal flipping, finding that it cannot occur for grains with dynamic symmetry, but does occur for grains lacking dynamic symmetry.

  2. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  3. Muonium spin relaxation in carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arseneau, D. J.; Pan, J. J.; Senba, M.; Shelley, M.; Fleming, D. G.

    1997-04-01

    The spin relaxation of Mu was measured in mixtures of CO and Ar at pressures up to 270 atm and at various magnetic fields. The relaxation rate increased with magnetic field in the way expected for electron spin-exchange processes, though the effect declined at high pressures. We describe the results in terms of spin relaxation of Mu-formyl radicals, MuCO, which break up to give depolarized Mu at low pressures, but are increasingly stabilized at higher pressures.

  4. Relaxation dynamics of a single DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshen, E.; Zhao, W. Z.; Carmon, G.; Rosen, S.; Granek, R.; Feingold, M.

    2005-06-01

    The relaxation of a single DNA molecule is studied. The experimental system consists of optical tweezers and a micron-sized bead that is tethered to the bottom of the sample by a single double-stranded DNA molecule. The bead slows down the DNA relaxation from a strongly stretched configuration such that it is passing through stretched equilibrium states. This allows for a theoretical description of the relaxation trajectory, which is in good agreement with experiment.

  5. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Horizontal ridge augmentation using a combination approach

    PubMed Central

    Rachana, C.; Sridhar, N.; Rangan, Anand V.; Rajani, V.

    2012-01-01

    Resorption of alveolar bone - a common sequel of tooth loss jeopardizes the functional and esthetic outcome of treatment, especially in the maxillary anterior areas. Therefore, augmentation of deficient alveolar ridges is an important aspect of dental implant therapy. A case of severe maxillary ridge deficiency successfully treated with horizontal ridge augmentation to facilitate implant placement is described. Ridge augmentation was achieved using a combination of autogenous block graft, particulate grafting, and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Follow-up was done next day, after ten days, three months, and six months. Various approaches can be followed in order to achieve an increase in the ridge width. In our case, we used a combination of different techniques for ridge augmentation. A significant improvement in ridge width was noticed at six months thus facilitating the placement of implants. PMID:23162345

  7. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  8. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  9. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  10. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V. . Physics Div.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on augmentation which is a technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduced by the extra conductors required. it is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in a conventional railgun by diverting a fraction {phi} of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series-connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1 {minus} {phi}). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system.

  11. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  12. Paley-Wiener criterion for relaxation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Rajagopal, A. K.; Rendell, R. W.; Teitler, S.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown how the Paley-Wiener theorem in Fourier-transform theory can provide the bound for physically acceptable relaxation functions for long times. In principle the linear exponential decay function, and hence also a superposition of linear exponential decay functions, does not provide an acceptable description of relaxation phenomenon although the Paley-Wiener bound can be made to approach arbitrarily close to linear exponential. A class of relaxation functions proposed recently obeys the Paley-Wiener bound. The general necessity for time-dependent relaxation rates is emphasized and discussed.

  13. Advancing Human Centered Augmented Reality Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    ADVANCING HUMAN CENTERED AUGMENTED REALITY RESEARCH Brian Goldiez1, Mark A. Livingston 2, Jeffrey Dawson1, Dennis Brown2, Peter Hancock1, Yohan...Advanced Engineering & Sciences Alexandria, VA 22303 ABSTRACT Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology that offers possibilities that...other technologies are not able to fulfill. AR uses a computer to add information to the real world. Future AR technology will be low cost

  14. STABILITY/CONTROL AUGMENTATION SYSTEM EVALUATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study was made to evaluate competency of pilots trained in aircraft having a stability augmentation system . This is to determine the necessity of... Augmentation System . When the students reached private pilot proficiency, they were given three flight checks. The first with the system on, the...was to train five students to required flight performance for a private pilot certificate in a Cherokee-140 equipped with the Mitchell AK-153 Stability

  15. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Augmentation is a well-known technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduce by the extra conductors required. It is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in conventional railgun by diverting a fraction {phi} of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1-{phi}). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system. Additions to the electrical system are required to establish the shunt current and to control its magnitude during projectile acceleration. The relationship between muzzle shunt augmentation and conventional series augmentation is developed and various techniques is developed and various techniques for establishing and controlling the shunt current are illustrated with a practical example. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Augmentation techniques for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Zampogna, Biagio; D'Adamio, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    There is a high rate of recurrence of tear and failed healing after rotator cuff repair. Several strategies have proposed to augment rotator cuff repairs to improve postoperative outcome and shoulder performance. We systematically review the literature on clinical outcome following rotator cuff augmentation. We performed a comprehensive search of Medline, CINAHL, Embase and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, from inception of the database to 20 June 2012, using various combinations of keywords. The reference lists of the previously selected articles were then examined by hand. Only studies focusing on clinical outcomes of human patients who had undergone augmented rotator cuff repair were selected. We then evaluated the methodological quality of each article using the Coleman methodology score (CMS), a 10 criteria scoring list assessing the methodological quality of the selected studies (CMS). Thirty-two articles were included in the present review. Two were retrospective studies, and 30 were prospective. Biologic, synthetic and cellular devices were used in 24, 7 and 1 studies, respectively. The mean modified Coleman methodology score was 64.0. Heterogeneity of the clinical outcome scores makes it difficult to compare different studies. None of the augmentation devices available is without problems, and each one presents intrinsic weaknesses. There is no dramatic increase in clinical and functional assessment after augmented procedures, especially if compared with control groups. More and better scientific evidence is necessary to use augmentation of rotator cuff repairs in routine clinical practice.

  17. Autogenous augmentation mammaplasty with microsurgical tissue transfer.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert J; Heitland, Andreas S

    2003-07-01

    Many patients dream of reducing their abdominal or gluteal fat tissue and, in the same procedure, enlarging their breasts without the need for implants and their related problems. Following this demand, a new "natural" alternative to breast augmentation with autogenous tissue is presented. Since 1993, 16 patients have undergone either unilateral or bilateral breast augmentation with free fat transfer. These 20 augmentation mammaplasties consisted of nine deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps, eight superior gluteal artery perforator flaps, and three superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps. The postoperative results were judged aesthetically by independent examiners and by the patients according to Netscher's score. The additional operations for final shaping of the breasts and the postoperative complications at the donor and recipient sites are reported. The augmented breasts improved the aesthetic proportions more than 100 percent. All flaps survived, and except for minor postoperative complications such as small areas of wound dehiscence, the breasts could be shaped aesthetically in a second-stage procedure several weeks later. Breast augmentation with autogenous tissue offers a natural alternative to alloplastic augmentation mammaplasty.

  18. Augmentation strategies for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, André F; Machado, Juliana Raulino; Cavalcante, João L

    2009-01-01

    The majority of patients with depression fail to remit on one or more antidepressant trials. These patients have treatment-resistant depression (TRD) with high relapsing rates. Augmentation pharmacotherapy refers to the addition of drugs that are not standard antidepressants in order to enhance the effect of a classical antidepressant drug. This review highlights the current status and future research directions of augmentation treatments for TRD with a special focus on research data published within the past year. Atypical antipsychotics, stimulants, pindolol, lithium, lamotrigine and mecamylamine were tested for efficacy in clinical trials. Most of the trials were not controlled or had limited sample size. Recent data now support the use of some atypical antipsychotics to augment depression resistant to the newer, more selective, antidepressants. Lithium and triiodothyronin (T3) augmentation of tricyclic agents remains the best studied strategy. Data converge to demonstrate the efficacy of some atypical antipsychotics as augmenting agents to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Further adequately powered controlled trials on augmentation pharmacotherapy of TRD are necessary.

  19. Zen meditation and ABC relaxation theory: an exploration of relaxation states, beliefs, dispositions, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Gillani, N B; Smith, J C

    2001-06-01

    This study is an attempt to rigorously map the psychological effects of Zen meditation among experienced practitioners. Fifty-nine Zen meditators with at least six years of experience practiced an hour of traditional Zazen seated meditation. A control group of 24 college students spent 60 min silently reading popular magazines. Before relaxation, all participants took the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (SRSI), the Smith Relaxation Dispositions/Motivations Inventory (SRD/MI), and the Smith Relaxation Beliefs Inventory (SRBI). After practice, participants again took the SRSI. Analyses revealed that meditators are less likely to believe in God, more likely to believe in Inner Wisdom, and more likely to display the relaxation dispositions Mental Quiet, Mental Relaxation, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. Pre- and postsession analyses revealed that meditators showed greater increments in the relaxation states Mental Quiet, Love and Thankfulness, and Prayerfulness, as well as reduced Worry. Results support Smith's ABC Relaxation Theory.

  20. Myocardial contraction-relaxation coupling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Henry Pickering Bowditch in the late 1800s to early 1900s, cardiac muscle contraction has remained an intensely studied topic for several reasons. The heart is located centrally in our body, and its pumping motion demands the attention of the observer. The contraction of the heart encompasses a complex interplay of mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties, and its function can thus be studied from any of these viewpoints. In addition, diseases of the heart are currently killing more people in the Westernized world than any other disease. When combined with the increasing emphasis of research to be clinically relevant, this contributes to the heart remaining a topic of continued basic and clinical investigation. Yet, there are significant aspects of cardiac muscle contraction that are still not well understood. A big complication of the study of cardiac muscle contraction is that there exists no equilibrium among many of the important governing parameters, which include pre- and afterload, intracellular ion concentrations, membrane potential, and velocity and direction of movement. Thus the classic approach of perturbing an equilibrium or a steady state to learn about the role of the perturbing factor in the system cannot be unambiguously interpreted, since each of the parameters that govern contraction are constantly changing, as well as constantly changing their interaction with each other. In this review, presented as the 54th Bowditch Lecture at Experimental Biology meeting in Anaheim in April 2010, I will revisit several governing factors of cardiac muscle relaxation by applying newly developed tools and protocols to isolated cardiac muscle tissue in which the dynamic interactions between the governing factors of contraction and relaxation can be studied. PMID:20852049

  1. Music assisted progressive muscle relaxation, progressive muscle relaxation, music listening, and silence: a comparison of relaxation techniques.

    PubMed

    Robb, S L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of music assisted progressive muscle relaxation (M + PMR), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), music listening, and silence/suggestion on measures of anxiety and perceived relaxation. The study also examined participant responses to a posttreatment questionnaire to identify relationships between musical and nonmusical elements in relaxation techniques. Sixty university students participated in the study. Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to each treatment condition. Subjects were tested individually using the same relaxation script for M + PMR and PMR conditions. One-way analyses of covariance were computed to compare pre and posttest differences among groups. Results of the ANCOVA revealed no differences among groups for the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) or the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Analysis of variance, however, revealed each treatment condition to be equally effective in producing significant changes in anxiety and perceived relaxation from the pre to posttest period. Additionally, mean score differences revealed decreases for all conditions with M + PMR eliciting the greatest amount of change. A content analysis of posttreatment questionnaire items revealed detailed information about each participant's relaxation experience, state of mind, and use of self-generated relaxation techniques.

  2. The Effects of Progressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation and Stress Responses: An Investigation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Relaxation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-28

    295’-6772 APPROVAL SHEET Title ofDissertation: "The Effects ofProgressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation~ and Stress Responses: An...and Music on Attention, Relaxation, and Stress Responses: An Investigation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Relaxation.n beyond brief excerpts is...Health Sciences ii ABSTRACT Title: The Effects of Progressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation, and Stress Responses: An Investigation of

  3. Left ventricle segmentation in MRI via convex relaxed distribution matching.

    PubMed

    Nambakhsh, Cyrus M S; Yuan, Jing; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Goela, Aashish; Rajchl, Martin; Peters, Terry M; Ayed, Ismail Ben

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental step in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases, automatic left ventricle (LV) segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is still acknowledged to be a difficult problem. Most of the existing algorithms require either extensive training or intensive user inputs. This study investigates fast detection of the left ventricle (LV) endo- and epicardium surfaces in cardiac MRI via convex relaxation and distribution matching. The algorithm requires a single subject for training and a very simple user input, which amounts to a single point (mouse click) per target region (cavity or myocardium). It seeks cavity and myocardium regions within each 3D phase by optimizing two functionals, each containing two distribution-matching constraints: (1) a distance-based shape prior and (2) an intensity prior. Based on a global measure of similarity between distributions, the shape prior is intrinsically invariant with respect to translation and rotation. We further introduce a scale variable from which we derive a fixed-point equation (FPE), thereby achieving scale-invariance with only few fast computations. The proposed algorithm relaxes the need for costly pose estimation (or registration) procedures and large training sets, and can tolerate shape deformations, unlike template (or atlas) based priors. Our formulation leads to a challenging problem, which is not directly amenable to convex-optimization techniques. For each functional, we split the problem into a sequence of sub-problems, each of which can be solved exactly and globally via a convex relaxation and the augmented Lagrangian method. Unlike related graph-cut approaches, the proposed convex-relaxation solution can be parallelized to reduce substantially the computational time for 3D domains (or higher), extends directly to high dimensions, and does not have the grid-bias problem. Our parallelized implementation on a graphics processing unit (GPU) demonstrates that the proposed algorithm

  4. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  5. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  6. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  7. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  8. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  9. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  10. Dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, John le G.

    1987-12-01

    Two dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate are attributed to reorientations of mixed-isotope ammonium ions. Loss peaks were observed between 20 and 40 K and obey the Arrhenius law with activation energy 1.5 kcal/mol for the stronger relaxation. The dipole moment is of the order of 0.015 D.

  11. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.; McGuire, K.; Okabayashi, M.

    1982-07-01

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated.

  12. Mechanical spectroscopy of Snoek type relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.; Golovin, I. S.

    2012-09-01

    A review is presented for work in the area of elasticity for metals and alloys with a body-centered cubic lattice caused by diffusion under stress of interstitial atoms, i.e., Snoek relaxation in metals and Snoek type relaxation in alloys. Practical possibilities in analyzing materials of this class by mechanical spectroscopy are demonstrated.

  13. Magnetization Transfer Induced Biexponential Longitudinal Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Prantner, Andrew M.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Garbow, Joel R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal relaxation of brain water 1H magnetization in mammalian brain in vivo is typically analyzed on a per voxel basis using a monoexponential model, thereby assigning a single relaxation time constant to all 1H magnetization within a given voxel. This approach was tested by obtaining inversion recovery data from grey matter of rats at 64 exponentially-spaced recovery times. Using Bayesian probability for model selection, brain water data were best represented by a biexponential function characterized by fast and slow relaxation components. At 4.7 T, the amplitude fraction of the rapidly relaxing component is 3.4 ± 0.7 % with a rate constant of 44 ± 12 s-1 (mean ± SD; 174 voxels from 4 rats). The rate constant of the slow relaxing component is 0.66 ± 0.04 s-1. At 11.7 T, the corresponding values are 6.9 ± 0.9 %, 19 ± 5 s-1, and 0.48 ± 0.02 s-1 (151 voxels from 4 rats). Several putative mechanisms for biexponential relaxation behavior were evaluated, and magnetization transfer between bulk water protons and non-aqueous protons was determined to be the source of biexponential longitudinal relaxation. MR methods requiring accurate quantification of longitudinal relaxation may need to take this effect explicitly into account. PMID:18759367

  14. Ab initio determination of the nuclear relaxation contribution to the second hyperpolarizability of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Benoı̂t

    1998-04-01

    Although basis set saturation, electron correlation and frequency dispersion have been addressed thoroughly, the electronic second hyperpolarizability of carbon disulfide computed by K. Ohta, T. Sakaguchi, K. Kamada and T. Fukumi (Chem. Phys. Lett. 274 (1997) 306) is not in agreement with experiment. In this Letter the potentially substantial nuclear relaxation contribution is evaluated within the Møller-Plesset scheme limited to second order by using the 6-31G * basis set augmented by three diffuse functions (1p and 2d). Within the enhanced approximation, the nuclear relaxation contribution to the static, dc-Kerr and ESHG second hyperpolarizability turns out to amount to 26.5%, 6.8% and -0.8% of the pure static electronic counterpart, respectively. The remaining gap between theory and experiment suggests new experiments should be carried out.

  15. Enthalpy relaxation and annealing effect in polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    The effects of thermal history on the enthalpy relaxation in polystyrene are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of the specific heat in the liquid and the glassy states, that of relaxation time, and the exponent of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function are determined by measurements of the thermal response against sinusoidal temperature variation. A phenomenological model equation previously proposed to interpret the memory effect in the frozen state is applied to the enthalpy relaxation and the evolution of entropy under a given thermal history is calculated. The annealing below the glass transition temperature produces two effects on enthalpy relaxation: the decay of excess entropy with annealing time in the early stage of annealing and the increase in relaxation time due to physical aging in the later stage. The crossover of these effects is reflected in the variation of temperature of the maximum specific heat observed in the heating process after annealing and cooling.

  16. On relaxations and aging of various glasses

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel; Oreg, Yuval; Imry, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Slow relaxation occurs in many physical and biological systems. “Creep” is an example from everyday life. When stretching a rubber band, for example, the recovery to its equilibrium length is not, as one might think, exponential: The relaxation is slow, in many cases logarithmic, and can still be observed after many hours. The form of the relaxation also depends on the duration of the stretching, the “waiting time.” This ubiquitous phenomenon is called aging, and is abundant both in natural and technological applications. Here, we suggest a general mechanism for slow relaxations and aging, which predicts logarithmic relaxations, and a particular aging dependence on the waiting time. We demonstrate the generality of the approach by comparing our predictions to experimental data on a diverse range of physical phenomena, from conductance in granular metals to disordered insulators and dirty semiconductors, to the low temperature dielectric properties of glasses. PMID:22315418

  17. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  18. Augmented Reality for the Improvement of Remote Laboratories: An Augmented Remote Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andujar, J. M.; Mejias, A.; Marquez, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) provides huge opportunities for online teaching in science and engineering, as these disciplines place emphasis on practical training and unsuited to completely nonclassroom training. This paper proposes a new concept in virtual and remote laboratories: the augmented remote laboratory (ARL). ARL is being tested in the first…

  19. Augmented Reality for the Improvement of Remote Laboratories: An Augmented Remote Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andujar, J. M.; Mejias, A.; Marquez, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) provides huge opportunities for online teaching in science and engineering, as these disciplines place emphasis on practical training and unsuited to completely nonclassroom training. This paper proposes a new concept in virtual and remote laboratories: the augmented remote laboratory (ARL). ARL is being tested in the first…

  20. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  1. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    PubMed

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T1 and T2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially resolved

  2. Metal-substituted protein MRI contrast agents engineered for enhanced relaxivity and ligand sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lelyveld, Victor S; Brustad, Eric; Arnold, Frances H; Jasanoff, Alan

    2011-02-02

    Engineered metalloproteins constitute a flexible new class of analyte-sensitive molecular imaging agents detectable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but their contrast effects are generally weaker than synthetic agents. To augment the proton relaxivity of agents derived from the heme domain of cytochrome P450 BM3 (BM3h), we formed manganese(III)-containing proteins that have higher electron spin than their native ferric iron counterparts. Metal substitution was achieved by coexpressing BM3h variants with the bacterial heme transporter ChuA in Escherichia coli and supplementing the growth medium with Mn3+-protoporphyrin IX. Manganic BM3h variants exhibited up to 2.6-fold higher T1 relaxivities relative to native BM3h at 4.7 T. Application of ChuA-mediated porphyrin substitution to a collection of thermostable chimeric P450 domains resulted in a stable, high-relaxivity BM3h derivative displaying a 63% relaxivity change upon binding of arachidonic acid, a natural ligand for the P450 enzyme and an important component of biological signaling pathways. This work demonstrates that protein-based MRI sensors with robust ligand sensitivity may be created with ease by including metal substitution among the toolkit of methods available to the protein engineer.

  3. Cyanide and sulfide interact with nitrogenous compounds to influence the relaxation of various smooth muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Kruszyna, H.; Kruszyna, R.; Smith, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    Sodium nitroprusside relaxed guinea pig ileum after the segment had been submaximally contracted by either histamine or acetylcholine, intact isolated rabbit gall bladder after submaximal contraction by either acetylcholine or cholecystokinin octapeptide, and rat pulmonary artery helical strips after submaximal contraction with norepinephrine. In each of these cases the relaxation produced by nitroprusside was at least partially reversed by the subsequent addition of excess sodium cyanide. Cyanide, however, in nontoxic concentrations did not reverse the spasmolytic effects of hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium azide, nitroglycerin, sodium nitrite, or nitric oxide hemoglobin on guinea pig ileum, nor did cyanide alone in the same concentrations have any effect. The similar interaction between nitroprusside and cyanide on rabbit aortic strips is not dependent on the presence of an intact endothelia cell layer. Also, on rabbit aortic strips and like cyanide, sodium sulfide reversed the spasmolytic effects of azide and hydroxylamine, but it had little or no effect on the relaxation induced by papaverine. Unlike cyanide, however, sulfide augmented the relaxation induced by nitroprusside, and it reversed the effects of nitric oxide hemoglobin, nitroglycerin, and nitrite. A direct chemical reaction between sulfide and nitroprusside may account for the difference between it and cyanide. Although evidence was obtained also for a direct chemical reaction between sulfide and norepinephrine, that reaction does not seem to have played a role in these results.

  4. Aesthetic breast augmentation and thoracic deformities.

    PubMed

    Wolter, T P; Lorenz, S; Neuhann-Lorenz, C

    2010-10-01

    To ensure the best results from aesthetic breast augmentation, preoperative evaluation and adequate patient information are essential. However, assessment of the underlying thoracic shape often is neglected. Patients with obvious deformities are aware of the problematic reconstruction, whereas patients with mild or moderate deformities often are not aware of their condition and fail to see that standard breast augmentation will lead to unsatisfying results. The authors reviewed their charts for patients with breast augmentation and mild to moderate thoracic deformities, then compiled the therapeutic possibilities and the outcome. Of the 548 patients who underwent breast augmentation, 7.1% (n = 39) exhibited low- or midgrade thoracic wall deformities. Almost none of the patients were aware of their deformity. The patients were augmented with silicone-filled, textured round implants. Placement and volume were adapted to the anatomic situation. A reoperation was not performed in any case, and both patient and physician satisfaction was high. The percentage of patients with thoracic deformity in this group was high compared with an overall incidence of less than 2%. This emphasizes the need for cautious physical examination and preoperative documentation. By individualized surgical planning and diligent implant selection, optimal results and patient satisfaction can be achieved.

  5. Stability-Augmentation Devices for Miniature Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, RIchard M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-aerodynamic mechanical devices are under consideration as means to augment the stability of miniature autonomous and remotely controlled aircraft. Such aircraft can be used for diverse purposes, including military reconnaissance, radio communications, and safety-related monitoring of wide areas. The need for stability-augmentation devices arises because adverse meteorological conditions generally affect smaller aircraft more strongly than they affect larger aircraft: Miniature aircraft often become uncontrollable under conditions that would not be considered severe enough to warrant grounding of larger aircraft. The need for the stability-augmentation devices to be non-aerodynamic arises because there is no known way to create controlled aerodynamic forces sufficient to counteract the uncontrollable meteorological forces on miniature aircraft. A stability-augmentation device of the type under consideration includes a mass pod (a counterweight) at the outer end of a telescoping shaft, plus associated equipment to support the operation of the aircraft. The telescoping shaft and mass pod are stowed in the rear of the aircraft. When deployed, they extend below the aircraft. Optionally, an antenna for radio communication can be integrated into the shaft. At the time of writing this article, the deployment of the telescoping shaft and mass pod was characterized as passive and automatic, but information about the deployment mechanism(s) was not available. The feasibility of this stability-augmentation concept was demonstrated in flights of hand-launched prototype aircraft.

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Subfascial Calf Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Andjelkov, Katarina; Sforza, Marcos; Husein, Rodwan; Atanasijevic, Tatjana C; Popovic, Vesna M

    2017-03-01

    Calf augmentation surgery is one of the least popular procedures among plastic surgeons; in contrast, it is by far one of the most gratifying procedures among patients. In this article, the authors present a retrospective analysis of a surgeon's extensive experience with calf implants. The authors retrospectively analyzed 134 patients having calf augmentation for cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in their practice from 2003 to 2015. All patients were divided into two groups: primary cases and patients who had previously been operated on and who were referred to our service as patients who had complications after calf augmentation surgery. The subfascial approach was the preferred approach by authors for all primary cases. The authors analyzed indications, complication rates, results, and pitfalls. Secondary cases were further divided into three groups according to the origin of the problem and some possible solutions. Subfascial calf augmentation surgery is safe and easy to reproduce, with a short recovery period and a low complication rate (<1 percent). To achieve the best aesthetic results, surgeons should choose appropriate implants for each case. In secondary cases, fat grafting is a powerful tool and can be used alone or in combination with calf implants. There are several groups of patients seeking calf augmentation surgery (e.g., bodybuilders, women, those with reconstructive problems). Therefore, treatment should be planned individually. The development of a new implant is necessary and should be based on detailed anatomical findings and in accordance with surgical techniques. The process is intriguing and rewarding. Therapeutic, V.

  7. Nonlinear electrochemical relaxation around conductors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the simplest problem of electrochemical relaxation in more than one dimension-the response of an uncharged, ideally polarizable metallic sphere (or cylinder) in a symmetric, binary electrolyte to a uniform electric field. In order to go beyond the circuit approximation for thin double layers, our analysis is based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations of dilute solution theory. Unlike most previous studies, however, we focus on the nonlinear regime, where the applied voltage across the conductor is larger than the thermal voltage. In such strong electric fields, the classical model predicts that the double layer adsorbs enough ions to produce bulk concentration gradients and surface conduction. Our analysis begins with a general derivation of surface conservation laws in the thin double-layer limit, which provide effective boundary conditions on the quasineutral bulk. We solve the resulting nonlinear partial differential equations numerically for strong fields and also perform a time-dependent asymptotic analysis for weaker fields, where bulk diffusion and surface conduction arise as first-order corrections. We also derive various dimensionless parameters comparing surface to bulk transport processes, which generalize the Bikerman-Dukhin number. Our results have basic relevance for double-layer charging dynamics and nonlinear electrokinetics in the ubiquitous PNP approximation.

  8. Spin relaxation in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbert, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Intriguing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductor devices have been reported: anomalous magnetoresistance in organic spin valves and large effects of small magnetic fields on the current and luminescence of organic light-emitting diodes. Influences of isotopic substitution on these effects points at the role of hyperfine coupling. We performed studies of spin relaxation in organic semiconductors based on (i) coherent spin precession of the electron spin in an effective magnetic field consisting of a random hyperfine field and an applied magnetic field and (ii) incoherent hopping of charges. These ingredients are incorporated in a stochastic Liouville equation for the dynamics of the spin density matrix of single charges as well as pairs of charges. For single charges we find a spin diffusion length that depends on the magnetic field, explaining anomalous magnetoresistance in organic spin valves. For pairs of charges we show that the magnetic field influences formation of singlet bipolarons, in the case of like charges, and singlet and triplet excitons, in the case of opposite charges. We can reproduce different line shapes of reported magnetic field effects, including recently found effects at ultra-small fields.

  9. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  10. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  11. Rain: relaxations in the sky.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ole; Christensen, Kim

    2002-09-01

    We demonstrate how, from the point of view of energy flow through an open system, rain is analogous to many other relaxational processes in nature such as earthquakes. By identifying rain events as the basic entities of the phenomenon, we show that the number density of rain events per year is inversely proportional to the released water column raised to the power of 1.4. This is the rain equivalent of the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes. The event durations and the waiting times between events are also characterized by scaling regions, where no typical time scale exists. The Hurst exponent of the rain intensity signal H=0.76>0.5. It is valid in the temporal range from minutes up to the full duration of the signal of half a year. All of our findings are consistent with the concept of self-organized criticality, which refers to the tendency of slowly driven nonequilibrium systems towards a state of scale-free behavior.

  12. Domain Relaxation in Langmuir Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernoff, Andrew J.; Alexander, James C.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Mann, J. Adin; Zou, Lu; Wintersmith, Jacob R.

    2007-11-01

    We report on an experimental, theoretical and computational study of a molecularly thin polymer Langmuir layer domain on the surface of a subfluid. When stretched (by a transient stagnation flow), the Langmuir layer takes the form of a bola consisting of two roughly circular reservoirs connected by a thin tether. This shape relaxes to the circular minimum energy configuration. The tether is never observed to rupture, even when it is more than a hundred times as long as it is thin. We model these experiments as a free boundary problem where motion is driven by the line tension of the domain and damped by the viscosity of the subfluid. We process the digital images of the experiment to extract the domain shape, use one of these shapes as an initial condition for the numerical solution of a boundary-integral model of the underlying hydrodynamics, and compare the subsequent images of the experiment to the numerical simulation. The numerical evolutions verify that our hydrodynamical model can reproduce the observed dynamics. They also allow us to deduce the magnitude of the line tension in the system, often to within 1%.

  13. Cognitive Cost of Using Augmented Reality Displays.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, James; Ssin, Seung Youb; ElSayed, Neven A M; Dorrian, Jillian; Webb, David P; Walsh, James A; Simon, Timothy M; Irlitti, Andrew; Smith, Ross T; Kohler, Mark; Thomas, Bruce H

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of two cognitive load studies comparing three augmented reality display technologies: spatial augmented reality, the optical see-through Microsoft HoloLens, and the video see-through Samsung Gear VR. In particular, the two experiments focused on isolating the cognitive load cost of receiving instructions for a button-pressing procedural task. The studies employed a self-assessment cognitive load methodology, as well as an additional dual-task cognitive load methodology. The results showed that spatial augmented reality led to increased performance and reduced cognitive load. Additionally, it was discovered that a limited field of view can introduce increased cognitive load requirements. The findings suggest that some of the inherent restrictions of head-mounted displays materialize as increased user cognitive load.

  14. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Formwork application optimization by using augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaconu, R.; Petruse, R.; Brindasu, P. D.

    2016-11-01

    By using the PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) principle on the formwork case study, after determining the functions and the technical solutions, the application must be made as optimum as possible in order to assure productivity and provide the necessary information as quick as possible. The concept is to create a complex management for the formwork based on augmented reality. By taking into account the development rate of the information, augmented reality is tending to be one of the widest (in term of domain) visualization instrument. Also used in the construction domain, augmented reality can be applied also for the case of formwork design and management. The application of the solution will be retrieved in the construction of the product, its transportation and deposit. The usage of this concept will help reduce, even eliminate human or technical errors and can offer a precise state of a specific required formwork from the stock.

  16. Therapeutics: Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Augmentation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael; Lascano, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Subjects with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency who develop pulmonary disease are managed following general treatment guidelines, including disease management interventions. In addition, administration of intravenous infusions of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (augmentation therapy) at regular schedules is a specific therapy for individuals with AATD with pulmonary involvement.This chapter summarizes the manufacturing differences of commercially available formulations and the available evidence of the effects of augmentation therapy. Biologically, there is clear evidence of in vivo local antiprotease effects in the lung and systemic immunomodulatory effects. Clinically, there is cumulative evidence of slowing lung function decline and emphysema progression. The optimal dose of augmentation therapy is being revised as well as more individualized assessment of who needs this therapy.

  17. Augmentation cystoplasty: Contemporary indications, techniques and complications

    PubMed Central

    Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Thorpe, Andrew C.; Harding, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty (AC) has traditionally been used in the treatment of the low capacity, poorly compliant or refractory overactive bladder (OAB). The use of intravesical botulinum toxin and sacral neuromodulation in detrusor overactivity has reduced the number of AC performed for this indication. However, AC remains important in the pediatric and renal transplant setting and still remains a viable option for refractory OAB. Advances in surgical technique have seen the development of both laparoscopic and robotic augmentation cystoplasty. A variety of intestinal segments can be used although ileocystoplasty remains the most common performed procedure. Early complications include thromboembolism and mortality, whereas long-term problems include metabolic disturbance, bacteriuria, urinary tract stones, incontinence, perforation, the need for intermittent self-catheterization and carcinoma. This article examines the contemporary indications, published results and possible future directions for augmentation cystoplasty. PMID:24235795

  18. [Experiences with the augmentation of vocal cords].

    PubMed

    Berghaus, A

    1987-06-01

    Augmentation of a vocal fold serves to improve glottic closure and may be indicated for paresis of the recurrent nerve and after tumor resection. Methods include injection of viscous fluids (paraffin, liquid silicone, polyvinyl alcohol, gelatin, sesame oil, collagen and particularly teflon paste) and operations to tighten the vocal cord or displace it medially. The disadvantages of the former include the danger of overcorrection, tissue irritation and possible systemic absorption of the material. As an alternative, solid material such as cartilage or synthetics may be used for augmentation. Experience obtained so far has shown that chips of porous polyethylene (PHDPE) are particularly suitable: they are easy to use, show good tissue tolerance and are anchored by ingrowth of connective tissue. The value of photokymography of the larynx in the assessment of therapeutic results after vocal-fold augmentation is discussed.

  19. Liquid injectable silicone for soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Prather, Chad L; Jones, Derek H

    2006-01-01

    Liquid injectable silicone is a unique soft tissue augmenting agent that may be effectively utilized for the correction of specific cutaneous and subcutaneous atrophies. Although historical complications have occurred, resulting likely from the presence of adulterants and impurities, modern purified silicone products approved by the Food and Drug Administration for injection into the human body may be employed with minimal complications when strict protocol is followed. In this article the present authors review the history and controversy regarding silicone as well as describe the appropriate indications, patient selection, instrumentation, treatment protocol, and anticipated complications involved with the use of liquid injectable silicone for soft tissue augmentation. Although its use is controversial, the present authors maintain that liquid injectable silicone is an important and effective augmenting agent for the long-term correction of scars and facial contour defects such as HIV facial lipoatrophy. Furthermore, it is a treatment modality deserving of continued investigation.

  20. Left Ventricular Responses to Acute Changes in Late Systolic Pressure Augmentation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Changes in the cardiovascular system with age may predispose older persons to development of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Vascular stiffening, aortic pressure augmentation, and ventricular–vascular coupling have been implicated. We explored the potential for acute reductions in late systolic pressure augmentation to impact left ventricular relaxation in older persons without heart failure. METHODS Sixteen older persons free of known cardiovascular disease with the exception of hypertension had noninvasive tonometry and cardiac ultrasound to evaluate central augmentation index (AI) and diastolic function at baseline and after randomized, blinded administration of intravenous B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and hydralazine in a crossover design. RESULTS AI was significantly reduced after BNP (11.4±8.9 to −0.2±14.7%; P = 0.02) and nonsignificantly reduced after hydralazine (14.7±8.4% to 11.5±8.8%; P = 0.39). With decreased AI during BNP, a trend toward worsened myocardial relaxation by tissue Doppler imaging occurred (E’ velocity pre- and post-BNP: 10.0±2.5 and 8.8±2.0cm/s, respectively; P = 0.06). There was a significant fall in stroke volume with BNP (68.5±18.3 to 60.9±18.1ml; P = 0.02), suggesting that changes in preload overwhelmed effects of afterload reduction on ventricular performance. With hydralazine, neither relaxation nor stroke volume changed. CONCLUSIONS Acute changes in late systolic aortic pressure augmentation do not necessarily lead to improved systolic or diastolic function in older people. Preload may be a more important determinant of cardiac performance than afterload in older people with compensated ventricular function. The potential for changes in preload to impair rather than enhance left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in older people warrants further study. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00204984. PMID:23537892

  1. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  2. Relaxation of impact basins on icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of relaxation of very large impact craters on icy satellites is addressed and the extent to which such studies can help place constraints on the nature of such satellite interiors is investigated. Very general calculations aimed at understanding the nature of relaxation of large impact structures, including the directions, relaxation velocities, and stress levels, are presented. The dependence of relaxation on such factors as silicate core size and viscosity gradients in the ice is examined. The general results are used to address whether comparing the current morphology of impact basins to estimates of their original shape will yield an understanding of the thermal and mechanical structure of the interiors of the icy satellites. It is found that the relaxation rates derived from models of satellite interiors can provide constraints on viscous layer thicknesses. High thermal gradients can permit substantial relaxation even in thin viscous layers. Finally, the constraints on the internal structure of Tethys arising from the extremely relaxed state of the Odysseus basin and the existence of Ithaca Chasma are discussed.

  3. Relaxation processes in disaccharide sugar glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Ha, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyung-Kook

    2013-02-01

    We represented relaxation processes of disaccharide sugars (anhydrous trehalose and maltose) in supercooled and glassy states by using several spectroscopy techniques which include a broadband dielectric loss spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (Retvield analysis) methods which are powerful tools to measure the dynamics in glass forming materials. In a dielectric loss spectroscopy study, we found that anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses have an extra relaxation process besides α-, JG β- and γ-relaxations which could be related to a unique property of glycoside bond in disaccharides. In photon correlation spectroscopy study, we found an interesting compressed exponential relaxation at temperatures above 140°C. The q-1 dependence of its relaxation time corresponds to an ultraslow ballistic motion due to the local structure rearrangements. In the same temperature range, we found the glycosidic bond structure changes in trehalose molecule from the Raman and the Retvield X-ray diffraction measurements indicating that the observed compressed exponential relaxation in supercooled liquid trehalose could be resulted in the glycosidic bond structure change. Therefore, the overall results from this study might support the fact that the superior bioprotection ability of disaccharide sugar glasses might originate from this unique relaxation process of glycosidic bond.

  4. Differences in endplate deformation of the adjacent and augmented vertebra following cement augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, S. K.; Heini, P. F.; Ferguson, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Vertebral cement augmentation can restore the stiffness and strength of a fractured vertebra and relieve chronic pain. Previous finite element analysis, biomechanical tests and clinical studies have indirectly associated new adjacent vertebral fractures following augmentation to altered loading. The aim of this repeated measures in situ biomechanical study was to determine the changes in the adjacent and augmented endplate deformation following cement augmentation of human cadaveric functional spine units (FSU) using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The surrounding soft tissue and posterior elements of 22 cadaveric human FSU were removed. FSU were assigned to two groups, control (n = 8) (loaded on day 1 and day 2) and augmented (n = 14) (loaded on day 1, augmented 20% cement fill, and loaded on day 2). The augmented group was further subdivided into a prophylactic augmentation group (n = 9), and vertebrae which spontaneously fractured during loading on day 1 (n = 5). The FSU were axially loaded (200, 1,000, 1,500–2,000 N) within a custom made radiolucent, saline filled loading device. At each loading step, FSUs were scanned using the micro-CT. Endplate heights were determined using custom software. No significant increase in endplate deformation following cement augmentation was noted for the adjacent endplate (P > 0.05). The deformation of the augmented endplate was significantly reduced following cement augmentation for both the prophylactic and fracture group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively). Endplate deformation of the controls showed no statistically significant differences between loading on day 1 and day 2. A linear relationship was noted between the applied compressive load and endplate deflection (R2 = 0.58). Evidence of significant endplate deformation differences between unaugmented and augmented FSU, while evident for the augmented endplate, was not present for the adjacent endplate. This non-invasive micro-CT method may also

  5. The augmentation algorithm and molecular phylogenetic trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1978-01-01

    Moore's (1977) augmentation procedure is discussed, and it is concluded that the procedure is valid for obtaining estimates of the total number of fixed nucleotide substitutions both theoretically and in practice, for both simulated and real data, and in agreement, for experimentally dense data sets, with stochastic estimates of the divergence, provided the restrictions on codon mutability resulting from natural selection are explicitly allowed for. Tateno and Nei's (1978) critique that the augmentation procedure has a systematic bias toward overestimation of the total number of nucleotide replacements is disputed, and a data analysis suggests that ancestral sequences inferred by the method of parsimony contain a large number of incorrectly assigned nucleotides.

  6. Shuffle-exchanges on augmented meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A mesh connected array of size N = two to the Kth power, K an integer, can be augmented by adding at most one edge per node such that it can perform a shuffle-exchange of size N/2 in constant time. A shuffle-exchange of size N is performed on this augmented array in constant time. This is done by combining the available perfect shuffle of size N/2 with the existing nearest neighbor connections of the mesh. By carefully scheduling the different permutations that are composed in order to achieve the shuffle, the time required is reduced to 5 steps, which is optimal for this network.

  7. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9:5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hyper- sonic protuberances (k/delta < 0.33) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  8. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9.5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hypersonic protuberances (k/delta less than 0.3) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  9. Nasal dorsal augmentation with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Mark A; Parhiscar, Afshin

    2003-11-01

    Silicone rubber has been used safely and effectively for facial augmentation for nearly 5 decades in eastern Asia. We have used silicone rubber nasal implants in primary ethnic rhinoplasty and have found consistent and long-lasting results with low complication rates. Silicone dorsal nasal augmentation in primary rhinoplasty avoids donor site morbidity and implant resorption as seen with autogenous implants. Silicone nasal implants have a low extrusion and infection rate. In the appropriate patient with proper placement, silicone nasal implant is nearly the ideal implant material.

  10. Augmentation in contingency learning under time pressure.

    PubMed

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Matute, Helena

    2010-08-01

    Recent research suggests that cue competition effects in human contingency learning, such as blocking, are due to higher-order cognitive processes. Moreover, some experimental reports suggest that the effect opposite to blocking, augmentation, could occur in experimental preparations that preclude the intervention of reasoning mechanisms. In the present research, we tested this hypothesis by investigating cue interaction effects in an experimental task in which participants had to enter their responses under time pressure. The results show that under these conditions, augmentation, instead of blocking, is observed.

  11. Evaluation of low power augmented hydrazine thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadar, Ilan; Gany, Alon

    1992-02-01

    A brief review of the current concepts of power addition to the widespread, low-power hydrazine thruster and a general analysis of the augmentation processes are presented. Among the devices surveyed are the resistojets (RJ) and the arcjets (AJ), which transfer electric energy by physical contact with the hydrazine decomposition gases, and the microwave thrusters (MW), which apply electromagnetic fields generated by microwaves. A comparison between the variety of present and future augmented hydrazine thrusters (AHT) suggests that the AJ is the most promising means for the energy addition procedure, when both reliability and performance are taken into account.

  12. Flap-augmented shrouds for aerogenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.

    1976-01-01

    Axisymmetrical shrouds for windmills are augmented by ring-shaped 'flaps' and their performance is studied experimentally. The concept of the shroud as an annular 'wing' is justified, leading to the conclusion that high-lift techniques should be used in shroud design, and that high-lift devices, such as flaps, would increase the power output of the windmill. It is shown experimentally that the ideal power output of a flap-augmented shrouded turbine can be more than 4 times the power of unshrouded turbines of the same diameter.

  13. Viscoelastic relaxation of Enceladus's ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadek, Ondřej; Běhounková, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël

    2017-07-01

    We propose a dynamic model relating the non-hydrostatic long-wavelength topography on Enceladus to loading at the base of the ice shell. In dynamic equilibrium, the surface topography induced by a bottom load is very close to that inferred for Airy isostasy. However, due to the small size of the moon the relaxation to equilibrium is significantly longer than the maximum Maxwell relaxation time. During the relaxation, the upper load/bottom load ratio can be either smaller than 1 or larger than 1, depending on the initial state and the loading history.

  14. Le Chatelier's principle with multiple relaxation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R.; Levine, R. D.

    1986-05-01

    Le Chatelier's principle is discussed within the constrained variational approach to thermodynamics. The formulation is general enough to encompass systems not in thermal (or chemical) equilibrium. Particular attention is given to systems with multiple constraints which can be relaxed. The moderation of the initial perturbation increases as additional constraints are removed. This result is studied in particular when the (coupled) relaxation channels have widely different time scales. A series of inequalities is derived which describes the successive moderation as each successive relaxation channel opens up. These inequalities are interpreted within the metric-geometry representation of thermodynamics.

  15. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    PubMed

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  16. Relaxation time in disordered molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Rodrigo P.; Freire, José A.

    2015-05-28

    Relaxation time is the typical time it takes for a closed physical system to attain thermal equilibrium. The equilibrium is brought about by the action of a thermal reservoir inducing changes in the system micro-states. The relaxation time is intuitively expected to increase with system disorder. We derive a simple analytical expression for this dependence in the context of electronic equilibration in an amorphous molecular system model. We find that the disorder dramatically enhances the relaxation time but does not affect its independence of the nature of the initial state.

  17. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  18. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: influence of electron spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Kowalewski, J; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-03-28

    The work presents a theory of nuclear ((1)H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of (15)N and (14)N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)]. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The (1)H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the (1)H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(14)N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both (14)N and (15)N systems and explains the features of (1)H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  19. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: Influence of electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-03-01

    The work presents a theory of nuclear (1H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of 15N and 14N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The 1H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the 1H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-14N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both 14N and 15N systems and explains the features of 1H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide and vascular relaxation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Tang, Chao-Shu; DU, Jun-Bao; Jin, Hong-Fang

    2011-11-01

    To review the vasorelaxant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in arterial rings in the cardiovascular system under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions and the possible mechanisms involved. The data in this review were obtained from Medline and Pubmed sources from 1997 to 2011 using the search terms "hydrogen sulfide" and "vascular relaxation". Articles describing the role of hydrogen sulfide in the regulation of vascular activity and its vasorelaxant effects were selected. H(2)S plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular tone. The vasomodulatory effects of H(2)S depend on factors including concentration, species and tissue type. The H(2)S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), causes vasorelaxation of rat isolated aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was more pronounced than that observed in pulmonary arterial rings. The expression of K(ATP) channel proteins and mRNA in the aortic rings was increased compared with pulmonary artery rings. H(2)S is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Downregulation of the endogenous H(2)S pathway is an important factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The vasorelaxant effects of H(2)S have been shown to be mediated by activation of K(ATP) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells and via the induction of acidification due to activation of the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger. It is speculated that the mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictive function of H(2)S in the aortic rings involves decreased NO production and inhibition of cAMP accumulation. H(2)S is an important endogenous gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and acts as a modulator of vascular tone in the homeostatic regulation of blood pressure.

  1. Relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjiu, Aurel; Biter, Teodor Lucian; Turcu, Flaviu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network built by replicating the Vicsek fractal in dendrimer shape. The relaxation dynamics is investigated in the framework of the generalized Gaussian structure model by employing both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse-type approach, we show the iterative procedure whereby the whole eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix of the multihierarchical structure can be obtained. Remarkably, the general picture that emerges from both approaches, even though we have a mixed growth algorithm, is that the obtained multihierarchical structure preserves the individual relaxation behaviors of its components. The theoretical findings with respect to the splitting of the intermediate domain of the relaxation quantities are well supported by experimental results.

  2. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T < Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  3. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  4. The Irreversible Thermodynamics of Chemical Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelly, Z. A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the thermodynamics of relaxation methods, considering (1) mode of perturbation of chemical equilibria, (2) enforced change of the concentrations, and (3) chemical contributions to equations of state. (CS)

  5. The Irreversible Thermodynamics of Chemical Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelly, Z. A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the thermodynamics of relaxation methods, considering (1) mode of perturbation of chemical equilibria, (2) enforced change of the concentrations, and (3) chemical contributions to equations of state. (CS)

  6. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, K. F.; Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    We consider theoretically the relaxation from the first excited vibrational state to the ground state of oxygen molecules in neat liquid oxygen. The relaxation rate constant is related in the usual way to the Fourier transform of a certain quantum mechanical force-force time-correlation function. A result from Egelstaff allows one instead to relate the rate constant (approximately) to the Fourier transform of a classical force-force time-correlation function. This Fourier transform is then evaluated approximately by calculating three equilibrium averages from a classical molecular dynamics simulation. Our results for the relaxation times (at two different temperatures) are within a factor of 5 of the experimental relaxation times, which are in the ms range.

  7. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... hour to spare, regular use of the relaxation exercises discussed here will help you to feel more ... each day. Most people prefer to do the exercises either just upon awakening or prior to bedtime. ...

  8. An Asynchronous Augmentation to Traditional Course Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Marvin L.; Wolverton, Mimi

    Asynchronous augmentation facilitates distributed learning, which relies heavily on technology and self-learning. This paper reports the results of delivering a real estate principles course using an asynchronous course delivery format. It highlights one of many ways to enhance learning using technology, and it provides information concerning how…

  9. Antidepressant augmentation with anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Antidepressant augmentation strategies are commonly employed to treat depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressant monotherapy. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms have been implicated in depression, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been found effective in animal models of depression both in monotherapy and when used to augment antidepressant drugs. However, results with NSAIDs have been mixed in human observational studies, with both better and worse depression outcomes reported. Four small (pooled N = 160) randomized controlled trials suggest that celecoxib (200-400 mg/d) augmentation of antidepressant medication improves 4-6 week outcomes in major depressive disorder. There are no data, however, to support the use of celecoxib or other NSAIDs in antidepressant-resistant depression. There are also concerns about adverse events associated with NSAID treatment, and about pharmacodynamic drug interactions between these drugs and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. A reasonable conclusion for the present is that NSAID augmentation of antidepressants is, at best, a tentative approach in nonrefractory major depression.

  10. A User's Perspective on Augmentative Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Lewis, Marsha R.; Ford, Alison

    1987-01-01

    In extensive interviews, an augmentative communication user with cerebral palsy (age 25) reflected on the effectiveness of devices designed for her during her school career. Among emergent themes were a disproportionate emphasis on "device usage" over "speech usage," allowing professionals to dominate the decision-making…

  11. Understanding the Conics through Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Patricia; Pulido, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the production of a digital environment to foster the learning of conics through augmented reality. The name conic refers to curves obtained by the intersection of a plane with a right circular conical surface. The environment gives students the opportunity to interact with the cone and the plane as virtual objects in real…

  12. The Educational Possibilities of Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabero, Julio; Barroso, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A large number of emergent technologies have been acquiring a strong impulse in recent years. One of these emergent technologies is Augmented Reality (RA), which will surely have a high level of penetration into all our educational centers, including universities, in the next 3 to 5 years, as a number of different reports have already highlighted.…

  13. Intelligent Augmented Reality Training for Motherboard Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerfield, Giles; Mitrovic, Antonija; Billinghurst, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the combination of Augmented Reality (AR) with Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) to assist with training for manual assembly tasks. Our approach combines AR graphics with adaptive guidance from the ITS to provide a more effective learning experience. We have developed a modular software framework for intelligent AR training…

  14. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  15. Determination of Student Opinions in Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicen, Huseyin; Bal, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and…

  16. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Design Principles for Augmented Reality Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunleavy, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is an emerging technology that utilizes mobile, context-aware devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical environment. This overview of design principles focuses on specific strategies that instructional designers can use to develop AR learning…

  18. Get Real: Augmented Reality for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rebecca; DeBay, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Kids love augmented reality (AR) simulations because they are like real-life video games. AR simulations allow students to learn content while collaborating face to face and interacting with a multimedia-enhanced version of the world around them. Although the technology may seem advanced, AR software makes it easy to develop content-based…

  19. Understanding the Conics through Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Patricia; Pulido, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the production of a digital environment to foster the learning of conics through augmented reality. The name conic refers to curves obtained by the intersection of a plane with a right circular conical surface. The environment gives students the opportunity to interact with the cone and the plane as virtual objects in real…

  20. Intelligent Augmented Reality Training for Motherboard Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerfield, Giles; Mitrovic, Antonija; Billinghurst, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the combination of Augmented Reality (AR) with Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) to assist with training for manual assembly tasks. Our approach combines AR graphics with adaptive guidance from the ITS to provide a more effective learning experience. We have developed a modular software framework for intelligent AR training…

  1. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  2. Design Principles for Augmented Reality Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunleavy, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is an emerging technology that utilizes mobile, context-aware devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical environment. This overview of design principles focuses on specific strategies that instructional designers can use to develop AR learning…

  3. Location-Based Learning through Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Te-Lien; Chanlin, Lih-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A context-aware and mixed-reality exploring tool cannot only effectively provide an information-rich environment to users, but also allows them to quickly utilize useful resources and enhance environment awareness. This study integrates Augmented Reality (AR) technology into smartphones to create a stimulating learning experience at a university…

  4. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  5. E-Learning: Between Augmentation and Disruption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilesen, Simon B.; Josephsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Based on a framework for analysis combining diffusion theory, content layer analysis and sense making, this paper discusses the theme of "e-learning as augmentation or disruption" from the point of view of technological innovation. Two cases of on-campus blended learning at Roskilde University, Denmark, are introduced to illustrate the…

  6. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene augmentation of the lower face.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F

    1996-05-01

    Most options for rejuvenation of the lower face use soft-tissue fillers that augment the appropriate sites. Each of these options has associated risks and benefits. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (E-PTFE) as a soft-tissue filler in the face. From January 1991 through December 1993, the authors used E-PTFE soft-tissue patches for lower facial augmentation in 41 patients at 115 implant sites. Postsurgical follow-up has ranged from 2.5 to 4.5 years; during this time, complications have occurred in 4 patients. One implant had to be removed because of a seroma (1 patient), 4 implants required further secondary augmentation (2 patients), and 1 implant required revision because of malposition (1 patient). There have been no cases of implant infection, extrusion, long-term inflammation, or capsule formation. In this article, the authors review the technical aspects of E-PTFE use and discuss issues relating to the long-term efficacy of this new option for soft-tissue augmentation. The technique is also compared with other options for rejuvenation of the lower face.

  7. Augmented Transition Networks for Natural Language Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, W. A.

    The augmented transition network described in this report was developed in the course of work in semantic interpretation in the context of a computer system which answers English questions. In order to provide mechanical input for the semantic interpreter, a parsing program based on the notion of a "recursive transition network grammar" was…

  8. Complications after bladder augmentation in children.

    PubMed

    Molina, Carlos Augusto Fernandes; Lima, Gilson José de; Cassini, Marcelo Ferreira; Andrade, Murilo Ferreira de; Facincani, Inalda; Tucci Júnior, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Bladder augmentation is an effective surgical procedure for increasing bladder capacity and reducing pressure on the urinary system. It is indicated for patients with anomalies such as spina bifida, myelomeningocele, urethral valve and bladder exstrophy, who progress with low tolerance of medication. This was a retrospective study conducted on pediatric patients submitted to bladder augmentation from 2000 to 2011. 34 patients aged 4 to 17 years were submitted to bladder augmentation, 30 of them with an ileal loop and 4 with a ureter.A continent urinary shunt was performed in 16 patients, the Mitrofanoff conduit was associated in 15, and the Macedo technique was used in one. Mean follow-up was 34.35 months (1 to 122 months). Mean creatinine was 1.5 ng/ml (0.4 to 7.5 ng/ml) preoperatively and 1.78 ng/ml postoperatively. Three patients required a renal transplant during follow-up. There was improvement or resolution of vesicoureteral reflux in 83.5% of the kidneys on the right and in 75% on the left. Bladder capacity increased, on average, from 152.5 ml to 410 ml. The main complications were vesical lithiasis in 3 patients and conduit perforation in one. Bladder augmentation showed good results in this series, preserving renal function in most of the patients.

  9. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  10. Location-Based Learning through Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Te-Lien; Chanlin, Lih-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A context-aware and mixed-reality exploring tool cannot only effectively provide an information-rich environment to users, but also allows them to quickly utilize useful resources and enhance environment awareness. This study integrates Augmented Reality (AR) technology into smartphones to create a stimulating learning experience at a university…

  11. A Universal Logging Format for Augmentative Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesher, Gregory W.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Rinkus, Gerard; Higginbotham, D. Jeffery

    This report discusses how technical and technological advances in alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) have outstripped the ability to assess their impact on actual communication and argues that this is due in part to the lack of a consistent and reliable method to measure long-term communicative efficacy. The report proposes a…

  12. Control of dipolar relaxation in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiou, B.; Bismut, G.; Beaufils, Q.; Crubellier, A.; Maréchal, E.; Pedri, P.; Vernac, L.; Gorceix, O.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2010-04-01

    We study dipolar relaxation in both ultracold thermal and Bose-condensed Cr atom gases. We show three different ways to control dipolar relaxation, making use of either a static magnetic field, an oscillatory magnetic field, or an optical lattice to reduce the dimensionality of the gas from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D). Although dipolar relaxation generally increases as a function of a static magnetic-field intensity, we find a range of nonzero magnetic-field intensities where dipolar relaxation is strongly reduced. We use this resonant reduction to accurately determine the S=6 scattering length of Cr atoms: a6=103±4a0. We compare this new measurement to another new determination of a6, which we perform by analyzing the precise spectroscopy of a Feshbach resonance in d-wave collisions, yielding a6=102.5±0.4a0. These two measurements provide, by far, the most precise determination of a6 to date. We then show that, although dipolar interactions are long-range interactions, dipolar relaxation only involves the incoming partial wave l=0 for large enough magnetic-field intensities, which has interesting consequences on the stability of dipolar Fermi gases. We then study ultracold Cr gases in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice resulting in a collection of independent 2D gases. We show that dipolar relaxation is modified when the atoms collide in reduced dimensionality at low magnetic-field intensities, and that the corresponding dipolar relaxation rate parameter is reduced by a factor up to 7 compared to the 3D case. Finally, we study dipolar relaxation in the presence of rf oscillating magnetic fields, and we show that both the output channel energy and the transition amplitude can be controlled by means of the rf frequency and Rabi frequency.

  13. Augmentation in restless legs syndrome patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ji-Ye; Moon, Hye-Jin; Song, Mei Ling; Lee, Hochang B; Cho, Yong Won

    2015-05-01

    Augmentation has been known as the major complication of long-term dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). However, there have been no reports on the prevalence of augmentation in Korea. Thus, we aimed to assess the rate of augmentation and evaluate related factors in Korean RLS patients. Ninety-four idiopathic RLS patients who have been treated over a period of at least 6 months were enrolled. Thirty subjects were treated with a dopamine agonist only, and 64 were treated with a dopamine agonist and alpha two delta ligands. We assessed the clinical characteristics of those RLS subjects and evaluated the rate of augmentation. Augmentation was assessed using the NIH criteria for augmentation by two RLS experts independently. Eleven subjects (11.7%) were classified as having definitive or highly suggestive clinical indication of augmentation. In comparing the augmentation group with the non-augmentation group, there were no significant differences of baseline clinical characteristics. Four (13.3%) of the dopamine agonists monotherapy group and seven (10.9%) of the combination therapy group were categorized as augmentation. There was no significant difference in the augmentation rate between these two groups. We found an 11.7% augmentation rate in Korean RLS subjects. There was no difference in the rate of RLS augmentation between the dopaminergic monotherapy group and the combined treatment group. It may be related with using a similar dosage of dopaminergic drugs.

  14. Basic MR relaxation mechanisms and contrast agent design.

    PubMed

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M; Martins, André F; Pinho, Marco C; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have undergone continuous and substantial evolution by virtue of hardware and software innovations and the development and implementation of exogenous contrast media. Thirty years since the first MRI contrast agent was approved for clinical use, a reliance on MR contrast media persists, largely to improve image quality with higher contrast resolution and to provide additional functional characterization of normal and abnormal tissues. Further development of MR contrast media is an important component in the quest for continued augmentation of diagnostic capabilities. In this review we detail the many important considerations when pursuing the design and use of MR contrast media. We offer a perspective on the importance of chemical stability, particularly kinetic stability, and how this influences one's thinking about the safety of metal-ligand-based contrast agents. We discuss the mechanisms involved in MR relaxation in the context of probe design strategies. A brief description of currently available contrast agents is accompanied by an in-depth discussion that highlights promising MRI contrast agents in the development of future clinical and research applications. Our intention is to give a diverse audience an improved understanding of the factors involved in developing new types of safe and highly efficient MR contrast agents and, at the same time, provide an appreciation of the insights into physiology and disease that newer types of responsive agents can provide.

  15. Orientational relaxation in semiflexible dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Biswas, Parbati

    2013-12-14

    The orientational relaxation dynamics of semiflexible dendrimers are theoretically calculated within the framework of optimized Rouse-Zimm formalism. Semiflexibility is modeled through appropriate restrictions in the direction and orientation of the respective bond vectors, while the hydrodynamic interactions are included via the preaveraged Oseen tensor. The time autocorrelation function M(i)(1)(t) and the second order orientational autocorrelation function P(i)(2)(t) are analyzed as a function of the branch-point functionality and the degree of semiflexibility. Our approach of calculating M(i)(1)(t) is completely different from that of the earlier studies (A. Perico and M. Guenza J. Chem. Phys., 1985, 83, 3103; J. Chem. Phys., 1986, 84, 510), where the expression of M(i)(1)(t) obtained from earlier studies does not demarcate the flexible dendrimers from the semiflexible ones. The component of global motion of the time autocorrelation function exhibits a strong dependence on both degree of semiflexibility and branch-point functionality, while the component of pulsation motion depends only on the degree of semiflexibility. But it is difficult to distinguish the difference in the extent of pulsation motion among the compressed (0 < φ < π/2) and expanded (π/2 < φ < π) conformations of semiflexible dendrimers. The qualitative behavior of P(i)(2)(t) obtained from our calculations closely matches with the expression for P(exact)(2)(t) in the earlier studies. Theoretically calculated spectral density, J(ω), is found to depend on the degree of semiflexibility and the branch-point functionality for the compressed and expanded conformations of semiflexible dendrimers as a function of frequency, especially in the high frequency regime, where J(ω) decays with frequency for both compressed and expanded conformations of semiflexible dendrimers. This decay of the spectral density occurs after displaying a cross-over behavior with the variation in the degree of

  16. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of phlogopite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Anupinder; Awasthi, A. M.; Singh, Lakhwant

    2012-11-01

    An in-depth investigation of the dielectric characteristics of annealed phlogopite mica has been conducted in the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and over the temperature range 653-873 K through the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. These formalisms show qualitative similarities in relaxation processes. The frequency dependence of the M″ and dc conductivity is found to obey an Arrhenius law and the activation energy of the phlogopite mica calculated both from dc conductivity and the modulus spectrum is similar, indicating that same type of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation phenomena. The electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted with the Havriliak-Negami function. Scaling of M‧, M″, ac conductivity has also been performed in order to obtain insight into the relaxation mechanisms. The scaling behaviour indicates that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at different temperatures. The relaxation mechanism was also examined using the Cole-Cole approach. The study elaborates that the investigation regarding the temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric relaxation in the phlogopite mica will be helpful for various cutting edge applications of this material in electrical engineering.

  17. Stress relaxation in viscous soft spheres.

    PubMed

    Boschan, Julia; Vasudevan, Siddarth A; Boukany, Pouyan E; Somfai, Ellák; Tighe, Brian P

    2017-10-04

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation tests in athermal viscous soft sphere packings close to their unjamming transition. By systematically and simultaneously varying both the amplitude of the applied strain step and the pressure of the initial condition, we access both linear and nonlinear response regimes and control the distance to jamming. Stress relaxation in viscoelastic solids is characterized by a relaxation time τ* that separates short time scales, where viscous loss is substantial, from long time scales, where elastic storage dominates and the response is essentially quasistatic. We identify two distinct plateaus in the strain dependence of the relaxation time, one each in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The height of both plateaus scales as an inverse power law with the distance to jamming. By probing the time evolution of particle velocities during relaxation, we further identify a correlation between mechanical relaxation in the bulk and the degree of non-affinity in the particle velocities on the micro scale.

  18. Ultrasonic relaxations in lanthanide phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, G.; D'angelo, G.; Federico, M.; Tripodo, G.; Saunders, G. A.; Senin, H. B.

    1994-08-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range of 10 to 90 MHz have been measured in La2O3-P2O5 and Sm2O3-P2O5 glasses with high lanthanide concentrations as a function of temperature between 1.5 and 400 K. Two distinct features characterize the attenuation behavior: (i) a plateau at temperatures below 15 K and (ii) a broad high-temperature peak. The former feature is interpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted relaxation of two-level systems and the latter by assuming the existence of a distribution of thermally activated relaxing centers. For both these mechanisms the product of the deformation potential squared and the density of relaxing particles decreases with increasing lanthanide-ion concentration. This result, taken together with previous observations of the properties of oxide glasses, provides physical insight into the microscopic origin of the relaxation effects and suggests that the source of the low- and high-temperature attenuation mechanisms is the same. At temperatures below 100 K, the sound velocity, after the subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, follows a linear law as predicted by the soft-potential model for the relaxation of soft harmonic oscillators. An encouraging agreement is obtained between the parameters regulating this mechanism and those determined from the acoustic attenuation plateau.

  19. Relaxation therapies for asthma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huntley, A; White, A R; Ernst, E

    2002-02-01

    Emotional stress can either precipitate or exacerbate both acute and chronic asthma. There is a large body of literature available on the use of relaxation techniques for the treatment of asthma symptoms. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if there is any evidence for or against the clinical efficacy of such interventions. Four independent literature searches were performed on Medline, Cochrane Library, CISCOM, and Embase. Only randomised clinical trials (RCTs) were included. There were no restrictions on the language of publication. The data from trials that statistically compared the treatment group with that of the control were extracted in a standardised predefined manner and assessed critically by two independent reviewers. Fifteen trials were identified, of which nine compared the treatment group with the control group appropriately. Five RCTs tested progressive muscle relaxation or mental and muscular relaxation, two of which showed significant effects of therapy. One RCT investigating hypnotherapy, one of autogenic training, and two of biofeedback techniques revealed no therapeutic effects. Overall, the methodological quality of the studies was poor. There is a lack of evidence for the efficacy of relaxation therapies in the management of asthma. This deficiency is due to the poor methodology of the studies as well as the inherent problems of conducting such trials. There is some evidence that muscular relaxation improves lung function of patients with asthma but no evidence for any other relaxation technique.

  20. On convex relaxation of graph isomorphism

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Bronstein, Alexander; Kimmel, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of exact and inexact matching of weighted undirected graphs, in which a bijective correspondence is sought to minimize a quadratic weight disagreement. This computationally challenging problem is often relaxed as a convex quadratic program, in which the space of permutations is replaced by the space of doubly stochastic matrices. However, the applicability of such a relaxation is poorly understood. We define a broad class of friendly graphs characterized by an easily verifiable spectral property. We prove that for friendly graphs, the convex relaxation is guaranteed to find the exact isomorphism or certify its inexistence. This result is further extended to approximately isomorphic graphs, for which we develop an explicit bound on the amount of weight disagreement under which the relaxation is guaranteed to find the globally optimal approximate isomorphism. We also show that in many cases, the graph matching problem can be further harmlessly relaxed to a convex quadratic program with only n separable linear equality constraints, which is substantially more efficient than the standard relaxation involving 2n equality and n2 inequality constraints. Finally, we show that our results are still valid for unfriendly graphs if additional information in the form of seeds or attributes is allowed, with the latter satisfying an easy to verify spectral characteristic. PMID:25713342

  1. Repeated vertebral augmentation for new vertebral compression fractures of postvertebral augmentation patients: a nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Cheng-Loong; Wang, Hao-Kwan; Syu, Fei-Kai; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Postvertebral augmentation vertebral compression fractures are common; repeated vertebral augmentation is usually performed for prompt pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of repeat vertebral augmentation. Methods We performed a retrospective, nationwide, population-based longitudinal observation study, using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. All patients who received vertebral augmentation for vertebral compression fractures were evaluated. The collected data included patient characteristics (demographics, comorbidities, and medication exposure) and repeat vertebral augmentation. Kaplan–Meier and stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed for analyses. Results The overall incidence of repeat vertebral augmentation was 11.3% during the follow-up until 2010. Patients with the following characteristics were at greater risk for repeat vertebral augmentation: female sex (AOR=1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–2.36), advanced age (AOR=1.60; 95% CI: 1.32–2.08), diabetes mellitus (AOR=4.31; 95% CI: 4.05–5.88), cerebrovascular disease (AOR=4.09; 95% CI: 3.44–5.76), dementia (AOR=1.97; 95% CI: 1.69–2.33), blindness or low vision (AOR=3.72; 95% CI: 2.32–3.95), hypertension (AOR=2.58; 95% CI: 2.35–3.47), and hyperlipidemia (AOR=2.09; 95% CI: 1.67–2.22). Patients taking calcium/vitamin D (AOR=2.98; 95% CI: 1.83–3.93), bisphosphonates (AOR=2.11; 95% CI: 1.26–2.61), or calcitonin (AOR=4.59; 95% CI: 3.40–5.77) were less likely to undergo repeat vertebral augmentation; however, those taking steroids (AOR=7.28; 95% CI: 6.32–8.08), acetaminophen (AOR=3.54; 95% CI: 2.75–4.83), or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (AOR=6.14; 95% CI: 5.08–7.41) were more likely to undergo repeat vertebral augmentation. Conclusion We conclude that the incidence of repeat vertebral augmentation is rather high. An understanding of risk factors predicting repeat

  2. Quercetin acutely relaxes airway smooth muscle and potentiates β-agonist-induced relaxation via dual phosphodiesterase inhibition of PLCβ and PDE4

    PubMed Central

    Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of the airways with symptoms including exaggerated airway narrowing and airway inflammation. Early asthma therapies used methylxanthines to relieve symptoms, in part, by inhibiting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), the enzyme responsible for degrading cAMP. The classification of tissue-specific PDE subtypes and the clinical introduction of PDE-selective inhibitors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (i.e., roflumilast) have reopened the possibility of using PDE inhibition in the treatment of asthma. Quercetin is a naturally derived PDE4-selective inhibitor found in fruits, vegetables, and tea. We hypothesized that quercetin relaxes airway smooth muscle via cAMP-mediated pathways and augments β-agonist relaxation. Tracheal rings from male A/J mice were mounted in myographs and contracted with acetylcholine (ACh). Addition of quercetin (100 nM-1 mM) acutely and concentration-dependently relaxed airway rings precontracted with ACh. In separate studies, pretreatment with quercetin (100 μM) prevented force generation upon exposure to ACh. In additional studies, quercetin (50 μM) significantly potentiated isoproterenol-induced relaxations. In in vitro assays, quercetin directly attenuated phospholipase C activity, decreased inositol phosphate synthesis, and decreased intracellular calcium responses to Gq-coupled agonists (histamine or bradykinin). Finally, nebulization of quercetin (100 μM) in an in vivo model of airway responsiveness significantly attenuated methacholine-induced increases in airway resistance. These novel data show that the natural PDE4-selective inhibitor quercetin may provide therapeutic relief of asthma symptoms and decrease reliance on short-acting β-agonists. PMID:23873842

  3. Data Distribution for Mobile Augmented Reality in Simulation and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    The Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS) is a mobile augmented reality system that displays head-up battlefield intelligence information to a...constraints, we present a robust event-based data distribution mechanism for mobile augmented reality and virtual environments. It is based on replicated...its name, a plan of its interior, icons to represent reported hazard locations, and the names of adjacent streets. The full power of mobile augmented

  4. Favorable Pulse Wave Augmentation Indices and Left Ventricular Diastolic Profile in β-Thalassemia Minor.

    PubMed

    Chamaidi, Aikaterini; Karagiannis, Georgios; Christidi, Aikaterini; Parisis, Charalambos; Koutrakis, Konstantinos; Xanthopoulos, Andrew; Skoularigis, John; Giamouzis, Gregory; Triposkiadis, Filippos K

    2017-11-01

    β-Thalassemia minor (β-Τm) is associated with rheological and biochemical alterations that can affect cardiovascular function. We aimed to evaluate the elastic arterial properties and the pulse wave augmentation indices in a population of patients with β-Τm. Seventy-five individuals with β-Τm (age 55.5 [42.75-65.25], women 48%) and 127 controls (age 57 years [48-63], women 55.1%) underwent comprehensive echocardiographic evaluation and applanation tonometry of the radial and femoral artery. Pulse wave analysis revealed that augmentation pressure, augmentation index (AIx), and heart rate-corrected AIx were significantly lower (median [interquartile range]: 8.75 [4.625-13] vs 11 [6.5-14.5], P = .017; 26.5 [17.5-33.375] vs 30.5 [20.75-37.5], P = .014; and 22.25 [15.125-29.5] vs 27 [20.5-33], P = .008, respectively) in the β-Τm group compared to controls. The left atrial active emptying volume was significantly lower and the isovolumic relaxation time was shorter in the β-Τm group compared to the control group (10.2 [7.4-14.4] vs 12.0 [8.6-15.8], P = .040 and 78 [70-90] vs 90 [70-104], P = .034, respectively). β-Thalassemia minor is associated with favorable pulse wave augmentation indices and left ventricular diastolic function profile in asymptomatic individuals with cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  6. 14 CFR 117.17 - Flight duty period: Augmented flightcrew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight duty period: Augmented flightcrew. 117.17 Section 117.17 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...: Augmented flightcrew. (a) For flight operations conducted with an acclimated augmented flightcrew,...

  7. 14 CFR 117.17 - Flight duty period: Augmented flightcrew.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight duty period: Augmented flightcrew. 117.17 Section 117.17 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... period: Augmented flightcrew. (a) For flight operations conducted with an acclimated augmented...

  8. Usability Engineering: Domain Analysis Activities for Augmented Reality Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses our usability engineering process for the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). Usability engineering is a structured...management principals and techniques, formal and semiformal evaluation techniques, and computerized tools. BARS is an outdoor augmented reality system...originally developed the process in the context of virtual reality applications, but in this work we are adapting the procedures to an augmented

  9. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  10. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  11. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  12. Tests on Thrust Augmenters for Jet Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Shoemaker, James M

    1932-01-01

    This series of tests was undertaken to determine how much the reaction thrust of a jet could be increased by the use of thrust augmenters and thus to give some indication as to the feasibility of jet propulsion for airplanes. The tests were made during the first part of 1927 at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. A compressed air jet was used in connection with a series of annular guides surrounding the jet to act as thrust augmenters. The results show that, although it is possible to increase the thrust of a jet, the increase is not large enough to affect greatly the status of the problem of the application of jet propulsion to airplanes.

  13. Augmenting Probabilistic Risk Assesment with Malevolent Initiators

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder

    2011-11-01

    As commonly practiced, the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in nuclear power plants only considers accident initiators such as natural hazards, equipment failures, and human error. Malevolent initiators are ignored in PRA, but are considered the domain of physical security, which uses vulnerability assessment based on an officially specified threat (design basis threat). This paper explores the implications of augmenting and extending existing PRA models by considering new and modified scenarios resulting from malevolent initiators. Teaming the augmented PRA models with conventional vulnerability assessments can cost-effectively enhance security of a nuclear power plant. This methodology is useful for operating plants, as well as in the design of new plants. For the methodology, we have proposed an approach that builds on and extends the practice of PRA for nuclear power plants for security-related issues. Rather than only considering 'random' failures, we demonstrated a framework that is able to represent and model malevolent initiating events and associated plant impacts.

  14. Stability boundaries for command augmentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    The Stability Augmentation System (SAS) is a special case of the Command Augmentation System (CAS). Control saturation imposes bounds on achievable commands. The state equilibrium depends only on the open loop dynamics and control deflection. The control magnitude to achieve a desired command equilibrium is independent of the feedback gain. A feedback controller provides the desired response, maintains the system equilibrium under disturbances, but it does not affect the equilibrium values of states and control. The saturation boundaries change with commands, but the location of the equilibrium points in the saturated region remains unchanged. Nonzero command vectors yield saturation boundaries that are asymmetric with respect to the state equilibrium. Except for the saddle point case with MCE control law, the stability boundaries change with commands. For the cases of saddle point and unstable nodes, the region of stability decreases with increasing command magnitudes.

  15. Simulating autonomous agents wtih augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelenbe, Erol; Hussain, Khaled F.; Kaptan, Varol

    2002-07-01

    In many critical applications such as airport operations (for capacity planning), military simulations (for tactical training and planning), and medical simulations (for the planning of medical treatment and surgical operations), it is very useful to conduct simulations within physically accurate and visually realistic settings that are represented by real video imaging sequences. Furthermore, it is important that the simulated entities conduct autonomous actions which are realistic and which follow plans of action or intelligent behavior in reaction to current situations. We describe the research we have conducted to incorporate synthetic objects in a visually realistic manner in video sequences representing a real scene. We also discuss how the synthetic objects can be designed to conduct intelligent behavior within an augmented reality setting. The paper discusses both the computer vision aspects that we have addressed and solved, and the issues related to the insertion of intelligent autonomous objects within an augmented reality simulation.

  16. Vision-based augmented reality system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yongtian; Shi, Qi; Yan, Dayuan

    2003-04-01

    The most promising aspect of augmented reality lies in its ability to integrate the virtual world of the computer with the real world of the user. Namely, users can interact with the real world subjects and objects directly. This paper presents an experimental augmented reality system with a video see-through head-mounted device to display visual objects, as if they were lying on the table together with real objects. In order to overlay virtual objects on the real world at the right position and orientation, the accurate calibration and registration are most important. A vision-based method is used to estimate CCD external parameters by tracking 4 known points with different colors. It achieves sufficient accuracy for non-critical applications such as gaming, annotation and so on.

  17. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  18. Augmented-reality-based segmentation refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornik, Alexander; Reitinger, Bernhard; Beichel, Reinhard; Sorantin, Erich; Werkgartner, Georg

    2004-05-01

    Planning of surgical liver tumor resections based on image data from X-ray computed tomography requires correct segmentation of the liver, liver vasculature and pathological structures. Automatic liver segmentation methods frequently fail in cases where the anatomy is degenerated by lesions or other present liver diseases. On the other hand performing a manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming task. Therefore Augmented Reality based segmentation refinement tools are reported, that aid radiologists to efficiently correct incorrect segmentations in true 3D using head-mounted displays and tracked input devices. The developed methods facilitate segmentation refinement by interactively deforming a mesh data structure reconstructed from an initial segmentation. The variety of refinement methods are all accessible through the intuitive, direct 3D user interface of an Augmented Reality system.

  19. Behavior sensitivities for control augmented structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. A.; Lust, R. V.; Schmit, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    During the past few years it has been recognized that combining passive structural design methods with active control techniques offers the prospect of being able to find substantially improved designs. These developments have stimulated interest in augmenting structural synthesis by adding active control system design variables to those usually considered in structural optimization. An essential step in extending the approximation concepts approach to control augmented structural synthesis is the development of a behavior sensitivity analysis capability for determining rates of change of dynamic response quantities with respect to changes in structural and control system design variables. Behavior sensitivity information is also useful for man-machine interactive design as well as in the context of system identification studies. Behavior sensitivity formulations for both steady state and transient response are presented and the quality of the resulting derivative information is evaluated.

  20. Recent advances in soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Krauss, M C

    1999-06-01

    Soft tissue augmentation has become increasingly important as more individuals seek aesthetic improvement without major surgical procedures. The choice of an appropriate subcutaneous implant, whether solid or injectable, requires a thorough understanding of the materials available. This review of the literature addresses autologous fat and dermis transplantation, autologous and allogeneic human collagen, bovine collagen, acellular dermal allograft, hyaluronic acid derivatives, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, polymethyl-methacrylate microspheres, and other potential biomaterials. The search for the perfect material to eradicate rhytids, smooth scars, and fill traumatic detects continues. New products appear, sometimes with great fanfare, which fail to fulfill the promise of a better alternative to what we use now. For this reason, an in-depth understanding of implant materials is necessary for any physician performing soft-tissue augmentation procedures.

  1. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  2. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  3. Load relaxation of olivine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Reid F.; Stone, Donald S.; Plookphol, Thawatchai

    2016-10-01

    Single crystals of ferromagnesian olivine (San Carlos, AZ, peridot; Fo88-90) have been deformed in both uniaxial creep and load relaxation under conditions of ambient pressure, T = 1500°C and pO2 = 10-10 atm; creep stresses were in the range 40 ≤ σ1 (MPa) ≤ 220. The crystals were oriented such that the applied stress was parallel to [011]c, which promotes single slip on the slowest slip system in olivine, (010)[001]. The creep rates at steady state match well the results of earlier investigators, as does the stress sensitivity (a power law exponent of n = 3.6). Dislocation microstructures, including spatial distribution of low-angle (subgrain) boundaries, additionally confirm previous investigations. Inverted primary creep (an accelerating strain rate with an increase in stress) was observed. Load relaxation, however, produced a singular response—a single hardness curve—regardless of the magnitude of creep stress or total accumulated strain preceding relaxation. The log stress versus log strain rate data from load-relaxation and creep experiments overlap to within experimental error. The load-relaxation behavior is distinctly different than that described for other crystalline solids, where the flow stress is affected strongly by work hardening such that a family of distinct hardness curves is generated, which are related by a scaling function. The response of olivine for the conditions studied, we argue, indicates flow that is rate limited by dislocation glide, reflecting specifically a high intrinsic lattice resistance (Peierls stress).

  4. Hot Electron Energy Relaxation in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chia-Hung

    We present experimental results on hot electron relaxation in doped bulk GaAs and quantum wells. Using steady state photoluminescence we measured the electron -LO phonon scattering time for thermalized hot electrons in quantum wells. The results are in good agreement with our theoretical calculation of electron-LO phonon interaction in two dimensional systems. Within random phase approximation, the emitted LO phonons may couple to two dimensional plasmons. Both the screening and phonon reabsorption properties can be drastically changed as a function of electron density, temperature and phonon lifetime. Theoretical energy relaxation rates, including dynamical screening and phonon reabsorption effects, will be presented. For hot electrons with energies well above the LO phonon energy, we developed a two-beam, lock-in technique to measure the energy-resolved cooling rate. In the case of quantum wells, hot electrons relax at a constant rate. For heavily doped bulk GaAs, the relaxation rate is inversely proportional to electron kinetic energy. The new method demonstrates itself as a valuable way to study the fast initial relaxation which would otherwise need femtosecond pulse laser techniques.

  5. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGES

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  6. Anomalous Enthalpy Relaxation in Vitreous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extreme sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content in vitreous silica, but also from the irreversibility of its glass transition when repeating the calorimetric scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica.

  7. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  8. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-21

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  9. Pharmacologic and Hemodynamic Influences on the Rate of Isovolumic Left Ventricular Relaxation in the Normal Conscious Dog

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Joel S.; Lewinter, Martin M.; Mahler, Felix; Engler, Robert; O'Rourke, Robert A.

    1977-01-01

    We studied the effects of acute pharmacologic and hemodynamic interventions on isovolumic left ventricular relaxation in 19 conscious dogs using micromanometer tip catheters. Isoproterenol (11 studies) augmented peak rate of rise of left ventricular pressure [(+) dP/dt] by 1,275±227 (SE) mm Hg/s (P < 0.001) and dP/dt at an isopressure point of 35 mm Hg during isovolumic relaxation [(−) dP/dt35] by 435±80 mm Hg/s (P < 0.001). Peak (−) dP/dt decreased by 467±89 mm Hg/s (P < 0.002). The time constant, T, derived from the logarithmic fall of pressure during isovolumic relaxation, shortened from 20±2.8 to 14.9±1.8 ms (P < 0.003). Calcium (11 studies) increased peak (+) dP/dt and (−) dP/dt35 (both P < 0.0001); peak (−) dP/dt was unchanged. T shortened from 20.4±1.8 to 17.3±1.5 ms (P < 0.002). Volume (13 studies) did not affect either dP/dt or T. Phenylephrine (13 studies) augmented peak (−) dP/dt, but reduced (−) dP/dt35 (both P < 0.01); T lengthened from 22.1±1.5 to 32.5±1.5 ms (P < 0.01). In 15 studies, rapid atrial pacing increased peak (+) dP/dt and (−) dP/dt35 (both P < 0.01). In the first post-pacing beat, peak (−) dP/dt and (−) dP/dt35 decreased (both P < 0.01), although peak (+) dP/dt increased further. T paralleled values of (−) dP/dt35. In five dogs, beta adrenergic blockade had no significant effect on any variable after calcium, volume, or phenylephrine infusion or during or after atrial pacing when the pre-and post-propranolol states were compared. We conclude that positive inotropic interventions augment both left ventricular contraction and relaxation. The changes in isovolumic relaxation are independent of alterations in sympathetic tone produced by beta-adrenergic blockade. Peak (−) dP/dt may not be a valid measure of left ventricular relaxation rate during acute alterations in inotropic state or afterload. PMID:893662

  10. Augmented REality Sandtables (ARESs) Impact on Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    Virtual Reality Annual International Symposium; 1998 March 14–18; Atlanta (GA). p. 12–19. Darken RP, Peterson B. Spatial orientation, wayfinding, and...ARL-CR-0803 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Augmented REality Sandtable’s (ARES’s) Impact on Learning by Tarah N... REality Sandtable’s (ARES’s) Impact on Learning by Tarah N Schmidt-Daly, Jennifer M Riley, Kelly S Hale, David Yacht, and Jack Hart Design

  11. Tree-augmented Cox proportional hazards models.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaogang; Tsai, Chih-Ling

    2005-07-01

    We study a hybrid model that combines Cox proportional hazards regression with tree-structured modeling. The main idea is to use step functions, provided by a tree structure, to 'augment' Cox (1972) proportional hazards models. The proposed model not only provides a natural assessment of the adequacy of the Cox proportional hazards model but also improves its model fitting without loss of interpretability. Both simulations and an empirical example are provided to illustrate the use of the proposed method.

  12. TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  13. Raman-Augmented Stratospheric-Ozone Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, I. Stuart

    1994-01-01

    Differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) system measures concentration of ozone in stratosphere augmented with subsystem measuring Raman scattering from nitrogen. One of number of DIAL systems used in long-term monitoring of stratospheric ozone. Raman scattering from nitrogen provides data to correct for effects of aerosols. Channels at wavelengths of 332 and 385 nm added to DIAL receiver to measure Raman backscattering from nitrogen molecules in stratosphere. Data-acquisition electronics sample photon counts at a rate of 250 MHz.

  14. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  15. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  16. Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    A ugmented reality (AR) has been part of computergraphics methodology for decades. A number of prototype AR systems have shown the possibilities this...and predicting what might happen in the near future in your environment. We per- formed a domain analysis to determine which AR capa- bilities most...user’s location and then per- forming the (cognitive) task of Mark A. Livingston Naval Research Laboratory Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality

  17. Augmented Lagrangian method for optimal laser control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hai; Dussault, Jean-Pierre; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    1994-06-01

    We use penalty methods derived from Augmented Lagrangians coupled with unitary exponential operator methods to solve the optimal control problem for molecular time-dependent Schodinger equations involving laser pulse excitations. A stable numerical algorithm is presented which propagates directly from initial states to given final states. Results are reported for an analytically solvable model for the complete inversion of a three-state system.

  18. Asian Breast Augmentation: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zelken, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Economic, cultural, and regulatory phenomena may explain recent popularization of implant-based augmentation in Asia; but the collective Eastern experience remains limited. Asian surgeons and their patients rely on evidence-based medicine that originates elsewhere and may not be entirely relevant. Distinct anatomic and cultural features of Asian women warrant a tailored approach to breast augmentation. We explore the Asian experience with a thorough exploration of the recent literature. Methods: A literature search was performed for articles written after 2000, of Asian women who underwent augmentation mammoplasty using MEDLINE, Embase, and Pubmed Databases. Technique and outcomes data were summarized. Results: Twelve articles reported outcomes of 2089 women. Korea contributed most series (English language, 7), followed by China (3), Taiwan (1), and Japan (1). Silicone implants were used in 82.1% of women studied, and almost exclusively after 2009. More round (68.9%) than anatomic implants (31.1%) were placed. Non-inframammary (axillary, areolar, and umbilical) incisions were used in 96.9% of cases. Nearly all implants were positioned below the muscle or fascia; subglandular placement accounted for 1.1% of cases. Implant/nipple malposition (1.3%), capsular contracture (1.9%), hematoma (0.6%), and infection (0.2%) rates were reported in most series. Undesirable scarring was the most frequent complication (7.3%), but was reported only in 4 of 12 series. Conclusions: Studies of Asian women undergoing augmentation mammoplasty are limited, often with ill-defined outcomes and inadequate follow-up. As experience accumulates, an expanding literature relevant to Asian women will provide evidence-based guidelines that improve outcomes and patient satisfaction, and foster innovation. PMID:26893980

  19. Learning by Augmenting Rules and Accumulating Censors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    CONTROLLIMSoFFICIENAME AND ADDRIESS 12. REPORT DATEF Advanced-Research Projects Agency uj18. 11,00 Wrlsorr Blvd .2 UMUERnO~pAGES Aritngton, Virginia. � ag- 4 8 ,f...678 May196 LEARNING BY AUGMENTING RULES AND ACCUMULATING CENSORS by Patrick i. Winston Abstract This paper is a synthesis of several sets of ideas ... ideas about learning from precedents and exercises, ideas about learning using near misses, ideas about generalizing if-then rules and ideas about

  20. Adaptive information design for outdoor augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Neuhöfer, Jan A; Govaers, Felix; El Mokni, Hichem; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Augmented Reality focuses on the enrichment of the user's natural field of view by consistent integration of text, symbols and interactive three-dimensional objects in real time. Placing virtual objects directly into the user's view in a natural context empowers highly dynamic applications. On the other hand, this necessitates deliberate choice of information design and density, in particular for deployment in hazardous environments like military combat scenarios. As the amount of information needed is not foreseeable and strongly depends on the individual mission, an appropriate system must offer adequate adaptation capabilities. The paper presents a prototypical, vehicle-mountable Augmented Reality vision system, designed for enhancing situation awareness in stressful urban warfare scenarios. Tracking, as one of the most crucial challenges for outdoor Augmented Reality, is accomplished by means of a Differential-GPS approach while the type of display to attach can be modified, ranging from ocular displays to standard LCD mini-screens. The overall concept also includes envisioning of own troops (blue forces), for which a multi-sensor tracking approach has been chosen. As a main feature, the system allows switching between different information categories, focusing on friendly, hostile, unidentified or neutral data. Results of an empirical study on the superiority of an in-view navigation cue approach conclude the paper.

  1. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  2. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  3. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  4. Bone augmentation procedures in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chiapasco, Matteo; Casentini, Paolo; Zaniboni, Marco

    2009-01-01

    This review evaluated (1) the success of different surgical techniques for the reconstruction of edentulous deficient alveolar ridges and (2) the survival/success rates of implants placed in the augmented areas. Clinical investigations published in English involving more than 10 consecutively treated patients and mean follow-up of at least 12 months after commencement of prosthetic loading were included. The following procedures were considered: onlay bone grafts, sinus floor elevation via a lateral approach, Le Fort I osteotomy with interpositional grafts, split ridge/ridge expansion techniques, and alveolar distraction osteogenesis. Full-text articles were identified using computerized and hand searches by key words. Success and related morbidity of augmentation procedures and survival/success rates of implants placed in the augmented sites were analyzed. A wide range of surgical procedures were identified. However, it was difficult to demonstrate that one surgical procedure offered better outcomes than another. Moreover, it is not yet known if some surgical procedures, eg, reconstruction of atrophic edentulous mandibles with onlay autogenous bone grafts or maxillary sinus grafting procedures in case of limited/moderate sinus pneumatization, improve long-term implant survival. Every surgical procedure presents advantages and disadvantages. Priority should be given to those procedures which are simpler and less invasive, involve less risk of complications, and reach their goals within the shortest time frame. The main limit encountered in this literature review was the overall poor methodological quality of the published articles. Larger well-designed long-term trials are needed.

  5. Ridge augmentation in an organ transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, D; Burtscher, D

    2016-05-01

    With the continuing progress in medicine, the number of successful organ transplantations has continued to increase, a fact that also concerns dentists and implantologists. Implantology after organ transplantation remains controversial due to the patient's immunocompromised situation and the corresponding risk of infection. Only a few studies on this topic have been reported, with all of them showing the dental implant success rates in transplant patients to be similar to those in healthy subjects. However, immunosuppression has been identified as a contraindication to bone augmentation. Consequently, there is still a lack of knowledge regarding pre-implantology bone grafting procedures. The following case report describes the use of ridge augmentation and extended bilateral sinus lift procedures in a liver transplant patient. The patient was treated with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the upper jaw and was followed up for a total of 28 months after implant insertion. According to the findings presented, pre-implantology augmentation procedures may be performed successfully in immunosuppressed organ transplant patients. Stable peri-implant conditions were shown over a period of more than 2 years. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed to define a safe treatment protocol for these high-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Video-augmented feedback for procedural performance.

    PubMed

    Wittler, Mary; Hartman, Nicholas; Manthey, David; Hiestand, Brian; Askew, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Resident programs must assess residents' achievement of core competencies for clinical and procedural skills. Video-augmented feedback may facilitate procedural skill acquisition and promote more accurate self-assessment. A randomized controlled study to investigate whether video-augmented verbal feedback leads to increased procedural skill and improved accuracy of self-assessment compared to verbal only feedback. Participants were evaluated during procedural training for ultrasound guided internal jugular central venous catheter (US IJ CVC) placement. All participants received feedback based on a validated 30-point checklist for US IJ CVC placement and validated 6-point procedural global rating scale. Scores in both groups improved by a mean of 9.6 points (95% CI: 7.8-11.4) on the 30-point checklist, with no difference between groups in mean score improvement on the global rating scale. In regards to self-assessment, participant self-rating diverged from faculty scoring, increasingly so after receiving feedback. Residents rated highly by faculty underestimated their skill, while those rated more poorly demonstrated increasing overestimation. Accuracy of self-assessment was not improved by addition of video. While feedback advanced the skill of the resident, video-augmented feedback did not enhance skill acquisition or improve accuracy of resident self-assessment compared to standard feedback.

  7. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  8. Medial and Lateral Pectoral Nerve Block with Liposomal Bupivacaine for the Management of Postsurgical Pain after Submuscular Breast Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Mark; Carpin, Kimberly; Piña, Edward M.; Casso, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary: This report describes an ultrasound-guided medial and lateral pectoralis nerve block using liposome bupivacaine, performed before the surgical incision, in a patient undergoing submuscular breast augmentation. The anatomic basis and technique are described. This procedure may be offered to patients undergoing submuscular insertion of a breast implant or tissue expander. Advancements in ultrasound guidance allow for more precise anatomic placement of local anesthetic agents. The injection technique used for this procedure resulted in complete relaxation of the pectoralis major, facilitating the surgical dissection and markedly diminishing postsurgical pain and muscle spasms. PMID:25587516

  9. Temperature relaxation in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Chao; Ren, Haijun; Cai, Huishan; Li, Ding

    2013-10-15

    A magnetic field greatly affects the relaxation phenomena in a plasma when the particles’ thermal gyro-radii are smaller than the Debye length. Its influence on the temperature relaxation (TR) is investigated through consideration of binary collisions between charged particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field within a perturbation theory. The relaxation times are calculated. It is shown that the electron-electron (e-e) and ion-ion (i-i) TR rates first increase and then decrease as the magnetic field grows, and the doubly logarithmic term contained in the electron-ion (e-i) TR rate results from the exchange between the electron parallel and the ion perpendicular kinetic energies.

  10. Stratospheric Relaxation in IMPACT's Radiation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Edis, T; Grant, K; Cameron-Smith, P

    2006-11-13

    While Impact incorporates diagnostic radiation routines from our work in previous years, it has not previously included the stratospheric relaxation required for forcing calculations. We have now implemented the necessary changes for stratospheric relaxation, tested its stability, and compared the results with stratosphere temperatures obtained from CAM3 met data. The relaxation results in stable temperature profiles in the stratosphere, which is encouraging for use in forcing calculations. It does, however, produce a cooling bias when compared to CAM3, which appears to be due to differences in radiation calculations rather than the interactive treatment of ozone. The cause of this bias is unclear as yet, but seems to be systematic and hence cancels out when differences are taken relative to a control simulation.

  11. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  12. Dielectric relaxation in AC powder electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Su, Haibin; Tan, Chuan Seng; Wong, Terence Kin Shun; Teo, Ronnie Jin Wah

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric properties of AC powder electroluminescent devices were measured and analyzed using complex impedance spectroscopy to determine the relaxation processes occurring within the devices. The relaxation processes identified were ascribed to the electrode polarization caused by ion accumulation at the electrode/resin interfaces, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effects at the (ZnS or BaTiO3) particle/resin interfaces, and the dipolar reorientation of polymer chains in the resin matrix. Each relaxation process was represented by its corresponding equivalent circuit component. Space charge polarization at the electrodes were represented by a Warburg element, a resistor, and a constant phase element. The resin matrix, ZnS/resin and BaTiO3/resin interfaces could each be modeled by a resistor and a capacitor in parallel. The simulated equivalent circuits for three different printed structures showed good fitting with their experimental impedance results.

  13. A general relaxation theory of simple liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merilo, M.; Morgan, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple relaxation theory to account for the behavior of liquids under dynamic conditions was proposed. The general dynamical equations are similar in form to the phenomenological relaxation equations used in theories of viscoelasticity, however, they differ in that all the coefficients of the present equations are expressed in terms of thermodynamic and molecular quantities. The theory is based on the concept that flow in a liquid distorts both the radial and the velocity distribution functions, and that relaxation equations describing the return of these functions to their isotropic distributions, characterizing a stationary liquid, can be written. The theory was applied to the problems of steady and oscillatory shear flows and to the propagation of longitudinal waves. In all cases classical results are predicted for strain rates, and an expression for the viscosity of a liquid, simular to the Macedo-Litovitz equation, is obtained.

  14. Substrate stress relaxation regulates cell spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Darnell, Max; Klumpers, Darinka; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Mooney, David J.

    2015-02-01

    Studies of cellular mechanotransduction have converged upon the idea that cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity by gauging resistance to the traction forces they exert on the ECM. However, these studies typically utilize purely elastic materials as substrates, whereas physiological ECMs are viscoelastic, and exhibit stress relaxation, so that cellular traction forces exerted by cells remodel the ECM. Here we investigate the influence of ECM stress relaxation on cell behaviour through computational modelling and cellular experiments. Surprisingly, both our computational model and experiments find that spreading for cells cultured on soft substrates that exhibit stress relaxation is greater than cells spreading on elastic substrates of the same modulus, but similar to that of cells spreading on stiffer elastic substrates. These findings challenge the current view of how cells sense and respond to the ECM.

  15. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  16. Dielectric relaxation of high-k oxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of high-k dielectrics was observed and classified into two parts: extrinsic cause and intrinsic cause. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant (dielectric relaxation), that is the intrinsic frequency dispersion, could not be characterized before considering the effects of extrinsic frequency dispersion. Several mathematical models were discussed to describe the dielectric relaxation of high-k dielectrics. For the physical mechanism, dielectric relaxation was found to be related to the degree of polarization, which depended on the structure of the high-k material. It was attributed to the enhancement of the correlations among polar nanodomain. The effect of grain size for the high-k materials' structure mainly originated from higher surface stress in smaller grain due to its higher concentration of grain boundary. PMID:24180696

  17. Logarithmic relaxation in a kinetically constrained model.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Angel J; Colmenero, Juan

    2006-07-07

    We present Monte Carlo simulations on a coarse-grained model for relaxation in binary mixtures. The liquid structure is substituted by a three-dimensional array of cells. A spin variable is assigned to each cell, with values 0 or 1 denoting, respectively, unexcited and excited local states in a mobility field. Change in local mobility (spin flip) is permitted according to kinetic constraints determined by the mobilities of neighboring cells. We introduce two types of cells ("fast" and "slow") with very different rates for spin flip. Fast cells display anomalous relaxation, characterized by a concave-to-convex crossover in dynamic correlators by changing temperature or composition. At intermediate state points logarithmic relaxation is observed over three time decades. These results display striking analogies with dynamic correlators reported in recent simulations on polymer blends.

  18. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  19. Vibrational relaxation of chloroiodomethane in cold argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2013-10-01

    Electronically exciting the C-I stretch in the molecule chloroiodomethane CH2ClI embedded in a matrix of argon at 12 K can lead to an isomer, iso-chloroiodomethane CH2Cl-I, that features a chlorine iodine bond. By temporally probing the isomer at two different frequencies of 435 nm and 485 nm, multiple timescales for isomerization and vibrational energy relaxation were inferred [T. J. Preston, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 114503 (2011)]. This relaxation is studied theoretically using molecular dynamics by considering 2 and 3 dimensional models. Multiple decay rate constants of the same order of magnitude as the experiment are observed. These decay rate constants are interpreted within the context of the Landau-Teller theory. Sensitivity of the decay rate constants on the bath and system parameters shed more light into the mechanism of vibrational energy relaxation.

  20. Proton relaxation times in cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Subramanian, S.; Chandrakumar, N.; Rajalakshmi, K.R.; Sukumaran, S.S.

    1988-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation parameters (T1, T2) were measured for over 100 malignant and normal tissue samples of various organs of the human body. The purpose of this study was to estimate the reliability of the NMR technique in discriminating normal from malignant tissues. Breast and cervix samples were analyzed by using the malignancy index concept and we were able to distinguish malignant and normal tissue in 17 out of 18 breast samples and 5 out of 7 cervix samples. Since the relaxation data of a normal control population of the other organs were not available, the data for these are reported without any further analysis. The distinction between carcinomas and sarcomas was also made by using the estimated relaxation parameters. Malignancy indices of breast tissue samples for linear least-squares and nonlinear two-parameter and three-parameter least-squares procedures were calculated and used to evaluate the relative efficiencies in discriminating malignant from normal tissues.

  1. Nonlocal and collective relaxation in stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1993-01-01

    The modal response of stellar systems to fluctuations at large scales is presently investigated by means of analytic theory and n-body simulation; the stochastic excitation of these modes is shown to increase the relaxation rate even for a system which is moderately far from instability. The n-body simulations, when designed to suppress relaxation at small scales, clearly show the effects of large-scale fluctuations. It is predicted that large-scale fluctuations will be largest for such marginally bound systems as forming star clusters and associations.

  2. Dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, the dielectric relaxation phenomenon in muscovite mica has been studied over the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 653-853K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The values of the activation energy obtained from electric modulus and conductivity data are found to be nearly similar, suggesting that same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. This type of study will explore the potential of this material for various applications in electrical engineering.

  3. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  4. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  5. Relaxation behavior of polyethylene welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, Valeriy; Iurzhenko, Maksym; Shadrin, Andriy; Galchun, Anatoliy

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents results of the investigation of structure relaxation and thermal properties of PE-80 and PE-100 polyethylene hot-tool butt welds. It was found that a weld with the re-crystallized crystalline structure is formed during the welding of dissimilar types of polyethylene. It is shown that within a long period (1 year) the relaxation occurs not only in amorphous but also in the crystalline phase (crystalline α-form transforms into mixed αβ-form), with respective changes in polyethylene properties.

  6. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  8. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  9. Relaxation methods for unfactored implicit upwind schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation methods are presented for unfactored implicit upwind schemes for hyperbolic equations. The theoretical bases are explained using linear and nonlinear scalar equations; construction of the method for the unsteady Euler equations (nonlinear system) is but a natural extension. One of the important advantages of the above methods vis a vis factored implicit schemes is the possibility of faster convergence to steady state, as illustrated by the results. Several classes of relaxation schemes such as pointwise, linewise, Gauss-Seidel, and non-Gauss-Seidel methods are discussed, along with various strategies for convergence.

  10. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  11. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1993-06-29

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  12. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, Paul; Bernhardt, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  13. A comparison of somatic relaxation and EEG activity in classical progressive relaxation and transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Warrenburg, S; Pagano, R R; Woods, M; Hlastala, M

    1980-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, electroencephalogram (EEG), and four other measures of somatic relaxation were monitored in groups of long-term practitioners of classical Jacobson's progressive relaxation (PR) and Transcendental Meditation (TM) and also in a group of novice PR trainees. All subjects (1) practiced relaxation or meditation (treatment), (2) sat with eyes closed (EC control), and (3) read from a travel book during two identical sessions on different days. EEG findings indicated that all three groups remained primarily awake during treatment and EC control and that several subjects in each group displayed rare theta (5-7 Hz) waveforms. All three groups demonstrated similar decrements in somatic activity during treatment and EC control which were generally of small magnitude (e. g., 2-5% in oxygen consumption). These results supported the "relaxation response" model for state changes in somatic relaxation for techniques practiced under low levels of stress but not the claim that the relaxation response produced a hypometabolic state. Despite similar state effects, the long-term PR group manifested lower levels of somatic activity across all conditions compared to both novice PR and long-term TM groups. We concluded that PR causes a generalized trait of somatic relaxation which is manifested in a variety of settings and situations. Two likely explanations for this trait were discussed: (1) PR practitioners are taught to generalize relaxation to daily activities, and/or (2) according to a "multiprocess model," PR is a "somatic technique," which should produce greater somatic relaxation than does TM, a "cognitive technique." Further research is required to elucidate these possibilities.

  14. Girth augmentation of the penis using flaps "Shaeer's augmentation phalloplasty": the superficial circumflex iliac flap.

    PubMed

    Shaeer, Osama

    2014-07-01

    Penile girth augmentation can be achieved by various techniques, among which are liposuction injection, synthetic grafts, and autologous grafts, with variable outcome, mostly related to viability and receptivity of the tissue used for augmentation. Flaps are considered superior to grafts considering their uninterrupted blood supply. The current work describes long-term experience with penile girth augmentation using the superficial circumflex iliac artery and vein (SCIAV) flap. SCIAV flap was used for penile girth augmentation in 40 candidates who followed up for a minimum of 18 months. The flap was mobilized from the groin region. The penis was pulled out of a peno-pubic incision. The flap was tunneled under the pubic region to emerge at the base of the penis and was sutured to the subcoronal area and on either sides of the spongiosum. Another session was required for either de-bulking of the oversized flap (four overweight candidates), flap pedicle (n = 6), or for donor site scar revision (n = 11). Gain in girth in centimeters was evaluated. Excluding dropouts (n = 8) and participants who had encountered de-bulking of the flap body (n = 4), 40 participants had a preoperative average flaccid girth (AFG) of 9.3 ± 1.1 cm. Immediately postoperative AFG was 14.9 ± 1.1 cm (P < 0.001). Postoperative AFG at the final follow-up visit (a minimum of 18 months) was 14.5 ± 1.1 cm (55.6% gain compared with baseline, P < 0.001). SCIAV flap is a reliable option for long-lasting and sizable penile girth augmentation. One-stage augmentation is more suited for non-obese candidates. A second session may be indicated in overweight candidates or for scar revision. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. High relaxivity MRI contrast agents part 2: Optimization of inner- and second-sphere relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Vincent; Dumas, Stephane; Sun, Wei-Chuan; Troughton, Jeffrey S.; Greenfield, Matthew T.; Caravan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives The observed relaxivity of gadolinium based contrast agents has contributions from the water molecule(s) that bind directly to the gadolinium ion (inner-sphere water), long lived water molecules and exchangeable protons that make up the second-sphere of coordination, and water molecules that diffuse near the contrast agent (outer-sphere). Inner- and second-sphere relaxivity can both be increased by optimization of the lifetimes of the water molecules and protons in these coordination spheres, the rotational motion of the complex, and the electronic relaxation of the gadolinium ion. We sought to identify new high relaxivity contrast agents by systematically varying the donor atoms that bind directly to gadolinium to increase inner-sphere relaxivity and concurrently including substituents that influence the second-sphere relaxivity. Methods Twenty GdDOTA derivatives were prepared and their relaxivity determined in presence and absence of human serum albumin as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Data was analyzed to extract the underlying molecular parameters influencing relaxivity. Each compound had a common albumin-binding group and an inner-sphere donor set comprising the 4 tertiary amine N atoms from cyclen, an α-substituted acetate oxygen atom, two amide oxygen atoms, an inner-sphere water oxygen atom, and a variable donor group. Each amide nitrogen was substituted with different groups to promote hydrogen bonding with second-sphere water molecules. Results Relaxivites at 0.47T and 1.4T, 37 °C, in serum albumin ranged from 16.0 to 58.1 mM−1s−1 and from 12.3 to 34.8 mM−1s−1 respectively. The reduction of inner-sphere water exchange typical of amide donor groups could be offset by incorporating a phosphonate or phenolate oxygen atom donor in the first coordination sphere resulting in higher relaxivity. Amide nitrogen substitution with pendant phosphonate or carboxylate groups increased relaxivity by as much as 88

  16. Relaxation processes in administered-rate pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Arnold, Michael R.

    2000-10-01

    We show how the theory of anelasticity unifies the observed dynamics and proposed models of administered-rate products. This theory yields a straightforward approach to rate model construction that we illustrate by simulating the observed relaxation dynamics of two administered rate products. We also demonstrate how the use of this formalism leads to a natural definition of market friction.

  17. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  18. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0 relaxation is a narrowing of the glass transition width from 7.1°C to 1.4°C, and the ΔHnr term increasing from 0.21 cal/gm to 0.92 cal/gm. In bulk GexSe100-x glasses as x increases to 20%, the length of the polymeric Sen chains between the Ge-crosslinks decreases to n = 2. and the striking relaxation effects nearly vanish. J.C. Phillips, Rep.Prog.Phys. 59 , 1133 (1996). Supported by NSF Grant DMR 08-53957.

  19. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  20. Nonconical Relaxation for Supersonic Potential Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear, three-dimensional effects computed from full potentialflow equation. Nonconical Relaxation program, NCOREL, employs new computational technique for prediction of inviscid, nonlinear supersonic aerodynamics. Unlike conventional linear potential equations, NCOREL utilizes full potential flow equation to predict formation of supercritical crossflow regions, embedded shocks, and bow shocks. NCOREL written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  1. Relaxation in bolted thermoplastic composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Walter J.; Schmitt, Ron R.

    1993-04-01

    The long term effects of the relaxation of fastener clamp-up force on the strength of mechanically fastened joints were investigated through a test program of single-shear joints. Static tests of two graphite/thermoplastic composite materials, IM6/KIII and IM8/APC (HTA), established joint bearing strength as a function of clamp-up force for both protruding head and countersunk fasteners. Test results indicated that joint bearing strength of both materials increased by as much as twenty-eight percent over the range of clamp-up force. Short-term fastener clamp-up force relaxation was monitored with special bolt force sensor washers. The results of these tests indicated that the fastener clamp-up force decreased an average of six percent from the initial value during the short-term room temperature tests and was projected to be as high as sixteen percent after 100,000 hours of service. The relaxation rate at the elevated temperature of 250F was projected to be as high as thirty-seven percent for HTA and sixty percent for KIII after 100,000 hours of service. It was concluded that the short-term relaxation of the clamp-up force did not significantly lower the bearing strength of either material, but an extended exposure to 250F could affect the bearing strength.

  2. Relaxation for Children. (Revised and Expanded Edition.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Jenny

    Intended as a guide to reduce negative stress in children, this book suggests relaxation and meditation techniques to help children cope with stressful events. Part 1 provides an introduction to the format of the book. Part 2 contains summaries of the 10 sessions that make up the program. Each session has six sequential stages in which students…

  3. Collection Development: Relaxation & Meditation, September 1, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lettus, Dodi

    2010-01-01

    One of the first books to document the relationship between stress and physical and emotional health was "The Relaxation Response" by Herbert Benson, M.D., with Miriam Z. Klipper. Originally published in 1975, the book grew out of Benson's observations as a cardiologist and his research as a fellow at Harvard Medical School. Benson's study of…

  4. Dielectric relaxation of CdSe nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantani; Dutta, Alo; Ghosh, Binita; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles of cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been synthesized by soft chemical route using mercaptoethanol as a capping agent. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope measurements show that the prepared sample belongs to sphalerite structure with the average particle size of 25 nm. The band gap of the material is found to be 2.1 eV. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of the sample are measured at various excitation wavelengths. The PL spectra appear in the visible region, and the emission feature depends on the wavelength of the excitation. Impedance spectroscopy is applied to investigate the dielectric relaxation of the sample in a temperature range from 323 to 473 K and in a frequency range from 42 Hz to 1.1 MHz. The complex impedance plane plot has been analyzed by an equivalent circuit consisting of two serially connected R-CPE units, each containing a resistance (R) and a constant phase element (CPE). The dielectric relaxation of the sample is investigated in the electric modulus formalism. The temperature dependent relaxation times obey the Arrhenius law. The Havriliak-Negami model is used to investigate the dielectric relaxation mechanism in the sample. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to obey the power law.

  5. Relaxation processes of densified silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Antoine; Martinez, Valérie; de Ligny, Dominique; Champagnon, Bernard; Martinet, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Densified SiO2 glasses, obtained from different pressure and temperature routes, have been annealed over a wide range of temperatures far below the glass transition temperature (500 °C-900 °C). Hot and cold compressions were useful to separate the effects of pressure and the compression temperature. In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to follow the structural evolution during the thermal relaxation. A similar glass structure between the non-densified silica and the recovered densified silica after the temperature annealing demonstrates a perfect recovery of the non-densified silica glass structure. While the density decreases monotonically, the structural relaxation takes place through a more complex mechanism, which shows that density is not a sufficient parameter to fully characterize the structure of densified silica glass. The relaxation takes place through a transitory state, consisting in an increase of the network inhomogeneity, shown by an increase in the intensity of the D2 band which is associated with 3 membered rings. The activation energy of these processes is 255 ± 45 kJ/mol for the hot compressed samples. The kinetic is overall faster for the cold compressed samples. In that last case, the relaxation is partially activated by internal stresses release.

  6. Electron Spin Relaxation in Irradiated Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    the development and use of ELDOR techniques to study the spectral diffusion in irradiated L-alanine and other irradiated organic solids. Pulsed STELDOR...and pulsed two-frequency ELDOR methods were developed and the details of the implementation is reported. The assignment of relaxation times that gave

  7. Relaxation Treatment for Insomnia: A Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfolk, Robert L.; McNulty, Terrence F.

    1983-01-01

    Compared four relaxation treatments for sleep onset insomnia with a waiting-list control. Treatments varied in presence or absence of muscular tension-release instructions and in foci of attention. Results showed all treatment conditions reduced latency of sleep onset and fatigue; visual focusing best reduced the number of nocturnal awakenings.…

  8. Collection Development: Relaxation & Meditation, September 1, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lettus, Dodi

    2010-01-01

    One of the first books to document the relationship between stress and physical and emotional health was "The Relaxation Response" by Herbert Benson, M.D., with Miriam Z. Klipper. Originally published in 1975, the book grew out of Benson's observations as a cardiologist and his research as a fellow at Harvard Medical School. Benson's study of…

  9. Relaxation/Covert Rehearsal for Problematic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fling, Sheila; McKenzie, Patricia

    A study was conducted to determine whether group relaxation training combined with guided fantasy as a method of covert cognitive rehearsal would be more effective than story-listening or no special treatment in enabling "problematic" children to decrease muscle tension, activity level, and behavior problems and to increase academic performance…

  10. Towards a Calm Baby and Relaxed Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaper, Karen Kennedy

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research findings concerning benefits of particular forms of infant stimulation. Suggests stimulation has a soothing effect on infants. Proposes that, because many parents react with anxiety to infant stress, the use of these stimulation techniques may not only soothe the infant, but also relax the parents. (Author/RC)

  11. Magnetic relaxation in dipolar magnetic nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Barker, Joe; Chantrell, Roy; Friedman, Gary; York-Drexel Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the role of dipolar interactions on thermal relaxation in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems is of fundamental importance in magnetic recording, for optimizing the hysteresis heating contribution in the hyperthermia cancer treatment in biomedicine, or for biological and chemical sensing, for example. In this talk, we discuss our related efforts to quantify the influence of dipolar interactions on thermal relaxation in small clusters of MNPs. Setting up the master equation and solving the associated eigenvalue problem, we identify the observable relaxation time scale spectra for various types of MNP clusters, and demonstrate qualitatively different spectral characteristics depending on the point group of symmetries of the particle arrangement within the cluster - being solely a dipolar interaction effect. Our findings provide insight into open questions related to magnetic relaxation in bulk MNP systems, and may prove to be also of practical relevance, e.g., for improving robustness of methodologies in biological and chemical sensing. OH gratefully acknowledges support from a Marie Curie Intra European Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme under grant agreement PIEF-GA-2010-273014

  12. An Introduction to Relaxed Hand Anthropometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Anthropometric data comparing the length of the relaxed hand with the flat, straightened hand are presented. The correlation coefficient between the hand length in the two positions is not high. A forthcoming comprehensive research program on the anthropometry of the hand is revealed.

  13. Towards a Calm Baby and Relaxed Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaper, Karen Kennedy

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research findings concerning benefits of particular forms of infant stimulation. Suggests stimulation has a soothing effect on infants. Proposes that, because many parents react with anxiety to infant stress, the use of these stimulation techniques may not only soothe the infant, but also relax the parents. (Author/RC)

  14. Nuclear Moment Alignment, Relaxation and Detection Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    of magnetic field gradients and a pair of reverse Helmholtz coils along the y and z axes provide a source of nulcear relaxation (magnetic field...use to detect the noble gas nulcear polarization, was first devised by Cohen-Tannoudji et al12 and first -13 3 used to detect the nuclear polarization

  15. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-01

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.

  16. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti.

    PubMed

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-14

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.

  17. Charge Relaxation Dynamics of an Electrolytic Nanocapacitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology-based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion, and bioelectrochemical sensing devices as well as the controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is employed to simulate an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation-to-anion diffusivity, and electrode separations. The use of a novel continuously varying and Galilean-invariant molecular-speed-dependent relaxation time (MSDRT) with the LB equation recovers a correct microscopic description of the molecular-collision phenomena and enhances the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlaps indicated oscillatory behavior for the ionic current density, in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlaps. Further, at low solvent viscosities and large EDL overlaps, anomalous plasmalike spatial oscillations of the electric field were observed that appeared to be purely an effect of nanoscale confinement. Employing MSDRT in our simulations enabled modeling of the fundamental physics of the transient charge relaxation dynamics in electrochemical systems operating away from equilibrium wherein Nernst–Einstein relation is known to be violated. PMID:25678941

  18. Relaxation for Children. (Revised and Expanded Edition.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Jenny

    Intended as a guide to reduce negative stress in children, this book suggests relaxation and meditation techniques to help children cope with stressful events. Part 1 provides an introduction to the format of the book. Part 2 contains summaries of the 10 sessions that make up the program. Each session has six sequential stages in which students…

  19. Fat Emulsification Measured Using NMR Transverse Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciani, L.; Ramanathan, C.; Tyler, D. J.; Young, P.; Manoj, P.; Wickham, M.; Fillery-Travis, A.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method of measuring the droplet size in oil-in-water emulsions. It is based on changes in the NMR transverse relaxation rate due to the effect of microscopic magnetic susceptibility differences between fat droplets and the surrounding water. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of a series of emulsions with constant oil volume fraction and five different mean droplet sizes, in the range 0.4-20.9 μm, were measured in vitro at 37°C using EPI. While the longitudinal relaxation rate 1/T1 did not change significantly, 1/T2 was observed to increase with mean droplet size. The measured changes in 1/T2 were found to be in good agreement with results predicted from proton random walk simulations, and were also consistent with analytical solutions based on an outer sphere relaxation model. Measurements of 1/T2 on emulsions with a higher oil volume fraction, and on emulsions of a fixed size where the water phase was doped with gadolinium to modulate the susceptibility difference between the phases, also showed the predicted behavior. As part of this study the susceptibility difference between olive oil and water was measured to be 1.55 ppm.

  20. BRIEF REPORT: The colour relaxation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofei, Zhang; Jiarong, Li

    1996-03-01

    Colour diffusion in quark - gluon plasma (QGP) is investigated from the transport equations of QGP. The pure non-Abelian collision term describing the colour diffusion in QGP is obtained, the expression for colour relaxation time is derived and the physical picture of the colour diffusion in QGP is shown.

  1. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated: 15 May 2016 Print Jump to Topic Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS You’ve been to the doctor and you’ve had all of the tests. The diagnosis you’ve been given is irritable ...

  2. Relaxation Treatment for Insomnia: A Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfolk, Robert L.; McNulty, Terrence F.

    1983-01-01

    Compared four relaxation treatments for sleep onset insomnia with a waiting-list control. Treatments varied in presence or absence of muscular tension-release instructions and in foci of attention. Results showed all treatment conditions reduced latency of sleep onset and fatigue; visual focusing best reduced the number of nocturnal awakenings.…

  3. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienfait, Audrey; Pla, Jarryd; Kubo, Yuimaru; Zhou, Xin; Stern, Michael; Lo, Cheuk; Weis, Christopher; Schenkel, Thomas; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Morton, John; Bertet, Patrice

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental relaxation mechanisms for a quantum system. For spins, however, it is negligible compared to non-radiative relaxation processes due to their weak coupling to the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that spontaneous emission is strongly enhanced when the quantum system is placed in a resonant cavity - an effect now used to control the lifetime of systems with an electrical dipole. Here, by coupling donor spins in silicon to a high quality factor superconducting microwave cavity of small mode volume, we reach the regime where spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant spin relaxation channel. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude when the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, showing it can be engineered and controlled on-demand. Our results provide a novel way to initialize any spin into its ground state, with applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also show for the first time an alteration of spin dynamics by quantum fluctuations, a step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of a spin to microwave photons.

  4. Collisionless relaxation in beam-plasma systems

    SciTech Connect

    Backhaus, Ekaterina Yu.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis reports the results from the theoretical investigations, both numerical and analytical, of collisionless relaxation phenomena in beam-plasma systems. Many results of this work can also be applied to other lossless systems of plasma physics, beam physics and astrophysics. Different aspects of the physics of collisionless relaxation and its modeling are addressed. A new theoretical framework, named Coupled Moment Equations (CME), is derived and used in numerical and analytical studies of the relaxation of second order moments such as beam size and emittance oscillations. This technique extends the well-known envelope equation formalism, and it can be applied to general systems with nonlinear forces. It is based on a systematic moment expansion of the Vlasov equation. In contrast to the envelope equation, which is derived assuming constant rms beam emittance, the CME model allows the emittance to vary through coupling to higher order moments. The CME model is implemented in slab geometry in the absence of return currents. The CME simulation yields rms beam sizes, velocity spreads and emittances that are in good agreement with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a wide range of system parameters. The mechanism of relaxation is also considered within the framework of the CME system. It is discovered that the rapid relaxation or beam size oscillations can be attributed to a resonant coupling between different modes of the system. A simple analytical estimate of the relaxation time is developed. The final state of the system reached after the relaxation is complete is investigated. New and accurate analytical results for the second order moments in the phase-mixed state are obtained. Unlike previous results, these connect the final values of the second order moments with the initial beam mismatch. These analytical estimates are in good agreement with the CME model and PIC simulations. Predictions for the final density and temperature are developed that show

  5. Suppression of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin-relaxation mechanism for all spin components in [111] zincblende quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartoixà, X.; Ting, D. Z.-Y.; Chang, Y.-C.

    2005-01-01

    We apply the D’yakonov-Perel’ (DP) formalism to [111]-grown zinc blende quantum wells (QW’s) to compute the spin lifetimes of electrons in the two-dimensional electron gas. We account for both bulk and structural inversion asymmetry (Rashba) effects. We see that, under certain conditions, the spin splitting vanishes to first order in k , which effectively suppresses the DP spin relaxation mechanism for all three spin components. We predict extended spin lifetimes as a result, giving rise to the possibility of enhanced spin storage. We also study [110]-grown QW’s, where the effect of structural inversion asymmetry is to augment the spin relaxation rate of the component perpendicular to the well. We derive analytical expressions for the spin lifetime tensor and its proper axes, and see that they are dependent on the relative magnitude of the BIA- and SIA-induced splittings.

  6. Prominent β-relaxations in yttrium based metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z. G.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-19

    Most metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit weak slow β-relaxation. We report the prominent β-relaxation in YNiAl metallic glass with a wide composition range. Compared with other MGs, the MGs show a pronounced β-relaxation peak and high β-relaxation peak temperature, and the β-relaxation behavior varies significantly with the changes of the constituent elements, which is attributed to the fluctuations of chemical interactions between the components. We demonstrate the correlation between the β-relaxation and the activation of flow units for mechanical behaviors of the MG and show that the MG is model system for studying some controversial issues in glasses.

  7. Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the frequency dependent dielectric relaxation behaviors of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses in the temperature range which covers a supercooled and glassy states. In addition to the α-, Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-, and γ-relaxations in a typical glass forming system, we observed an extra relaxation process between JG β- and γ-relaxations in the dielectric loss spectra. We found that the unknown extra relaxation is a unique property of disaccharide which might originate from the intramolecular motion of flexible glycosidic bond. We also found that the temperature dependence of the JG β-relaxation time changes at 0.95Tg and it might be universal.

  8. Management of a Common Breast Augmentation Complication

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The double-bubble deformity is one of the most common problems in breast augmentation, with or without mastopexy. Classically, open techniques have been used to treat this deformity, including elevation and reconstruction of the inframammary crease or parenchymal scoring. In this study, the author reports experience with a simple, closed technique of serial fat grafting procedures to treat the double-bubble deformity. Twenty-eight patients with double-bubble deformities were retrospectively evaluated. Fifteen patients had undergone primary augmentation, whereas 13 patients had undergone augmentation mastopexy. Eight patients presented with bilateral double-bubble deformity. Up to 3 sessions of fat grafting were performed on each patient, with a mean of 2.1 sessions required for patients in the series. An average of 27 cm3 of fat was injected with each treatment per breast. Fat was injected with a 1.5-mm blunt cannula into the subdermal and superficial breast tissue layers beneath the old inframammary fold. There were no oil cysts, infections, or donor site problems noted in the series. Twelve patients with limited breast tissue underwent magnetic resonance imaging examination at the conclusion of the fat grafting sessions, and no implant injury or disruption was noted. All patients were pleased with the results of treatment, and no revisional surgery was required. This study suggests that fat grafting is an effective treatment of the breast double-bubble deformity. The procedure allows the correction of a challenging deformity with a simple, closed technique which is safe and cost-effective. PMID:26101976

  9. Complications of Fat Transfer for Breast Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Kontoes, Paraskevas; Gounnaris, George

    2017-06-22

    Autologous fat grafting is quite common for breast augmentations as well as for reconstructive breast surgery. Coleman has described the surgical technique of fat grafting. Fat is harvested, and after centrifugation and refinement, blunt infiltration cannulas are used to place the fat through small incisions. The grafted tissue is placed in small aliquots with each withdrawal of the cannula. In order to achieve an aesthetically pleasing contour of the breast, the fat should be layered into different levels from the chest wall to the skin. However, autogenous lipotransfer if not performed lege artis might lead to complications such as fat necrosis, calcification, formation of encapsulated fatty masses (cystic lesions), lymphadenopathy, disfigurement of breast contouring, hypersensitive breasts, itchy nipples. A 36-year old female patient, presented with multiple palpable cystic lesions, disrupted breast contouring, asymmetry, hypersensation and pain during examination, 6 months after autologous fat grafting for breast augmentation elsewhere. The patient had ultrasound and MRI screening, which revealed the multiple bilateral cysts formation in the breast tissue. Surgical removal of the large lesions was performed, and specimens were sent for pathology and cytology consideration and screening. A few months after surgical removal of these lesions and after symptoms subsided, breast augmentation was performed with silicone implants. An aesthetically pleasing result together with relief of the patient's initial symptomatology was achieved. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these evidence-based medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  10. Uterine muscle relaxant drugs for threatened miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Lede, R; Duley, L

    2005-07-20

    Miscarriage is the spontaneous loss of a pregnancy before the fetus is viable. Uterine muscle relaxant drugs have been used for women at risk of miscarriage in the belief they relax uterine muscle, and hence reduce the risk of miscarriage. To assess the effects for the woman and her baby of uterine muscle relaxant drugs when used for threatened miscarriage. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (4 May 2004), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2004). Randomised trials were included, and quasi-randomised trials were excluded. The participants were women with a pregnancy of less than 20 weeks' gestation having a threatened miscarriage. The interventions were any uterine muscle relaxing drugs (including tocolytic and antispasmodic agents) compared with either placebo or no drug. Primary outcomes for the review were miscarriage: defined as spontaneous pregnancy loss before fetal viability, baby death (stillbirth or neonatal death) and maternal death. Both review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility and trial quality, and extracted data. One poor quality trial (170 women) was included. This compared a beta-agonist with placebo. There was a lower risk of intrauterine death associated with the use of a beta-agonist (relative risk (RR) 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12 to 0.51). Preterm birth was the only other outcome reported (RR 1.67, 95% CI 0.63 to 4.38). There is insufficient evidence to support the use of uterine muscle relaxant drugs for women with threatened miscarriage. Any such use should be restricted to the context of randomised trials.

  11. Load Relaxation of Olivine Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. F.; Stone, D. S.; Plookphol, T.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of ferromagnesian olivine (San Carlos, AZ, peridot; Fo90-92) have been deformed in both uniaxial creep and load relaxation under conditions of ambient pressure, T = 1500ºC and pO2 = 10-10 atm; creep stresses were in the range 40 ≤ σ1 (MPa) ≤ 220. The crystals were oriented such that the applied stress was parallel to [011]c, which promotes single slip on the slowest slip system in olivine, (010)[001]. The creep rates at steady state match well the results of earlier investigators, as does the stress sensitivity (a power-law exponent of n = 3.6). Dislocation microstructures, including spatial distribution of low-angle (subgrain) boundaries, additionally confirm previous investigations. Inverted primary creep (an accelerating strain rate with an increase in stress) was observed. Load-relaxation, however, produced a singular response—a single hardness curve—regardless of the magnitude of creep stress or total accumulated strain preceding relaxation. The log-stress v. log-strain rate data from load-relaxation and creep experiments overlap to within experimental error. The load-relaxation behavior is distinctly different that that described for other crystalline solids, where the flow stress is affected strongly by work hardening such that a family of distinct hardness curves is generated, which are related by a scaling function. The response of olivine for the conditions studied, thus, indicates flow that is rate-limited by dislocation glide, reflecting specifically a high intrinsic lattice resistance (Peierls stress).

  12. Dielectric relaxation in liquid crystalline dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmur, D. A.; Luckhurst, G. R.; de la Fuente, M. R.; Diez, S.; Peréz Jubindo, M. A.

    2001-11-01

    Dielectric measurements are reported for liquid crystalline dimers consisting of two mesogenic groups joined through ether links by a flexible alkyl chain. Results are presented for the odd-symmetric dimer, α,ω-bis[(4-cyanobiphenyl)-4'-yloxy]undecane (BCB.O11), and the odd-asymmetric dimer, α-[(4-cyanobiphenyl)-4'-yloxy]-ω-(4-decylanilinebenzylidene-4'-oxy) nonane (CB.O9O.10). The real and imaginary parts of the electric permittivities of aligned samples were measured as functions of frequency over the range 102-109 Hz at temperatures throughout the nematic phase. Measurements were fitted as a function of frequency to the Havriliak-Negami function, and yielded relaxation times and dielectric strengths for the relaxations at each of the temperatures studied. The static dielectric anisotropy for both materials was positive. For BCB.O11, the parallel and perpendicular components of the permittivity exhibited one low frequency and one high frequency relaxation, while the parallel component of the permittivity for CB.O9O.10 showed three relaxations, which were well-separated in frequency. A generic model of liquid crystalline dimers based on mixtures of linear and bent conformers with the tetrahedral angle has been proposed [A. Ferrarini et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 214, 409 (1993)]. This model is used to provide a qualitative interpretation of the dielectric measurements reported. To obtain a satisfactory explanation of the results, it is necessary to include additional conformers having either a hairpin shape or a bent shape with an angle of 180° minus the tetrahedral angle. The temperature dependence measured for the strengths of the dielectric relaxations is explained in terms of changes of the order parameter and changes in the relative probabilities of different shaped conformers.

  13. Enhancement effects of nicotine on neurogenic relaxation responses in the corpus cavernosum in rabbits: the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ozturk Fincan, Gokce Sevim; Vural, Ismail Mert; Ercan, Zeynep Sevim; Sarioglu, Yusuf

    2010-02-10

    Nicotine acts as an agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which belong to a superfamily of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels. We previously demonstrated that nicotine increases the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked nitrergic relaxation responses via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The aim of the present study is to investigate the subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rabbit corpus cavernosum. EFS-evoked relaxation responses were recorded from corpus cavernosum strips obtained from rabbits with an isometric force displacement transducers. Effects of nicotine on EFS-evoked relaxations were examined in pre-contracted tissues. Then the effect of nicotine on the EFS-evoked relaxations was examined in the presence of hexamethonium, dihydro-beta-erythroidine, mecamylamine or alpha-bungarotoxin. In our study, nicotine (3 x 10(-5), 10(-4)) transiently increased nitrergic relaxations induced by EFS in the rabbit isolated corpus cavernosum. While hexamethonium and mecamylamine near totally inhibited or abolished the neurorelaxation response to nicotine (3 x 10(-5)) on EFS, dihydro-beta-erythroidine and alpha-bungarotoxin partially inhibited these responses. These findings demonstrated that the alpha3-beta4, alpha4-beta2 and alpha7 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play role on the nicotine-induced augmentation in EFS-evoked relaxation responses in rabbit corpus cavernosum. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stem Cells for Augmenting Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gulotta, Lawrence V.; Chaudhury, Salma; Wiznia, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Tendon healing is fraught with complications such as reruptures and adhesion formation due to the formation of scar tissue at the injury site as opposed to the regeneration of native tissue. Stem cells are an attractive option in developing cell-based therapies to improve tendon healing. However, several questions remain to be answered before stem cells can be used clinically. Specifically, the type of stem cell, the amount of cells, and the proper combination of growth factors or mechanical stimuli to induce differentiation all remain to be seen. This paper outlines the current literature on the use of stem cells for tendon augmentation. PMID:22190960

  15. Augmented reality for breast tumors visualization.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Ali; Heydarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Gupta, Gopal; Tamil, Lakshman

    2016-08-01

    3D visualization of breast tumors are shown to be effective by previous studies. In this paper, we introduce a new augmented reality application that can help doctors and surgeons to have a more accurate visualization of breast tumors; this system uses a marker-based image-processing technique to render a 3D model of the tumors on the body. The model can be created using a combination of breast 3D mammography by experts. We have tested the system using an Android smartphone and a head-mounted device. This proof of concept can be useful for oncologists to have a more effective screening, and surgeons to plan the surgery.

  16. Heat transfer augmentation in nanofluids via nanofins.

    PubMed

    Vadasz, Peter

    2011-02-18

    Theoretical results derived in this article are combined with experimental data to conclude that, while there is no improvement in the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids beyond the Maxwell's effective medium theory (J.C. Maxwell, Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 1891), there is substantial heat transfer augmentation via nanofins. The latter are formed as attachments on the hot wire surface by yet an unknown mechanism, which could be related to electrophoresis, but there is no conclusive evidence yet to prove this proposed mechanism.

  17. Entrainment and mixing in thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, L.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector flows has been conducted. Measurements of the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean velocity, turbulent intensities and Reynolds stresses were made in two shroud geometries at various primary nozzle pressure ratios. The effects of shroud geometry and primary nozzle pressure ratio on the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean flow field and turbulent field were determined. From these measurements the evolution of mixing within the shroud of the primary flow and entrained fluid was obtained. The relationship between the mean flow field, the turbulent field and the shroud surface pressure distribution is discussed.

  18. B-52 stability augmentation system reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowling, T. C.; Key, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    The B-52 SAS (Stability Augmentation System) was developed and retrofitted to nearly 300 aircraft. It actively controls B-52 structural bending, provides improved yaw and pitch damping through sensors and electronic control channels, and puts complete reliance on hydraulic control power for rudder and elevators. The system has experienced over 300,000 flight hours and has exhibited service reliability comparable to the results of the reliability test program. Development experience points out numerous lessons with potential application in the mechanization and development of advanced technology control systems of high reliability.

  19. Augmented Evolutionary Computation Using Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ae, Tadashi; Kamitani, Motoki

    2006-06-01

    Evolutionary computation is an anticipatory computation for generation of creative sets including the set of sequences. The Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC, in short) is known as one of evolutionary computations, but it is not necessarily efficient because it may make the user tired. Therefore, we propose an improved method, that is, Augmented Interactive Evolutionary Computation (AIEC, in short), where the hypothesis/verification is applied for the generative agent instead of the objective element. We will state this type of evolutionary computation which is realized by a Genetic Programming.

  20. Bridge feedback for active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Lurie, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for broadband damping augmentation of a structural system in which the active members (with feedback control) were developed such that their mechanical input impedance can be electrically adjusted to maximize the energy dissipation rate in the structural system. The active member consists of sensors, an actuator, and a control scheme. A mechanical/electrical analogy is described to model the passive structures and the active members in terms of their impedance representation. As a result, the problem of maximizing dissipative power is analogous to the problem of impedance matching in the electrical network. Closed-loop performance was demonstrated for single- and multiple-active-member controlled truss structure.

  1. Electromagnetic acceleration studies with augmented rails

    SciTech Connect

    Maruo, T.; Fujioka, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Okamoto, A.; Ikuta, K.; Nemoto, K. )

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study of electromagnetic acceleration in the rail-type accelerators with two kinds of rail geometry was carried out experimentally. The accelerators were energized by 200kJ capacitor bank and the weight of loaded projectiles was about 1.3 grams with 10mm {times} 10mm square bore. The attained velocity was 4.3km/s in the augmented accelerator, while it was 3.8km/s in the classical device. In this paper these differences in attained velocity are briefly discussed. A theoretical understanding of the rail erosion is also described.

  2. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. An Experimental Study of Thrust Augmenting Ejectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    A , AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUG’XENTING EJECTORS THESIS William D. Lewis Captain 11. S. Army AFIT/GAE/Ai/83D- 13 1 DTIC Li~i ELECTE JANI...83D-13 AN LEPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUG-M..TING EJECTORS "l•HSIS William D. Levis Captain U. S. Army AF1T/GAAE/AA/$3D- 13 ’jK Approved for public...release; distribution unliaited I V .,, AFIT/GAE/AA/83D- 13 AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUGMENTING EJECTORS THESIS Presented to *he Faculty of the

  4. Active components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation of airway smooth muscle by modulating cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Wakita, Ryo; Emala, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    β-Agonists are the first-line therapy to alleviate asthma symptoms by acutely relaxing the airway. Purified components of ginger relax airway smooth muscle (ASM), but the mechanisms are unclear. By elucidating these mechanisms, we can explore the use of phytotherapeutics in combination with traditional asthma therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine if 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol potentiate β-agonist-induced ASM relaxation; and (2) define the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this potentiation. Human ASM was contracted in organ baths. Tissues were relaxed dose dependently with β-agonist, isoproterenol, in the presence of vehicle, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol (100 μM). Primary human ASM cells were used for cellular experiments. Purified phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D or phospholipase C β enzyme was used to assess inhibitory activity of ginger components using fluorescent assays. A G-LISA assay was used to determine the effects of ginger constituents on Ras homolog gene family member A activation. Significant potentiation of isoproterenol-induced relaxation was observed with each of the ginger constituents. 6-Shogaol showed the largest shift in isoproterenol half-maximal effective concentration. 6-Gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol significantly inhibited PDE4D, whereas 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol also inhibited phospholipase C β activity. 6-Shogaol alone inhibited Ras homolog gene family member A activation. In human ASM cells, these constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase and 8-gingerol decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Isolated components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation in human ASM. This potentiation involves PDE4D inhibition and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. Together with β-agonists, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol may augment existing asthma therapy, resulting in relief of symptoms through

  5. Panic attacks during relaxation and relaxation-induced anxiety: a hyperventilation interpretation.

    PubMed

    Ley, R

    1988-12-01

    This paper explains how a hyperventilation theory of panic disorder accounts for panic attacks during relaxation and relaxation-induced anxiety. The explanation is based on the observation that chronic hyperventilators maintain a steady state of low pCO2 (arterial carbon dioxide tension) and are, therefore, sensitive to relatively small increases in ventilation when metabolism is low and to relatively sudden reductions in metabolism when ventilation is relatively constant. Thus, if minute volume of air breathed remains constant while the metabolic production of CO2 decreases, as in the case of one who sits down or lies down to relax, respiratory hypocapnea may increase in intensity until it produces the familiar sensations which mark the panic attack. Data from relevant studies of panic attacks during relaxation support the hyperventilation interpretation.

  6. Flying Qualities of Relaxed Static Stability Aircraft. Volume I. Flying Qualities Airworthiness Assessment and Flight Testing of Augmented Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    FOR CURRENT PART 25 AIRCRAFT.... 58 3. MAXIMUM FORCES EXERTED ON AIRCRAFT ,CONTROL STICK (LBS) BY MEN AND WOME No ......,.....o...denotes damped Imaginary Pole in Right oscillatory response) Half Plane (denotes divergent oscillation) I/ x Left Half Plane Right Half Plane stable...unstable) I0 0 ýRealI Pole (denotes rReal Pole in Right Half first obrder ’respornse) Plane (denotes diver~gent- Sfirst order response) . -- ttime -T

  7. Augmented versus non-augmented open surgical repair of fresh tendo-achilles injury: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Partha Sarathi; Latif, Abdul; Bhattacharyya, Arunangsu

    2012-11-01

    Injuries to the tendo-achilles in our country are mostly open injuries due to fall or slippage into the Indian type of lavatory pan. After thorough debridement open repair of the tendoachilles is done by non-augmented or augmented method. We studied about the augmented versus non-augmented open surgicalrepair of fresh tendo-achilles injuries. This was a prospective randomised study. It is evaluated from the study that the mean operative time was about 29 minutes longer (p < 0.001) and there was about 7 cm longer (p < 0.001) incision needed in augmented repair group which is statistically significant. The study shows that, the functional outcome of non-augmented repair group is better at 6 months follow-up but at 9 months follow-up functional outcomes are comparable in both non-augmented and augmented repair groups. The time for full functional recovery is more in augmented repair group. So, it is safer to use non-augmented repair technique in the treatment of fresh cases of tendo-achilles injuries due to less operative time, smaller incision, less complications and early functional recovery.

  8. Augmenting Your Own Reality: Student Authoring of Science-Based Augmented Reality Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent…

  9. Augmenting Your Own Reality: Student Authoring of Science-Based Augmented Reality Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent…

  10. Magnetic field induced augmented thermal conduction phenomenon in magneto-nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Ajay; Dhar, Purbarun; Nandi, Tandra; Das, Sarit K.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic field induced augmented thermal conductivity of magneto-nanocolloids involving nanoparticles, viz. Fe2O3, Fe3O4, NiO and Co3O4 dispersed in different base fluids have been reported. Experiments reveal the augmented thermal transport under external applied magnetic field. A maximum thermal conductivity enhancement ∼114% is attained at 7.0 vol% concentration and 0.1 T magnetic flux density for Fe3O4/EG magneto-nanocolloid. However, a maximum ∼82% thermal conductivity enhancement is observed for Fe3O4/kerosene magneto-nanocolloid for the same concentration but relatively at low magnetic flux density (∼0.06 T). Thereby, a strong effect of fluid as well as particle physical properties on the chain formation propensity, leading to enhanced conduction, in such systems is observed. Co3O4 nanoparticles show insignificant effect on the thermal conductivity enhancement of MNCs due to their minimal magnetic moment. A semi-empirical approach has been proposed to understand the mechanism and physics behind the thermal conductivity enhancement under external applied magnetic field, in tune with near field magnetostatic interactions as well as Neel relaxivity of the magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the phenomenon of enhanced thermal conductivity as a function of physical parameters and shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  11. High relaxivity Gd(III)-DNA gold nanostars: investigation of shape effects on proton relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rotz, Matthew W; Culver, Kayla S B; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-03-24

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)-DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA-Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM(-1) s(-1). Additionally, DNA-Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA-Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA-Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)-DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)-DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs.

  12. Chloride channel blockade relaxes airway smooth muscle and potentiates relaxation by β-agonists

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter; Rinderspacher, Alison; Fu, Xiao Wen; Zhang, Yi; Landry, Donald W.; Emala, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Severe bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in asthmatic patients. We questioned whether chloride channels/transporters are novel targets for the relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM). We have screened a library of compounds, derivatives of anthranilic and indanyloxyacetic acid, that were originally developed to antagonize chloride channels in the kidney. We hypothesized that members of this library would be novel calcium-activated chloride channel blockers for the airway. The initial screen of this compound library identified 4 of 20 compounds that relaxed a tetraethylammonium chloride-induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings. The two most effective compounds, compounds 1 and 13, were further studied for their potential to either prevent the initiation of or relax the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contraction or to potentiate β-agonist-mediated relaxation. Both relaxed an established ACh-induced contraction in human and guinea pig ex vivo ASM. In contrast, the prevention of an ACh-induced contraction required copretreatment with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter blocker bumetanide. The combination of compound 13 and bumetanide also potentiated relaxation by the β-agonist isoproterenol in guinea pig tracheal rings. Compounds 1 and 13 hyperpolarized the plasma cell membrane of human ASM cells and blocked spontaneous transient inward currents, a measure of chloride currents in these cells. These functional and electrophysiological data suggest that modulating ASM chloride flux is a novel therapeutic target in asthma and other bronchoconstrictive diseases. PMID:24879056

  13. Prospects for Optogenetic Augmentation of Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Sarah; Schultz, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    The ability to optically control neural activity opens up possibilities for the restoration of normal function following neurological disorders. The temporal precision, spatial resolution, and neuronal specificity that optogenetics offers is unequalled by other available methods, so will it be suitable for not only restoring but also extending brain function? As the first demonstrations of optically "implanted" novel memories emerge, we examine the suitability of optogenetics as a technique for extending neural function. While optogenetics is an effective tool for altering neural activity, the largest impediment for optogenetics in neural augmentation is our systems level understanding of brain function. Furthermore, a number of clinical limitations currently remain as substantial hurdles for the applications proposed. While neurotechnologies for treating brain disorders and interfacing with prosthetics have advanced rapidly in the past few years, partially addressing some of these critical problems, optogenetics is not yet suitable for use in humans. Instead we conclude that for the immediate future, optogenetics is the neurological equivalent of the 3D printer: its flexibility providing an ideal tool for testing and prototyping solutions for treating brain disorders and augmenting brain function.

  14. Prospects for Optogenetic Augmentation of Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Sarah; Schultz, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to optically control neural activity opens up possibilities for the restoration of normal function following neurological disorders. The temporal precision, spatial resolution, and neuronal specificity that optogenetics offers is unequalled by other available methods, so will it be suitable for not only restoring but also extending brain function? As the first demonstrations of optically “implanted” novel memories emerge, we examine the suitability of optogenetics as a technique for extending neural function. While optogenetics is an effective tool for altering neural activity, the largest impediment for optogenetics in neural augmentation is our systems level understanding of brain function. Furthermore, a number of clinical limitations currently remain as substantial hurdles for the applications proposed. While neurotechnologies for treating brain disorders and interfacing with prosthetics have advanced rapidly in the past few years, partially addressing some of these critical problems, optogenetics is not yet suitable for use in humans. Instead we conclude that for the immediate future, optogenetics is the neurological equivalent of the 3D printer: its flexibility providing an ideal tool for testing and prototyping solutions for treating brain disorders and augmenting brain function. PMID:26635547

  15. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  16. Performance of a solar augmented heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedinger, A. F. G.; Tomlinsin, J. J.; Reid, R. L.; Chaffin, D. J.

    Performance results from a test house equipped with a parallel solar augmented heat pump system with off-peak storage and a utility interconnection back-up, are presented. The collector array consisted of 12 air heating flat plates with a 9 l/sec flow. Thermal storage was consigned to a 260 cu ft crushed limestone pebble bed, with an 8.8 kW heat pump used to draw heat from storage during off-peak hours and a 15 kW electrical resistance heater used to charge the pebble bed. Monitoring and data recording were carried out on all energy inputs and outputs of the systems, and a modified TRNSYS program was employed to model the system performance. The data indicate that although the system offered the possibility of reducing the utility capacity, the addition of the solar system did not significantly augment the performance of the heat-pump system, at least in terms of the cost of supplementary electricity.

  17. Augmenting system reliability analyses with observation priors

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Earl; Anderson-cook, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Occasionally, a system may fail a test without an obvious component being at fault. Instead, experts may know that at least one of a set of components has failed, but there is uncertainty about which members in the set were the actual failures. When no further information is available, this missing data may be imputed using standard data augmentation (DA). This process is already used in the current implementation of the JMP complex-system reliability modeling codes. In some cases when this situation arises, there may be some supplemental information about the nature of the failure that suggests which subset of components are more likely to have failed. the behavior of the system during the failure may make certain components more likely candidates, and lead the engineering experts to have certain prior beliefs about what occurred. In this case, it is still known that at least one of a set of components failed, but the experts have some idea that certain failure scenarios are more likely than others. This white paper addresses this situation by modifying the imputation process of data augmentation through the use of an observation prior. This prior is specific to particular observations, and a given outcome which is repeated several times could potentially have different observation priors associated with each occurrence.

  18. NASA's Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agan, Martin; Voisinet, Leeann; Devereaux, Ann

    1998-01-01

    The objective of Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) effort is to develop and integrate advanced technologies for real-time personal display of information relevant to the health and safety of space station/shuttle personnel. The WARP effort will develop and demonstrate technologies that will ultimately be incorporated into operational Space Station systems and that have potential earth applications such as aircraft pilot alertness monitoring and in various medical and consumer environments where augmented reality is required. To this end a two phase effort will be undertaken to rapidly develop a prototype (Phase I) and an advanced prototype (Phase II) to demonstrate the following key technology features that could be applied to astronaut internal vehicle activity (IVA) and potentially external vehicle activity (EVA) as well: 1) mobile visualization, and 2) distributed information system access. Specifically, Phase I will integrate a low power, miniature wireless communication link and a commercial biosensor with a head mounted display. The Phase I design will emphasize the development of a relatively small, lightweight, and unobtrusive body worn prototype system. Phase II will put increased effort on miniaturization, power consumption reduction, increased throughput, higher resolution, and ``wire removal'' of the subsystems developed in Phase I.

  19. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Rajat; Kumar, N Nanda; Ravindran, C

    2015-12-01

    Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas.

  20. HDF Augmentation: Interoperability in the Last Mile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plutchak, J.; Folk, M. J.; Habermann, T.; Knox, L.

    2014-12-01

    Science data files are generally written to serve well-defined purposes for a small science teams. In many cases, the organization of the data and the metadata are designed for custom tools developed and maintained by and for the team. Using these data outside of this context many times involves restructuring, re-documenting, or reformatting the data. This expensive and time-consuming process usually prevents data reuse and thus decreases the total life-cycle value of the data considerably. If the data are unique or critically important to solving a particular problem, they can be modified into a more generally usable form or metadata can be added in order to enable reuse. This augmentation process can be done to enhance data for the intended purpose or for a new purpose, to make the data available to new tools and applications, to make the data more conventional or standard, or to simplify preservation of the data. The HDF Group has addressed augmentation needs in many ways: by adding extra information, by renaming objects or moving them around in the file, by reducing complexity of the organization, and sometimes by hiding data objects that are not understood by specific applications. In some cases these approaches require re-writing the data into new files and in some cases it can be done externally, without affecting the original file. We will describe and compare several examples of each approach.