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Sample records for augments chemoreflex control

  1. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists.

  2. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  3. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  4. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  5. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  6. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  7. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  8. Control augmentation for lateral control wheel steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulkes, R. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flight control system design for lateral control wheel steering is discussed. Two alternate designs are presented. The first design is a roll-rate command, bank-angle hold system with a wings-level track-hold submode. The second is a curved-track-hold system. Design details and real-time flight simulator results are included.

  9. Interaction between cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and chemoreflex is mediated by the NTS AT1 receptors in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Zhong; Gao, Lie; Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H; Wang, Wei

    2008-09-01

    Several sympathoexcitatory reflexes, such as the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) and arterial chemoreflex, are significantly augmented and contribute to elevated sympathetic outflow in chronic heart failure (CHF). This study was undertaken to investigate the interaction between the CSAR and the chemoreflex in CHF and to further identify the involvement of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) in this interaction. CHF was induced in rats by coronary ligation. Acute experiments were performed in anesthetized rats. The chemoreflex-induced increase in cardiovascular responses was significantly greater in CHF than in sham-operated rats after either chemical or electrical activation of the CSAR. The inhibition of the CSAR by epicardial lidocaine reduced the chemoreflex-induced effects in CHF rats but not in sham-operated rats. Bilateral NTS injection of the AT1R antagonist losartan (10 and 100 pmol) dose-dependently decreased basal sympathetic nerve activity in CHF but not in sham-operated rats. This procedure also abolished the CSAR-induced enhancement of the chemoreflex. The discharge and chemosensitivity of NTS chemosensitive neurons were significantly increased following the stimulation of the CSAR in sham-operated and CHF rats, whereas CSAR inhibition by epicardial lidocaine significantly attenuated chemosensitivity of NTS neurons in CHF but not in sham-operated rats. Finally, the protein expression of AT1R in the NTS was significantly higher in CHF than in sham-operated rats. These results demonstrate that the enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent input contributes to an excitatory effect of chemoreflex function in CHF, which is mediated by an NTS-AT1R-dependent mechanism.

  10. A preliminary look at control augmented dynamic response of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Jewell, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The augmentation of structural characteristics, mass, damping, and stiffness through the use of control theory in lieu of structural redesign or augmentation was reported. The standard single-degree-of-freedom system was followed by a treatment of the same system using control augmentation. The system was extended to elastic structures using single and multisensor approaches and concludes with a brief discussion of potential application to large orbiting space structures.

  11. Chemoreflexes, Sleep Apnea, and Sympathetic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Mansukhani, Meghna P.; Kara, Tomas; Caples, Sean; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension are closely linked conditions. Disordered breathing events in OSA are characterized by increasing efforts against an occluded airway whilst asleep, resulting in a marked sympathetic response. This is predominantly due to hypoxemia activating the chemoreflexes, resulting in reflex increases in sympathetic neural outflow. In addition, apnea, and the consequent lack of inhibition of the sympathetic system that occurs with lung inflation during normal breathing, potentiates central sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic activation persists into the daytime, and is thought to contribute to hypertension and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This review discusses chemoreflex physiology and sympathetic modulation during normal sleep, as well as the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, its extension into wakefulness, and changes after treatment. Evidence supporting the role of the peripheral chemoreflex in the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, including in the context of co-morbid obesity, metabolic syndrome and systemic hypertension is reviewed. Finally, alterations in cardiovascular variability and other potential mechanisms that might play a role in the autonomic imbalance seen in OSA are also discussed. PMID:25097113

  12. Dopamine microinjected into brainstem of awake rats affects baseline arterial pressure but not chemoreflex responses.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Waldyr M; Granjeiro, Erica M; Bongamba, Leni G H; Mendes, Ricardo A; Machado, Benedito H

    2010-06-24

    Dopamine (DA) is a neuromodulator in the brainstem involved with the generation and modulation of the autonomic and respiratory activities. Here we evaluated the effect of microinjection of DA intracisterna magna (icm) or into the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii (cNTS) on the baseline cardiovascular and respiratory parameters and on the cardiovascular and respiratory responses to chemoreflex activation in awake rats. Guide cannulas were implanted in cisterna magna or cNTS and femoral artery and vein were catheterized. Respiratory frequency (f(R)) was measured by whole-body plethysmography. Chemoreflex was activated with KCN (iv) before and after microinjection of DA icm or into the cNTS bilaterally while mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and f(R) were recorded. Microinjection of DA icm (n=13), but not into the cNTS (n=8) produced a significant decrease in baseline MAP (-15+/-1 vs 1+/-1mmHg) and HR (-55+/-11 vs -11+/-17bpm) in relation to control (saline with ascorbic acid, n=9) but no significant changes in baseline f(R). Microinjection of DA icm or into the cNTS produced no significant changes in the pressor, bradycardic and tachypneic responses to chemoreflex activation. These data show that a) DA icm affects baseline cardiovascular regulation, but not baseline f(R) and autonomic and respiratory components of chemoreflex and b) DA into the cNTS does not affect either the autonomic activity to the cardiovascular system or the autonomic and respiratory responses of chemoreflex activation.

  13. Noradrenergic inhibitory modulation in the caudal commissural NTS of the pressor response to chemoreflex activation in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Silva de Oliveira, Luciana C; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2007-10-30

    In the present study we evaluated the possible modulatory role of noradrenaline on the neurotransmission of the peripheral chemoreflex afferents in the caudal commissural NTS of awake rats. To reach this goal we performed a dose-response curve to microinjection of increasing dose of noradrenaline into the caudal commissural NTS of awake rats and then the threshold dose, which produces minor changes in the baseline mean arterial pressure, was selected to be used in the chemoreflex experiment. The peripheral chemoreflex was activated with KCN before and after bilateral microinjections of noradrenaline (5 nMol/50 nL, threshold dose) into the NTS. The data show that microinjection of noradrenaline into the caudal NTS produced a significant reduction in the pressor response to the chemoreflex 30 s after the injection when compared to the control response (30+/-6 vs. 49+/-3 mm Hg) but no significant changes in the bradycardic response. The data indicate that noradrenaline in the caudal commissural NTS of awake rats may play an important inhibitory neuromodulatory role on the processing of the pressor/sympathoexcitatory component of the chemoreflex.

  14. Control-Volume Analysis Of Thrust-Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1990-01-01

    New method of analysis of transient flow in thrust-augmenting ejector based on control-volume formulation of governing equations. Considered as potential elements of propulsion subsystems of short-takeoff/vertical-landing airplanes.

  15. Backstepping Control Augmented by Neural Networks For Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkheiri, Mohammed; Boudjema, Farès

    2008-06-01

    A new control approach is proposed to address the tracking problem of robot manipulators. In this approach, one relies first on a partially known model to the system to be controlled using a backstepping control strategy. The obtained controller is then augmented by an online neural network that serves as an approximator for the neglected dynamics and modeling errors. The proposed approach is systematic, and exploits the known nonlinear dynamics to derive the stepwise virtual stabilizing control laws. At the final step, an augmented Lyapunov function is introduced to derive the adaptation laws of the network weights. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is demonstrated through computer simulation on PUMA 560 robot.

  16. Augmented thermal bus wih multiple thermoelectric devices individually controlled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurality of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pumps to maintain isothermality in the source.

  17. Sympathetic neural outflow and chemoreflex sensitivity are related to spontaneous breathing rate in normal men.

    PubMed

    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; van de Borne, Philippe; Montano, Nicola; Hering, Dagmara; Kara, Tomas; Somers, Virend K

    2006-01-01

    Respiration contributes importantly to short-term modulation of sympathetic nerve activity. However, the relationship between spontaneous breathing rate, chemoreflex function, and direct measures of sympathetic traffic in healthy humans has not been studied previously. We tested the hypothesis that muscle sympathetic nerve activity and chemoreflex sensitivity are linked independently to respiratory rate in normal subjects. We studied 69 normal male subjects aged 29.6+/-8.1 years. Subjects were subdivided according to the tertiles of respiratory rate distributions. Mean respiration rate was 10.6 breaths/min in the first tertile, 14.8 breaths/min in the second tertile, and 18.0 breaths/min in the third tertile. Subjects from the third tertile (faster respiratory rate) had greater sympathetic activity than subjects from the first tertile (slower respiratory rate; 29+/-3 versus 17+/-2 bursts/min; P<0.001). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed that only respiratory rate was linked independently to sympathetic activity (r=0.42; P<0.001). In comparison to subjects with slow respiratory rate, subjects with fast respiratory rate had greater increases in minute ventilation during both hypercapnia (7.3+/-0.8 versus 3.2+/-1.0 L/min; P=0.005) and hypoxia (5.7+/-0.8 versus 2.4+/-0.7 L/min; P=0.007). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity and chemoreflex sensitivity are linked to spontaneous respiratory rate in normal humans. Faster respiratory rate is associated with higher levels of sympathetic traffic and potentiated responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Spontaneous breathing frequency, central sympathetic outflow, and chemoreflex sensitivity exhibit significant and hitherto unrecognized interactions in the modulation of neural circulatory control.

  18. Experimental Investigations of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Stability Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, David J.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    A team of researchers from the Army Research Laboratory, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Bell Helicopter-Textron, Inc. have completed hover-cell and wind-tunnel testing of a 1/5-size aeroelastically-scaled tiltrotor model using a new active control system for stability augmentation. The active system is based on a generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm originally developed at NASA LaRC in 1997 for un-known disturbance rejection. Results of these investigations show that GPC combined with an active swashplate can significantly augment the damping and stability of tiltrotors in both hover and high-speed flight.

  19. Digital control of highly augmented combat rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed concepts for the next generation of combat helicopters are to be embodied in a complex, highly maneuverable, multiroled vehicle with avionics systems. Single pilot and nap-of-the-Earth operations require handling qualities which minimize the involvement of the pilot in basic stabilization tasks. To meet these requirements will demand a full authority, high-gain, multimode, multiply-redundant, digital flight-control system. The gap between these requirements and current low-authority, low-bandwidth operational rotorcraft flight-control technology is considerable. This research aims at smoothing the transition between current technology and advanced concept requirements. The state of the art of high-bandwidth digital flight-control systems are reviewed; areas of specific concern for flight-control systems of modern combat are exposed; and the important concepts are illustrated in design and analysis of high-gain, digital systems with a detailed case study involving a current rotorcraft system. Approximate and exact methods are explained and illustrated for treating the important concerns which are unique to digital systems.

  20. Pilots Rate Augmented Generalized Predictive Control for Reconfiguration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soloway, Don; Haley, Pam

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report the results from the research being conducted in reconfigurable fight controls at NASA Ames. A study was conducted with three NASA Dryden test pilots to evaluate two approaches of reconfiguring an aircraft's control system when failures occur in the control surfaces and engine. NASA Ames is investigating both a Neural Generalized Predictive Control scheme and a Neural Network based Dynamic Inverse controller. This paper highlights the Predictive Control scheme where a simple augmentation to reduce zero steady-state error led to the neural network predictor model becoming redundant for the task. Instead of using a neural network predictor model, a nominal single point linear model was used and then augmented with an error corrector. This paper shows that the Generalized Predictive Controller and the Dynamic Inverse Neural Network controller perform equally well at reconfiguration, but with less rate requirements from the actuators. Also presented are the pilot ratings for each controller for various failure scenarios and two samples of the required control actuation during reconfiguration. Finally, the paper concludes by stepping through the Generalized Predictive Control's reconfiguration process for an elevator failure.

  1. Space Launch System Implementation of Adaptive Augmenting Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.

    2014-01-01

    Given the complex structural dynamics, challenging ascent performance requirements, and rigorous flight certification constraints owing to its manned capability, the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle requires a proven thrust vector control algorithm design with highly optimized parameters to provide stable and high-performance flight. On its development path to Preliminary Design Review (PDR), the SLS flight control system has been challenged by significant vehicle flexibility, aerodynamics, and sloshing propellant. While the design has been able to meet all robust stability criteria, it has done so with little excess margin. Through significant development work, an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm has been shown to extend the envelope of failures and flight anomalies the SLS control system can accommodate while maintaining a direct link to flight control stability criteria such as classical gain and phase margin. In this paper, the work performed to mature the AAC algorithm as a baseline component of the SLS flight control system is presented. The progress to date has brought the algorithm design to the PDR level of maturity. The algorithm has been extended to augment the full SLS digital 3-axis autopilot, including existing load-relief elements, and the necessary steps for integration with the production flight software prototype have been implemented. Several updates which have been made to the adaptive algorithm to increase its performance, decrease its sensitivity to expected external commands, and safeguard against limitations in the digital implementation are discussed with illustrating results. Monte Carlo simulations and selected stressing case results are also shown to demonstrate the algorithm's ability to increase the robustness of the integrated SLS flight control system.

  2. Space Launch System Implementation of Adaptive Augmenting Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2014-01-01

    Given the complex structural dynamics, challenging ascent performance requirements, and rigorous flight certification constraints owing to its manned capability, the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle requires a proven thrust vector control algorithm design with highly optimized parameters to robustly demonstrate stable and high performance flight. On its development path to preliminary design review (PDR), the stability of the SLS flight control system has been challenged by significant vehicle flexibility, aerodynamics, and sloshing propellant dynamics. While the design has been able to meet all robust stability criteria, it has done so with little excess margin. Through significant development work, an adaptive augmenting control (AAC) algorithm previously presented by Orr and VanZwieten, has been shown to extend the envelope of failures and flight anomalies for which the SLS control system can accommodate while maintaining a direct link to flight control stability criteria (e.g. gain & phase margin). In this paper, the work performed to mature the AAC algorithm as a baseline component of the SLS flight control system is presented. The progress to date has brought the algorithm design to the PDR level of maturity. The algorithm has been extended to augment the SLS digital 3-axis autopilot, including existing load-relief elements, and necessary steps for integration with the production flight software prototype have been implemented. Several updates to the adaptive algorithm to increase its performance, decrease its sensitivity to expected external commands, and safeguard against limitations in the digital implementation are discussed with illustrating results. Monte Carlo simulations and selected stressing case results are shown to demonstrate the algorithm's ability to increase the robustness of the integrated SLS flight control system.

  3. Synthesis of the unmanned aerial vehicle remote control augmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    Medium size Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) usually flies as an autonomous aircraft including automatic take-off and landing phases. However in the case of the on-board control system failure, the remote steering is using as an emergency procedure. In this reason, remote manual control of unmanned aerial vehicle is used more often during take-of and landing phases. Depends on UAV take-off mass and speed (total energy) the potential crash can be very danger for airplane and environment. So, handling qualities of UAV is important from pilot-operator point of view. In many cases the dynamic properties of remote controlling UAV are not suitable for obtaining the desired properties of the handling qualities. In this case the control augmentation system (CAS) should be applied. Because the potential failure of the on-board control system, the better solution is that the CAS algorithms are placed on the ground station computers. The method of UAV handling qualities shaping in the case of basic control system failure is presented in this paper. The main idea of this method is that UAV reaction on the operator steering signals should be similar - almost the same - as reaction of the "ideal" remote control aircraft. The model following method was used for controller parameters calculations. The numerical example concerns the medium size MP-02A UAV applied as an aerial observer system.

  4. Synthesis of the unmanned aerial vehicle remote control augmentation system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczyk, Andrzej

    2014-12-10

    Medium size Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) usually flies as an autonomous aircraft including automatic take-off and landing phases. However in the case of the on-board control system failure, the remote steering is using as an emergency procedure. In this reason, remote manual control of unmanned aerial vehicle is used more often during take-of and landing phases. Depends on UAV take-off mass and speed (total energy) the potential crash can be very danger for airplane and environment. So, handling qualities of UAV is important from pilot-operator point of view. In many cases the dynamic properties of remote controlling UAV are not suitable for obtaining the desired properties of the handling qualities. In this case the control augmentation system (CAS) should be applied. Because the potential failure of the on-board control system, the better solution is that the CAS algorithms are placed on the ground station computers. The method of UAV handling qualities shaping in the case of basic control system failure is presented in this paper. The main idea of this method is that UAV reaction on the operator steering signals should be similar - almost the same - as reaction of the 'ideal' remote control aircraft. The model following method was used for controller parameters calculations. The numerical example concerns the medium size MP-02A UAV applied as an aerial observer system.

  5. Control and Augmentation of Passive Porosity through Transpiration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Bauer, Steven X. S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for controlling pressure loading of a member caused by a fluid moving past the member or the member moving through a fluid. The device consists of a porous skin mounted over the solid surface of the member and separated from the solid surface by a plenum. Fluid from an area exerting high pressure on the member may enter the plenum through the porous surface and exit into an area exerting a lower pressure on the member, thus controlling pressure loading of the member. A transpirational control device controls the conditions within the plenum thus controlling the side force and yaw moment on the forebody.

  6. Antagonism of glutamate receptors in the intermediate and caudal NTS of awake rats produced no changes in the hypertensive response to chemoreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Benedito H; Bonagamba, Leni G H

    2005-01-15

    The role of excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the neurotransmission of the sympathoexcitatory component of the chemoreflex (pressor response) in the intermediate and caudal aspects of the commissural nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of awake rats was evaluated. Microinjection of kynurenic acid, a non-selective antagonist of EAA receptors, into the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS produced a large increase in the baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP), which may reduce the magnitude of the pressor response to chemoreflex activation. To avoid this problem sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was infused (i.v.) after microinjections of kynurenic acid (2 nmol/50 nl) into the NTS, in order to normalize the MAP and then the chemoreflex was activated and the magnitude of the pressor response evaluated. Microinjection of kynurenic acid into the intermediate (bilaterally) and caudal (midline) commissural NTS (n=6) produced a significant increase in baseline MAP (103+/-5 vs. 137+/-6 mm Hg) normalized by SNP infusion (107+/-4 mm Hg) and under this experimental condition the pressor response to chemoreflex activation was not statistically different in relation to the control (37+/-7 vs. 44+/-6 mm Hg). Bilateral microinjections of kynurenic acid into the caudal NTS (n=8) also produced a significant increase in baseline MAP (109+/-4 vs. 145+/-6 mm Hg) normalized by SNP infusion (109+/-6 mm Hg). After normalization of MAP, the pressor response to chemoreflex activation at 3 (34+/-6 mm Hg) and 10 min (37+/-6 mm Hg) was also not different in relation to the control (46+/-5 mm Hg). These data indicate that the antagonism of EAA receptors simultaneously in the intermediate (bilateral) and caudal (midline) commissural NTS or only in the caudal commissural NTS (bilateral) of awake rats had no effect on the hypertensive response to chemoreflex activation. We suggest that neurotransmitter other than l-glutamate may take part in the neurotransmission of the sympathoexcitatory component

  7. CMG-Augmented Control of a Hovering VTOL Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K. B.; Moerder, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes how Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs) can be used for stability augmentation to a thrust vectoring system for a generic Vertical Take-Off and Landing platform. The response characteristics of the platform which uses only thrust vectoring and a second configuration which includes a single-gimbal CMG array are simulated and compared for hovering flight while subject to severe air turbulence. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of a CMG array in its ability to significantly reduce the agility requirement on the thrust vectoring system. Albeit simplifying physical assumptions on a generic CMG configuration, the numerical results also suggest that reasonably sized CMGs will likely be sufficient for a small hovering vehicle.

  8. An augmented reality binocular system (ARBS) for air traffic controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulbrook, Jim E.; Ruffner, John W.; Labbe, Roger

    2008-04-01

    The primary means by which air traffic tower controllers obtain information is through direct out-thewindow viewing, although a considerable amount of time is spent looking at electronic displays and other information sources inside the tower cab. The Air Force Research Laboratory sponsored the development of a prototype Augmented Reality Binocular System (ARBS) that enhances tower controller performance, situation awareness, and safety. The ARBS is composed of a virtual binocular (VB) that displays real-time imagery from high resolution telephoto cameras and sensors mounted on pan/tilt units (PTUs). The selected PTU tracks to the movement of the VB, which has an inertial heading and elevation sensor. Relevant airfield situation text and graphic depictions that identify airfield features are overlaid on the imagery. In addition, the display is capable of labeling and tracking vehicles on which an Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) system has been installed. The ARBS provides air traffic controllers and airfield security forces with the capability to orient toward, observe, and conduct continuous airfield operations and surveillance/security missions from any number of viewing aspects in limited visibility conditions. In this paper, we describe the ARBS in detail, discuss the results of a Usability Test of the prototype ARBS, and discuss ideas for follow-on efforts to develop the ARBS to a fieldable level.

  9. Spinal cord injury is associated with enhanced peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Amy T; Sankari, Abdulghani; Badr, M Safwan

    2016-09-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is prevalent in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), but the exact mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether peripheral chemoreceptors activity is enhanced in individuals with chronic SCI compared to abled-bodied control subjects using CO2 and O2 chemical tests. In protocol (1) 30 subjects (8 cervical [cSCI], 7 thoracic [tSCI] and 15 able-bodied [AB]) were studied to determine the ventilatory response to hyperoxia during wakefulness in the supine position. In protocol (2) 24 subjects (6 cSCI, 6 tSCI, and 12 AB subjects) were studied to determine the ventilatory response to a single breath of CO2 (SBCO2). The chemoreflex response to SBCO2 was calculated as ∆VE/∆CO2 (L/min/mmHg). The ventilatory response to hyperoxia was defined as the % change in VT following acute hyperoxia compared to preceding baseline. During hyperoxia SCI subjects had a significant decrease in VT and VE (63.4 ± 21.7% and 63.1 ± 23.0% baseline, respectively, P < 0.05) compared to AB (VT: 87.1 ± 14.3% and VE: 91.38 ± 15.1% baseline, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between cSCI and tSCI in the VT or VE during hyperoxia (P = NS). There was no significant correlation between AHI and VE% baseline (r = -0.28) in SCI and AB (n = 30). SCI participants had a greater ventilatory response to an SBCO2 than AB (0.78 ± 0.42 L/min/mmHg vs. 0.26 ± 0.10 L/min/mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05). Peripheral ventilatory chemoresponsiveness is elevated in individuals with chronic SCI compared to able-bodied individuals. PMID:27597767

  10. Effects of simulated reflux laryngitis on laryngeal chemoreflexes in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Carreau, Anne-Marie; Patural, Hugues; Samson, Nathalie; Doueik, Alexandre A; Hamon, Julie; Fortier, Pierre-Hugues; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2011-08-01

    It has been suggested that reflux laryngitis (RL) is involved in apneas-bradycardias of the newborn. The aim of the present study was to develop a unique RL model in newborn lambs to test the hypothesis that RL enhances the cardiorespiratory components of the laryngeal chemoreflexes (LCR) in the neonatal period. Gastric juice surrogate (2 ml of normal saline solution with HCl pH 2 + pepsin 300 U/ml) (RL group, n = 6) or normal saline (control group, n = 6) was repeatedly injected onto the posterior aspect of the larynx, 3 times a day for 6 consecutive days, via a retrograde catheter introduced into the cervical esophagus. Lambs instilled with gastric juice surrogate presented clinical signs of RL, as well as moderate laryngitis on histological observation. Laryngeal chemoreflexes were thereafter induced during sleep by injection of 0.5 ml of HCl (pH 2), ewe's milk, distilled water or saline into the laryngeal vestibule via a chronic, transcutaneous supraglottal catheter. Overall, RL led to a significantly greater respiratory inhibition compared with the control group during LCR, including longer apnea duration (P = 0.01), lower minimal respiratory rate (P = 0.002), and a more prominent decrease in arterial hemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) (P = 0.03). No effects were observed on cardiac variables. In conclusion, 1) our unique neonatal ovine model presents clinical and histological characteristics of RL; and 2) the presence of RL in newborn lambs increases the respiratory inhibition observed with LCR, at times leading to severe apneas and desaturations.

  11. Order of events matter: comparing discrete models for optimal control of species augmentation.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Erin N; Gross, Louis J; Lenhart, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    We investigate optimal timing of augmentation of an endangered/threatened species population in a target region by moving individuals from a reserve or captive population. This is formulated as a discrete-time optimal control problem in which augmentation occurs once per time period over a fixed number of time periods. The population model assumes the Allee effect growth functions in both target and reserve populations and the control objective is to maximize the target and reserve population sizes over the time horizon while accounting for costs of augmentation. Two possible orders of events are considered for different life histories of the species relative to augmentation time: move individuals either before or after population growth occurs. The control variable is the proportion of the reserve population to be moved to the target population. We develop solutions and illustrate numerical results which indicate circumstances for which optimal augmentation strategies depend upon the order of events. PMID:22882021

  12. Activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors inhibits regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreflex.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2012-09-01

    Previously we have shown that adenosine operating via the A(1) receptor subtype may inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the baroreflex arc within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and differentially increase renal (RSNA), preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA>RSNA≥LSNA). Since the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex and the arterial baroreflex are mediated via similar medullary pathways, and glutamate is a primary transmitter in both pathways, it is likely that adenosine operating via A(1) receptors in the NTS may differentially inhibit regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors. Therefore, in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 37) we compared regional sympathoinhibition evoked by the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (activated with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT(3) receptor agonist phenylbiguanide, PBG, 1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors [microinjections of N(6)-cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl]. Activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors evoked differential, dose-dependent sympathoinhibition (RSNA>ASNA>LSNA), and decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. These differential sympathetic responses were uniformly attenuated in dose-dependent manner by microinjections of CPA into the NTS. Volume control (n = 11) and blockade of adenosine receptor subtypes in the NTS via 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT, 1 nmol in 100 nl) (n = 9) did not affect the reflex responses. We conclude that activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors uniformly inhibits neural and cardiovascular cardiopulmonary chemoreflex responses. A(1) adenosine receptors have no tonic modulatory effect on this reflex under normal conditions. However, when adenosine is released into the NTS (i.e., during stress or severe hypotension/ischemia), it may serve as negative feedback regulator for depressor and sympathoinhibitory reflexes

  13. Carotid body chemoreflex: a driver of autonomic abnormalities in sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This article presents emerging evidence for heightened carotid body chemoreflex activity as a major driver of sympathetic activation and hypertension in sleep apnoea patients. What advances does it heighlight? This article discusses the recent advances on cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the exaggerated chemoreflex in experimental models of sleep apnoea. The carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen concentration, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of the sympathetic tone, blood pressure and breathing. Sleep apnoea is a disease of the respiratory system that affects several million adult humans. Apnoeas occur during sleep, often as a result of obstruction of the upper airway (obstructive sleep apnoea) or because of defective respiratory rhythm generation by the CNS (central sleep apnoea). Patients with sleep apnoea exhibit several co-morbidities, with the most notable among them being heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Emerging evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia resulting from periodic apnoea stimulates the carotid body, and the ensuing chemoreflex mediates the increased sympathetic tone and hypertension in sleep apnoea patients. Rodent models of intermittent hypoxia that simulate the O2 saturation profiles encountered during sleep apnoea have provided important insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the heightened carotid body chemoreflex. This article describes how intermittent hypoxia affects the carotid body function and discusses the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the exaggerated chemoreflex. PMID:27474260

  14. Menstrual cycle and sex effects on sympathetic responses to acute chemoreflex stress.

    PubMed

    Usselman, Charlotte W; Gimon, Tamara I; Nielson, Chantelle A; Luchyshyn, Torri A; Coverdale, Nicole S; Van Uum, Stan H M; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to examine the effects of sex (males vs. females) and sex hormones (menstrual cycle phases in women) on sympathetic responsiveness to severe chemoreflex activation in young, healthy individuals. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was measured at baseline and during rebreathing followed by a maximal end-inspiratory apnea. In women, baseline MSNA was greater in the midluteal (ML) than early-follicular (EF) phase of the menstrual cycle. Baseline MSNA burst incidence was greater in men than women, while burst frequency and total MSNA were similar between men and women only in the ML phase. Chemoreflex activation evoked graded increases in MSNA burst frequency, amplitude, and total activity in all participants. In women, this sympathoexcitation was greater in the EF than ML phase. The sympathoexcitatory response to chemoreflex stimulation of the EF phase in women was also greater than in men. Nonetheless, changes in total peripheral resistance were similar between sexes and menstrual cycle phases. This indicates that neurovascular transduction was attenuated during the EF phase during chemoreflex activation, thereby offsetting the exaggerated sympathoexcitation. Chemoreflex-induced increases in mean arterial pressure were similar across sexes and menstrual cycle phases. During acute chemoreflex stimulation, reduced neurovascular transduction could provide a mechanism by which apnea-associated morbidity might be attenuated in women relative to men. PMID:25527774

  15. Multimodal user input to supervisory control systems - Voice-augmented keyboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.; Forren, Michelle G.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a voice-augmented keyboard input modality is evaluated in a supervisory control application. An implementation of voice recognition technology in supervisory control is proposed: voice is used to request display pages, while the keyboard is used to input system reconfiguration commands. Twenty participants controlled GT-MSOCC, a high-fidelity simulation of the operator interface to a NASA ground control system, via a workstation equipped with either a single keyboard or a voice-augmented keyboard. Experimental results showed that in all cases where significant performance differences occurred, performance with the voice-augmented keyboard modality was inferior to and had greater variance than the keyboard-only modality. These results suggest that current moderately priced voice recognition systems are an inappropriate human-computer interaction technology in supervisory control systems.

  16. Flight Test of Composite Model Reference Adaptive Control (CMRAC) Augmentation Using NASA AirSTAR Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Gadient, ROss; Lavretsky, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents flight test results of a robust linear baseline controller with and without composite adaptive control augmentation. The flight testing was conducted using the NASA Generic Transport Model as part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at NASA Langley Research Center.

  17. Interactions between CO2 chemoreflexes and arterial baroreflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. A.; Lu, I. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We studied interactions between CO2 chemoreflexes and arterial baroreflexes in 10 supine healthy young men and women. We measured vagal carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflexes and steady-state fast Fourier transform R-R interval and photoplethysmographic arterial pressure power spectra at three arterial pressure levels (nitroprusside, saline, and phenylephrine infusions) and three end-tidal CO2 levels (3, 4, and 5%, fixed-frequency, large-tidal-volume breathing, CO2 plus O2). Our study supports three principal conclusions. First, although low levels of CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation reduce R-R intervals and R-R interval variability, statistical modeling suggests that this effect is indirect rather than direct and is mediated by reductions of arterial pressure. Second, reductions of R-R intervals during hypocapnia reflect simple shifting of vagally mediated carotid baroreflex responses on the R-R interval axis rather than changes of baroreflex gain, range, or operational point. Third, the influence of CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation on arterial pressure (and, derivatively, on R-R intervals and R-R interval variability) depends critically on baseline arterial pressure levels: chemoreceptor effects are smaller when pressure is low and larger when arterial pressure is high.

  18. Mechanisms of carotid body chemoreflex dysfunction during heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Harold D.; Marcus, Noah J.; Del Rio, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have drawn interest in the potential for carotid body (CB) ablation or desensitization as an effective strategy for clinical treatment and management of cardio-respiratory diseases including hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and renal failure. These disease states have in common sympathetic overactivity, which plays an important role in the development and progression of the disease and is often associated with breathing dysregulation, which in turn likely mediates or aggravates the autonomic imbalance. Evidence from both chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and animal models indicates that the CB chemoreflex is enhanced in CHF and contributes to the tonic elevation in sympathetic activity and the development of periodic breathing associated with the disease. Although this maladaptive change likely derives from altered function at all levels of the reflex arc, a tonic increase in afferent activity from CB glomus cells is likely to be a main driving force. This report will focus on our understanding of mechanisms that alter CB function in CHF and their potential translational impact on treatment of CHF. PMID:25398713

  19. An augmented MMS MACS for the Topex/Poseidon mission and beyond. [Modular Attitude Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Dennehy, C. J.; Lee, D.; Welch, R. V.

    1990-01-01

    The augmented Modular Attitude Control Subsystem (MACS) is described, with emphasis on the significant hardware modifications that have been incorporated into the Landsat MMS (Multimission Modular Spacecraft) MACS design to satisfy the Topex/Poseidon mission attitude control and determination requirements. Particular attention is given to a modification consisting in the addition of an earth pointing safe hold mode utilizing yaw coarse sun sensors to provide a yaw-slew capability for maintaining adequate illumination of the solar array. The design utility of this augmented MACS module for future spacecraft applications is pointed out.

  20. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  1. Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoates, Keith B.

    1993-01-01

    From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

  2. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  3. Interaction of the carotid baroreflex, the muscle chemoreflex and the cardiopulmonary baroreflex in man during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiken, O.; Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Dudley, G. A.; Morariu, G.; Mekjavic, I. B.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of the muscle chemoreflex and the cardiopulmonary baroreflex with the carotid baroreflex in humans performing exercise was investigated in healthy subjects using specially designed exercise regimen and apparatus. Stimulation of the muscle chemoreflex was achieved by restricting blood flow in the exercising muscles by means of applying a pressure of 50 mm Hg, whereas cardiopulmonary baroreceptors were unloaded by employing LBNP of -20 mm Hg. The carotid baroreceptors were unloaded and stimulated by neck-pressure maneuvers (Sprenkle et al., 1986). Results showed that the cardiodecelerating capacity of the carotid baroreflex remains active during exercise, and may even be sensitized by the chemoreflex-induced increase in arterial pressure; but it is not affected by the cardiopulmonary baroreceptor activity.

  4. A computerized integrated system for the assessment of central and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Roberto; Bruschi, Claudio; Pinna, Gian Domenico

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of chemoreflex sensitivity (CRS) is of major importance in studies investigating the adaptation of ventilation to the needs of human body. Increased sensitivity of chemoreceptors to both hypoxia and hypercapnia has recently been shown to be a powerful and independent prognosticator in heart failure (HF) patients, thus highlighting the importance of the assessment of CRS also in the clinical setting. In spite of this, the measurement of CRS is currently limited to the research setting. One possible reason might be the lack of suitable commercial equipments. On the basis of these considerations, we designed a system to carry out a comprehensive assessment of CRS, including both central and peripheral chemoreceptors. The system is based on the integration of different commercial devices and is entirely managed by a custom software written in Matlab language. The main features of our system are: (1) the implementation of standard methods (the Read's rebreathing test, the CO2 single breath test and the transient hypoxia test) suitable for both pathological and healthy subjects, (2) data quality assurance and reduction of subjective judgment in the analysis through advanced analysis procedures and statistical outliers rejection, and (3) full interactive control of every step of the recording and analysis procedures. The system is currently used in our Institution in the assessment of CRS in HF patients, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and healthy subjects. It has proven to be very effective and easy to use even by clinical personnel without a specific background in respiratory function assessment.

  5. Control augmented structural synthesis with dynamic stability constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamic stability constraints are included in a computer program that simultaneously synthesizes a structure and its control system. Two measures of stability, the real part of the system complex eigenvalues and the damping ratio, are examined. The procedure for calculating the sensitivities of the two measures of stability to changes in the structure and its control system is explained. The sensitivities are used to formulate an approximate problem that is solved at each design iteration. The effects of structural damping and noncollated controllers on the synthesis process are discussed.

  6. Peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine: new insight into mechanisms of extreme apnea.

    PubMed

    Bain, Anthony R; Dujic, Zeljko; Hoiland, Ryan L; Barak, Otto F; Madden, Dennis; Drvis, Ivan; Stembridge, Mike; MacLeod, David B; MacLeod, Douglas M; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine on maximal apnea time, and the related hemodynamic and cerebrovascular responses in elite apnea divers. In a randomized order, participants performed a maximal apnea while receiving either intravenous 2 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) dopamine or volume-matched saline (placebo). The chemoreflex and hemodynamic response to dopamine was also assessed during hypoxia [arterial O2 tension, (PaO2 ) ∼35 mmHg] and mild hypercapnia [arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2 ) ∼46 mmHg] that mimicked the latter parts of apnea. Outcome measures included apnea duration, arterial blood gases (radial), heart rate (HR, ECG), mean arterial pressure (MAP, intra-arterial), middle (MCAv) and posterior (PCAv) cerebral artery blood velocity (transcranial ultrasound), internal carotid (ICA) and vertebral (VA) artery blood flow (ultrasound), and the chemoreflex responses. Although dopamine depressed the ventilatory response by 27 ± 41% (vs. placebo; P = 0.01), the maximal apnea duration was increased by only 5 ± 8% (P = 0.02). The PaCO2 and PaO2 at apnea breakpoint were similar (P > 0.05). When compared with placebo, dopamine increased HR and decreased MAP during both apnea and chemoreflex test (P all <0.05). At rest, dopamine compared with placebo dilated the ICA (3.0 ± 4.1%, P = 0.05) and VA (6.6 ± 5.0%, P < 0.01). During apnea and chemoreflex test, conductance of the cerebral vessels (ICA, VA, MCAv, PCAv) was increased with dopamine; however, flow (ICA and VA) was similar. At least in elite apnea divers, the small increase in apnea time and similar PaO2 at breakpoint (∼31 mmHg) suggest the apnea breakpoint is more related to PaO2 , rather than peripheral chemoreflex drive to breathe.

  7. Fos expression in the NTS in response to peripheral chemoreflex activation in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josiane de Campos; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Stern, Javier E; Machado, Benedito H

    2010-01-15

    Chemoreflex afferent fibers terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), but the specific location of the NTS neurons excited by peripheral chemoreflex activation remains to be characterized. Here, the topographic distribution of chemoreflex sensitive cells at the commissural NTS was evaluated. To reach this goal, Fos-immunoreactive neurons (Fos-ir) were accounted in rostro-caudal levels of the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS, after intermittent chemoreflex activation with intravenous injection of potassium cyanide [KCN (80microg/kg) or saline (0.9%, vehicle), one injection every 3min during 30min]. In response to intermittent intravenous injections of KCN, a significant increase in the number of Fos-ir neurons was observed specifically in the lateral intermediate commissural NTS [(LI)NTS (82+/-9 vs. 174+/-16, cell number mean per section)] and lateral caudal commissural NTS [(LC)NTS (71+/-9 vs. 199+/-18, cell number mean per section)]. To evaluate the influence of baroreceptor-mediated inputs following the increase in blood pressure during intermittent chemoreflex activation, we performed an intermittent activation of the arterial baroreflex by intravenous injection of phenylephrine [1.5microg/kg iv (one injection every 3min during 30min)]. This procedure induced no change in Fos-ir in (LI)NTS (64+/-6 vs. 62+/-12, cell number mean per section) or (LC)NTS (56+/-15 vs. 77+/-12, cell number mean per section). These data support the involvement of the commissural NTS in the processing of peripheral chemoreflex, and provide a detailed characterization of the topographical distribution of activated neurons within this brain region.

  8. A remotely augmented vehicle approach to flight testing RPV control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deets, D. A.; Edwards, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A remotely augmented vehicle concept for flight testing advanced control systems was developed as an outgrowth of a remotely piloted research vehicle (RPV) program in which control laws are implemented through telemetry uplink and downlink data channels using a general purpose ground based digital computer which provides the control law computations. Some advantages of this approach are that the cost of one control system facility is spread over a number of RPV programs, and control laws can be changed quickly as required, without changing the flight hardware. The remotely augmented vehicle concept is described, and flight test results from a subscale F-15 program are discussed. Suggestions of how the concept could lead to more effective testing of RPV control system concepts, and how it is applicable to a military RPV reconnaissance mission are given.

  9. Feedback linearisation control of an induction machine augmented by single-hidden layer neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Abbas, Hamou; Belkheiri, Mohammed; Zegnini, Boubakeur

    2016-01-01

    We consider adaptive output feedback control methodology of highly uncertain nonlinear systems with both parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics. The approach is also applicable to systems of unknown, but bounded dimension. However, the relative degree of the regulated output is assumed to be known. This new control strategy is proposed to address the tracking problem of an induction motor based on a modified field-oriented control method. The obtained controller is then augmented by an online neural network that serves as an approximator for the neglected dynamics and modelling errors. The network weight adaptation rule is derived from the Lyapunov stability analysis, that guarantees boundedness of all the error signals of the closed-loop system. Computer simulations of an output feedback controlled induction machine, augmented via single-hidden-layer neural networks, demonstrate the practical potential of the proposed control algorithm.

  10. Analysis of Aeroheating Augmentation due to Reaction Control System Jets on Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Buck, Gregory M.; Decaro, Anthony D.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of effects of the reaction control system jet plumes on aftbody heating of Orion entry capsule is presented. The analysis covered hypersonic continuum part of the entry trajectory. Aerothermal environments at flight conditions were evaluated using Langley Aerothermal Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) code and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) algorithm code. Results show a marked augmentation of aftbody heating due to roll, yaw and aft pitch thrusters. No significant augmentation is expected due to forward pitch thrusters. Of the conditions surveyed the maximum heat rate on the aftshell is expected when firing a pair of roll thrusters at a maximum deceleration condition.

  11. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  12. Stability Assessment and Tuning of an Adaptively Augmented Classical Controller for Launch Vehicle Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen; Zhu, J. Jim; Adami, Tony; Berry, Kyle; Grammar, Alex; Orr, Jeb S.; Best, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a robust and practical adaptive control scheme for launch vehicles [ [1] has been introduced. It augments a classical controller with a real-time loop-gain adaptation, and it is therefore called Adaptive Augmentation Control (AAC). The loop-gain will be increased from the nominal design when the tracking error between the (filtered) output and the (filtered) command trajectory is large; whereas it will be decreased when excitation of flex or sloshing modes are detected. There is a need to determine the range and rate of the loop-gain adaptation in order to retain (exponential) stability, which is critical in vehicle operation, and to develop some theoretically based heuristic tuning methods for the adaptive law gain parameters. The classical launch vehicle flight controller design technics are based on gain-scheduling, whereby the launch vehicle dynamics model is linearized at selected operating points along the nominal tracking command trajectory, and Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) controller design techniques are employed to ensure asymptotic stability of the tracking error dynamics, typically by meeting some prescribed Gain Margin (GM) and Phase Margin (PM) specifications. The controller gains at the design points are then scheduled, tuned and sometimes interpolated to achieve good performance and stability robustness under external disturbances (e.g. winds) and structural perturbations (e.g. vehicle modeling errors). While the GM does give a bound for loop-gain variation without losing stability, it is for constant dispersions of the loop-gain because the GM is based on frequency-domain analysis, which is applicable only for LTI systems. The real-time adaptive loop-gain variation of the AAC effectively renders the closed-loop system a time-varying system, for which it is well-known that the LTI system stability criterion is neither necessary nor sufficient when applying to a Linear Time-Varying (LTV) system in a frozen-time fashion. Therefore, a

  13. Accurate calculation of control-augmented structural eigenvalue sensitivities using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for generating mode shapes for model order reduction in a way that leads to accurate calculation of eigenvalue derivatives and eigenvalues for a class of control augmented structures. The method is based on treating degrees of freedom where control forces act or masses are changed in a manner analogous to that used for boundary degrees of freedom in component mode synthesis. It is especially suited for structures controlled by a small number of actuators and/or tuned by a small number of concentrated masses whose positions are predetermined. A control augmented multispan beam with closely spaced natural frequencies is used for numerical experimentation. A comparison with reduced-order eigenvalue sensitivity calculations based on the normal modes of the structure shows that the method presented produces significant improvements in accuracy.

  14. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority.

  15. Prediction of the Chemoreflex Gain by Common Clinical Variables in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mirizzi, Gianluca; Giannoni, Alberto; Ripoli, Andrea; Iudice, Giovanni; Bramanti, Francesca; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral and central chemoreflex sensitivity, assessed by the hypoxic or hypercapnic ventilatory response (HVR and HCVR, respectively), is enhanced in heart failure (HF) patients, is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease, and is under investigation as a potential therapeutic target. Chemoreflex sensitivity assessment is however demanding and, therefore, not easily applicable in the clinical setting. We aimed at evaluating whether common clinical variables, broadly obtained by routine clinical and instrumental evaluation, could predict increased HVR and HCVR. Methods and results 191 patients with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction—LVEF—<50%) underwent chemoreflex assessment by rebreathing technique to assess HVR and HCVR. All patients underwent clinical and neurohormonal evaluation, comprising: echocardiogram, cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), daytime cardiorespiratory monitoring for breathing pattern evaluation. Regarding HVR, multivariate penalized logistic regression, Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) logistic regression and random forest analysis identified, as predictors, the presence of periodic breathing and increased slope of the relation between ventilation and carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) during exercise. Again, the above-mentioned statistical tools identified as HCVR predictors plasma levels of N-terminal fragment of proBNP and VE/VCO2 slope. Conclusions In HF patients, the simple assessment of breathing pattern, alongside with ventilatory efficiency during exercise and natriuretic peptides levels identifies a subset of patients presenting with increased chemoreflex sensitivity to either hypoxia or hypercapnia. PMID:27099934

  16. An analysis of a candidate control algorithm for a ride quality augmentation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suikat, Reiner; Donaldson, Kent; Downing, David R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of a candidate algorithm for a ride quality augmentation system. The algorithm consists of a full-state feedback control law based on optimal control output weighting, estimators for angle of attack and sideslip, and a maneuvering algorithm. The control law is shown to perform well by both frequency and time domain analysis. The rms vertical acceleration is reduced by about 40 percent over the whole mission flight envelope. The estimators for the angle of attack and sideslip avoid the often inaccurate or costly direct measurement of those angles. The maneuvering algorithm will allow the augmented airplane to respond to pilot inputs. The design characteristics and performance are documented by the closed-loop eigenvalues; rms levels of vertical, lateral, and longitudinal acceleration; and representative time histories and frequency response.

  17. Simulator investigations of side-stick controller/stability and control augmentation systems for night nap-of-earth flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, K. H.; Aiken, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    Several night nap-of-the-earth mission tasks were evaluated using a helmet-mounted display which provided a limited field-of-view image with superimposed flight control symbology. A wide range of stability and control augmentation designs was investigated. Variations in controller force-deflection characteristics and the number of axes controlled through an integrated side-stick controller were studied. In general, a small displacement controller is preferred over a stiffstick controller particularly for maneuvering flight. Higher levels of stability augmentation were required for IMC tasks to provide handling qualities comparable to those achieved for the same tasks conducted under simulated visual flight conditions. Previously announced in STAR as N82-23216

  18. Adaptive Control Using Neural Network Augmentation for a Modified F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy; Karneshige, J. T.; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    Description of the performance of a simplified dynamic inversion controller with neural network augmentation follows. Simulation studies focus on the results with and without neural network adaptation through the use of an F-15 aircraft simulator that has been modified to include canards. Simulated control law performance with a surface failure, in addition to an aerodynamic failure, is presented. The aircraft, with adaptation, attempts to minimize the inertial cross-coupling effect of the failure (a control derivative anomaly associated with a jammed control surface). The dynamic inversion controller calculates necessary surface commands to achieve desired rates. The dynamic inversion controller uses approximate short period and roll axis dynamics. The yaw axis controller is a sideslip rate command system. Methods are described to reduce the cross-coupling effect and maintain adequate tracking errors for control surface failures. The aerodynamic failure destabilizes the pitching moment due to angle of attack. The results show that control of the aircraft with the neural networks is easier (more damped) than without the neural networks. Simulation results show neural network augmentation of the controller improves performance with aerodynamic and control surface failures in terms of tracking error and cross-coupling reduction.

  19. Reconfigurable Control with Neural Network Augmentation for a Modified F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy; Kaneshige, John T.; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    Description of the performance of a simplified dynamic inversion controller with neural network augmentation follows. Simulation studies focus on the results with and without neural network adaptation through the use of an F-15 aircraft simulator that has been modified to include canards. Simulated control law performance with a surface failure, in addition to an aerodynamic failure, is presented. The aircraft, with adaptation, attempts to minimize the inertial cross-coupling effect of the failure (a control derivative anomaly associated with a jammed control surface). The dynamic inversion controller calculates necessary surface commands to achieve desired rates. The dynamic inversion controller uses approximate short period and roll axis dynamics. The yaw axis controller is a sideslip rate command system. Methods are described to reduce the cross-coupling effect and maintain adequate tracking errors for control surface failures. The aerodynamic failure destabilizes the pitching moment due to angle of attack. The results show that control of the aircraft with the neural networks is easier (more damped) than without the neural networks. Simulation results show neural network augmentation of the controller improves performance with aerodynamic and control surface failures in terms of tracking error and cross-coupling reduction.

  20. Effects of caffeine and/or nasal CPAP treatment on laryngeal chemoreflexes in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Boudaa, Nadia; Samson, Nathalie; Carrière, Vincent; Germim, Pamela Samanta; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Bairam, Aida; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    Current knowledge suggests that laryngeal chemoreflexes (LCR) are involved in the occurrence of certain neonatal apneas/bradycardias, especially in the preterm newborn. While caffeine and/or nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) are the most frequent options used for treating apneas in preterm newborns, their effects on LCR-related apneas/bradycardias are virtually unknown. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that caffeine and/or nCPAP decreases LCR-related cardiorespiratory inhibition in a preterm ovine model. Seven preterm lambs were born vaginally on gestational day 133 (normal gestation: 147 days) after intramuscular injections of betamethasone and mifepristone. Five days after birth, a chronic surgical instrumentation was performed to record states of alertness, electrocardiogram, systemic arterial pressure, and electromyographic activity of a laryngeal constrictor muscle, as well as to insert a transcutaneous supraglottal catheter. LCR were induced in quiet sleep under four conditions: 1) control (without caffeine or nCPAP); 2) nCPAP (5 cmH2O, without caffeine); 3) caffeine (10 mg/kg infused intravenously for 30 min, without nCPAP); and 4) nCPAP + caffeine. Our results showed that nCPAP consistently blunted LCR-related cardiorespiratory inhibition vs. control condition, contrary to caffeine whose overall effect was nonsignificant. In addition, nCPAP condition was characterized by a more consistent and rapid arousal after HCl injection. No significant differences were observed between all tested conditions with regard to swallowing and cough. It is concluded that nCPAP should be further assessed for its usefulness in treating neonatal apneas linked to LCR.

  1. The use of active controls to augment rotor/fuselage stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Warmbrodt, W.

    1985-01-01

    The use of active blade pitch control to increase helicopter rotor/body damping is studied. Control is introduced through a conventional nonrotating swashplate. State variable feedback of rotor and body states is used. Feedback parameters include cyclic rotor flap and lead-lag states, and body pitch and roll rotations. The use of position, rate, and acceleration feedback is studied for the various state variables. In particular, the influence of the closed loop feedback gain and phase on system stability is investigated. For the rotor/body configuration analyzed, rotor cyclic inplane motion and body roll-rate and roll-acceleration feedback can considerably augment system damping levels and eliminate ground resonance instabilities. Scheduling of the feedback state, phase, and gain with rotor rotation speed can be used to maximize the damping augmentation. This increase in lead-lag damping can be accomplished without altering any of the system modal frequencies. Investigating various rotor design parameters (effective hinge offset, blade precone, blade flap stiffness) indicates that active control for augmenting rotor/body damping will be particularly powerful for hingeless and bearingless rotor hubs.

  2. Exercise training attenuates chemoreflex-mediated reductions of renal blood flow in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Noah J; Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Schiller, Alicia M; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Zucker, Irving H; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-07-15

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), carotid body chemoreceptor (CBC) activity is increased and contributes to increased tonic and hypoxia-evoked elevation in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Elevated RSNA and reduced renal perfusion may contribute to development of the cardio-renal syndrome in CHF. Exercise training (EXT) has been shown to abrogate CBC-mediated increases in RSNA in experimental heart failure; however, the effect of EXT on CBC control of renal blood flow (RBF) is undetermined. We hypothesized that CBCs contribute to tonic reductions in RBF in CHF, that stimulation of the CBC with hypoxia would result in exaggerated reductions in RBF, and that these responses would be attenuated with EXT. RBF was measured in CHF-sedentary (SED), CHF-EXT, CHF-carotid body denervation (CBD), and CHF-renal denervation (RDNX) groups. We measured RBF at rest and in response to hypoxia (FiO2 10%). All animals exhibited similar reductions in ejection fraction and fractional shortening as well as increases in ventricular systolic and diastolic volumes. Resting RBF was lower in CHF-SED (29 ± 2 ml/min) than in CHF-EXT animals (46 ± 2 ml/min, P < 0.05) or in CHF-CBD animals (42 ± 6 ml/min, P < 0.05). In CHF-SED, RBF decreased during hypoxia, and this was prevented in CHF-EXT animals. Both CBD and RDNX abolished the RBF response to hypoxia in CHF. Mean arterial pressure increased in response to hypoxia in CHF-SED, but was prevented by EXT, CBD, and RDNX. EXT is effective in attenuating chemoreflex-mediated tonic and hypoxia-evoked reductions in RBF in CHF.

  3. Sliding mode control for Lorentz-augmented spacecraft hovering around elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Yan, Ye; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Hua

    2014-10-01

    A Lorentz spacecraft is an electrostatically charged space vehicle that could actively modulate its surface charge to generate Lorentz force as it moves through the planetary magnetic field. The induced Lorentz force provides propellantless electromagnetic propulsion for orbital maneuvering, such as spacecraft hovering that the chaser thrusts continuously to create an equilibrium state at the desired position relative to the target. Due to the fact that the direction of Lorentz force is determined by the local magnetic field and the velocity of the spacecraft with respect to the local magnetic field, which does not necessarily coincide with that of the required control acceleration for hovering, thus, in most cases, the Lorentz force works as a means of auxiliary propulsion to reduce the expenditure of fuel onboard. And that is why it is called Lorentz-augmented hovering. A dynamical model for Lorentz-augmented hovering around elliptic orbits is developed based upon the assumption that the Earth's magnetic field could be modeled as a tilted dipole that corotates with Earth. Fuel-optimal open-loop control laws are then derived based on the proposed dynamical model, presenting the optimal trajectories of the required specific charge of Lorentz spacecraft and the thruster-generated control acceleration. Considering the external disturbances that may drift the desired hovering position, a closed-loop integral sliding mode controller is also designed to guarantee the tracking of optimal control trajectories, ensuring the robustness of the system against perturbations. Numerical simulations are presented to analyze the characteristics of Lorentz-augmented hovering around eccentric orbits and the results substantiate the validity of the proposed open-loop and closed-loop control methods.

  4. Effect of continuous rearing on courtship acoustics of five braconid parasitoids, candidates for augmentative biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The courtship acoustics of five species of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), potential candidates for augmentative biological control of Anastrepha species (Diptera: Tephritidae), were compared between recently colonized individuals and those continuously reared 70-148 generations. During...

  5. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  6. Inhibitory modulation of chemoreflex bradycardia by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus is mediated by 5-HT3 receptors in the NTS of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Weissheimer, Karin Viana; Machado, Benedito H

    2007-03-30

    Several studies demonstrated the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its different receptor subtypes in the modulation of neurotransmission of cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Moreover, anatomic evidence suggests that nucleus raphe obscurus (ROb) is a source of 5-HT-containing terminals within the NTS. In the present study we investigated the possible changes in the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreceptor activation by potassium cyanide (KCN, i.v.) following ROb stimulation with L-glutamate (10 nmol/50 nL) and also whether 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal commissural NTS are involved in this neuromodulation. The results showed that stimulation of the ROb with L-glutamate in awake rats (n=15) produced a significant reduction in the bradycardic response 30 s after the microinjection (-182+/-19 vs -236+/-10 bpm; Wilcoxon test) but no changes in the pressor response to peripheral chemoreceptor activation (43+/-4 vs 51+/-3 mmHg; two-way ANOVA) in relation to the control. Microinjection of 5--HT3 receptors antagonist granisetron (500 pmol/50 nL), but not the vehicle, into the caudal commissural NTS bilaterally prevented the reduction of chemoreflex bradycardia in response to microinjection of L-glutamate into ROb. These data indicate that 5-HT-containing projections from ROb to the NTS play an inhibitory neuromodulatory role in the chemoreflex evoked bradycardia by releasing 5-HT and activating 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal NTS.

  7. A control-volume method for analysis of unsteady thrust augmenting ejector flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for predicting transient thrust augmenting ejector characteristics is presented. The analysis blends classic self-similar turbulent jet descriptions with a control volume mixing region discretization to solicit transient effects in a new way. Division of the ejector into an inlet, diffuser, and mixing region corresponds with the assumption of viscous-dominated phenomenon in the latter. Inlet and diffuser analyses are simplified by a quasi-steady analysis, justified by the assumptions that pressure is the forcing function in those regions. Details of the theoretical foundation, the solution algorithm, and sample calculations are given.

  8. Effectiveness of basic display augmentation in vehicular control by visual field cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, A. J.; Merhav, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper investigates the effectiveness of different basic display augmentation concepts - fixed reticle, velocity vector, and predicted future vehicle path - for RPVs controlled by a vehicle-mounted TV camera. The task is lateral manual control of a low flying RPV along a straight reference line in the presence of random side gusts. The man-machine system and the visual interface are modeled as a linear time-invariant system. Minimization of a quadratic performance criterion is assumed to underlie the control strategy of a well-trained human operator. The solution for the optimal feedback matrix enables the explicit computation of the variances of lateral deviation and directional error of the vehicle and of the control force that are used as performance measures.

  9. Optimal placement of actuators and sensors in control augmented structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A control-augmented structural synthesis methodology is presented in which actuator and sensor placement is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes and control variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. A multiobjective utopian approach is used to obtain a compromise solution for inherently conflicting objective functions such as strucutal mass control effort and number of actuators. Constraints are imposed on transient displacements, natural frequencies, actuator forces and dynamic stability as well as controllability and observability of the system. The combinatorial aspects of the mixed - (0,1) continuous variable design optimization problem are made tractable by combining approximation concepts with branch and bound techniques. Some numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  10. Presentation of flight control design and handling quality commonality by separate surface stability augmentation for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Douglas; Creighton, Thomas; Haddad, Raphael; Hendrich, Louis; Morgan, Louise; Russell, Mark; Swift, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The methodology and results for a flight control design and implementation for common handling qualities by Separate Surface Stability Augmentation (SSSA) for the family of commuter airplanes are contained. The open and closed loop dynamics and the design results of augmenting for common handling qualities are presented. The physical and technology requirements are presented for implementing the SSSA system. The conclusion of this report and recommendations for changes or improvement are discussed.

  11. Engine Yaw Augmentation for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft via Optimal Control Allocation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.; Yoo, Seung Yeun

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric engine thrust was implemented in a hybrid-wing-body non-linear simulation to reduce the amount of aerodynamic surface deflection required for yaw stability and control. Hybrid-wing-body aircraft are especially susceptible to yaw surface deflection due to their decreased bare airframe yaw stability resulting from the lack of a large vertical tail aft of the center of gravity. Reduced surface deflection, especially for trim during cruise flight, could reduce the fuel consumption of future aircraft. Designed as an add-on, optimal control allocation techniques were used to create a control law that tracks total thrust and yaw moment commands with an emphasis on not degrading the baseline system. Implementation of engine yaw augmentation is shown and feasibility is demonstrated in simulation with a potential drag reduction of 2 to 4 percent. Future flight tests are planned to demonstrate feasibility in a flight environment.

  12. Riluzole augmentation in treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a pilot placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H.; Wasylink, Suzanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Simpson, Ryan; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Kelmendi, Ben; Sanacora, Gerard; Coric, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects approximately 2.5% of the population and is associated with significant morbidity. Many patients receive little benefit from the best available treatments, and even those who do respond often suffer from significant residual symptoms. Convergent evidence suggests that abnormalities in glutamate homeostasis and neurotransmission may contribute to OCD and that glutamate-modulating medications may be of benefit in patients whose symptoms are refractory to standard interventions. Small open-label trials of augmentation of SSRI pharmacotherapy with the glutamate modulator riluzole have suggested benefit in adults with refractory symptoms. We report a pilot placebo-control trial of riluzole augmentation of ongoing SRI treatment in SRI-refractory patients. Method Outpatients (n = 27) and inpatients (n = 12) with DSM-IV OCD on stable SSRI pharmacotherapy were randomized between 11/2006 and 12/2012 to receive riluzole 50 mg bid or placebo and followed for 12 weeks, after a 2-week placebo lead-in. Results Riluzole was well tolerated; one patient experienced moderate nausea, but none discontinued treatment due to side effects. While there was nominally greater Y-BOCS improvement in the riluzole group (our primary outcome), it did not reach significance in a mixed model random effects analysis, in the overall analysis or in the outpatient subsample. In the outpatient subsample there was a trend suggesting benefit from riluzole augmentation for obsessions (p = 0.056, 2-tailed, uncorrected), in a secondary analysis. Among outpatients, more achieved at least a partial response (>25% improvement) with riluzole than with placebo (p = 0.02 in a secondary analysis). Conclusions Riluzole may be of benefit to a subset of patients. Larger samples would be required to detect effects of the order suggested by the nominal improvement in our outpatient subsample. PMID:26214725

  13. A Study on Marker Overlapping Control for M2M-Based Augmented Reality Multiple Object Loading Using Bresenham Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sungmo; Song, Jae-Gu; Kim, Seoksoo

    The problem of one marker one object loading only available in marker-based augmented reality technology can be solved by PPHT-based augmented reality multiple objects loading technology which detects the same marker in the image and copies at a desirable location. However, since the distance between markers will not be measured in the process of detecting and copying markers, markers can be overlapped and thus the objects would not be augmented. To solve this problem, a circle having the longest radius needs to be created from a focal point of a marker to be copied, so that no object is copied within the confines of the circle. Therefore, a marker overlapping control for M2M-based augmented reality multiple object loading has been studied using Bresenham algorithm.

  14. The Roles of Parasitoid Foraging for Hosts, Food and Mates in the Augmentative Control of Tephritidae

    PubMed Central

    Sivinski, John; Aluja, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ultimately, the success of augmentative fruit fly biological control depends upon the survival, dispersal, attack rate and multi-generational persistence of mass-reared parasitoids in the field. Foraging for hosts, food and mates is fundamental to the above and, at an operational level, the choice of the parasitoid best suited to control a particular tephritid in a certain environment, release rate estimates and subsequent monitoring of effectiveness. In the following we review landscape-level and microhabitat foraging preferences, host/fruit ranges, orientation through environmental cues, host vulnerabilities/ovipositor structures, and inter and intraspecific competition. We also consider tephritid parasitoid mating systems and sexual signals, and suggest the directions of future research. PMID:26466622

  15. Air contaminant control investigation of a jet augmented local exhaust system

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, D.B.; Johnston, W.L.; Konzen, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of a jet augmented local exhaust system to control air contaminants was investigated in a scale model hood. Tracer gas concentrations were mapped on top of idealized airflow streamlines to illustrate the jet's interaction with air contaminants. A key findings was the possibility of contaminant loss from the hood if the jet flow was not recaptured completely. Airflow design parameters, which had been identified previously to affect the airflow pattern, were evaluation for their effect on air contaminant control. The results indicated that tracer gas recovery was affected by a single airflow design parameters. An inverse linear relationship between the design parameter and control levels indicated that the recovery rate was controllable in design and that 100% control was achievable at a low total airflow rate. Important potential design advantages include the ability to specify the contaminant control level prior to installation, system flexibility to change contaminant control levels by adjusting airflow design parameters, and lower installation and operation costs than a comparable local exhaust system. The next research step is to test a full-scale prototype system to evaluate its performance efficiency and economy under realistic operating conditions.

  16. Flight evaluation of highly augmented controls and electronic displays for precision approach and landing of powered-lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Hynes, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on simulators and on the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft to evaluate the effect of highly augmented control modes and electronic displays on the ability of pilots to execute precision approaches and landings on a short runway. It is found that the primary benefits of highly augmented flightpath and airspeed controls and electronic displays are realized when the pilot is required to execute precisely a complex transition and approach under instrument conditions and in the presence of a wide range of wind and turbulence conditions. A flightpath and airspeed command and stabilization system incorporating nonlinear, inverse system concepts produced fully satisfactory flightpath control throughout the aircraft's terminal operating envelope.

  17. Stereovision and augmented reality for closed-loop control of grasping in hand prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Cipriani, Christian; Popovic, Dejan; Farina, Dario

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Technologically advanced assistive devices are nowadays available to restore grasping, but effective and effortless control integrating both feed-forward (commands) and feedback (sensory information) is still missing. The goal of this work was to develop a user friendly interface for the semi-automatic and closed-loop control of grasping and to test its feasibility. Approach. We developed a controller based on stereovision to automatically select grasp type and size and augmented reality (AR) to provide artificial proprioceptive feedback. The system was experimentally tested in healthy subjects using a dexterous hand prosthesis to grasp a set of daily objects. The subjects wore AR glasses with an integrated stereo-camera pair, and triggered the system via a simple myoelectric interface. Main results. The results demonstrated that the subjects got easily acquainted with the semi-autonomous control. The stereovision grasp decoder successfully estimated the grasp type and size in realistic, cluttered environments. When allowed (forced) to correct the automatic system decisions, the subjects successfully utilized the AR feedback and achieved close to ideal system performance. Significance. The new method implements a high level, low effort control of complex functions in addition to the low level closed-loop control. The latter is achieved by providing rich visual feedback, which is integrated into the real life environment. The proposed system is an effective interface applicable with small alterations for many advanced prosthetic and orthotic/therapeutic rehabilitation devices.

  18. Analysis and testing of stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.; Wattman, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of stability augmentation systems for aircraft flight control were conducted. The flutter suppression system analysis of a scale supersonic transport wing model is described. Mechanization of the flutter suppression system is reported. The ride control synthesis for the B-52 aeroelastic model is discussed. Model analyses were conducted using equations of motion generated from generalized mass and stiffness data.

  19. An assessment of various side-stick controller/stability and control augmentation systems for night nap-of-Earth flight using piloted simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, K. H.; Aiken, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    Several night nap-of-the-earth mission tasks were evaluated using a helmet-mounted display which provided a limited field-of-view image with superimposed flight control symbology. A wide range of stability and control augmentation designs was investigated. Variations in controller force-deflection characteristics and the number of axes controlled through an integrated side-stick controller were studied. In general, a small displacement controller is preferred over a stiffstick controller particularly for maneuvering flight. Higher levels of stability augmentation were required for IMC tasks to provide handling qualities comparable to those achieved for the same tasks conducted under simulated visual flight conditions.

  20. Reconfigurable Control with Neural Network Augmentation for a Modified F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a simplified dynamic inversion controller with neural network supplementation. This 6 DOF (Degree-of-Freedom) simulation study focuses on the results with and without adaptation of neural networks using a simulation of the NASA modified F-15 which has canards. One area of interest is the performance of a simulated surface failure while attempting to minimize the inertial cross coupling effect of a [B] matrix failure (a control derivative anomaly associated with a jammed or missing control surface). Another area of interest and presented is simulated aerodynamic failures ([A] matrix) such as a canard failure. The controller uses explicit models to produce desired angular rate commands. The dynamic inversion calculates the necessary surface commands to achieve the desired rates. The simplified dynamic inversion uses approximate short period and roll axis dynamics. Initial results indicated that the transient response for a [B] matrix failure using a Neural Network (NN) improved the control behavior when compared to not using a neural network for a given failure, However, further evaluation of the controller was comparable, with objections io the cross coupling effects (after changes were made to the controller). This paper describes the methods employed to reduce the cross coupling effect and maintain adequate tracking errors. The IA] matrix failure results show that control of the aircraft without adaptation is more difficult [leas damped) than with active neural networks, Simulation results show Neural Network augmentation of the controller improves performance in terms of backing error and cross coupling reduction and improved performance with aerodynamic-type failures.

  1. Effects of sensory augmentation on postural control and gait symmetry of transfemoral amputees: a case description.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Anna; Arieta, Alejandro Hernandez; Riener, Robert; Vallery, Heike

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent advances in leg prosthetics, transfemoral amputees still experience limitations in postural control and gait symmetry. It has been hypothesized that artificial sensory information might improve the integration of the prosthesis into the human sensory-motor control loops and, thus, reduce these limitations. In three transfemoral amputees, we investigated the effect of Electrotactile Moving Sensation for Sensory Augmentation (EMSSA) without training and present preliminary findings. Experimental conditions included standing with open/closed eyes on stable/unstable ground as well as treadmill walking. For standing conditions, spatiotemporal posturographic measures and sample entropy were derived from the center of pressure. For walking conditions, step length and stance duration were calculated. Conditions without feedback showed effects congruent with findings in the literature, e.g., asymmetric weight bearing and step length, and validated the collected data. During standing, with EMSSA a tendency to influence postural control in a negative way was found: Postural control was less effective and less efficient and the prosthetic leg was less involved. Sample entropy tended to decrease, suggesting that EMSSA demanded increased attention. During walking, with EMSSA no persistent positive effect was found. This contrasts the positive subjective assessment and the positive effect on one subject's step length. PMID:26718557

  2. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Mechanics and Analysis Division developed an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for launch vehicles that improves robustness and performance by adapting an otherwise welltuned classical control algorithm to unexpected environments or variations in vehicle dynamics. This AAC algorithm is currently part of the baseline design for the SLS Flight Control System (FCS), but prior to this series of research flights it was the only component of the autopilot design that had not been flight tested. The Space Launch System (SLS) flight software prototype, including the adaptive component, was recently tested on a piloted aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) which has the capability to achieve a high level of dynamic similarity to a launch vehicle. Scenarios for the flight test campaign were designed specifically to evaluate the AAC algorithm to ensure that it is able to achieve the expected performance improvements with no adverse impacts in nominal or nearnominal scenarios. Having completed the recent series of flight characterization experiments on DFRC's F/A-18, the AAC algorithm's capability, robustness, and reproducibility, have been successfully demonstrated. Thus, the entire SLS control architecture has been successfully flight tested in a relevant environment. This has increased NASA's confidence that the autopilot design is ready to fly on the SLS Block I vehicle and will exceed the performance of previous architectures.

  3. Augmenting Psychoeducation with a Mobile Intervention for Bipolar Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A; Ceglowski, Jenni; Wang, Vicki C; Yaghouti, Faraz; Mausbach, Brent T; Thompson, Wesley K; Granholm, Eric L

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder are frequently unavailable and resource intensive. Mobile technology may improve access to evidence-based interventions and may increase their efficacy. We evaluated the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of an augmentative mobile ecological momentary intervention targeting self-management of mood symptoms. Methods This was a randomized single-blind controlled trial with 82 consumers diagnosed with bipolar disorder who completed a four-session psychoeducational intervention and were assigned to 10 weeks of either: 1) mobile device delivered interactive intervention linking patient-reported mood states with personalized self-management strategies, or 2) paper-and-pencil mood monitoring. Participants were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks (mid-point), 12 weeks (post-treatment), and 24 weeks (follow up) with clinician-rated depression and mania scales and self-reported functioning. Results Retention at 12 weeks was 93% and both conditions were associated with high satisfaction. Compared to the paper-and-pencil condition, participants in the augmented mobile intervention condition showed significantly greater reductions in depressive symptoms at 6 and 12 weeks (Cohen's d for both were d=0.48). However, these effects were not maintained at 24-week follow up. Conditions did not differ significantly in the impact on manic symptoms or functional impairment. Limitations This was not a definitive trial and was not powered to detect moderators and mediators. Conclusions Automated mobile-phone intervention is feasible, acceptable, and may enhance the impact of brief psychoeducation on depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder. However, sustainment of gains from symptom self-management mobile interventions, once stopped, may be limited. PMID:25479050

  4. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Botella, Cristina; Pérez-Ara, M Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31) versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32) in a randomized controlled trial. "One-session treatment" guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants' expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants.

  5. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Botella, Cristina; Pérez-Ara, M Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31) versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32) in a randomized controlled trial. "One-session treatment" guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants' expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants. PMID:26886423

  6. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Botella, Cristina; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31) versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32) in a randomized controlled trial. “One-session treatment” guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants’ expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants. PMID:26886423

  7. Tantalum acetabular augments in one-stage exchange of infected total hip arthroplasty: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Till Orla; Kendoff, Daniel; Sabihi, Reza; Kamath, Atul F; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    During the one-stage exchange procedure for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA), acetabular defects challenge reconstructive options. Porous tantalum augments are an established tool for addressing acetabular destruction in aseptic cases, but their utility in septic exchange is unknown. This retrospective case-control study presents the initial results of tantalum augmentation during one-stage exchange for PJI. Primary endpoints were rates of re-infection and short-term complications associated with this technique. Study patients had no higher risk of re-infection with equivalent durability at early follow-up with a re-infection rate in both groups of 4%. In conclusion, tantalum augments are a viable option for addressing acetabular defects in one-stage exchange for septic THA. Further study is necessary to assess long-term durability when compared to traditional techniques for acetabular reconstruction.

  8. The myths and physiology surrounding intrapartum decelerations: the critical role of the peripheral chemoreflex.

    PubMed

    Lear, Christopher A; Galinsky, Robert; Wassink, Guido; Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Davidson, Joanne O; Westgate, Jenny A; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2016-09-01

    A distinctive pattern of recurrent rapid falls in fetal heart rate, called decelerations, are commonly associated with uterine contractions during labour. These brief decelerations are mediated by vagal activation. The reflex triggering this vagal response has been variably attributed to a mechanoreceptor response to fetal head compression, to baroreflex activation following increased blood pressure during umbilical cord compression, and/or a Bezold-Jarisch reflex response to reduced venous return from the placenta. Although these complex explanations are still widespread today, there is no consistent evidence that they are common during labour. Instead, the only mechanism that has been systematically investigated, proven to be reliably active during labour and, crucially, capable of producing rapid decelerations is the peripheral chemoreflex. The peripheral chemoreflex is triggered by transient periods of asphyxia that are a normal phenomenon associated with all uterine contractions. This should not cause concern as the healthy fetus has a remarkable ability to adapt to these repeated but short periods of asphyxia. This means that the healthy fetus is typically not at risk of hypotension and injury during uncomplicated labour even during repeated brief decelerations. The physiologically incorrect theories surrounding decelerations that ignore the natural occurrence of repeated asphyxia probably gained widespread support to help explain why many babies are born healthy despite repeated decelerations during labour. We propose that a unified and physiological understanding of intrapartum decelerations that accepts the true nature of labour is critical to improve interpretation of intrapartum fetal heart rate patterns. PMID:27328617

  9. Exercise training attenuates the pressor response evoked by peripheral chemoreflex in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Calegari, Leonardo; Mozzaquattro, Bruna B; Rossato, Douglas D; Quagliotto, Edson; Ferreira, Janaina B; Rasia-Filho, Alberto; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-09-01

    The effects of exercise training (ExT) on the pressor response elicited by potassium cyanide (KCN) in the rat model of ischemia-induced heart failure (HF) are unknown. We evaluated the effects of ExT on chemoreflex sensitivity and its interaction with baroreflex in rats with HF. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: trained HF (Tr-HF), sedentary HF (Sed-HF), trained sham (Tr-Sham), and sedentary sham (Sed-Sham). Trained animals underwent to a treadmill running protocol for 8 weeks (60 m/day, 5 days/week, 16 m/min). After ExT, arterial pressure (AP), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), peripheral chemoreflex (KCN: 100 μg/kg body mass), and cardiac function were evaluated. The results demonstrate that ExT induces an improvement in BRS and attenuates the pressor response to KCN relative to the Sed-HF group (P < 0.05). The improvement in BRS was associated with a reduction in the pressor response following ExT in HF rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, ExT induced a reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and pulmonary congestion compared with the Sed-HF group (P < 0.05). The pressor response to KCN in the hypotensive state is decreased in sedentary HF rats. These results suggest that ExT improves cardiac function and BRS and attenuates the pressor response evoked by KCN in HF rats. PMID:27295522

  10. Control of the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid hydrogels for tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Ju; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kim, Byung-Soo; Jiang, Ge; Cho, Il Hwan; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2008-09-01

    A novel protocol to control the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels was successfully developed for tissue augmentation applications. HA has a different conformational structure in water and organic solvent, and the carboxyl group of HA is known to be the recognition site of hyaluronidase and HA receptors. Based on these findings, HA was chemically modified by grafting adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to the carboxyl group of HA in the water to prepare HA-ADH(WATER) and in the mixed solvent of water and ethanol to prepare degradation-controlled HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL). Three kinds of HA hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking of HA-ADH(WATER) or HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate, and by the crosslinking of HA-OH with divinyl sulfone (DVS). In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that HA-DVS hydrogels were degraded most rapidly, followed by HA-ADH(WATER) hydrogels and HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) hydrogels. There was no adverse effect during and after in vivo degradation tests. All of the HA hydrogel samples appeared to be biocompatible, according to the histological analysis with hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue. PMID:18022803

  11. Spinal Cord Stimulation and Augmentative Control Strategies for Leg Movement after Spinal Paralysis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Severe spinal cord injury is a devastating condition, tearing apart long white matter tracts and causing paralysis and disability of body functions below the lesion. But caudal to most injuries, the majority of neurons forming the distributed propriospinal system, the localized gray matter spinal interneuronal circuitry, and spinal motoneuron populations are spared. Epidural spinal cord stimulation can gain access to this neural circuitry. This review focuses on the capability of the human lumbar spinal cord to generate stereotyped motor output underlying standing and stepping, as well as full weight-bearing standing and rhythmic muscle activation during assisted treadmill stepping in paralyzed individuals in response to spinal cord stimulation. By enhancing the excitability state of the spinal circuitry, the stimulation can have an enabling effect upon otherwise "silent" translesional volitional motor control. Strategies for achieving functional movement in patients with severe injuries based on minimal translesional intentional control, task-specific proprioceptive feedback, and next-generation spinal cord stimulation systems will be reviewed. The role of spinal cord stimulation can go well beyond the immediate generation of motor output. With recently developed training paradigms, it can become a major rehabilitation approach in spinal cord injury for augmenting and steering trans- and sublesional plasticity for lasting therapeutic benefits.

  12. Acrolein Causes TRPA1-Mediated Sensory Irritation and Indirect Potentiation of TRPV1-Mediated Pulmonary Chemoreflex Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that acute exposure to acrolein causes immediate sensory irritation, with rapid decrease in heart rate (HR) and increase in inspiratory time (Ti), and potentiation of pulmonary chemoreflex response 24hrs later; of these effects only the latter is mediat...

  13. Sensitivity of control-augmented structure obtained by a system decomposition method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanskisobieski, Jaroslaw; Bloebaum, Christina L.; Hajela, Prabhat

    1988-01-01

    The verification of a method for computing sensitivity derivatives of a coupled system is presented. The method deals with a system whose analysis can be partitioned into subsets that correspond to disciplines and/or physical subsystems that exchange input-output data with each other. The method uses the partial sensitivity derivatives of the output with respect to input obtained for each subset separately to assemble a set of linear, simultaneous, algebraic equations that are solved for the derivatives of the coupled system response. This sensitivity analysis is verified using an example of a cantilever beam augmented with an active control system to limit the beam's dynamic displacements under an excitation force. The verification shows good agreement of the method with reference data obtained by a finite difference technique involving entire system analysis. The usefulness of a system sensitivity method in optimization applications by employing a piecewise-linear approach to the same numerical example is demonstrated. The method's principal merits are its intrinsically superior accuracy in comparison with the finite difference technique, and its compatibility with the traditional division of work in complex engineering tasks among specialty groups.

  14. Autonomic and cardiovascular responses to chemoreflex stress in apnoea divers.

    PubMed

    Steinback, Craig D; Breskovic, Toni; Banic, Ivana; Dujic, Zeljko; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2010-08-25

    Sleep apnoea, with repeated periods of hypoxia, results in cardiovascular morbidity and concomitant autonomic dysregulation. Trained apnoea divers also perform prolonged apnoeas accompanied by large lung volumes, large reductions in cardiac output and severe hypoxia and hypercapnia. We tested the hypothesis that apnoea training would be associated with decreased cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex gains and reduced respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography). Six trained divers and six controls were studied at rest and during asphyxic rebreathing. Despite an elevated resting heart rate (70+/-14 vs. 56+/-10 bpm; p=0.038), divers had a similar cardiovagal baroreflex gain (-1.22+/-0.47 beats/mmHg) as controls (-1.29+/-0.61; NS). Similarly, though MSNA burst frequency was slightly higher in divers at rest (16+/-4 bursts/min vs. 10+/-5 bursts/min, p=0.03) there was no difference in baseline burst incidence, sympathetic baroreflex gain (-3.8+/-2.1%/mmHg vs. -4.7+/-1.7%/mmHg) or respiratory modulation of MSNA between groups. Resting total peripheral resistance (11.9+/-2.6 vs. 12.3+/-2.2 mmHg/L/min) and pulse wave velocity (5.82+/-0.55 vs. 6.10+/-0.51 m/s) also were similar between divers and controls, respectively. Further, the sympathetic response to asphyxic rebreathing was not different between controls and divers (-1.70+/-1.07 vs. -1.74+/-0.84 a.u./% desaturation). Thus, these data suggest that, unlike patients with sleep apnoea, apnoea training in otherwise healthy individuals does not produce detectable autonomic dysregulation or maladaption.

  15. Force and Position Control in Humans - The Role of Augmented Feedback.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Benedikt; Keller, Martin; Leukel, Christian; Gollhofer, Albert; Taube, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    During motor behaviour, humans interact with the environment by for example manipulating objects and this is only possible because sensory feedback is constantly integrated into the central nervous system and these sensory inputs need to be weighted in order meet the task specific goals. Additional feedback presented as augmented feedback was shown to have an impact on motor control and motor learning. A number of studies investigated whether force or position feedback has an influence on motor control and neural activation. However, as in the previous studies the presentation of the force and position feedback was always identical, a recent study assessed whether not only the content but also the interpretation of the feedback has an influence on the time to fatigue of a sustained submaximal contraction and the (inhibitory) activity of the primary motor cortex using subthreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation. This paper describes one possible way to investigate the influence of the interpretation of feedback on motor behaviour by investigating the time to fatigue of submaximal sustained contractions together with the neuromuscular adaptations that can be investigated using surface EMG. Furthermore, the current protocol also describes how motor cortical (inhibitory) activity can be investigated using subthreshold TMS, a method known to act solely on the cortical level. The results show that when participants interpret the feedback as position feedback, they display a significantly shorter time to fatigue of a submaximal sustained contraction. Furthermore, subjects also displayed an increased inhibitory activity of the primary cortex when they believed to receive position feedback compared when they believed to receive force feedback. Accordingly, the results show that interpretation of feedback results in differences on a behavioural level (time to fatigue) that is also reflected in interpretation-specific differences in the amount of inhibitory M1 activity

  16. A piloted simulator investigation of side-stick controller/stability and control augmentation system requirements for helicopter visual flight tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, K. H.; Dunford, P. J.; Aiken, E. W.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    A piloted simulator experiment was conducted to assess the effects of side-stick controller characteristics and level of stability and control augmentation on handling qualities for several low-altitude control tasks. Visual flight tasks were simulated using four-window computer-generated imagery depicting either a nap-of-the-earth course or a runway with obstacles positioned to provide a slalom course. Both low speed and forward flight control laws were implemented, and a method for automatically switching control modes was developed. Variations in force-deflection characteristics and the number of axes controlled through an integrated side-stick were investigated. With high levels of stability and control augmentation, a four-axis controller with small-deflection in all four axes achieved satisfactory handling qualities for low-speed tasks.

  17. Augmenting sensorimotor control using "goal-aware" vibrotactile stimulation during reaching and manipulation behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tzorakoleftherakis, Emmanouil; Murphey, Todd D; Scheidt, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We describe two sets of experiments that examine the ability of vibrotactile encoding of simple position error and combined object states (calculated from an optimal controller) to enhance performance of reaching and manipulation tasks in healthy human adults. The goal of the first experiment (tracking) was to follow a moving target with a cursor on a computer screen. Visual and/or vibrotactile cues were provided in this experiment, and vibrotactile feedback was redundant with visual feedback in that it did not encode any information above and beyond what was already available via vision. After only 10 minutes of practice using vibrotactile feedback to guide performance, subjects tracked the moving target with response latency and movement accuracy values approaching those observed under visually guided reaching. Unlike previous reports on multisensory enhancement, combining vibrotactile and visual feedback of performance errors conferred neither positive nor negative effects on task performance. In the second experiment (balancing), vibrotactile feedback encoded a corrective motor command as a linear combination of object states (derived from a linear-quadratic regulator implementing a trade-off between kinematic and energetic performance) to teach subjects how to balance a simulated inverted pendulum. Here, the tactile feedback signal differed from visual feedback in that it provided information that was not readily available from visual feedback alone. Immediately after applying this novel "goal-aware" vibrotactile feedback, time to failure was improved by a factor of three. Additionally, the effect of vibrotactile training persisted after the feedback was removed. These results suggest that vibrotactile encoding of appropriate combinations of state information may be an effective form of augmented sensory feedback that can be applied, among other purposes, to compensate for lost or compromised proprioception as commonly observed, for example, in stroke

  18. Sympathetic neural recruitment strategies: responses to severe chemoreflex and baroreflex stress.

    PubMed

    Badrov, Mark B; Usselman, Charlotte W; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-07-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that neural coding patterns exist within the autonomic nervous system. We investigated sympathetic axonal recruitment strategies in humans during chemoreflex- and baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation using a novel action potential (AP) analysis technique. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) was collected in 11 young individuals (6 females) during baseline and two subsequent protocols: 1) severe chemoreflex stimulation (maximal end-inspiratory apnea following rebreathe), and 2) severe baroreceptor unloading (-80 mmHg lower body negative pressure; LBNP). When compared with each respective baseline, apnea and LBNP increased AP frequency and mean AP content per sympathetic burst (all P < 0.01). When APs were binned according to peak-to-peak amplitude (i.e., into "clusters"), total clusters detected increased during both apnea (Δ7 ± 5; P = 0.0009) and LBNP (Δ11 ± 8; P = 0.0012) compared with baseline. This was concomitant to an increased number of active clusters per burst during apnea (Δ3 ± 1; P < 0.0001) and LBNP (Δ3 ± 3; P = 0.0076). At baseline and during apnea (R(2) = 0.98; P < 0.0001) and LBNP (R(2) = 0.95; P < 0.0001), a pattern emerged whereby AP cluster latency decreased as cluster size increased. Furthermore, the AP cluster latency profile was shifted downward during apnea (∼53 ms) and upward during LBNP (∼31 ms). The data indicate that variations in synaptic delays and latent subpopulations of larger axons exist as recruitment strategies for sympathetic outflow. The synaptic delay component appears to express reflex specificity, whereas latent subpopulation recruitment demonstrates sensitivity to stress severity.

  19. Sympathetic neural recruitment strategies: responses to severe chemoreflex and baroreflex stress

    PubMed Central

    Badrov, Mark B.; Usselman, Charlotte W.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that neural coding patterns exist within the autonomic nervous system. We investigated sympathetic axonal recruitment strategies in humans during chemoreflex- and baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation using a novel action potential (AP) analysis technique. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) was collected in 11 young individuals (6 females) during baseline and two subsequent protocols: 1) severe chemoreflex stimulation (maximal end-inspiratory apnea following rebreathe), and 2) severe baroreceptor unloading (−80 mmHg lower body negative pressure; LBNP). When compared with each respective baseline, apnea and LBNP increased AP frequency and mean AP content per sympathetic burst (all P < 0.01). When APs were binned according to peak-to-peak amplitude (i.e., into “clusters”), total clusters detected increased during both apnea (Δ7 ± 5; P = 0.0009) and LBNP (Δ11 ± 8; P = 0.0012) compared with baseline. This was concomitant to an increased number of active clusters per burst during apnea (Δ3 ± 1; P < 0.0001) and LBNP (Δ3 ± 3; P = 0.0076). At baseline and during apnea (R2 = 0.98; P < 0.0001) and LBNP (R2 = 0.95; P < 0.0001), a pattern emerged whereby AP cluster latency decreased as cluster size increased. Furthermore, the AP cluster latency profile was shifted downward during apnea (∼53 ms) and upward during LBNP (∼31 ms). The data indicate that variations in synaptic delays and latent subpopulations of larger axons exist as recruitment strategies for sympathetic outflow. The synaptic delay component appears to express reflex specificity, whereas latent subpopulation recruitment demonstrates sensitivity to stress severity. PMID:25947171

  20. Semiochemical lures reduce emigration and enhance pest control services in open-field predator augmentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Augmentation biocontrol is a commercially viable pest management tactic in enclosed glasshouse environments, but is far less effective in open-field agriculture where newly released enemies rapidly disperse from release sites. We tested the potential for behavior-modifying semiochemicals to increase...

  1. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) flight characterization experiments performed using an F/A-18 (TN 853). AAC was designed and developed specifically for launch vehicles, and is currently part of the baseline autopilot design for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The scope covered here includes a brief overview of the algorithm (covered in more detail elsewhere), motivation and benefits of flight testing, top-level SLS flight test objectives, applicability of the F/A-18 as a platform for testing a launch vehicle control design, test cases designed to fully vet the AAC algorithm, flight test results, and conclusions regarding the functionality of AAC. The AAC algorithm developed at Marshall Space Flight Center is a forward loop gain multiplicative adaptive algorithm that modifies the total attitude control system gain in response to sensed model errors or undesirable parasitic mode resonances. The AAC algorithm provides the capability to improve or decrease performance by balancing attitude tracking with the mitigation of parasitic dynamics, such as control-structure interaction or servo-actuator limit cycles. In the case of the latter, if unmodeled or mismodeled parasitic dynamics are present that would otherwise result in a closed-loop instability or near instability, the adaptive controller decreases the total loop gain to reduce the interaction between these dynamics and the controller. This is in contrast to traditional adaptive control logic, which focuses on improving performance by increasing gain. The computationally simple AAC attitude control algorithm has stability properties that are reconcilable in the context of classical frequency-domain criteria (i.e., gain and phase margin). The algorithm assumes that the baseline attitude control design is well-tuned for a nominal trajectory and is designed to adapt only when necessary. Furthermore, the adaptation is attracted to the nominal design and adapts only on an as-needed basis

  2. A flight investigation of the stability, control, and handling qualities of an augmented jet flap STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vomaske, R. F.; Innis, R. C.; Swan, B. E.; Grossmith, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The stability, control, and handling qualities of an augmented jet flap STOL airplane are presented. The airplane is an extensively modified de Havilland Buffalo military transport. The modified airplane has two fan-jet engines which provide vectorable thrust and compressed air for the augmentor jet flap and Boundary-Layer Control (BLC). The augmentor and BLC air is cross ducted to minimize asymmetric moments produced when one engine is inoperative. The modifications incorporated in the airplane include a Stability Augmentation System (SAS), a powered elevator, and a powered lateral control system. The test gross weight of the airplane was between 165,000 and 209,000 N (37,000 and 47,000 lb). Stability, control, and handling qualities are presented for the airspeed range of 40 to 180 knots. The lateral-directional handling qualities are considered satisfactory for the normal operating range of 65 to 160 knots airspeed when the SAS is functioning. With the SAS inoperative, poor turn coordination and spiral instability are primary deficiencies contributing to marginal handling qualities in the landing approach. The powered elevator control system enhanced the controllability in pitch, particularly in the landing flare and stall recovery.

  3. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; Vanzwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of twenty five constant pitch-rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control.

  4. Thrust Augmentation Through Active Flow Control: Lessons from a Bluegill Sunfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Imran; Mittal, Rajat; Lauder, George

    2002-11-01

    Numerical simulations are being used to analyze the effect that vortices shed from the dorsal fin have on the thrust of the tail fin for a Bluegill Sunfish. The simulations are being carried out using a Cartesian grid method which allows us to simulate flows with complex moving boundararies on stationary Cartesian grids. The simulations attempt to model the kinematics of the fin motion and the flow conditions as measured by Drucker & Lauder (J. Exp. Bio. Vol. 202, pp 2393-2412, 1999) for a live specimen using PIV. Our simulations indicate that vortex shedding from the upstream dorsal fin is indeed capable of increasing the thrust of the tail fin significantly. However, this thrust augmentation is found to be quite sensitive to the phase relationship between the two flapping fins. Furthermore, the maximum thrust augmentation is found for phase angles that match those observed for the Bluegill Sunfish! The numerical simulation allow us to examine the underlying physical mechanism for this thrust augmentation and results pertaining to this will be presented.

  5. Galantamine efficacy and tolerability as an augmentative therapy in autistic children: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ghaleiha, Ali; Ghyasvand, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Farokhnia, Mehdi; Yadegari, Noorollah; Tabrizi, Mina; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Yekehtaz, Habibeh; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2014-07-01

    The role of cholinergic abnormalities in autism was recently evidenced and there is a growing interest in cholinergic modulation, emerging for targeting autistic symptoms. Galantamine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and an allosteric potentiator of nicotinic receptors. This study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of galantamine as an augmentative therapy to risperidone, in autistic children. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, 40 outpatients aged 4-12 years whom had a diagnosis of autism (DSM IV-TR) and a score of 12 or higher on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C) Irritability subscale were equally randomized to receive either galantamine (up to 24 mg/day) or placebo, in addition to risperidone (up to 2 mg/day), for 10 weeks. We rated participants by ABC-C and a side effects checklist, at baseline and at weeks 5 and 10. By the study endpoint, the galantamine-treated patients showed significantly greater improvement in the Irritability (P = 0.017) and Lethargy/Social Withdrawal (P = 0.005) subscales than the placebo group. The difference between the two groups in the frequency of side effects was not significant. In conclusion, galantamine augmentation was shown to be a relatively effective and safe augmentative strategy for alleviating some of the autism-related symptoms.

  6. Development and human factors analysis of an augmented reality interface for multi-robot tele-operation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sam; Lucas, Nathan P.; Ellis, R. Darin; Pandya, Abhilash

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a seamlessly controlled human multi-robot system comprised of ground and aerial robots of semiautonomous nature for source localization tasks. The system combines augmented reality interfaces capabilities with human supervisor's ability to control multiple robots. The role of this human multi-robot interface is to allow an operator to control groups of heterogeneous robots in real time in a collaborative manner. It used advanced path planning algorithms to ensure obstacles are avoided and that the operators are free for higher-level tasks. Each robot knows the environment and obstacles and can automatically generate a collision-free path to any user-selected target. It displayed sensor information from each individual robot directly on the robot in the video view. In addition, a sensor data fused AR view is displayed which helped the users pin point source information or help the operator with the goals of the mission. The paper studies a preliminary Human Factors evaluation of this system in which several interface conditions are tested for source detection tasks. Results show that the novel Augmented Reality multi-robot control (Point-and-Go and Path Planning) reduced mission completion times compared to the traditional joystick control for target detection missions. Usability tests and operator workload analysis are also investigated.

  7. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  8. Serotonin in the solitary tract nucleus shortens the laryngeal chemoreflex in anaesthetized neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, William T; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Failure to terminate apnoea and arouse is likely to contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Serotonin is deficient in the brainstems of babies who died of SIDS. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) would shorten reflex apnoea. What is the main finding and its importance? Serotonin microinjected into the NTS shortened the apnoea and respiratory inhibition associated with the laryngeal chemoreflex. Moreover, this effect was achieved through a 5-HT3 receptor. This is a new insight that is likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of SIDS. The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR), an airway-protective reflex that causes apnoea and bradycardia, has long been suspected as an initiating event in the sudden infant death syndrome. Serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT receptors may be deficient in the brainstems of babies who die of sudden infant death syndrome, and 5-HT seems to be important in terminating apnoeas directly or in causing arousals or as part of the process of autoresuscitation. We hypothesized that 5-HT in the brainstem would limit the duration of the LCR. We studied anaesthetized rat pups between 7 and 21 days of age and made microinjections into the cisterna magna or into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Focal, bilateral microinjections of 5-HT into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. The 5-HT1a receptor antagonist, WAY 100635, did not affect the LCR consistently, nor did a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, alter the duration of the LCR. The 5-HT3 specific agonist, 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-biguanide, microinjected bilaterally into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. Thus, endogenous 5-HT released within the NTS may curtail the respiratory depression that is part of the LCR, and serotonergic shortening of the LCR may be attributed to activation of 5-HT3 receptors within the NTS. 5-HT3 receptors are expressed presynaptically on C

  9. Issues of Mitigation Strategies in Augmented System for Next Generation Control Room

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan Q. Tran

    2007-08-01

    Past research on augmented systems has been predominately concerned with measuring and classifying an operator’s functional states. Only recently has the field begun researching mitigation strategies. The purpose of this paper is to add further conceptual understanding to mitigation strategies. Based upon the decision making literature, we pose three issues that mitigation strategies need to resolve: the types of decision strategies an operator uses, the structure of the information that an operator processes, and finally, the cue or pattern of cues that the operator relies on in making decisions. These issues are important to ensure that mitigation strategies are congruent to operator’s decision-making behaviors.

  10. Antidepressant Augmentation Using the NMDA-Antagonist Memantine: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric G.; Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Ulbricht, Christine M.; Landolin, Chelsea S.; Patel, Jayendra K.; Rothschild, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intravenous NMDA antagonists have shown promising results in rapidly ameliorating depression symptoms, but placebo-controlled trials of oral NMDA antagonists as monotherapy have not observed efficacy. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT00344682) of the NMDA antagonist memantine as an augmentation treatment for patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder. Method 31 participants with partial or nonresponse to their current antidepressant were randomized (from 2006–2011) to add memantine (flexible dose 5–20 mg/day, with all memantine group participants reaching the dose of 20 mg/day) (n= 15) or placebo (n= 16) to their existing treatment for 8 weeks. The primary outcome, change in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Score (MADRS), was evaluated with repeated measures mixed effects models using last-observation-carried-forward methods. Secondary outcomes included other depression and anxiety rating scales, suicidal and delusional ideation, and other adverse effects. Results Participants receiving memantine did not show a statistically or clinically significant change in MADRS scores compared to placebo, either over the entire study (β=0.133, favoring placebo, p=0.74) or at study completion (week 8 MADRS score change: −7.13 +/−6.61 (memantine); −7.25 +/−11.14 (placebo), p=0.97). A minimal-to-small effect size (comparing change to baseline variability) was observed (d=0.19), favoring placebo. Similarly, no substantial effect sizes favoring memantine, nor statistically significant between-group differences, were observed on secondary efficacy or safety outcomes. Conclusions This trial did not detect significant statistical or effect size differences between memantine and placebo augmentation among nonresponders or poor responders to conventional antidepressants. While the small number of participants is a limitation, this study suggests memantine lacks substantial efficacy as an augmentation treatment against

  11. Respiratory and sympathetic chemoreflex regulation by Kölliker-Fuse neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Rosélia S; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S

    2015-02-01

    Chemoreceptor activation increases phrenic nerve activity (PNA) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The dorsolateral pontine neurons, including the parabrachial nucleus and the Kölliker-Fuse (KF) region project to several brainstem areas involved in autonomic and respiratory regulation. Here the objective was to further test the hypothesis that the KF region could contribute to central and peripheral sympathetic chemoreflex activation. In urethane-anesthetized sino-aortic denervated or intact and vagotomized male Wistar rats (N = 7-8/group), hypercapnia (end-expiratory CO2 from 5 to 10 %) or KCN increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), splanchnic SNA, and PNA frequency and amplitude. Bilateral injection of muscimol (GABA-A agonist; 2 mM-50 nl) into the KF region increased resting PNA amplitude and reduced resting PNA frequency, without significant changes in resting MAP and SNA. Bilateral blockade of the KF region reduced the rise in MAP, sSNA, and PNA frequency and amplitude produced by hypercapnia or hypoxia. Our data suggest that the KF neurons could integrate and modulate breathing and sympathetic outflow during chemoreceptor activation.

  12. Flight Testing of the Space Launch System (SLS) Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) Algorithm on an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Wall, John H.; Miller, Chris J.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2014-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Mechanics and Analysis Division developed an adaptive augmenting control (AAC) algorithm for launch vehicles that improves robustness and performance on an as-needed basis by adapting a classical control algorithm to unexpected environments or variations in vehicle dynamics. This was baselined as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) flight control system. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to partner with the SLS Program and the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) to flight test the AAC algorithm on a manned aircraft that can achieve a high level of dynamic similarity to a launch vehicle and raise the technology readiness of the algorithm early in the program. This document reports the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  13. Respirator triggering of electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT): differences in dynamic changes between augmented ventilation and controlled mechanical ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Kleinsasser, Axel; Schuster, Antonius H.; Loeckinger, Alexander; Frede, Thomas; Springer, Peter; Hoermann, Christoph; zur Nedden, Dieter

    2000-04-01

    The purpose was to evaluate differences in dynamic changes of the lung aeration (air-tissue ratio) between augmented modes of ventilation (AMV) and controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) in normal subjects. 4 volunteers, ventilated with the different respirator protocols via face mask, were scanned using the EBCT in the 50 ms mode. A software analyzed the respirator's digitized pressure and volume signals of two subsequent ventilation phases. Using these values it was possible to calculate the onset of inspiration or expiration of the next respiratory phase. The calculated starting point was then used to trigger the EBCT. The dynamic changes of air- tissue ratios were evaluated in three separate regions: a ventral, an intermediate and a dorsal area. AMV results in increase of air-tissue ratio in the dorsal lung area due to the active contraction of the diaphragm, whereas CMV results in a more pronounced increase in air-tissue ratio of the ventral lung area. This study gives further insight into the dynamic changes of the lung's biomechanics by comparing augmented ventilation and controlled mechanical ventilation in the healthy proband.

  14. An investigation of side-stick-controller/stability and control-augmentation system requirements for helicopter terrain flight under reduced visibility conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, K. H.; Glusman, S. I.; Aiken, E. W.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    Simulation of the reduced visibility tasks is effected by providing the pilot with a visually coupled, helmet-mounted display of flight-control symbols superimposed upon terrain-board imagery. Forward-flight, low-speed, and precision-hover control modes are implemented, and a method is developed for the blending of control laws between each control mode. An investigation is made of the variations in the level of integration of primary control functions on a single side-stick controller. For most of the flight tasks investigated, separated controller configurations are preferred to a single, fully integrated side-stick device. Satisfactory handling qualities over all controller configurations are attained only for a precision-hover task conducted with a high level of stability and control augmentation. For most tasks flown with the helmet-mounted display significant degradation in handling qualities occurs relative to the identical tasks flown under visual flight conditions.

  15. Ribavirin in Cancer Immunotherapies: Controlling Nitric Oxide Augments Cytotoxic Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Kast, Richard E

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Either ribavirin (RBV) or cyclophosphamide (CY) can shift an immune response from Th2 toward a Th1 cytokine profile. CY is used in this role in various current cancer immunotherapy attempts but with mixed success. More potent and reliable immunoadjuvants and Th1 response biasing methods are needed. RBV is used today mainly to augment interferon-alpha treatment of hepatitis C. RBV shifts an immune response from Th2 toward Th1 more effectively than CY and may be a safe and useful adjuvant for current cancer immunotherapeutic efforts. RBV is thought to act by inhibition of tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis. Tetrahydrobiopterin is an essential cofactor for all known isoforms of nitric oxide synthase. Lowered nitric oxide favors Th1 development as high levels favor Th2 weighting. PMID:12659664

  16. Augmented thermal bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurity of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pump to maintain isothermality in the source.

  17. Augmented Thermal Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurality of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pumps to maintain isothermality in the source.

  18. Reconfigurable Control Design with Neural Network Augmentation for a Modified F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.

    2007-01-01

    The viewgraphs present background information about reconfiguration control design, design methods used for paper, control failure survivability results, and results and time histories of tests. Topics examined include control reconfiguration, general information about adaptive controllers, model reference adaptive control (MRAC), the utility of neural networks, radial basis functions (RBF) neural network outputs, neurons, and results of investigations of failures.

  19. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control:In-Flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for the Space Launch System (SLS) has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of the launch vehicle's baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a potential manual steering mode were also investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority, which is the subject of this paper. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of 25 constant pitch rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control, evaluating six different nominal and off-nominal test case scenarios. Pilot comments and PIO ratings were given following each trajectory and correlated with aircraft state data and internal controller signals post-flight.

  20. Active structural control for damping augmentation and compensation of thermal distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    A large space-based Focus Mission Interferometer is used as a testbed for the NASA Controls and Structures Interaction Program. Impedance-based adaptive structural control and control of thermal disturbances are demonstrated using an end-to-end simulation of the system's optical performance. Attention is also given to integrated optical/structural modeling and a hierarchical, layered control strategy.

  1. Can Atypical Antipsychotic Augmentation Reduce Subsequent Treatment Failure More Effectively Among Depressed Patients with a Higher Degree of Treatment Resistance? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Ahn, Il Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atypical antipsychotic augmentation was demonstrated to be efficacious in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in previous meta-analyses. We investigate whether there are differences in the effect size of atypical antipsychotic augmentation in major depressive disorder according to the degree of treatment resistance. Methods: A comprehensive search of four databases identified 11 randomized controlled trials. The 11 trials, which included 3 341 participants, were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Atypical antipsychotic augmentation of antidepressant therapy showed superior efficacy compared to antidepressant monotherapy in TRD in terms of both response and remission rates (response, risk ratio [RR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25 to 1.53; remission, RR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.42 to 1.85). In addition, regarding response rates in the TRD trials, atypical antipsychotic augmentation exhibited significantly different effect sizes according to the degree of treatment resistance (TRD 1: RR = 1.24; TRD 2: RR = 1.37; TRD 2–4: RR = 1.58). In non-TRD trials, atypical antipsychotic augmentation failed to show superior efficacy over antidepressant monotherapy in terms of remission rates (RR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.69 to 1.14). Atypical antipsychotic augmentation of antidepressant therapy exhibits greater effect size in patients with a higher degree of treatment resistance. Conclusions: This finding strengthens the rationale for considering atypical antipsychotic augmentation among depressed patients with multiple previous treatment failures in clinical practice. The efficacy of atypical antipsychotic augmentation for non-TRD seems to be different from that for TRD and, thus, further studies of non-TRD populations are needed. PMID:25770098

  2. Study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: Antiglucocorticoid augmentation of anti-Depressants in Depression (The ADD Study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some patients with depression do not respond to first and second line conventional antidepressants and are therefore characterised as suffering from treatment refractory depression (TRD). On-going psychosocial stress and dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are both associated with an attenuated clinical response to antidepressants. Preclinical data shows that co-administration of corticosteroids leads to a reduction in the ability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to increase forebrain 5-hydroxytryptamine, while co-administration of antiglucocorticoids has the opposite effect. A Cochrane review suggests that antiglucocorticoid augmentation of antidepressants may be effective in treating TRD and includes a pilot study of the cortisol synthesis inhibitor, metyrapone. The Antiglucocorticoid augmentation of anti-Depressants in Depression (The ADD Study) is a multicentre randomised placebo controlled trial of metyrapone augmentation of serotonergic antidepressants in a large population of patients with TRD in the UK National Health Service. Methods/design Patients with moderate to severe treatment refractory Major Depression aged 18 to 65 will be randomised to metyrapone 500 mg twice daily or placebo for three weeks, in addition to on-going conventional serotonergic antidepressants. The primary outcome will be improvement in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score five weeks after randomisation (i.e. two weeks after trial medication discontinuation). Secondary outcomes will include the degree of persistence of treatment effect for up to 6 months, improvements in quality of life and also safety and tolerability of metyrapone. The ADD Study will also include a range of sub-studies investigating the potential mechanism of action of metyrapone. Discussion Strengths of the ADD study include broad inclusion criteria meaning that the sample will be representative of patients with TRD treated within the UK National Health

  3. Lip augmentation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Patrick J; Hilger, Peter A

    2004-02-01

    Lip augmentation has become increasingly popular in recent years as a reflection of cultural trends emphasizing youth and beauty. Techniques to enhance the appearance of the lips have evolved with advances in biotechnology. An understanding of lip anatomy and aesthetics forms the basis for successful results. We outline the pertinent anatomy and aesthetics of the preoperative evaluation. A summary of various filler materials available is provided. Augmentation options include both injectable and open surgical techniques. The procedures and materials currently favored by the authors are described in greater detail.

  4. Flow Control Research at NASA Langley in Support of High-Lift Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Jones, Gregory S.; Moore, Mark D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the efforts at NASA Langley to apply active and passive flow control techniques for improved high-lift systems, and advanced vehicle concepts utilizing powered high-lift techniques. The development of simplified high-lift systems utilizing active flow control is shown to provide significant weight and drag reduction benefits based on system studies. Active flow control that focuses on separation, and the development of advanced circulation control wings (CCW) utilizing unsteady excitation techniques will be discussed. The advanced CCW airfoils can provide multifunctional controls throughout the flight envelope. Computational and experimental data are shown to illustrate the benefits and issues with implementation of the technology.

  5. Augmentation cheiloplasty.

    PubMed

    Ho, L C

    1994-06-01

    A technique of augmentation cheiloplasty with prior correction of a thin vermillion is described. Preserving and accentuating the natural contours of the lips is emphasised in vermillion correction and volume expansion with fat cell grafts. Thin vermillion correction, lip volume expansion and the state of fat cell grafts are reviewed.

  6. An Action Dependent Heuristic Dynamic Programming-controlled Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for Transient Stability Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinpu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaopeng

    To enhance the stability of power system, the active power and reactive power can be absorbed from or released to Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit according to system power requirements. This paper proposes a control strategy based on action dependent heuristic dynamic programing (ADHDP) which can control SMES to improve the stability of electric power system with on-line learning ability. Based on back propagation (BP) neural network, ADHDP approximates the optimal control solution of nonlinear system through iteration step by step. This on-line learning ability improves its performance by learning from its own mistakes through reinforcement signal from external environment, so that it can adjust the neural network weights according to the back propagation error to achieve optimal control performance. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, simulation tests are carried out in Matlab/Simulink. And a conventional Proportional-Integral (PI) controlled method is used to compare the performance of ADHDP. Simulation results show that the proposed controller demonstrates superior damping performance on power system oscillation caused by three-phase fault and wind power fluctuation over the PI controller.

  7. Augmented Adaptive Control of a Wind Turbine in the Presence of Structural Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.; Wright, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in highly turbulent environments resulting in aerodynamic loads that can easily excite turbine structural modes, potentially causing component fatigue and failure. Two key technology drivers for turbine manufacturers are increasing turbine up time and reducing maintenance costs. Since the trend in wind turbine design is towards larger, more flexible turbines with lower frequency structural modes, manufacturers will want to develop methods to operate in the presence of these modes. Accurate models of the dynamic characteristics of new wind turbines are often not available due to the complexity and expense of the modeling task, making wind turbines ideally suited to adaptive control. In this paper, we develop theory for adaptive control with rejection of disturbances in the presence of modes that inhibit the controller. We use this method to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed, accommodate wind gusts, and reduce the interference of certain structural modes in feedback. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. The adaptive pitch controller for Region 3 is compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller.

  8. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S.; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively.

  9. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively. PMID:27271840

  10. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S.; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively. PMID:27271840

  11. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S.; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively. PMID:27271840

  12. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-06-07

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively.

  13. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A pitch active control system (PACS) was developed and flight tested on a wide body jet transport (L-1011) with a flying horizontal stabilizer. Two dual channel digital computers and the associated software provide command signals to a dual channel series servo which controls the stabilizer power actuators. Input sensor signals to the computer are pitch rate, column trim position, and dynamic pressure. Control laws are given for the PACS and the system architecture is defined. Discussions are given regarding piloted flight simulation and vehicle system simulation and vehicle system simulation tests that are performed to verify control laws and system operation prior to installation on the aircraft. Modifications to the basic aircraft included installation of the PACS, addition of a c.g. management system to provide a c.g. range from 25 to 39% mac, and downrigging of the geared elevator to provide the required nose down control authority for aft c.g. flight test conditions. Three pilots used the Cooper-Harper Rating Scale to judge flying qualities of the aircraft with PACS on and off. The handling qualities with the c.g. at 39% mac (41% stability margin) and PACS operating were judged to be as good as the handling qualities with the c.g. at 25% mac (+15% stability margin) and PACS off.

  14. Autonomy and control: augmenting the validity of the theory of planned behaviour in predicting exercise.

    PubMed

    Brickell, Tracey A; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Pretty, Grace M

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) along with additional constructs in predicting exercise, and explored the motivational antecedents of exercise intentions. Participants included 162 Canadian University College students (61% females). Measures of TPB, autonomous and controlling intention, perceived autonomy support and core autonomous intention were completed during phase 1 of data collection. Two and three weeks later behaviour was assessed. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that: (a) attitude and perceived behavioural control significantly predicted TPB intention and core autonomous intention; (b) subjective norm predicted controlling intention; and (c) perceived autonomy support predicted autonomous and core autonomous intention. TPB intention significantly predicted behaviour. TPB is a fairly useful model for predicting behaviour and important information can be gained when other measures of intention are explored.

  15. Chin augmentation.

    PubMed

    Choe, K S; Stucki-McCormick, S U

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of facial aesthetic surgery is to restore, enhance, and rejuvenate the aging face to a more youthful appearance, achieving balance and harmony. The mental area must be addressed in order to have a complete synthesis of the face. The concept of augmenting the mental area with implants has evolved so significantly that it now stands by itself as an important procedure. Various autogenous implants for chin augmentation have been in use for over 100 years but have complications. The advent of synthetic materials has given rise to various types of alloplastic implants: Gore-Tex, Medpor, Supramid, Silastic, and Mersilene. No one implant is perfect for every face. This article overviews several alloplastic implants--their advantages, disadvantages, and complications, in addition to the different techniques of preparing and delivering the implants.

  16. Pilot-optimal augmentation synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    An augmentation synthesis method usable in the absence of quantitative handling qualities specifications, and yet explicitly including design objectives based on pilot-rating concepts, is presented. The algorithm involves the unique approach of simultaneously solving for the stability augmentation system (SAS) gains, pilot equalization and pilot rating prediction via optimal control techniques. Simultaneous solution is required in this case since the pilot model (gains, etc.) depends upon the augmented plant dynamics, and the augmentation is obviously not a priori known. Another special feature is the use of the pilot's objective function (from which the pilot model evolves) to design the SAS.

  17. Augmentative Biological Control Using Parasitoids for Fruit Fly Management in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Flávio R M; Ricalde, Marcelo P

    2012-01-01

    The history of classical biological control of fruit flies in Brazil includes two reported attempts in the past 70 years. The first occurred in 1937 when an African species of parasitoid larvae (Tetrastichus giffardianus) was introduced to control the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata and other tephritids. The second occurred in September 1994 when the exotic parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, originally from Gainesville, Florida, was introduced by a Brazilian agricultural corporation (EMBRAPA) to evaluate the parasitoid's potential for the biological control of Anastrepha spp. and Ceratitis capitata. Although there are numerous native Brazilian fruit fly parasitoids, mass rearing of these native species is difficult. Thus, D. longicaudata was chosen due to its specificity for the family Tephritidae and its ease of laboratory rearing. In this paper we review the literature on Brazilian fruit fly biological control and suggest that those tactics can be used on a large scale, together creating a biological barrier to the introduction of new fruit fly populations, reducing the source of outbreaks and the risk of species spread, while decreasing the use of insecticides on fruit destined for domestic and foreign markets. PMID:26466795

  18. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small horizontal tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Kairys, A. A.; Maass, C. A.; Siegart, C. D.; Rakness, W. L.; Mijares, R. D.; King, R. W.; Peterson, R. S.; Hurley, S. R.; Wickson, D.

    1982-01-01

    A limited authority pitch active control system (PACS) was developed for a wide body jet transport (L-1011) with a flying horizontal stabilizer. Two dual channel digital computers and the associated software provide command signals to a dual channel series servo which controls the stabilizer power actuators. Input sensor signals to the computer are pitch rate, column-trim position, and dynamic pressure. Control laws are given for the PACS and the system architecture is defined. The piloted flight simulation and vehicle system simulation tests performed to verify control laws and system operation prior to installation on the aircraft are discussed. Modifications to the basic aircraft are described. Flying qualities of the aircraft with the PACS on and off were evaluated. Handling qualities for cruise and high speed flight conditions with the c.g. at 39% mac ( + 1% stability margin) and PACS operating were judged to be as good as the handling qualities with the c.g. at 25% (+15% stability margin) and PACS off.

  19. Augmentative Biological Control Using Parasitoids for Fruit Fly Management in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Flávio R. M.; Ricalde, Marcelo P.

    2012-01-01

    The history of classical biological control of fruit flies in Brazil includes two reported attempts in the past 70 years. The first occurred in 1937 when an African species of parasitoid larvae (Tetrastichus giffardianus) was introduced to control the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata and other tephritids. The second occurred in September 1994 when the exotic parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, originally from Gainesville, Florida, was introduced by a Brazilian agricultural corporation (EMBRAPA) to evaluate the parasitoid’s potential for the biological control of Anastrepha spp. and Ceratitis capitata. Although there are numerous native Brazilian fruit fly parasitoids, mass rearing of these native species is difficult. Thus, D. longicaudata was chosen due to its specificity for the family Tephritidae and its ease of laboratory rearing. In this paper we review the literature on Brazilian fruit fly biological control and suggest that those tactics can be used on a large scale, together creating a biological barrier to the introduction of new fruit fly populations, reducing the source of outbreaks and the risk of species spread, while decreasing the use of insecticides on fruit destined for domestic and foreign markets. PMID:26466795

  20. Organelle size control - increasing vacuole content activates SNAREs to augment organelle volume through homotypic fusion.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Yann; Neumann, Heinz; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Cells control the size of their compartments relative to cell volume, but there is also size control within each organelle. Yeast vacuoles neither burst nor do they collapse into a ruffled morphology, indicating that the volume of the organellar envelope is adjusted to the amount of content. It is poorly understood how this adjustment is achieved. We show that the accumulating content of yeast vacuoles activates fusion of other vacuoles, thus increasing the volume-to-surface ratio. Synthesis of the dominant compound stored inside vacuoles, polyphosphate, stimulates binding of the chaperone Sec18/NSF to vacuolar SNAREs, which activates them and triggers fusion. SNAREs can only be activated by lumenal, not cytosolic, polyphosphate (polyP). Control of lumenal polyP over SNARE activation in the cytosol requires the cytosolic cyclin-dependent kinase Pho80-Pho85 and the R-SNARE Nyv1. These results suggest that cells can adapt the volume of vacuoles to their content through feedback from the vacuole lumen to the SNAREs on the cytosolic surface of the organelle.

  1. Controlled Cavitation to Augment SWL Stone Comminution: Mechanistic Insights In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been documented to result from mechanical stresses conferred directly to the stone, as well as the activity of cavitational microbubbles. Studies have demonstrated that the presence of this cavitation activity is crucial for stone subdivision; however, its exact role in the comminution process remains somewhat weakly defined, in part due to the fact that it is difficult to isolate the cavitational component from the shock waves themselves. In this study, we further explored the importance of cavitation in SWL stone comminution through the use of histotripsy ultrasound therapy. Histotripsy was utilized to target model stones designed to mimic the mid-range tensile fracture strength of naturally occurring cystine calculi with controlled cavitation at strategic time points in the SWL comminution process. All SWL was applied at a peak-positive pressure (p+) of 34 MPa and a peak-negative pressure (p−) of 8 MPa; a shock rate of 1 Hz was used. Histotripsy pulses had a p− of 33 MPa and were applied at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 100 Hz. Ten model stones were sonicated in-vitro with each of five different treatment schemes: A. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) with 0.7 seconds of histotripsy interleaved between successive shocks (totaling to 42,000 pulses); B. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) followed by 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (1 burst per second, totaling to 42,000 pulses); C. 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses) followed by 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks); D. 10 minutes SWL-only (600 shocks); E. 10 minutes histotripsy-only applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses). Following sonication, debris was collected and sieved through 8, 6, 4, and 2 mm filters. It was found that SWL-only generated a broad range of fragment sizes, with an average of 14.9 ± 24.1% of the original stone mass remaining >8 mm. Histotripsy-only eroded the surface of stones to tiny

  2. Distribution of Fos-Like Immunoreactivity, Catecholaminergic and Serotoninergic Neurons Activated by the Laryngeal Chemoreflex in the Medulla Oblongata of Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolu; Guo, Ruichen; Zhao, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) induces apnea, glottis closure, bradycardia and hypertension in young and maturing mammals. We examined the distribution of medullary nuclei that are activated by the LCR and used immunofluorescent detection of Fos protein as a cellular marker for neuronal activation to establish that the medullary catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons participate in the modulation of the LCR. The LCR was elicited by the infusion of KCl-HCl solution into the laryngeal lumen of adult rats in the experimental group, whereas the control group received the same surgery but no infusion. In comparison, the number of regions of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) that were activated by the LCR significantly increased in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), the loose formation of the nucleus ambiguus (AmbL), the rostral ventral respiratory group (RVRG), the ventrolateral reticular complex (VLR), the pre-Bötzinger complex (PrBöt), the Bötzinger complex (Böt), the spinal trigeminal nucleus (SP5), and the raphe obscurus nucleus (ROb) bilaterally from the medulla oblongata. Furthermore, 12.71% of neurons with FLI in the dorsolateral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (SolDL) showed tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity (TH-ir, catecholaminergic), and 70.87% of neurons with FLI in the ROb were serotoninergic. Our data demonstrated the distribution of medullary nuclei that were activated by the LCR, and further demonstrated that catecholaminergic neurons of the SolDL and serotoninergic neurons of the ROb were activated by the LCR, indicating the potential central pathway of the LCR. PMID:26087133

  3. Do peripheral and/or central chemoreflexes influence skin blood flow in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Matthew J.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Voluntary apnea activates the central and peripheral chemoreceptors, leading to a rise in sympathetic nerve activity and limb vasoconstriction (i.e., brachial blood flow velocity and forearm cutaneous vascular conductance decrease to a similar extent). Whether peripheral and/or central chemoreceptors contribute to the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response remains unknown. We performed three separate experiments in healthy young men to test the following three hypotheses. First, inhibition of peripheral chemoreceptors with brief hyperoxia inhalation (100% O2) would attenuate the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to voluntary apnea. Second, activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors with 5 min of hypoxia (10% O2, 90% N2) would augment the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to voluntary apnea. Third, activation of the central chemoreceptors with 5 min of hypercapnia (7% CO2, 30% O2, 63% N2) would have no influence on cutaneous responses to voluntary apnea. Studies were performed in the supine posture with skin temperature maintained at thermoneutral levels. Beat‐by‐beat blood pressure, heart rate, brachial blood flow velocity, and cutaneous vascular conductance were measured and changes from baseline were compared between treatments. Relative to room air, hyperoxia attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to voluntary apnea in both muscle (−16 ± 10 vs. −40 ± 12%, P = 0.023) and skin (−14 ± 6 vs. −24 ± 5%, P = 0.033). Neither hypoxia nor hypercapnia had significant effects on cutaneous responses to apnea. These data indicate that skin blood flow is controlled by the peripheral chemoreceptors but not the central chemoreceptors. PMID:25344478

  4. An electrooculogram-based binary saccade sequence classification (BSSC) technique for augmentative communication and control.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Johnalan; Burke, Edward; Condron, James

    2009-01-01

    In the field of assistive technology, the electrooculogram (EOG) can be used as a channel of communication and the basis of a man-machine interface. For many people with severe motor disabilities, simple actions such as changing the TV channel require assistance. This paper describes a method of detecting saccadic eye movements and the use of a saccade sequence classification algorithm to facilitate communication and control. Saccades are fast eye movements that occurs when a person's gaze jumps from one fixation point to another. The classification is based on pre-defined sequences of saccades, guided by a static visual template (e.g. a page or poster). The template, consisting of a table of symbols each having a clearly identifiable fixation point, is situated within view of the user. To execute a particular command, the user moves his or her gaze through a pre-defined path of eye movements. This results in a well-formed sequence of saccades which are translated into a command if a match is found in a library of predefined sequences. A coordinate transformation algorithm is applied to each candidate sequence of recorded saccades to mitigate the effect of changes in the user's position and orientation relative to the visual template. Upon recognition of a saccade sequence from the library, its associated command is executed. A preliminary experiment in which two subjects were instructed to perform a series of command sequences consisting of 8 different commands are presented in the final sections. The system is also shown to be extensible to facilitate convenient text entry via an alphabetic visual template. PMID:19965222

  5. Cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreflex activation and comparison of different methods to evaluate baroreflex gain in conscious mice using telemetry.

    PubMed

    Braga, Valdir A; Burmeister, Melissa A; Sharma, Ram V; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-10-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptors located in the carotid bodies are the primary sensors of systemic hypoxia. Although the pattern of responses elicited by peripheral chemoreceptor activation is well established in rats, lambs, and rabbits, the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreflex activation in conscious mice have not been delineated. Here we report that stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors by potassium cyanide (KCN) in conscious mice elicits a unique biphasic response in blood pressure that is characterized by an initial and robust rise followed by a decrease in blood pressure, which is accompanied by a marked reduction in heart rate. The depressor and bradycardic responses to KCN were abolished by muscarinic receptor blockade with atropine, and the pressor response was abolished by alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade with prazosin, suggesting that vagal and sympathetic drive to the heart and sympathetic drive to the vasculature mediate these cardiovascular responses. These studies characterized the chemoreflex in conscious mice and established the reliability of using them for studying hypoxia-related diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea. In another series of experiments, two methods for analyzing baroreflex sensitivity were compared: the classical pharmacological approach using phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside (i.e., the Oxford technique) or the sequence method for analyzing spontaneous baroreflex activity. Our findings indicate that both methods are reliable, and the sequence method certainly has its benefits as a predictive tool in the context of long-term noninvasive studies using telemetry. However, for absolute determination of baroreflex function, analysis of spontaneous baroreflex activity should be complemented by the classical pharmacological method. PMID:18667715

  6. In-Flight Suppression of a De-Stabilized F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John; VanZwieten, Tannen; Giiligan Eric; Miller, Chris; Hanson, Curtis; Orr, Jeb

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) has been developed for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) family of launch vehicles and implemented as a baseline part of its flight control system (FCS). To raise the technical readiness level of the SLS AAC algorithm, the Launch Vehicle Adaptive Control (LVAC) flight test program was conducted in which the SLS FCS prototype software was employed to control the pitch axis of Dryden's specially outfitted F/A-18, the Full Scale Advanced Systems Test Bed (FAST). This presentation focuses on a set of special test cases which demonstrate the successful mitigation of the unstable coupling of an F/A-18 airframe structural mode with the SLS FCS.

  7. Lamotrigine Augmentation Versus Placebo in Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhali, Mohammadrasoul; Zarrabi, Homa; Kafie, Moosa; Heidarzadeh, Abtin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used in first-line treatments for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Nevertheless, many of these patients do not respond well to initial therapy. The hypothesis of glutamatergic dysfunction in specific brain regions has been proposed in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study was designed to evaluate the possible efficacy of lamotrigine, a glutamatergic agent in Serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Method: This study was a 12-week, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive fixed-doses of lamotrigine (100 mg) to Serotonin reuptake inhibitors therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eligible subjects who had a total Y-BOCS of 21 or above were randomly assigned to receive adjunctive treatment with either lamotrigine (n = 26), or placebo (n = 27). Response to lamotrigine was defined as clinical improvement (>25% decrease in the total Y-BOCS score), which was administered at weeks 0, 8 and 12. Results: At the endpoint (week 12), significant differences were observed in obsession, compulsion, and total Y-BOCS scores comparing lamotrigine to placebo (P = 0.01, 0.005 and 0.007 respectively). The mean reduction in obsession, compulsion and total scores in lamotrigine group was about 4.15, 4.50 and 8.73, respectively. Similarly, the mean reductions in the placebo group were 2.52, 2.56 and 5.07. Effect sizes for efficacy measureswerecalculatedbyCohen’sd, and it was calculated as 0.54 for the total YBOCS. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that this augmentation is well tolerated and may be an effective strategy for patients with refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27437007

  8. Controlling Virtual Clouds and Making it Rain Particle Systems in Real Spaces Using Situated Augmented Simulation and Portable Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedley, N.; Lonergan, C. D.

    2012-07-01

    The research described in this paper reports on the design, rationale, development and implementation of a set of new geospatial interfaces that combine multi-touch interaction, portable virtual environments, 'geosimulation gaming', and mobile augmented reality. The result is a set of new ways for us to combine the capabilities of geospatial virtual environments, augmented realitiy and geosimulation. These new hybrid interfaces deliver new geospatial information experiences - new ways of connecting spatial data, simulations, and abstract concepts to real spaces. Their potential to enhance environmental perception and learning must be explored.

  9. Contribution of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory region to the expiratory-sympathetic coupling in response to peripheral chemoreflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Dias, Mirela B; Cavalcanti-Kwiatkoski, Roberta; Machado, Benedito H; Zoccal, Daniel B

    2012-08-01

    Central mechanisms of coupling between respiratory and sympathetic systems are essential for the entrainment between the enhanced respiratory drive and sympathoexcitation in response to hypoxia. However, the brainstem nuclei and neuronal network involved in these respiratory-sympathetic interactions remain unclear. Here, we evaluated whether the increase in expiratory activity and expiratory-modulated sympathoexcitation produced by the peripheral chemoreflex activation involves the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory region (RTN/pFRG). Using decerebrated arterially perfused in situ rat preparations (60-80 g), we recorded the activities of thoracic sympathetic (tSN), phrenic (PN), and abdominal nerves (AbN) as well as the extracellular activity of RTN/pFRG expiratory neurons, and reflex responses to chemoreflex activation were evaluated before and after inactivation of the RTN/pFRG region with muscimol (1 mM). In the RTN/pFRG, we identified late-expiratory (late-E) neurons (n = 5) that were silent at resting but fired coincidently with the emergence of late-E bursts in AbN after peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Bilateral muscimol microinjections into the RTN/pFRG region (n = 6) significantly reduced basal PN frequency, mean AbN activity, and the amplitude of respiratory modulation of tSN (P < 0.05). With respect to peripheral chemoreflex responses, muscimol microinjections in the RTN/pFRG enhanced the PN inspiratory response, abolished the evoked late-E activity of AbN, but did not alter either the magnitude or pattern of the tSN reflex response. These findings indicate that the RTN/pFRG region is critically involved in the processing of the active expiratory response but not of the expiratory-modulated sympathetic response to peripheral chemoreflex activation of rat in situ preparations.

  10. Risperidone Augmentation for Treatment-Resistant Aggression in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenteros, Jorge L.; Lewis, John E.; Davalos, Marisabel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of risperidone augmentation for treatment-resistant aggression in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Twenty-five children (ages 7-12 years) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) and significant aggressive behaviors were randomized to risperidone or placebo for 4…

  11. Efficacy of indigenous predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) against the citrus rust mite Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Acari: Eriophyidae): augmentation and conservation biological control in Israeli citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Yonatan; Gal, Shira; Argov, Yael; Domeratzky, Sylvie; Melamed, Eti; Gan-Mor, Samuel; Coll, Moshe; Palevsky, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The citrus rust mite (CRM), Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Acari: Eriophyidae) is a cosmopolitan key pest of citrus, inflicting severe economic damage if not controlled. In Israel, CRM damages all citrus cultivars. International regulation and increasing control failures of CRM led growers to seek sustainable biological control solutions such as acarine biological control agents. Laboratory studies conducted in Israel have indicated that the indigenous predator species Amblyseius swirskii, Iphiseius degenerans, Typhlodromus athiasae and Euseius scutalis (all Acari: Phytoseiidae) can potentially control CRM. Our general objective in the present study was to bridge the gap of knowledge between laboratory studies and the lack of control efficacy of these species in commercial orchards. Predator augmentation in the field showed that although predator populations increased immediately following releases they later decreased and did not affect CRM populations. When A. swirskii augmentation was combined with a series of maize pollen applications, A. swirskii populations were enhanced substantially and continuously but again CRM populations were not affected. Growth chamber studies with CRM-infested seedlings, with or without a maize pollen supplement, indicated that pollen provisioning led to population increase of E. scutalis and A. swirskii but only E. scutalis significantly lowered CRM populations. Control with E. scutalis was confirmed in the field on CRM infested seedlings with pollen provisioned by adjacent flowering Rhodes grass. While experiments in mature citrus orchard showed that pollen supplement usually increased predator populations they also indicated that other factors such as intraguild interactions and pesticide treatments should be taken into account when devising CRM biological control programs.

  12. Efficacy and safety of aripiprazole augmentation of clozapine in schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Srisurapanont, Manit; Suttajit, Sirijit; Maneeton, Narong; Maneeton, Benchalak

    2015-03-01

    Limited options are available for clozapine-resistant schizophrenia and intolerable side effects of clozapine. We conducted a systematic review of randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole augmentation of clozapine for schizophrenia. Electronic databases searched included PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Web of Science. This review synthesized the data of four short-term (8-24 weeks), placebo-controlled trials (N = 347). The overall relative risk (RR, 95% confidence interval) of discontinuation rates was not significantly different between groups (RR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.78 to 2.56). The pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs, 95% CIs) (Z-test; number of study; I(2)-index) suggested trends of aripiprazole augmentation benefits on overall psychotic [-0.40 (-0.87 to 0.07) (n = 3; Z = 1.68, p = 0.09; I(2) = 68%)], positive [-1.05 (-2.39 to 0.29) (n = 3; Z = 1.54, p = 0.12; I(2) = 94%)], and negative [-0.36 (-0.77 to 0.05) (n = 3; Z = 1.74, p = 0.08; I(2) = 54%)] symptoms. Despite of no benefit on three cardiometabolic indices (i.e., fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein), aripiprazole augmentation was superior for weight change with a mean difference (95% CI) of -1.36 kg (-2.35 to -0.36) (n = 3; Z = 2.67, p = 0.008; I(2) = 39%) and LDL-cholesterol with a mean difference of -11.06 mg/dL (-18.25 to -3.87) (n = 3; Z = 3.02, p = 0.003; I(2) = 31%). Aripiprazole augmentation was not correlated with headache and insomnia but significantly associated with agitation/akathesia (RR = 7.59, 95% CI = 1.43 to 40.18) (n = 3; Z = 2.38, p = 0.02; I(2) = 0%) and anxiety (RR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.02 to 7.15) (n = 1; Z = 2.00, p = 0.05). The limited short-term data suggested that aripiprazole augmentation of clozapine can minimize the cardiometabolic risk, causes agitation/akathesia, and may be effective in

  13. In-Flight Suppression of an Unstable F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Flight Control System (FCS) includes an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) component which employs a multiplicative gain update law to enhance the performance and robustness of the baseline control system for extreme off-nominal scenarios. The SLS FCS algorithm including AAC has been flight tested utilizing a specially outfitted F/A-18 fighter jet in which the pitch axis control of the aircraft was performed by a Non-linear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) controller, SLS reference models, and the SLS flight software prototype. This paper describes test cases from the research flight campaign in which the fundamental F/A-18 airframe structural mode was identified using post-flight frequency-domain reconstruction, amplified to result in closed loop instability, and suppressed in-flight by the SLS adaptive control system.

  14. In-Flight Suppression of a Destabilized F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Flight Control System (FCS) includes an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) component which employs a multiplicative gain update law to enhance the performance and robustness of the baseline control system for extreme off nominal scenarios. The SLS FCS algorithm including AAC has been flight tested utilizing a specially outfitted F/A-18 fighter jet in which the pitch axis control of the aircraft was performed by a Non-linear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) controller, SLS reference models, and the SLS flight software prototype. This paper describes test cases from the research flight campaign in which the fundamental F/A-18 airframe structural mode was identified using frequency-domain reconstruction of flight data, amplified to result in closed loop instability, and suppressed in-flight by the SLS adaptive control system.

  15. The use of the Alexis® device in breast augmentation to improve outcomes: a comparative randomized case-control survey

    PubMed Central

    Dessy, Luca Andrea; Serratore, Francesco; Ribuffo, Diego; Mazzocchi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background We present our experience in using a disposable wound retractor commonly used in abdominal surgery named Alexis® (Applied Medical Resources Corporation, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, USA), during breast augmentation in order to improve outcomes, particularly final scar length. Methods Between January 2010 and November 2012, 40 patients undergoing breast augmentation with an inframammary approach were enrolled in the present study. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 underwent breast augmentation with the standard technique; group 2 underwent breast augmentation by using the Alexis® (Applied Medical Resources Corporation) device. Patients were followed-up for a 12-month period. The time of surgery, the days of drain duration and the length of the incisions were recorded for both groups and statistical significance was evaluated with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Also, final scar appearance was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Patients in group 2 reported a lower incidence of hematomas and had shorter drain duration. The difference in scar length between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). Surgeons and patients were mostly satisfied with the final appearance of the scar. Conclusions The use of the Alexis® (Applied Medical Resources Corporation) device has proven useful in reducing the length of the inframammary incision. Interestingly, the increased visibility obtained with the use of the Alexis device allowed a better hemostasis, as suggested by the shorter drain duration and lower incidence of hematomas. However, its use prolongs the operative time, for which we recommend surgeons to allow themselves some time to become familiar with the device. Level of evidence: level I, evidence obtained from at least one properly designed randomized controlled trial. PMID:27294035

  16. Assessing the association of oxytocin augmentation with obstetric anal sphincter injury in nulliparous women: a population-based, case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rygh, Astrid B; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Körner, Hartwig; Eggebø, Torbjørn M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of oxytocin augmentation with obstetric anal sphincter injury among nulliparous women. Design Population-based, case–control study. Setting Primary and secondary teaching hospital serving a Norwegian region. Population 15 476 nulliparous women with spontaneous start of labour, single cephalic presentation and gestation ≥37 weeks delivering vaginally between 1999 and 2012. Methods Based on the presence or absence of oxytocin augmentation, episiotomy, operative vaginal delivery and birth weight (<4000 vs ≥4000 g), we modelled in logistic regression the best fit for prediction of anal sphincter injury. Within the modified model of main exposures, we tested for possible confounding, and interactions between maternal age, ethnicity, occiput posterior position and epidural analgaesia. Main outcome measure Obstetric anal sphincter injury. Results Oxytocin augmentation was associated with a higher OR of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in women giving spontaneous birth to infants weighing <4000 g (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.2). Episiotomy was not associated with sphincter injuries in spontaneous births, but with a lower OR in operative vaginal deliveries. Spontaneous delivery of infants weighing ≥4000 g was associated with a threefold higher OR, and epidural analgaesia was associated with a 30% lower OR in comparison to no epidural analgaesia. Conclusions Oxytocin augmentation was associated with a higher OR of obstetric anal sphincter injuries during spontaneous deliveries of normal-size infants. We observed a considerable effect modification between the most important factors predicting anal sphincter injuries in the active second stage of labour. PMID:25059967

  17. Effects of Mobile Augmented Reality Learning Compared to Textbook Learning on Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background By adding new levels of experience, mobile Augmented Reality (mAR) can significantly increase the attractiveness of mobile learning applications in medical education. Objective To compare the impact of the heightened realism of a self-developed mAR blended learning environment (mARble) on learners to textbook material, especially for ethically sensitive subjects such as forensic medicine, while taking into account basic psychological aspects (usability and higher level of emotional involvement) as well as learning outcomes (increased learning efficiency). Methods A prestudy was conducted based on a convenience sample of 10 third-year medical students. The initial emotional status was captured using the “Profile of Mood States” questionnaire (POMS, German variation); previous knowledge about forensic medicine was determined using a 10-item single-choice (SC) test. During the 30-minute learning period, the students were randomized into two groups: the first group consisted of pairs of students, each equipped with one iPhone with a preinstalled copy of mARble, while the second group was provided with textbook material. Subsequently, both groups were asked to once again complete the POMS questionnaire and SC test to measure changes in emotional state and knowledge gain. Usability as well as pragmatic and hedonic qualities of the learning material was captured using AttrakDiff2 questionnaires. Data evaluation was conducted anonymously. Descriptive statistics for the score in total and the subgroups were calculated before and after the intervention. The scores of both groups were tested against each other using paired and unpaired signed-rank tests. An item analysis was performed for the SC test to objectify difficulty and selectivity. Results Statistically significant, the mARble group (6/10) showed greater knowledge gain than the control group (4/10) (Wilcoxon z=2.232, P=.03). The item analysis of the SC test showed a difficulty of P=0.768 (s=0.09) and a

  18. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  19. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  20. Antipsychotic Augmentation of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Update Meta-Analysis of Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dold, Markus; Aigner, Martin; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder do not respond adequately to serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Augmentation with antipsychotic drugs can be beneficial in this regard. However, since new relevant randomized controlled trials evaluating new antipsychotics were conducted, a recalculation of the effect sizes appears necessary. Methods: We meta-analyzed all double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials comparing augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors with antipsychotics to placebo supplementation in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder. The primary outcome was mean change in the Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale total score. Secondary outcomes were obsessions, compulsions, response rates, and attrition rates. The data collection process was conducted independently by 2 authors. Hedges’s g and risks ratios were calculated as effect sizes. In preplanned meta-regressions, subgroup analyses, and sensitivity analyses, we examined the robustness of the results and explored reasons for potential heterogeneity. Results: Altogether, 14 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials (n=491) investigating quetiapine (N=4, n=142), risperidone (N=4, n=132), aripiprazole (N=2, n=79), olanzapine (N=2, n=70), paliperidone (N=1, n=34), and haloperidol (N=1, n=34) were incorporated. Augmentation with antipsychotics was significantly more efficacious than placebo in Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale total reduction (N=14, n=478; Hedges’s g=-0.64, 95% CI: -0.87 to -0.41; P=<.01). Aripiprazole (Hedges’s g=-1.35), haloperidol (Hedges’s g=-0.82), and risperidone (Hedges’s g=-0.59) significantly outperformed placebo. Antipsychotics were superior to placebo in treating obsessions, compulsions, and achieving response. There was no between-group difference concerning all-cause discontinuation. The nonsignificant meta-regressions suggest no influence of the antipsychotic dose or baseline symptom severity on the meta

  1. Mutually Augmented Cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesdorf, Florian; Pangercic, Dejan; Bubb, Heiner; Beetz, Michael

    In mac, an ergonomic dialog-system and algorithms will be developed that enable human experts and companions to be integrated into knowledge gathering and decision making processes of highly complex cognitive systems (e.g. Assistive Household as manifested further in the paper). In this event we propose to join algorithms and methodologies coming from Ergonomics and Artificial Intelligence that: a) make cognitive systems more congenial for non-expert humans, b) facilitate their comprehension by utilizing a high-level expandable control code for human experts and c) augment representation of such cognitive system into “deep representation” obtained through an interaction with human companions.

  2. Creatine Fails to Augment the Benefits from Resistance Training in Patients with HIV Infection: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Giorgos K.; Mulligan, Kathleen; DaSilva, Makani; Doyle, Julie W.; Khatami, Hootan; Schleich, Thomas; Kent-Braun, Jane A.; Schambelan, Morris

    2009-01-01

    Background Progressive resistance exercise training (PRT) improves physical functioning in patients with HIV infection. Creatine supplementation can augment the benefits derived from training in athletes and improve muscle function in patients with muscle wasting. The objective of this study was to determine whether creatine supplementation augments the effects of PRT on muscle strength, energetics, and body composition in HIV-infected patients. Methodology/Principal Findings This is a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, clinical research center-based, outpatient study in San Francisco. 40 HIV–positive men (20 creatine, 20 placebo) enrolled in a 14-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive creatine monohydrate or placebo for 14 weeks. Treatment began with a loading dose of 20 g/day or an equivalent number of placebo capsules for 5 days, followed by maintenance dosing of 4.8 g/day or placebo. Beginning at week 2 and continuing to week 14, all subjects underwent thrice-weekly supervised resistance exercise while continuing on the assigned study medication (with repeated 6-week cycles of loading and maintenance). The main outcome measurements included muscle strength (one repetition maximum), energetics (31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy), composition and size (magnetic resonance imaging), as well as total body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Thirty-three subjects completed the study (17 creatine, 16 placebo). Strength increased in all 8 muscle groups studied following PRT, but this increase was not augmented by creatine supplementation (average increase 44 vs. 42%, difference 2%, 95% CI −9.5% to 13.9%) in creatine and placebo, respectively). There were no differences between groups in changes in muscle energetics. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area increased following resistance exercise, with no additive effect of creatine. Lean body mass (LBM) increased to a significantly greater extent with creatine. Conclusions

  3. L1 Adaptive Control Augmentation System with Application to the X-29 Lateral/Directional Dynamics: A Multi-Input Multi-Output Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brian Joseph; Burken, John J.; Xargay, Enric

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an L(sub 1) adaptive control augmentation system design for multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems in the presence of unmatched uncertainties which may exhibit significant cross-coupling effects. A piecewise continuous adaptive law is adopted and extended for applicability to multi-input multi-output systems that explicitly compensates for dynamic cross-coupling. In addition, explicit use of high-fidelity actuator models are added to the L1 architecture to reduce uncertainties in the system. The L(sub 1) multi-input multi-output adaptive control architecture is applied to the X-29 lateral/directional dynamics and results are evaluated against a similar single-input single-output design approach.

  4. A placebo-controlled crossover study of iloperidone augmentation for residual anger and irritability in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F.; Fava, Maurizio; Kim, Daniel Ju Hyung; Baer, Lee; Shelton, Richard C.; Cusin, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Even when patients experience remission with antidepressants, many continue to report anger attacks and excessive irritability despite continued treatment. Iloperidone antagonizes 5-HT-2a, D2, and alpha-1 receptors, which can have anti-aggressive effects. We examined iloperidone’s safety and efficacy as an augmentation agent in outpatients with partially remitted major depressive disorder (MDD) with residual symptoms of anger and irritability. Methods: A total of 13 outpatients with partially remitted MDD [currently treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)] received four weeks of iloperidone or placebo, followed by one week of washout. Patients were then crossed over to the other treatment arm for 4 weeks. Treatment arms were randomized and double blind; and two sites were used for the study. Analyses compared treatment response using the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) Anger/Hostility Subscale as the primary outcome measure. Results: There was no significant differential effect of iloperidone × weeks on the SQ Anger/Hostility Subscore over the course of the study, compared with placebo × weeks, regardless of administration order (p = 0.77). Conclusions: Iloperidone did not significantly outperform placebo on measures of anger or irritability in patients with partially remitted MDD and residual anger/irritability. PMID:26913173

  5. Augmented Reality for Close Quarters Combat

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a state-of-the-art augmented reality training system for close-quarters combat (CQB). This system uses a wearable augmented reality system to place the user in a real environment while engaging enemy combatants in virtual space (Boston Dynamics DI-Guy). Umbra modeling and simulation environment is used to integrate and control the AR system.

  6. Status report of RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Mike; Demeo, Martha E.

    1993-01-01

    A status report of Remote Manipulator System (RMS) active damping augmentation is presented. Topics covered include: active damping augmentation; benefits of RMS ADA; simulated payload definition; sensor and actuator definition; ADA control law design; Shuttle Engineering Simulator (SES) real-time simulation; and astronaut evaluation.

  7. Augmented Reality for Close Quarters Combat

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-20

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a state-of-the-art augmented reality training system for close-quarters combat (CQB). This system uses a wearable augmented reality system to place the user in a real environment while engaging enemy combatants in virtual space (Boston Dynamics DI-Guy). Umbra modeling and simulation environment is used to integrate and control the AR system.

  8. Components of a Rice-Oilseed Rape Production System Augmented with Trichoderma sp. Tri-1 Control Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on Oilseed Rape.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Roberts, Daniel P; Xie, Lihua; Maul, Jude E; Yu, Changbing; Li, Yinshui; Zhang, Yinbo; Qin, Lu; Liao, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses on many crops throughout the world. A multicomponent treatment that consisted of the residual rice straw remaining after rice harvest and Trichoderma sp. Tri-1 (Tri-1) formulated with the oilseed rape seedcake fertilizer was used in field soil infested with S. sclerotiorum. This treatment resulted in oilseed rape seed yield that was significantly greater than the nontreated control or when the fungicide carbendizem was used in the presence of this pathogen in field trials. Yield data suggested that the rice straw, oilseed rape seedcake, and Tri-1 components of this treatment all contributed incrementally. Similar treatment results were obtained regarding reduction in disease incidence. Slight improvements in yield and disease incidence were detected when this multicomponent treatment was combined with a fungicide spray. Inhibition of sclerotial germination by this multicomponent treatment trended greater than the nontreated control at 90, 120, and 150 days in field studies but was not significantly different from this control. This multicomponent treatment resulted in increased yield relative to the nontreated control in the absence of pathogen in a greenhouse pot study, while the straw alone and the straw plus oilseed rape seedcake treatments did not; suggesting that Tri-1 was capable of promoting growth. Experiments reported here indicate that a treatment containing components of a rice-oilseed rape production system augmented with Tri-1 can control S. sclerotiorum on oilseed rape, be used in integrated strategies containing fungicide sprays for control of this pathogen, and promote plant growth.

  9. Components of a Rice-Oilseed Rape Production System Augmented with Trichoderma sp. Tri-1 Control Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on Oilseed Rape.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Roberts, Daniel P; Xie, Lihua; Maul, Jude E; Yu, Changbing; Li, Yinshui; Zhang, Yinbo; Qin, Lu; Liao, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses on many crops throughout the world. A multicomponent treatment that consisted of the residual rice straw remaining after rice harvest and Trichoderma sp. Tri-1 (Tri-1) formulated with the oilseed rape seedcake fertilizer was used in field soil infested with S. sclerotiorum. This treatment resulted in oilseed rape seed yield that was significantly greater than the nontreated control or when the fungicide carbendizem was used in the presence of this pathogen in field trials. Yield data suggested that the rice straw, oilseed rape seedcake, and Tri-1 components of this treatment all contributed incrementally. Similar treatment results were obtained regarding reduction in disease incidence. Slight improvements in yield and disease incidence were detected when this multicomponent treatment was combined with a fungicide spray. Inhibition of sclerotial germination by this multicomponent treatment trended greater than the nontreated control at 90, 120, and 150 days in field studies but was not significantly different from this control. This multicomponent treatment resulted in increased yield relative to the nontreated control in the absence of pathogen in a greenhouse pot study, while the straw alone and the straw plus oilseed rape seedcake treatments did not; suggesting that Tri-1 was capable of promoting growth. Experiments reported here indicate that a treatment containing components of a rice-oilseed rape production system augmented with Tri-1 can control S. sclerotiorum on oilseed rape, be used in integrated strategies containing fungicide sprays for control of this pathogen, and promote plant growth. PMID:26390095

  10. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  11. Augmented reality system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  12. Augmentation-related brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self

  13. Augmentation-related brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self

  14. Augmentation-related brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self.

  15. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Troedhan, Angelo; Schlichting, Izabela; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation volume. Four different biomaterials were inserted randomly (easy-graft CRYSTAL n = 38, easy-graft CLASSIC n = 41, NanoBone n = 42, BioOss n = 34), 2 ccm in each case. After a mean healing period of 8,92 months uniform tapered screw Q2-implants were inserted and Drill-Torque-Values (DTV) and ITV were recorded and compared to a group of 36 subantral sites without need of sinuslifting. DTV/ITV were processed for statistics by ANOVA-tests. Mean DTV/ITV obtained in Ncm were: Control Group 10,2/22,2, Bio-Oss 12,7/26,2, NanoBone 17,5/33,3, easy-graft CLASSIC 20,3/45,9, easy-graft CRYSTAL 23,8/56,6 Ncm, significance-level of differences throughout p < 0,05. Within the limits of this study the results suggest self-hardening solid-block-like bone-graft-materials to achieve significantly better DTV/ITV than loose granulate biomaterials for its suspected improvement of vascularization and mineralization of the subantral scaffold by full immobilization of the augmentation site towards pressure changes in the human sinus at normal breathing. PMID:25073446

  16. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Troedhan, Angelo; Schlichting, Izabela; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel

    2014-07-30

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation volume. Four different biomaterials were inserted randomly (easy-graft CRYSTAL n = 38, easy-graft CLASSIC n = 41, NanoBone n = 42, BioOss n = 34), 2 ccm in each case. After a mean healing period of 8,92 months uniform tapered screw Q2-implants were inserted and Drill-Torque-Values (DTV) and ITV were recorded and compared to a group of 36 subantral sites without need of sinuslifting. DTV/ITV were processed for statistics by ANOVA-tests. Mean DTV/ITV obtained in Ncm were: Control Group 10,2/22,2, Bio-Oss 12,7/26,2, NanoBone 17,5/33,3, easy-graft CLASSIC 20,3/45,9, easy-graft CRYSTAL 23,8/56,6 Ncm, significance-level of differences throughout p < 0,05. Within the limits of this study the results suggest self-hardening solid-block-like bone-graft-materials to achieve significantly better DTV/ITV than loose granulate biomaterials for its suspected improvement of vascularization and mineralization of the subantral scaffold by full immobilization of the augmentation site towards pressure changes in the human sinus at normal breathing.

  17. Systems development of a stall/spin research facility using remotely controlled/augmented aircraft models. Volume 1: Systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, R. J.; Jai, A. R.; Parker, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    A ground based, general purpose, real time, digital control system simulator (CSS) is specified, developed, and integrated with the existing instrumentation van of the testing facility. This CSS is built around a PDP-11/55, and its operational software was developed to meet the dual goal of providing the immediate capability to represent the F-18 drop model control laws and the flexibility for expansion to represent more complex control laws typical of control configured vehicles. Overviews of the two CSS's developed are reviewed as well as the overall system after their integration with the existing facility. Also the latest version of the F-18 drop model control laws (REV D) is described and the changes needed for its incorporation in the digital and analog CSS's are discussed.

  18. An Experimental Evaluation of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Aeroelastic Stability Augmentation in Airplane Mode of Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in the airplane mode of flight are presented. GPC is an adaptive time-domain predictive control method that uses a linear difference equation to describe the input-output relationship of the system and to design the controller. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5-scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 that was modified to incorporate a GPC-based multi-input multi-output control algorithm to individually control each of the three swashplate actuators. Wing responses were used for feedback. The GPC-based control system was highly effective in increasing the stability of the critical wing mode for all of the conditions tested, without measurable degradation of the damping in the other modes. The algorithm was also robust with respect to its performance in adjusting to rapid changes in both the rotor speed and the tunnel airspeed.

  19. Development and Flight Test of an Augmented Thrust-Only Flight Control System on an MD-11 Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Burken, John J.; Pappas, Drew

    1996-01-01

    An emergency flight control system using only engine thrust, called Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA), has been developed and flight tested on an MD-11 airplane. In this thrust-only control system, pilot flight path and track commands and aircraft feedback parameters are used to control the throttles. The PCA system was installed on the MD-11 airplane using software modifications to existing computers. Flight test results show that the PCA system can be used to fly to an airport and safely land a transport airplane with an inoperative flight control system. In up-and-away operation, the PCA system served as an acceptable autopilot capable of extended flight over a range of speeds and altitudes. The PCA approaches, go-arounds, and three landings without the use of any non-nal flight controls have been demonstrated, including instrument landing system-coupled hands-off landings. The PCA operation was used to recover from an upset condition. In addition, PCA was tested at altitude with all three hydraulic systems turned off. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only flight control; describes the MD-11 airplane and systems; and discusses PCA system development, operation, flight testing, and pilot comments.

  20. V-TIME: a treadmill training program augmented by virtual reality to decrease fall risk in older adults: study design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent work has demonstrated that fall risk can be attributed to cognitive as well as motor deficits. Indeed, everyday walking in complex environments utilizes executive function, dual tasking, planning and scanning, all while walking forward. Pilot studies suggest that a multi-modal intervention that combines treadmill training to target motor function and a virtual reality obstacle course to address the cognitive components of fall risk may be used to successfully address the motor-cognitive interactions that are fundamental for fall risk reduction. The proposed randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effects of treadmill training augmented with virtual reality on fall risk. Methods/Design Three hundred older adults with a history of falls will be recruited to participate in this study. This will include older adults (n=100), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n=100), and patients with Parkinson’s disease (n=100). These three sub-groups will be recruited in order to evaluate the effects of the intervention in people with a range of motor and cognitive deficits. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the intervention group (treadmill training with virtual reality) or to the active-control group (treadmill training without virtual reality). Each person will participate in a training program set in an outpatient setting 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Assessments will take place before, after, and 1 month and 6 months after the completion of the training. A falls calendar will be kept by each participant for 6 months after completing the training to assess fall incidence (i.e., the number of falls, multiple falls and falls rate). In addition, we will measure gait under usual and dual task conditions, balance, community mobility, health related quality of life, user satisfaction and cognitive function. Discussion This randomized controlled trial will demonstrate the extent to which an intervention that combines treadmill training augmented

  1. Flight Test Comparison of Different Adaptive Augmentations for Fault Tolerant Control Laws for a Modified F-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Lee, James A.; Kaneshinge, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the improvements and enhancements to a neural network based approach for directly adapting to aerodynamic changes resulting from damage or failures. This research is a follow-on effort to flight tests performed on the NASA F-15 aircraft as part of the Intelligent Flight Control System research effort. Previous flight test results demonstrated the potential for performance improvement under destabilizing damage conditions. Little or no improvement was provided under simulated control surface failures, however, and the adaptive system was prone to pilot-induced oscillations. An improved controller was designed to reduce the occurrence of pilot-induced oscillations and increase robustness to failures in general. This report presents an analysis of the neural networks used in the previous flight test, the improved adaptive controller, and the baseline case with no adaptation. Flight test results demonstrate significant improvement in performance by using the new adaptive controller compared with the previous adaptive system and the baseline system for control surface failures.

  2. Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Augmentation of Pharmacotherapy in Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: The Pediatric OCD Treatment Study II (POTS II) Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Martin E.; Sapyta, Jeffrey; Freeman, Jennifer B.; Khanna, Muniya; Compton, Scott; Almirall, Daniel; Moore, Phoebe; Choate-Summers, Molly; Garcia, Abbe; Edson, Aubrey L.; Foa, Edna B.; March, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Context The extant literature on the treatment of pediatric OCD indicates that partial response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) is the norm, and that augmentation with short-term OCD-specific cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) may provide additional benefit. Objective To examine the effects of augmenting SRIs with CBT or a brief form of CBT, instructions in CBT (I-CBT) delivered in the context of medication management (MM). Design A 12-week, 3 (site: Penn, Duke, Brown) × 3 (treatment conditions: MM, MM+I-CBT, & MM+CBT) × 4 (repeated measures: weeks 0, 4, 8, & 12) randomized controlled trial. Setting The outpatient clinics of three academic medical centers between 2004 and 2009. Participants Outpatients (N = 124) between the ages of 7–17 with primary OCD and a Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) score ≥ 16 despite an adequate SRI trial. Interventions Participants were randomized to receive 12 weeks of: 1) MM (7 sessions), 2) MM+I-CBT (7 sessions) or 3) MM+CBT (7 sessions of MM plus 14 concurrent CBT sessions). Main Outcome Measures Responder status as defined as a post-treatment CY-BOCS reduction of 30% or greater compared to baseline; change in continuous CY-BOCS total score over 12 weeks. Results MM+CBT was superior to MM and to MM+I-CBT on all outcome measures. In the primary ITT analysis, 68.6% in MM+CBT (95% confidence interval [CI], 53.9%–83.3%) were considered responders, which was significantly better than the 34.0% in MM+I-CBT (95% CI, 18.0% to 50.0%), and 30.0% in MM (95% CI, 14.9% to 45.1%). Planned pairwise comparisons show that MM+CBT was superior to both MM and MM+I-CBT (p < 0.01 for both). MM+I-CBT was not statistically significant from MM (p = 0.72). The number needed to treat (NNT) with MM+CBT versus MM to see one additional RESPONSE at Week 12, on average, was estimated as 3; for MM+CBT versus MM+I-CBT the NNT was also estimated as 3 ;for MM+I-CBT versus MM the NNT was estimated as 25. Conclusion Among

  3. Revision Breast Augmentation at the Time of Cardiac Sarcoma Resection: The Importance of Pocket Control When Inframammary Approach Is Combined with Simultaneous Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jessica F.; Kim, Min P.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Sternotomy in patients with previous breast augmentation becomes an aesthetic challenge when an inframammary approach is utilized over the traditional midline skin incision. Although the inframammary fold approach offers a well-concealed scar when compared with the midline chest incision, patients with a history of previous breast augmentation are at risk for alteration of the anatomy leading to symmastia, implant malposition, and asymmetry. We present a case report of sternotomy and resection of a mediastinal perivascular epithelioid cell tumor with concomitant revision augmentation with silicone implants and SERI Scaffold. Our patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a good cosmetic result 1 year after concomitant revision augmentation in conjunction with cardiac tumor resection. In conclusion, the authors feel that despite the difficulties in performing breast augmentation in patients undergoing thoracic surgery, it is possible to obtain good results. It is necessary to reinforce the repair with a mesh to recreate support and proper anatomy. PMID:27257577

  4. Making Self-Help More Helpful: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Impact of Augmenting Self-Help Materials with Implementation Intentions on Promoting the Effective Self-Management of Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Rachel; Webb, Thomas L.; Sheeran, Paschal

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of self-help materials may be constrained by failures to undertake recommended exercises or to deploy the techniques that one has learned at the critical moment. The present randomized controlled trial investigated whether augmenting self-help materials with if-then plans (or implementation intentions) could overcome…

  5. Equating of Augmented Subscores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Haberman, Shelby J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing level of interest in subscores for their potential diagnostic value. Haberman (2008b) suggested reporting an augmented subscore that is a linear combination of a subscore and the total score. Sinharay and Haberman (2008) and Sinharay (2010) showed that augmented subscores often lead to more accurate…

  6. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  7. Malar and submalar augmentation.

    PubMed

    Binder, William J; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2008-02-01

    Over the past four decades, revolutionary improvements in the design and manufacture of facial implants have broadened the application of midface augmentation. The contemporary practice of facial rejuvenation reflects a 20-year culmination of rapid advances made in the understanding and treatment of midface aging. This article highlights the practice of malar and submalar augmentation: when and how it should be used.

  8. An adenosine A2A agonist injected in the nucleus of the solitary tract prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex by a GABAergic mechanism in decerebrate piglets

    PubMed Central

    Duy, Philip M.; Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermic prolongation of the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) in decerebrate piglets is prevented or reversed by gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor antagonists and adenosine A2A (Ad-A2A) receptor antagonists administered in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that enhanced GABAA activity and administration of the Ad-A2A agonist, CGS-21680, would prolong the LCR under normothermic conditions. We studied 46 decerebrate piglets ranging from 3 to 8 post-natal days of age. Focal injection into the NTS of 100 nl of 0.5 M nipecotic acid, a GABA reuptake inhibitor, significantly (P < 0.05) prolonged the LCR under normothermic conditions in 10 of 11 animals tested. Injecting 100 nl of 5–12.5 microM CGS-21680 unilaterally or bilaterally into the NTS also prolonged the LCR under normothermic conditions (n=15), but the effect was smaller than the effect of unilateral injection of nipecotic acid. Systemic administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, prevented the CGS-21680-dependent prolongation of the LCR in normothermic animals (n = 11). We conclude that thermal prolongation of the LCR depends on a thermally sensitive process or set of neurons in the NTS, which, when activated by elevated brain temperature, enhance adenosinergic and GABAergic function in the region of the NTS. These results emphasize the importance of a thermally sensitive integrative site in the dorsal medulla that, along with sites in the ventral medulla, determine the response to laryngeal chemoreflex stimulation. PMID:20418346

  9. Reversible HuR-microRNA binding controls extracellular export of miR-122 and augments stress response.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kamalika; Ghoshal, Bartika; Ghosh, Souvik; Chakrabarty, Yogaditya; Shwetha, Shivaprasad; Das, Saumitra; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2016-08-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs), the tiny but stable regulatory RNAs in metazoan cells, can undergo selective turnover in presence of specific internal and external cues to control cellular response against the changing environment. We have observed reduction in cellular miR-122 content, due to their accelerated extracellular export in human hepatic cells starved for small metabolites including amino acids. In this context, a new role of human ELAV protein HuR has been identified. HuR, a negative regulator of miRNA function, accelerates extracellular vesicle (EV)-mediated export of miRNAs in human cells. In stressed cells, HuR replaces miRNPs from target messages and is both necessary and sufficient for the extracellular export of corresponding miRNAs. HuR could reversibly bind miRNAs to replace them from Ago2 and subsequently itself gets freed from bound miRNAs upon ubiquitination. The ubiquitinated form of HuR is predominantly associated with multivesicular bodies (MVB) where HuR-unbound miRNAs also reside. These MVB-associated pool of miRNAs get exported out via EVs thereby delimiting cellular miR-122 level during starvation. Therefore, by modulating extracellular export of miR-122, HuR could control stress response in starved human hepatic cells.

  10. Intermittent daytime mouthpiece ventilation successfully augments nocturnal non-invasive ventilation, controlling ventilatory failure and maintaining patient independence.

    PubMed

    Ward, Karen; Ford, Verity; Ashcroft, Helen; Parker, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman with spinal muscular atrophy and a 7-year history of nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV) use via nasal mask and chinstrap was admitted electively. Outpatient review suggested symptomatic hypercapnia and hypoxaemia. Use of her usual NIV resulted in early morning respiratory acidosis due to excess mouth leak, and continuous face mask NIV was instigated while in hospital. Once stabilised, she elected to return to nasal ventilation. At outpatient review, respiratory acidosis reoccurred despite diurnal use of NIV. Using the patient's routine ventilator and a novel mouthpiece and trigger algorithm, intermittent daytime mouthpiece ventilation (MPV) was introduced alongside overnight NIV. Control of respiratory failure was achieved and, vitally, independent living maintained. Intermittent MPV was practicable and effective where the limits of ventilator tolerance had otherwise been reached. MPV may reduce the need for tracheostomy ventilation and this case serves as a reminder of the increasing options routinely available to NIV clinicians. PMID:26160549

  11. The Effect of Continuous and Discretized Presentations of Concurrent Augmented Visual Biofeedback on Postural Control in Quiet Stance

    PubMed Central

    D’Anna, Carmen; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Bertollo, Maurizio; Comani, Silvia; Conforto, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous and a discretized Visual Biofeedback (VBF) on balance performance in upright stance. The coordinates of the Centre of Pressure (CoP), extracted from a force plate, were processed in real-time to implement the two VBFs, administered to two groups of 12 healthy participants. In the first group, a representation of the CoP was continuously shown, while in the second group, the discretized VBF was provided at an irregular frequency (that depended on the subject's performance) by displaying one out of a set of five different emoticons, each corresponding to a specific area covered by the current position of the CoP. In the first case, participants were asked to maintain a white spot within a given square area, whereas in the second case they were asked to keep the smiling emoticon on. Trials with no VBF were administered as control. The effect of the two VBFs on balance was studied through classical postural parameters and a subset of stabilogram diffusion coefficients. To quantify the amount of time spent in stable conditions, the percentage of time during which the CoP was inside the stability area was calculated. Both VBFs improved balance maintainance as compared to the absence of any VBF. As compared to the continuous VBF, in the discretized VBF a significant decrease of sway path, diffusion and Hurst coefficients was found. These results seem to indicate that a discretized VBF favours a more natural postural behaviour by promoting a natural intermittent postural control strategy. PMID:26196518

  12. The effect of mirtazapine augmentation of clozapine in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Rocco; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Cedro, Clemente; Neri, Pietro; La Torre, Diletta; Spina, Edoardo; Di Rosa, Antonio Enrico; Meduri, Mario

    2004-03-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies to effectively treat negative symptoms remains one of the primary goals in the treatment of schizophrenia. Mirtazapine is the first of a new class of dual action compounds, the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSa), whose activity is related to the enhancement of noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission by a presynaptic alpha2 antagonism and postsynaptic 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 antagonism, respectively. This study was a 8-week double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 30 mg adjunctive mirtazapine to clozapine therapy in 24 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia. The main finding at the end of the trial was a significant reduction on the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) total scores in the mirtazapine group compared to placebo (P<0.01) with a significant improvement on the SANS subscales avolition/apathy and anhedonia/asociality. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total score at week 8 showed superiority of mirtazapine over placebo. These findings suggest a potential role for mirtazapine as an augmentation strategy in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:15076014

  13. Augmented reality: a review.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  14. Augmented reality: a review.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries. PMID:22559183

  15. Ziprasidone Augmentation of Escitalopram for Major Depressive Disorder: Efficacy Results from a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Papakostas, George I.; Fava, Maurizio; Baer, Lee; Swee, Michaela B.; Jaeger, Adrienne; Bobo, William V.; Shelton, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the efficacy of adjunctive ziprasidone in adults with non-psychotic unipolar major depression experiencing persistent symptoms following 8 weeks of open-label escitalopram. Method This was a multi-center, parallel randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at three academic medical centers in the United States. The participant pool consisted of 139 outpatients with persistent symptoms of major depressive disorder following an 8-week open label trial of escitalopram (phase 1). Subjects were randomized (1:1, n=139) to adjunctive ziprasidone (escitalopram+ziprasidone, n=71) or adjunctive placebo (escitalopram+placebo, n=68), with 8 weekly follow-up assessments. Primary outcome was defined by clinical response according to the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and determined by a 50% or greater reduction in scale scores. The Hamilton Anxiety Rating scale (HAM-A) and Visual Analogue Scale for Pain were defined a priori as key secondary outcome measures. Results Rates of clinical response (35.2% vs. 20.5%, p=0.04) and mean improvement in HAMD-17 total scores (−6.4 ± 6.4 vs. −3.3 ± 6.2, p=0.04) were significantly greater for the escitalopram+ziprasidone group. Several secondary measures of antidepressant efficacy were also in favor of adjunctive ziprasidone. Escitalopram+ziprasidone also resulted in significantly greater improvement in HAM-A, but not Visual Analogue Scale for Pain scores. Ten (14%) patients discontinued escitalopram+ziprasidone due to intolerance versus none for escitalopram+placebo (p<0.01 versus placebo). Conclusions Adjunctive ziprasidone, when added to escitalopram, demonstrated antidepressant efficacy in adult patients with major depressive disorder experiencing persistent symptoms following 8 weeks of open-label escitalopram. PMID:26085041

  16. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-01-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value. PMID:27165120

  17. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-05-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value.

  18. Augmenting computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

  19. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  20. Soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ranella J; Cohen, Joel L

    2006-09-01

    Recent additions to the soft tissue augmentation armamentarium have greatly increased the dermatologic surgeon's choices in optimizing facial contouring and the treatment of acne scars. In this article, we review the science of fillers and look at the future of dermal fillers.

  1. Augmented Reality Binoculars.

    PubMed

    Oskiper, Taragay; Sizintsev, Mikhail; Branzoi, Vlad; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present an augmented reality binocular system to allow long range high precision augmentation of live telescopic imagery with aerial and terrain based synthetic objects, vehicles, people and effects. The inserted objects must appear stable in the display and must not jitter and drift as the user pans around and examines the scene with the binoculars. The design of the system is based on using two different cameras with wide field of view and narrow field of view lenses enclosed in a binocular shaped shell. Using the wide field of view gives us context and enables us to recover the 3D location and orientation of the binoculars much more robustly, whereas the narrow field of view is used for the actual augmentation as well as to increase precision in tracking. We present our navigation algorithm that uses the two cameras in combination with an inertial measurement unit and global positioning system in an extended Kalman filter and provides jitter free, robust and real-time pose estimation for precise augmentation. We have demonstrated successful use of our system as part of information sharing example as well as a live simulated training system for observer training, in which fixed and rotary wing aircrafts, ground vehicles, and weapon effects are combined with real world scenes. PMID:26357208

  2. Augmentative & Alternative Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patti

    2007-01-01

    There is no definitive recipe for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) success, but its universal ingredients can be found at home. The main ones are: (1) Understanding that all children need to express themselves, however outgoing or shy they may be; (2) Willingness to embrace the technology that may help your child regardless of your…

  3. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  4. Specific Phobias in Youth: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing One-Session Treatment to a Parent-Augmented One-Session Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Halldorsdottir, Thorhildur; Fraire, Maria G; Austin, Kristin E.; Noguchi, Ryoichi J. P.; Lewis, Krystal M.; Jarrett, Matthew A.; Cunningham, Natoshia R.; Canavera, Kristin; Allen, Kristy B.; Whitmore, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine the efficacy of a parent-augmented One Session Treatment (A-OST) in treating specific phobias (SP) in youth by comparing this novel treatment to child-focused OST, a well-established treatment. Method A total of 97 youth (ages 6–15, 51.5% female, 84.5% white) who fulfilled diagnostic criteria for SP were randomized to either A-OST or OST. SPs were assessed with semi-structured diagnostic interviews, clinician improvement ratings, and parent and child improvement ratings. In addition, measures of treatment satisfaction and parental self-efficacy were obtained. Blind assessments were completed pretreatment, post-treatment, and 1-month and 6-months following treatment. Analyses were undertaken using mixed models. In addition, gender, age, internalizing/externalizing problems, parent overprotection, and parent anxiety were examined as potential predictors and moderators of treatment outcome. Results Both treatment conditions produced similar outcomes with approximately 50% of youth in both treatments diagnosis free and judged to be much or very much improved at post-treatment and 1-month follow up. At 6-month follow up, however, the treatments diverged with OST resulting in marginally superior outcomes to A-OST, contrary to predictions. Only age of child predicted treatment outcome across the two treatments (older children did better); unexpectedly, none of the variables moderated treatment outcomes. Conclusions Parent augmentation of OST produced no appreciable gains in treatment outcomes. Directions for future research are highlighted. PMID:25645164

  5. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  6. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the functioning of stability augmentation or other automatic or power-operated systems is necessary to...

  7. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stability augmentation, automatic, and... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the functioning of stability augmentation or other automatic or power-operated system is necessary to...

  8. NASA Communications Augmentation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.; Laios, Straton C.

    1990-09-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom Augmentation (NAUG) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), and other projects. The NAUG is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The NAUG network development will be based on the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). This paper describes the NAUG network architecture, subsystems, topology, and services; addresses issues of internetworking the Nascom network with other elements of the Space Station Information System (SSIS); discusses the operations environment. This paper also notes the areas of related research and presents the current conception of how the network will provide broadband services in 1998.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past several years, efforts have been under way to design and develop an operationally flexible research facility for investigating the use of cross-field MHD accelerators as a potential thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. The baseline configuration for this high-power experimental facility utilizes a 1.5-MWe multi-gas arc-heater as a thermal driver for a 2-MWe MHD accelerator, which resides in a large-bore 2-tesla electromagnet. A preliminary design study using NaK seeded nitrogen as the working fluid led to an externally diagonalized segmented MHD channel configuration based on an expendable heat-sink design concept. The current status report includes a review of engineering/design work and performance optimization analyses and summarizes component hardware fabrication and development efforts, preliminary testing results, and recent progress toward full-up assembly and testing

  10. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  11. Augmented kinematic feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, Ed P., Jr.; Archipley-Smith, Donna K.

    1994-07-01

    This paper discusses a real-time augmented kinematic feedback system which can be used as a diagnosis tool for individuals with motor disabilities. The system captures and analyzes movement via color targets attached to an individual and then feeds back information about movement kinematics. This target tracking approach has a high potential for achieving a real- time kinematic assessment capability. The approach recognizes distinct moving colored targets using video data. Multiple colored targets are attached to an individual at strategic locations and then target movement is tracked using a video data acquisition system. The ability to track and assess movement in real-time allows researchers and practitioners to better study and potentially treat various motor disabilities. Recent research has suggested that kinematic feedback can enhance motor recovery of disabled individuals. This approach addresses the need for a real-time measure of human movement and discusses using kinematic feedback to enhance disability recovery.

  12. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  13. Creating Tangible Interfaces by Augmenting Physical Objects with Multimodal Language

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, David R. ); Cohen, Philip R.

    2001-01-01

    Rasa is a tangible augmented reality environment that digitally enhances the existing paper-based command and control capability in a military command post. By observing and understanding the users' speech, pen, and touch-based multimodal language, Rasa computationally augments the physical objects on a command post map, linking these items to digital representations of the same; for example, linking a paper map to the world and Post-it notes to military units. Herein, we give a thorough account of Rasa's underlying multiagent framework, and its recognition, understanding, and multimodal integration components. Moreover, we examine five properties of language: generativity, comprehensibility, compositionality, referentiality, and, at times, persistence--that render it suitable as an augmentation approach, contrasting these properties to those of other augmentation methods. It is these properties of language that allow users of Rasa to augment physical objects, transforming them into tangible interfaces.

  14. Pancreatic beta cell function following liraglutide-augmented weight loss in individuals with prediabetes: analysis of a randomised, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Alice; Ariel, Danit; Abbasi, Fahim; Lamendola, Cindy; Grove, Kaylene; Tomasso, Vanessa; Reaven, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Liraglutide can modulate insulin secretion by directly stimulating beta cells or indirectly through weight loss and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Recently, we showed that liraglutide treatment in overweight individuals with prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) led to greater weight loss (−7.7% vs −3.9%) and improvement in insulin resistance compared with placebo. The current study evaluates the effects on beta cell function of weight loss augmented by liraglutide compared with weight loss alone. Methods This was a parallel, randomised study conducted in a single academic centre. Both participants and study administrators were blinded to treatment assignment. Individuals who were 40–70 years old, overweight (BMI 27–40 kg/m2) and with prediabetes were randomised (via a computerised system) to receive liraglutide (n = 35) or matching placebo (n = 33), and 49 participants were analysed. All were instructed to follow an energy-restricted diet. Primary outcome was insulin secretory function, which was evaluated in response to graded infusions of glucose and day-long mixed meals. Results Liraglutide treatment (n = 24) significantly (p ≤0.03) increased the insulin secretion rate (% mean change [95% CI]; 21% [12, 31] vs −4% [−11, 3]) and pancreatic beta cell sensitivity to intravenous glucose (229% [161, 276] vs −0.5% (−15, 14]), and decreased insulin clearance rate (−3.5% [−11, 4] vs 8.2 [0.2, 16]) as compared with placebo (n = 25). The liraglutide-treated group also had significantly (p ≤0.03) lower day-long glucose (−8.2% [−11, −6] vs −0.1 [−3, 2]) and NEFA concentrations (−14 [−20, −8] vs −2.1 [−10, 6]) following mixed meals, whereas day-long insulin concentrations did not significantly differ as compared with placebo. In a multivariate regression analysis, weight loss was associated with a decrease in insulin secretion rate and day-long glucose and insulin concentrations in

  15. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  16. Antidepressant augmentation with anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Antidepressant augmentation strategies are commonly employed to treat depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressant monotherapy. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms have been implicated in depression, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been found effective in animal models of depression both in monotherapy and when used to augment antidepressant drugs. However, results with NSAIDs have been mixed in human observational studies, with both better and worse depression outcomes reported. Four small (pooled N = 160) randomized controlled trials suggest that celecoxib (200-400 mg/d) augmentation of antidepressant medication improves 4-6 week outcomes in major depressive disorder. There are no data, however, to support the use of celecoxib or other NSAIDs in antidepressant-resistant depression. There are also concerns about adverse events associated with NSAID treatment, and about pharmacodynamic drug interactions between these drugs and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. A reasonable conclusion for the present is that NSAID augmentation of antidepressants is, at best, a tentative approach in nonrefractory major depression.

  17. Infusing CD19-directed T cells to augment disease control in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for advanced B-lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A; Hackett, Perry B; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-05-01

    Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR(+) T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR(+) T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources. PMID:22107246

  18. Infusing CD19-Directed T Cells to Augment Disease Control in Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Advanced B-Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR+ T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR+ T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources. PMID:22107246

  19. B-52 stability augmentation system reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowling, T. C.; Key, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    The B-52 SAS (Stability Augmentation System) was developed and retrofitted to nearly 300 aircraft. It actively controls B-52 structural bending, provides improved yaw and pitch damping through sensors and electronic control channels, and puts complete reliance on hydraulic control power for rudder and elevators. The system has experienced over 300,000 flight hours and has exhibited service reliability comparable to the results of the reliability test program. Development experience points out numerous lessons with potential application in the mechanization and development of advanced technology control systems of high reliability.

  20. Augmentation Improves Human Cadaveric Vertebral Body Compression Mechanics For Lumbar Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Jonathon H.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Maurer, Philip M.; Erbe, Erik M.; Entrekin, Dean; Balderston, Richard A.; Bertagnoli, Rudolf; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric biomechanical study. Objectives Quantify the effects of vertebral body augmentation on biomechanics under axial compression by a total disc replacement (TDR) implant. Summary of Background Data TDR is a surgical alternative to lumbar spinal fusion to treat degenerative disc disease. Osteoporosis in the adjacent vertebrae to the interposed TDR may lead to implant subsidence or vertebral body fracture. Vertebral augmentation is used to treat osteoporotic compression fracture. The study sought to evaluate whether vertebral augmentation improves biomechanics under TDR axial loading. Methods Forty-five L1-L5 lumbar vertebral body segments with intact posterior elements were used. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans were performed to determine bone density, block randomizing specimens by bone density into augmentation and control groups. A semi-constrained keeled lumbar disc replacement device was implanted providing 50% endplate coverage. Vertebral augmentation of 17.6 ± 0.9% vertebral volume fill with Cortoss was performed on augmentation group. All segments underwent axial compression at a rate of 0.2 mm/s to 6mm. Results The load-displacement response for all specimens was non-linear. Subfailure mechanical properties with augmentation were significantly different from control; in all cases the augmented group was 2× higher than control. At failure, the maximum load and stiffness with augmentation was not significantly different from control. The maximum apparent stress and modulus with augmentation were 2× and 1.3× greater than control, respectively. The subfailure stress and apparent modulus with augmentation was moderately correlated with bone density while the control subfailure properties were not. The augmented maximum stress was not correlated with bone density, while the control was weakly correlated. The maximum apparent modulus was moderately correlated with bone density for both the augmented and control groups

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  2. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Sander, Nichlas; Kristoffersen, Morten B; Håkansson, Bo; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP) with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR) has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR). Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming. The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy) for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game. The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb, and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives. Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study.

  3. Augmented Likelihood Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stille, Maik; Kleine, Matthias; Hägele, Julian; Barkhausen, Jörg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2016-01-01

    The presence of high-density objects remains an open problem in medical CT imaging. Data of projections passing through objects of high density, such as metal implants, are dominated by noise and are highly affected by beam hardening and scatter. Reconstructed images become less diagnostically conclusive because of pronounced artifacts that manifest as dark and bright streaks. A new reconstruction algorithm is proposed with the aim to reduce these artifacts by incorporating information about shape and known attenuation coefficients of a metal implant. Image reconstruction is considered as a variational optimization problem. The afore-mentioned prior knowledge is introduced in terms of equality constraints. An augmented Lagrangian approach is adapted in order to minimize the associated log-likelihood function for transmission CT. During iterations, temporally appearing artifacts are reduced with a bilateral filter and new projection values are calculated, which are used later on for the reconstruction. A detailed evaluation in cooperation with radiologists is performed on software and hardware phantoms, as well as on clinically relevant patient data of subjects with various metal implants. Results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm is able to outperform contemporary metal artifact reduction methods such as normalized metal artifact reduction.

  4. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two-dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  5. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W. . Applied Mechanics Div. III)

    1989-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  6. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  7. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

  8. Augmented low-Dye tape alters foot mobility and neuromotor control of gait in individuals with and without exercise related leg pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Augmented low-Dye (ALD) tape is frequently used in the management of lower limb musculoskeletal pain and injury, yet our knowledge of its effect is incomplete, especially in regard to its neuromotor effects. Methods We measured electromyographic (EMG) activity of twelve lower limb muscles, three-dimensional kinematics of the ankle, knee, hip and pelvis, foot posture and foot mobility to determine the physiological effect of ALD tape. Fourteen females with exercise related leg pain and 14 matched asymptomatic females walked on a treadmill under three conditions: pre-tape, tape and post-tape. A series of repeated measure analysis of variance procedures were performed to investigate differences in EMG, kinematic, foot posture and mobility measurements. Results Application of ALD tape produced reductions in recruitment of tibialis anterior (7.3%) and tibialis posterior (6.9%). Large reductions in midfoot mobility (0.45 to 0.63 cm) and increases in arch height (0.58 cm), as well as moderate changes in ankle motion in the sagittal (2.0 to 5.3°) and transverse planes (4.0 to 4.3°) were observed. Reduced muscle activation (<3.0%) and increased motion (<1.7°) was observed at more proximal segments (knee, hip, pelvis) but were of smaller magnitude than at the foot and ankle. Changes in foot posture, foot mobility, ankle kinematics and leg muscle activity did not persist following the removal of ALD tape, but at more proximal segments small changes (<2.2°, <5.4% maximum) continued to be observed following the removal of tape. There were no differences between groups. Conclusions This study provides evidence that ALD tape influences muscle recruitment, movement patterns, foot posture and foot mobility. These effects occur in individuals with and without pain, and are dissipated up the kinetic chain. ALD tape should be considered in the management of individuals where increased arch height, reduced foot mobility, reduced ankle abduction and plantar flexion or

  9. Soft tissue augmentation using Restylane.

    PubMed

    Biesman, Brian

    2004-05-01

    Soft tissue augmentation plays an important role in facial rejuvenation. To accomplish this goal, numerous materials have been used. Hyaluronic acids represent the latest family of products to become available in the United States. This article provides an introduction to the proper use of Restylane, the first hyaluronic acid product to be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for soft tissue augmentation.

  10. Design and numerical evaluation of full-authority flight control systems for conventional and thruster-augmented helicopters employed in NOE operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perri, Todd A.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The development and methodology is presented for development of full-authority implicit model-following and explicit model-following optimal controllers for use on helicopters operating in the Nap-of-the Earth (NOE) environment. Pole placement, input-output frequency response, and step input response were used to evaluate handling qualities performance. The pilot was equipped with velocity-command inputs. A mathematical/computational trajectory optimization method was employed to evaluate the ability of each controller to fly NOE maneuvers. The method determines the optimal swashplate and thruster input histories from the helicopter's dynamics and the prescribed geometry and desired flying qualities of the maneuver. Three maneuvers were investigated for both the implicit and explicit controllers with and without auxiliary propulsion installed: pop-up/dash/descent, bob-up at 40 knots, and glideslope. The explicit controller proved to be superior to the implicit controller in performance and ease of design.

  11. 14 CFR 23.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.672 Stability augmentation and automatic... systems must not activate the control system. (b) The design of the stability augmentation system or of... thereof, or by overriding the failure by movement of the flight controls in the normal sense. (c) It...

  12. 14 CFR 23.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.672 Stability augmentation and automatic... systems must not activate the control system. (b) The design of the stability augmentation system or of... thereof, or by overriding the failure by movement of the flight controls in the normal sense. (c) It...

  13. Orion MPCV Continuum RCS Heating Augmentation Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Andrew J.; White, Molly E.

    2014-01-01

    The reaction control system jets of the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle can have a significant impact on the magnitude and distribution of the surface heat flux on the leeside of the aft-body, when they are fired. Changes in surface heating are expressed in terms of augmentation factor over the baseline smooth body heating. Wind tunnel tests revealed heating augmentation factors as high as 13.0, 7.6, 2.8, and 5.8 for the roll, pitch down, pitch up, and yaw jets respectively. Heating augmentation factor models, based almost exclusively on data from a series of wind tunnel tests have been developed, for the purposes of thermal protection system design. The wind tunnel tests investigated several potential jet-to-freestream similarity parameters, and heating augmentation factors derived from the data showed correlation with the jet-to-freestream momentum ratio. However, this correlation was not utilized in the developed models. Instead augmentation factors were held constant throughout the potential trajectory space. This simplification was driven by the fact that ground to flight traceability and sting effects are not well understood. Given the sensitivity of the reaction control system jet heating augmentation to configuration, geometry, and orientation the focus in the present paper is on the methodology used to develop the models and the lessons learned from the data. The models that are outlined in the present work are specific to the aerothermal database used to design the thermal protection system for the Exploration Flight Test 1 vehicle.

  14. Bayesian Alternation during Tactile Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Goeke, Caspar M.; Planera, Serena; Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well-described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study, we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC) task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition), rotation only (native condition), and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition). Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants' responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND). Then, we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67) than the Bayesian integration model (χred2 = 4.34). Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all (WTA) model (χred2 = 1.64), which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However, the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2 = 1.09) utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  15. Augmenting ejector endwall effects. [V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. L.; Squyers, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Rectangular inlet ejectors which had multiple hypermixing nozzles for their primary jets were investigated for the effects of endwall blowing on thrust augmentation performance. The ejector configurations tested had both straight wall and active boundary layer control type diffusers. Endwall flows were energized and controlled by simple blowing jets suitably located in the ejector. Both the endwall and boundary layer control diffuser blowing rates were varied to determine optimum performance. High area ratio diffusers with insufficient endwall blowing showed endwall separation and rapid degradation of thrust performance. Optimized values of diffuser boundary layer control and endwall nozzle blowing rates in an ejector augmenter were shown to achieve high levels of augmentation performance for maximum compactness.

  16. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial-temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal-occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal-central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation of

  17. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial–temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal–occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal–central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation

  18. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial-temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal-occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal-central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation of

  19. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Çetinel, Bülent; Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  20. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  1. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG)

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, C.G.; Cummings, C.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1986-11-01

    Superconducting augmentation consists of a superconducting coil operating in the persistent mode closely coupled magnetically with a normally conducting rail gun. A theoretical investigation of the effect of this system on a rail gun has shown that two benefits occur. Projectile velocities and launch efficiencies increase significantly depending on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation circuits. Previous work evaluated an idealized system by neglecting energy dissipation effects. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis to include the neglected terms and show improved actual launch efficiencies for the SARG configuration. In this paper, the authors discuss details of projectile design in depth and present preliminary results of rail gun performance.

  2. An overview of current Navy programs to develop thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The primary objective of Navy sponsored research in thrust augmentation is the development of an improved augmenter for V/STOL application. In support of this goal, a data base is being established to provide an accurate prediction capability for use in ejector design. A general technology development of ejectors and associated effects presently is split into the more specific areas of lift and control, since thrust augmenting ejectors may be suitable for both. Research areas examined include advanced diffuser and end wall design; advanced primary nozzles; analytic studies; augmenting reaction controls; and nozzle design.

  3. 14 CFR 23.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.672 Stability augmentation and automatic...-operated systems is necessary to show compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part... systems must not activate the control system. (b) The design of the stability augmentation system or...

  4. 14 CFR 23.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.672 Stability augmentation and automatic...-operated systems is necessary to show compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part... systems must not activate the control system. (b) The design of the stability augmentation system or...

  5. 14 CFR 23.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.672 Stability augmentation and automatic...-operated systems is necessary to show compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part... systems must not activate the control system. (b) The design of the stability augmentation system or...

  6. A Cross-Sectional Study Demonstrating Increased Serum Amyloid A Related Inflammation in High-Density Lipoproteins from Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and How This Association Was Augmented by Poor Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    McEneny, Jane; Daniels, Jane-Ann; McGowan, Anne; Gunness, Anjuli; Moore, Kevin; Stevenson, Michael; Young, Ian S.; Gibney, James

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory atherosclerosis is increased in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Normally high-density lipoproteins (HDL) protect against atherosclerosis; however, in the presence of serum amyloid-A- (SAA-) related inflammation this property may be reduced. Fasting blood was obtained from fifty subjects with T1DM, together with fifty age, gender and BMI matched control subjects. HDL was subfractionated into HDL2 and HDL3 by rapid ultracentrifugation. Serum-hsCRP and serum-, HDL2-, and HDL3-SAA were measured by ELISAs. Compared to control subjects, SAA was increased in T1DM subjects, nonsignificantly in serum (P = 0.088), and significantly in HDL2(P = 0.003) and HDL3(P = 0.005). When the T1DM group were separated according to mean HbA1c (8.34%), serum-SAA and HDL3-SAA levels were higher in the T1DM subjects with HbA1c ≥ 8.34%, compared to when HbA1c was <8.34% (P < 0.05). Furthermore, regression analysis illustrated, that for every 1%-unit increase in HbA1c, SAA increased by 20% and 23% in HDL2 and HDL3, respectively, independent of BMI. HsCRP did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). This cross-sectional study demonstrated increased SAA-related inflammation in subjects with T1DM that was augmented by poor glycaemic control. We suggest that SAA is a useful inflammatory biomarker in T1DM, which may contribute to their increased atherosclerosis risk. PMID:26557720

  7. Overwintering hosts for the exotic leafroller parasitoid, Colpoclypeus florus: implications for habitat manipulation to augment biological control of leafrollers in pome fruits.

    PubMed

    Pfannenstiel, R S; Unruh, T R; Brunner, J F

    2010-01-01

    Thirty sites of managed and native habitats were surveyed for leafrollers (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in the apple producing region of central Washington State and northern Oregon from September through November 1997-2000 to discover species that supported overwintering by the parasitoid Colpoclypeus florus (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae). C. florus, a species introduced from Europe, requires medium to large host larvae late in autumn on which to overwinter, and few leafroller species display this biology. Over the four years, five potential C. florus hosts were collected, including: Ancylis comptana (Froelich), Xenotemna pallorana (Robinson), and Syndemis sp. (Tortricidae), Filatima sp. (Gelechiidae), and Caloptilia burgessiellia (Zeller) (Gracillariidae). Of these, A. comptana, Syndemis sp., and Filatima sp. have been confirmed as overwintering hosts for C. florus. During the four years, the Syndemis sp. was rare and observed at only one location feeding on redosier dogwood, Cornus sericea L. (Cornales: Cornaceae) although, at this location, many of the larvae collected were parasitized by C. florus. Filatima sp. was common in the Yakima valley feeding on balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera L. ssp. trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray ex Hook) Brayshaw (Malpighiales: Salicaceae) but was rarely parasitized. A. comptana, however, was collected at many locations in central Washington and was frequently found as an overwintering host for C. florus. A. comptana was found feeding on two Rosaceae: Wood's rose, Rosa woodsii Lindl., and strawberry, Fragaria ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae). Based on the number of host larvae collected, A. comptana appears to be the primary overwintering host for C. florus in Washington. Introduction of A. comptana populations to near-orchard habitats may facilitate biological control of leafrollers that are orchard pests.

  8. Controlled release of thymosin beta 4 using a collagen-chitosan sponge scaffold augments cutaneous wound healing and increases angiogenesis in diabetic rats with hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ti, Dongdong; Hao, Haojie; Xia, Lei; Tong, Chuan; Liu, Jiejie; Dong, Liang; Xu, Shenjun; Zhao, Yali; Liu, Huiling; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2015-02-01

    It is important to establish an efficient vascularization for the long-term acceptance of bioengineered skin equivalents treating the cutaneous wounds of diabetic rats with hindlimb ischemia. This study investigates the possible use of a collagen-chitosan sponge scaffold encapsulated with thymosin beta 4 (CCSS-eTβ4), an angiogenic factor, to accelerate cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with hindlimb ischemia. CCSSs-eTβ4 was fabricated using a freeze-drying method. The scaffolds were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, swelling and degradation assays, mechanical properties, and scaffolds of 50:50 collagen-chitosan were selected and applied. The controlled release of Tβ4 from the scaffolds elicited localized and prolonged effects over 12 days, as shown by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In vivo, CCSSs-eTβ4 improved diabetic cutaneous wound healing, with faster wound reepithelialization, better dermal reorganization, and higher wound vascularization. Furthermore, CCSSs-eTβ4 downregulated inflammatory genes and upregulated angiogenic genes in the wound tissue. Significant increases in CD31-positive endothelial cells and new vessel density were also observed. In vitro, Tβ4 increased the migratory and proliferative activity of high glucose (HG)-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Meanwhile, we found that Tβ4 could promote HG-treated HUVECs migration and improve angiogenesis by activation of the VEGF/AKT pathway. Overall, these findings demonstrated the promising potential of CCSSs-eTβ4 to promote more effective wound healing and suggest its possible application for diabetic cutaneous wound treatment. PMID:25204972

  9. Augmented assessment as a means to augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Rigorous scientific assessment of educational technologies typically lags behind the availability of the technologies by years because of the lack of validated instruments and benchmarks. Even when the appropriate assessment instruments are available, they may not be applied because of time and monetary constraints. Work in augmented reality, instrumented mannequins, serious gaming, and similar promising educational technologies that haven't undergone timely, rigorous evaluation, highlights the need for assessment methodologies that address the limitations of traditional approaches. The most promising augmented assessment solutions incorporate elements of rapid prototyping used in the software industry, simulation-based assessment techniques modeled after methods used in bioinformatics, and object-oriented analysis methods borrowed from object oriented programming. PMID:16404012

  10. [Subantral augmentation with porous titanium in experiment and clinic].

    PubMed

    Sirak, S V; Shchetinin, E V; Sletov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the use of porous titanium for subantral augmentation. Experimental study was conducted on 12 yearling rams. Subantral augmentation using porous titanium was performed in 33 patients. In the control group consisting of 14 patients calcium phosphates and bone collagen based agents ("Bio-Оss" and "Collost") were used. In the main and control groups 46 and 32 implant were placed, respectively. Pilot histological and clinical studies proved that the granules of porous titanium are biocompatible with bone tissue, provide the optimal surface microrelief, thus creating good conditions for adhesion, expansion and migration of osteoforming cells, have negligible kinetics of resorption, are porous to ensure effective neovascularization of de novo formed bone tissue. Porous titanium is an effective alternative material for subantral bone augmentation for dental implantation and reconstructive operations on the maxillary sinus. PMID:26925568

  11. [Subantral augmentation with porous titanium in experiment and clinic].

    PubMed

    Sirak, S V; Shchetinin, E V; Sletov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the use of porous titanium for subantral augmentation. Experimental study was conducted on 12 yearling rams. Subantral augmentation using porous titanium was performed in 33 patients. In the control group consisting of 14 patients calcium phosphates and bone collagen based agents ("Bio-Оss" and "Collost") were used. In the main and control groups 46 and 32 implant were placed, respectively. Pilot histological and clinical studies proved that the granules of porous titanium are biocompatible with bone tissue, provide the optimal surface microrelief, thus creating good conditions for adhesion, expansion and migration of osteoforming cells, have negligible kinetics of resorption, are porous to ensure effective neovascularization of de novo formed bone tissue. Porous titanium is an effective alternative material for subantral bone augmentation for dental implantation and reconstructive operations on the maxillary sinus.

  12. Virtually-augmented interfaces for tactical aircraft.

    PubMed

    Haas, M W

    1995-05-01

    The term Fusion Interface is defined as a class of interface which integrally incorporates both virtual and non-virtual concepts and devices across the visual, auditory and haptic sensory modalities. A fusion interface is a multi-sensory virtually-augmented synthetic environment. A new facility has been developed within the Human Engineering Division of the Armstrong Laboratory dedicated to exploratory development of fusion-interface concepts. One of the virtual concepts to be investigated in the Fusion Interfaces for Tactical Environments facility (FITE) is the application of EEG and other physiological measures for virtual control of functions within the flight environment. FITE is a specialized flight simulator which allows efficient concept development through the use of rapid prototyping followed by direct experience of new fusion concepts. The FITE facility also supports evaluation of fusion concepts by operational fighter pilots in a high fidelity simulated air combat environment. The facility was utilized by a multi-disciplinary team composed of operational pilots, human-factors engineers, electronics engineers, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists to prototype and evaluate the first multi-sensory, virtually-augmented cockpit. The cockpit employed LCD-based head-down displays, a helmet-mounted display, three-dimensionally localized audio displays, and a haptic display. This paper will endeavor to describe the FITE facility architecture, some of the characteristics of the FITE virtual display and control devices, and the potential application of EEG and other physiological measures within the FITE facility.

  13. Complications of soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ranella J; Stier, Meghan

    2008-09-01

    The wide variety of dermal fillers presently available has revolutionized treatment options for patients seeking a refreshed appearance. Soft tissue fillers include both bovine and human collagens, the hyaluronans, calcium hydroxyapatite, poly-L-lactic acid, and synthetic polymers. However, soft tissue augmentation is never risk-free, and as these procedures have increased in prevalence, complications have been more frequently reported. This article describes a range of complications resulting from dermal filler injections, reviews key case studies, and discusses possible treatment options for adverse effects. While biodegradable fillers offer the least risk for the patient, location, allergic reactions, granulomas, necrosis, and infection are all serious complications that must be considered before performing soft tissue augmentation with any approved dermal filler.

  14. Augmented reality building operations tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  15. TDRSS Augmentation System for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems(GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  16. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  17. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  18. Measuring patient outcomes in breast augmentation: introducing the BREAST-Q Augmentation module.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Reavey, Patrick L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie; McCarthy, Colleen; Cano, Stefan J

    2009-01-01

    The Breast-Q Augmentation module is a new and unique questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes following breast augmentation. It has undergone a rigorous development and validation process and is currently the only questionnaire for breast augmentation that meets international and federal standards for questionnaire development. The Breast-Q Augmentation module covers a comprehensive set of concerns of breast augmentation patients, including satisfaction with breasts and impact on quality of life. With its excellent psychometric properties, the Breast-Q Augmentation module can provide clinicians and researchers with a wealth of essential data to improve the field of breast augmentation from the perspectives of both surgeons and patients.

  19. Transaxillary endoscopic silicone gel breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Strock, Louis L

    2010-09-01

    Following the return of silicone gel breast implants to the US market in 2006, augmentation with these implants has become increasingly popular. Surgeons have an array of refined techniques from which to choose when performing these procedures, many of which offer the advantage of reduced or less-obvious postoperative scarring. For obvious reasons, many patients are requesting placement of the implants through incisions that are removed from the breast area (and thereby hidden). The challenge of these approaches is to provide a level of technical control that matches what is afforded with the traditional inframammary approach. The addition of endoscopic assistance has provided a level of tissue visualization and technical control not previously possible with the transaxillary approach, with results that rival those of an inframammary procedure. In this article, the author presents his current operative technique, which has allowed for the routine placement of silicone gel breast implants through a transaxillary incision using endoscopic assistance.

  20. Prospects for Optogenetic Augmentation of Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Sarah; Schultz, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to optically control neural activity opens up possibilities for the restoration of normal function following neurological disorders. The temporal precision, spatial resolution, and neuronal specificity that optogenetics offers is unequalled by other available methods, so will it be suitable for not only restoring but also extending brain function? As the first demonstrations of optically “implanted” novel memories emerge, we examine the suitability of optogenetics as a technique for extending neural function. While optogenetics is an effective tool for altering neural activity, the largest impediment for optogenetics in neural augmentation is our systems level understanding of brain function. Furthermore, a number of clinical limitations currently remain as substantial hurdles for the applications proposed. While neurotechnologies for treating brain disorders and interfacing with prosthetics have advanced rapidly in the past few years, partially addressing some of these critical problems, optogenetics is not yet suitable for use in humans. Instead we conclude that for the immediate future, optogenetics is the neurological equivalent of the 3D printer: its flexibility providing an ideal tool for testing and prototyping solutions for treating brain disorders and augmenting brain function. PMID:26635547

  1. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... failed system. (c) It must be shown that after any single failure of the stability augmentation system or... power-operated systems. 27.672 Section 27.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  2. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... failed system. (c) It must be show that after any single failure of the stability augmentation system or... power-operated systems. 29.672 Section 29.672 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If...

  3. Augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy with pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ganasen, K A; Ipser, J C; Stein, D J

    2010-09-01

    There has long been interest in combining pharmacotherapy with psychotherapy, including cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). More recently, basic research on fear extinction has led to interest in augmentation of CBT with the N-methyl Daspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine (DCS) for anxiety disorders. In this article, the literature on clinical trials that have combined pharmacotherapy and CBT is briefly reviewed, focusing particularly on the anxiety disorders. The literature on CBT and DCS is then systematically reviewed. A series of randomized placebo-controlled trials on panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobia suggest that low dose DCS before therapy sessions may be more effective compared with CBT alone in certain anxiety disorders. The strong translational foundation of this work is compelling, and the positive preliminary data gathered so far encourage further work. Issues for future research include delineating optimal dosing, and demonstrating effectiveness in real-world settings.

  4. Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-05-01

    The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

  5. Augmented reality in medical education?

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality.

  6. Augmented reality in medical education?

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality. PMID:24464832

  7. PRP Augmentation for ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Andriolo, Luca; Di Matteo, Berardo; Kon, Elizaveta; Filardo, Giuseppe; Venieri, Giulia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Current research is investigating new methods to enhance tissue healing to speed up recovery time and decrease the risk of failure in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Biological augmentation is one of the most exploited strategies, in particular the application of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP). Aim of the present paper is to systematically review all the preclinical and clinical papers dealing with the application of PRP as a biological enhancer during ACL reconstructive surgery. Thirty-two studies were included in the present review. The analysis of the preclinical evidence revealed that PRP was able to improve the healing potential of the tendinous graft both in terms of histological and biomechanical performance. Looking at the available clinical evidence, results were not univocal. PRP administration proved to be a safe procedure and there were some evidences that it could favor the donor site healing in case of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft and positively contribute to graft maturation over time, whereas the majority of the papers did not show beneficial effects in terms of bony tunnels/graft area integration. Furthermore, PRP augmentation did not provide superior functional results at short term evaluation. PMID:26064903

  8. Bioremediation: When is augmentation needed?

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, J.V.; Tsao, Y.M.; Bleam, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Each contaminated site exhibits different characteristics and requires a site-specific remediation plan. The decontamination of a hazardous materials site is a complex procedure involving systematic, step-by-step problem solving. Assessing the conditions necessary to optimize the efficiency of microbial systems in degrading environmental pollutants and the economics required is essential in selecting and implementing cost-effective biotreatment. This assessment requires a good understanding of the microorganisms themselves. A firm grasp of the conditions under which the appropriate mixed culture system can be established and maintained to achieve the desired biodegradation tasks is necessary. The final component, and perhaps the most critical, is the translation of the scientific data into cost-effective full-scale cleanup processes. Augmentation with proven contaminant-degrading microorganisms leads to a higher degree of confidence in remediation success, and for certain sites has been shown to save time and money over alternative approaches.

  9. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  10. Development of a low risk augmentation system for an energy efficient transport having relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizlo, T. R.; Berg, R. A.; Gilles, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    An augmentation system for a 230 passenger, twin engine aircraft designed with a relaxation of conventional longitudinal static stability was developed. The design criteria are established and candidate augmentation system control laws and hardware architectures are formulated and evaluated with respect to reliability, flying qualities, and flight path tracking performance. The selected systems are shown to satisfy the interpreted regulatory safety and reliability requirements while maintaining the present DC 10 (study baseline) level of maintainability and reliability for the total flight control system. The impact of certification of the relaxed static stability augmentation concept is also estimated with regard to affected federal regulations, system validation plan, and typical development/installation costs.

  11. Sensory Augmentation for the Blind

    PubMed Central

    Kärcher, Silke M.; Fenzlaff, Sandra; Hartmann, Daniela; Nagel, Saskia K.; König, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Common navigational aids used by blind travelers during large-scale navigation divert attention away from important cues of the immediate environment (i.e., approaching vehicles). Sensory augmentation devices, relying on principles similar to those at work in sensory substitution, can potentially bypass the bottleneck of attention through sub-cognitive implementation of a set of rules coupling motor actions with sensory stimulation. We provide a late blind subject with a vibrotactile belt that continually signals the direction of magnetic north. The subject completed a set of behavioral tests before and after an extended training period. The tests were complemented by questionnaires and interviews. This newly supplied information improved performance on different time scales. In a pointing task we demonstrate an instant improvement of performance based on the signal provided by the device. Furthermore, the signal was helpful in relevant daily tasks, often complicated for the blind, such as keeping a direction over longer distances or taking shortcuts in familiar environments. A homing task with an additional attentional load demonstrated a significant improvement after training. The subject found the directional information highly expedient for the adjustment of his inner maps of familiar environments and describes an increase in his feeling of security when exploring unfamiliar environments with the belt. The results give evidence for a firm integration of the newly supplied signals into the behavior of this late blind subject with better navigational performance and more courageous behavior in unfamiliar environments. Most importantly, the complementary information provided by the belt lead to a positive emotional impact with enhanced feeling of security. The present experimental approach demonstrates the positive potential of sensory augmentation devices for the help of handicapped people. PMID:22403535

  12. Augmented Reality Imaging System: 3D Viewing of a Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, David B.; Boone, John M.; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objective To display images of breast cancer from a dedicated breast CT using Depth 3-Dimensional (D3D) augmented reality. Methods A case of breast cancer imaged using contrast-enhanced breast CT (Computed Tomography) was viewed with the augmented reality imaging, which uses a head display unit (HDU) and joystick control interface. Results The augmented reality system demonstrated 3D viewing of the breast mass with head position tracking, stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence and the use of a 3D cursor and joy-stick enabled fly through with visualization of the spiculations extending from the breast cancer. Conclusion The augmented reality system provided 3D visualization of the breast cancer with depth perception and visualization of the mass's spiculations. The augmented reality system should be further researched to determine the utility in clinical practice. PMID:27774517

  13. 77 FR 58419 - Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Licensing Applications for Instrumentation and Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... public comment on Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control Systems, augmenting NUREG-1537, Part 1... Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control System, augmenting NUREG-1537, Part 1, ``Guidelines for...

  14. Assessment of different screw augmentation techniques and screw designs in osteoporotic spines

    PubMed Central

    Chavanne, A.; Spitaler, R.; Kropik, K.; Aigner, N.; Ogon, M.; Redl, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is an experimental study on human cadaver spines. The objective of this study is to compare the pullout forces between three screw augmentation methods and two different screw designs. Surgical interventions of patients with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Biomechanically the pedicle provides the strongest screw fixation in healthy bone, whereas in osteoporosis all areas of the vertebra are affected by the disease. This explains the high screw failure rates in those patients. Therefore PMMA augmentation of screws is often mandatory. This study involved investigation of the pullout forces of augmented transpedicular screws in five human lumbar spines (L1–L4). Each spine was treated with four different methods: non-augmented unperforated (solid) screw, perforated screw with vertebroplasty augmentation, solid screw with vertebroplasty augmentation and solid screw with balloon kyphoplasty augmentation. Screws were augmented with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The pullout forces were measured for each treatment with an Instron testing device. The bone mineral density was measured for each vertebra with Micro-CT. The statistical analysis was performed with a two-sided independent student t test. Forty screws (10 per group and level) were inserted. The vertebroplasty-augmented screws showed a significant higher pullout force (mean 918.5 N, P = 0.001) than control (mean 51 N), the balloon kyphoplasty group did not improve the pullout force significantly (mean 781 N, P > 0.05). However, leakage occurred in some cases treated with perforated screws. All spines showed osteoporosis on Micro-CT. Vertebroplasty-augmented screws, augmentation of perforated screws and balloon kyphoplasty augmented screws show higher pullout resistance than non-augmented screws. Significant higher pullout forces were only reached in the vertebroplasty augmented vertebra. The perforated screw design led to epidural leakage due to the position of the

  15. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  16. Enhancing Education through Mobile Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author has discussed about the Mobile Augmented Reality and enhancing education through it. The aim of the present study was to give some general information about mobile augmented reality which helps to boost education. Purpose of the current study reveals the mobile networks which are used in the institution campus as well…

  17. Embedding Augmentative Communication within Early Childhood Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia; Banajee, Meher; Stricklin, Sarintha Buras

    2000-01-01

    This article first describes various augmentative communication systems including sign language, picture symbols, and voice output communication devices. It then explains ways to embed augmentative communication within four types of early childhood classroom activities: (1) special or planned activities, (2) meal time, (3) circle time, and (4)…

  18. Age grouping to optimize augmentation success.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Robert W

    2010-05-01

    This article has described the different age groups that present for noninvasive injectable lip and perioral augmentation, as well as the breakdown of 3 subgroups that present within the 4 general age groups. With the fundamental understanding of these presenting groups and subgroups, the practicing augmenter will be able to better treatment plan and educate the patient on realistic and optimal aesthetic outcomes.

  19. Nonsteady-Flow Thrust Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foa, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Ejector augmenters in which the transfer of mechanical energy from the primary to the secondary flow takes place through the work of interface pressure forces are investigated. Nonsteady flow processes are analyzed from the standpoint of energy transfer efficiency and a comparison of a rotary jet augmenter to an ejector is presented.

  20. Human responses to augmented virtual scaffolding models.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Simeonov, Peter; Dotson, Brian; Ammons, Douglas; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Chiou, Sharon

    2005-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of adding real planks, in virtual scaffolding models of elevation, on human performance in a surround-screen virtual reality (SSVR) system. Twenty-four construction workers and 24 inexperienced controls performed walking tasks on real and virtual planks at three virtual heights (0, 6 m, 12 m) and two scaffolding-platform-width conditions (30, 60 cm). Gait patterns, walking instability measurements and cardiovascular reactivity were assessed. The results showed differences in human responses to real vs. virtual planks in walking patterns, instability score and heart-rate inter-beat intervals; it appeared that adding real planks in the SSVR virtual scaffolding model enhanced the quality of SSVR as a human - environment interface research tool. In addition, there were significant differences in performance between construction workers and the control group. The inexperienced participants were more unstable as compared to construction workers. Both groups increased their stride length with repetitions of the task, indicating a possibly confidence- or habit-related learning effect. The practical implications of this study are in the adoption of augmented virtual models of elevated construction environments for injury prevention research, and the development of programme for balance-control training to reduce the risk of falls at elevation before workers enter a construction job. PMID:16253942

  1. Human responses to augmented virtual scaffolding models.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Simeonov, Peter; Dotson, Brian; Ammons, Douglas; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Chiou, Sharon

    2005-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of adding real planks, in virtual scaffolding models of elevation, on human performance in a surround-screen virtual reality (SSVR) system. Twenty-four construction workers and 24 inexperienced controls performed walking tasks on real and virtual planks at three virtual heights (0, 6 m, 12 m) and two scaffolding-platform-width conditions (30, 60 cm). Gait patterns, walking instability measurements and cardiovascular reactivity were assessed. The results showed differences in human responses to real vs. virtual planks in walking patterns, instability score and heart-rate inter-beat intervals; it appeared that adding real planks in the SSVR virtual scaffolding model enhanced the quality of SSVR as a human - environment interface research tool. In addition, there were significant differences in performance between construction workers and the control group. The inexperienced participants were more unstable as compared to construction workers. Both groups increased their stride length with repetitions of the task, indicating a possibly confidence- or habit-related learning effect. The practical implications of this study are in the adoption of augmented virtual models of elevated construction environments for injury prevention research, and the development of programme for balance-control training to reduce the risk of falls at elevation before workers enter a construction job.

  2. Testing and Development of a Percussive Augmenter for Rotary Drills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, Christopher; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Hammering drills are effective in fracturing the drilled medium while rotary drills remove cuttings. The combination provides a highly effective penetration mechanism. Piezoelectric actuators were integrated into an adapter to produce ultrasonic percussion; augmenting rotary drilling. The drill is capable of operating at low power, low applied force and, with proper tuning, low noise. These characteristics are of great interest for future NASA missions and the construction/remodeling industry. The developed augmenter connects a commercially available drill and bit and was tested to demonstrate its capability. Input power to the drill was read using a multimeter and the augmenter received a separate input voltage. The drive frequency of the piezoelectric actuator was controlled by a hill climb algorithm that optimizes and records average power usage to operate the drill at resonating frequency. Testing the rotary drill and augmenter across a range of combinations with total power constant at 160 Watts has shown results in concrete and limestone samples that are as good as or better than the commercial drill. The drill rate was increased 1.5 to over 10 times when compared to rotation alone.

  3. Polyacrylamide hydrogel injection for breast augmentation: Another injectable failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenxiang; Li, Shirong; Wang, Lingli; Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Jinping; Luo, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Increasing complications of polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) augmentation mammoplasty, such as chronic persistent infection, have recently caught the attention of both the medical field and the general public. Material/Methods A total of 96 patients with severe chronic infection following PAAG augmentation mammoplasty were treated in the present study including 63 cases with infection confined to the breast and 33 with systemic infection. Endoscopy and surgery were performed to completely remove the materials and clear the infected tissues followed by drug-irrigation and vacuum-assisted closure for several days. Results In patients with severe infection there were large amounts of PAAG, fibers and infiltration of numerous neutrophils and macrophages. The infection-inducing materials were extensively dispersed in the mammary and subcutaneous tissues, pectoral fascia and intermuscular space. In addition, there was scattered distribution of PAAG materials in the armpit, chest wall and abdominal wall, which were mixed with necrotic tissues and surrounded by lymphocytes, giant cells, macrophages and other inflammatory cells, forming chronic granulomatous and fibrous lesions. Infection was controlled following surgical intervention. No residual infectious foci or recurrent infections were noted among these patients. Although the severe infection did not result in mastectomy, patients had breast atrophy and various degrees of deformation. Conclusions Chronic infection following PAAG augmentation mammaplasty usually causes systemic infection and other devastating adverse reactions. This study confirms PAAG augmentation mammaplasty is another failed attempt. More attention should be paid to the injection of large doses of liquid filler. PMID:22648256

  4. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity impacts CO2–[H+] washout at the central chemoreceptors and hence has marked influence on the control of ventilation. To date, the integration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation has been investigated exclusively with measures of anterior CBF, which has a differential reactivity from the vertebrobasilar system and perfuses the brainstem. We hypothesized that: (1) posterior versus anterior CBF would have a stronger relationship to central chemoreflex magnitude during hypercapnia, and (2) that higher posterior reactivity would lead to a greater hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD). End-tidal forcing was used to induce steady-state hyperoxic (300 mmHg ) hypercapnia (+3, +6 and +9 mmHg ) and isocapnic hypoxia (45 mmHg ) before and following pharmacological blunting (indomethacin; INDO; 1.45 ± 0.17 mg kg−1) of resting CBF and reactivity. In 22 young healthy volunteers, ventilation, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities and extra-cranial blood flows were measured during these challenges. INDO-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness (CVR) to CO2 was unrelated to variability in ventilatory sensitivity during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Further results in a sub-group of volunteers (n = 9) revealed that elevations of via end-tidal forcing reduce arterial–jugular venous gradients, attenuating the effect of CBF on chemoreflex responses. During isocapnic hypoxia, vertebral artery CVR was related to the magnitude of HVD (R2 = 0.27; P < 0.04; n = 16), suggesting that CO2–[H+] washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. No relationships were apparent with anterior CVR. As higher posterior, but not anterior, CVR was linked to HVD, our study highlights the importance of measuring flow in posterior vessels to investigate CBF and ventilatory integration. Key points Anterior and posterior cerebral circulations have differential reactivity to changes in arterial blood gases, but the

  5. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  6. Performance of a self-augmented railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Rodney L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Goldstein, Shyke A.

    1991-10-01

    The accelerating force of a railgun can be increased by augmenting the self-induced magnetic field created by the armature current. Augmentation fields can be produced by external current coils or, as is done here, by shorting the railgun muzzle, and using the gun rails as the augmentation coil. Experimental results are presented for a 3.6-m railgun operated in this self-augmented mode, and effective inductance gradients are achieved which are as much as 9.3 times that of the unaugmented gun. A circuit model is presented which explains features of the measured shunt current and voltage. It is concluded that self-augmentation is an effective way to reduce ohmic heating in the armature of a railgun.

  7. Augmented robotic device for EVA hand manoeuvres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, Eloise; Brooker, Graham

    2012-12-01

    During extravehicular activities (EVAs), pressurised space suits can lead to difficulties in performing hand manoeuvres and fatigue. This is often the cause of EVAs being terminated early, or taking longer to complete. Assistive robotic gloves can be used to augment the natural motion of a human hand, meaning work can be carried out more efficiently with less stress to the astronaut. Lightweight and low profile solutions must be found in order for the assistive robotic glove to be easily integrated with a space suit pressure garment. Pneumatic muscle actuators combined with force sensors are one such solution. These actuators are extremely light, yet can output high forces using pressurised gases as the actuation drive. Their movement is omnidirectional, so when combined with a flexible exoskeleton that itself provides a degree of freedom of movement, individual fingers can be controlled during flexion and extension. This setup allows actuators and other hardware to be stored remotely on the user's body, resulting in the least possible mass being supported by the hand. Two prototype gloves have been developed at the University of Sydney; prototype I using a fibreglass exoskeleton to provide flexion force, and prototype II using torsion springs to achieve the same result. The gloves have been designed to increase the ease of human movements, rather than to add unnatural ability to the hand. A state space control algorithm has been developed to ensure that human initiated movements are recognised, and calibration methods have been implemented to accommodate the different characteristics of each wearer's hands. For this calibration technique, it was necessary to take into account the natural tremors of the human hand which may have otherwise initiated unexpected control signals. Prototype I was able to actuate the user's hand in 1 degree of freedom (DOF) from full flexion to partial extension, and prototype II actuated a user's finger in 2 DOF with forces achieved

  8. An adaptive brain actuated system for augmenting rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Roset, Scott A.; Gant, Katie; Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    For people living with paralysis, restoration of hand function remains the top priority because it leads to independence and improvement in quality of life. In approaches to restore hand and arm function, a goal is to better engage voluntary control and counteract maladaptive brain reorganization that results from non-use. Standard rehabilitation augmented with developments from the study of brain-computer interfaces could provide a combined therapy approach for motor cortex rehabilitation and to alleviate motor impairments. In this paper, an adaptive brain-computer interface system intended for application to control a functional electrical stimulation (FES) device is developed as an experimental test bed for augmenting rehabilitation with a brain-computer interface. The system's performance is improved throughout rehabilitation by passive user feedback and reinforcement learning. By continuously adapting to the user's brain activity, similar adaptive systems could be used to support clinical brain-computer interface neurorehabilitation over multiple days. PMID:25565945

  9. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide restores normal breathing stability and improves autonomic control during experimental heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Marcus, Noah J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic imbalance and breathing instability are major contributors to the progression of heart failure (CHF). Potentiation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreflex has been shown to contribute to these effects. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently has been proposed to mediate CB hypoxic chemoreception. We hypothesized that H2S synthesis inhibition should decrease CB chemoreflex activation and improve breathing stability and autonomic function in CHF rats. Using the irreversible inhibitor of cystathione γ-lyase dl-propargylglycine (PAG), we tested the effects of H2S inhibition on resting breathing patterns, the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the hypoxic sensitivity of CB chemoreceptor afferents in rats with CHF. In addition, heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) were calculated as an index of autonomic function. CHF rats, compared with sham rats, exhibited increased breath interval variability and number of apneas, enhanced CB afferent discharge and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, decreased HRV, and increased low-frequency SBPV. Remarkably, PAG treatment reduced the apnea index by 90%, reduced breath interval variability by 40–60%, and reversed the enhanced hypoxic CB afferent and chemoreflex responses observed in CHF rats. Furthermore, PAG treatment partially reversed the alterations in HRV and SBPV in CHF rats. Our results show that PAG treatment restores breathing stability and cardiac autonomic function and reduces the enhanced ventilatory and CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia in CHF rats. These results support the idea that PAG treatment could potentially represent a novel pathway to control sympathetic outflow and breathing instability in CHF. PMID:23449938

  10. CAROTID CHEMORECEPTOR ABLATION IMPROVES SURVIVAL IN HEART FAILURE: RESCUING AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF CARDIORESPIRATORY FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Marcus, Noah J.; Schultz, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether selective ablation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors improves cardiorespiratory control and survival during heart failure. Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a recognized health problem worldwide, and novel treatments are needed to better improve life quality and decrease mortality. Enhanced carotid chemoreflex drive from the CB is thought to contribute significantly to autonomic dysfunction, abnormal breathing patterns, and increased mortality in heart failure. Methods CHF was induced by coronary ligation in rats. Selective CB denervation (CBD) was performed to remove carotid chemoreflex drive in the CHF state (16 weeks post MI). Indices of autonomic and respiratory function were assessed in CB intact and CBD animals. CBD at 2 weeks post-MI was performed to evaluate whether early targeted CB ablation decreases the progression of left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac remodeling and arrhythmic episodes and improves survival. Results CHF rats developed increased CB chemoreflex drive and chronic central pre-sympathetic neuronal activation, increased indices of elevated sympathetic outflow, increased breathing variability and apnea incidence, and desensitization of the baroreflex. Selective CB ablation reduced the central pre-sympathetic neuronal activation by 40%, normalized indices of sympathetic outflow and baroreflex sensitivity, and reduced the incidence of apneas in CHF animals from 16.8 ± 1.8 events/h to 8.0 ± 1.4 events/h. Remarkably, when CB ablation was performed early, cardiac remodeling, deterioration of left ventricle ejection fraction, and cardiac arrhythmias were reduced. Most importantly, the rats that underwent early CB ablation exhibited an 85% survival rate compared to 45% survival in CHF rats without the intervention. Conclusion Carotid chemoreceptors play a seminal role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and their targeted ablation might be of therapeutic value to reduce cardiorespiratory

  11. Development of a remote digital augmentation system and application to a remotely piloted research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A cost-effective approach to flight testing advanced control concepts with remotely piloted vehicles is described. The approach utilizes a ground based digital computer coupled to the remotely piloted vehicle's motion sensors and control surface actuators through telemetry links to provide high bandwidth feedback control. The system was applied to the control of an unmanned 3/8-scale model of the F-15 airplane. The model was remotely augmented; that is, the F-15 mechanical and control augmentation flight control systems were simulated by the ground-based computer, rather than being in the vehicle itself. The results of flight tests of the model at high angles of attack are discussed.

  12. Augmented microscopy with near-infrared fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G. Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence has become a frequently used intraoperative technique for image-guided surgical interventions. In procedures such as cerebral angiography, surgeons use the optical surgical microscope for the color view of the surgical field, and then switch to an electronic display for the NIR fluorescence images. However, the lack of stereoscopic, real-time, and on-site coregistration adds time and uncertainty to image-guided surgical procedures. To address these limitations, we developed the augmented microscope, whereby the electronically processed NIR fluorescence image is overlaid with the anatomical optical image in real-time within the optical path of the microscope. In vitro, the augmented microscope can detect and display indocyanine green (ICG) concentrations down to 94.5 nM, overlaid with the anatomical color image. We prepared polyacrylamide tissue phantoms with embedded polystyrene beads, yielding scattering properties similar to brain matter. In this model, 194 μM solution of ICG was detectable up to depths of 5 mm. ICG angiography was then performed in anesthetized rats. A dynamic process of ICG distribution in the vascular system overlaid with anatomical color images was observed and recorded. In summary, the augmented microscope demonstrates NIR fluorescence detection with superior real-time coregistration displayed within the ocular of the stereomicroscope. In comparison to other techniques, the augmented microscope retains full stereoscopic vision and optical controls including magnification and focus, camera capture, and multiuser access. Augmented microscopy may find application in surgeries where the use of traditional microscopes can be enhanced by contrast agents and image guided delivery of therapeutics, including oncology, neurosurgery, and ophthalmology.

  13. Neural Control of Breathing and CO2 Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances have clarified how the brain detects CO2 to regulate breathing (central respiratory chemoreception). These mechanisms are reviewed and their significance is presented in the general context of CO2/pH homeostasis through breathing. At rest, respiratory chemoreflexes initiated at peripheral and central sites mediate rapid stabilization of arterial PCO2 and pH. Specific brainstem neurons (e.g., retrotrapezoid nucleus, RTN; serotonergic) are activated by PCO2 and stimulate breathing. RTN neurons detect CO2 via intrinsic proton receptors (TASK-2, GPR4), synaptic input from peripheral chemoreceptors and signals from astrocytes. Respiratory chemoreflexes are arousal state dependent whereas chemoreceptor stimulation produces arousal. When abnormal, these interactions lead to sleep-disordered breathing. During exercise, central command and reflexes from exercising muscles produce the breathing stimulation required to maintain arterial PCO2 and pH despite elevated metabolic activity. The neural circuits underlying central command and muscle afferent control of breathing remain elusive and represent a fertile area for future investigation. PMID:26335642

  14. Neural Control of Breathing and CO2 Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances have clarified how the brain detects CO2 to regulate breathing (central respiratory chemoreception). These mechanisms are reviewed and their significance is presented in the general context of CO2/pH homeostasis through breathing. At rest, respiratory chemoreflexes initiated at peripheral and central sites mediate rapid stabilization of arterial PCO2 and pH. Specific brainstem neurons (e.g., retrotrapezoid nucleus, RTN; serotonergic) are activated by PCO2 and stimulate breathing. RTN neurons detect CO2 via intrinsic proton receptors (TASK-2, GPR4), synaptic input from peripheral chemoreceptors and signals from astrocytes. Respiratory chemoreflexes are arousal state dependent whereas chemoreceptor stimulation produces arousal. When abnormal, these interactions lead to sleep-disordered breathing. During exercise, central command and reflexes from exercising muscles produce the breathing stimulation required to maintain arterial PCO2 and pH despite elevated metabolic activity. The neural circuits underlying central command and muscle afferent control of breathing remain elusive and represent a fertile area for future investigation.

  15. Augmented reality: past, present, future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzerillo, Laura

    2013-03-01

    A great opportunity has permitted to carry out a cultural, historical, architectural and social research with great impact factor on the international cultural interest. We are talking about the realization of a museum whose the main theme is the visit and the discovery of a monument of great prestige: the monumental building the "Steri" in Palermo. The museum is divided into sub themes including the one above all, that has aroused the international interest so much that it has been presented the instance to include the museum in the cultural heritage of UNESCO. It is the realization of a museum path that regards the cells of the Inquisition, which are located just inside of some buildings of the monumental building. The project, as a whole, is faced, in a total view, between the various competences implicated: historic, chemic, architectonic, topographic, drawing, representation, virtual communication, informatics. The birth of the museum will be a sum of the results of all these disciplines involved. Methodology, implementation, fruition, virtual museum, goals, 2D graphic restitution, effects on the cultural heritage and landscape environmental, augmented reality, Surveying 2D and 3D, hi-touch screen, Photogrammetric survey, Photographic survey, representation, drawing 3D and more than this has been dealt with this research.

  16. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  17. Postauricular fascia in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Aldo Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Ten rhinoplasty operations performed using postauricular fascia for the purpose of augmenting the radix and dorsum of the nose were analyzed retrospectively. All the operations were performed over a 1-year period, between 2005 and 2006. The fascia of the postauricular area has been used as a source of pliable soft-tissue grafts in primary and revision rhinoplasty. It may be easily accessed using a single sulcus incision that also enables harvesting of ear cartilage grafts. Deficiency in the radix is an overlooked abnormality seen in many patients undergoing primary as well as revision rhinoplasty after aggressive hump removal. Recent trends in rhinoplasty have been to avoid the overly reduced nasal skeleton and to create a more balanced nasal surgery result. This article presents the use of the postauricular fascia as a radix graft that has been found to be simple to carry out, reliable, and long lasting. In addition, the fascia graft is useful in the camouflage of various nasal deformities in the dorsum and sidewalls. The average patient follow-up for the study was 24 months.

  18. Optimal Lorentz-augmented spacecraft formation flying in elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Yan, Ye; Zhou, Yang

    2015-06-01

    An electrostatically charged spacecraft accelerates as it moves through the Earth's magnetic field due to the induced Lorentz force, providing a new means of propellantless electromagnetic propulsion for orbital maneuvers. The feasibility of Lorentz-augmented spacecraft formation flying in elliptic orbits is investigated in this paper. Assuming the Earth's magnetic field as a tilted dipole corotating with Earth, a nonlinear dynamical model that characterizes the orbital motion of Lorentz spacecraft in the vicinity of arbitrary elliptic orbits is developed. To establish a predetermined formation configuration at given terminal time, pseudospectral method is used to solve the optimal open-loop trajectories of hybrid control inputs consisted of Lorentz acceleration and thruster-generated control acceleration. A nontilted dipole model is also introduced to analyze the effect of dipole tilt angle via comparisons with the tilted one. Meanwhile, to guarantee finite-time convergence and system robustness against external perturbations, a continuous fast nonsingular terminal sliding mode controller is designed and the closed-loop system stability is proved by Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations substantiate the validity of proposed open-loop and closed-loop control schemes, and the results indicate that an almost propellantless formation establishment can be achieved by choosing appropriate objective function in the pseudospectral method. Furthermore, compared to the nonsingular terminal sliding mode controller, the closed-loop controller presents superior convergence rate with only a bit more control effort. And the proposed controller can be applied in other Lorentz-augmented relative orbital control problems.

  19. Effects of propellant composition variables on acceleration-induced burning-rate augmentation of solid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    This work was conducted to define further the effects of propellant composition variables on the acceleration-induced burning rate augmentation of solid propellants. The rate augmentation at a given acceleration was found to be a nonlinear inverse function of the reference burning rate and not controlled by binder or catalyst type at a given reference rate. A nonaluminized propellant and a low rate double-base propellant exhibited strong transient rate augmentation due to surface pitting resulting from the retention of hot particles on the propellant surface.

  20. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance.

  1. Flight experience with a remotely augmented vehicle flight test technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, K. L.

    1981-01-01

    A flight technique which uses the remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) concept is developed to flight test advanced control law concepts. The design, development and flight test validation of a RAV system mechanized on a digital fly-by-wire aircraft are described, and future applications are discussed. Flight experiments investigate complete inner loop, low sample rate, and adaptive control system mechanisms. The technique, which utilizes a ground-based FORTRAN programmable digital computer and up and down telemetry links is found to provide the flexibility necessary to effectively investigate alternate control law mechanisms in flight.

  2. Surgical Approaches to Breast Augmentation: The Transaxillary Approach.

    PubMed

    Strock, Louis L

    2015-10-01

    The transaxillary approach to breast augmentation has the advantage of allowing breast implants to be placed with no incisions on the breasts. There has been a general perception of a lack of technical control compared with the inframammary approach. This article presents the transaxillary approach from the perspective of the technical control gained with the aid of an endoscope, which allows precise creation of the tissue pocket with optimal visualization. The aspects of technique that allow optimal technical control are discussed, in addition to postoperative processes that aid in stabilizing the device position and allow consistent and predictable outcomes.

  3. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  4. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  5. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  6. Methods and systems relating to an augmented virtuality environment

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Curtis W; Anderson, Matthew O; McKay, Mark D; Wadsworth, Derek C; Boyce, Jodie R; Hruska, Ryan C; Koudelka, John A; Whetten, Jonathan; Bruemmer, David J

    2014-05-20

    Systems and methods relating to an augmented virtuality system are disclosed. A method of operating an augmented virtuality system may comprise displaying imagery of a real-world environment in an operating picture. The method may further include displaying a plurality of virtual icons in the operating picture representing at least some assets of a plurality of assets positioned in the real-world environment. Additionally, the method may include displaying at least one virtual item in the operating picture representing data sensed by one or more of the assets of the plurality of assets and remotely controlling at least one asset of the plurality of assets by interacting with a virtual icon associated with the at least one asset.

  7. Equivalence ratio and constriction effects on RBCC thrust augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koupriyanov, M.; Etele, J.

    2011-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of a variable area rocket based combined cycle engine with and without simultaneous mixing and combustion is presented. The flowfield is solved using a steady, quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid control volume formulation with combustion effects included via a generalized equilibrium calculation. Compression augmentation is shown to be sensitive to the equivalence ratio within the primary rocket chamber, where ejector section performance is greatest at both low and high equivalence ratios but near a minimum at stoichiometric conditions. The thrust generated by the RBCC engine compared to that generated by the same rocket in isolation can be increased by as much as 12% at constriction ratios of between 45% and 50%. Thrust augmentation is also shown to vary with equivalence ratio, where for a fixed geometry the maximum thrust is generated at equivalence ratios slightly below unity.

  8. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice.

  9. Augmented mixed models for clustered proportion data

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Galvis, Diana M; Lachos, Victor H

    2015-01-01

    Often in biomedical research, we deal with continuous (clustered) proportion responses ranging between zero and one quantifying the disease status of the cluster units. Interestingly, the study population might also consist of relatively disease-free as well as highly diseased subjects, contributing to proportion values in the interval [0, 1]. Regression on a variety of parametric densities with support lying in (0, 1), such as beta regression, can assess important covariate effects. However, they are deemed inappropriate due to the presence of zeros and/or ones. To evade this, we introduce a class of general proportion density, and further augment the probabilities of zero and one to this general proportion density, controlling for the clustering. Our approach is Bayesian and presents a computationally convenient framework amenable to available freeware. Bayesian case-deletion influence diagnostics based on q-divergence measures are automatic from the Markov chain Monte Carlo output. The methodology is illustrated using both simulation studies and application to a real dataset from a clinical periodontology study. PMID:25491718

  10. Evaluating User Experience of Augmented Reality Eyeglasses.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Luciano; Orso, Valeria; Beretta, Andrea; Jacucci, Giulio; Spagnolli, Anna; Rimondi, Romina

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality based applications have been experimented with in various contexts. Typically, the interaction is supported by handled devices, which, in specific scenarios, may hinder the interaction and spoil the experience of use, as the user is forced to hold the device and to keep her eyes on it at all times. The recent launch on the market of light-weight, unobtrusive head-mounted displays may change this circumstance. Nevertheless, investigations are needed to understand if such head-worn devices effectively outperform handheld devices in terms of comfort and pleasant experience of use. Here we present two experiments aimed at assessing the comfort of wearing a head-worn, see-through AR viewer in both a controlled and a natural setting. Besides the comfort of wearing the device, aspects related to the user experience were also investigated in the field evaluation. Our findings suggest that the head-mounted display examined is comfortable to wear regardless of the context of use. Interestingly in the field trails, participants did not express concern for the impression they would have made on other people and the experience of use was overall pleasant. Possible issues related to visual fatigue emerged.

  11. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  12. Dermal fillers for facial soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, patients are demanding not only enhancement to their dental (micro) esthetics, but also their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Soft tissue augmentation via dermal filling agents may be used to correct facial defects such as wrinkles caused by age, gravity, and trauma; thin lips; asymmetrical facial appearances; buccal fold depressions; and others. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles, history, techniques, materials, complications, and clinical controversies regarding dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation.

  13. The HART I augmented electric gun facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fikse, D.A.; Ciesar, J.A.; Wehrli, H.A.; Rimersma, H.; Docherty, E.F.; Pipich, C.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an augmented electric gun system that has been commissioned. This system, called HART I (Hypervelocity Augmented Railgun Test), is built around a double augmented rail arrangement with a 1.27-cm square bore. It is powered by the SUVAC II 5.6-MJ distributed capacitor power supply. This arrangement allows operation in a simple, series augmented, or transaugmented gun system configuration. The objective of this facility is to perform materials research augmentation studies, and armature development in the 10-km/s regime. Armature masses of 2 to 4 g will be accelerated in a 4-m long barrel. Baseline bore materials will begin with conventional G9/GlidCop systems and then move into pyrolytic boron nitride/refractory materials. Hybrids, plasma, and ablation stabilized armature systems are planned. The gun system is instrumented with plasma and rail B-dot probes for inbore velocity measurements. In addition, breech and muzzle voltages, currents, and external velocities are measured. The HART I system is currently performing hypervelocity experiments to verify the augmentation models.

  14. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  15. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  16. 20 CFR 725.210 - Duration of augmented benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of augmented benefits. 725.210... Entitlement Conditions and Duration of Entitlement: Miner's Dependents (augmented Benefits) § 725.210 Duration of augmented benefits. Augmented benefits payable on behalf of a spouse or divorced spouse, or...

  17. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Daniele; Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting(®) (VBS), OsseoFix(®) and Spine Jack(®). VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix(®) and Spine Jack(®) are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix(®) has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting(®) and Spine Jack(®), the OsseoFix(®) has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack(®) is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors. PMID:27683690

  18. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting® (VBS), OsseoFix® and Spine Jack®. VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix® and Spine Jack® are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix® has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting® and Spine Jack®, the OsseoFix® has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack® is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors.

  19. Improving Robotic Operator Performance Using Augmented Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.; Bowen, Charles K.; Pace, John W.

    2007-01-01

    The Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) is a two-armed robot that functions as an extension to the end effector of the Space Station Robotics Manipulator System (SSRMS), currently in use on the International Space Station (ISS). Crew training for the SPDM is accomplished using a robotic hardware simulator, which performs most of SPDM functions under normal static Earth gravitational forces. Both the simulator and SPDM are controlled from a standard robotic workstation using a laptop for the user interface and three monitors for camera views. Most operations anticipated for the SPDM involve the manipulation, insertion, and removal of any of several types of Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU), modules which control various ISS functions. Alignment tolerances for insertion of the ORU into its receptacle are 0.25 inch and 0.5 degree from nominal values. The pre-insertion alignment task must be performed within these tolerances by using available video camera views of the intrinsic features of the ORU and receptacle, without special registration markings. Since optimum camera views may not be available, and dynamic orbital lighting conditions may limit periods of viewing, a successful ORU insertion operation may require an extended period of time. This study explored the feasibility of using augmented reality (AR) to assist SPDM operations. Geometric graphical symbols were overlaid on one of the workstation monitors to afford cues to assist the operator in attaining adequate pre-insertion ORU alignment. Twelve skilled subjects performed eight ORU insertion tasks using the simulator with and without the AR symbols in a repeated measures experimental design. Results indicated that using the AR symbols reduced pre-insertion alignment error for all subjects and reduced the time to complete pre-insertion alignment for most subjects.

  20. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting® (VBS), OsseoFix® and Spine Jack®. VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix® and Spine Jack® are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix® has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting® and Spine Jack®, the OsseoFix® has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack® is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors. PMID:27683690

  1. Augmentation treatment in major depressive disorder: focus on aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J Craig; Pikalov, Andrei; Berman, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a disabling psychiatric condition for which effective treatment remains an outstanding need. Antidepressants are currently the mainstay of treatment for depression; however, almost two-thirds of patients will fail to achieve remission with initial treatment. As a result, a range of augmentation and combination strategies have been used in order to improve outcomes for patients. Despite the popularity of these approaches, limited data from double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are available to allow clinicians to determine which are the most effective augmentation options or which patients are most likely to respond to which options. Recently, evidence has shown that adjunctive therapy with atypical antipsychotics has the potential for beneficial antidepressant effects in the absence of psychotic symptoms. In particular, aripiprazole has shown efficacy as an augmentation option with standard antidepressant therapy in two, large, randomized, double-blind studies. Based on these efficacy and safety data, aripiprazole was recently approved by the FDA as adjunctive therapy for MDD. The availability of this new treatment option should allow more patients with MDD to achieve remission and, ultimately, long-term, successful outcomes. PMID:19183784

  2. Hydroxyapatite composite resin cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander W L; Gillies, R Mark; Svehla, Martin J; Saito, Masanobu; Walsh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Pedicle screw stability is poor in osteopenic vertebrae attributable, in part, to low screw-bone interface strength. The current authors examined cement augmentation using a low curing temperature hydroxyapatite and bis-phenol-A glycidol methacrylate-based composite resin. This cement may stiffen the screw-bone interface and reduce the harmful effects associated with polymethylmethacrylate regarding temperature and toxic monomer. Thirty-five lumbar vertebrae from human cadavers were instrumented with pedicle screws, with one pedicle previously injected with cement and the other as the control. Caudocephalad toggling of +/- 1 mm for 1600 cycles was applied to the pedicle screws, and the resulting forces supported by the implant-bone interface were captured by a load cell. A curve was constructed from the peak caudal load for each cycle and three mechanical measures parameterized this curve: (1) initial load; (2) rate of load decay during the first 400 cycles; and (3) final load. The initial load increased by 16% as a result of cement augmentation, the final load increased by 65%, and the rate of load decay decreased by 59%. Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increased the stiffness and stability of the screw-bone interface. PMID:12579026

  3. Augmented Reality for the Improvement of Remote Laboratories: An Augmented Remote Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andujar, J. M.; Mejias, A.; Marquez, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) provides huge opportunities for online teaching in science and engineering, as these disciplines place emphasis on practical training and unsuited to completely nonclassroom training. This paper proposes a new concept in virtual and remote laboratories: the augmented remote laboratory (ARL). ARL is being tested in the first…

  4. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  5. The transareolar incision for breast augmentation revisited.

    PubMed

    Kompatscher, Peter; Schuler, Christine; Beer, Gertrude M

    2004-01-01

    Of the various possible incisions for breast augmentation, the transareolar access has gained only limited popularity. The potential side effects of this incision are said to be altered nipple sensation, impaired lactation, an increased rate of infections with capsular fibrosis, well visible scar formation with hypopigmentation, and the need for an additional access in case a breast ptosis correction should prove necessary at a later date. The purpose of this retrospective study was to judge advantages and limitations of transareolar breast augmentation, and to verify whether the reluctant attitude toward this surgical approach is justified. A sample of 18 patients with a transareolar, retropectoral breast augmentation was selected for a retrospective evaluation. The suitability of the technique in general was examined together with early postoperative complications, sensory changes, and late complications on the basis of an evaluation system for cosmetic surgical results. The study showed that only women with an areolar diameter of 3.5 cm or more without pronounced breast ptosis were suitable for the transareolar access. No early infections were noted. The rate of capsular fibrosis was 11%. Two years after breast augmentation, 16 women (89%) judged their breast sensation to be normal, but objective assessment showed that mean pressure and vibration sensation were moderately compromised in all parts of the breast. The scars were of good quality, with very little hypopigmentation. With appropriate patient selection, respecting the advantages and limitations, the transareolar incision has its definite place among the different incisions for breast augmentation. PMID:15164231

  6. Orthobiologics in the augmentation of osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Watson, J Tracy; Nicolaou, Daemeon A

    2015-02-01

    Many orthobiologic adjuvants are available and widely utilized for general skeletal restoration. Their use for the specific task of osteoporotic fracture augmentation is less well recognized. Common conductive materials are reviewed for their value in this patient population including the large group of allograft adjuvants categorically known as the demineralized bone matrices (DBMs). Another large group of alloplastic materials is also examined-the calcium phosphate and sulfate ceramics. Both of these materials, when used for the proper indications, demonstrate efficacy for these patients. The inductive properties of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and platelet concentrates show no clear advantages for this group of patients. Systemic agents including bisphosphonates, receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) inhibitors, and parathyroid hormone augmentation all demonstrate positive effects with this fracture cohort. Newer modalities, such as trace ion bioceramic augmentation, are also reviewed for their positive effects on osteoporotic fracture healing. PMID:25431160

  7. Augmented repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Zell, R A; Santoro, V M

    2000-06-01

    Twenty-five patients who had an acute Achilles tendon rupture were managed with an augmented repair using the gastrocnemius-soleus fascia. All patients healed their repair and there were no re-ruptures. There was one infection. Augmented repair allowed early functional recovery as evidenced by full ankle motion by four to eight weeks, full unassisted weight bearing by three weeks, cessation of braces by four weeks, and return to work by one to six weeks post-operatively. Augmentation adds a sufficient amount of collagen to allow early range of motion and weight bearing without re-rupture. Disadvantages included a long incision, soft tissue prominence, one infection, and sural nerve injury.

  8. Flap-augmented shrouds for aerogenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.

    1976-01-01

    Axisymmetrical shrouds for windmills are augmented by ring-shaped 'flaps' and their performance is studied experimentally. The concept of the shroud as an annular 'wing' is justified, leading to the conclusion that high-lift techniques should be used in shroud design, and that high-lift devices, such as flaps, would increase the power output of the windmill. It is shown experimentally that the ideal power output of a flap-augmented shrouded turbine can be more than 4 times the power of unshrouded turbines of the same diameter.

  9. Minimal inframammary incision for breast augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Nabil; Tawilé, Caroline; Brousseau, Valérie J

    2008-01-01

    The inframammary approach in breast augmentation, still the most popular technique among plastic surgeons, has always been hampered by the undesirable appearance of its scar. The present paper describes a modified approach to inframammary augmentation with saline-filled prostheses. This approach uses a very short incision, thus resulting in a much less noticeable scar. The surgical technique is easy to learn, simple to execute, does not necessitate any special equipment and gives consistent results. Decreasing the scar length to an absolute minimum ensures higher patient and surgeon satisfaction. PMID:19554159

  10. An investigation of high performance, short thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Jiang, T.; Pitts, D. R.; Ntone, F.

    1984-12-01

    The design of air-to-air, thrust augmenting ejectors having short curved wall diffusers utilizing boundary layer control is discussed. The design is achieved by an inverse method which uses the vorticity at the diffuser inlet as a flow parameter in the analysis. Three diffusers having ejector length-to-mixing chamber diameter ratios of approximately 6:1 and mixing chamber inlet area-to-primary nozzle area ratios of 20:1 and 40:1 were designed and tested. A new high level of performance was analytically predicted and achieved experimentally. Comparisons between predicted and observed performances, velocity distributions and pressure distributions are presented.

  11. PMMA-hydroxyapatite composite material retards fatigue failure of augmented bone compared to augmentation with plain PMMA: in vivo study using a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Arabmotlagh, Mohammad; Bachmaier, Samuel; Geiger, Florian; Rauschmann, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is the most commonly used void filler for augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral fracture, but the differing mechanical features of PMMA and osteoporotic bone result in overload and failure of adjacent bone. The aim of this study was to compare fatigue failure of bone after augmentation with PMMA-nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) composite material or with plain PMMA in a sheep model. After characterization of the mechanical properties of a composite material consisting of PMMA and defined amounts (10, 20, and 30% volume fraction) of HA, the composite material with 30% volume fraction HA was implanted in one distal femur of sheep; plain PMMA was implanted in the other femur. Native non-augmented bone served as control. Three and 6 months after implantation, the augmented bone samples were exposed to cyclic loading and the evolution of damage was investigated. The fatigue life was highest for the ovine native bone and lowest for bone-PMMA specimens. Bone-composite specimens showed significantly higher fatigue life than the respective bone-PMMA specimens in both 3- and 6-month follow-up groups. These results suggest that modification of mechanical properties of PMMA by addition of HA to approximate those of cancellous bone retards fatigue failure of the surrounding bone compared to augmented bone with plain PMMA. PMID:24652676

  12. PMMA-hydroxyapatite composite material retards fatigue failure of augmented bone compared to augmentation with plain PMMA: in vivo study using a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Arabmotlagh, Mohammad; Bachmaier, Samuel; Geiger, Florian; Rauschmann, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is the most commonly used void filler for augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral fracture, but the differing mechanical features of PMMA and osteoporotic bone result in overload and failure of adjacent bone. The aim of this study was to compare fatigue failure of bone after augmentation with PMMA-nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) composite material or with plain PMMA in a sheep model. After characterization of the mechanical properties of a composite material consisting of PMMA and defined amounts (10, 20, and 30% volume fraction) of HA, the composite material with 30% volume fraction HA was implanted in one distal femur of sheep; plain PMMA was implanted in the other femur. Native non-augmented bone served as control. Three and 6 months after implantation, the augmented bone samples were exposed to cyclic loading and the evolution of damage was investigated. The fatigue life was highest for the ovine native bone and lowest for bone-PMMA specimens. Bone-composite specimens showed significantly higher fatigue life than the respective bone-PMMA specimens in both 3- and 6-month follow-up groups. These results suggest that modification of mechanical properties of PMMA by addition of HA to approximate those of cancellous bone retards fatigue failure of the surrounding bone compared to augmented bone with plain PMMA.

  13. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, such systems must comply with § 25.671... the pilot were not aware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the control systems....

  14. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, such systems must comply with § 25.671... the pilot were not aware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the control systems....

  15. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, such systems must comply with § 25.671... the pilot were not aware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the control systems....

  16. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by overriding the failure by movement of the flight controls in the normal sense. (c) It must be..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If...

  17. 14 CFR 25.672 - Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... by overriding the failure by movement of the flight controls in the normal sense. (c) It must be..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.672 Stability augmentation and automatic and power-operated systems. If...

  18. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter; Wagner, Niels; Asal, Korhan; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Thomsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss may result from excessive release of glutamate, nitrogen oxide and reactive oxygen species. The effects of these factors on the inner ear may potentially be prevented or reduced by erythropoietin (EPO), as indicated by previously demonstrated neuro-protective effects of EPO upon damage to the central nervous system and the retina. This paper reports three separate trials, conducted to investigate the hypothesis that noise-induced hearing loss is prevented or reduced by erythropoietin. The trials employed three different modes of drug application, different administration time windows and different rodent species. In trial 1, guinea pigs were exposed to 110dB SPL, 4-20kHz wide band noise (WBN) for 8h. EPO was administered to the round window membrane 24h after noise exposure, either sustained by pump for a week or by single dose middle ear instillation. In trial 2, rats were exposed to 105dB SPL, 4-20kHz WBN for 8h. EPO was administered by single dose middle ear instillation 1 or 14h after noise exposure. In trial 3, rats were exposed to 105dB SPL, 4-20kHz WBN for 8 or 3x8h. EPO was injected intraperitoneally 1h before noise exposure. Oto-acoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses (at 16kHz) were recorded before and after noise exposure in all trials. The noise exposure induced a hearing loss in all animals. In trial 1, no recovery and no improvement of hearing occurred in any treatment group. In trial 2 and 3, a partial hearing recovery was seen. However, the hearing loss of the EPO treated animals was significantly worse than controls in trial 2. In trial 3, the hearing of the EPO treated animals exposed for 3x8h was significantly worse than controls. Thus, surprisingly, the results from 2 of the 3 present trials indicate that erythropoietin may in fact augment noise-induced hearing loss. This is contradictory to the beneficial effect of EPO reported by the vast majority of studies on stressed neural tissues. EPO administration

  19. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, James W.

    1992-08-01

    The Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project (Project) had its origin, in the mid-1980's, in perceived differences or inconsistencies in fish disease detection, diagnosis and control capabilities between the five conservation agencies rearing and releasing anadromous salmonids for fishery resource management and mitigation purposes in the Columbia River basin. Agency fish health programs varied greatly. Some agencies had personnel, equipment and funding to frequently monitor the health status of both juvenile production fish and adult salmon or steelhead trout at the time of spawning. Other agencies had much smaller programs and limited resources. These differences became better understood when the Pacific Northwest Fish Health Protection Committee developed its Model Fish Health Protection Program including recommendations for standard fish disease detection procedures. Even though some agencies could not immediately attain the goals set by the Model Program it was unanimously adopted as a desirable objective. Shortly thereafter, a multi-party planning group was assembled to help the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) find ways to improve agency fish health programs and implement measures under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The planning group assessed existing agency fish health monitoring capabilities, agreed upon satisfactory levels of capability to detect and identify important fish pathogens, and designed a five-year project establishing comparable fish health monitoring capability in each agency. It was strongly believed that such a project would improve the health and quality of the millions of hatchery fish released annually in the Columbia River basin and improve interagency communications and disease control coordination. During 1986 and 1987 BPA individually negotiated five separate contracts with the fishery agencies to standardize fish health monitoring, develop a common data collection and reporting format

  20. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter; Wagner, Niels; Asal, Korhan; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Thomsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss may result from excessive release of glutamate, nitrogen oxide and reactive oxygen species. The effects of these factors on the inner ear may potentially be prevented or reduced by erythropoietin (EPO), as indicated by previously demonstrated neuro-protective effects of EPO upon damage to the central nervous system and the retina. This paper reports three separate trials, conducted to investigate the hypothesis that noise-induced hearing loss is prevented or reduced by erythropoietin. The trials employed three different modes of drug application, different administration time windows and different rodent species. In trial 1, guinea pigs were exposed to 110dB SPL, 4-20kHz wide band noise (WBN) for 8h. EPO was administered to the round window membrane 24h after noise exposure, either sustained by pump for a week or by single dose middle ear instillation. In trial 2, rats were exposed to 105dB SPL, 4-20kHz WBN for 8h. EPO was administered by single dose middle ear instillation 1 or 14h after noise exposure. In trial 3, rats were exposed to 105dB SPL, 4-20kHz WBN for 8 or 3x8h. EPO was injected intraperitoneally 1h before noise exposure. Oto-acoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses (at 16kHz) were recorded before and after noise exposure in all trials. The noise exposure induced a hearing loss in all animals. In trial 1, no recovery and no improvement of hearing occurred in any treatment group. In trial 2 and 3, a partial hearing recovery was seen. However, the hearing loss of the EPO treated animals was significantly worse than controls in trial 2. In trial 3, the hearing of the EPO treated animals exposed for 3x8h was significantly worse than controls. Thus, surprisingly, the results from 2 of the 3 present trials indicate that erythropoietin may in fact augment noise-induced hearing loss. This is contradictory to the beneficial effect of EPO reported by the vast majority of studies on stressed neural tissues. EPO administration

  1. Results of cement augmentation and curettage in aneurysmal bone cyst of spine

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Saumyajit; Patel, Dharmesh R; Dhakal, Gaurav; Sarangi, T

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a vascular tumor of the spine. Management of spinal ABC still remains controversial because of its location, vascular nature and incidence of recurrence. In this manuscript, we hereby describe two cases of ABC spine treated by curettage, vertebral cement augmentation for control of bleeding and internal stabilization with two years followup. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing the role of cement augmentation in spinal ABC in controlling vascular bleeding in curettage of ABC of spine. Case 1: A 22 year old male patient presented with chronic back pain. On radiological investigation, there were multiple, osteolytic septite lesions at L3 vertebral body without neural compression or instability. Percutaneous transpedicular biopsy of L3 from involved pedicle was done. This was followed by cement augmentation through the uninvolved pedicle. Next, transpedicular complete curettage was done through involved pedicle. Case 2: A 15-year-old female presented with nonradiating back pain and progressive myelopathy. On radiological investigation, there was an osteolytic lesion at D9. At surgery, decompression, pedicle screw-rod fixation and posterolateral fusion from D7 to D11 was done. At D9 level, through normal pedicle cement augmentation was added to provide anterior column support and to control the expected bleeding following curettage. Transpedicular complete curettage was done through the involved pedicle with controlled bleeding at the surgical field. Cement augmentation was providing controlled bleeding at surgical field during curettage, internal stabilization and control of pain. On 2 years followup, pain was relieved and there was a stable spinal segment with well filled cement without any sign of recurrence in computed tomography scan. In selected cases of spinal ABC with single vertebral, single pedicle involvement; cement augmentation of vertebra through normal pedicle has an

  2. Results of cement augmentation and curettage in aneurysmal bone cyst of spine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Patel, Dharmesh R; Dhakal, Gaurav; Sarangi, T

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a vascular tumor of the spine. Management of spinal ABC still remains controversial because of its location, vascular nature and incidence of recurrence. In this manuscript, we hereby describe two cases of ABC spine treated by curettage, vertebral cement augmentation for control of bleeding and internal stabilization with two years followup. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing the role of cement augmentation in spinal ABC in controlling vascular bleeding in curettage of ABC of spine. Case 1: A 22 year old male patient presented with chronic back pain. On radiological investigation, there were multiple, osteolytic septite lesions at L3 vertebral body without neural compression or instability. Percutaneous transpedicular biopsy of L3 from involved pedicle was done. This was followed by cement augmentation through the uninvolved pedicle. Next, transpedicular complete curettage was done through involved pedicle. Case 2: A 15-year-old female presented with nonradiating back pain and progressive myelopathy. On radiological investigation, there was an osteolytic lesion at D9. At surgery, decompression, pedicle screw-rod fixation and posterolateral fusion from D7 to D11 was done. At D9 level, through normal pedicle cement augmentation was added to provide anterior column support and to control the expected bleeding following curettage. Transpedicular complete curettage was done through the involved pedicle with controlled bleeding at the surgical field. Cement augmentation was providing controlled bleeding at surgical field during curettage, internal stabilization and control of pain. On 2 years followup, pain was relieved and there was a stable spinal segment with well filled cement without any sign of recurrence in computed tomography scan. In selected cases of spinal ABC with single vertebral, single pedicle involvement; cement augmentation of vertebra through normal pedicle has an

  3. Augmented reality to enhance an active telepresence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Alison; Pretlove, John R. G.; Parker, Graham A.

    1996-12-01

    Tasks carried out remotely via a telerobotic system are typically complex, occur in hazardous environments and require fine control of the robot's movements. Telepresence systems provide the teleoperator with a feeling of being physically present at the remote site. Stereoscopic video has been successfully applied to telepresence vision systems to increase the operator's perception of depth in the remote scene and this sense of presence can be further enhanced using computer generated stereo graphics to augment the visual information presented to the operator. The Mechatronic Systems and Robotics Research Group have over seven years developed a number of high performance active stereo vision systems culminating in the latest, a four degree-of-freedom stereohead. This carries two miniature color cameras and is controlled in real time by the motion of the operator's head, who views the stereoscopic video images on an immersive head mounted display or stereo monitor. The stereohead is mounted on a mobile robot, the movement of which is controlled by a joystick interface. This paper describes the active telepresence system and the development of a prototype augmented reality (AR) application to enhance the operator's sense of presence at the remote site. The initial enhancements are a virtual map and compass to aid navigation in degraded visual conditions and a virtual cursor that provides a means for the operator to interact with the remote environment. The results of preliminary experiments using the initial enhancements are presented.

  4. Packing of Fruit Fly Parasitoids for Augmentative Releases

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Pablo; Cancino, Jorge; Ruiz, Lía

    2012-01-01

    The successful application of Augmentative Biological Control (ABC) to control pest fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) confronts two fundamental requirements: (1) the establishment of efficient mass rearing procedures for the species to be released, and (2) the development of methodologies for the packing and release of parasitoids that permit a uniform distribution and their optimal field performance under an area-wide approach. Parasitoid distributions have been performed by ground and by air with moderate results; both options face challenges that remain to be addressed. Different devices and strategies have been used for these purposes, including paper bags and the chilled adult technique, both of which are commonly used when releasing sterile flies. However, insect parasitoids have morphological and behavioral characteristics that render the application of such methodologies suboptimal. In this paper, we discuss an alternate strategy for the augmentative release of parasitoids and describe packing conditions that favor the rearing and emergence of adult parasitoids for increased field performance. We conclude that the use of ABC, including the packaging of parasitoids, requires ongoing development to ensure that this technology remains a viable and effective control technique for pest fruit flies. PMID:26466634

  5. Intelligent Augmented Reality Training for Motherboard Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerfield, Giles; Mitrovic, Antonija; Billinghurst, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the combination of Augmented Reality (AR) with Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) to assist with training for manual assembly tasks. Our approach combines AR graphics with adaptive guidance from the ITS to provide a more effective learning experience. We have developed a modular software framework for intelligent AR training…

  6. An Asynchronous Augmentation to Traditional Course Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Marvin L.; Wolverton, Mimi

    Asynchronous augmentation facilitates distributed learning, which relies heavily on technology and self-learning. This paper reports the results of delivering a real estate principles course using an asynchronous course delivery format. It highlights one of many ways to enhance learning using technology, and it provides information concerning how…

  7. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper.

  8. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  9. Get Real: Augmented Reality for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rebecca; DeBay, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Kids love augmented reality (AR) simulations because they are like real-life video games. AR simulations allow students to learn content while collaborating face to face and interacting with a multimedia-enhanced version of the world around them. Although the technology may seem advanced, AR software makes it easy to develop content-based…

  10. Location-Based Learning through Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Te-Lien; Chanlin, Lih-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A context-aware and mixed-reality exploring tool cannot only effectively provide an information-rich environment to users, but also allows them to quickly utilize useful resources and enhance environment awareness. This study integrates Augmented Reality (AR) technology into smartphones to create a stimulating learning experience at a university…

  11. Design Principles for Augmented Reality Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunleavy, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality is an emerging technology that utilizes mobile, context-aware devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) that enable participants to interact with digital information embedded within the physical environment. This overview of design principles focuses on specific strategies that instructional designers can use to develop AR learning…

  12. A Universal Logging Format for Augmentative Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesher, Gregory W.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Rinkus, Gerard; Higginbotham, D. Jeffery

    This report discusses how technical and technological advances in alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) have outstripped the ability to assess their impact on actual communication and argues that this is due in part to the lack of a consistent and reliable method to measure long-term communicative efficacy. The report proposes a…

  13. Introduction to augmented and virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caudell, Thomas P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper introduces the field of augmented reality as a prolog to the body of papers in the remainder of this session. I describe the use of head-mounted display technologies to improve the efficiency and quality of human workers in their performance of engineering design, manufacturing, construction, testing, and maintenance activities. This technology is used to `augment' the visual field of the wearer with information necessary in the performance of the current task. The enabling technology is head-up (see-through) display head sets (HUDsets) combined with head position sensing, real world registration systems, and database access software. A primary difference between virtual reality (VR) and `augmented reality' (AR) is in the complexity of the perceived graphical objects. In AR systems, only simple wire frames, template outlines, designators, and text is displayed. An immediate result of this difference is that augmented reality systems can be driven by standard and inexpensive microprocessors. Many research issues must be addressed before this technology can be widely used, including tracking and registration, human 3D perception and reasoning, and human task performance issues.

  14. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  15. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene augmentation of the lower face.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F

    1996-05-01

    Most options for rejuvenation of the lower face use soft-tissue fillers that augment the appropriate sites. Each of these options has associated risks and benefits. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (E-PTFE) as a soft-tissue filler in the face. From January 1991 through December 1993, the authors used E-PTFE soft-tissue patches for lower facial augmentation in 41 patients at 115 implant sites. Postsurgical follow-up has ranged from 2.5 to 4.5 years; during this time, complications have occurred in 4 patients. One implant had to be removed because of a seroma (1 patient), 4 implants required further secondary augmentation (2 patients), and 1 implant required revision because of malposition (1 patient). There have been no cases of implant infection, extrusion, long-term inflammation, or capsule formation. In this article, the authors review the technical aspects of E-PTFE use and discuss issues relating to the long-term efficacy of this new option for soft-tissue augmentation. The technique is also compared with other options for rejuvenation of the lower face. PMID:8628100

  16. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  17. Ondansetron augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a treatment strategy in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are the mainstay in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients who do not respond adequately to SRIs commonly receive augmentation therapy with another agent, usually an atypical antipsychotic drug. Atypical antipsychotics, however, may not be appropriate for or acceptable to all patients. Ondansetron is an experimental alternative for such patients. There have been at least 6 trials that have examined a short-term (8-12 weeks) role for ondansetron in patients with OCD. These include 1 placebo-controlled crossover trial (N = 11); 1 uncontrolled monotherapy trial (N = 8); 2 low-dose (0.5-1.0 mg/d), uncontrolled augmentation trials in patients who did not respond adequately to ongoing or earlier treatments (pooled N = 35); and 2 moderate- to high-dose (4-8 mg/d) randomized, placebo-controlled augmentation trials in patients with undocumented past treatment history (pooled N = 88). Ondansetron was modestly effective in the uncontrolled trials and strikingly effective in the controlled trials. Ondansetron was also very well tolerated in all of the studies. These enthusiastic observations must be tempered by the limitations of the reviewed data, such as small sample sizes, short study durations, lack of data on the effects of blinded ondansetron discontinuation, lack of long-term data, and study-specific limitations. At best, ondansetron (1-8 mg/d) may be considered an experimental SRI augmentation agent in OCD patients for whom augmentation with an atypical antipsychotic drug is problematic.

  18. Effect of Different Distal Fixation Augmentation Methods on the Pullout Strength of Fassier-Duval Telescoping Rods.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Alfred; Barsi, James; Baldini, Todd; Georgopoulos, Gaia

    2016-01-01

    Antegrade telescoping rods have been introduced for use in pediatric patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) to decrease the incidence of long-bone fractures and to correct and prevent deformities. Recent studies have documented failures of telescoping intramedullary rods due to inadequate distal fixation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pullout strength of distal fixation of the telescoping rod with and without synthetic calcium phosphate or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation. Four sets of 6 telescoping distal fixation rods were fixed according to standard insertion technique into an open-cell rigid-foam synthetic bone block simulating OI bone. The groups tested were as follows: control (no augmentation), 0.75 mL of PMMA-augmented, 0.75 mL of PMMA-rescued (stripped distal fixation, then resecured after PMMA augmentation), and 0.75 mL of bioabsorbable-calcium phosphate (CP)-augmented. All rods were tested to failure. The peak load was recorded. Average pullout strengths were as follows: control, 20±6.6 N; PMMA, 125±16.8 N; PMMA-rescued, 137±11.9 N; bioabsorbable-CP, 81±10.3 N. All augmented groups had significantly higher pullout strength compared with the control (P<.001). The PMMA and PMMA-rescued groups failed at the PMMA/bone interface, whereas the bioabsorbable-CP group failed at the cement/rod interface. All augmented constructs improved pullout strength by at least 400% compared with the control. Bioabsorbable cement may be less detrimental to the physis if pullout still occurs despite augmentation due to its mode of failure. This study provides biomechanical evidence to support the further in vivo investigation of either PMMA or bioabsorbable cement augmentation to improve pullout strength of distal telescoping rod fixation.

  19. Augmenting your own reality: student authoring of science-based augmented reality games.

    PubMed

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent games, TimeLab 2100, players role-play citizens of the early 22nd century when global climate change is out of control. Through AR, they see their community as it might be nearly one hundred years in the future. TimeLab and other similar AR games balance location specificity and portability--they are games that are tied to a location and games that are movable from place to place. Focusing students on developing their own AR games provides the best of both virtual and physical worlds: a more portable solution that deeply connects young people to their own surroundings. A series of initiatives has focused on technical and pedagogical solutions to supporting students authoring their own games. PMID:21240956

  20. Augmentation of acrylic bone cement with multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Brock; Andrews, Rodney; Rantell, Terry; Pienkowski, David

    2006-05-01

    Acrylic bone cement, based on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), is a proven polymer having important applications in medicine and dentistry, but this polymer continues to have less than ideal resistance to mechanical fatigue and impact. A variety of materials have been added to bone cement to augment its mechanical strength, but none of these augmentative materials has proven successful. Carbon nanotubes, a new hollow multiwalled tubular material 10-40 nm in diameter, 10-100 microm long, and 50-100 times the strength of steel at 1/6 the weight, have emerged as a viable augmentation candidate because of their large surface area to volume ratio. The objective of this study was to determine if the addition of multiwall carbon nanotubes to bone cement can alter its static or dynamic mechanical properties. Bar-shaped specimens made from six different (0-10% by weight) concentrations of multiwall carbon nanotubes were tested to failure in quasi-static 3-point bending and in 4-point bending fatigue (5 Hz). Analyses of variance and the 3-Parameter Weibull model were used to analyze the material performance data. The 2 wt % MWNT concentration enhanced flexural strength by 12.8% (p=0.003) and produced a 13.1% enhancement in yield stress (p=0.002). Bending modulus increased slightly with the smaller (<5 wt % MWNT) concentrations, but increased 24.1% (p<0.001) in response to the 10 wt % loading. While the 2 wt % loading produced slightly improved quasi-static test results, it was associated with clearly superior fatigue performance (3.3x increase in the Weibull mean fatigue life). Weibull minimum fatigue life (No), Weibull modulus (alpha), and characteristic fatigue life (beta) for bone cement augmented with carbon nanotubes were enhanced versus that observed in the control group. These data unambiguously showed that the bone cement-MWNT polymer system has an enhanced fatigue life compared to "control" bone cement (no added nanotubes). It is concluded that specific multiwall

  1. Graphical user interface concepts for tactical augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenta, Chris; Murphy, Anne; Hinton, Jeremy; Cook, James; Sherrill, Todd; Snarski, Steve

    2010-04-01

    Applied Research Associates and BAE Systems are working together to develop a wearable augmented reality system under the DARPA ULTRA-Vis program†. Our approach to achieve the objectives of ULTRAVis, called iLeader, incorporates a full color 40° field of view (FOV) see-thru holographic waveguide integrated with sensors for full position and head tracking to provide an unobtrusive information system for operational maneuvers. iLeader will enable warfighters to mark-up the 3D battle-space with symbologic identification of graphical control measures, friendly force positions and enemy/target locations. Our augmented reality display provides dynamic real-time painting of symbols on real objects, a pose-sensitive 360° representation of relevant object positions, and visual feedback for a variety of system activities. The iLeader user interface and situational awareness graphical representations are highly intuitive, nondisruptive, and always tactically relevant. We used best human-factors practices, system engineering expertise, and cognitive task analysis to design effective strategies for presenting real-time situational awareness to the military user without distorting their natural senses and perception. We present requirements identified for presenting information within a see-through display in combat environments, challenges in designing suitable visualization capabilities, and solutions that enable us to bring real-time iconic command and control to the tactical user community.

  2. Augmented heavy lift assist devices for enhanced safety performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Greg R.; Tan, Kok-Leong; Simpson, Gary

    1998-12-01

    Heavy lift assist devices are an important part of manufacturing facilities that involve large, heavy or bulky material. Many devices are available that provide lift but not motive force augmentation. In these devices, the physical strength of the operator is used to move and position the work piece. Due to large work piece inertial characteristics, inertial contributions from the lift device itself, and misuse of the assist manipulator, injuries may still occur. In this research, an approach is presented that provides reduced-authority actuation to the motive joints of the lift device that allows for augmentation of the human motion forces, provides a means of correcting injurious ergonomic interactions, and allows for high rate energy dissipation for payload trajectory control and emergency situations. The approach is to provide low torque input controlled by operator hand motions. These hand motions move the payload under a centralized trajectory generation scheme that uses modulated braking commands to impose motion constraints, such as object avoidance, resonance attenuation and ergonomic trajectory enhancement. The system is implemented in an virtual reality robot simulator that allows for the investigation of dynamic characteristics prior to the prototype stage.

  3. Chemosensitization as a Means to Augment Commercial Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Bruce C.; Chan, Kathleen L.; Kim, Jong H.

    2012-01-01

    Antimycotic chemosensitization and its mode of action are of growing interest. Currently, use of antifungal agents in agriculture and medicine has a number of obstacles. Foremost of these is development of resistance or cross-resistance to one or more antifungal agents. The generally high expense and negative impact, or side effects, associated with antifungal agents are two further issues of concern. Collectively, these problems are exacerbated by efforts to control resistant strains, which can evolve into a treadmill of higher dosages for longer periods. This cycle in turn, inflates cost of treatment, dramatically. A further problem is stagnation in development of new and effective antifungal agents, especially for treatment of human mycoses. Efforts to overcome some of these issues have involved using combinations of available antimycotics (e.g., combination therapy for invasive mycoses). However, this approach has had inconsistent success and is often associated with a marked increase in negative side effects. Chemosensitization by natural compounds to increase effectiveness of commercial antimycotics is a somewhat new approach to dealing with the aforementioned problems. The potential for safe natural products to improve antifungal activity has been observed for over three decades. Chemosensitizing agents possess antifungal activity, but at insufficient levels to serve as antimycotics, alone. Their main function is to disrupt fungal stress response, destabilize the structural integrity of cellular and vacuolar membranes or stimulate production of reactive oxygen species, augmenting oxidative stress and apoptosis. Use of safe chemosensitizing agents has potential benefit to both agriculture and medicine. When co-applied with a commercial antifungal agent, an additive or synergistic interaction may occur, augmenting antifungal efficacy. This augmentation, in turn, lowers effective dosages, costs, negative side effects and, in some cases, countermands resistance

  4. An Augmented Reality based 3D Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ryo; Kishimoto, Katsumi

    This paper presents a 3D catalog system that uses Augmented Reality technology. The use of Web-based catalog systems that present products in 3D form is increasing in various fields, along with the rapid and widespread adoption of Electronic Commerce. However, 3D shapes could previously only be seen in a virtual space, and it was difficult to understand how the products would actually look in the real world. To solve this, we propose a method that combines the virtual and real worlds simply and intuitively. The method applies Augmented Reality technology, and the system developed based on the method enables users to evaluate 3D virtual products in a real environment.

  5. Augmenting Probabilistic Risk Assesment with Malevolent Initiators

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder

    2011-11-01

    As commonly practiced, the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in nuclear power plants only considers accident initiators such as natural hazards, equipment failures, and human error. Malevolent initiators are ignored in PRA, but are considered the domain of physical security, which uses vulnerability assessment based on an officially specified threat (design basis threat). This paper explores the implications of augmenting and extending existing PRA models by considering new and modified scenarios resulting from malevolent initiators. Teaming the augmented PRA models with conventional vulnerability assessments can cost-effectively enhance security of a nuclear power plant. This methodology is useful for operating plants, as well as in the design of new plants. For the methodology, we have proposed an approach that builds on and extends the practice of PRA for nuclear power plants for security-related issues. Rather than only considering 'random' failures, we demonstrated a framework that is able to represent and model malevolent initiating events and associated plant impacts.

  6. Detonation wave augmentation of gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study that examined the effects of using detonation waves to augment the performance of gas turbines are reported. The central ideas were to reduce compressor requirements and to maintain high performance in jet engines. Gasdynamic equations were used to model the flows associated with shock waves generated by the detonation of fuel in detonator tubes. Shock wave attenuation to the level of Mach waves was found possible, thus eliminating interference with the compressor and the necessity of valves and seals. A preliminary parametric study of the performance of a compressor working at a 4:1 ratio in a conceptual design of a detonation wave augmented jet engine in subsonic flight indicated a clear superiority over conventional designs in terms of fuel efficiency and thrust.

  7. Vertebral Augmentation: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Nabhane, Linda; Issa El Khoury, Fouad; Kreichati, Gaby; El Rachkidi, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVF) are an increasing public health problem. Cement augmentation (vertebroplasty of kyphoplasty) helps stabilize painful OVF refractory to medical treatment. This stabilization is thought to improve pain and functional outcome. Vertebroplasty consists of injecting cement into a fractured vertebra using a percutaneous transpedicular approach. Balloon kyphoplasty uses an inflatable balloon prior to injecting the cement. Although kyphoplasty is associated with significant improvement of local kyphosis and less cement leakage, this does not result in long-term clinical and functional improvement. Moreover, vertebroplasty is favored by some due to the high cost of kyphoplasty. The injection of cement increases the stiffness of the fracture vertebrae. This can lead, in theory, to adjacent OVF. However, many studies found no increase of subsequent fracture when comparing medical treatment to cement augmentation. Kyphoplasty can have a protective effect due to restoration of sagittal balance. PMID:27114782

  8. [Augmentation enterocystoplasty. Apropos of 15 cases].

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, S; Elmrini, M; Bennani, S; Aboutaieb, R

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed the efficacy of augmentation enterocystoplasty about 15 cases, based on technical modalities and intestinal loop used. There were 10 tuberculosis bladders, 2 bilharzial bladders, 2 interstitial cystitis and one neurogenic bladder. We used for bladder augmentation the sigmoid (7 cases), ileum (6 cases) and coeco-ileum (2 cases). Ureteroileoplasty is associated in three cases for large tuberculous ureteral stenosis, and reimplantation of ureter in the neobladder is realised in seven cases. The results with detubularized ileum were excellent. We observed in one patient persistence of dilatation of upper urinary tract after use of detubularized sigmoid. The results with use of ileocoecum are poor. We observed good results by using detubularized ileum, so we prefer this intestinal loop than the others. There was no significative difference between different detubularisation technics. Reimplantation of ureter inneobladder is indicated when there is terminal ureteral lesions. PMID:8554290

  9. Projectile oscillations in augmented rail guns

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, M.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Homan, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    The projectile in an inductive store-powered rail gun, augmented by an external magnetic field, will oscillate under certain conditions. This behavior is easily understood when there is no resistance in the circuit comprising the storage coil, rails and armature. In this case, the flux in the complete circuit is conserved. However, as the projectile moves down the rails, more flux from the augmenting field is picked up. This must be accompanied by a decrease in current in the system to conserve the total flux. At a certain distance down the rails, the current must reverse to conserve the flux, and thus the force on the projectile reverses. This mechanism leads to oscillation of the projectile. An analytic solution is given for the case in which the resistance is zero.

  10. TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  11. The ligament augmentation device: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Maffulli, N

    1999-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common ligament injury in the knee, and a significant number of patients may develop progressive instability and disability despite aggressive rehabilitation. Various materials have been used for its reconstruction. These include autografts, allografts, prosthetic ligaments, and synthetic augmentation of the biological tissue. The concept of ligament augmentation device (LAD) arose from the observation that biological grafts undergo a phase of degeneration and loss of strength before being incorporated. The LAD is meant to protect the biological graft during this vulnerable phase. However, it provokes an inflammatory reaction in the knee, and has been found to delay maturation of autogenous graft in humans. In experimental situations, the LAD has been found to share loads in a composite graft. It has also been found to be substantially stronger than the biological graft. However, in clinical situations no significant advantages have been observed with the use of LAD to augment patellar tendon or hamstring reconstruction of the chronic ACL-deficient knee or in the acute setting to augment repair of the torn ACL. There are very few reports of the use of LAD in reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament, and again these do not suggest any advantage in its use. Insertion of the LAD implies the introduction of a foreign material into the knee, has been associated with complications such as reactive synovitis and effusions, and may also be associated with an increased risk of infection. At present, there is no evidence that its routine use should be advocated in uncomplicated reconstructions of the ACL using biological grafts.

  12. Primary Breast Augmentation with Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Saboeiro, Alesia P

    2015-07-01

    The controversy over fat grafting to the breasts has now been settled. In 2009, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Fat Graft Task Force stated that "Fat grafting may be considered for breast augmentation and correction of defects associated with medical conditions and previous breast surgeries; however, results are dependent on technique and surgeon expertise." This article discusses the history, indications, planning, complications, and present technique of fat grafting to the breast using the Coleman technique.

  13. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  14. The ligament augmentation device: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Maffulli, N

    1999-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is the most common ligament injury in the knee, and a significant number of patients may develop progressive instability and disability despite aggressive rehabilitation. Various materials have been used for its reconstruction. These include autografts, allografts, prosthetic ligaments, and synthetic augmentation of the biological tissue. The concept of ligament augmentation device (LAD) arose from the observation that biological grafts undergo a phase of degeneration and loss of strength before being incorporated. The LAD is meant to protect the biological graft during this vulnerable phase. However, it provokes an inflammatory reaction in the knee, and has been found to delay maturation of autogenous graft in humans. In experimental situations, the LAD has been found to share loads in a composite graft. It has also been found to be substantially stronger than the biological graft. However, in clinical situations no significant advantages have been observed with the use of LAD to augment patellar tendon or hamstring reconstruction of the chronic ACL-deficient knee or in the acute setting to augment repair of the torn ACL. There are very few reports of the use of LAD in reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament, and again these do not suggest any advantage in its use. Insertion of the LAD implies the introduction of a foreign material into the knee, has been associated with complications such as reactive synovitis and effusions, and may also be associated with an increased risk of infection. At present, there is no evidence that its routine use should be advocated in uncomplicated reconstructions of the ACL using biological grafts. PMID:10355719

  15. Augmentation mammaplasty using implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Susumu

    2012-09-01

    One of the techniques for augmentation mammaplasty is the procedure using implants. Even though this technique has been used for many years, there are still several controversial issues to be discussed and overcome for patient safety. In this review article, capsular contracture, leak or rupture of the implants, possible systemic disease, relation with breast cancer, and recent problems with Poly Implant Prothese implants are described and discussed. PMID:23094237

  16. Augmentation Mammaplasty Using Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    One of the techniques for augmentation mammaplasty is the procedure using implants. Even though this technique has been used for many years, there are still several controversial issues to be discussed and overcome for patient safety. In this review article, capsular contracture, leak or rupture of the implants, possible systemic disease, relation with breast cancer, and recent problems with Poly Implant Prothese implants are described and discussed. PMID:23094237

  17. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  18. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  19. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  20. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  1. Augmented amputations of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Mohler, D G; Kessler, J I; Earp, B E

    2000-02-01

    Ten patients who had amputations of a lower extremity for high-grade sarcomas underwent bone augmentation with either allograft or autograft between 1988 and 1996. There were eight transfemoral amputations and two transtibial amputations. The transferred segments consisted of one proximal tibia and six distal tibia autografts, two allografts, one autograft talar dome and first metatarsal, and one with a patellar cap of a supracondylar amputation. The average length of followup was 54 months. There were no nonunions of any of the grafts. There were three wound problems requiring additional operations. One autograft resorbed, and one autograft had a late infection. There was one local recurrence. Augmentation to provide length resulted in a 42% increase in bone length in those performed purely for length. All patients were able to use standard prostheses. Functional outcome was appropriate to the amputation level. Half of the patients avoided more proximal levels of amputation because of the ability to augment the osteotomy. The use of nonvascularized structural autografts or allografts is a simple procedure that can produce a superior residual limb in patients undergoing amputation. Its use should be considered in patients for whom traditional amputation techniques will result in poor function, difficulty in fitting a prosthesis, or greater than necessary anatomic loss. PMID:10693566

  2. Service connectivity architecture for mobile augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Tuukka; Pyssysalo, Tino; Roening, Juha

    2001-06-01

    Mobile augmented reality can be utilized in a number of different services, and it provides a lot of added value compared to the interfaces used in mobile multimedia today. Intelligent service connectivity architecture is needed for the emerging commercial mobile augmented reality services, to guarantee mobility and interoperability on a global scale. Some of the key responsibilities of this architecture are to find suitable service providers, to manage the connection with and utilization of such providers, and to allow smooth switching between them whenever the user moves out of the service area of the service provider she is currently connected to. We have studied the potential support technologies for such architectures and propose a way to create an intelligent service connectivity architecture based on current and upcoming wireless networks, an Internet backbone, and mechanisms to manage service connectivity in the upper layers of the protocol stack. In this paper, we explain the key issues of service connectivity, describe the properties of our architecture, and analyze the functionality of an example system. Based on these, we consider our proposition a good solution to the quest for global interoperability in mobile augmented reality services.

  3. Adaptive information design for outdoor augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Neuhöfer, Jan A; Govaers, Felix; El Mokni, Hichem; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Augmented Reality focuses on the enrichment of the user's natural field of view by consistent integration of text, symbols and interactive three-dimensional objects in real time. Placing virtual objects directly into the user's view in a natural context empowers highly dynamic applications. On the other hand, this necessitates deliberate choice of information design and density, in particular for deployment in hazardous environments like military combat scenarios. As the amount of information needed is not foreseeable and strongly depends on the individual mission, an appropriate system must offer adequate adaptation capabilities. The paper presents a prototypical, vehicle-mountable Augmented Reality vision system, designed for enhancing situation awareness in stressful urban warfare scenarios. Tracking, as one of the most crucial challenges for outdoor Augmented Reality, is accomplished by means of a Differential-GPS approach while the type of display to attach can be modified, ranging from ocular displays to standard LCD mini-screens. The overall concept also includes envisioning of own troops (blue forces), for which a multi-sensor tracking approach has been chosen. As a main feature, the system allows switching between different information categories, focusing on friendly, hostile, unidentified or neutral data. Results of an empirical study on the superiority of an in-view navigation cue approach conclude the paper.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmentation of Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeineh, Christopher; Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann

    2010-11-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDEs) are the focus of increasing attention due to their potentially superior performance over constant pressure engines. Yet due to its unsteady chamber pressure, the PDE system will either be over- or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle, with energy being used without maximum gain. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) augmentation offers the opportunity to extract energy and apply it to a separate stream where the net thrust will be increased. With MHD augmentation, such as in the Pulse Detonation Rocket-Induced MHD Ejector (PDRIME) concept, energy could be extracted from the high speed portion of the system, e.g., through a generator in the nozzle, and then applied directly to another flow or portion of the flow as a body force. The present high resolution numerical simulations explore the flow evolution and potential performance of such propulsion systems. An additional magnetic piston applying energy in the PDE chamber can also act in concert with the PDRIME for separate thrust augmentation. Results show that MHD can indeed influence the flow and pressure fields in a beneficial way in these configurations, with potential performance gains under a variety of flight and operating conditions. There are some challenges associated with achieving these gains, however, suggesting further optimization is required.

  5. Adult Partner-Augmented Communication Input to Youth with Mental Retardation Using the System for Augmenting Language (SAL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Rose A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the frequency and nature of augmented input that adult partners provided to 13 youth with moderate to severe mental retardation as they began to use the System for Augmenting Language. Analyses revealed differences in the frequency and in the manner and style with which home and school partners provided augmented input.…

  6. Whispering gallery mode resonators augmented with engraved diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Aveline, David C; Baumgartel, Lukas M; Lin, Guoping; Yu, Nan

    2013-02-01

    We report the demonstration of whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators augmented with diffraction gratings. We apply focused ion beam (FIB) methods to precisely engrave a surface grating directly into the perimeter of a crystalline disc. The grating provides a simple and highly directional free-space coupling mechanism with superior stability to evanescent coupling techniques. These integrated gratings can also provide control of the resonance spectrum, significantly reducing the mode density. Our FIB fabrication process does not introduce significant loss; Q≃3×10(7) has been demonstrated. The wavelength dependence of the diffraction angle was found to be in excellent agreement with grating theory. The versatility of spectral control and far-field grating coupling will have significant impact in WGM resonator applications in lasers, sensors, and optoelectronics.

  7. Cement augmentation for vertebral fractures in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Haroon; Bommireddy, Rajendranath; Klezl, Zdenek

    2014-12-01

    Objective of our study was to assess the outcome of cement augmentation in patients with multiple myeloma. We reviewed 12 patients with 48 vertebral fractures. Mean age was 62.5 years. Average length of follow-up was 27.5 months. Expected survival was less than 12 months in 2 patients and more than 12 months in the remaining patients. After surgery mean survival was 32.5 months. Mean correction in vertebral angle was 3.6°. Karnofsky score was more than 70 in 5 patients, 50-70 in 6 and less than 50 in 1 patient preoperatively, while it was more than 70 in all patients postoperatively. Preoperative mean ODI was 72%. After surgery it was 46% at 6 weeks and 14% at 12 months. All patients reported improvement in their pain status after surgery. Cement augmentation is a safe and effective way of treating symptoms of multiple myeloma, which occur due to vertebral metastases. It results in excellent pain control and improvement in quality of life. PMID:26280729

  8. Visual error augmentation enhances learning in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Ian; Huang, Felix C; Patton, James L

    2010-01-01

    Recent human motor learning and neuro-rehabilitation experiments have identified the benefits of assisting the learning process by artificially enhancing the errors one might experience. A yet untested question is just how far the nervous system will trust such treatments, especially in transformations with very large sensorimotor discrepancies. Our study asked 10 healthy subjects to perform targeted reaching in a virtual reality environment, where the transformation of the hand position matrix was a complete reversal - rotated 180 degrees about an arbitrary axis (hence 2 of the 3 coordinates are reversed). Our data show that after 500 practice trials, subject who received 2x Error Augmentation (EA) were able to reach their desired target 0.4 seconds more quickly and with a Maximum Perpendicular Trajectory deviation of 0.9 cm less, when compared to the control group. Furthermore, the manner in which subjects practiced was influenced by the error augmentation, resulting in more continuous motions for this group. These data further support that this type of enhancement, as well as possibly other distorted reality methods, may promote more complete adaptation/learning when compared to regular training.

  9. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Köller, Manfred; Godry, Holger; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64) with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders) were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15) months. With a mean healing index (HI) of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23). No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  10. Plant nanobionics approach to augment photosynthesis and biochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Juan Pablo; Landry, Markita P; Faltermeier, Sean M; McNicholas, Thomas P; Iverson, Nicole M; Boghossian, Ardemis A; Reuel, Nigel F; Hilmer, Andrew J; Sen, Fatih; Brew, Jacqueline A; Strano, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    The interface between plant organelles and non-biological nanostructures has the potential to impart organelles with new and enhanced functions. Here, we show that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) passively transport and irreversibly localize within the lipid envelope of extracted plant chloroplasts, promote over three times higher photosynthetic activity than that of controls, and enhance maximum electron transport rates. The SWNT-chloroplast assemblies also enable higher rates of leaf electron transport in vivo through a mechanism consistent with augmented photoabsorption. Concentrations of reactive oxygen species inside extracted chloroplasts are significantly suppressed by delivering poly(acrylic acid)-nanoceria or SWNT-nanoceria complexes. Moreover, we show that SWNTs enable near-infrared fluorescence monitoring of nitric oxide both ex vivo and in vivo, thus demonstrating that a plant can be augmented to function as a photonic chemical sensor. Nanobionics engineering of plant function may contribute to the development of biomimetic materials for light-harvesting and biochemical detection with regenerative properties and enhanced efficiency.

  11. Plant nanobionics approach to augment photosynthesis and biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo, Juan Pablo; Landry, Markita P.; Faltermeier, Sean M.; McNicholas, Thomas P.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Reuel, Nigel F.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Sen, Fatih; Brew, Jacqueline A.; Strano, Michael S.

    2014-04-01

    The interface between plant organelles and non-biological nanostructures has the potential to impart organelles with new and enhanced functions. Here, we show that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) passively transport and irreversibly localize within the lipid envelope of extracted plant chloroplasts, promote over three times higher photosynthetic activity than that of controls, and enhance maximum electron transport rates. The SWNT-chloroplast assemblies also enable higher rates of leaf electron transport in vivo through a mechanism consistent with augmented photoabsorption. Concentrations of reactive oxygen species inside extracted chloroplasts are significantly suppressed by delivering poly(acrylic acid)-nanoceria or SWNT-nanoceria complexes. Moreover, we show that SWNTs enable near-infrared fluorescence monitoring of nitric oxide both ex vivo and in vivo, thus demonstrating that a plant can be augmented to function as a photonic chemical sensor. Nanobionics engineering of plant function may contribute to the development of biomimetic materials for light-harvesting and biochemical detection with regenerative properties and enhanced efficiency.

  12. D-cycloserine as an augmentation strategy for cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders: an update.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Sawyer, Alice T; Asnaani, Anu

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective intervention for anxiety disorders. However, despite its proven efficacy, some patients fail to respond to an adequate course of treatment. In attempts to improve the efficacy of CBT, researchers have augmented the core learning processes of the intervention with d-cycloserine (DCS), an N-Methyl-D-Aspartate partial agonist. This article reviews the current literature on DCS as an augmentation strategy for CBT for anxiety disorders. We will describe the memory enhancing properties of DCS, review findings from randomized controlled studies of DCS in anxious populations and discuss mechanism, dosing and timing issues.

  13. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, such systems must comply with § 27.671... unsafe condition if the pilot is unaware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the...

  14. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, the system must comply with § 29.671 of... unsafe condition if the pilot is unaware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the...

  15. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, such systems must comply with § 27.671... unsafe condition if the pilot is unaware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the...

  16. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, the system must comply with § 29.671 of... unsafe condition if the pilot is unaware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the...

  17. 14 CFR 27.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 27.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, such systems must comply with § 27.671... unsafe condition if the pilot is unaware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the...

  18. 14 CFR 29.672 - Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Construction Control Systems § 29.672 Stability augmentation, automatic, and power-operated systems. If the... compliance with the flight characteristics requirements of this part, the system must comply with § 29.671 of... unsafe condition if the pilot is unaware of the failure. Warning systems must not activate the...

  19. Alien Contact!: Exploring Teacher Implementation of an Augmented Reality Curricular Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a five-teacher, exploratory case study, critically observing their implementation of a technology-intensive, augmented reality (AR) mathematics curriculum unit, along with its paper-based control. The unit itself was intended to promote multiple proportional-reasoning strategies with urban, public, middle school…

  20. Augmented kinematic feedback from haptic virtual reality for dental skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Haddawy, Peter; Rhienmora, Phattanapon; Jittimanee, Pannapa; Viratket, Piyanuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a haptic virtual reality system for dental skill training. In this study we examined several kinds of kinematic information about the movement provided by the system supplement knowledge of results (KR) in dental skill acquisition. The kinematic variables examined involved force utilization (F) and mirror view (M). This created three experimental conditions that received augmented kinematic feedback (F, M, FM) and one control condition that did not (KR-only). Thirty-two dental students were randomly assigned to four groups. Their task was to perform access opening on the upper first molar with the haptic virtual reality system. An acquisition session consisted of two days of ten trials of practice in which augmented kinematic feedback was provided for the appropriate experimental conditions after each trial. One week after, a retention test consisting of two trials without augmented feedback was completed. The results showed that the augmented kinematic feedback groups had larger mean performance scores than the KR-only group in Day 1 of the acquisition and retention sessions (ANOVA, p<0.05). The apparent differences among feedback groups were not significant in Day 2 of the acquisition session (ANOVA, p>0.05). The trends in acquisition and retention sessions suggest that the augmented kinematic feedback can enhance the performance earlier in the skill acquisition and retention sessions. PMID:21123503

  1. Synthetic biodegradable hydrogel delivery of demineralized bone matrix for bone augmentation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kinard, Lucas A.; Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Lam, Johnny; Lu, Steven; Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    There exists a strong clinical need for a more capable and robust method to achieve bone augmentation, and a system with fine-tuned delivery of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) has potential to meet that need. As such, the objective of the present study was to investigate a synthetic biodegradable hydrogel for the delivery of DBM for bone augmentation in a rat model. Oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) constructs were designed and fabricated by varying the content of rat-derived DBM particles (either 1:3, 1:1, or 3:1 DBM:OPF weight ratio on a dry basis) and using two DBM particle size ranges (50–150 or 150–250 μm). The physical properties of the constructs and the bioactivity of the DBM were evaluated. Select formulations (1:1 and 3:1 with 50–150 μm DBM) were evaluated in vivo compared to an empty control to investigate the effect of DBM dose and construct properties on bone augmentation. Overall, 3:1 constructs with higher DBM content achieved the greatest volume of bone augmentation exceeding 1:1 constructs and empty implants by 3-fold and 5-fold, respectively. As such, we have established that a synthetic, biodegradable hydrogel can function as a carrier for DBM, and that the volume of bone augmentation achieved by the constructs correlated directly to DBM dose. PMID:25046637

  2. Exploring the benefits of augmented reality documentation for maintenance and repair.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Steven; Feiner, Steven

    2011-10-01

    We explore the development of an experimental augmented reality application that provides benefits to professional mechanics performing maintenance and repair tasks in a field setting. We developed a prototype that supports military mechanics conducting routine maintenance tasks inside an armored vehicle turret, and evaluated it with a user study. Our prototype uses a tracked headworn display to augment a mechanic's natural view with text, labels, arrows, and animated sequences designed to facilitate task comprehension, localization, and execution. A within-subject controlled user study examined professional military mechanics using our system to complete 18 common tasks under field conditions. These tasks included installing and removing fasteners and indicator lights, and connecting cables, all within the cramped interior of an armored personnel carrier turret. An augmented reality condition was tested against two baseline conditions: the same headworn display providing untracked text and graphics and a fixed flat panel display representing an improved version of the laptop-based documentation currently employed in practice. The augmented reality condition allowed mechanics to locate tasks more quickly than when using either baseline, and in some instances, resulted in less overall head movement. A qualitative survey showed that mechanics found the augmented reality condition intuitive and satisfying for the tested sequence of tasks.

  3. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 5-HT₃ serotonin receptor antagonists as innovative antipsychotic augmentation treatments for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-07-01

    Antipsychotic treatment is the mainstay in the management of schizophrenia. However, despite optimum use of antipsychotic drugs, many schizophrenia patients continue to exhibit residual positive, negative, cognitive, and other symptoms. Various antipsychotic augmentation strategies have been studied using non-antipsychotic augmenting agents; 2 innovative classes of drugs examined have been nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 5-HT₃ serotonin receptor antagonists. Meta-analysis of the NSAID studies in schizophrenia patients with positive symptoms (8 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], pooled N = 774) shows that NSAID augmentation is associated with a significant decrease in positive symptom ratings (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.19), with no significant change in negative or total symptom ratings. Meta-analysis of the 5-HT₃ antagonist studies in stable schizophrenia patients (6 RCTs, pooled N = 311) shows that 5-HT₃ antagonist augmentation is associated with significant reduction in negative symptom (SMD = 1.10), general psychopathology (SMD = 0.70), and total symptom (SMD = 1.03) ratings without reduction in positive symptom ratings. Neither NSAID nor 5-HT₃ antagonist augmentation increases the dropout rate. Whereas the benefits with NSAID augmentation are, perhaps, too small to be clinically meaningful, antipsychotic augmentation with 5-HT₃ antagonists may be a possible strategy to reduce persistent negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Both fields of inquiry require further investigation.

  4. Adult partner-augmented communication input to youth with mental retardation using the System for Augmenting Language (SAL).

    PubMed

    Sevcik, R A; Romski, M A; Watkins, R V; Deffebach, K P

    1995-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to characterize the frequency and nature of augmented input that adult partners provided to 13 youth with mental retardation as they began to use the System for Augmenting Language (SAL). Analyses of youth-partner interactions revealed differences in the frequency with which home and school partners provided augmented input and in the manner and style of home and school partners' augmented input, particularly in directiveness and position of lexigram symbols within Utterances. Overall, partners naturally provided augmented input in a manner likely to promote youth's learning of the SAL. PMID:7474982

  5. Damping augmentation of helicopter rotors using magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongsheng

    This dissertation describes an investigation exploring the use of magnetorheological (MR) dampers to augment the stability of helicopter rotors. Helicopters with advanced soft in-plane rotors are susceptible to ground resonance instabilities due to the coupling of the lightly damped rotor lag modes and fuselage modes. Traditional passive lag dampers, such as hydraulic or elastomeric dampers, can be used to alleviate these instabilities. However, these passive dampers suffer from the disadvantages that they produce large damper loads in forward flight conditions. These damper forces increase fatigue loads and reduce component life. Thus, it is desirable to have lag dampers controllable or adaptable, so that the damper can apply loads only when needed. MR fluid based dampers have recently been considered for helicopter lag damping augmentation because the forces generated by these dampers can be controlled by an applied magnetic field. In this dissertation, control schemes to integrate MR dampers with helicopters are developed and the influences of the MR dampers on rotorcraft ground resonance are studied. Specifically, the MR dampers are incorporated into the ground resonance model in two ways: using a linear equivalent viscous damping and using a nonlinear damper model. The feasibility of using MR dampers to stabilize ground resonance is studied. The open loop on-off control is utilized where MR dampers are turned on over RPM where ground resonance occurs, and turned off otherwise. To further explore the damping control ability of MR dampers, the nonlinear semi-active closed loop feedback control strategies are developed: feedback linearization control and sliding mode control. The performance of the two control strategies is evaluated using two examples: to stabilize an unstable rotor and to augment the stability of a marginally stable rotor. In addition, the robustness of the closed loop control strategies is studied using two cases: damper degradation and

  6. Tadalafil augments tumor specific immunity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Califano, Joseph A; Khan, Zubair; Noonan, Kimberly A.; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hao; Goodman, Steven; Gourin, Christine G.; Ha, Patrick K.; Fakhry, Carole; Saunders, John; Levine, Marshall; Tang, Mei; Neuner, Geoffrey; Richmon, Jeremy D.; Blanco, Ray; Agrawal, Nishant; Koch, Wayne M.; Marur, Shanthi; Weed, Donald T.; Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors can augment immune function in head and neck cancer patients through inhibition of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Experimental Design We performed a randomized, prospective, double blinded, placebo controlled, phase II clinical trial to determine the in vivo effects of systemic PDE5 inhibition on immune function in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. Results Tadalafil augmented immune response, increasing ex vivo T cell expansion to a mean 2.4 fold increase compared to 1.1 fold in control patients (P= 0.01), reducing peripheral MDSC numbers to mean 0.81 fold change compared to a 1.26 fold change in control patients (P=0.001), and increasing general immunity as measured by delayed type hypersensitivity response (P=0.002). Tumor specific immunity in response to HNSCC tumor lysate was augmented in tadalafil treated patients (P=0.04). Conclusions These findings demonstrate that tadalafil augments general and tumor-specific immunity in HNSCC patients and has therapeutic potential in HNSCC. Evasion of immune surveillance and suppression of systemic and tumor specific immunity is a significant feature of head and neck cancer development. This study demonstrates that a PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, can reverse tumor specific immune suppression in head and neck cancer patients, with potential for therapeutic application. PMID:25564570

  7. Resorbable polymer fibers for ligament augmentation.

    PubMed

    Dürselen, L; Dauner, M; Hierlemann, H; Planck, H; Claes, L E; Ignatius, A

    2001-01-01

    Resorbable augmentation devices for cruciate ligament surgery have been developed to temporarily protect healing tendon grafts or sutured ligaments against high tensile loads during the postoperative healing period. Materials available at present [e.g., polydioxanone (PDS)] show a half-life tensile strength of only 4-6 weeks, whereas the process of revitalization and recovering of the transplanted tendon graft can take up to 12 months. Therefore, a device that provides gradually decreasing mechanical properties with a half-time strength of at least 6 months would be desirable. In order to obtain a suitable material, we investigated the degradation kinetics of a variety of different resorbable fibers made of poly(L-lactide) and poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide). The fiber materials differed in processing and treatment parameters like thermal posttreatment, irradiation, and fiber diameter. The fibers were degraded in vitro and were tested for mechanical properties and molecular weight at various time points up to 72 weeks. The half-time strength of the materials ranged between 5 and 64 weeks, depending on their treatment parameters. In contrast, the stiffness did not decrease adequately. However, an augmentation stiffness that does not change much versus time could not provide a gradual increase in graft load, which is important to stimulate the orientation of the collagenous tissue. Therefore, design of an augmentation construct braided out of more than one quickly degrading fiber materials is suggested. After the breakdown of the faster-degrading fiber components the stiffness would automatically decrease by the diminution of the load-carrying fiber volume. PMID:11745519

  8. Egr2-neurons control the adult respiratory response to hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell S.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Soriano, Laura P.; Nattie, Eugene E.; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    ‘The early growth response 2 transcription factor, Egr2, establishes a population of brainstem neurons essential for normal breathing at birth. Egr2-null mice die perinatally of respiratory insufficiency characterized by subnormal respiratory rate and severe apneas. Here we bypass this lethality using a noninvasive pharmacogenetic approach to inducibly perturb neuron activity postnatally, and ask if Egr2-neurons control respiration in adult mice. We found that the normal ventilatory increase in response to elevated tissue CO2 was impaired, blunted by 63.1±8.7% after neuron perturbation due to deficits in both respiratory amplitude and frequency. By contrast, room-air breathing was unaffected, suggesting that the drive for baseline breathing may not require those Egr2-neurons manipulated here. Of the multiple brainstem sites proposed to affect ventilation in response to hypercapnia, only the retrotrapezoid nucleus, a portion of the serotonergic raphé, and a portion of the A5 nucleus have a history of Egr2 expression. We recently showed that acute inhibition of serotonergic neurons en masse blunts the CO2 chemoreflex in adults, causing a difference in hypercapnic response of ~50% after neuron perturbation through effects on respiratory amplitude only. The suppressed respiratory frequency upon perturbation of Egr2-neurons thus may stem from non-serotonergic neurons within the Egr2 domain. Perturbation of Egr2-neurons did not affect body temperature, even on exposure to ambient 4 °C. These findings support a model in which Egr2-neurons are a critical component of the respiratory chemoreflex into adulthood. Methodologically, these results highlight how pharmacogenetic approaches allow neuron function to be queried in unanesthetized adult animals, reaching beyond the roadblocks of developmental lethality and compensation as well as the anatomical disturbances associated with invasive methods. PMID:23261662

  9. Towards personalized speech synthesis for augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Mills, Timothy; Bunnell, H Timothy; Patel, Rupal

    2014-09-01

    Text-to-speech options on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices are limited. Often, several individuals in a group setting use the same synthetic voice. This lack of customization may limit technology adoption and social integration. This paper describes our efforts to generate personalized synthesis for users with profoundly limited speech motor control. Existing voice banking and voice conversion techniques rely on recordings of clearly articulated speech from the target talker, which cannot be obtained from this population. Our VocaliD approach extracts prosodic properties from the target talker's source function and applies these features to a surrogate talker's database, generating a synthetic voice with the vocal identity of the target talker and the clarity of the surrogate talker. Promising intelligibility results suggest areas of further development for improved personalization. PMID:25025818

  10. Melatonin enhances vertical bone augmentation in rat calvaria secluded spaces

    PubMed Central

    Shino, Hiromichi; Hasuike, Akira; Arai, Yoshinori; Honda, Masaki; Isokawa, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Background Melatonin has many roles, including bone remodeling and osseointegration of dental implants. The topical application of melatonin facilitated bone regeneration in bone defects. We evaluated the effects of topical application of melatonin on vertical bone augmentation in rat calvaria secluded spaces. Material and Methods In total, 12 male Fischer rats were used and two plastic caps were fixed in the calvarium. One plastic cap was filled with melatonin powder and the other was left empty. Results Newly generated bone at bone defects and within the plastic caps was evaluated using micro-CT and histological sections. New bone regeneration within the plastic cap was increased significantly in the melatonin versus the control group. Conclusions Melatonin promoted vertical bone regeneration in rat calvaria in the secluded space within the plastic cap. Key words:Melatonin, bone regeneration, bone defects, secluded space, rat calvarium. PMID:26595835

  11. Augmenting Your Own Reality: Student Authoring of Science-Based Augmented Reality Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Eric; Sheldon, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) simulations superimpose a virtual overlay of data and interactions onto a real-world context. The simulation engine at the heart of this technology is built to afford elements of game play that support explorations and learning in students' natural context--their own community and surroundings. In one of the more recent…

  12. A piloted simulator study on augmentation systems to improve helicopter flying qualities in terrain flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T. N.; Talbot, P. D.; Gerdes, R. M.; Dugan, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Four basic single-rotor helicopters, one teetering, on articulated, and two hingeless, which were found to have a variety of major deficiencies in a previous fixed-based simulator study, were selected as baseline configurations. The stability and control augmentation systems (SCAS) include simple control augmentation systems to decouple pitch and yaw responses due to collective input and to quicken the pitch and roll control responses; SCAS of rate-command type designed to optimize the sensitivity and damping and to decouple the pitch-roll due to aircraft angular tate; and attitude-command type SCAS. Pilot ratings and commentary are presented as well as performance data related to the task. SCAS control usages and their gain levels associated with specific rotor types are also discussed.

  13. HDF Augmentation: Interoperability in the Last Mile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plutchak, J.; Folk, M. J.; Habermann, T.; Knox, L.

    2014-12-01

    Science data files are generally written to serve well-defined purposes for a small science teams. In many cases, the organization of the data and the metadata are designed for custom tools developed and maintained by and for the team. Using these data outside of this context many times involves restructuring, re-documenting, or reformatting the data. This expensive and time-consuming process usually prevents data reuse and thus decreases the total life-cycle value of the data considerably. If the data are unique or critically important to solving a particular problem, they can be modified into a more generally usable form or metadata can be added in order to enable reuse. This augmentation process can be done to enhance data for the intended purpose or for a new purpose, to make the data available to new tools and applications, to make the data more conventional or standard, or to simplify preservation of the data. The HDF Group has addressed augmentation needs in many ways: by adding extra information, by renaming objects or moving them around in the file, by reducing complexity of the organization, and sometimes by hiding data objects that are not understood by specific applications. In some cases these approaches require re-writing the data into new files and in some cases it can be done externally, without affecting the original file. We will describe and compare several examples of each approach.

  14. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  15. Preconditioning stimuli that augment chromaffin cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Laura; García-Eguiagaray, Josefina; García, Antonio G; Gandía, Luis

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated here whether a preconditioned stimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors augmented the catecholamine release responses elicited by supramaximal 3-s pulses of 100 muM acetylcholine (100ACh) or 100 mM K(+) (100K(+)) applied to fast-perifused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Threshold concentrations of nicotine (1-3 muM) that caused only a tiny secretion did, however, augment the responses elicited by 100ACh or 100K(+) by 2- to 3.5-fold. This effect was suppressed by mecamylamine and by Ca(2+) deprivation, was developed with a half-time (t(1/2)) of 1 min, and was reversible. The nicotine effect was mimicked by threshold concentrations of ACh, choline, epibatidine, and oxotremorine-M but not by methacholine. Threshold concentrations of K(+) caused lesser potentiation of secretion compared with that of threshold nicotine. The data are compatible with an hypothesis implying 1) that continuous low-frequency sympathetic discharge places chromaffin cells at the adrenal gland in a permanent "hypersensitive" state; and 2) this allows an explosive secretion of catecholamines by high-frequency sympathetic discharge during stress.

  16. Soft tissue augmentation with ArteFill.

    PubMed

    Hilinski, John M; Cohen, Steven R

    2009-05-01

    ArteFill is a novel, third-generation polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) injectable filler with unique properties. When compared with predecessor materials, ArteFill demonstrates improved biocompatibility as a result of more uniform PMMA microsphere size and shape. This translates into less adverse events after placement. ArteFill can provide a permanent volume enhancement by stimulation of fibroblasts that encapsulate nonabsorbable microspheres with collagen deposition. Currently, ArteFill is FDA approved for permanent augmentation of moderately deep nasolabial folds. It is also commonly used off-label for augmentation of other skin creases and regional areas of volume deficiency, such as the tear trough-malar and marionette line-prejowl sulcus regions. The key to success with ArteFill is a conservative approach with avoidance of overcorrection. Proper technique includes deep dermal to subcutaneous placement with full correction achieved gradually over several treatments. Complications are mostly limited to nodule formation, which is easily managed in most cases with conservative intervention.

  17. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site. Techniques to manipulate the biologic events following tendon repair may improve healing. We used a sheep infraspinatus repair model to evaluate the effect of osteoinductive growth factors and BMP-12 on tendon-to-bone healing. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed increased formation of new bone and fibrocartilage at the healing tendon attachment site in the treated animals, and biomechanical testing showed improved load-to-failure. Other techniques with potential to augment repair site biology include use of platelets isolated from autologous blood to deliver growth factors to a tendon repair site. Modalities that improve local vascularity, such as pulsed ultrasound, have the potential to augment rotator cuff healing. Important information about the biology of tendon healing can also be gained from studies of substances that inhibit healing, such as nicotine and antiinflammatory medications. Future approaches may include the use of stem cells and transcription factors to induce formation of the native tendon-bone insertion site after rotator cuff repair surgery. PMID:18264850

  18. Breast Augmentation With Autologous Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fa-Cheng; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Autologous fat transplantation has attracted great interest in breast augmentation for cosmetic purpose. In the present study, we reported our experience in fat grafting in breast in 105 cases, and some detailed procedure concerning efficacy and safety of grafting was evaluated. Methods Fat was harvested using 20-mL syringe attached to a 3-hole blunt cannula in a diameter not beyond 3 mm. After washing with cool normal saline to remove blood, the fat was managed with open method using cotton towel as a platform for concentration fat tissue and separating them from fluids, oil, and debris. A 14-gauge, 1-hole blunt cannula was used to place the fat through 3-mm incision on inframammary fold. The fat was infiltrated into the breast from deep to superficial subcutaneous plane. Results Between July 2002 and August 2010, 105 patients have undergone this procedure. The age distribution of the patients ranged from 18 to 45 years, with a mean of 31.3 years. Grafted fat volume has ranged from 120 to 250 mL (average, 205 mL) per breast per session. All women had a significant improvement in their breast size and shape postoperatively, and the breasts were soft and natural in appearance. Conclusions Liposuction and autologous fat transplantation is a suitable approach for augmentation mammaplasty. PMID:25003461

  19. Moderate Hyperbilirubinemia Alters Neonatal Cardiorespiratory Control and Induces Inflammation in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius

    PubMed Central

    Specq, Marie-Laure; Bourgoin-Heck, Mélisande; Samson, Nathalie; Corbin, François; Gestreau, Christian; Richer, Maxime; Kadhim, Hazim; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia (HB) occurs in 90% of preterm newborns. Moderate HB can induce acute neurological disorders while severe HB has been linked to a higher incidence of apneas of prematurity. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that even moderate HB disrupts cardiorespiratory control in preterm lambs. Two groups of preterm lambs (born 14 days prior to term), namely control (n = 6) and HB (n = 5), were studied. At day 5 of life, moderate HB (150–250 μmol/L) was induced during 17 h in the HB group after which cardiorespiratory control as well as laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes were assessed during baseline recordings and during hypoxia. Recordings were repeated 72 h after HB induction, just before euthanasia. In addition, neuropathological studies were performed to investigate for cerebral bilirubin deposition as well as for signs of glial reactivity in brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control. Results revealed that sustained and moderate HB: (i) decreased baseline respiratory rate and increased the time spent in apnea; (ii) blunted the cardiorespiratory inhibition normally observed during both laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes; and (iii) increased heart rate in response to acute hypoxia. These acute physiological changes were concurrent with an activation of Alzheimer type II astrocytes throughout the brain, including the brainstem. Concomitantly, bilirubin deposits were observed in the leptomeninges, but not in brain parenchyma. While most cardiorespiratory alterations returned to normal 72 h after HB normalization, the expression of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) was still increased within the nucleus tractus solitarius. In conclusion, moderate and sustained HB in preterm lambs induced cardiorespiratory alterations, the latter of which were associated with neurohistopathological changes. These changes are indicative of an inflammatory response in the brainstem

  20. Augmenting Trust Establishment in Dynamic Systems with Social Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lagesse, Brent J; Kumar, Mohan; Venkatesh, Svetha; Lazarescu, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    Social networking has recently flourished in popularity through the use of social websites. Pervasive computing resources have allowed people stay well-connected to each other through access to social networking resources. We take the position that utilizing information produced by relationships within social networks can assist in the establishment of trust for other pervasive computing applications. Furthermore, we describe how such a system can augment a sensor infrastructure used for event observation with information from mobile sensors (ie, mobile phones with cameras) controlled by potentially untrusted third parties. Pervasive computing systems are invisible systems, oriented around the user. As a result, many future pervasive systems are likely to include a social aspect to the system. The social communities that are developed in these systems can augment existing trust mechanisms with information about pre-trusted entities or entities to initially consider when beginning to establish trust. An example of such a system is the Collaborative Virtual Observation (CoVO) system fuses sensor information from disaparate sources in soft real-time to recreate a scene that provides observation of an event that has recently transpired. To accomplish this, CoVO must efficently access services whilst protecting the data from corruption from unknown remote nodes. CoVO combines dynamic service composition with virtual observation to utilize existing infrastructure with third party services available in the environment. Since these services are not under the control of the system, they may be unreliable or malicious. When an event of interest occurs, the given infrastructure (bus cameras, etc.) may not sufficiently cover the necessary information (be it in space, time, or sensor type). To enhance observation of the event, infrastructure is augmented with information from sensors in the environment that the infrastructure does not control. These sensors may be unreliable

  1. Long-Term Efficacy of Modified-Release Recombinant Human Thyrotropin Augmented Radioiodine Therapy for Benign Multinodular Goiter: Results from a Multicenter, International, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Selection Study

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Pacini, Furio; Pinchera, Aldo; Leung, Angela M.; Vaisman, Mario; Reiners, Christoph; Wemeau, Jean-Louis; Huysmans, Dyde A.; Harper, William; Rachinsky, Irina; de Souza, Hevelyn Noemberg; Castagna, Maria G.; Antonangeli, Lucia; Braverman, Lewis E.; Corbo, Rossana; Düren, Christian; Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Marriott, Christopher; Driedger, Albert; Grupe, Peter; Watt, Torquil; Magner, James; Purvis, Annie; Graf, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhanced reduction of multinodular goiter (MNG) can be achieved by stimulation with recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) before radioiodine (131I) therapy. The objective was to compare the long-term efficacy and safety of two low doses of modified release rhTSH (MRrhTSH) in combination with 131I therapy. Methods: In this phase II, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 95 patients (57.2±9.6 years old, 85% women, 83% Caucasians) with MNG (median size 96.0 mL; range 31.9–242.2 mL) were randomized to receive placebo (n=32), 0.01 mg MRrhTSH (n=30), or 0.03 mg MRrhTSH (n=33) 24 hours before a calculated 131I activity. Thyroid volume (TV) and smallest cross-sectional area of trachea (SCAT) were measured (by computed tomography scan) at baseline, six months, and 36 months. Thyroid function and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated at three-month and yearly intervals respectively. Results: At six months, TV reduction was enhanced in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (32.9% vs. 23.1% in the placebo group; p=0.03) but not in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group. At 36 months, the mean percent TV reduction from baseline was 44±12.7% (SD) in the placebo group, 41±21.0% in the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group, and 53±18.6% in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group, with no statistically significant differences among the groups, p=0.105. In the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group, the subset of patients with basal 131I uptake <20% had a 24% greater TV reduction at 36 months than the corresponding subset of patients in the placebo group (p=0.01). At 36 months, the largest relative increase in SCAT was observed in the 0.03 mg MRrhTSH group (13.4±23.2%), but this was not statistically different from the increases observed in the placebo or the 0.01 mg MRrhTSH group (p=0.15). Goiter-related symptoms were reduced and QoL improved, without any enhanced benefit from using MRrhTSH. At three years, the prevalence of permanent hypothyroidism was 13%, 33%, and 45% in the placebo, 0.01 mg, and 0.03

  2. Optimal Constellation Design for Satellite Based Augmentation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Isao

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely utilized in daily life, for instance car navigation. Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) are proposed so as to provide GPS better navigation accuracy and integrity capability. Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) is a kind of WAAS and Multi-functional Transportation Satellite (MTSAT) has been developed in Japan. To improve navigation accuracy most efficiently, augmentation satellites should be so placed that minimize Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) of constellation. In this paper the result of optimal constellation design for SBAS is shown.

  3. The role of the remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) laboratory in flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Dorothea; Le, Jeanette H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents on overview of the unique capabilities and historical significance of the Remotely Augmented Vehicle (RAV) Laboratory at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The report reviews the role of the RAV Laboratory in enhancing flight test programs and efficient testing of new aircraft control laws. The history of the RAV Laboratory is discussed with a sample of its application using the X-29 aircraft. The RAV Laboratory allows for closed- or open-loop augmentation of the research aircraft while in flight using ground-based, high performance real-time computers. Telemetry systems transfer sensor and control data between the ground and the aircraft. The RAV capability provides for enhanced computational power, improved flight data quality, and alternate methods for the testing of control system concepts. The Laboratory is easily reconfigured to reflect changes within a flight program and can be adapted to new flight programs.

  4. The role of the Remotely Augmented Vehicle (RAV) laboratory in flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Dorothea; Le, Jeanette H.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of the unique capabilities and historical significance of the Remotely Augmented Vehicle (RAV) Lab at NASA-Dryden. The role is reviewed of the RAV Lab in enhancing flight test programs and efficient testing of new aircraft control laws. The history of the RAV Lab is discussed with a sample of its application using the X-29 aircraft. The RAV Lab allows for closed or open loop augmentation of the research aircraft while in flight using ground based, high performance real time computers. Telemetry systems transfer sensor and control data between the ground and the aircraft. The RAV capability provides for enhanced computational power, improved flight data quality, and alternate methods for the testing of control system concepts. The Lab is easily reconfigured to reflect changes within a flight program and can be adapted to new flight programs.

  5. Flight test results for a separate surface stability augmented Beech model 99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, G. E.; Henry, H. F.; Roskam, J.

    1977-01-01

    A flight evaluation of a Beech model 99 equipped with an attitude command control system incorporating separate surface stability augmentation (SSSA) was conducted to determine whether an attitude command control system could be implemented using separate surface controls, and to determine whether the handling and ride qualities of the aircraft were improved by the SSSA attitude command system. The results of the program revealed that SSSA is a viable approach to implementing attitude command and also that SSSA has the capability of performing less demanding augmentation tasks such as yaw damping, wing leveling, and pitch damping. The program also revealed that attitude command did improve the pilot rating and ride qualities of the airplane while flying an IFR mission in turbulence. Some disadvantages of the system included the necessity of holding aileron force in a banked turn and excessive stiffness in the pitch axis.

  6. Reconfigurable hardware for an augmented reality application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo Moreo, F. Javier; Martinez Alvarez, J. Javier; Garrigos Guerrero, F. Javier; Ferrandez Vicente, J. Manuel

    2005-06-01

    An FPGA-based approach is proposed to build an augmented reality system in order to aid people affected by a visual disorder known as tunnel vision. The aim is to increase the user's knowledge of his environment by superimposing on his own view useful information obtained with image processing. Two different alternatives have been explored to perform the required image processing: a specific purpose algorithm to extract edge detection information, and a cellular neural network with the suitable template. Their implementations in reconfigurable hardware pursue to take advantage of the performance and flexibility that show modern FPGAs. This paper describes the hardware implementation of both the Canny algorithm and the cellular neural network, and the overall system architecture. Results of the implementations and examples of the system functionality are presented.

  7. Image-processing with augmented reality (AR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Hossein R.; Mohurutshe, Pagiel L.; Habibi Lashkari, Arash

    2013-03-01

    In this project, the aim is to discuss and articulate the intent to create an image-based Android Application. The basis of this study is on real-time image detection and processing. It's a new convenient measure that allows users to gain information on imagery right on the spot. Past studies have revealed attempts to create image based applications but have only gone up to crating image finders that only work with images that are already stored within some form of database. Android platform is rapidly spreading around the world and provides by far the most interactive and technical platform for smart-phones. This is why it was important to base the study and research on it. Augmented Reality is this allows the user to maipulate the data and can add enhanced features (video, GPS tags) to the image taken.

  8. Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Anantharaj, Valentine G; Younan, Nicolas H.; Petersen, Walter A.; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Behrangi, Ali; Aanstoos, James

    2013-01-01

    We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

  9. Evolving neural networks through augmenting topologies.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Kenneth O; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2002-01-01

    An important question in neuroevolution is how to gain an advantage from evolving neural network topologies along with weights. We present a method, NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT), which outperforms the best fixed-topology method on a challenging benchmark reinforcement learning task. We claim that the increased efficiency is due to (1) employing a principled method of crossover of different topologies, (2) protecting structural innovation using speciation, and (3) incrementally growing from minimal structure. We test this claim through a series of ablation studies that demonstrate that each component is necessary to the system as a whole and to each other. What results is significantly faster learning. NEAT is also an important contribution to GAs because it shows how it is possible for evolution to both optimize and complexify solutions simultaneously, offering the possibility of evolving increasingly complex solutions over generations, and strengthening the analogy with biological evolution. PMID:12180173

  10. Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lejing; Weidert, Simon; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro Michael; Riquarts, Christian; Euler, Ekkehard; Navab, Nassir

    The Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm (CamC) system that extends a regular mobile C-arm by a video camera provides an X-ray and video image overlay. Thanks to the mirror construction and one time calibration of the device, the acquired X-ray images are co-registered with the video images without any calibration or registration during the intervention. It is very important to quantify and qualify the system before its introduction into the OR. In this communication, we extended the previously performed overlay accuracy analysis of the CamC system by another clinically important parameter, the applied radiation dose for the patient. Since the mirror of the CamC system will absorb and scatter radiation, we introduce a method for estimating the correct applied dose by using an independent dose measurement device. The results show that the mirror absorbs and scatters 39% of X-ray radiation.

  11. Development of the augmented musculature device.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Pankretz, Ty

    2004-12-01

    We developed an Augmented Musculature Device (AMD) that assists the movements of its wearer. It has direct application to aiding military and law enforcement personnel, the neurologically impaired, or those requiring any type of cybernetic assistance. The AMD consists of a collection of artificial muscles, each individually actuated, strategically placed along the surface of the human body. The actuators employed by the AMD are known as 'air muscles' and operate pneumatically. They are commercially available from several vendors and are relatively inexpensive. They have a remarkably high force-to-weight ratio--as high as 400:1 (as compared with 16:1 typical of DC motors). They are flexible and elastic, even when powered, making them ideal for interaction with humans.

  12. Visualizing Sea Level Rise with Augmented Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Looking Glass is an application on the iPhone that visualizes in 3-D future scenarios of sea level rise, overlaid on live camera imagery in situ. Using a technology known as augmented reality, the app allows a layperson user to explore various scenarios of sea level rise using a visual interface. Then the user can see, in an immersive, dynamic way, how those scenarios would affect a real place. The first part of the experience activates users' cognitive, quantitative thinking process, teaching them how global sea level rise, tides and storm surge contribute to flooding; the second allows an emotional response to a striking visual depiction of possible future catastrophe. This project represents a partnership between a science journalist, MIT, and the Rhode Island School of Design, and the talk will touch on lessons this projects provides on structuring and executing such multidisciplinary efforts on future design projects.

  13. Status of Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Lineberry, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past several years, efforts have been under way to design and develop an operationally flexible research facility for investigating the use of cross-field MHD accelerators as a potential thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems, The baseline configuration for this high-power experimental facility utilizes a 1,5-MW, multi-gas arc-heater as a thermal driver for a 2-MW, MHD accelerator, which resides in a large-bore 2-tesla electromagnet. A preliminary design study using NaK seeded nitrogen as the working fluid led to an externally diagonalized segmented MHD channel configuration based on an expendable beat-sink design concept. The current status report includes a review of engineering/design work and performance optimization analyses and summarizes component hardware fabrication and development efforts, preliminary testing results, and recent progress toward full-up assembly and testing

  14. Augmented Shock Wave Severance of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach for severing or weakening a variety of materials. The technique employs embedding explosive cords into parallel grooves that are cut into a surface of a material. The cords are initiated simultaneously to produce shock waves that progress toward the centerline between the cords and the lower surface of the material. Intersecting incident and reflected waves augment at the centerline to fail or weaken the material in tension. No harmful debris is produced on the opposite side of the material from the explosive cords. The primary focus of the effort described in this paper was to fracture the F-16 aircraft trilaminate canopy. Also, complete severance was achieved in 2024-T4 aluminum plate stock. Possible applications are through canopy egress and crew module severance from military aircraft and separation of rocket vehicle stages and payloads. This approach offers important advantages over explosive methods currently in use.

  15. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Jan; Köller, Manfred; Godry, Holger; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22–64) with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders) were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4–15) months. With a mean healing index (HI) of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23). No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing. PMID:22577502

  16. [Evaluation of asymmetric implants in breast augmentation surgery].

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A D; Couturaud, B

    2005-10-01

    Since more than 30 years, the quality of breast implants has continued to evolve in order to improve the aesthetic results of prosthetic augmentation. Shapes and materials of these implants have also evolved to obtain stronger and more reliable prostheses almost similar to the natural breast. Therefore it can be considered that the use of asymmetric implants is the last step in implant technology before using made to measure implants. Asymmetric implants allow obtaining different contours in harmony to the different breast shapes capable to reproduce faithfully, in all dimensions, the anatomy of the female breast, including the differences between each side which maximise the naturalness of the result. Such implants have an axis directed towards the exterior and lower part of the chest wall, are wider than high with a thinner part on their inner edge and a concave rear side moulding the curves of the chest wall. In our own experience, we placed between 2002 and 2004, asymmetric implants in 100 patients. Such implants were easy to place and no secondary rotation was observed. The control of secondary displacements even in case of prosthesis change seems to be linked to their concave rear side, roughness and asymmetry. When analysing retrospectively the medical records, no distinctive features were observed when compared to symmetric classic implants in easiness in the surgical procedure or in complications except a slightly higher rate of seroma formation. However asymmetric implants are less appropriate in case of major breast ptosis, patients being unsatisfied by the "too natural" breast shape. Moreover a high risk of secondary rotation seems to be real in such cases. In summary, for all these reasons, asymmetric implants, are gradually considered to be a first-rank choice for implants in breast augmentation cosmetic surgery. PMID:16198044

  17. Performance of a solar augmented heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedinger, A. F. G.; Tomlinson, J. J.; Reid, R. L.; Chaffin, D. J.

    Performance of a residential size solar augmented heat pump is reported for the 1979-1980 heating season. The facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee, has a measured heat load coefficient of 339.5 watt/C (644 BTU/hr- F). The solar augmented heat pump system consists of 7.4 cu m of one inch diameter crushed limestone. The heat pump is a nominal 8.8 KW (2 1/2 ton) high efficiency unit. The system includes electric resistance heaters to give the option of adding thermal energy to the pebble bed storage during utility off-peak periods, thus offering considerable load management capability. A 15 KW electric resistance duct heater is used to add thermal energy to the pebble bin as required during off-peak periods. Hourly thermal performance and on site weather data was taken for the period November 1, 1979, to April 13, 1980. Thermal performance data consists of heat flow summations for all modes of the system, pebble bed temperatures, and space temperature. Weather data consists of dry bulb temperature, dew point temperature, total global insolation (in the plane of the collector), and wind speed and direction. An error analysis was performed and the least accurate of the measurements was determined to be the heat flow at 5%. Solar system thermal performance factor was measured to be 8.77. The heat pump thermal performance factor was 1.64. Total system seasonal performance factor was measured to be 1.66. Using a modified version of TRNSYS, the thermal performance of this system was simulated. When simulation results were compared with data collected onsite, the predicted heat flow and power consumption generally were within experimental accuracy.

  18. Limited V-shaped cement augmentation of the proximal femur to prevent secondary hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Fliri, Ladina; Sermon, An; Wähnert, Dirk; Schmoelz, Werner; Blauth, Michael; Windolf, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Patients with a femoral fracture due to osteoporosis are at high risk of sustaining a secondary fracture on the contralateral side. A prophylactic mechanical reinforcement of the contralateral side during operation of the initial fracture could be of interest for such patients. This biomechanical in vitro study investigates the potential of a limited V-shaped bone cement augmentation to prevent secondary hip fractures by targeting the areas of the proximal femur with the highest stresses during a fall. Five pairs of human cadaveric proximal femora were tested in a configuration simulating a fall on the greater trochanter. The femoral neck of one specimen of each pair was augmented with 8-14 ml polymethylmethacrylate from the lateral cortex towards inferior and superior, spanning a V-shaped cement pattern. Clinical relevant fractures were generated with a 45 kg mass in controlled free fall. Load-displacement data were recorded and energy to fracture, fracture load, yield load and stiffness were statistically evaluated. Augmented samples absorbed 124% more energy until fracture compared to their controls (p = 0.043). No significant differences were found between the two groups for fracture load (p = 0.5), yield load (p = 0.35) and stiffness (p = 0.5). Biomechanically, a limited V-shaped prophylactic cement augmentation carries potential to prevent secondary hip fractures indicated by increased energy absorption until fracture. Further investigations are necessary to minimize interference with the biology and to maximize the mechanical benefit of prophylactic augmentation.

  19. Potential Use of Augmented Reality in LIS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wójcik, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this article is the use of augmented reality technology in library and information science education. The aim is to determine the scope and potential uses of augmented reality in the education of information professionals. In order to determine the scope and forms of potential use of AR technology in LIS education a two-step…

  20. Augmenting a Child's Reality: Using Educational Tablet Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Patricia; Karas, Carly; Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the classroom integration of an innovative technology, augmented reality. Although the process of adding new technologies into a classroom setting can be daunting, the concept of augmented reality has demonstrated the ability to educate students and to assist with their comprehension of a procedural task. One half of the…

  1. 14 CFR 91.1061 - Augmented flight crews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Augmented flight crews. 91.1061 Section 91... Operations Program Management § 91.1061 Augmented flight crews. (a) No program manager may assign any flight crewmember, and no flight crewmember may accept an assignment, for flight time as a member of an...

  2. The Local Games Lab ABQ: Homegrown Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Experiments in the use of augmented reality games formerly required extensive material resources and expertise to implement above and beyond what might be possible within the usual educational contexts. Currently, the more common availability of hardware in these contexts and the existence of easy-to-use, general purpose augmented reality design…

  3. Augmented Reality, the Future of Contextual Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sungkur, Roopesh Kevin; Panchoo, Akshay; Bhoyroo, Nitisha Kirtee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to show the relevance of augmented reality (AR) in mobile learning for the 21st century. With AR, any real-world environment can be augmented by providing users with accurate digital overlays. AR is a promising technology that has the potential to encourage learners to explore learning materials from a totally new…

  4. 14 CFR 25.945 - Thrust or power augmentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... augmentation liquid tank capacity available for the use of each engine must be large enough to allow operation of the airplane under the approved procedures for the use of liquid-augmented power. The computation of liquid consumption must be based on the maximum approved rate appropriate for the desired...

  5. Percussive Augmenter of Rotary Drills (PARoD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressa, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    A percussive augmenter is being developed and it is designed to add ultrasonic hammering to a conventional commercial rotary drill through an adapter using a piezoelectric actuator. The combination of ultrasonic hammering and rotation creates a drill that requires low power and low axial load while providing faster penetration than conventional rotary-only drills. These characteristics make percussive augmentation of rotary drills ideal for not only planetary exploration but commercial applications as well. The purpose of this internship was to produce, test, and optimize an augmenter that drives a 2 inch diameter bit. This task was part of the percussive augmenter's phase II of an ongoing contract and it involved increasing the capability of the .25 inch version of the augmenter prototype that was developed in phase I. Due to fabrication delays of the augmenter, an extensive part of the test effort was conducted using previous rotary and hammer drill prototypes. These tests focused on drilling deep over long periods of time to provide for effective stress test of the drill. Modifications were made to the drill, its components, and the testing procedure to achieve desired borehole depths. These results were used to start initial testing on the 2 inch augmenter and provide preliminary data on the augmenter's ability to significantly improve penetration rate over conventional rotary-only drills.

  6. On Location Learning: Authentic Applied Science with Networked Augmented Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Eric; Klopfer, Eric; Perry, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The learning of science can be made more like the practice of science through authentic simulated experiences. We have created a networked handheld Augmented Reality environment that combines the authentic role-playing of Augmented Realities and the underlying models of Participatory Simulations. This game, known as Outbreak @ The Institute, is…

  7. Augmentation of Cognition and Perception Through Advanced Synthetic Vision Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Williams, Steve P.; McNabb, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic Vision System technology augments reality and creates a virtual visual meteorological condition that extends a pilot's cognitive and perceptual capabilities during flight operations when outside visibility is restricted. The paper describes the NASA Synthetic Vision System for commercial aviation with an emphasis on how the technology achieves Augmented Cognition objectives.

  8. 14 CFR 91.1061 - Augmented flight crews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Augmented flight crews. 91.1061 Section 91...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1061 Augmented flight crews. (a) No program manager may assign any...

  9. Evaluation of magnetorheological fluid augmented fabric as a fragment barrier material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwon Joong; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2012-07-01

    The augmentation of high strength fabrics with non-Newtonian fluids has been suggested as a means for improving the ballistic performance of fragment barrier materials widely used in fan blade containment, body armor, orbital debris shielding, and other applications. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids have attracted particular interest, in view of their controllability and proven effectiveness in a variety of damping applications. In a basic research investigation of the MR fluid augmented fabric barrier concept, the authors have fabricated MR fluid saturated Kevlar targets and measured the ballistic performance of these targets both with and without an applied magnetic field. The experimental results show that magnetization of the MR fluid does, when considered in isolation, improve the ability of the augmented fabric to absorb impact energy. However, the benefits of plastic and viscous energy dissipation in the magnetized semi-solid are more than offset by the detrimental effects of yarn lubrication associated with the fluid’s hydrocarbon carrier. An analytical model developed to assist in the interpretation of the experimental data suggests that frictional interaction of the yarns is significantly more effective than magnetorheological augmentation of the fabric in distributing projectile loads away from the point of impact.

  10. Augmentation in Restless Legs Syndrome: Treatment with Gradual Medication Modification.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Adam; Rabin, Marcie; Kurlan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic drugs can cause augmentation during the treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). We previously reported that sudden withdrawal of dopaminergic treatment was poorly tolerated. We now report our experience with gradual withdrawal of the dopaminergic drug during the drug substitution process using a retrospective chart review with comparison to previous data. Seven patients with RLS and dopaminergic drug-induced augmentation were treated with a gradual withdrawal of the offending drug and replacement with an alternative medication. Compared to sudden withdrawal, measured outcomes were similar but gradual tapering was better tolerated. We conclude that for augmentation in RLS, gradual tapering of the augmentation-inducing dopaminergic drug is better tolerated than sudden withdrawal. The optimal approach to treating augmentation has not been established and may differ between patients. Further study with direct comparison of strategies and a larger patient population is needed to confirm our preliminary observations.

  11. Augmentation in Restless Legs Syndrome: Treatment with Gradual Medication Modification

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Adam; Rabin, Marcie; Kurlan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic drugs can cause augmentation during the treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). We previously reported that sudden withdrawal of dopaminergic treatment was poorly tolerated. We now report our experience with gradual withdrawal of the dopaminergic drug during the drug substitution process using a retrospective chart review with comparison to previous data. Seven patients with RLS and dopaminergic drug-induced augmentation were treated with a gradual withdrawal of the offending drug and replacement with an alternative medication. Compared to sudden withdrawal, measured outcomes were similar but gradual tapering was better tolerated. We conclude that for augmentation in RLS, gradual tapering of the augmentation-inducing dopaminergic drug is better tolerated than sudden withdrawal. The optimal approach to treating augmentation has not been established and may differ between patients. Further study with direct comparison of strategies and a larger patient population is needed to confirm our preliminary observations. PMID:26106453

  12. Augmented Reality as a Countermeasure for Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, James; Dorrlan, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan; Chatburn, Alex; Smith, Ross T; Carskadon, Mary A; Lushington, Kurt; Thomas, Bruce H

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to have serious deleterious effects on executive functioning and job performance. Augmented reality has an ability to place pertinent information at the fore, guiding visual focus and reducing instructional complexity. This paper presents a study to explore how spatial augmented reality instructions impact procedural task performance on sleep deprived users. The user study was conducted to examine performance on a procedural task at six time points over the course of a night of total sleep deprivation. Tasks were provided either by spatial augmented reality-based projections or on an adjacent monitor. The results indicate that participant errors significantly increased with the monitor condition when sleep deprived. The augmented reality condition exhibited a positive influence with participant errors and completion time having no significant increase when sleep deprived. The results of our study show that spatial augmented reality is an effective sleep deprivation countermeasure under laboratory conditions.

  13. A lifting surface theory for thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilaqua, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    The circulation theory of airfoil lift has been applied to calculate the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors. The ejector shroud is considered to be 'flying' in the secondary velocity field induced by the entrainment of the primary jet, so that the augmenting thrust is viewed as analogous to the lift on an airfoil. Vortex lattice methods are utilized to compute the thrust augmentation from the force on the flaps. The augmentation is shown to be a function of the length and shape of the flaps, as well as their position and orientation. Predictions of this new theory are compared with the results of classical methods of calculating the augmentation by integration of the stream thrust.

  14. Augmented Reality as a Countermeasure for Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, James; Dorrlan, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan; Chatburn, Alex; Smith, Ross T; Carskadon, Mary A; Lushington, Kurt; Thomas, Bruce H

    2016-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to have serious deleterious effects on executive functioning and job performance. Augmented reality has an ability to place pertinent information at the fore, guiding visual focus and reducing instructional complexity. This paper presents a study to explore how spatial augmented reality instructions impact procedural task performance on sleep deprived users. The user study was conducted to examine performance on a procedural task at six time points over the course of a night of total sleep deprivation. Tasks were provided either by spatial augmented reality-based projections or on an adjacent monitor. The results indicate that participant errors significantly increased with the monitor condition when sleep deprived. The augmented reality condition exhibited a positive influence with participant errors and completion time having no significant increase when sleep deprived. The results of our study show that spatial augmented reality is an effective sleep deprivation countermeasure under laboratory conditions. PMID:26780802

  15. Augmented pressor and sympathetic responses to skeletal muscle metaboreflex activation in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; Manrique, Camila; Lastra, Guido; Fisher, James P; Fadel, Paul J

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies have reported exaggerated increases in arterial blood pressure during exercise in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. However, little is known regarding the underlying neural mechanism(s) involved. We hypothesized that T2D patients would exhibit an augmented muscle metaboreflex activation and this contributes to greater pressor and sympathetic responses during exercise. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured in 16 patients with T2D (8 normotensive and 8 hypertensive) and 10 healthy controls. Graded isolation of the muscle metaboreflex was achieved by postexercise ischemia (PEI) following static handgrip performed at 30% and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). A cold pressor test (CPT) was also performed as a generalized sympathoexcitatory stimulus. Increases in MAP and MSNA during 30 and 40% MVC handgrip were augmented in T2D patients compared with controls (P < 0.05), and these differences were maintained during PEI (MAP: 30% MVC PEI: T2D, Δ16 ± 2 mmHg vs. controls, Δ8 ± 1 mmHg; 40% MVC PEI: T2D, Δ26 ± 3 mmHg vs. controls, Δ16 ± 2 mmHg, both P < 0.05). MAP and MSNA responses to handgrip and PEI were not different between normotensive and hypertensive T2D patients (P > 0.05). Interestingly, MSNA responses were also greater in T2D patients compared with controls during the CPT (P < 0.05). Collectively, these findings indicate that muscle metaboreflex activation is augmented in T2D patients and this contributes, in part, to augmented pressor and sympathetic responses to exercise in this patient group. Greater CPT responses suggest that a heightened central sympathetic reactivity may be involved. PMID:26566729

  16. Cement leakage in pedicle screw augmentation: a prospective analysis of 98 patients and 474 augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan U; Baldauf, Joerg; Marx, Sascha; Kirsch, Michael; Schroeder, Henry W S; Pillich, Dirk T

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Loosening and pullout of pedicle screws are well-known problems in pedicle screw fixation surgery. Augmentation of pedicle screws with bone cement, first described as early as 1975, increases the pedicle-screw interface and pullout force in osteoporotic vertebrae. The aim of the present study was to identify cement leakage and pulmonary embolism rates in a large prospective single-center series of pedicle screw augmentations. METHODS All patients who underwent cement-augmented pedicle screw placement between May 2006 and October 2010 at the authors' institution were included in this prospective cohort study. Perivertebral cement leakage and pulmonary cement embolism were evaluated with a CT scan of the area of operation and with a radiograph of the chest, respectively. RESULTS A total of 98 patients underwent placement of cement-augmented pedicle screws; 474 augmented screws were inserted in 237 vertebrae. No symptomatic perivertebral cement leakage or symptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was observed, but asymptomatic perivertebral cement leakage was seen in 88 patients (93.6%) and in 165 augmented vertebrae (73.3%). Cement leakage most often occurred in the perivertebral venous system. Clinically asymptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was found in 4 patients (4.1%). CONCLUSIONS Perivertebral cement leakage often occurs in pedicle screw augmentation, but in most cases, it is clinically asymptomatic. Cement augmentation should be performed under continuous fluoroscopy to avoid high-volume leakage. Alternative strategies, such as use of expandable screws, should be examined in more detail for patients at high risk of screw loosening.

  17. Augmentation of femoral neck fracture fixation with an injectable calcium-phosphate bone mineral cement.

    PubMed

    Stankewich, C J; Swiontkowski, M F; Tencer, A F; Yetkinler, D N; Poser, R D

    1996-09-01

    The first goal of this study was to determine if augmentation with an injectable, in situ setting, calcium-phosphate cement that is capable of being remodeled and was designed to mimic bone mineral significantly improved the strength and stiffness of fixation in a cadaveric femoral neck fracture model. The second goal was to determine if greater increases in fixation strength were achieved as the bone density of the specimen decreased. Sixteen pairs of fresh cadaveric human femora with a mean age of 70.9 years (SD = 17.2 years) were utilized. The bone density of the femoral neck was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The femoral head was impacted vertically with the femoral shaft fixed in 12 degrees of adduction using a materials testing machine to create a fully displaced fracture. Following fracture, 30% inferior comminution was created in each specimen. One randomly chosen femur from each pair underwent anatomic reduction and fixation with three cannulated cancellous bone screws, 7 mm in diameter, in an inverted triangle configuration. The contralateral femur underwent the same fixation augmented with calcium-phosphate cement. Specimens were preconditioned followed by 1.000 cycles to one body weight (611.6 N) at 0.5 Hz to simulate single-limb stance loading. The stiffness in the first cycle was observed to be significantly greater in cement-augmented specimens compared with unaugmented controls (p < 0.05). After cycling, each specimen was loaded at 10 mm/min until complete displacement of the fracture surface and failure of fixation occurred. Specimens augmented with bone mineral cement failed at a mean of 4,573 N (SD = 1,243 N); this was significantly greater (p < 0.01) than the mean for controls (3,092 N, SD = 1,258 N). The relative improvement in fixation strength (augmented/control x 100%) was not inversely correlated to femoral neck bone density (p = 0.25, R2 = 0.09), was weakly correlated to the volume of cement injected (p = 0.07, R2 = 0

  18. An augmented reality framework for optimization of computer assisted navigation in endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Irene; Shen, Rui; Moreau, Richard; Brizzi, Vicenzo; Rossol, Nathaniel; Basu, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is performed by placing a catheter through blood vessels. Due to the fragility of arteries and the difficulty in controlling a long elastic wire to reach the target region, training plays an extremely important role in helping a surgeon acquire the required complex skills. Virtual reality simulators and augmented reality systems have proven to be effective in minimally invasive surgical training. These systems, however, often employ pre-captured or computer-generated medical images. We have developed an augmented reality system for ultrasound-guided endovascular surgical training, where real ultrasound images captured during the procedure are registered with a pre-scanned phantom model to give the operator a realistic experience. Our goal is to extend the planning and training environment to deliver a system for computer assisted remote endovascular surgery where the navigation of a catheter can be controlled through a robotic device based on the guidance provided by an endovascular surgeon.

  19. Augmentation of IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi-Chao

    The first edition of the IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas was published in 1983 by Wu et al in printed and magnetic tape versions and it has been widely used by the astronomical community for research and teaching purposes. It was recognized then that numerous spectral type-luminosity class combinations were not available in the Atlas, but the authors decided that it was important to provide the Atlas to the community early. Now we are proposing a 3-year program to augment the Atlas (1) to provide as complete a coverage of the spectral type-luminosity class as possible and (2) to provide more than one star per spectral type-luminosity class combination to guard against variability and pecularity and to allow a finite range of temperature, gravity and metallicity in a given combination. Almost all the data in the 1983 Atlas are the high quality, high SIN trailed spectra, we propose to obtain trailed spectra or images with multiple exposures in the large aperture such that the data for the augmentation effort will have the same quality and SIN as the 1983 Atlas. Our primary goal is to collect the data and make them available to the community immediately (without claiming the 6-month proprietary right) and at the end of each year we will provide National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) an annual incremental delivery of the data at an earliest possible date, so the data can be distributed to the general astronomical community. At the end of the 3rd year, our delivery to the NSSDC will contain all the data collected by this program combined with those from the 1983 Atlas and 50 stars from the archive. These data can be used by other astronomers for stellar population synthesis of galaxies, to study the nature of distant galaxies, to attempt establishing a UV spectral classification system, as comparison stars for interstellar extinction studies and for peculiar objects or binary systems, for the study of the effects of temperature, gravity and metallicity on stellar UV

  20. Ionospheric Challenges for GNSS Based Augmentation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, P.; Valladares, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic physical phenomenon that presents a variable source of error for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS based operational systems. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wide-Area Augmentation System (WAAS) was designed to enhance the GNSS standard positioning service by providing additional accuracy, availability and integrity that is sufficient for use in commercial aviation. It is the first of a number of planned regional Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS). Other systems in development include the European EGNOS system, the MSAS system in Japan and the GAGAN system in India. In addition, the South American countries are investigating the feasibility of operating an SBAS system in this region. Much of the WAAS ionospheric research and development focused on defining and mitigating ionospheric challenges characteristic of the mid-latitude regions, where the ionosphere is well studied and relatively quiescent. The EGNOS and MSAS systems will primarily operate under a similarly quiescent mid-latitude ionosphere. SBAS system development in South America, India and other low-latitude regions, however, will have to contend with much more extreme conditions. These conditions include strong spatial and temporal gradients, plasma depletions and scintillation. All of these conditions have a potential to limit SBAS performance in the low latitude regions. This presentation will review the effects that the ionosphere has on the mid-latitude WAAS system. It will present the techniques that are used to mitigate ionospheric disturbances induced on the system during severe geomagnetic activity and it will quantify the effect that this activity has on system performance. The presentation will then present data from the South American Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) that can be used to infer the ionospheric effects on SBAS performance in the most challenging low-latitude ionospheric environment

  1. Optimizing the Use of Aripiprazole Augmentation in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: From Clinical Trials to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changsu; Wang, Sheng-Min; Lee, Soo-Jung; Jun, Tae-Youn

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a recurrent, chronic, and devastating disorder leading to serious impairment in functional capacity as well as increasing public health care costs. In the previous decade, switching therapy and dose adjustment of ongoing antidepressants was the most frequently chosen subsequent treatment option for MDD. However, such recommendations were not based on firmly proven efficacy data from well-designed, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) but on practical grounds and clinical reasoning. Aripiprazole augmentation has been dramatically increasing in clinical practice owing to its unique action mechanisms as well as proven efficacy and safety from adequately powered and well-controlled RCTs. Despite the increased use of aripiprazole in depression, limited clinical information and knowledge interfere with proper and efficient use of aripiprazole augmentation for MDD. The objective of the present review was to enhance clinicians' current understanding of aripiprazole augmentation and how to optimize the use of this therapy in the treatment of MDD. PMID:26306301

  2. Rain-fade simulation and power augmentation for satellite communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Svoboda, James S.

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of an automated rain-fade simulation and power augmentation system is presented. The system experimentally simulates and measures the effects of radiofrequency power fade on a 20 GHz communication link using a multimode travelling wave tube amplifier for loss compensation. Precision, computer-controlled attenuators are used in the fade simulation. Test plans for analog and digital testing are discussed.

  3. Dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, Thomas E.; Xia, Houchun; Chen, Yung

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of constrained viscoelastic layer damping treatment designs is evaluated separately as passive control measures for low frequency joint dominated modes and higher frequency boom flexure dominated modes using a NASTRAN finite element analysis. Passive damping augmentation is proposed which is based on a constrained viscoelastic layer damping treatment applied to the surface of the manipulators's flexible booms. It is pointed out that even the joint compliance dominated modes can be damped to some degree through appropriate design of the treatment.

  4. Aortic augmentation index in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Antoniazzi, Valeria; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is used to investigate arterial stiffness. The authors tested the hypothesis that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate a higher AIx and also evaluated several related factors. In 97 patients with PAD, identified by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI ≤ 0.9), and 97 controls (ABPI ≥ 0.91< 1.4), AIx (%) was determined using tonometry of the radial artery. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in characteristics of age, sex, height, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, and heart rate. AIx was higher in patients with PAD (32 ± 9 vs 28 ± 9; P = .001). In multivariate regression analysis, AIx was independently associated with heart rate (β = -0.40, P = .0005). This study showed that AIx increased in patients with PAD and that heart rate is a determinant of AIx. Further studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological and clinical importance of AIx in patients with PAD. PMID:25228305

  5. Functional Augmentation of Naturally-Derived Materials for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Ashley B.; Priddy, Lauren B.; Li, Mon-Tzu. A.; Guldberg, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have utilized a wide spectrum of synthetic and naturally-derived scaffold materials. Synthetic scaffolds are better defined and offer the ability to precisely and reproducibly control their properties, while naturally-derived scaffolds typically have inherent biological and structural properties that may facilitate tissue growth and remodeling. More recently, efforts to design optimized biomaterial scaffolds have blurred the line between these two approaches. Naturally-derived scaffolds can be engineered through the manipulation of intrinsic properties of the pre-existing backbone (e.g., structural properties), as well as the addition of controllable functional components (e.g., biological properties). Chemical and physical processing techniques used to modify structural properties of synthetic scaffolds have been tailored and applied to naturally-derived materials. Such strategies include manipulation of mechanical properties, degradation, and porosity. Furthermore, bio-functional augmentation of natural scaffolds via incorporation of exogenous cells, proteins, peptides, or genes has been shown to enhance functional regeneration over endogenous response to the material itself. Moving forward, the regenerative mode of action of naturally-derived materials requires additional investigation. Elucidating such mechanisms will allow for the determination of critical design parameters to further enhance efficacy and capitalize on the full potential of naturally-derived scaffolds. PMID:25422160

  6. Interactive augmented reality system for product design review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Giandomenico; Re, Guido Maria

    2010-01-01

    The product development process, of industrial products, includes a phase dedicated to the design review that is a crucial phase where various experts cooperate in selecting the optimal product shape. Although computer graphics allows us to create very realistic virtual representations of the products, it is not uncommon that designers decide to build physical mock-ups of their newly conceived products because they need to physically interact with the prototype and also to evaluate the product within a plurality of real contexts. This paper describes the hardware and software development of our Augmented Reality design review system that allows to overcome some issues related to the 3D visualization and to the interaction with the virtual objects. Our system is composed by a Video See Through Head Mounted Display, which allows to improve the 3D visualization by controlling the convergence of the video cameras automatically, and a wireless control system, which allows us to create some metaphors to interact with the virtual objects. During the development of the system, in order to define and tune the algorithms, we have performed some testing sessions. Then, we have performed further tests in order to verify the effectiveness of the system and to collect additional data and comments about usability and ergonomic aspects.

  7. LCD masks for spatial augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithwick, Quinn Y. J.; Reetz, Daniel; Smoot, Lanny

    2014-03-01

    One aim of Spatial Augmented Reality is to visually integrate synthetic objects into real-world spaces amongst physical objects, viewable by many observers without 3D glasses, head-mounted displays or mobile screens. In common implementations, using beam-combiners, scrim projection, or transparent self-emissive displays, the synthetic object's and real-world scene's light combine additively. As a result, synthetic objects appear low-contrast and semitransparent against well-lit backgrounds, and do not cast shadows. These limitations prevent synthetic objects from appearing solid and visually integrated into the real-world space. We use a transparent LCD panel as a programmable dynamic mask. The LCD panel displaying the synthetic object's silhouette mask is colocated with the object's color image, both staying aligned for all points-of-view. The mask blocks the background providing occlusion, presents a black level for high-contrast images, blocks scene illumination thus casting true shadows, and prevents blow-by in projection scrim arrangements. We have several implementations of SAR with LCD masks: 1) beam-combiner with an LCD mask, 2) scrim projection with an LCD mask, and 3) transparent OLED display with an LCD mask. Large format (80" diagonal) and dual layer volumetric variations are also implemented.

  8. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michak, Patty

    1990-05-01

    Since 1986 Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This interagency project was developed to provide a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. Agencies involved in the project are: WDF, Washington Department of Wildlife, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its third year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1989. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989 and will compare sampling results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on stocks. 2 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Augmentation of the IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chi-Chao

    1996-01-01

    The IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas and the first addendum were published by Wu et al. in printed and machine readable versions. This atlas and addendum contain UV spectra of 315 stars with spectral types ranging from O3 to M5 and many spectral type-luminosity class combinations. There were three criteria for selecting these stars: (1) they were not spectroscopic binaries or variables with significant changes in magnitude or color, (2) they must have well-determined spectral types (many are MK standards), and (3) the stars should not be heavily reddened. Further augmentation of the atlas is desirable to provide a more complete coverage of the spectral type-luminosity class combinations and more than one star per combination. The extra spectral type-luminosity class combinations reduce the need for interpolation. The extra stars within a given combination guard against variability and peculiarity, and allow for a finite range of temperature, metallicity and gravity. The previous atlas and addendum presented data that were obtained through the eleventh episode under IUE programs with C.-C. Wu and D. Burstein as principal investigators. In this second addendum, we present the spectra obtained by Wu's programs during the twelfth through seventeenth episodes: SALCW, SAMCW, SANCW, SAOCW, SAPCW and SAQCW. During the period between July 1989 and September 1994, Wu observed 183 stars under these programs. Most of these observations are high quality trails or pseudo-trails (multiple exposures in the large aperture).

  10. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    PubMed

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis.

  11. Augmented standard model and the simplest scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tai Tsun; Wu, Sau Lan

    2015-11-01

    The experimental discovery of the Higgs particle in 2012 by the ATLAS Collaboration and the CMS Collaboration at CERN ushers in a new era of particle physics. On the basis of these data, scalar quarks and scalar leptons are added to each generation of quarks and leptons. The resulting augmented standard model has fermion-boson symmetry for each of three generations, but only one Higgs doublet giving masses to all the elementary particles. A specific special case, the simplest scenario, is studied in detail. In this case, there are twenty six quadratic divergences, and all these divergences are cancelled provided that one single relation between the masses is satisfied. This mass relation contains a great deal of information, and in particular determines the masses of all the right-handed scalar quarks and scalar leptons, while gives relations for the masses of the left-handed ones. An alternative procedure is also given with a different starting point and less reliance on the experimental data. The result is of course the same.

  12. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  13. Augmenting Transition Probabilities for Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrazas-Salines, Imelda; Park, Chul; Strawa, Anthony W.; Hartman, G. Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The transition probability values for a number of neutral atomic nitrogen (NI) lines in the visible wavelength range are determined in order to augment those given in the National Bureau of Standards Tables. These values are determined from experimentation as well as by using the published results of other investigators. The experimental determination of the lines in the 410 to 430 nm range was made from the observation of the emission from the arc column of an arc-heated wind tunnel. The transition probability values of these NI lines are determined to an accuracy of +/- 30% by comparison of their measured intensities with those of the atomic oxygen (OI) multiplet at around 615 nm. The temperature of the emitting medium is determined both using a multiple-layer model, based on a theoretical model of the flow in the arc column, and an empirical single-layer model. The results show that the two models lead to the same values of transition probabilities for the NI lines.

  14. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, James W.

    1989-08-15

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. Second year activities focused on full implementation of disease surveillance activities and histopathological support services to participating state agencies. Persistent and sometimes severe disease losses were caused by infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in summer steelhead trout in Idaho and in spring chinook salmon at hatcheries on the lower Columbia River. Diagnostic capability was enhanced by the installation, for field use, of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology at the Dworshak Fish Health Center for the detection and assay of bacterial kidney disease and by a dot-blot'' training session for virus identification at the Lower Columbia Fish Health Center. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to 13 Columbia River basin National Fish hatcheries. Case history data was fully documented in a computerized data base for storage and analysis. This report briefly describes work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin. It also summarizes the health status of fish reared at those hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar year 1988. 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, James W.

    1990-08-15

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. This report briefly describes third-year work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin and for histopathological support services provided to participating state agencies. It also summarizes the health status of fish reared at participating Service hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar year 1989. Items of note included severe disease losses to infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in summer steelhead trout in Idaho, the detection of IHN virus in juvenile spring chinook salmon at hatcheries on the lower Columbia River, and improved bacterial kidney disease (BKD) detection and adult assay by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technology at the Dworshak Fish Health Center. Complete diagnostic and inspection services were provided to 13 Columbia River Basin National Fish Hatcheries. Case history data was fully documented in a computerized data base for storage and analysis and is summarized herein. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Augmented Fish Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Michak, Patty

    1989-05-01

    Since 1986 Washington department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project. This project provides a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its second year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1988. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1988 and will compare sampling results from 1987 and 1988. The analysis will be divided in two sections: adult analysis and juvenile analysis. The adult analysis will include results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on index stocks. Additionally, highlights from monthly monitoring exams will identify any significant and unusual findings from the routine exams completed in 1988. 6 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Wave Augmented Diffuser for Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J. (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wave augmented diffuser for a centrifugal compressor surrounds the outlet of an impeller that rotates on a drive shaft having an axis of rotation. The impeller brings flow in in an axial direction and imparts kinetic energy to the flow discharging it in radial and tangential directions. The flow is discharged into a plurality of circumferentially disposed wave chambers. The wave chambers are periodically opened and closed by a rotary valve such that the flow through the diffuser is unsteady. The valve includes a plurality of valve openings that are periodically brought into and out of fluid communication with the wave chambers. When the wave chambers are closed, a reflected compression wave moves upstream towards the diffuser bringing the flow into the wave chamber to rest. This action recovers the kinetic energy from the flow and limits any boundary layer growth. The flow is then discharged in an axial direction through an opening in the valve plate when the valve plate is rotated to an open position. The diffuser thus efficiently raises the static pressure of the fluid and discharges an axially directed flow at a radius that is predominantly below the maximum radius of the diffuser.

  18. Directing driver attention with augmented reality cues

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, Michelle L.; Schall, Mark C.; Gavin, Patrick; Lee, John D.; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Vecera, Shaun; Rizzo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This simulator study evaluated the effects of augmented reality (AR) cues designed to direct the attention of experienced drivers to roadside hazards. Twenty-seven healthy middle-aged licensed drivers with a range of attention capacity participated in a 54 mile (1.5 hour) drive in an interactive fixed-base driving simulator. Each participant received AR cues to potential roadside hazards in six simulated straight (9 mile long) rural roadway segments. Drivers were evaluated on response time for detecting a potentially hazardous event, detection accuracy for target (hazard) and non-target objects, and headway with respect to the hazards. Results showed no negative outcomes associated with interference. AR cues did not impair perception of non-target objects, including for drivers with lower attentional capacity. Results showed near significant response time benefits for AR cued hazards. AR cueing increased response rate for detecting pedestrians and warning signs but not vehicles. AR system false alarms and misses did not impair driver responses to potential hazards. PMID:24436635

  19. Thermal Augmentation of Vancomycin Against Staphylococcal Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Rachael A; Sharma, Prannda; Pavlovsky, Leonid; Stewart, Elizabeth J; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G

    2015-08-01

    Given the increasing evidence of safe application of elevated temperature in other clinical contexts, we consider the potential for supplemental hyperthermia to augment the effects of vancomycin against staphylococci, a major source of postoperative and posttraumatic sepsis. Laboratory reference strains and libraries of clinical blood isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, both as planktonic cells and as established biofilms, were assessed for thermosensitivity and increased susceptibility to vancomycin in the setting of thermal treatment. In addition to viability measures, patterns of stress gene expression were assessed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and structural changes were measured using quantitative transmission electron microscopy. Laboratory strains of both species had reduced growth and biofilm viability at 45°C, a temperature commonly used in other domains such as adjuvant treatments of malignancy. Blood isolates of S. epidermidis were consistent in this regard as well, but significant between-isolate variability in thermosensitivity was seen in blood isolates of S. aureus. Expression profiling and ultrastructural measurements confirmed that elevated temperature was a substantial stressor with or without vancomycin treatment. Our findings suggest that temperature elevations shown to be tolerated in humans in other settings hold the potential to be used as an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy against staphylococcal biofilms. PMID:25784524

  20. Predictive Design Morphologies for Gravel Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. A.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2004-12-01

    Spawning habitat rehabilitation (SHR) is an interdisciplinary practice merging hydrology, geomorphology, aquatic ecology, and civil engineering to improve existing aquatic habitat and restoring fluvial complexity. Although SHR is widespread, it needs a science-based design process. The Spawning Habitat Integrated Rehabilitation Approach (SHIRA) is a scientifically peer-reviewed framework for doing SHR on regulated rivers. Although SHIRA has shown success with gravel augmentation on the Mokulmne River using hypothesis driven designs, the goal of this study was to evaluate several more natural processes for their potential in SHR, and to do so at the geomorphic-unit scale for the first time. Multiple design hypotheses were included in 6 SHR scenarios for rehabilitating the Lewiston Dam reach of the Trinity River, CA. Morphologies tested for their process mechanics included central bars, transverse-oblique bars, riffles, point bars, and bench-constricted pools. Varying longitudinal and lateral approach slopes for each feature were evaluated as well as feature sequencing. For each design scenario, a 2D model predicted local depth, velocity, shields stress, depth of scour, and habitat suitability for life stages of chinook and steelhead salmon at 300 and 6000 cfs. Data were analyzed to determine if conceptually expected geomorphic and ecological outcomes were in fact predicted by the 2D model. One design will be selected for actual construction in 2005 to evaluate 2D model predictions.

  1. Breast Augmentation after Conservation Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, James; Hsieh, Frank; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data regarding outcomes for patients undergoing breast augmentation with implants after breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy. This retrospective study examined outcomes for patients with breast implant-only augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. Methods: Between June 1998 and December 2010, 671 women underwent prosthetic breast reconstruction. Nineteen patients (2.8%) underwent an augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. The mean age was 55.8 years (range, 40–69 years). Sixteen of these patients underwent one-stage implant-only breast augmentation, whereas 3 patients underwent two-stage expander and then implant augmentation. Results: All surgeries were successful. The average size of breast implant used was 258.7 g. Seven patients also received contralateral augmentation with an average implant size of 232.2 g. One patient received oral antibiotics for minor wound infection. Patients were judged to have an excellent (14/19; 73.7%), good (3/19; 15.8%), or fair (2/19; 10.5%) cosmetic result. Conclusion: The breasts of selected patients with breast cancer after BCS and radiotherapy. with asymmetry can be adequately augmented with breast implants alone. PMID:27536475

  2. Freeze-dried bone for maxillary sinus augmentation in sheep. Part II: biomechanical findings.

    PubMed

    Haas, Robert; Haidvogl, Daniela; Dörtbudak, Orhun; Mailath, Georg

    2002-12-01

    This study examines the biomechanical loading capacity of dental implants placed in the posterior maxilla in conjunction with subantral augmentation with either homogeneous demineralized freeze-dried bone from sheep (s-DFDB) or heterogeneous demineralized freeze-dried human bone (h-DFDB) as grafting material in sheep. In 36 adult female mountain sheep, the Schneiderian membrane was elevated extraorally in both maxillary sinuses, and two titanium plasma-flame-sprayed cylindrical implants were inserted in each lateral antral wall. Three groups of 18 maxillary sinuses each were augmented with s-DFDB, h-DFDB and autogenous bone from the illiac crest, respectively. In the remaining 18 sinuses, the subantral hollow space was left empty. Pull-out tests were carried out after intervals of 12, 16 and 26 weeks. The mean pull-out force needed, irrespective of time, was 259.3 N in the empty control group, 356.7 N in the group augmented with autogenous bone, 278.1 N in the test group augmented with h-DFDB and 365.2 N in the group augmented with s-DFDB, revealing no significant difference between the individual groups (P > 0.05). The implants of the group augmented with autogenous bone showed an increase in the mean pull-out force from 223.8 N after 12 weeks to 523.7 N after 26 weeks. The nonaugmented control group yielded values of 248 N after 12 weeks, which rose to 269.8 N at the last test, while the values of the h-DFDB group increased from 275.4 N to 325.4 N. The highest initial pull-out values were obtained in the s-DFDB group. They amounted to 310.5 N after 12 weeks and rose to 481.4 N after 26 weeks. Time thus proved to have a significant influence on the pull-out forces (P = 0.014) with a statistically proven linear trend (P = 0.007). The findings of this experimental study indicate that the use of homogeneous DFDB in one-stage sinus lift procedures results in a mechanical loading capacity of implants comparable to that achieved by autogenous cancellous bone from the

  3. 3D augmented reality with integral imaging display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xin; Hua, Hong; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) integral imaging display for augmented reality is presented. By implementing the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion method, elemental image arrays with different capturing parameters can be transferred into the identical format for 3D display. With the proposed merging algorithm, a new set of elemental images for augmented reality display is generated. The newly generated elemental images contain both the virtual objects and real world scene with desired depth information and transparency parameters. The experimental results indicate the feasibility of the proposed 3D augmented reality with integral imaging.

  4. Augmented reality for underground pipe inspection and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Pretlove, John R. G.

    1998-12-01

    The University of Surrey is engaged in developing augmented reality systems and teleoperation techniques for enhanced visual analysis and task performance in hostile environments. One particular current project in the UK is addressing the development of stereo vision systems, augmented reality, image processing techniques and specialist robotic vehicles which may be used for the future examination and maintenance of underground sewage pipes. This paper describes the components of the stereo vision and augmented reality system and illustrates some preliminary results of the use of the stereo robotic system mounted on a mobile laboratory vehicle and calibrated using a pin-hole camera model.

  5. Pyriform Aperture Augmentation as An Adjunct to Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Yaremchuk, Michael J; Vibhakar, Dev

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal deficiency in the central midface impacts nasal aesthetics. This lack of lower face projection can be corrected by alloplastic augmentation of the pyriform aperture. Creating convexity in the deficient midface will make the nose seem less prominent. Augmentation of the pyriform aperture is, therefore, often a useful adjunct during the rhinoplasty procedure. Augmenting the skeleton in this area can alter the projection of the nasal base, the nasolabial angle, and the vertical plane of the lip. The implant design and surgical techniques described here are extensions of others' previous efforts to improve paranasal aesthetics. PMID:26616706

  6. Soft Tissue Augmentation with Silk Composite Graft

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Tae; Kweon, Hae Yong; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between 4-hexylresorcinol (4HR) and antibody as that affects the performance of a silk-4HR combination graft for soft tissue augmentation in an animal model. Methods: The silk graft materials consisted of four types: silk+10% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) (ST0), silk+10% TCP+1% 4HR (ST1), silk+10% TCP+3% 4HR (ST3), and silk+10% TCP+6% 4-HR (ST6). The antibody binding assay tested the 4HR effect and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) exam was done for silk grafts. The animal experiment used a subcutaneous pocket mouse model. The graft – SH0 or SH1 or SH3 or SH6 – was placed in a subcutaneous pocket. The animals were killed at one, two, and four weeks, postoperatively. The specimens were subjected to histological analysis and lysozyme assay. Results: Groups with 4HR applied showed lower antibody binding affinity to antigen compared to groups without 4HR. In the SEM examination, there was no significant difference among groups. Histological examinations revealed many foreign body giant cells in ST0 and ST1 group at four weeks postoperatively. Both ST3 and ST6 groups developed significantly lower levels of giant cell values compared to ST0 and ST1 groups (P <0.001) at four weeks postoperatively. In the lysozyme assay, the ST1 and ST3 groups showed denser signals than the other groups. Conclusion: 4HR combined silk implants resulted in high levels of vascular and connective tissue regeneration. PMID:27489833

  7. Gravel Augmentation Below Dams: California Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Minear, J. T.

    2004-12-01

    Most dams block all coarse sediment traveling downstream, such that reaches downstream are commonly typically depleted of gravel, causing a variety of effects such as incision, bank erosion, coarsening of the bed material, and reduction of salmonid spawning habitiat. To compensate for this reduction in coarse sediment supply, gravel has been artificially added below dams, using techniques such as high flow stock piling, high flow direct injection, artificial riffle construction, riffle supplementation, and construction of side channel or artificial spawning channels. In the Trinity and Sacramento-San Joaquin River systems of northern California, loss of suitable salmonid spawning gravels below dams has motivated augmentation of over 320,000 m3 of gravel in 73 separate projects on 19 rivers since 1978, mostly since 1990. Of the 67 projects for which adequate data were available, 48 involved adding less than 7,500 m3 each. Costs reported for 57 of the projects totaled nearly $8,753,000, but these figures generally did not include the cost of staff time involved in planning, design, and oversight. Despite the magnitude of this experimental intervention, fewer than half of the projects were monitored, and of those few had monitored sufficient parameters pre- and post- project to evaluate project performance. Performance of these projects to date has been mixed: in many cases the imported gravels have promptly washed out, some channel forms created have been unnatural and not heavily used by salmon. In all cases, the volumes of gravel artificially added have been only a small percentage of the annual coarse sediment deficit.

  8. Telescopic multi-resolution augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey; Frenchi, Christopher; Szu, Harold

    2014-05-01

    To ensure a self-consistent scaling approximation, the underlying microscopic fluctuation components can naturally influence macroscopic means, which may give rise to emergent observable phenomena. In this paper, we describe a consistent macroscopic (cm-scale), mesoscopic (micron-scale), and microscopic (nano-scale) approach to introduce Telescopic Multi-Resolution (TMR) into current Augmented Reality (AR) visualization technology. We propose to couple TMR-AR by introducing an energy-matter interaction engine framework that is based on known Physics, Biology, Chemistry principles. An immediate payoff of TMR-AR is a self-consistent approximation of the interaction between microscopic observables and their direct effect on the macroscopic system that is driven by real-world measurements. Such an interdisciplinary approach enables us to achieve more than multiple scale, telescopic visualization of real and virtual information but also conducting thought experiments through AR. As a result of the consistency, this framework allows us to explore a large dimensionality parameter space of measured and unmeasured regions. Towards this direction, we explore how to build learnable libraries of biological, physical, and chemical mechanisms. Fusing analytical sensors with TMR-AR libraries provides a robust framework to optimize testing and evaluation through data-driven or virtual synthetic simulations. Visualizing mechanisms of interactions requires identification of observable image features that can indicate the presence of information in multiple spatial and temporal scales of analog data. The AR methodology was originally developed to enhance pilot-training as well as `make believe' entertainment industries in a user-friendly digital environment We believe TMR-AR can someday help us conduct thought experiments scientifically, to be pedagogically visualized in a zoom-in-and-out, consistent, multi-scale approximations.

  9. Transparent 3D display for augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jisoo

    2012-11-01

    Two types of transparent three-dimensional display systems applicable for the augmented reality are demonstrated. One of them is a head-mounted-display-type implementation which utilizes the principle of the system adopting the concave floating lens to the virtual mode integral imaging. Such configuration has an advantage in that the threedimensional image can be displayed at sufficiently far distance resolving the accommodation conflict with the real world scene. Incorporating the convex half mirror, which shows a partial transparency, instead of the concave floating lens, makes it possible to implement the transparent three-dimensional display system. The other type is the projection-type implementation, which is more appropriate for the general use than the head-mounted-display-type implementation. Its imaging principle is based on the well-known reflection-type integral imaging. We realize the feature of transparent display by imposing the partial transparency to the array of concave mirror which is used for the screen of reflection-type integral imaging. Two types of configurations, relying on incoherent and coherent light sources, are both possible. For the incoherent configuration, we introduce the concave half mirror array, whereas the coherent one adopts the holographic optical element which replicates the functionality of the lenslet array. Though the projection-type implementation is beneficial than the head-mounted-display in principle, the present status of the technical advance of the spatial light modulator still does not provide the satisfactory visual quality of the displayed three-dimensional image. Hence we expect that the head-mounted-display-type and projection-type implementations will come up in the market in sequence.

  10. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    PubMed

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. PMID:26224206

  11. Enrichment design with patient population augmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhou, Yijie; Zhang, Lanju; Cui, Lu

    2015-05-01

    Clinical trials can be enriched on subpopulations that may be more responsive to treatments to improve the chance of trial success. In 2012 FDA issued a draft guidance to facilitate enrichment design, where it pointed out the uncertainty on the subpopulation classification and on the treatment effect outside of the identified subpopulation. We consider a novel design strategy where the identified subpopulation (biomarker-positive) is augmented by some biomarker-negative patients. Specifically, after sufficiently powering biomarker-positive subpopulation we propose to enroll biomarker-negative patients, enough to assess the overall treatment benefit. We derive a weighted statistic for this assessment, correcting for the disproportionality of biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subpopulations under enriched trial setting. Screening information is utilized for weight determination. This statistic is an unbiased estimate of the overall treatment effect as that in all-comer trials, and is the basis to power for the overall treatment effect. For analysis, testing will be first performed on biomarker-positive subpopulation; only if treatment benefit is established in this subpopulation will overall treatment effect be tested using the weighted statistic. This design approach differs from typical enrichment design or stratified all-comer design in that the former enrolls only biomarker-positive patients and the latter enrolls a regular all-comer population. It also differs from adaptive enrichment by maintaining the trial design and analysis priority on biomarker-positive subpopulation. Therefore the proposed approach not only warrants a high probability of trial success on biomarker-positive subpopulation, but also efficiently assesses the overall treatment effect in the presence of an uncertain treatment benefit among biomarker-negative patients.

  12. Augmented Reality System for E-maintenance Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbelkacem, S.; Zenati-Henda, N.; Belhocine, M.; Malek, S.

    2009-03-01

    We present in this paper an Augmented Reality platform for e-maintenance application. In our case, the aim is not to develop a vision system based on augmented reality concept, but to show the relationship between the different actors in the proposed architecture and to facilitate maintenance of the machine. With this platform we identify all possible scenarios which allow the technician to intervene on a machine breakdown using distant expert if necessary. Each scenario depends on the machine parameters and the technician competences. To implement a configuration of Augmented Reality system, we chose a case study of maintenance scenario for machine breakdown. Then we represent this scenario by an interaction model which allows establishing Augmented Reality configuration.

  13. Augmented Reality a Review on Technology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruse, Radu Emanuil; Bondrea, Ioan

    2014-11-01

    We present in this paper an overview of the concepts and potential industrial Augmented Reality applications that can be very efficient. We also present the basic technological requirements for an AR system

  14. [Cement augmentation of pedicle screws : Pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Blattert, T R; Liljenqvist, U

    2016-09-01

    Cement augmentation of pedicle screws biomechanically increases screw purchase in the bone. However, clinical complications may occur. The pros and cons of the technique are discussed from different clinical perspectives. PMID:27514827

  15. Superconducting augmented rail gun (SARG). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, C.G.; Scholz, W.

    1987-02-01

    Both the energy efficiency and projectile velocity of a rail-gun system can be substantially increased by the addition of an adjunct superconducting augmentation coil system. The energy efficiency results from the superconducting coil's ability to recover the rail magnetic field energy normally dissipated at the end of launch in rail guns, by means of a unique application of the flux conservation of property of superconducting coils. The increased velocity results from the augmented Lorentz force due to the augmentation-coil magnetic field. In an idealized system, both the energy efficiency and projectile velocities can be increased by more than 80%, dependent on the magnetic coupling between the rail and augmentation coils. The theoretical evaluation was extended to include dissipative effects which reveal that actual launch efficiencies are increased from 25% (rail gun) to over 50% (SARG). A theoretical analysis of SARG is presented here together with the progress of an experimental demonstrator developer at Benet Weapons Lab.

  16. Transpedicle body augmenter for vertebral augmentation in symptomatic multiple osteoporotic compression fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Allen; Li, Kung-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    Background: Multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) have been treated with polymethylmethacrylate augmentation; however, there are cement complications and long-term fracture healing that are unknown. Transpedicle body augmenter (a porous titanium spacer) has been reported as an internal support to reconstruct the vertebral body combining short-segment fixation in burst fracture and Kümmell's disease with cord compression. Transpedicle body augmenter for vertebral augmentation (TpBA) also has been reported successfully in treating single painful VCF and vertebral metastasis lesions including pending fractures and pathologic compression fractures. To test the hypothesis that TpBA can effectively and safely treat the symptomatic multiple VCFs, this retrospective study was done by analyzing the radiographic and clinical results. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiographic results of TpBA for symptomatic multiple (more than two levels) VCFs in 62 patients with a total of 236 levels, i.e. 3.8 VCFs per patient. Manual reduction and TpBA via paramedian incisions with blunt dissection were done. One incision was made for two continuous levels and alternative side was selected for next incision. Mean age was 74.3 years (range, 62-87 years), and female-male ratio was 5.2:1. Anterior vertebral height and wedge angle by radiographic findings were measured at preoperative, initial follow-up and final follow-up. Clinical results were assessed by questionnaires and clinical observations. By July 2008, 58 patients returned to answer the questionnaire including quantification of pain on the visual analog scale, the response to operations (better, same, or worse after operation), returned to their pre-fracture function (yes/no) and satisfaction (a scale of 0 = completely dissatisfied to 10 = completely satisfied). Results: The mean symptom duration was 7 months, and follow-up, 48 months. The average operation time was 21 min per

  17. Augmentation of host resistance to microbial infections by recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Minami, A; Fujimoto, K; Ozaki, Y; Nakamura, S

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 alpha augmented resistance of mice to microbial infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, and Candida albicans. The effective doses of interleukin-1 alpha ranged from 0.01 to 10 micrograms per mouse, depending on the infecting organism, route of administration, and challenge dose. Intravenous interleukin-1 alpha was, dose for dose, more effective than intravenous muramyl dipeptide and lentinan against the P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae infections. Augmentation by interleukin-1 alpha of resistance to infection was also observed in P. aeruginosa-infected mice in a state of cyclophosphamide-induced leucopenia. Interleukin-1 alpha may be useful for controlling obstinate infections not curable by antimicrobial agents alone. PMID:3263325

  18. Augmented Reality in a Simulated Tower Environment: Effect of Field of View on Aircraft Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Adelstein, Bernard D.; Reisman, Ronald J.; Schmidt-Ott, Joelle R.; Gips, Jonathan; Krozel, Jimmy; Cohen, Malcolm (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical see-through, augmented reality display was used to study subjects' ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing at the Dallas Ft. Worth International airport in an ATC Tower simulation. Subjects monitored the traffic patterns as if from the airport's western control tower. Three binocular fields of view (14 deg, 28 deg and 47 deg) were studied in an independent groups' design to measure the degradation in detection performance associated with the visual field restrictions. In a second experiment the 14 deg and 28 deg fields were presented either with 46% binocular overlap or 100% overlap for separate groups. The near asymptotic results of the first experiment suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47% are unlikely to dramatically improve performance; and those of the second experiment suggest that partial binocular overlap is feasible for augmented reality displays such as may be used for ATC tower applications.

  19. Foreign body granulomas after injection of Bio-alcamid for lip augmentation.

    PubMed

    Akrish, Sharon; Dayan, Dan; Taicher, Shlomo; Adam, Iris; Nagler, Rafael M

    2009-01-01

    Bio-alcamid is one of the newest agents on the market for soft tissue augmentation. Seven studies were documented in the medical literature that examined the safety of Bio-alcamid (Polymekon, Brindisy, Italy); all reported no cases of tissue migration, foreign body granulomas, allergenicity, or interference with the control of cell proliferation. On 2 separate occasions, a woman who had recently undergone lip augmentation presented at our hospital with submucosal nodules of the lip. Histologic examination revealed multiple foreign body-type granulomas composed of giant cells, epithelioid cells, and chronic inflammation of the lip. Efforts to produce a cosmetic material that fulfills all the criteria as an "ideal" agent has not yet been found because all injectable foreign agents have the potential to induce adverse reactions. Caution must be exercised in all cases and the risks explained to the patient before its use.

  20. Use of augmented feedback for the modification of the pedaling mechanics of cyclists.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, D J; Cavanagh, P R

    1990-03-01

    On-line computer representation of forces applied to the pedals during a 90-degree sector of the pedaling cycle were used to train a group of cyclists to alter their pattern of force application while they cycled on a stationary cycle. The subjects rode for 32 min each day for ten days. During these training rides, three cyclists were given augmented feedback on only their pedaling rate, while three other cyclists were presented with augmented, visual feedback on the magnitude of force application in the sector of interest as well as cadence. At the end of the training period it was noted that the experimental group showed significantly reduced pedal forces in the sector of interest while the control group did not. It was concluded that this technique of modifying a well-practised task was an effective one and that it could be used to explore various training modalities and other pedaling styles.