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Sample records for augments tumor killing

  1. IL-2 augments the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred B cells which directly kill tumor cells via the CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Xia, Leiming; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Huang, Shiang; Ren, Xiubao; Lundy, Steven K.; Dai, Fu; Li, Qiao; Chang, Alfred E.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that antitumor B cells directly kill tumor cells via the Fas/FasL pathway and are regulated by IL-10. In this study, we defined additional mechanisms involved in B cell antitumor immunity. Administration of IL-2 significantly augmented the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) B cells which express IL- 2R. Culture supernatant of purified B splenocytes harvested from the mice that received adoptive transfer of 4T1 TDLN B cells plus IL-2 administration produced larger amounts of IgG which bound to 4T1, resulting in 4T1 lysis. Furthermore, we detected CXCR4 expression on 4T1 TDLN B cells, and 4T1 tumor cells produced its ligand CXCL12. Transwell experiments demonstrated the chemoattraction of CXCR4-expressing 4T1 TDLN B cells towards CXCL12- producing 4T1 cells. Blockade of CXCR4 using a CXCR4-specific inhibitor, AMD3100, significantly reduced the killing of 4T1 tumor cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. Blockade of FasL and CXCR4 concurrently inhibited B cell-mediated direct killing of tumor cells in an additive manner, indicating that both Fas/FasL and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathways are involved in the direct killing of 4T1 cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. TDLN B cells produced perforin. Additional transwell experiments showed that effector B cells could directly kill tumor cells in cell-cell contact via the Fas/FasL and CXCR4/CXCL12 pathways as well as perforin, while without cell contact, perforin secreted by B cells led to tumor cell cytotoxicity. These findings underscore the diversity of function by which B cells can play an important role in the host immune response to tumor. PMID:27528023

  2. IL-2 augments the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred B cells which directly kill tumor cells via the CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Tao, Huimin; Hu, Yangyang; Chen, Quanning; Chen, Xin; Xia, Leiming; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Huang, Shiang; Ren, Xiubao; Lundy, Steven K; Dai, Fu; Li, Qiao; Chang, Alfred E

    2016-09-13

    We previously reported that antitumor B cells directly kill tumor cells via the Fas/FasL pathway and are regulated by IL-10. In this study, we defined additional mechanisms involved in B cell antitumor immunity. Administration of IL-2 significantly augmented the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) B cells which express IL- 2R. Culture supernatant of purified B splenocytes harvested from the mice that received adoptive transfer of 4T1 TDLN B cells plus IL-2 administration produced larger amounts of IgG which bound to 4T1, resulting in 4T1 lysis. Furthermore, we detected CXCR4 expression on 4T1 TDLN B cells, and 4T1 tumor cells produced its ligand CXCL12. Transwell experiments demonstrated the chemoattraction of CXCR4-expressing 4T1 TDLN B cells towards CXCL12- producing 4T1 cells. Blockade of CXCR4 using a CXCR4-specific inhibitor, AMD3100, significantly reduced the killing of 4T1 tumor cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. Blockade of FasL and CXCR4 concurrently inhibited B cell-mediated direct killing of tumor cells in an additive manner, indicating that both Fas/FasL and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathways are involved in the direct killing of 4T1 cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. TDLN B cells produced perforin. Additional transwell experiments showed that effector B cells could directly kill tumor cells in cell-cell contact via the Fas/FasL and CXCR4/CXCL12 pathways as well as perforin, while without cell contact, perforin secreted by B cells led to tumor cell cytotoxicity. These findings underscore the diversity of function by which B cells can play an important role in the host immune response to tumor.

  3. Preclinical characterization of 1-7F9, a novel human anti–KIR receptor therapeutic antibody that augments natural killer–mediated killing of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    André, Pascale; Spee, Pieter; Zahn, Stefan; Anfossi, Nicolas; Gauthier, Laurent; Capanni, Marusca; Ruggeri, Loredana; Benson, Don M.; Blaser, Bradley W.; Della Chiesa, Mariella; Moretta, Alessandro; Vivier, Eric; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Velardi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitory-cell killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) negatively regulate natural killer (NK) cell–mediated killing of HLA class I–expressing tumors. Lack of KIR-HLA class I interactions has been associated with potent NK-mediated antitumor efficacy and increased survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients upon haploidentical stem cell transplantation from KIR-mismatched donors. To exploit this pathway pharmacologically, we generated a fully human monoclonal antibody, 1-7F9, which cross-reacts with KIR2DL1, -2, and -3 receptors, and prevents their inhibitory signaling. The 1-7F9 monoclonal antibody augmented NK cell–mediated lysis of HLA-C–expressing tumor cells, including autologous AML blasts, but did not induce killing of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggesting a therapeutic window for preferential enhancement of NK-cell cytotoxicity against malignant target cells. Administration of 1-7F9 to KIR2DL3-transgenic mice resulted in dose-dependent rejection of HLA-Cw3–positive target cells. In an immunodeficient mouse model in which inoculation of human NK cells alone was unable to protect against lethal, autologous AML, preadministration of 1-7F9 resulted in long-term survival. These data show that 1-7F9 confers specific, stable blockade of KIR, boosting NK-mediated killing of HLA-matched AML blasts in vitro and in vivo, providing a preclinical basis for initiating phase 1 clinical trials with this candidate therapeutic antibody. PMID:19553639

  4. Glucose Augments Killing Efficiency of Daptomycin Challenged Staphylococcus aureus Persisters.

    PubMed

    Prax, Marcel; Mechler, Lukas; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus in stationary growth phase with high doses of the antibiotic daptomycin (DAP) eradicates the vast majority of the culture and leaves persister cells behind. Despite resting in a drug-tolerant and dormant state, persister cells exhibit metabolic activity which might be exploited for their elimination. We here report that the addition of glucose to S. aureus persisters treated with DAP increased killing by up to five-fold within one hour. This glucose-DAP effect also occurred with strains less sensitive to the drug. The underlying mechanism is independent of the proton motive force and was not observed with non-metabolizable 2-deoxy-glucose. Our results are consistent with two hypotheses on the glucose-DAP interplay. The first is based upon glucose-induced carbohydrate transport proteins that may influence DAP and the second suggests that glucose may trigger the release or activity of cell-lytic proteins to augment DAP's mode of action.

  5. Glucose Augments Killing Efficiency of Daptomycin Challenged Staphylococcus aureus Persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Mechler, Lukas; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus in stationary growth phase with high doses of the antibiotic daptomycin (DAP) eradicates the vast majority of the culture and leaves persister cells behind. Despite resting in a drug-tolerant and dormant state, persister cells exhibit metabolic activity which might be exploited for their elimination. We here report that the addition of glucose to S. aureus persisters treated with DAP increased killing by up to five-fold within one hour. This glucose-DAP effect also occurred with strains less sensitive to the drug. The underlying mechanism is independent of the proton motive force and was not observed with non-metabolizable 2-deoxy-glucose. Our results are consistent with two hypotheses on the glucose-DAP interplay. The first is based upon glucose-induced carbohydrate transport proteins that may influence DAP and the second suggests that glucose may trigger the release or activity of cell-lytic proteins to augment DAP’s mode of action. PMID:26960193

  6. Augmented reality for breast tumors visualization.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Ali; Heydarzadeh, Mehrdad; Nourani, Mehrdad; Gupta, Gopal; Tamil, Lakshman

    2016-08-01

    3D visualization of breast tumors are shown to be effective by previous studies. In this paper, we introduce a new augmented reality application that can help doctors and surgeons to have a more accurate visualization of breast tumors; this system uses a marker-based image-processing technique to render a 3D model of the tumors on the body. The model can be created using a combination of breast 3D mammography by experts. We have tested the system using an Android smartphone and a head-mounted device. This proof of concept can be useful for oncologists to have a more effective screening, and surgeons to plan the surgery.

  7. PDE5 Inhibitors Enhance Celecoxib Killing in Multiple Tumor Types

    PubMed Central

    BOOTH, LAURENCE; ROBERTS, JANE L.; CRUICKSHANKS, NICHOLA; TAVALLAI, SEYEDMEHRAD; WEBB, TIMOTHY; SAMUEL, PETER; CONLEY, ADAM; BINION, BRITTANY; YOUNG, HAROLD F.; POKLEPOVIC, ANDREW; SPIEGEL, SARAH; DENT, PAUL

    2015-01-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1α/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:25303541

  8. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2017-08-15

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  9. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  10. From growing plants to killing tumors.

    PubMed

    Flinn, E D

    2000-04-01

    A technique called photodynamic therapy, originally developed for commercial plant growth research on the Space Shuttle, has been used by surgeons in two successful operations for brain tumors. The device uses pin-head-size light emitting diodes (LEDs) that release long, cool, wavelengths of light which activate photosensitive antineoplastic drugs. The device is being adapted to non-space uses through a Small Business Innovation Research grant. The LEDs also are used to treat skin cancer, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Research is being conducted regarding LED use in wound healing, tissue growth, and prevention of muscle and bone atrophy in astronauts.

  11. Biosystems Engineering of Prokaryotes with Tumor-Killing Capacities.

    PubMed

    Kalyoncu, Ebuzer; Olmez, Tolga T; Ozkan, Alper D; Sarioglu, Omer F

    2016-01-01

    Certain bacteria selectively attack tumor tissues and trigger tumor shrinkage by producing toxins and modulating the local immune system, but their clinical utility is limited because of the dangers posed by systemic infection. Genetic engineering can be used to minimize the risks associated with tumor-targeting pathogens, as well as to increase their efficiency in killing tumor cells. Advances in genetic circuit design have led to the development of bacterial strains with enhanced tumor-targeting capacities and the ability to secrete therapeutics, cytotoxic proteins and prodrug-cleaving enzymes, which allows their safe and effective use for cancer treatment. The present review details the recent advances in the design and application of these modified bacterial strains.

  12. Nexavar/Stivarga and Viagra Interact to Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tavallai, Mehrad; Hamed, Hossein A.; Roberts, Jane L.; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Chuckalovcak, John; Poklepovic, Andrew; Booth, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    We determined whether the multi‐kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors such as Viagra (sildenafil) to kill tumor cells. PDE5 and PDGFRα/β were over‐expressed in liver tumors compared to normal liver tissue. In multiple cell types in vitro sorafenib/regorafenib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death, regardless of whether cells were grown in 10 or 100% human serum. Knock down of PDE5 or of PDGFRα/β recapitulated the effects of the individual drugs. The drug combination increased ROS/RNS levels that were causal in cell killing. Inhibition of CD95/FADD/caspase 8 signaling suppressed drug combination toxicity. Knock down of ULK‐1, Beclin1, or ATG5 suppressed drug combination lethality. The drug combination inactivated ERK, AKT, p70 S6K, and mTOR and activated JNK. The drug combination also reduced mTOR protein expression. Activation of ERK or AKT was modestly protective whereas re‐expression of an activated mTOR protein or inhibition of JNK signaling almost abolished drug combination toxicity. Sildenafil and sorafenib/regorafenib interacted in vivo to suppress xenograft tumor growth using liver and colon cancer cells. From multiplex assays on tumor tissue and plasma, we discovered that increased FGF levels and ERBB1 and AKT phosphorylation were biomarkers that were directly associated with lower levels of cell killing by ‘rafenib + sildenafil. Our data are now being translated into the clinic for further determination as to whether this drug combination is a useful anti‐tumor therapy for solid tumor patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2281–2298, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25704960

  13. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  14. Morphological effect of oscillating magnetic nanoparticles in killing tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shi, Hongcheng

    2014-04-01

    Forced oscillation of spherical and rod-shaped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via low-power and low-frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) was firstly used to kill cancer cells in vitro. After being loaded by human cervical cancer cells line (HeLa) and then exposed to a 35-kHz AMF, MNPs mechanically damaged cell membranes and cytoplasm, decreasing the cell viability. It was found that the concentration and morphology of the MNPs significantly influenced the cell-killing efficiency of oscillating MNPs. In this preliminary study, when HeLa cells were pre-incubated with 100 μg/mL rod-shaped MNPs (rMNP, length of 200 ± 50 nm and diameter of 50 to 120 nm) for 20 h, MTT assay proved that the cell viability decreased by 30.9% after being exposed to AMF for 2 h, while the cell viability decreased by 11.7% if spherical MNPs (sMNP, diameter of 200 ± 50 nm) were used for investigation. Furthermore, the morphological effect of MNPs on cell viability was confirmed by trypan blue assay: 39.5% rMNP-loaded cells and 15.1% sMNP-loaded cells were stained after being exposed to AMF for 2 h. It was also interesting to find that killing tumor cells at either higher (500 μg/mL) or lower (20 μg/mL) concentration of MNPs was less efficient than that achieved at 100 μg/mL concentration. In conclusion, the relatively asymmetric morphological rod-shaped MNPs can kill cancer cells more effectively than spherical MNPs when being exposed to AMF by virtue of their mechanical oscillations.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  16. Nanotechnology for the detection and kill of circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Yuan, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a surrogate biomarker of hematogenous metastases and thus could be considered as a `liquid biopsy' which reveals metastasis in action. But it is absolutely a challenge to detect CTCs due to their extreme rarity. At present, the most common principle is to take advantage of the epithelial surface markers of CTCs which attach to a specific antibody. Antibody-magnetic nanobeads combine with the epithelial surface markers, and then the compound is processed by washing, separation, and detection. However, a proportion of CTC antigen expressions are down-regulated or lost in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus, this part of CTCs cannot be detected by classical detection methods such as CellSearch. To resolve this problem, some multiple-marker CTC detections have been developed rapidly. Additionally, nanotechnology is a promising approach to kill CTCs with high efficiency. Implantable nanotubes coated with apoptosis-promoting molecules improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. The review introduces some novel CTC detection techniques and therapeutic methods by virtue of nanotechnology to provide a better knowledge of the progress about CTC study.

  17. Nanotechnology for the detection and kill of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a surrogate biomarker of hematogenous metastases and thus could be considered as a ‘liquid biopsy’ which reveals metastasis in action. But it is absolutely a challenge to detect CTCs due to their extreme rarity. At present, the most common principle is to take advantage of the epithelial surface markers of CTCs which attach to a specific antibody. Antibody-magnetic nanobeads combine with the epithelial surface markers, and then the compound is processed by washing, separation, and detection. However, a proportion of CTC antigen expressions are down-regulated or lost in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus, this part of CTCs cannot be detected by classical detection methods such as CellSearch. To resolve this problem, some multiple-marker CTC detections have been developed rapidly. Additionally, nanotechnology is a promising approach to kill CTCs with high efficiency. Implantable nanotubes coated with apoptosis-promoting molecules improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. The review introduces some novel CTC detection techniques and therapeutic methods by virtue of nanotechnology to provide a better knowledge of the progress about CTC study. PMID:25258614

  18. Hypofractionation results in reduced tumor cell kill compared to conventional fractionation for tumors with regions of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, David J.; Keall, Paul J.; Loo, Billy W.; Chen, Zhe J.; Brown, J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. Method and Materials A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors (HRFs) for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Results Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 105 over a distance of 130 μm. For head and neck and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of ~ 103 as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Conclusion Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia. PMID:21183291

  19. Enhanced Performance of Brain Tumor Classification via Tumor Region Augmentation and Partition

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Wei; Cao, Shuangliang; Yang, Ru; Yang, Wei; Yun, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Zhijian; Feng, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic classification of tissue types of region of interest (ROI) plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. In the current study, we focus on the classification of three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor) in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images. Spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which splits the image into increasingly fine rectangular subregions and computes histograms of local features from each subregion, exhibits excellent results for natural scene classification. However, this approach is not applicable for brain tumors, because of the great variations in tumor shape and size. In this paper, we propose a method to enhance the classification performance. First, the augmented tumor region via image dilation is used as the ROI instead of the original tumor region because tumor surrounding tissues can also offer important clues for tumor types. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into increasingly fine ring-form subregions. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method on a large dataset with three feature extraction methods, namely, intensity histogram, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and bag-of-words (BoW) model. Compared with using tumor region as ROI, using augmented tumor region as ROI improves the accuracies to 82.31% from 71.39%, 84.75% from 78.18%, and 88.19% from 83.54% for intensity histogram, GLCM, and BoW model, respectively. In addition to region augmentation, ring-form partition can further improve the accuracies up to 87.54%, 89.72%, and 91.28%. These experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and effective for the classification of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MRI. PMID:26447861

  20. Enhanced Performance of Brain Tumor Classification via Tumor Region Augmentation and Partition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Wei; Cao, Shuangliang; Yang, Ru; Yang, Wei; Yun, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Zhijian; Feng, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic classification of tissue types of region of interest (ROI) plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. In the current study, we focus on the classification of three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor) in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images. Spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which splits the image into increasingly fine rectangular subregions and computes histograms of local features from each subregion, exhibits excellent results for natural scene classification. However, this approach is not applicable for brain tumors, because of the great variations in tumor shape and size. In this paper, we propose a method to enhance the classification performance. First, the augmented tumor region via image dilation is used as the ROI instead of the original tumor region because tumor surrounding tissues can also offer important clues for tumor types. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into increasingly fine ring-form subregions. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method on a large dataset with three feature extraction methods, namely, intensity histogram, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and bag-of-words (BoW) model. Compared with using tumor region as ROI, using augmented tumor region as ROI improves the accuracies to 82.31% from 71.39%, 84.75% from 78.18%, and 88.19% from 83.54% for intensity histogram, GLCM, and BoW model, respectively. In addition to region augmentation, ring-form partition can further improve the accuracies up to 87.54%, 89.72%, and 91.28%. These experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and effective for the classification of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MRI.

  1. HAMLET kills tumor cells by apoptosis: structure, cellular mechanisms, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Fischer, Walter; Aronsson, Annika; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-05-01

    New cancer treatments should aim to destroy tumor cells without disturbing normal tissue. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) offers a new molecular approach to solving this problem, because it induces apoptosis in tumor cells but leaves normal differentiated cells unaffected. After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and freezes their metabolic machinery. The cells proceed to fragment their DNA, and they disintegrate with apoptosis-like characteristics. HAMLET kills a wide range of malignant cells in vitro and maintains this activity in vivo in patients with skin papillomas. In addition, HAMLET has striking effects on human glioblastomas in a rat xenograft model. After convection-enhanced delivery, HAMLET diffuses throughout the brain, selectively killing tumor cells and controlling tumor progression without apparent tissue toxicity. HAMLET thus shows great promise as a new therapeutic with the advantage of selectivity for tumor cells and lack of toxicity.

  2. Hypofractionation Results in Reduced Tumor Cell Kill Compared to Conventional Fractionation for Tumors With Regions of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David J.; Keall, Paul J.; Loo, Billy W.; Chen, Zhe J.; Brown, J. Martin

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Results: Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10{sup 5} over a distance of 130 {mu}m. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of {approx}10{sup 3} as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia.

  3. Hypofractionation results in reduced tumor cell kill compared to conventional fractionation for tumors with regions of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Carlson, David J; Keall, Paul J; Loo, Billy W; Chen, Zhe J; Brown, J Martin

    2011-03-15

    Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10(5) over a distance of 130 μm. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of ∼10(3) as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperoxygenation enhances the direct tumor cell killing of photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Shakil, Abdus; Chen, Hua; Beckers, Jill; Shapiro, Howard; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or as a result of oxygen bleaching during Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) light irradiation, can significantly reduce the effectiveness of PDT induced cell killing. To overcome the effect of tumor hypoxia and improve tumor cell killing, we propose using supplemental hyperoxygenation during Photofrin PDT. Our previous study has demonstrated that, in an in vivo model, tumor control can be improved by normobaric or hyperbaric 100% oxygen supply. The mechanism for the tumor cure enhancement of the hyperoxygenation-PDT combined therapy is investigated in this study by using an in vivo/in vitro technique. A hypoxic tumor model was established by implanting mammary adenocarcinoma (MCA) in hind legs of C3H mice. Light irradiation (200 J/cm2 at either 75 or 150 mW/cm2), under various oxygen supplemental conditions (room air or carbogen or 100% normobaric or hyperbaric 100% oxygen), was delivered through an optical fiber with a microlens to animals who received 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin 24 hours prior to light irradiation. Tumors treated with PDT were harvested and grown in vitro for colony formation analysis. Treated tumors were also analyzed histologically. The results show that, when combined with hyperoxygenation, the cell killing rate immediately after a PDT treatment is significantly improved over that treated without hyperoxygenation, suggesting an enhanced direct cell killing. This study further confirms our earlier observation that when a PDT treatment is combined with hyperoxygenation, it can be more effective in controlling hypoxic tumors. H&E stain revealed that PDT induced tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. In conclusion, by using an in vivo/in vitro assay, we have shown that PDT combined with hyper-oxygenation can enhance direct cell killing and improve tumor cure.

  5. Cancer immunotherapy based on killing of Salmonella-infected tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Avogadri, Francesca; Martinoli, Chiara; Petrovska, Liljana; Chiodoni, Claudia; Transidico, Pietro; Bronte, Vincenzo; Longhi, Renato; Colombo, Mario P; Dougan, Gordon; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    A major obstacle for the development of effective immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to escape the immune system. The possibility to kill tumor cells because they are recognized as infected rather than as malignant could help overcome immune escape mechanisms. Here we report a conceptually new approach of cancer immunotherapy based on in vivo infection of tumors and killing of infected tumor cells. Attenuated but still invasive, Salmonella typhimurium can be successfully exploited to invade melanoma cells that can present antigenic determinants of bacterial origin and become targets for anti-Salmonella-specific T cells. However, to fully appreciate the anticancer therapeutic properties of S. typhimurium, tumor-bearing mice need to be vaccinated against S. typhimurium before intratumoral Salmonella injection. Tumor infection when coupled to anti-Salmonella vaccination leads to 50% to 100% tumor-free mice with a better outcome on larger tumors. Invasive Salmonella also exert an indirect toxic effect on tumor cells through the recruitment of inflammatory cells and the cross-presentation of tumor antigens, which allow induction of tumor-specific immune response. This is effective in retarding the growth of untreated established distant tumors and in protecting the mice from subsequent tumor challenges.

  6. Capacity of tumor necrosis factor to augment lymphocyte-mediated tumor cell lysis of malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.V.; Manning, L.S.; Davis, M.R.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rHuTNF) was evaluated both for direct anti-tumor action against human malignant mesothelioma and for its capacity to augment the generation and lytic phases of lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against this tumor. rHuTNF was directly toxic by MTT assay to one of two mesothelioma cell lines evaluated, but had no effect on susceptibility to subsequent lymphocyte-mediated lysis of either line. TNF alone was incapable of generating anti-mesothelioma lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) activity. Furthermore, it did not augment the degree or LAK activity produced by submaximal interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations nor did it augment lysis of mesothelioma cells by natural killer (NK) or LAK effector cells during the 4-hr 51chromium release cytolytic reaction. The studies also suggest that mesothelioma targets are less responsive to TNF plus submaximal IL-2 concentrations than the standard LAK sensitive target Daudi, raising the possibility that intermediate LAK sensitive tumors such as mesothelioma may require separate and specific evaluation in immunomodulation studies. This in vitro study indicates that use of low-dose rHuTNF and IL-2 is unlikely to be an effective substitute for high-dose IL-2 in generation and maintenance of LAK activity in adoptive immunotherapy for mesothelioma.

  7. 6-thioguanine selectively kills BRCA2-defective tumors and overcomes PARP inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Issaeva, Natalia; Thomas, Huw D; Djureinovic, Tatjana; Djurenovic, Tatjana; Jaspers, Janneke E; Stoimenov, Ivaylo; Kyle, Suzanne; Pedley, Nicholas; Gottipati, Ponnari; Zur, Rafal; Sleeth, Kate; Chatzakos, Vicky; Mulligan, Evan A; Lundin, Cecilia; Gubanova, Evgenia; Kersbergen, Ariena; Harris, Adrian L; Sharma, Ricky A; Rottenberg, Sven; Curtin, Nicola J; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Familial breast and ovarian cancers are often defective in homologous recombination (HR) due to mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Cisplatin chemotherapy or poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors were tested for these tumors in clinical trials. In a screen for novel drugs that selectively kill BRCA2-defective cells, we identified 6-thioguanine (6TG), which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) that are repaired by HR. Furthermore, we show that 6TG is as efficient as a PARP inhibitor in selectively killing BRCA2-defective tumors in a xenograft model. Spontaneous BRCA1-defective mammary tumors gain resistance to PARP inhibitors through increased P-glycoprotein expression. Here, we show that 6TG efficiently kills such BRCA1-defective PARP inhibitor-resistant tumors. We also show that 6TG could kill cells and tumors that have gained resistance to PARP inhibitors or cisplatin through genetic reversion of the BRCA2 gene. Although HR is reactivated in PARP inhibitor-resistant BRCA2-defective cells, it is not fully restored for the repair of 6TG-induced lesions. This is likely to be due to several recombinogenic lesions being formed after 6TG. We show that BRCA2 is also required for survival from mismatch repair-independent lesions formed by 6TG, which do not include DSBs. This suggests that HR is involved in the repair of 6TG-induced DSBs as well as mismatch repair-independent 6TG-induced DNA lesion. Altogether, our data show that 6TG efficiently kills BRCA2-defective tumors and suggest that 6TG may be effective in the treatment of advanced tumors that have developed resistance to PARP inhibitors or platinum-based chemotherapy.

  8. CAR-T Cells Inflict Sequential Killing of Multiple Tumor Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Cross, Ryan S; Yong, Carmen S; Prince, H Miles; Ritchie, David S; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells shows great promise clinically. However, there are important aspects of CAR-T-cell biology that have not been explored, particularly with respect to the kinetics of activation, immune synapse formation, and tumor cell killing. Moreover, the effects of signaling via the endogenous T-cell receptor (TCR) or CAR on killing kinetics are unclear. To address these issues, we developed a novel transgenic mouse (designated CAR.OT-I), in which CD8(+) T cells coexpressed the clonogenic OT-I TCR, recognizing the H-2K(b)-presented ovalbumin peptide SIINFEKL, and an scFv specific for human HER2. Primed CAR.OT-I T cells were mixed with SIINFEKL-pulsed or HER2-expressing tumor cells and visualized in real-time using time-lapse microscopy. We found that engagement via CAR or TCR did not affect cell death kinetics, except that the time from degranulation to CAR-T-cell detachment was faster when CAR was engaged. We showed, for the first time, that individual CAR.OT-I cells can kill multiple tumor cells ("serial killing"), irrespective of the mode of recognition. At low effector:target ratios, the tumor cell killing rate was similar via TCR or CAR ligation over the first 20 hours of coincubation. However, from 20 to 50 hours, tumor cell death mediated through CAR became attenuated due to CAR downregulation throughout the time course. Our study provides important insights into CAR-T-tumor cell interactions, with implications for single- or dual receptor-focused T-cell therapy.

  9. Dynamic visualization the whole process of cytotoxic T lymphocytes killing the B16 tumor cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) played a key role in the immune system to destroy the tumor cells. Although some mechanisms of CTLs killing the tumor cells are revealed already, the dynamic information of CTLs interaction with tumor cells are still not known very clearly. Here we used confocal microscopy to visualize the whole process of CTLs killing the tumor cells in vitro. The imaging data showed that CTLs destroyed the target tumor cells rapidly and efficiently. Several CTLs surrounded one or some tumor cells and the average time for CTLs destroying one tumor cell is just a few minutes in vitro. The study displayed the temporal events of CTLs interacting with tumor cells at the beginning and finally killing them and directly presented the efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity of the CTLs. The results helped us to deeply understand the mechanism of the CTLs destroying the tumor cells and to develop the cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Depolarization Controls TRAIL-Sensitization and Tumor-Selective Killing of Cancer Cells: Crosstalk with ROS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Uchida, Mayumi; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2014-01-01

    Conventional genotoxic anti-cancer drugs target the proliferative advantage of tumor cells over normal cells. This kind of approach lacks the selectivity of treatment to cancer cells, because most of the targeted pathways are essential for the survival of normal cells. As a result, traditional cancer treatments are often limited by undesirable damage to normal cells (side-effects). Ideal anti-cancer drugs are expected to be highly effective against malignant tumor cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. Such selective killing can be achieved by targeting pathways essential for the survival of cancer cells, but not normal cells. As cancer cells are characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, selective apoptosis induction is a promising approach for selective killing of cancer cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising tumor-selective anti-cancer drug. However, the congenital and acquired resistance of some cancer cell types, including malignant melanoma cells, currently impedes effective TRAIL therapy, and an innovative approach that can override TRAIL resistance is urgently required. Apoptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage caused by disruption of the maintenance of the normal physiological concentrations of K+ and Na+ and intracellular ion homeostasis. The disrupted ion homeostasis leads to depolarization and apoptosis. Recent evidence suggests that depolarization is an early and prerequisite event during TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Moreover, diverse natural products and synthetic chemicals capable of depolarizing the cell membrane exhibit tumor-selective killing and TRAIL-sensitizing effects. Here, we discuss the role of depolarization in selective killing of cancer cells in connection with the emerging concept that oxidative stress is a critical mediator of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunctions and serves as a tumor-selective target in cancer treatment. PMID:24910845

  11. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O’Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  12. Combinatorial BTK and MALT1 inhibition augments killing of CD79 mutant diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel; Bognar, Miriam; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Kutzner, Kerstin; Vincendeau, Michelle; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-12-08

    Survival of activated B cell-subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is driven by chronic B cell receptor (BCR) signaling that activates the canonical NF-κB pathway. Inhibition of BTK by Ibrutinib has been shown to kill ABC DLBCL cells that carry activating mutations in the BCR adaptor CD79. However, mutations in BTK or in downstream components such as CARMA1/CARD11 can render lymphomas Ibrutinib resistant. Therefore, we assessed here the simultaneous inhibition of BTK and the protease MALT1 that acts downstream of CARMA1 and is essential for ABC DLBCL tumor growth. We show that in CD79 mutant cells BTK is a crucial upstream regulator of MALT1, but dispensable in CARMA1 mutant ABC DLBCL. Combined inhibition of BTK by Ibrutinib and MALT1 by S-Mepazine additively impaired MALT1 cleavage activity and expression of NF-κB pro-survival factors. Thereby, combinatorial Ibrutinib and S-Mepazine treatment enhanced killing of CD79 mutant ABC DLBCL cells. Moreover, while expression of oncogenic CARMA1 in CD79 mutant cells conferred Ibrutinib resistance, double mutant cells were still sensitive to MALT1 inhibition by S-Mepazine. Thus, based on the genetic background combinatorial BTK and MALT1 inhibition may improve effectiveness of therapeutic treatment and reduce the chances for the development of drug resistances.

  13. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin augmented the killing activity, cytokine production and proliferation of NK cells, and inhibited the proliferation of Meth A sarcoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman; Zhong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) is a popular tumor vaccine carrier protein and an immunostimulant. The present study aimed to investigate the immunoregulatory activity of KLH on cytotoxicity, cytokines production, and proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells. Moreover, antiproliferative activity of KLH on Meth A sarcoma cells was studied. Cytotoxicity was determined with killing ability of NK cells against yeast artificial chromosome (YAC)-1 cells. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) productions by NK cells were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Proliferations of NK and Meth A cells were determined by [(3)H]thymidine incorporated proliferation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, respectively. KLH at 6.25, 12.5, and 25 μg/well augmented cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 cells by 2.5, three, and five-times, respectively. KLH at 25 μg/well enhanced IFN-γ and TNF-α productions by 17- and 23-folds, respectively. The proliferation of NK cells was three times stimulated by KLH. The proliferation of Meth A cells was markedly inhibited by all the doses; the highest (4-folds higher) inhibition was observed at a dose of KLH (25 μg/well). The study demonstrated the anticancer activity of KLH acting through the induction of NK cells and inhibition of cancer cells. KLH, therefore, may be a good candidate for an anticancer agent alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Photoradiation therapy causing selective tumor kill in a rat glioma model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, A.H.; Morstyn, G.

    1987-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of photoradiation therapy using the photosensitizer, hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), and the argon-pumped rhodamine dye laser tuned to 630 nm in the rat C6 glioma model. Animal models of cerebral glioma were established by implanting 10(6) C6 glioma cells in adult Wistar rats, and craniotomies were performed on normal and tumor-bearing animals. HpD in doses of up to 80 mg/kg followed by craniotomy resulted in no damage to the normal brain, and laser light at doses of up to 1200 joules/cm2 without the prior administration of HpD produced no significant damage if the craniotomy site was irrigated with normal saline to prevent a temperature rise. Photoradiation caused no brain necrosis in non-tumor bearing animals if less than 20 mg of HpD per kg and 200 joules of red light per cm2 were used. At higher doses of HpD and light, cerebral necrosis did occur. The depth of necrosis depended on the dose of both HpD and light. Treatment with 40 mg of HpD per kg and 400 joules of light per cm2 resulted in cerebral necrosis in 50% of the treated animals. The mean depth of brain necrosis was 1.3 mm. Selective kill of a cerebral glioma with sparing of the normal brain was achieved with photoradiation therapy at doses of HpD of less than 20 mg/kg and light doses of less than 200 joules/cm2. At these doses, the mean depth of tumor kill was 4.5 mm. In 2 of 10 animals, the depth of tumor destruction was more than 6 mm.

  15. Tadalafil augments tumor specific immunity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Califano, Joseph A; Khan, Zubair; Noonan, Kimberly A.; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hao; Goodman, Steven; Gourin, Christine G.; Ha, Patrick K.; Fakhry, Carole; Saunders, John; Levine, Marshall; Tang, Mei; Neuner, Geoffrey; Richmon, Jeremy D.; Blanco, Ray; Agrawal, Nishant; Koch, Wayne M.; Marur, Shanthi; Weed, Donald T.; Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors can augment immune function in head and neck cancer patients through inhibition of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Experimental Design We performed a randomized, prospective, double blinded, placebo controlled, phase II clinical trial to determine the in vivo effects of systemic PDE5 inhibition on immune function in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. Results Tadalafil augmented immune response, increasing ex vivo T cell expansion to a mean 2.4 fold increase compared to 1.1 fold in control patients (P= 0.01), reducing peripheral MDSC numbers to mean 0.81 fold change compared to a 1.26 fold change in control patients (P=0.001), and increasing general immunity as measured by delayed type hypersensitivity response (P=0.002). Tumor specific immunity in response to HNSCC tumor lysate was augmented in tadalafil treated patients (P=0.04). Conclusions These findings demonstrate that tadalafil augments general and tumor-specific immunity in HNSCC patients and has therapeutic potential in HNSCC. Evasion of immune surveillance and suppression of systemic and tumor specific immunity is a significant feature of head and neck cancer development. This study demonstrates that a PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, can reverse tumor specific immune suppression in head and neck cancer patients, with potential for therapeutic application. PMID:25564570

  16. Sorafenib/Regorafenib and Lapatinib interact to kill CNS tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Hossein A.; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present studies were to determine whether the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with the ERBB1/ERBB2 inhibitor lapatinib to kill CNS tumor cells. In multiple CNS tumor cell types sorafenib and lapatinib interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death. Tumor cells lacking PTEN, and anoikis or lapatinib resistant cells were as sensitive to the drug combination as cells expressing PTEN or parental cells, respectively. Similar data were obtained using regorafenib. Treatment of brain cancer cells with [sorafenib + lapatinib] enhanced radiation toxicity. The drug combination increased the numbers of LC3-GFP vesicles; this correlated with a reduction in endogenous LC3II, and p62 and LAMP2 degradation. Knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 significantly suppressed drug combination lethality. Expression of c-FLIP-s, BCL-XL or dominant negative caspase 9 reduced drug combination toxicity; knock down of FADD or CD95 was protective. Expression of both activated AKT and activated MEK1 or activated mTOR was required to strongly suppress drug combination lethality. As both lapatinib and sorafenib are FDA approved agents, our data argue for further determination as to whether lapatinib and sorafenib is a useful glioblastoma therapy. PMID:24911215

  17. Augmentation of immune responses to SARS coronavirus by a combination of DNA and whole killed virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander N; Liu, Qiang; Petric, Martin; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2005-08-15

    We studied the immunogenicity of a DNA SARS-vaccine, a whole killed virus, or a whole killed and DNA vaccine combination. The DNA vaccine contained a plasmid encoding the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S protein under the control of the human CMV promoter and intron A. The whole killed virus vaccine was comprised of SARS-CoV, propagated in Vero-E6 cells, with subsequent beta-propilactone inactivation and formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Mice immunized twice with the DNA vaccine and once with the whole killed virus elicited higher antibody responses than mice immunized three times with the DNA vaccine or once with the whole killed virus vaccine. Mice immunized twice with the whole killed virus vaccine elicited higher antibody responses than mice immunized three times with the DNA vaccine or once with the whole killed virus vaccine. However, a combination of the vaccines induced T-helper type 1 (Th1) immune responses while the whole killed virus vaccine induced T helper type 2 (Th2) immune response. These results demonstrate that combination of the DNA vaccine and the whole killed virus vaccine can be used to enhance the magnitude and change the bias of the immune responses to SARS-CoV.

  18. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  19. Autoimmunity as a Double Agent in Tumor Killing and Cancer Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Toomer, Kevin H.; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy through manipulation of the immune system holds great potential for the treatment of human cancers. However, recent trials targeting the negative immune regulators cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, programed death 1 (PD-1), and PD-1 receptor ligand (PD-L1) demonstrated that clinically significant antitumor responses were often associated with the induction of autoimmune toxicity. This finding suggests that the same immune mechanisms that elicit autoimmunity may also contribute to the destruction of tumors. Given the fact that the immunological identity of tumors might be largely an immunoprivileged self, autoimmunity may not represent a wholly undesirable outcome in the context of cancer immunotherapy. Rather, targeted killing of cancer cells and autoimmune damage to healthy tissues may be intricately linked through molecular mechanisms, in particular inflammatory cytokine signaling. On the other hand, since chronic inflammation is a well-recognized condition that promotes tumor development, it appears that autoimmunity can be a “double agent” in mediating either pro-tumor or antitumor effects. This review surveys the tumor-promoting and tumoricidal activities of several prominent cytokines: IFN-γ, TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-17, IL-23, IL-4, and IL-13, produced by three major subsets of T helper cells that interact with innate immune cells. Many of these cytokines exert divergent and seemingly contradictory effects on cancer development in different human and animal models, suggesting a high degree of context dependence in their functions. We hypothesize that these inflammatory cytokines could mediate a feedback loop of autoimmunity, antitumor immunity, and tumorigenesis. Understanding the diverse and paradoxical roles of cytokines from autoimmune responses in the setting of cancer will advance the long-term goal of improving cancer immunotherapy, while minimizing the hazards of immune-mediated tissue damage and the possibility of de novo

  20. High CD46 receptor density determines preferential killing of tumor cells by oncolytic measles virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bambi D; Nakamura, Takafumi; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2004-07-15

    Live attenuated Edmonston B strain of measles virus (MV-Edm) is a potent and specific oncolytic agent, but the mechanism underlying its tumor selectivity is unknown. The virus causes cytopathic effects (CPEs) of extensive syncytial formation in tumor cells but minimal damage or cell killing in normal cells. The CPE is dependent on expression of viral proteins and the presence of CD46, the major cellular receptor of MV-Edm. Using a virally encoded soluble marker peptide to provide a quantitative readout of the level of viral gene expression, we determined that tumor cells and normal cells expressed comparable levels of viral proteins. CD46 mediates virus attachment, entry, and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. Using engineered cells expressing a range of CD46 densities, we determined that whereas virus entry increased progressively with CD46 density, cell fusion was minimal at low receptor densities but increased dramatically above a threshold density of CD46 receptors. It is well established that tumor cells express abundant CD46 receptors on their surfaces compared with their normal counterparts. Thus, at low CD46 densities typical of normal cells, infection occurs, but intercellular fusion is negligible. At higher densities typical of tumor cells, infection leads to extensive cell fusion. Intercellular fusion also results in enhancement of viral gene expression through recruitment of neighboring uninfected cells into the syncytium, further amplifying the CPE. Discrimination between high and low CD46 receptor density provides a compelling basis for the oncolytic specificity of MV-Edm and establishes MV-Edm as a promising CD46-targeted cancer therapeutic agent.

  1. Dendritic cell tumor killing activity and its potential applications in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Neale; Alizadeh, Darya; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Universally viewed as the sentinels and messengers of the immune system and traditionally referred to as professional antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) play a fundamental role in antitumor immunity. DCs are uniquely equipped with the ability to acquire, process, and present to T lymphocytes tumor-derived antigens. They can drive the differentiation of naive T cells into activated tumor-specific effector lymphocytes. DCs also dictate the type and regulate the strength and duration of T-cell responses. In addition, they contribute to natural killer and natural killer T-cell antitumoral function and to B-cell-mediated immunity. Besides this cardinal role as orchestrators of innate and adaptive immune responses, many studies have provided evidence that DCs can also function as direct cytotoxic effectors against tumors. This less conventional aspect of DC function has, however, raised controversy as it relates to the origin of these cells and the induction, regulation, and mechanisms underlying their tumoricidal activity. The possible impact of the cytotoxic function of DCs on their capability to present antigens also has been the focus of intensive research. This review examines these questions and discusses the biological significance of this nontraditional property and possible strategies to exploit the killing potential of DCs in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Nanovectorization of TRAIL with single wall carbon nanotubes enhances tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Al Batoul; Picaud, Fabien; Rattier, Thibault; Pudlo, Marc; Dufour, Florent; Saviot, Lucien; Chassagnon, Rémi; Lherminier, Jeannine; Gharbi, Tijani; Micheau, Olivier; Herlem, Guillaume

    2015-02-11

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or Apo2L) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily. This type II transmembrane protein is able to bound specifically to cancer cell receptors (i.e., TRAIL-R1 (or DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (or DR5)) and to induce apoptosis without being toxic for healthy cells. Because membrane-bound TRAIL induces stronger receptor aggregation and apoptosis than soluble TRAIL, we proposed here to vectorize TRAIL using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to mimic membrane TRAIL. Owing to their exceptional and revolutional properties, carbon nanotubes, especially SWCNTs, are used in a wide range of physical or, now, medical applications. Indeed due to their high mechanical resistance, their high flexibility and their hydrophobicity, SWCNTs are known to rapidly diffuse in an aqueous medium such as blood, opening the way of development of new drug nanovectors (or nanocarriers). Our TRAIL-based SWCNTs nanovectors proved to be more efficient than TRAIL alone death receptors in triggering cancer cell killing. These NPTs increased TRAIL pro-apoptotic potential by nearly 20-fold in different Human tumor cell lines including colorectal, nonsmall cell lung cancer, or hepatocarcinomas. We provide thus a proof-of-concept that TRAIL nanovector derivatives based on SWCNT may be useful to future nanomedicine therapies.

  3. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE®) antibody constructs can mediate bystander tumor cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sandra L.; Sherman, Marika; McElroy, Patricia L.; Lofgren, Julie A.; Moody, Gordon; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Coxon, Angela

    2017-01-01

    For targets that are homogenously expressed, such as CD19 on cells of the B lymphocyte lineage, immunotherapies can be highly effective. Targeting CD19 with blinatumomab, a CD19/CD3 bispecific antibody construct (BiTE®), or with chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) has shown great promise for treating certain CD19-positive hematological malignancies. In contrast, solid tumors with heterogeneous expression of the tumor-associated antigen (TAA) may present a challenge for targeted therapies. To prevent escape of TAA-negative cancer cells, immunotherapies with a local bystander effect would be beneficial. As a model to investigate BiTE®-mediated bystander killing in the solid tumor setting, we used epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a target. We measured lysis of EGFR-negative populations in vitro and in vivo when co-cultured with EGFR-positive cells, human T cells and an EGFR/CD3 BiTE® antibody construct. Bystander EGFR-negative cells were efficiently lysed by BiTE®-activated T cells only when proximal to EGFR-positive cells. Our mechanistic analysis suggests that cytokines released by BiTE®-activated T-cells induced upregulation of ICAM-1 and FAS on EGFR-negative bystander cells, contributing to T cell-induced bystander cell lysis. PMID:28837681

  4. A CSPG4-specific immunotoxin kills rhabdomyosarcoma cells and binds to primary tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Hannes; Niesen, Judith; Mladenov, Radoslav; Stein, Christoph; Pardo, Alessa; Fey, Georg; Helfrich, Wijnand; Fischer, Rainer; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Barth, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) remains challenging, with metastatic and alveolar RMS offering a particularly poor prognosis. Therefore, the identification and evaluation of novel antigens, which are suitable targets for immunotherapy, is one attractive possibility to improve the treatment of this disease. Here we show that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is expressed on RMS cell lines and RMS patient material. We evaluated the immunotoxin (IT) αMCSP-ETA', which specifically recognizes CSPG4 on the RMS cell lines RD, FL-OH1, TE-671 and Rh30. It is internalized rapidly, induces apoptosis and thus kills RMS cells selectively. We also demonstrate the specific binding of this IT to RMS primary tumor material from three different patients.

  5. Anti-platelet agents augment cisplatin nanoparticle cytotoxicity by enhancing tumor vasculature permeability and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sarangi, Sasmit; Chien, Kelly; Sengupta, Poulomi; Papa, Anne-Laure; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2014-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is critically dependent on platelet mediated hemostasis and disruption of the same can augment delivery of nano-formulation based chemotherapeutic agents which depend on enhanced permeability and retention for tumor penetration. Here, we evaluated the role of Clopidogrel, a well-known inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in potentiating the tumor cytotoxicity of cisplatin nano-formulation in a murine breast cancer model. In vivo studies in murine syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model showed a significant greater penetration of macromolecular fluorescent nanoparticles after clopidogrel pretreatment. Compared to self-assembling cisplatin nanoparticles (SACNs), combination therapy with clopidogrel and SACN was associated with a 4 fold greater delivery of cisplatin to tumor tissue and a greater reduction in tumor growth as well as higher survival rate. Clopidogrel enhances therapeutic efficiency of novel cisplatin based nano-formulations agents by increasing tumor drug delivery and can be used as a potential targeting agent for novel nano-formulation based chemotherapeutics.

  6. Activity levels of cathepsins B and L in tumor cells are a biomarker for efficacy of reovirus-mediated tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Y; Hotani, T; Katayama, Y; Tachibana, M; Mizuguchi, H; Sakurai, F

    2015-03-01

    Reovirus has gained much attention as an anticancer agent; however, the mechanism of the tumor cell-specific replication of reovirus is not fully understood. Although Ras activation is known to be crucial for tumor cell-specific replication of reovirus, it remains controversial which cellular factors are required for the reovirus-mediated tumor cell killing. In this study, we systematically investigated which cellular factors determined the efficiencies of reovirus-mediated tumor cell killing in various human cultured cell lines. The efficiency of reovirus-mediated cell killing varied widely among the cell lines. Junction adhesion molecule-A, a reovirus receptor, was highly expressed in almost all cell lines examined. Ras activation levels were largely different between the cell lines; however, there were no apparent correlations among the reovirus-mediated cell killing efficiencies and Ras activation status. On the other hand, activity levels of the cysteine proteases cathepsins B and L, which are crucial for proteolytic disassembly of the outer capsid proteins of reovirus, showed a tendency to be correlated with the efficiency of reovirus-mediated cell killing. These results indicate that the activity of cathepsins B and L is the most suitable as a biomarker for the efficacy of reovirus-mediated oncolysis among the factors examined in this study.

  7. Efficient killing of CD22{sup +} tumor cells by a humanized diabody-RNase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Juergen . E-mail: juergen.krauss@uni-essen.de; Arndt, Michaela A.E.; Vu, Bang K.; Newton, Dianne L.; Seeber, Siegfried; Rybak, Susanna M.

    2005-06-03

    We report on the generation of a dimeric immunoenzyme capable of simultaneously delivering two ribonuclease (RNase) effector domains on one molecule to CD22{sup +} tumor cells. As targeting moiety a diabody derived from the previously humanized scFv SGIII with grafted specificity of the murine anti-CD22 mAb RFB4 was constructed. Further engineering the interface of this construct (V{sub L}36{sub Leu{yields}}{sub Tyr}) resulted in a highly robust bivalent molecule that retained the same high affinity as the murine mAb RFB4 (K{sub D} 0.2 nM). A dimeric immunoenzyme comprising this diabody and Rana pipiens liver ribonuclease I (rapLRI) was generated, expressed as soluble protein in bacteria, and purified to homogeneity. The dimeric fusion protein killed several CD22{sup +} tumor cell lines with high efficacy (IC{sub 50} = 3-20 nM) and exhibited 9- to 48-fold stronger cytotoxicity than a monovalent rapLRI-scFv counterpart. Our results demonstrate that engineering of dimeric antibody-ribonuclease fusion proteins can markedly enhance their biological efficacy.

  8. Cloned transgenic farm animals produce a bispecific antibody for T cell-mediated tumor cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Müller, Sigrid; Minoia, Rosa; Wolf, Eckhard; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wenigerkind, Hendrik; Lassnig, Caroline; Besenfelder, Urban; Müller, Mathias; Lytton, Simon D.; Jung, Gundram; Brem, Gottfried

    2004-01-01

    Complex recombinant antibody fragments for modulation of immune function such as tumor cell destruction have emerged at a rapid pace and diverse anticancer strategies are being developed to benefit patients. Despite improvements in molecule design and expression systems, the quantity and stability, e.g., of single-chain antibodies produced in cell culture, is often insufficient for treatment of human disease, and the costs of scale-up, labor, and fermentation facilities are prohibitive. The ability to yield mg/ml levels of recombinant antibodies and the scale-up flexibility make transgenic production in plants and livestock an attractive alternative to mammalian cell culture as a source of large quantities of biotherapeutics. Here, we report on the efficient production of a bispecific single-chain antibody in the serum of transgenic rabbits and a herd of nine cloned, transgenic cattle. The bispecific protein, designated r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan and the human CD28 molecule on T cells. Purified from the serum of transgenic animals, the protein is stable and fully active in mediating target cell-restricted T cell stimulation and tumor cell killing. PMID:15105446

  9. Exploiting oncogene-induced replicative stress for the selective killing of Myc-driven tumors.

    PubMed

    Murga, Matilde; Campaner, Stefano; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Toledo, Luis I; Soria, Rebeca; Montaña, Maria F; Artista, Luana D'; Schleker, Thomas; Guerra, Carmen; Garcia, Elena; Barbacid, Mariano; Hidalgo, Manuel; Amati, Bruno; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2011-11-27

    Oncogene-induced replicative stress activates an Atr- and Chk1-dependent response, which has been proposed to be widespread in tumors. We explored whether the presence of replicative stress could be exploited for the selective elimination of cancer cells. To this end, we evaluated the impact of targeting the replicative stress-response on cancer development. In mice (Mus musculus), the reduced levels of Atr found on a mouse model of the Atr-Seckel syndrome completely prevented the development of Myc-induced lymphomas or pancreatic tumors, both of which showed abundant levels of replicative stress. Moreover, Chk1 inhibitors were highly effective in killing Myc-driven lymphomas. By contrast, pancreatic adenocarcinomas initiated by K-Ras(G12V) showed no detectable evidence of replicative stress and were nonresponsive to this therapy. Besides its impact on cancer, Myc overexpression aggravated the phenotypes of Atr-Seckel mice, revealing that oncogenes can modulate the severity of replicative stress-associated diseases.

  10. PSMA-homing dsRNA chimeric protein vector kills prostate cancer cells and activates anti-tumor bystander responses

    PubMed Central

    Langut, Yael; Edinger, Nufar; Flashner-Abramson, Efrat; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lebendiker, Mario; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Klein, Shoshana; Levitzki, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic androgen-resistant prostate cancer remains a challenge. We describe a protein vector that selectively delivers synthetic dsRNA, polyinosinic/polycytidylic acid (polyIC), to prostate tumors by targeting prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is overexpressed on the surface of prostate cancer cells. The chimeric protein is built from the double stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain of PKR tethered to a single chain anti-PSMA antibody. When complexed with polyIC, the chimera demonstrates selective and efficient killing of prostate cancer cells. The treatment causes the targeted cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and to secrete toxic cytokines. In a bystander effect, these cytokines kill neighboring cancer cells that do not necessarily overexpress PSMA, and activate immune cells that enhance the killing effect. The strong effects of the targeted polyIC are demonstrated on both 2D cell cultures and 3D tumor spheroids. PMID:28445962

  11. Individual motile CD4+ T cells can participate in efficient multi-killing through conjugation to multiple tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liadi, Ivan; Singh, Harjeet; Romain, Gabrielle; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Adolacion, Jay R T.; Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Qiu, Peng; Roysam, Badrinath; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Varadarajan, Navin

    2015-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) for the investigational treatment of B-cell malignancies comprise a heterogeneous population, and their ability to persist and participate in serial killing of tumor cells is a predictor of therapeutic success. We implemented Timelapse Imaging Microscopy In Nanowell Grids (TIMING) to provide direct evidence that CD4+CAR+ T cells (CAR4 cells) can engage in multi-killing via simultaneous conjugation to multiple tumor cells. Comparisons of the CAR4 cells and CD8+CAR+ T cells (CAR8 cells) demonstrate that while CAR4 cells can participate in killing and multi-killing, they do so at slower rates, likely due to the lower Granzyme B content. Significantly, in both sets of T cells, a minor sub-population of individual T cells identified by their high motility, demonstrated efficient killing of single tumor cells. By comparing both the multi-killer and single killer CAR+ T cells it appears that the propensity and kinetics of T-cell apoptosis was modulated by the number of functional conjugations. T cells underwent rapid apoptosis, and at higher frequencies, when conjugated to single tumor cells in isolation and this effect was more pronounced on CAR8 cells. Our results suggest that the ability of CAR+ T cells to participate in multi-killing should be evaluated in the context of their ability to resist activation induced cell death (AICD). We anticipate that TIMING may be utilized to rapidly determine the potency of T-cell populations and may facilitate the design and manufacture of next-generation CAR+ T cells with improved efficacy. PMID:25711538

  12. Co-Expression of Tumor Antigen and Interleukin-2 From an Adenoviral Vector Augments the Efficiency of Therapeutic Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nielsen, Karen Nørgaard; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that for the majority of antigens, adenoviral vaccines expressing the target antigen fused to the MHC associated invariant chain (Ii) induce an accelerated, augmented, and prolonged transgene-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Here we describe a new adenoviral vaccine vector approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly prolonged tumor control in vaccinated wild type (WT) mice. The improved tumor control required antigen-specific cells, since no tumor control was observed, unless the melanoma cells expressed the vaccine targeted antigen. We also tested our new vaccine in immunodeficient (CD80/86 deficient) mice. Following vaccination with the IL-2 expressing construct, these mice were able to raise a delayed but substantial CD8+ T-cell response, and to control melanoma growth nearly as efficaciously as similarly vaccinated WT mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that current vaccine vectors can be improved and even tailored to meet specific demands: in the context of therapeutic vaccination, the capacity to promote an augmented effector T-cell response. PMID:25023330

  13. Cancer-induced defective cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector function: another mechanism how antigenic tumors escape immune-mediated killing.

    PubMed Central

    Radoja, S.; Frey, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The notion that a deficit in immune cell functions permits tumor growth has received experimental support with the discovery of several different biochemical defects in T lymphocytes that infiltrate cancers. Decreased levels of enzymes involved with T-cell signal transduction have been reported by several laboratories, suggesting that tumors or host cells recruited to the tumor site actively down-regulate antitumor T-cell immune response. This permits tumor escape from immune-mediated killing. The possibility that defects in T-cell signal transduction can be reversed, which would potentially permit successful vaccination or adoptive immunotherapy, motivates renewed interest in the field. Summarizing the literature concerning tumor-induced T-cell dysfunction, we focus on the end stage of immune response to human cancer, that of defective cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing function. Based on the data from several laboratories, we hypothesize a biochemical mechanism that accounts for the unusual phenotype of antitumor T-cell accumulation in tumors, but with defective killing function. PMID:10972084

  14. Tumor cell-specific photothermal killing by SELEX-derived DNA aptamer-targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Lee, Alexander Sheng Wei; Yap, Lim Wei; Jans, David A.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal uptake by MCF10A normal cells. Upon near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, tumour cell death of >96%, could be effected, compared to <1% in the normal cells or cells incubated with GNRs alone, our KW16-13 aptamer-targeted GNRs thus showing >71-fold tumor cell death than GNRs-targeted with a previously described aptamer. This demonstrates the significant potential for aptamer functionalised-GNRs to be used effective and above all selective anti-cancer photothermal therapeutics.Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal

  15. Augmentation of various immune reactivities of tumor-bearing hosts with an extract of Cordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, N; Yoshida, J; Ren, L J; Chen, H; Miyazawa, Y; Fujii, Y; Huang, Y X; Takamura, S; Suzuki, S; Koshimura, S

    1990-01-01

    In order to enhance general reactivity of immune system in the tumor-bearing host, we employed extract of Cordyceps sinensis (CSE) as a biological response modifier. Cordyceps sinensis is an interesting material produced by a kind of mushroom parasitic to larval moths and was used to hasten recovery from exhaustion in ancient China. In this experiment, C57BL/6 mice implanted subcutaneously with syngeneic EL-4 lymphoma cells were employed as the host. Oral administration of the extract leads to a reduction of tumor size and prolongation of the host survival time. As judged by plaque-forming cells against T-dependent (sheep erythrocytes) and T-independent (bacterial lipopolysaccharide) antigens, CSE showed to augment the antibody responses. As for the activities of peritoneal macrophages, chemotaxis was dramatically depressed within a few days after EL-4 transplantation up to the end of life, but treatment with CSE at -14, -7, -4, +4, +7 and +10 days after the tumor transplantation augmented the activity about four times stronger than that of control. Phagocytic activity of macrophages was also decreased in tumor-bearing mice treated with cyclophosphamide (100 mg/kg) 3 and 5 days after tumor transplantation. But administration of CSE restored the activity to more than the normal level. The overall efficacy of CSE was tested with protective activity against systemic infection by Salmonella enteritides. The tumor-bearing mice receiving this medicine lived significantly longer than any other groups without CSE.

  16. Canonical hedgehog signaling augments tumor angiogenesis by induction of VEGF-A in stromal perivascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Tang, Tracy; Eastham-Anderson, Jeff; Dunlap, Debra; Alicke, Bruno; Nannini, Michelle; Gould, Stephen; Yauch, Robert; Modrusan, Zora; DuPree, Kelly J.; Darbonne, Walter C.; Plowman, Greg; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Callahan, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical to the patterning and development of a variety of organ systems, and both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent Hh pathway activation are known to promote tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that in tumors promoted by Hh ligands, activation occurs within the stromal microenvironment. Testing whether ligand-driven Hh signaling promotes tumor angiogenesis, we found that Hh antagonism reduced the vascular density of Hh-producing LS180 and SW480 xenografts. In addition, ectopic expression of sonic hedgehog in low-Hh–expressing DLD-1 xenografts increased tumor vascular density, augmented angiogenesis, and was associated with canonical Hh signaling within perivascular tumor stromal cells. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying Hh-mediated tumor angiogenesis, we established an Hh-sensitive angiogenesis coculture assay and found that fibroblast cell lines derived from a variety of human tissues were Hh responsive and promoted angiogenesis in vitro through a secreted paracrine signal(s). Affymetrix array analyses of cultured fibroblasts identified VEGF-A, hepatocyte growth factor, and PDGF-C as candidate secreted proangiogenic factors induced by Hh stimulation. Expression studies of xenografts and angiogenesis assays using combinations of Hh and VEGF-A inhibitors showed that it is primarily Hh-induced VEGF-A that promotes angiogenesis in vitro and augments tumor-derived VEGF to promote angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:21597001

  17. Augmented anti-tumor activity of NK-92 cells expressing chimeric receptors of TGF-βR II and NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongjuan; Guo, Linghua; Song, Yuan; Zhang, Yinsheng; Lin, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Mei, Yu; Sandikin, Dedy; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-04-01

    The capacity of natural killer (NK) cells to kill tumor cells without specific antigen recognition provides an advantage over T cells and makes them potential effectors for tumor immunotherapy. However, the efficacy of NK cell adoptive therapy can be limited by the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a potent immunosuppressive cytokine that can suppress NK cell function. To convert the suppressive signal induced by TGF-β to an activating signal, we genetically modified NK-92 cells to express a chimeric receptor with TGF-β type II receptor extracellular and transmembrane domains and the intracellular domain of NK cell-activating receptor NKG2D (TN chimeric receptor). NK-92 cells expressing TN receptors were resistant to TGF-β-induced suppressive signaling and did not down-regulate NKG2D. These modified NK-92 cells had higher killing capacity and interferon γ (IFN-γ) production against tumor cells compared with the control cells and their cytotoxicity could be further enhanced by TGF-β. More interestingly, the NK-92 cells expressing TN receptors were better chemo-attracted to the tumor cells expressing TGF-β. The presence of these modified NK-92 cells significantly inhibited the differentiation of human naïve CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T cells. NK-92-TN cells could also inhibit tumor growth in vivo in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft tumor model. Therefore, TN chimeric receptors can be a novel strategy to augment anti-tumor efficacy in NK cell adoptive therapy.

  18. Enhancement of macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing by bacterial outer membrane proteins (porins).

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, J B; Ribi, E; Wheat, R W

    1983-01-01

    Various microbial products are known to influence the function of mouse peritoneal macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and certain lipid A-associated proteins are known to enhance the tumoricidal effects of macrophages. The purpose of this study was to determine whether porins (outer membrane proteins) of Salmonella typhimurium G30/C21 would influence the activity of macrophages from lipid A-responsive and -unresponsive mice. Porins, extracted by a combined sodium dodecyl sulfate-EDTA method from cell walls, were free of LPS as determined by Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and appeared as a band at approximately 36,000 molecular weight on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In tumor cell killing assays done under LPS-free conditions, the porins in doses of 1 to 10 ng/ml enhanced the tumoricidal effect of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN or C3H/HeJ mice. Protein-free LPS enhanced the tumoricidal activity of macrophages from bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice. The tumoricidal-enhancing activity of protein-free LPS was blocked by the lipid A-binding antibiotic polymyxin B sulfate, but the effects of porins were not altered by the polymyxin B sulfate. These results suggest that porins, proteins known to alter membrane function, may alter macrophage function by interaction with macrophage membranes. Images PMID:6311745

  19. Enhancement of Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Bacteria with Nitroglycerin Involving Augmentation of the EPR Effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Long, Liao; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteria, about 1 μm in size, is now becoming an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Solid tumors exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for biocompatible macromolecules such as polymer-conjugated anticancer agents, liposomes, and micelles. This phenomenon permits tumor-selective delivery of such macromolecules. We report here that bacteria injected intravenously evidenced a property similar to that can of these macromolecules. Bacteria that can accumulate selectively in tumors may therefore be used in cancer treatment.Facultative or anaerobic bacteria will grow even under the hypoxic conditions present in solid tumors. We found earlier that nitric oxide (NO) was among the most important factors that facilitated the EPR effect via vasodilatation, opening of endothelial cell junction gaps, and increasing the blood flow of hypovascular tumors. Here, we describe the augmentation of the EPR effect by means of nitroglycerin (NG), a commonly used NO donor, using various macromolecular agents in different tumor models. More importantly, we report that NG significantly enhanced the delivery of Lactobacillus casei to tumors after intravenous injection of the bacteria, more than a tenfold increase in bacterial accumulation in tumors after NG treatment. This finding suggests that NG has a potential advantage to enhance bacterial therapy of cancer, and further investigations of this possibility are warranted.

  20. Two-stage model of radon-induced malignant lung tumors in rats: effects of cell killing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebeck, E. G.; Curtis, S. B.; Cross, F. T.; Moolgavkar, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    A two-stage stochastic model of carcinogenesis is used to analyze lung tumor incidence in 3750 rats exposed to varying regimens of radon carried on a constant-concentration uranium ore dust aerosol. New to this analysis is the parameterization of the model such that cell killing by the alpha particles could be included. The model contains parameters characterizing the rate of the first mutation, the net proliferation rate of initiated cells, the ratio of the rates of cell loss (cell killing plus differentiation) and cell division, and the lag time between the appearance of the first malignant cell and the tumor. Data analysis was by standard maximum likelihood estimation techniques. Results indicate that the rate of the first mutation is dependent on radon and consistent with in vitro rates measured experimentally, and that the rate of the second mutation is not dependent on radon. An initial sharp rise in the net proliferation rate of initiated cell was found with increasing exposure rate (denoted model I), which leads to an unrealistically high cell-killing coefficient. A second model (model II) was studied, in which the initial rise was attributed to promotion via a step function, implying that it is due not to radon but to the uranium ore dust. This model resulted in values for the cell-killing coefficient consistent with those found for in vitro cells. An "inverse dose-rate" effect is seen, i.e. an increase in the lifetime probability of tumor with a decrease in exposure rate. This is attributed in large part to promotion of intermediate lesions. Since model II is preferable on biological grounds (it yields a plausible cell-killing coefficient), such as uranium ore dust. This analysis presents evidence that a two-stage model describes the data adequately and generates hypotheses regarding the mechanism of radon-induced carcinogenesis.

  1. Two-stage model of radon-induced malignant lung tumors in rats: effects of cell killing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebeck, E. G.; Curtis, S. B.; Cross, F. T.; Moolgavkar, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    A two-stage stochastic model of carcinogenesis is used to analyze lung tumor incidence in 3750 rats exposed to varying regimens of radon carried on a constant-concentration uranium ore dust aerosol. New to this analysis is the parameterization of the model such that cell killing by the alpha particles could be included. The model contains parameters characterizing the rate of the first mutation, the net proliferation rate of initiated cells, the ratio of the rates of cell loss (cell killing plus differentiation) and cell division, and the lag time between the appearance of the first malignant cell and the tumor. Data analysis was by standard maximum likelihood estimation techniques. Results indicate that the rate of the first mutation is dependent on radon and consistent with in vitro rates measured experimentally, and that the rate of the second mutation is not dependent on radon. An initial sharp rise in the net proliferation rate of initiated cell was found with increasing exposure rate (denoted model I), which leads to an unrealistically high cell-killing coefficient. A second model (model II) was studied, in which the initial rise was attributed to promotion via a step function, implying that it is due not to radon but to the uranium ore dust. This model resulted in values for the cell-killing coefficient consistent with those found for in vitro cells. An "inverse dose-rate" effect is seen, i.e. an increase in the lifetime probability of tumor with a decrease in exposure rate. This is attributed in large part to promotion of intermediate lesions. Since model II is preferable on biological grounds (it yields a plausible cell-killing coefficient), such as uranium ore dust. This analysis presents evidence that a two-stage model describes the data adequately and generates hypotheses regarding the mechanism of radon-induced carcinogenesis.

  2. Failure of anti tumor-derived endothelial cell immunotherapy depends on augmentation of tumor hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolo, Annalisa; Marimpietri, Danilo; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Cocco, Claudia; Pistorio, Angela; Gambini, Claudio; Cilli, Michele; Horenstein, Alberto; Malavasi, Fabio; Pistoia, Vito

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Tenascin-C (TNC)+ human neuroblastoma (NB) cells transdifferentiate into tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC), which have been detected both in primary tumors and in tumors formed by human NB cell lines in immunodeficient mice. TDEC are genetically unstable and may favor tumor progression, suggesting that their elimination could reduce tumor growth and dissemination. So far, TDEC have never been targeted by antibody-mediated immunotherapy in any of the tumor models investigated. To address this issue, immunodeficient mice carrying orthotopic NB formed by the HTLA-230 human cell line were treated with TDEC-targeting cytotoxic human (h)CD31, that spares host-derived endothelial cells, or isotype-matched mAbs. hCD31 mAb treatment did not affect survival of NB-bearing mice, but increased significantly hypoxia in tumor microenvironment, where apoptotic and proliferating TDEC coexisted, indicating the occurrence of vascular remodeling. Tumor cells from hCD31 mAb treated mice showed i) up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related and vascular mimicry (VM)-related gene expression, ii) expression of endothelial (i.e. CD31 and VE-cadherin) and EMT-associated (i.e. Twist-1, N-cadherin and TNC) immunophenotypic markers, and iii) up-regulation of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) expression. In vitro experiments with two NB cell lines showed that hypoxia was the common driver of all the above phenomena and that human recombinant HMGB-1 amplified EMT and TDEC trans-differentiation. In conclusion, TDEC targeting with hCD31 mAb increases tumor hypoxia, setting the stage for the occurrence of EMT and of new waves of TDEC trans-differentiation. These adaptive responses to the changes induced by immunotherapy in the tumor microenvironment allow tumor cells to escape from the effects of hCD31 mAb. PMID:25362644

  3. Failure of anti tumor-derived endothelial cell immunotherapy depends on augmentation of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pezzolo, Annalisa; Marimpietri, Danilo; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Cocco, Claudia; Pistorio, Angela; Gambini, Claudio; Cilli, Michele; Horenstein, Alberto; Malavasi, Fabio; Pistoia, Vito

    2014-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that Tenascin-C (TNC)(+) human neuroblastoma (NB) cells transdifferentiate into tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC), which have been detected both in primary tumors and in tumors formed by human NB cell lines in immunodeficient mice. TDEC are genetically unstable and may favor tumor progression, suggesting that their elimination could reduce tumor growth and dissemination. So far, TDEC have never been targeted by antibody-mediated immunotherapy in any of the tumor models investigated. To address this issue, immunodeficient mice carrying orthotopic NB formed by the HTLA-230 human cell line were treated with TDEC-targeting cytotoxic human (h)CD31, that spares host-derived endothelial cells, or isotype-matched mAbs. hCD31 mAb treatment did not affect survival of NB-bearing mice, but increased significantly hypoxia in tumor microenvironment, where apoptotic and proliferating TDEC coexisted, indicating the occurrence of vascular remodeling. Tumor cells from hCD31 mAb treated mice showed i) up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related and vascular mimicry (VM)-related gene expression, ii) expression of endothelial (i.e. CD31 and VE-cadherin) and EMT-associated (i.e. Twist-1, N-cadherin and TNC) immunophenotypic markers, and iii) up-regulation of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) expression. In vitro experiments with two NB cell lines showed that hypoxia was the common driver of all the above phenomena and that human recombinant HMGB-1 amplified EMT and TDEC trans-differentiation. In conclusion, TDEC targeting with hCD31 mAb increases tumor hypoxia, setting the stage for the occurrence of EMT and of new waves of TDEC trans-differentiation. These adaptive responses to the changes induced by immunotherapy in the tumor microenvironment allow tumor cells to escape from the effects of hCD31 mAb.

  4. Killing tumor cells: the effect of photodynamic therapy using mono-l-aspartyl chlorine and NS-398

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Elizabeth H.; Webber, John; Kessel, David; Fromm, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a useful treatment for malignant tumors. PDT involves the administration of a photosensitive drug that is selected by neoplastic tissues and their vasculature. One such photosensitizer is mono-l-aspartyl chlorine e6 (NPe6). Recent evidence suggests that the presence of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor NS-398 may potentiate the effect of photosensitizing agents. This study was designed to determine if the addition of NS-398 to NPe6-induced PDT in single or fractionated dosing would result in greater tumor kill. Methods Colon-38 tumor was subcutaneously implanted into both flanks of mice and allowed to grow to 0.5 to 1.0 cm. Mice were randomly allocated to 5 groups: (1) single dose of NPe6; (2) fractionated dose of NPe6; (3) NS-398 only; (4) single dose of NPe6 + NS-398; and (5) fractionated dose of NPe6 + NS-398. The left flank was shielded from exposure to irradiation. Tumor size was measured before initiation of PDT and at the time of sacrifice. Results The initial tumor weights of both flanks were not significantly different between all groups. Tumor weights at the time of death after PDT using NPe6 were significantly less than their paired tumors in the untreated flanks (P <0.0001). Tumor weights in the treated flanks were significantly less in the group receiving the fractionated dosing of NPe6 as compared to the single dose of NPe6 (P = 0.0037). NS-398 plus the single dose of NPe6 significantly decreased tumor weight in the PDT-treated flank (P = 0.035) at a level equivalent to that observed with fractionated dosing of the photosensitizer in the absence of NS-398. NS-398 did not significantly further decrease tumor weight in the group that received the fractionated dose of NPe6. Conclusions Fractionated dosing of NPe6 demonstrated the best tumor kill. However, NS-398 did not potentiate the effect of PDT using fractionated dosing of NPe6. While PDT using the single NPe6 dose significantly decreased tumor weight

  5. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensor Inositol-Requiring Enzyme 1α Augments Bacterial Killing through Sustained Oxidant Production.

    PubMed

    Abuaita, Basel H; Burkholder, Kristin M; Boles, Blaise R; O'Riordan, Mary X

    2015-07-14

    Bacterial infection can trigger cellular stress programs, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which occurs when misfolded proteins accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we used the human pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as an infection model to probe how ER stress promotes antimicrobial function. MRSA infection activated the most highly conserved unfolded protein response sensor, inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), which was necessary for robust bacterial killing in vitro and in vivo. The macrophage IRE1-dependent bactericidal activity required reactive oxygen species (ROS). Viable MRSA cells excluded ROS from the nascent phagosome and strongly triggered IRE1 activation, leading to sustained generation of ROS that were largely Nox2 independent. In contrast, dead MRSA showed early colocalization with ROS but was a poor activator of IRE1 and did not trigger sustained ROS generation. The global ROS stimulated by IRE1 signaling was necessary, but not sufficient, for MRSA killing, which also required the ER resident SNARE Sec22B for accumulation of ROS in the phagosomal compartment. Taken together, these results suggest that IRE1-mediated persistent ROS generation might act as a fail-safe mechanism to kill bacterial pathogens that evade the initial macrophage oxidative burst. Cellular stress programs have been implicated as important components of the innate immune response to infection. The role of the IRE1 pathway of the ER stress response in immune secretory functions, such as antibody production, is well established, but its contribution to innate immunity is less well defined. Here, we show that infection of macrophages with viable MRSA induces IRE1 activation, leading to bacterial killing. IRE1-dependent bactericidal activity required generation of reactive oxygen species in a sustained manner over hours of infection. The SNARE protein Sec22B, which was previously demonstrated to control ER

  6. EWS-FLI-1-targeted cytotoxic T-cell killing of multiple tumor types belonging to the Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Liu, Fangjun; Porter, Ryan M.; O’Sullivan, Regina P.; Merghoub, Taha; Lunsford, Elaine P.; Robichaud, Kyle; Van Valen, Frans; Lessnick, Stephen L.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Wells, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFTs) comprises a group of aggressive, malignant bone and soft tissue tumors that predominantly affect children and young adults. These tumors frequently share expression of the EWS-FLI-1 translocation, which is central to tumor survival but not present in healthy cells. In this study, we examined EWS-FLI-1 antigens for their capacity to induce immunity against a range of ESFT types. Design Computer prediction analysis of peptide binding, HLA-A2.1 stabilization assays, and induction of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes (CTL) in immunized HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice were used to assess the immunogenicity of native and modified peptides derived from the fusion region of EWS-FLI-1 type 1. CTL-killing of multiple ESFT family members in vitro, and control of established xenografts in vivo, was assessed. We also examined whether these peptides could induce human CTLs in vitro. Results EWS-FLI-1 type 1 peptides were unable to stabilize cell surface HLA-A2.1 and induced weak CTL activity against Ewing Sarcoma cells. In contrast, peptides with modified anchor residues induced potent CTL killing of Ewing Sarcoma cells presenting endogenous (native) peptides. The adoptive transfer of CTL specific for the modified peptide YLNPSVDSV resulted in enhanced survival of mice with established Ewing Sarcoma xenografts. YLNPSVDSV-specific CTL displayed potent killing of multiple ESFT types in vitro: Ewing Sarcoma, pPNET, Askin’s Tumor, and Biphenotypic Sarcoma. Stimulation of human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with YLNPSVDSV peptide resulted in potent CTL-killing. Conclusions These data show that YLNPSVDSV peptide is a promising antigen for ESFT immunotherapy and warrants further clinical development. PMID:22879388

  7. EWS-FLI-1-targeted cytotoxic T-cell killing of multiple tumor types belonging to the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H; Liu, Fangjun; Porter, Ryan M; O'Sullivan, Regina P; Merghoub, Taha; Lunsford, Elaine P; Robichaud, Kyle; Van Valen, Frans; Lessnick, Stephen L; Gebhardt, Mark C; Wells, James W

    2012-10-01

    The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) comprises a group of aggressive, malignant bone, and soft tissue tumors that predominantly affect children and young adults. These tumors frequently share expression of the EWS-FLI-1 translocation, which is central to tumor survival but not present in healthy cells. In this study, we examined EWS-FLI-1 antigens for their capacity to induce immunity against a range of ESFT types. Computer prediction analysis of peptide binding, HLA-A2.1 stabilization assays, and induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) in immunized HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice were used to assess the immunogenicity of native and modified peptides derived from the fusion region of EWS-FLI-1 type 1. CTL-killing of multiple ESFT family members in vitro, and control of established xenografts in vivo, was assessed. We also examined whether these peptides could induce human CTLs in vitro. EWS-FLI-1 type 1 peptides were unable to stabilize cell surface HLA-A2.1 and induced weak CTL activity against Ewing sarcoma cells. In contrast, peptides with modified anchor residues induced potent CTL killing of Ewing sarcoma cells presenting endogenous (native) peptides. The adoptive transfer of CTL specific for the modified peptide YLNPSVDSV resulted in enhanced survival of mice with established Ewing sarcoma xenografts. YLNPSVDSV-specific CTL displayed potent killing of multiple ESFT types in vitro: Ewing sarcoma, pPNET, Askin's Tumor, and Biphenotypic sarcoma. Stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with YLNPSVDSV peptide resulted in potent CTL-killing. These data show that YLNPSVDSV peptide is a promising antigen for ESFT immunotherapy and warrants further clinical development.

  8. Hypoxia-activated cytotoxic agent tirapazamine enhances hepatic artery ligation-induced killing of liver tumor in HBx transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chen, Kai-Wei; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Su, Tung-Hung; Jao, Ping; Ni, Lin-Chun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2016-10-18

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the main treatment for intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification because of its exclusive arterial blood supply. Although TACE achieves substantial necrosis of the tumor, complete tumor necrosis is uncommon, and the residual tumor generally rapidly recurs. We combined tirapazamine (TPZ), a hypoxia-activated cytotoxic agent, with hepatic artery ligation (HAL), which recapitulates transarterial embolization in mouse models, to enhance the efficacy of TACE. The effectiveness of this combination treatment was examined in HCC that spontaneously developed in hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) transgenic mice. We proved that the tumor blood flow in this model was exclusively supplied by the hepatic artery, in contrast to conventional orthotopic HCC xenografts that receive both arterial and venous blood supplies. At levels below the threshold oxygen levels created by HAL, TPZ was activated and killed the hypoxic cells, but spared the normoxic cells. This combination treatment clearly limited the toxicity of TPZ to HCC, which caused the rapid and near-complete necrosis of HCC. In conclusion, the combination of TPZ and HAL showed a synergistic tumor killing activity that was specific for HCC in HBx transgenic mice. This preclinical study forms the basis for the ongoing clinical program for the TPZ-TACE regimen in HCC treatment.

  9. Real-time dynamic optical imaging of ACC-M tumor cells killed by HSV-tk/ACV system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjin; Li, Zhiyang; Xie, Xiangmo; Lu, Lisha

    2013-01-01

    HSV-tk/ACV induced and killed human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell (ACC-M) in vivo and in vitro, which were observed through optical imaging and green fluorescence protein (GFP) tagging technique. ACC-M was transfected with TK-GFP, and the single clone cell ACC-M-TK-GFP was selected by G418. With fluorescent stereomicroscope, whole-body fluorescent imaging system and fluorescent microscope, we could observe ACV treated ACC-M-TK-GFP cells in cell level and nude mice. The therapies of tumor were visualized clearly with optical imaging. This study proves that optical imaging is a very good approach for studying the effect of HSV-tk/ACV on the ACC-M tumor cells and decreasing the amount of vessel about tumors cell. Optical imaging will become a visual groundwork for monitoring tumor growth and evaluating in vivo curative effect of antitumor drugs.

  10. Recombinant interleukin-2 significantly augments activity of rituximab in human tumor xenograft models of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lopes de Menezes, Daniel E; Denis-Mize, Kimberly; Tang, Yan; Ye, Helen; Kunich, John C; Garrett, Evelyn N; Peng, Jing; Cousens, Lawrence S; Gelb, Arnold B; Heise, Carla; Wilson, Susan E; Jallal, Bahija; Aukerman, Sharon L

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates select immune effector cell responses associated with antitumor activity, including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that activates ADCC in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The ability of rIL-2 to augment rituximab-dependent tumor responses was investigated. The efficacy of rIL-2 in combination with rituximab was evaluated in 2 NHL tumor xenograft models: the CD20hi, rituximab-sensitive, low-grade Daudi model and the CD20lo, aggressive, rituximab-resistant Namalwa model. Combination of rIL-2 plus rituximab was synergistic in a rituximab-sensitive Daudi tumor model, as evidenced by significant tumor regressions and increased time to tumor progression, compared with rIL-2 and rituximab single agents. In contrast, rituximab-resistant Namalwa tumors were responsive to single-agent rIL-2 and showed an increased response when combined with rituximab. Using in vitro killing assays, rIL-2 was shown to enhance activity of rituximab by activating ADCC and lymphokine-activated killer activity. Additionally, the activity of rIL-2 plus rituximab F(ab')2 was similar to that of rIL-2 alone, indicating a critical role for immunoglobulin G1 Fc-FcgammaR-effector responses in mediating ADCC. Antiproliferative and apoptotic tumor responses, along with an influx of immune effector cells, were observed by immunohistochemistry. Collectively, the data suggest that rIL-2 mediates potent tumoricidal activity against NHL tumors, in part, through activation and trafficking of monocytes and natural killer cells to tumors. These data support the mechanistic and therapeutic rationale for combination of rIL-2 with rituximab in NHL clinical trials and for single-agent rIL-2 in rituximab-resistant NHL patients.

  11. Defining the Molecular Signature of Chemotherapy-Mediated Lung Tumor Phenotype Modulation and Increased Susceptibility to T-Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Caballero, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chemotherapy with platinum doublets, including cisplatin plus vinorelbine, is standard of care for non–small-cell lung cancer. Sublethal exposure to certain chemotherapeutic agents has been demonstrated to alter the phenotype or biology of human tumor cells, rendering them more susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)–mediated lysis. The effects of cisplatin/vinorelbine on tumor sensitivity to T-cell cytotoxicity and its molecular mechanisms, however, have not been fully elucidated. We examined the effect of this chemotherapy on growth, cell-surface phenotype, and CTL-mediated lysis of five distinct human lung carcinoma cell lines in vitro and examined the molecular mechanisms associated with enhanced CTL sensitivity. These studies demonstrate that sublethal exposure of human lung tumor cells to the platinum doublet modulates tumor cell phenotype and increases sensitivity to major histocompatibility complex–restricted perforin/granzyme–mediated CTL killing. These studies also demonstrate that exposure to chemotherapy markedly decreased the protein secretion ratio of transforming growth factor-β/interleukin (IL)-8. We examined the gene expression profile of two lung tumor cell lines to identify a shared gene signature in response to sublethal cisplatin/vinorelbine and found coordinate expression of only 16 transcripts, including those for cytokine/chemokine expression and apoptosis such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL8, CXCL5, and B cell lymphoma-2–like genes (BCL-2). Overall, these results suggest that sublethal exposure to cisplatin/vinorelbine increases sensitivity to perforin/granzyme–mediated CTL killing by modulation of (a) tumor phenotype, (b) cytokine/chemokine milieu, and (c) the proapoptotic/antiapoptotic gene ratio. The data presented here propose a complex mechanism that is distinct from and complementary to that of immunogenic cell death. This molecular signature may be useful in predicting responses to immunotherapy as well as

  12. The Use of Chelated Radionuclide (Samarium-153-Ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate) to Modulate Phenotype of Tumor Cells and Enhance T Cell–Mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mala; Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Yu, Sarah; Paik, Chang H.; Camphausen, Kevin; Becker, Michael D.; Goeckeler, William F.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Exposing human tumor cells to sublethal doses of external beam radiation up-regulates expression of tumor antigen and accessory molecules, rendering tumor cells more susceptible to killing by antigen-specific CTLs. This study explored the possibility that exposure to palliative doses of a radiopharmaceutical agent could alter the phenotype of tumor cells to render them more susceptible to T cell – mediated killing. Experimental Design Here, 10 human tumor cell lines (4 prostate, 2 breast, and 4 lung) were exposed to increasing doses of the radiopharmaceutical samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetrame-thylenephosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP) used in cancer patients to treat pain due to bone metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis for expression of five surface molecules and several tumor-associated antigens involved in prostate cancer were done. LNCaP human prostate cancer cells were exposed to153Sm-EDTMP and incubated with tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL in a CTL killing assay to determine whether exposure to 153Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to T cell – mediated killing. Results Tumor cells up-regulated the surface molecules Fas (100% of cell lines up-regulated Fas), carcinoembryonic antigen (90%), mucin-1 (60%), MHC class I (50%), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (40%) in response to 153Sm-EDTMP. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed additional up-regulated tumor antigens. Exposure to 153Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to killing by CTLs specific for prostate-specific antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, and mucin-1. Conclusions Doses of 153Sm-EDTMP equivalent to palliative doses delivered to bone alter the phenotype of tumor cells, suggesting that153Sm-EDTMP may work synergistically with immuno-therapy to increase the susceptibility of tumor cells to CTL killing. PMID:18594006

  13. The use of chelated radionuclide (samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate) to modulate phenotype of tumor cells and enhance T cell-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mala; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Yu, Sarah; Paik, Chang H; Camphausen, Kevin; Becker, Michael D; Goeckeler, William F; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2008-07-01

    Exposing human tumor cells to sublethal doses of external beam radiation up-regulates expression of tumor antigen and accessory molecules, rendering tumor cells more susceptible to killing by antigen-specific CTLs. This study explored the possibility that exposure to palliative doses of a radiopharmaceutical agent could alter the phenotype of tumor cells to render them more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Here, 10 human tumor cell lines (4 prostate, 2 breast, and 4 lung) were exposed to increasing doses of the radiopharmaceutical samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ((153)Sm-EDTMP) used in cancer patients to treat pain due to bone metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis for expression of five surface molecules and several tumor-associated antigens involved in prostate cancer were done. LNCaP human prostate cancer cells were exposed to (153)Sm-EDTMP and incubated with tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL in a CTL killing assay to determine whether exposure to (153)Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Tumor cells up-regulated the surface molecules Fas (100% of cell lines up-regulated Fas), carcinoembryonic antigen (90%), mucin-1 (60%), MHC class I (50%), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (40%) in response to (153)Sm-EDTMP. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed additional up-regulated tumor antigens. Exposure to (153)Sm-EDTMP rendered LNCaP cells more susceptible to killing by CTLs specific for prostate-specific antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, and mucin-1. Doses of (153)Sm-EDTMP equivalent to palliative doses delivered to bone alter the phenotype of tumor cells, suggesting that (153)Sm-EDTMP may work synergistically with immunotherapy to increase the susceptibility of tumor cells to CTL killing.

  14. Genetic control of natural killing and in vivo tumor elimination by the Chok locus.

    PubMed

    Idris, A H; Iizuka, K; Smith, H R; Scalzo, A A; Yokoyama, W M

    1998-12-21

    The molecular mechanisms underlying target recognition during natural killing are not well understood. One approach to dissect the complexities of natural killer (NK) cell recognition is through exploitation of genetic differences among inbred mouse strains. In this study, we determined that interleukin 2-activated BALB/c-derived NK cells could not lyse Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as efficiently as C57BL/6-derived NK cells, despite equivalent capacity to kill other targets. This strain-determined difference was also exhibited by freshly isolated NK cells, and was determined to be independent of host major histocompatibility haplotype. Furthermore, CHO killing did not correlate with expression of NK1.1 or 2B4 activation molecules. Genetic mapping studies revealed linkage between the locus influencing CHO killing, termed Chok, and loci encoded within the NK gene complex (NKC), suggesting that Chok encodes an NK cell receptor specific for CHO cells. In vivo assays recapitulated the in vitro data, and both studies determined that Chok regulates an NK perforin-dependent cytotoxic process. These results may have implications for the role of NK cells in xenograft rejection. Our genetic analysis suggests Chok is a single locus that affects NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity similar to other NKC loci that also regulate the complex activity of NK cells.

  15. Anti-tumor activity of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 on Meth-A tumor cells in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoichi; Itoh, Yukie; Kataoka, Motoyuki; Iino-Miura, Shiori; Miura, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeo; Fujisawa, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    Probiotics exert numerous effects on human well-being. Here, heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 (H-Lp) was isolated as a potent immuno-modulator among 15 strains of lactobacilli in terms of TNF-α induction ability in peritoneal macrophages. In vitro TNF-α and IFN-γ induction in Peyer's patch (PP) cells was higher when incubated with H-Lp than with live L. plantarum BF-LP284 (L-Lp). Suppression of syngeneic Meth-A tumors in a murine model by oral administration of H-Lp was also greater than that of L-Lp and of controls. H-Lp stimulated IFN-γ production in spleen cells, which displayed inhibited tumor growth in Winn assays when treated with H-Lp. Moreover, H-Lp increased the ratio of CD3(+ )cells among peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Meth-A tumor-bearing mice, suggesting an H-Lp-mediated anti-tumor mechanism whereby immune cells that are activated by H-Lp in PP and acquire anti-tumor activity in the spleen migrate to tumor sites through lymphocyte homing to inhibit tumor growth.

  16. Targeting lactate-fueled respiration selectively kills hypoxic tumor cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonveaux, Pierre; Végran, Frédérique; Schroeder, Thies; Wergin, Melanie C.; Verrax, Julien; Rabbani, Zahid N.; De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Kennedy, Kelly M.; Diepart, Caroline; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Kelley, Michael J.; Gallez, Bernard; Wahl, Miriam L.; Feron, Olivier; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    Tumors contain oxygenated and hypoxic regions, so the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. Hypoxic tumor cells primarily use glucose for glycolytic energy production and release lactic acid, creating a lactate gradient that mirrors the oxygen gradient in the tumor. By contrast, oxygenated tumor cells have been thought to primarily use glucose for oxidative energy production. Although lactate is generally considered a waste product, we now show that it is a prominent substrate that fuels the oxidative metabolism of oxygenated tumor cells. There is therefore a symbiosis in which glycolytic and oxidative tumor cells mutually regulate their access to energy metabolites. We identified monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) as the prominent path for lactate uptake by a human cervix squamous carcinoma cell line that preferentially utilized lactate for oxidative metabolism. Inhibiting MCT1 with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC) or siRNA in these cells induced a switch from lactate-fueled respiration to glycolysis. A similar switch from lactate-fueled respiration to glycolysis by oxygenated tumor cells in both a mouse model of lung carcinoma and xenotransplanted human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells was observed after administration of CHC. This retarded tumor growth, as the hypoxic/glycolytic tumor cells died from glucose starvation, and rendered the remaining cells sensitive to irradiation. As MCT1 was found to be expressed by an array of primary human tumors, we suggest that MCT1 inhibition has clinical antitumor potential. PMID:19033663

  17. A novel thermal accelerant for augmentation of microwave energy during image-guided tumor ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, William K. C.; Maxwell, Aaron W. P.; Frank, Victoria E.; Primmer, Michael P.; Paul, Jarod B.; Susai, Cynthia; Collins, Scott A.; Borjeson, Tiffany M.; Baird, Greyson L.; Lombardo, Kara A.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2017-02-01

    The greatest challenge in image-guided thermal ablation (IGTA) of liver tumors is a relatively high recurrence rate (ca. 30%) due to incomplete ablation. To meet this challenge, we have developed a novel Thermal Accelerator (TA) to demonstrate its capability to, 1) augment microwave (MW) energy from a distance unattainable by antenna alone; 2) turn into a gel at body temperature; 3) act as a CT or US contrast. We have examined the TA efficiency using in vitro and ex vivo models: microwave power, TA dose, frequencies and TA-to-tip distance were varied, and temperature readings compared with and without TA. Using the in vitro model, it was established that both the rate and magnitude of increase in ablation zone temperature were significantly greater with TA under all tested conditions (p<0.0001). On ultrasound imaging, the TA was echogenic as gel. On CT, TA density was proportional to dose, with average values ranging from 329 HU to 3071 HU at 10 mg/mL and 1,000mg/mL, respectively. TA can be accurately deposited to a target area using CT or US as image-guidance and augment MW energy effectively so that ablation time is significantly reduced, which will contribute to complete ablation. The preliminary results obtained from in vivo experiments using swine as an animal model are consistent with the observations made in in vitro and en vivo studies.

  18. TCR-like antibody drug conjugates mediate killing of tumor cells with low peptide/HLA targets.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Devin B; Bivens, Camille K; Mobley, Alexis S; Herrera, Christian E; McCormick, Amanda L; Wichner, Timea; Sabnani, Manoj K; Wood, Laurence M; Weidanz, Jon A

    The currently marketed antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) destabilize microtubule assembly in cancer cells and initiate apoptosis in patients. However, few tumor antigens (TA) are expressed at high densities on cancer lesions, potentially minimizing the therapeutic index of current ADC regimens. The peptide/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex can be specifically targeted by therapeutic antibodies (designated T cell receptor [TCR]-like antibodies) and adequately distinguish malignant cells, but has not been the focus of ADC development. We analyzed the killing potential of TCR-like ADCs when cross-linked to the DNA alkylating compound duocarmycin. Our data comprise proof-of-principle results that TCR-like ADCs mediate potent tumor cytotoxicity, particularly under common scenarios of low TA/HLA density, and support their continued development alongside agents that disrupt DNA replication. Additionally, TCR-like antibody ligand binding appears to play an important role in ADC functionality and should be addressed during therapy development to avoid binding patterns that negate ADC killing efficacy.

  19. PIM Kinase Inhibitors Kill Hypoxic Tumor Cells by Reducing Nrf2 Signaling and Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Noel A; Sainz, Alva G; Song, Jin H; Kraft, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia is a significant obstacle to the successful treatment of solid tumors, and it is highly correlated with metastasis, therapeutic resistance, and disease recurrence in cancer patients. As a result, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapies that target hypoxic cells within the tumor microenvironment. The Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) kinases represent a prosurvival pathway that is upregulated in response to hypoxia, in a HIF-1-independent manner. We demonstrate that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of PIM kinases is significantly more toxic toward cancer cells in hypoxia as compared with normoxia. Xenograft studies confirm that PIM kinase inhibitors impede tumor growth and selectively kill hypoxic tumor cells in vivo Experiments show that PIM kinases enhance the ability of tumor cells to adapt to hypoxia-induced oxidative stress by increasing the nuclear localization and activity of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which functions to increase the expression of antioxidant genes. Small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors prevent Nrf2 from accumulating in the nucleus, reducing the transcription of cytoprotective genes and leading to the build-up of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to toxic levels in hypoxic tumor cells. This toxic effect of PIM inhibitors can be successfully blocked by ROS scavengers, including N-acetyl cystine and superoxide dismutase. Thus, inhibition of PIM kinases has the potential to oppose hypoxia-mediated therapeutic resistance and induce cell death in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1637-47. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Augmented macrophage differentiation and polarization of tumor-associated macrophages towards M1 subtype in listeria-administered tumor-bearing host.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rakesh K; Vishvakarma, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Tribhuban M; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of Listeria administration on differentiation of macrophages from precursor bone marrow cells and functional status of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Listeria administration not only resulted in an augmented infiltration of tumor by F4/80 macrophages but also repolarized the functional status of TAM displaying features of some M1 macrophage subtype with upregulated phagocytosis and tumoricidal activity accompanied by altered expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1, toll-like receptor-2, surface markers: CD11c, interleukin-2 receptor, CD62L, and secreted molecules: nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Declined tumor cell survival and modulated repertoire of cytokines: interferon-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β in tumor microenvironment indicated their role in polarization of TAM towards proinflammatory state. Bone marrow cell of Listeria-administered tumor-bearing mice showed augmented survival, declined expression of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis with an upregulated differentiation into activation responsive bone marrow-derived macrophages along with altered expression of macrophage-colony stimulating factor, macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor. These findings indicate that Listeria infection is associated with an augmented differentiation of macrophages accompanied by tumoricidal activation of TAM.

  1. HAMLET kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism--cellular, molecular, and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Catharina; Agerstam, Helena; Aronson, Annika; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Düringer, Caroline; Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Leijonhuvud, Irene; Linse, Sara; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Nilsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Jenny; Svensson, Malin

    2003-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex that induces apoptosis-like death in tumor cells, but leaves fully differentiated cells unaffected. This review summarizes the information on the in vivo effects of HAMLET in patients and tumor models on the tumor cell biology, and on the molecular characteristics of the complex. HAMLET limits the progression of human glioblastomas in a xenograft model and removes skin papillomas in patients. This broad anti-tumor activity includes >40 different lymphomas and carcinomas and apoptosis is independent of p53 or bcl-2. In tumor cells HAMLET enters the cytoplasm, translocates to the perinuclear area, and enters the nuclei where it accumulates. HAMLET binds strongly to histones and disrupts the chromatin organization. In the cytoplasm, HAMLET targets ribosomes and activates caspases. The formation of HAMLET relies on the propensity of alpha-lactalbumin to alter its conformation when the strongly bound Ca2+ ion is released and the protein adopts the apo-conformation that exposes a new fatty acid binding site. Oleic acid (C18:1,9 cis) fits this site with high specificity, and stabilizes the altered protein conformation. The results illustrate how protein folding variants may be beneficial, and how their formation in peripheral tissues may depend on the folding change and the availability of the lipid cofactor. One example is the acid pH in the stomach of the breast-fed child that promotes the formation of HAMLET. This mechanism may contribute to the protective effect of breastfeeding against childhood tumors. We propose that HAMLET should be explored as a novel approach to tumor therapy.

  2. Theory and Experimental Validation of a Spatio-temporal Model of Chemotherapy Transport to Enhance Tumor Cell Kill

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihui; Chuang, Yao-Li; Dogra, Prashant; Butner, Joseph D.; Day, Armin; Xu, Rong; Shen, Haifa; Simbawa, Eman; AL-Fhaid, A. S.; Mahmoud, S. R.; Curley, Steven A.; Ferrari, Mauro; Cristini, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuously releasing drug molecules into the tumor over an extended period of time may significantly improve the chemotherapeutic efficacy by overcoming physical transport limitations of conventional bolus drug treatment. In this paper, we present a generalized space- and time-dependent mathematical model of drug transport and drug-cell interactions to quantitatively formulate this hypothesis. Model parameters describe: perfusion and tissue architecture (blood volume fraction and blood vessel radius); diffusion penetration distance of drug (i.e., a function of tissue compactness and drug uptake rates by tumor cells); and cell death rates (as function of history of drug uptake). We performed preliminary testing and validation of the mathematical model using in vivo experiments with different drug delivery methods on a breast cancer mouse model. Experimental data demonstrated a 3-fold increase in response using nano-vectored drug vs. free drug delivery, in excellent quantitative agreement with the model predictions. Our model results implicate that therapeutically targeting blood volume fraction, e.g., through vascular normalization, would achieve a better outcome due to enhanced drug delivery. Author Summary Cancer treatment efficacy can be significantly enhanced through the elution of drug from nano-carriers that can temporarily stay in the tumor vasculature. Here we present a relatively simple yet powerful mathematical model that accounts for both spatial and temporal heterogeneities of drug dosing to help explain, examine, and prove this concept. We find that the delivery of systemic chemotherapy through a certain form of nano-carriers would have enhanced tumor kill by a factor of 2 to 4 over the standard therapy that the patients actually received. We also find that targeting blood volume fraction (a parameter of the model) through vascular normalization can achieve more effective drug delivery and tumor kill. More importantly

  3. A Nanoparticle-Based Combination Chemotherapy Delivery System for Enhanced Tumor Killing by Dynamic Rewiring of Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Stephen W.; Lee, Michael J.; Deng, Zhou J.; Dreaden, Erik C.; Siouve, Elise; Shopsowitz, Kevin E.; Shah, Nisarg J.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) inhibitor erlotinib promotes the dynamic rewiring of apoptotic pathways, which sensitizes cells within a specific period to subsequent exposure to the DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin. A critical challenge for translating this therapeutic network rewiring into clinical practice is the design of optimal drug delivery systems. We report the generation of a nanoparticle delivery vehicle that contained more than one therapeutic agent and produced a controlled sequence of drug release. Liposomes, representing the first clinically approved nanomedicine systems, are well-characterized, simple, and versatile platforms for the manufacture of functional and tunable drug carriers. Using the hydrophobic and hydrophilic compartments of liposomes, we effectively incorporated both hydrophobic (erlotinib) and hydrophilic (doxorubicin) small molecules, through which we achieved the desired time sequence of drug release. We also coated the liposomes with folate to facilitate targeting to cancer cells. When compared to the time-staggered application of individual drugs, staggered release from tumor-targeted single liposomal particles enhanced dynamic rewiring of apoptotic signaling pathways, resulting in improved tumor cell killing in culture and tumor shrinkage in animal models. PMID:24825919

  4. H-ferritin–nanocaged doxorubicin nanoparticles specifically target and kill tumors with a single-dose injection

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Minmin; Fan, Kelong; Zhou, Meng; Duan, Demin; Zheng, Jiyan; Yang, Dongling; Feng, Jing; Yan, Xiyun

    2014-01-01

    An ideal nanocarrier for efficient drug delivery must be able to target specific cells and carry high doses of therapeutic drugs and should also exhibit optimized physicochemical properties and biocompatibility. However, it is a tremendous challenge to engineer all of the above characteristics into a single carrier particle. Here, we show that natural H-ferritin (HFn) nanocages can carry high doses of doxorubicin (Dox) for tumor-specific targeting and killing without any targeting ligand functionalization or property modulation. Dox-loaded HFn (HFn-Dox) specifically bound and subsequently internalized into tumor cells via interaction with overexpressed transferrin receptor 1 and released Dox in the lysosomes. In vivo in the mouse, HFn-Dox exhibited more than 10-fold higher intratumoral drug concentration than free Dox and significantly inhibited tumor growth after a single-dose injection. Importantly, HFn-Dox displayed an excellent safety profile that significantly reduced healthy organ drug exposure and improved the maximum tolerated dose by fourfold compared with free Dox. Moreover, because the HFn nanocarrier has well-defined morphology and does not need any ligand modification or property modulation it can be easily produced with high purity and yield, which are requirements for drugs used in clinical trials. Thus, these unique properties make the HFn nanocage an ideal vehicle for efficient anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25267615

  5. Tumor cell hyperresistance to photodynamic killing arising from nitric oxide preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niziolek-Kierecka, Magdalena; Korytowski, Witold; Girotti, Albert W.

    2007-02-01

    Relatively little is known about how nitric oxide (NO) generated by tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves might affect the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Using a breast tumor epithelial line (COH-BR1) metabolically sensitized with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) by pre-treating with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), we have recently shown that NO from chemical donors can elicit both an immediate (NO-now) and delayed (NO-then) hyperresistance to photokilling. Cell death was mainly apoptotic when PpIX was confined to mitochondria, but mainly necrotic when it was allowed to diffuse to the cell periphery. We found that NO-now operates primarily by scavenging lipid-derived free radicals, whereas NO-then "preconditions" cells by some other mechanism. In addressing this, we have used a biologically relevant NO donor/tumor target model, viz. RAW 264.7 macrophages grown on microporous membrane inserts and COH-BR1 cells grown in culture plate wells. The RAW cells were activated with lipopolysaccharide, and 15 h later (when NO output was ~ 2 μM/h) placed over the tumor cells for 20 h, after which the latter were ALA-treated and then irradiated. Prior exposure to activated RAW macrophages reduced tumor cell photokilling by >50 %. This effect was completely lost when the RAW cells were pre-treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, confirming that NO was involved in the hyperresistance. Results from other experiments suggest that heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin play a role in the preconditioning effect described. These studies provide new insights into how NO might modulate PDT efficacy.

  6. Augmented IFN-γ and TNF-α Induced by Probiotic Bacteria in NK Cells Mediate Differentiation of Stem-Like Tumors Leading to Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Reduction in Inflammatory Cytokine Release; Regulation by IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Vickie T.; Tseng, Han-Ching; Kozlowska, Anna; Maung, Phyu Ou; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    Our previous reports demonstrated that the magnitude of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity correlate directly with the stage and level of differentiation of tumor cells. In addition, we have shown previously that activated NK cells inhibit growth of cancer cells through induction of differentiation, resulting in the resistance of tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity through secreted cytokines, as well as direct NK-tumor cell contact. In this report, we show that in comparison to IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb-treated NK cells, activation of NK cells by probiotic bacteria (sAJ2) in combination with IL-2 and anti-CD16mAb substantially decreases tumor growth and induces maturation, differentiation, and resistance of oral squamous cancer stem cells, MIA PaCa-2 stem-like/poorly differentiated pancreatic tumors, and healthy stem cells of apical papillae through increased secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α, as well as direct NK-tumor cell contact. Tumor resistance to NK cell-mediated killing induced by IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb + sAJ2-treated NK cells is induced by combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α since antibodies to both, and not each cytokine alone, were able to restore tumor sensitivity to NK cells. Increased surface expression of CD54, B7H1, and MHC-I on NK-differentiated tumors was mediated by IFN-γ since the addition of anti-IFN-γ abolished their increase and restored the ability of NK cells to trigger cytokine and chemokine release; whereas differentiated tumors inhibited cytokine release by the NK cells. Monocytes synergize with NK cells in the presence of probiotic bacteria to induce regulated differentiation of stem cells through secretion of IL-10 resulting in resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and inhibition of cytokine release. Therefore, probiotic bacteria condition activated NK cells to provide augmented differentiation of cancer stem cells resulting in inhibition of tumor growth, and decreased inflammatory cytokine release. PMID

  7. Augmentation of the effect of doxorubicin with low-dose tumor necrosis factor in experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bloom, N D; Norbergs, D A; Sherman, B; Sadjadi, M; Ramaswamy, G; Jacobs, R; Ackerman, N

    1990-06-01

    The antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor was studied in vivo as a single agent and in combination with a conventional chemotherapeutic agent. Dosages of tumor necrosis factor of 100 micrograms, 50 micrograms, and 25 micrograms were injected intraportally in Sprague-Dawley rats containing hepatic implants of Walker carcinosarcoma. An effect on the tumor was seen but was associated with a significant acute mortality. Lower dosages of tumor necrosis factor, 10 micrograms, 5 micrograms, and 1 microgram, administered with 10 mg/kg of doxorubicin (Adriamycin) significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of doxorubicin without an acute mortality. This suggests that lower dosages of tumor necrosis factor with conventional chemotherapy may augment the latter's effect without any added toxicity.

  8. Resveratrol and Arsenic Trioxide Act Synergistically to Kill Tumor Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Shen; Chen, You-Ran; Li, Pei-Chun; Dou, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which used as an effective agent in the treatment of leukaemia and other solid tumors, is largely limited by its toxicity. QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and sudden heart death have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity of As2O3. The present study was designed to explore whether the combination of As2O3 and resveratrol could generate a more powerful anti-cancer effect both in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods MTT assay was performed to assess the proliferation of Hela, MCF-7 and NB4 cells. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate combination index values from cell viability data. The apoptosis and the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were assessed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry separately in vitro. The effect of As2O3, alone and in combination with resveratrol on Hela tumor growth in an orthotopic nude mouse model was also investigated. The tumor volume and the immunohistochemical analysis of CD31, CD34 and VEGF were determined. Results Resveratrol dramatically enhanced the anti-cancer effect induced by As2O3 in vitro. In addition, isobolographic analysis further demonstrated that As2O3 and resveratrol generated a synergistic action. More apoptosis and ROS generation were observed in the combination treatment group. Similar synergistic effects were found in nude mice in vivo. The combination of As2O3 and resveratrol dramatically suppressed both tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. Conclusions Combining As2O3 with resveratrol would be a novel strategy to treat cancer in clinical practice. PMID:24901647

  9. Evaluation of a Novel Thermal Accelerant for Augmentation of Microwave Energy during Image-guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Park, William Keun Chan; Maxwell, Aaron Wilhelm Palmer; Frank, Victoria Elizabeth; Primmer, Michael Patrick; Collins, Scott Andrew; Baird, Grayson Luderman; Dupuy, Damian Edward

    2017-01-01

    The primary challenge in thermal ablation of liver tumors (e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal cancer) is the relatively high recurrence rate (~30%) for which incomplete ablation at the periphery of the tumor is the most common reason. In an attempt to overcome this, we have developed a novel thermal accelerant (TA) agent capable of augmenting microwave energy from a distance normally unattainable by a single microwave ablation antenna. This cesium-based block co-polymer compound transforms from a liquid to a gel at body temperature and is intrinsically visible by computed tomography. Using an agarose phantom model, herein we demonstrate that both the rate and magnitude of temperature increase during microwave ablation were significantly greater in the presence of TA when compared with controls. These results suggest robust augmentation of microwave energy, and may translate into larger ablation zone volumes within biologic tissues. Further work using in vivo techniques is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:28382173

  10. Nitric oxide prodrug JS-K inhibits ubiquitin E1 and kills tumor cells retaining wild-type p53.

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, J; Yang, Y; Saavedra, J E; Colburn, N H; Keefer, L K; Perantoni, A O

    2009-01-29

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a major effector molecule in cancer prevention. A number of studies have shown that NO prodrug JS-K (O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate) induces apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it is a promising new therapeutic for cancer. However, the mechanism of its tumor-killing activity remains unclear. Ubiquitin plays an important role in the regulation of tumorigenesis and cell apoptosis. Our earlier report has shown that inactivation of the ubiquitin system through blocking E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzyme) activity preferentially induces apoptosis in p53-expressing transformed cells. As E1 has an active cysteine residue that could potentially interact with NO, we hypothesized that JS-K could inactivate E1 activity. E1 activity was evaluated by detecting ubiquitin-E1 conjugates through immunoblotting. JS-K strikingly inhibits the ubiquitin-E1 thioester formation in cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of approximately 2 microM, whereas a JS-K analog that cannot release NO did not affect these levels in cells. Moreover, JS-K decreases total ubiquitylated proteins and increases p53 levels, which is mainly regulated by ubiquitin and proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, JS-K preferentially induces cell apoptosis in p53-expressing transformed cells. These findings indicate that JS-K inhibits E1 activity and kills transformed cells harboring wild-type p53.

  11. Augmenting tumor uptake of Tc-99m monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with biological response modifiers: Influence of interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Thakur, M.L.; Wilder, S.

    1994-05-01

    Following the evaluation of radiolabeled MAbs for scintigraphic imaging or therapy, low tumor uptake emerged as one of the most prominent problems. The aim of this investigation was to examine the influence of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}2b in augmenting uptake of Tc-99m labeled antimelanoma MAb 31.3 in nude mice bearing experimental human melanoma. MAb was labeled with Tc-99m by our ascorbic acid mediated reduction technique, analyzed and 20 {mu}g containing 40-120 {mu}Ci Tc-99m were administered i.v., 1 hr following i.m. or i.v. administration of 10K, 20K, or 100K i.u. IFN-{alpha}2b. Animals receiving 0.9% saline similarly served as controls. 4 and 24 hrs later, animals were sacrificed, imaged, and dissected for tissue distribution studies. Tumor blood flow was measured before and after administration of IFN by color Doppler imaging technique, intratumoral temperature was recorded using thermocouples, and tumor histology was performed to visualize tumor lymphocytic infiltration. Although no excessive lymphocytic infiltration was seen within 72 hr post-injection of IFN, and only a modest increase in tumor temperature was noted, a significant increase in blood flow was observed within 45 min. as differentiated by amplitudes at peak systolic and end diastolic cardiac cycles. The best tumor uptake enhancement was noted at 24 hr following i.m. administration of 20K i.u. IFN and measured greater than 300% of the control value (7.2{plus_minus}1.2%/g vs. 2.2{plus_minus}1.4%/g). IFN-{alpha}2b enhances tumor blood flow in experimental tumors and significantly augments the uptake of radiolabeled MAbs.

  12. Clinical-scale laser-based scanning and processing of live cells: selective photothermal killing of fluorescent tumor targets for autologous stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Manfred R.; Hanania, Elie G.; Eisfeld, Timothy; O'Neal, Robert A.; Khovananth, Kevin M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2001-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, is widely used for the treatment of cancer. However, contaminating tumor cells within HSC harvests continue to be of major concern since re-infused tumor cells have proven to contribute to disease relapse. Many tumor purging methods have been evaluated, but all leave detectable tumor cells in the transplant and result in significant loss of HSCs. These shortcomings cause engraftment delays and compromise the therapeutic value of purging. A novel approach integrating automated scanning cytometry, image analysis, and selective laser-induced killing of labeled cells within a cell mixture is described here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cells were spiked into cell mixtures, and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to label tumor cells within the mixture. Cells were then allowed to settle on a surface, and as the surface was scanned with a fluorescence excitation source, a laser pulse was fired at every detected tumor cell using high-speed beam steering mirrors. Tumor cells were selectively killed with little effect on adjacent non-target cells, demonstrating the feasibility of this automated cell processing approach. This technology has many potential research and clinical applications, one example of which is tumor cell purging for autologous HSC transplantation.

  13. Cell cycle arrest and clonogenic tumor cell kill by divergent chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Mastbergen, S C; Duivenvoorden, I; Versteegh, R T; Geldof, A A

    2000-01-01

    Regulators of cell cycle phase transitions could be important targets for cancer treatment using cytostatic chemotherapy. Therefore, the extent of cell cycle arrest induced by different cytostatic agents has to be correlated with ultimate clonogenic tumor cell death. Especially the value of early cell cycle perturbations as indicators for the clinical efficacy of drugs should be a matter of investigation. In vitro PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells were incubated for 24 hours with a panel of six different chemotherapeutic drugs in various concentrations (Aplidine, Cisplatin, Isohomohalichondrin B (IHB), Taxol, Vincristine and Vinorelbine). The short term effects on the cell cycle distribution were determined by DNA flowcytometry while the clonogenic capacity of these cells was quantitated to measure the cytotoxic treatment efficacy. Significant decreases of clonogenic survival proved to be strongly correlated with cell cycle perturbations. IHB, Taxol, Vincristine and Vinorelbine resulted in accumulation (up to 87-92%) in the G2M phase, while Cisplatin and Aplidine led to increases in the S-phase fraction and in both G2M- as well as S-phase fractions, respectively. Cell cycle phase perturbations appear to be suitable, early markers for cytotoxic drug efficacy.

  14. Whole recombinant Pichia pastoris expressing HPV16 L1 antigen is superior in inducing protection against tumor growth as compared to killed transgenic Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Bolhassani, Azam; Muller, Martin; Roohvand, Farzin; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Agi, Elnaz; Shokri, Mehdi; Rad, Mahdieh Motamedi; Hosseinzadeh, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The development of an efficient vaccine against high-risk HPV types can reduce the incidence rates of cervical cancer by generating anti-tumor protective responses. Traditionally, the majority of prophylactic viral vaccines are composed of live, attenuated or inactivated viruses. Among them, the design of an effective and low-cost vaccine is critical. Inactivated vaccines especially heat-killed yeast cells have emerged as a promising approach for generating antigen-specific immunotherapy. Recent studies have indicated that yeast cell wall components possess adjuvant activities. Moreover, a non-pathogenic protozoan, Leishmania tarentolae (L.tar) has attracted a great attention as a live candidate vaccine. In current study, immunological and protective efficacy of whole recombinant killed Pichia pastoris and Leishmania tarentolae expressing HPV16 L1 capsid protein was evaluated in tumor mice model. We found that Pichia-L1, L.tar-L1 and Gardasil groups increase the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, indicating a relative preference for the induction of Th1 immune responses. Furthermore, subcutaneous injection of killed Pichia-L1 generated the significant L1-specific IFN-γ immune response as well as the best protective effects in vaccinated mice as compared to killed L.tar-L1, killed Pichia pastoris, killed L.tar and PBS groups. Indeed, whole recombinant Leishmania tarentolae could not protect mice against C3 tumor mice model. These data suggest that Pichia-L1 may be a candidate for the control of HPV infections. PMID:25668661

  15. Chemotherapy-induced immunogenic modulation of tumor cells enhances killing by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and is distinct from immunogenic cell death.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James W; Garnett, Charlie T; Farsaci, Benedetto; Palena, Claudia; Tsang, Kwong-Yok; Ferrone, Soldano; Gameiro, Sofia R

    2013-08-01

    Certain chemotherapeutic regimens trigger cancer cell death while inducing dendritic cell maturation and subsequent immune responses. However, chemotherapy-induced immunogenic cell death (ICD) has thus far been restricted to select agents. In contrast, several chemotherapeutic drugs modulate antitumor immune responses, despite not inducing classic ICD. In addition, in many cases tumor cells do not die after treatment. Here, using docetaxel, one of the most widely used cancer chemotherapeutic agents, as a model, we examined phenotypic and functional consequences of tumor cells that do not die from ICD. Docetaxel treatment of tumor cells did not induce ATP or high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) secretion, or cell death. However, calreticulin (CRT) exposure was observed in all cell lines examined after chemotherapy treatment. Killing by carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), MUC-1, or PSA-specific CD8(+) CTLs was significantly enhanced after docetaxel treatment. This killing was associated with increases in components of antigen-processing machinery, and mediated largely by CRT membrane translocation, as determined by functional knockdown of CRT, PERK, or CRT-blocking peptide. A docetaxel-resistant cell line was selected (MDR-1(+), CD133(+)) by continuous exposure to docetaxel. These cells, while resistant to direct cytostatic effects of docetaxel, were not resistant to the chemomodulatory effects that resulted in enhancement of CTL killing. Here, we provide an operational definition of "immunogenic modulation," where exposure of tumor cells to nonlethal/sublethal doses of chemotherapy alters tumor phenotype to render the tumor more sensitive to CTL killing. These observations are distinct and complementary to ICD and highlight a mechanism whereby chemotherapy can be used in combination with immunotherapy. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  16. Cytolethal distending toxin B as a cell-killing component of tumor-targeted anthrax toxin fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Bachran, C; Hasikova, R; Leysath, C E; Sastalla, I; Zhang, Y; Fattah, R J; Liu, S; Leppla, S H

    2014-01-16

    Cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced by Gram-negative bacteria of several species. It is composed of three subunits, CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC, with CdtB being the catalytic subunit. We fused CdtB from Haemophilus ducreyi to the N-terminal 255 amino acids of Bacillus anthracis toxin lethal factor (LFn) to design a novel, potentially potent antitumor drug. As a result of this fusion, CdtB was transported into the cytosol of targeted cells via the efficient delivery mechanism of anthrax toxin. The fusion protein efficiently killed various human tumor cell lines by first inducing a complete cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by induction of apoptosis. The fusion protein showed very low toxicity in mouse experiments and impressive antitumor effects in a Lewis Lung carcinoma model, with a 90% cure rate. This study demonstrates that efficient drug delivery by a modified anthrax toxin system combined with the enzymatic activity of CdtB has great potential as anticancer treatment and should be considered for the development of novel anticancer drugs.

  17. Enhanced binding and killing of target tumor cells by drug-loaded liposomes modified with tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; D’Souza, Gerard GM; Bedi, Deepa; Fagbohun, Olusegun A; Potturi, L Prasanna; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Aim To explore cancer cell-specific phage fusion pVIII coat protein, identified using phage display, for targeted delivery of drug-loaded liposomes to MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Material & methods An 8-mer landscape library f8/8 and a biopanning protocol against MCF-7 cells were used to select a landscape phage protein bearing MCF-7-specific peptide. Size and morphology of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes modified with the tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein (phage–Doxil) were determined by dynamic light scattering and freeze-fraction electron microscopy. Topology of the phage protein in liposomes was examined by western blot. Association of phage–Doxil with MCF-7 cells was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrometry. Selective targeting to MCF-7 was shown by FACS using a coculture model with target and nontarget cells. Phage–Doxil-induced tumor cell killing and apoptosis were confirmed by CellTiter-Blue® Assay and caspase-3/CPP32 fluorometric assay. Results A chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 cells, identified from a phage landscape library, was directly incorporated into the liposomal bilayer of doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®) without additional conjugation with lipophilic moieties. Western blotting confirmed the presence of both targeting peptide and pVIII coat protein in the phage–Doxil, which maintained the liposomal morphology and retained a substantial part of the incorporated drug after phage protein incorporation. The binding activity of the phage fusion pVIII coat protein was retained after incorporation into liposomes, and phage–Doxil strongly and specifically targeted MCF-7 cells, demonstrating significantly increased cytotoxicity towards target cells in vitro. Conclusion We present a novel and straightforward method for making tumor-targeted nanomedicines by anchoring specific phage proteins (substitute antibodies) on their surface. PMID:20528452

  18. The Smac Mimetic BV6 Improves NK Cell-Mediated Killing of Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells by Simultaneously Targeting Tumor and Effector Cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kyra; Tognarelli, Sara; Roesler, Stefanie; Boedicker, Cathinka; Schubert, Ralf; Steinle, Alexander; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common cancer of connective tissues in pediatrics, is often resistant to conventional therapies. One underlying mechanism of this resistance is the overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, leading to a dysfunctional cell death program within tumor cells. Smac mimetics (SM) are small molecules that can reactivate the cell death program by antagonizing IAP proteins and thereby compensating their overexpression. Here, we report that SM sensitize two RMS cell lines (RD and RH30) toward natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing on the one hand, and increase the cytotoxic potential of NK cells on the other. The SM-induced sensitization of RH30 cells toward NK cell-mediated killing is significantly reduced through blocking tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on NK cells prior to coculture. In addition, the presence of zVAD.fmk, a pancaspase inhibitor, rescues tumor cells from the increase in killing, indicating an apoptosis-dependent cell death. On the NK cell side, the presence of SM in addition to IL-2 during the ex vivo expansion leads to an increase in their cytotoxic activity against RH30 cells. This effect is mainly TNFα-dependent and partially mediated by NK cell activation, which is associated with transcriptional upregulation of NF-κB target genes such as IκBα and RelB. Taken together, our findings implicate that SM represent a novel double-hit strategy, sensitizing tumor and activating NK cells with one single drug.

  19. Umbilical cord blood CD34+ progenitor-derived NK cells efficiently kill ovarian cancer spheroids and intraperitoneal tumors in NOD/SCID/IL2Rgnull mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstad-van Evert, Janneke S.; Cany, Jeannette; van den Brand, Dirk; Oudenampsen, Manon; Brock, Roland; Torensma, Ruurd; Bekkers, Ruud L.; Jansen, Joop H.; Massuger, Leon F.; Dolstra, Harry

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells is an attractive therapy approach against ovarian carcinoma. Here, we evaluated the potency of highly active NK cells derived from human CD34+ haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) to infiltrate and mediate killing of human ovarian cancer spheroids using an in vivo-like model system and mouse xenograft model. These CD56+Perforin+ HSPC-NK cells were generated under stroma-free conditions in the presence of StemRegenin-1, IL-15, and IL-12, and exerted efficient cytolytic activity and IFNγ production toward ovarian cancer monolayer cultures. Live-imaging confocal microscopy demonstrated that these HSPC-NK cells actively migrate, infiltrate, and mediate tumor cell killing in a three-dimensional multicellular ovarian cancer spheroid. Infiltration of up to 30% of total HSPC-NK cells within 8 h resulted in robust tumor spheroid destruction. Furthermore, intraperitoneal HSPC-NK cell infusions in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice bearing ovarian carcinoma significantly reduced tumor progression. These findings demonstrate that highly functional HSPC-NK cells efficiently destruct ovarian carcinoma spheroids in vitro and kill intraperitoneal ovarian tumors in vivo, providing great promise for effective immunotherapy through intraperitoneal HSPC-NK cell adoptive transfer in ovarian carcinoma patients. PMID:28919991

  20. Selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha: identification of a tumor-inhibitory factor and the first molecular insights to its effect.

    PubMed

    Widodo, Nashi; Kaur, Kamaljit; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Takagi, Yasuomi; Ishii, Tetsuro; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C

    2007-04-01

    Ashwagandha is regarded as a wonder shrub of India and is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine and health tonics that claim its variety of health-promoting effects. Surprisingly, these claims are not well supported by adequate studies, and the molecular mechanisms of its action remain largely unexplored to date. We undertook a study to identify and characterize the antitumor activity of the leaf extract of ashwagandha. Selective tumor-inhibitory activity of the leaf extract (i-Extract) was identified by in vivo tumor formation assays in nude mice and by in vitro growth assays of normal and human transformed cells. To investigate the cellular targets of i-Extract, we adopted a gene silencing approach using a selected small hairpin RNA library and found that p53 is required for the killing activity of i-Extract. By molecular analysis of p53 function in normal and a variety of tumor cells, we found that it is selectively activated in tumor cells, causing either their growth arrest or apoptosis. By fractionation, purification, and structural analysis of the i-Extract constituents, we have identified its p53-activating tumor-inhibiting factor as with a none. We provide the first molecular evidence that the leaf extract of ashwagandha selectively kills tumor cells and, thus, is a natural source for safe anticancer medicine.

  1. Defects in the Acquisition of Tumor-Killing Capability of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cells in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Ching; Su, Yu-Chia; Lu, Ya-Ting; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Hung-Ju; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Lai, Yo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidences have shown that diabetes mellitus not only raises risk but also heightens mortality rate of cancer. It is not clear, however, whether antitumor CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is down-modulated in diabetic hosts. We investigated the impact of hyperglycemia on CTLs' acquisition of tumor-killing capability by utilizing streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ-diabetic) mice. Murine diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (200 mg/kg) in C57BL/6 mice, 2C-T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic and P14-TCR transgenic mice. The study found that, despite harboring intact proliferative capacity measured with CFSE labeling and MTT assay, STZ-diabetic CD8+ CTLs displayed impaired effector functions. After stimulation, STZ-diabetic CD8+ CTLs produced less perforin and TNFα assessed by intracellular staining, as well as expressed less CD103 protein. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of STZ-diabetic P14 CD8+ effector cells showed an insufficient recruitment to the B16.gp33 melanoma and inadequate production of perforin, granzyme B and TNFα determined by immunohistochemistry in the tumor milieu. As a result, STZ-diabetic CD8+ effector cells were neither able to eliminate tumor nor to improve survival of tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data suggest that CD8+ CTLs are crippled to infiltrate into tumors and thus fail to acquire tumor-killing capability in STZ-diabetic hosts. PMID:25390652

  2. The augmented anti-tumor effects of Antrodia camphorata co-fermented with Chinese medicinal herb in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Lai; Huang, Zih-Ning; Hsieh, Hsiao-Hui; Yu, Wen-Chun; Tzeng, Win-Yu; Lee, Guo-Yang; Chen, Yi-Peng; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye

    2009-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata, unique fungal specie, has been used as a folk medicine in Taiwan for many years. The purpose of this study was to compare the extracts from the solid-state culture of A. camphorata co-fermented with Chinese medicinal herb (AC-CF) with two other extracts from fruiting bodies (AC-FB) or solid-state culture (AC-SS), for their anti-tumor effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We measured in vitro cell proliferation, percentage of apoptosis, population distribution of cell cycles, Western blot analysis of multiple drugs resistance-1 (MDR-1), and apoptosis-related proteins in HepG2 cells treated with three different preparations of A. camphorate extracts. Our results showed that AC-CF had better anti-proliferation effect on human hepatoma HepG2 cells than AC-FB or AC-SS dose-dependently. In addition, AC-CF in combination with anti-tumor agents (mitomycin C or methotrexate) showed better adjuvant anti-tumor effects than AC-FB or AC-SS. We further demonstrated the augmented adjuvant anti-tumor effects of AC-CF not only through down regulation of MDR-1 expression but also through a COX-2 dependent apoptosis pathway, involving down-regulation of COX-2 and p-AKT and up-regulation of PARP-1. In conclusion, in this study, we have demonstrated a novel strategy of fermenting A. camphorata with Chinese medicinal herb (AC-CF), which augmented their anti-tumor effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells as compared to the traditional ones (AC-FB or AC-SS).

  3. Augmenting antitumor T-cell responses to mimotope vaccination by boosting with native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Jordan, Kimberly R; U'ren, Lance; Sprague, Jonathan; Kemmler, Charles B; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with antigens expressed by tumors is one strategy for stimulating enhanced T-cell responses against tumors. However, these peptide vaccines rarely result in efficient expansion of tumor-specific T cells or responses that protect against tumor growth. Mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, elicit increased numbers of T cells that crossreact with the native tumor antigen, resulting in potent antitumor responses. Unfortunately, mimotopes may also elicit cells that do not crossreact or have low affinity for tumor antigen. We previously showed that one such mimotope of the dominant MHC class I tumor antigen of a mouse colon carcinoma cell line stimulates a tumor-specific T-cell clone and elicits antigen-specific cells in vivo, yet protects poorly against tumor growth. We hypothesized that boosting the mimotope vaccine with the native tumor antigen would focus the T-cell response elicited by the mimotope toward high affinity, tumor-specific T cells. We show that priming T cells with the mimotope, followed by a native tumor-antigen boost, improves tumor immunity compared with T cells elicited by the same prime with a mimotope boost. Our data suggest that the improved tumor immunity results from the expansion of mimotope-elicited tumor-specific T cells that have increased avidity for the tumor antigen. The enhanced T cells are phenotypically distinct and enriched for T-cell receptors previously correlated with improved antitumor immunity. These results suggest that incorporation of native antigen into clinical mimotope vaccine regimens may improve the efficacy of antitumor T-cell responses.

  4. Combining Heavy Ion Radiation and Artificial MicroRNAs to Target the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene Efficiently Kills Human Tumor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zhiming; Wang Ping; Wang Hongyan; Zhang Xiangming; Wang Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang Ya

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Previously, we demonstrated that heavy ions kill more cells at the same dose than X-rays because DNA-clustered lesions produced by heavy ions affect nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair but not homologous recombination repair (HRR). We have also shown that our designed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) could efficiently target XRCC4 (an essential factor for NHEJ) or XRCC2 (an essential factor for HRR) and sensitize human tumor cells to X-rays. Based on these data, we were interested in testing the hypothesis that combining heavy ions and amiRs to target HRR but not NHEJ should more efficiently kill human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human tumor cell lines (U87MG, a brain tumor cell line, and A549, a lung cancer cell line) and their counterparts, overexpressed with amiR to target XRCC2, XRCC4 or both, were used in this study. Survival sensitivities were examined using a clonogenic assay after these cells were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. In addition, these cell lines were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to form xenografts and the tumor size was compared after the tumor areas were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. Results: Although targeting either XRCC4 (NHEJ factor) or XRCC2 (HRR factor) sensitized the human tumor cells to X-rays, in vitro and the xenograft animal model, targeting only XRCC2 but not XRCC4 sensitized the human tumor cells to heavy ions in vitro and in the xenograft animal model. Conclusions: Combining heavy ions with targeting the HRR pathway, but not the NHEJ pathway, could significantly improve the efficiency of tumor cell death.

  5. Tumor-Unrelated CD4 T Cell Help Augments CD134 plus CD137 Dual Costimulation Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Payal; St Rose, Marie-Clare; Wang, Xi; Ryan, Joseph M.; Wasser, Jeffrey S.; Vella, Anthony T.; Adler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of immune-based cancer therapies to elicit beneficial CD8+ CTL is limited by tolerance pathways that inactivate tumor-specific CD4 helper T cells. A strategy to bypass this problem is to engage tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells. Thus, CD4 T cells, regardless of their specificity per se, can boost CD8+ CTL priming so long as the cognate epitopes are linked via presentation on the same dendritic cell. Here, we assessed the therapeutic impact of engaging tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells during dual costimulation with CD134 plus CD137 that not only provide help via the above-mentioned classical linked pathway, but also provide non-linked help that facilitates CTL function in T cells not directly responding to cognate antigen. We found that engagement of tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells dramatically boosted the ability of dual costimulation to control the growth of established B16 melanomas. Surprisingly, this effect depended upon a CD134-dependent component that was extrinsic to the tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells, suggesting that the dual-costimulated helper cells are themselves helped by a CD134+ cell(s). Nevertheless, the delivery of therapeutic help tracked with an increased frequency of tumor-infiltrating granzyme B+ effector CD8 T cells and a reciprocal decrease in Foxp3+CD4+ cell frequency. Notably, the tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells also infiltrated the tumors, and their deletion several days following initial T cell priming negated their therapeutic impact. Taken together, dual costimulation programs tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells to deliver therapeutic help during both the priming and effector stages of the anti-tumor response. PMID:26561553

  6. Evidence for induction of humoral and cytotoxic immune responses against devil facial tumor disease cells in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) immunized with killed cell preparations.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, A; Brown, G K; Tovar, C; Lyons, A B; Woods, G M

    2015-06-12

    Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) risk extinction from a contagious cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) in which the infectious agent is the tumor cell itself. Because devils are unable to produce an immune response against the tumor cells no devil has survived 'infection'. To promote an immune response we immunized healthy devils with killed DFTD tumor cells in the presence of adjuvants. Immune responses, including cytotoxicity and antibody production, were detected in five of the six devils. The incorporation of adjuvants that act via toll like receptors may provide additional signals to break 'immunological ignorance'. One of these devils was protected against a challenge with viable DFTD cells. This was a short-term protection as re-challenge one year later resulted in tumor growth. These results suggest that Tasmanian devils can generate immune responses against DFTD cells. With further optimization of immune stimulation it should be possible to protect Tasmanian devils against DFTD with an injectable vaccine.

  7. Local tumor irradiation augments the response to IL-2 therapy in a murine renal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Younes, E; Haas, G P; Dezso, B; Ali, E; Maughan, R L; Kukuruga, M A; Montecillo, E; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1995-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that local tumor irradiation effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of IL-2 therapy on pulmonary metastases from a murine renal adenocarcinoma, Renca. Irradiation with 300 rad to the left lung only, followed by systemic IL-2 therapy, results in increased tumor reduction in both lungs, suggesting that radiation enhances the systemic effect of immunotherapy. In this study, we show that irradiation of the tumor-bearing organ is essential for the combined effect of both modalities. This effect is radiation dose-dependent as increases in the radiation dosage result in greater tumor reduction in the irradiated field as well as systemically in nonirradiated fields when combined with immunotherapy. We find that irradiation has a direct inhibitory effect on Renca cell growth in vitro. Irradiation of Renca cells also causes an upregulation in H-2Kd class I MHC antigen detectable at 300 rad and more pronounced with 800 rad. By in vivo selective depletion of lymphocyte subsets, we demonstrate the involvement of Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ T cell subsets and AsGM1+ cells, including NK cells, in the antitumor effect mediated by tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Immunohistochemistry studies, performed on lung sections, showed a significant infiltration of CD3+ T cells and macrophages in the tumor nodules following treatment with tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Our studies indicate that the mechanism of interaction between tumor irradiation and immunotherapy may include radiation-induced alterations in the tumor growth and antigenicity which may enhance or trigger an anti-tumor response elicited by IL-2 and mediated by T cells, AsGM1+ cells, and macrophages.

  8. A Genetically Modified attenuated Listeria Vaccine Expressing HPV16 E7 Kill Tumor Cells in Direct and Antigen-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yan Yan; Tan, Wei Jun; Duan, Fei Fei; Pan, Zhi Ming; Chen, Xiang; Yin, Yue Lan; Jiao, Xin An

    2017-01-01

    Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes, LM) induces specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses, and has been identified as a promising cancer vaccine vector. Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, with human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16, being the main etiological factor. The therapeutic HPV vaccines are urgently needed. The E7 protein of HPV is necessary for maintaining malignancy in tumor cells. Here, a genetically modified attenuated LM expressing HPV16 E7 protein was constructed. Intraperitoneal vaccination of LM4Δhly::E7 significantly reduced tumor size and even resulted in complete regression of established tumors in a murine model of cervical cancer. We provided evidence that recombinant LM strains could enter the tumor tissue and induce non-specific tumor cell death, probably via activation of reactive oxygen species and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. LM4Δhly::E7 effectively triggered a strong antigen-specific cellular immunity in tumor-bearing mice, and elicited significant infiltration of T cells in the intratumoral milieu. In summary, these data showed LM4Δhly::E7 to be effective in a cervical cancer model and LM4Δhly::E7 induced an antitumor effect by antigen-specific cellular immune responses and direct killing of tumor cells, indicating a potential application against cervical cancer. PMID:28706878

  9. The Smac Mimetic BV6 Improves NK Cell-Mediated Killing of Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells by Simultaneously Targeting Tumor and Effector Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kyra; Tognarelli, Sara; Roesler, Stefanie; Boedicker, Cathinka; Schubert, Ralf; Steinle, Alexander; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common cancer of connective tissues in pediatrics, is often resistant to conventional therapies. One underlying mechanism of this resistance is the overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, leading to a dysfunctional cell death program within tumor cells. Smac mimetics (SM) are small molecules that can reactivate the cell death program by antagonizing IAP proteins and thereby compensating their overexpression. Here, we report that SM sensitize two RMS cell lines (RD and RH30) toward natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing on the one hand, and increase the cytotoxic potential of NK cells on the other. The SM-induced sensitization of RH30 cells toward NK cell-mediated killing is significantly reduced through blocking tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on NK cells prior to coculture. In addition, the presence of zVAD.fmk, a pancaspase inhibitor, rescues tumor cells from the increase in killing, indicating an apoptosis-dependent cell death. On the NK cell side, the presence of SM in addition to IL-2 during the ex vivo expansion leads to an increase in their cytotoxic activity against RH30 cells. This effect is mainly TNFα-dependent and partially mediated by NK cell activation, which is associated with transcriptional upregulation of NF-κB target genes such as IκBα and RelB. Taken together, our findings implicate that SM represent a novel double-hit strategy, sensitizing tumor and activating NK cells with one single drug. PMID:28326081

  10. Phenothiazine Inhibitors of TLKs Affect Double-Strand Break Repair and DNA Damage Response Recovery and Potentiate Tumor Killing with Radiomimetic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ronald, Sharon; Awate, Sanket; Rath, Abhijit; Carroll, Jennifer; Galiano, Floyd; Dwyer, Donard; Kleiner-Hancock, Heather; Mathis, J Michael; Vigod, Simone; De Benedetti, Arrigo

    2013-01-01

    The Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are involved in chromatin assembly, DNA repair, and transcription. Two TLK genes exist in humans, and their expression is often dysregulated in cancer. TLKs phosphorylate Asf1 and Rad9, regulating double-strand break (DSB) repair and the DNA damage response (DDR). TLKs maintain genomic stability and are important therapeutic intervention targets. We identified specific inhibitors of TLKs from several compound libraries, some of which belong to the family of phenothiazine antipsychotics. The inhibitors prevented the TLK-mediated phosphorylation of Rad9(S328) and impaired checkpoint recovery and DSB repair. The inhibitor thioridazine (THD) potentiated tumor killing with chemotherapy and also had activity alone. Staining for γ-H2AX revealed few positive cells in untreated tumors, but large numbers in mice treated with low doxorubicin or THD alone, possibly the result of the accumulation of DSBs that are not promptly repaired as they may occur in the harsh tumor growth environment.

  11. Lapatinib and Obatoclax Kill Tumor Cells through Blockade of ERBB1/3/4 and through Inhibition of BCL-xL and MCL-1

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Nichola; Hamed, Hossein A.; Bareford, M. Danielle; Poklepovic, Andrew; Fisher, Paul B.; Grant, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies in breast cancer cells have shown that lapatinib and obatoclax interact in a greater than additive fashion to cause cell death and do so through a toxic form of autophagy. The present studies sought to extend our analyses to the central nervous system (CNS) tumor cells and to further define mechanisms of drug action. Lapatinib and obatoclax killed multiple CNS tumor isolates. Cells lacking PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) function were relatively resistant to drug combination lethality; expression of PTEN in PTEN-null cells restored drug sensitivity, and knockdown of PTEN promoted drug resistance. On the basis of knockdown of ERBB1-4 (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1–4), we discovered that the inhibition of ERBB1/3/4 receptors were most important for enhancing obatoclax lethality rather than ERBB2. In parallel, we noted in CNS tumor cells that knockdown of BCL-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large)and MCL-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) interacted in an additive fashion to facilitate lapatinib lethality. Pretreatment of tumor cells with obatoclax enhanced the lethality of lapatinib to a greater extent than concomitant treatment. Treatment of animals carrying orthotopic CNS tumor isolates with lapatinib- and obatoclax-prolonged survival. Altogether, our data show that lapatinib and obatoclax therapy could be of use in the treatment of tumors located in the CNS. PMID:22357666

  12. Augmented-reality-guided biopsy of a tumor near the skull base: the surgeon's experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Sudra, Gunther; Ghanai, Sassan; Salb, Tobias; Dillmann, Ruediger; Marmulla, Ruediger; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    INPRES, a system for Augmented Reality has been developed in the collaborative research center "Information Technology in Medicine - Computer- and Sensor-Aided Surgery". The system is based on see-through glasses. In extensive preclinical testing the system has proven its functionality and tests with volunteers had been performed successfully, based on MRI imaging. We report the surgeons view of the first use of the system for AR guided biopsy of a tumour near the skull base. Preoperative planning was performed based on CT image data. The information to be projected was the tumour volume and was segmented from image data. With the use of infrared cameras, the positions of patient and surgeon were tracked intraoperatively and the information on the glasses displays was updated accordingly. The systems proved its functionality under OR conditions in patient care: Augmented reality information could be visualized with sufficient accuracy for the surgical task. After intraoperative calibration by the surgeon, the biopsy was acquired successfully. The advantage of see through glasses is their flexibility. A virtual stereoscopic image can be set up wherever and whenever desired. A biopsy at a delicate location could be performed without the need for wide exposure. This means additional safety and lower operation related morbidity to the patient. The integration of the calibration-procedure of the glasses into the intraoperative workflow is of importance to the surgeon.

  13. Augmented lymphocyte expansion from solid tumors with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Kevin M; DeVillier, Laura E; Feldman, Steven A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Dudley, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of patients with adoptive T cell therapy requires expansion of unique tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) cultures from single cell suspensions processed from melanoma biopsies. Strategies which increase the expansion and reliability of TIL generation from tumor digests are necessary to improve access to TIL therapy. Prior work evaluated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) for their antigen-specific and costimulatory properties. We investigated engineered cells for co-stimulatory enhancement (ECCE) consisting of K562 cells which express 4-1BBL in the absence of artificial antigen stimulation. ECCE accelerated TIL expansion and significantly improved TIL numbers (p=0.001) from single cell melanoma suspensions. TIL generated with ECCE contain significantly more CD8+CD62L+ and CD8+CD27+ T cells then comparable IL-2-expanded TIL and maintained anti-tumor reactivity. Moreover, ECCE improved TIL expansion from non-melanoma cell suspensions similar to that seen with melanoma tumors. These data demonstrate that ECCE addition to TIL production will enable treatment of patients ineligible using current methods. PMID:21989413

  14. Lack of p53 Augments Anti-Tumor Functions in Cytolytic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Kesarwani, Pravin; Soloshchenko, Myroslawa; Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Andrijauskaite, Kristina; Moxley, Kelly; Janakiraman, Harinarayanan; Scheffel, Matthew J.; Helke, Kristi; Armenson, Kent; Palanisamy, Viswanathan; Rubinstein, Mark P.; Mayer, Elizabeth-Garrett; Cole, David J.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Christina-Voelkel-Johnson; Nishimura, Michael I.; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive stimulation of T cell receptor (TCR) with cognate antigen results in robust proliferation and expansion of the T cells, and also imprints them with replicative senescence signatures. Our previous studies have shown that life-span and anti-tumor function of T cells can be enhanced by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) or intervening with ROS dependent JNK activation that leads to its activation induced cell death (AICD). Since tumor suppressor protein p53 is also a redox active transcription factor that regulates cellular ROS generation that triggers downstream factor mediating apoptosis, we determined if p53 levels could influence persistence and function of tumor reactive T cells. Using h3T TCR transgenic mice, with human tyrosinase epitope reactive T cells developed on p53 knock-out (KO) background, we determined its role in regulating anti-tumor T cell function. Our data shows that as compared to h3T cells, h3T-p53 KO T cells exhibited enhanced glycolytic commitment that correlated with increased proliferation, IFN-γ secretion, cytolytic capacity, expression of stemness gene signature and decreased TGF-β signaling. This increased effector function correlated to the improved control of subcutaneously established murine melanoma after adoptive transfer of p53-KO T cells. Pharmacological inhibition of human TCR transduced T cells using a combination of p53 inhibitors also potentiated the T cell effector function and improved persistence. Thus, our data highlights the key role of p53 in regulating the tumor reactive T cell response and that targeting this pathway could have potential translational significance in adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:27466285

  15. Macrophages help NK cells to attack tumor cells by stimulatory NKG2D ligand but protect themselves from NK killing by inhibitory ligand Qa-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhixia; Zhang, Cai; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and their crosstalk with other immune cells are important for innate immunity against tumor. To explore the role of the interaction between NK cells and macrophages in the regulation of anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we here demonstrate that poly I:C-treated macrophages increased NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against target tumor cells in NKG2D-dependent manner. In addition, IL-15, IL-18, and IFN-β secreted by poly I:C-treated macrophages are also involved in NKG2D expression and NK cell activation. Interestingly, the increase in expression of NKG2D ligands on macrophages induced a highly NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells, but not against macrophages themselves. Notably, a high expression level of Qa-1, a NKG2A ligand, on macrophages may contribute to such protection of macrophages from NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, Qa-1 or NKG2A knockdown and Qa-1 antibody blockade caused the macrophages to be sensitive to NK cytolysis. These results suggested that macrophages may activate NK cells to attack tumor by NKG2D recognition whereas macrophages protect themselves from NK lysis via preferential expression of Qa-1.

  16. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  17. Augmented lymphocyte expansion from solid tumors with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Kevin M; Devillier, Laura E; Feldman, Steven A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Dudley, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of patients with adoptive T-cell therapy requires expansion of unique tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) cultures from single-cell suspensions processed from melanoma biopsies. Strategies which increase the expansion and reliability of TIL generation from tumor digests are necessary to improve access to TIL therapy. Previous studies have evaluated artificial antigen presenting cells for their antigen-specific and costimulatory properties. We investigated engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement (ECCE) consisting of K562 cells that express 4-1BBL in the absence of artificial antigen stimulation. ECCE accelerated TIL expansion and significantly improved TIL numbers (P=0.001) from single-cell melanoma suspensions. TIL generated with ECCE contain significantly more CD8CD62L and CD8CD27 T cells then comparable interleukin-2-expanded TIL and maintained antitumor reactivity. Moreover, ECCE improved TIL expansion from nonmelanoma-cell suspensions similar to that seen with melanoma tumors. These data demonstrate that the addition of ECCE to TIL production will enable the treatment of patients that are ineligible using current methods.

  18. Inhibition of lung tumor growth and augmentation of radiosensitivity by decreasing peroxiredoxin I expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Keng, Peter C.; Shau Hungyi; Wu, C.-T.; Hu, Y.-C.; Liao, S.-K.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: miaofen@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: In this study, we examined the role of peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) in lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and its influence on these tumor cells' sensitivity to radiotherapy. Methods and materials: We established stable transfectants of A549 (p53+) and H1299 (p53-) lung carcinoma cell lines with Prx I antisense to downregulate their Prx I protein. We then examined their in vitro biologic changes and used nude mice xenografts of these cell lines to compare tumor invasion, spontaneous metastatic capacity, and sensitivity to radiotherapy. Results: The Prx I antisense transfectants of both cell lines showed a significant reduction in Prx I protein production. Prx I antisense transfectants grew more slowly than did the wild type. As xenografts in mice, A549 Prx I antisense transfectants showed a threefold delay in the generation of palpable tumors. The incidence of spontaneous metastasis of Prx I antisense transfectants was significantly less than that of the wild-type cells. Furthermore, irradiation of Prx I antisense transfectants caused more than twice the growth delay compared with the wild type. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that inactivation of Prx I may be a promising approach to improve the treatment outcome of patients with lung cancer.

  19. Proline biosynthesis augments tumor cell growth and aerobic glycolysis: involvement of pyridine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Hancock, Chad N; Fischer, Joseph W; Harman, Meredith; Phang, James M

    2015-11-24

    The metabolism of the nonessential amino acid proline contributes to tumor metabolic reprogramming. Previously we showed that MYC increases proline biosynthesis (PB) from glutamine. Here we show MYC increases the expression of the enzymes in PB at both protein and mRNA levels. Blockade of PB decreases tumor cell growth and energy production. Addition of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) or proline reverses the effects of P5C synthase knockdown but not P5C reductases knockdown. Importantly, the reversal effect of proline was blocked by concomitant proline dehydrogenase/oxidase (PRODH/POX) knockdown. These findings suggest that the important regulatory contribution of PB to tumor growth derives from metabolic cycling between proline and P5C rather than product proline or intermediate P5C. We further document the critical role of PB in maintaining pyridine nucleotide levels by connecting the proline cycle to glycolysis and to the oxidative arm of the pentose phosphate pathway. These findings establish a novel function of PB in tumorigenesis, linking the reprogramming of glucose, glutamine and pyridine nucleotides, and may provide a novel target for antitumor therapy.

  20. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha does not potentiate cell killing after photodynamic therapy with a silicon phthalocyanine in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Azizuddin, K; Kalka, K; Chiu, S M; Ahmad, N; Mukhtar, H; Separovic, D

    2001-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel cancer treatment utilizing a photosensitizer, visible light and oxygen. PDT with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, a new photosensitizer, is highly effective in cancer cell destruction and tumor ablation. The mechanisms underlying cancer cell killing by PDT are not fully understood. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) is a multifunctional cytokine that has been implicated in photocytotoxicity. We asked whether recombinant human TNF (rhTNF) affects Pc 4-PDT cytotoxicity in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Co-treatment of A431 cells with various doses of Pc 4-PDT and a sub-lethal rhTNF dose led to a sub-additive reduction in cell survival. In addition, in the presence of Pc 4-PDT or rhTNF, caspase-3 activity and apoptosis were induced. The combined treatment, however, did not potentiate either caspase-3 activity or apoptosis. Similar to previous findings we observed that Pc 4-PDT initiated a time-dependent extracellular TNF accumulation. The data suggest that: a) PDT and rhTNF induce cancer cell killing through different mechanisms; and b) Pc 4-PDT-induced TNF production is a stress response that may not directly affect photocytotoxicity.

  1. Multi-drug analyses in patients distinguish efficacious cancer agents based on both tumor cell killing and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Jason; Bertout, Jessica A; Kerwin, William S; Moreno-Gonzalez, Alicia; Casalini, Joey R; Grenley, Marc O; Beirne, Emily; Watts, Kori L; Keener, Andy; Thirstrup, Derek J; Tretyak, Ilona; Ditzler, Sally; Tripp, Chelsea D; Choy, Kevin; Gillings, Sarah; Breit, Megan N; Meleo, Karri A; Rizzo, Vanessa; Herrera, Chamisa L; Perry, James A; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Olson, James M; Klinghoffer, Richard

    2017-03-31

    The vision of a precision medicine-guided approach to novel cancer drug development is challenged by high intra-tumor heterogeneity and interpatient diversity. This complexity is rarely modeled accurately during preclinical drug development, hampering predictions of clinical drug efficacy. To address this issue, we developed CIVO (Comparative In Vivo Oncology) arrayed microinjection technology to test tumor responsiveness to simultaneous microdoses of multiple drugs directly in a patient's tumor. Here, in a study of 18 canine patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS), CIVO captured complex, patient-specific tumor responses encompassing both cancer cells and multiple immune infiltrates following localized exposure to different chemotherapy agents. CIVO also classified patient-specific tumor resistance to the most effective agent, doxorubicin, and further enabled assessment of a preclinical autophagy inhibitor, PS-1001, to reverse doxorubicin resistance. In a CIVO-identified subset of doxorubicin-resistant tumors, PS-1001 resulted in enhanced anti-tumor activity, increased infiltration of macrophages, and skewed this infiltrate toward M1 polarization. The ability to evaluate and cross-compare multiple drugs and drug combinations simultaneously in living tumors and across a diverse immune-competent patient population may provide a foundation from which to make informed drug development decisions. This method also represents a viable functional approach to complement current precision oncology strategies.

  2. Myeloid-specific deletion of tumor suppressor PTEN augments neutrophil transendothelial migration during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sarraj, Bara; Massberg, Steffen; Li, Yitang; Kasorn, Anongnard; Subramanian, Kulandayan; Loison, Fabien; Silberstein, Leslie E; von Andrian, Ulrich; Luo, Hongbo R

    2009-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) is a second messenger that is involved in a number of cell activities including cell growth, proliferation, and motility. PIP(3) is produced by PI3K and regulated by PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and SHIP lipid phosphatases. Evidence from our experiments shows that enhanced PIP(3) production results in elevated neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanism of this elevation is not well understood. We used intravital video microscopy to investigate neutrophil recruitment in the cremaster venules of wild-type and PTEN knockout (KO) mice. Neutrophil transmigration was augmented in PTEN KO mice 4 h after TNF-alpha intrascrotal injection. PTEN KO neutrophils also showed significantly enhanced transmigration 2 h after MIP-2 intrascrotal injection, an effect that dramatically decreased when PI3K or Src kinase inhibitor treatments preceded MIP-2 stimulation. Similarly, fMLP superfusion of the cremaster muscle lead to enhanced emigration in PTEN KO mice. The observed elevation in neutrophil emigration was likely caused by increased speed of crawling, crossing the venular wall, and migrating through the muscular tissue in PTEN KO mice because the effect of PTEN depletion on neutrophil rolling or adhesion was minimal. Interestingly, chemoattractant-induced release of gelatinase and elastase was also elevated in PTEN null neutrophils, providing a potential mechanism for the enhanced neutrophil migration in the PTEN KO mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PTEN deletion in neutrophils enhances their invasivity and recruitment to inflamed sites more likely by raising the cell physical capability to cross the vascular and tissue barriers.

  3. EGFR‐targeted Chimeras of Pseudomonas ToxA released into the extracellular milieu by attenuated Salmonella selectively kill tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, David; Carrafa, Jamie; Vincent, Lena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor‐targeted Salmonella VNP20009 preferentially replicate within tumor tissue and partially suppress tumor growth in murine tumor models. These Salmonella have the ability to locally induce apoptosis when they are in direct contact with cancer cells but they lack significant bystander killing, which may correlate with their overall lack of antitumor activity in human clinical studies. In order to compensate for this deficiency without enhancing overall toxicity, we engineered the bacteria to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)‐targeted cytotoxic proteins that are released into the extracellular milieu. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of the Salmonella strain VNP20009 to produce three different forms of the Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ToxA) chimeric with a tumor growth factor alpha (TGFα) which results in its producing culture supernatants that are cytotoxic and induce apoptosis in EGFR positive cancer cells as measured by the tetrazolium dye reduction, and Rhodamine 123 and JC‐10 mitochondrial depolarization assays. In addition, exchange of the ToxA REDLK endoplasmic reticulum retention signal for KDEL and co‐expression of the ColE3 lysis protein resulted in an overall increased cytotoxicity compared to the wild type toxin. This approach has the potential to significantly enhance the antitumor activity of VNP20009 while maintaining its previously established safety profile. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2698–2711. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27260220

  4. Costimulation improves the killing capability of T cells redirected to tumor cells expressing low levels of CD33: description of a novel modular targeting system.

    PubMed

    Arndt, C; Feldmann, A; von Bonin, M; Cartellieri, M; Ewen, E-M; Koristka, S; Michalk, I; Stamova, S; Berndt, N; Gocht, A; Bornhäuser, M; Ehninger, G; Schmitz, M; Bachmann, M

    2014-01-01

    Owing to their clinical success, there is growing interest in novel bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) for retargeting of T cells to tumor cells including for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). One potential target for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts is the surface molecule CD33. Here we describe a novel modular targeting platform that consists of a universal effector module (EM) and individual target modules (TMs). Both modules can form an immune complex via a peptide epitope. The resulting targeting complex can functionally replace a conventional bsAb. By fusion of a costimulatory domain (for example, the extracellular CD137 ligand domain) to the TM, the targeting complex can even provide a costimulatory signal to the redirected T cells at their side of interaction with the tumor cell. Furthermore, we observed that an efficient killing of tumor cells expressing low levels of the tumor target CD33 becomes critical at low effector-to-target cell ratios but can be improved by costimulation via CD137 using our novel targeting system.

  5. Resveratrol synergistically augments anti-tumor effect of 5-FU in vitro and in vivo by increasing S-phase arrest and tumor apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dun, Jiening; Chen, Xueyan; Gao, Haixia; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Yongjian

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that natural dietary agents, in combination with chemical agents, can improve the therapeutic response of cancers to chemotherapy and reduce the associated side-effects. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential and mechanisms of anticancer effects for the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and resveratrol (Res). In these studies, we employed the cancer cell lines TE-1 and A431 and an animal model of skin cancer. The presented results provide the first evidence that Res can enhance the anti-tumor potency of 5-FU by inducing S-phase arrest. The combination of Res and 5-FU demonstrates synergistic efficacy, causing tumor regression in a two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA. There was clear evidence of Res augmenting the growth inhibitory effect of 5-FU on the TE-1 and A431 cancer cells in vitro. In the in vivo studies, the tumor regression rate in the combination group increased significantly after four weeks of treatment (P < 0.01). The combination of 5-FU and Res significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells and the level of activated caspase-3, cleaved PARP and p53 proteins as well as increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In conclusion, the 5-FU/Res combination enabled a more effective inhibition of cell growth and the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells than 5-FU alone. The results of this study suggest that chemotherapy using natural dietary agents with chemical agents represents a superior cancer treatment option.

  6. Identification and Structural Analysis of an l-Asparaginase Enzyme from Guinea Pig with Putative Tumor Cell Killing Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Amanda M.; Nguyen, Hien-Anh; Rigouin, Coraline; Lavie, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    The initial observation that guinea pig serum kills lymphoma cells marks the serendipitous discovery of a new class of anti-cancer agents. The serum cell killing factor was shown to be an enzyme with l-asparaginase (ASNase) activity. As a direct result of this observation, several bacterial l-asparaginases were developed and are currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of the subset of hematological malignancies that are dependent on the extracellular pool of the amino acid asparagine. As drugs, these enzymes act to hydrolyze asparagine to aspartate, thereby starving the cancer cells of this amino acid. Prior to the work presented here, the precise identity of this guinea pig enzyme has not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We discovered that the guinea pig enzyme annotated as H0W0T5_CAVPO, which we refer to as gpASNase1, has the required low Km property consistent with that possessed by the cell-killing guinea pig serum enzyme. Elucidation of the ligand-free and aspartate complex gpASNase1 crystal structures allows a direct comparison with the bacterial enzymes and serves to explain the lack of l-glutaminase activity in the guinea pig enzyme. The structures were also used to generate a homology model for the human homolog hASNase1 and to help explain its vastly different kinetic properties compared with gpASNase1, despite a 70% sequence identity. Given that the bacterial enzymes frequently present immunogenic and other toxic side effects, this work suggests that gpASNase1 could be a promising alternative to these bacterial enzymes. PMID:25320094

  7. Killing Coyotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Presents different viewpoints concerning the federal government's Animal Damage Control (ADC) Program cited as responsible for killing millions of predators. Critics provide evidence of outdated and inhumane methods exemplified in the coyote killings. The ADC emphasizes new, nonlethal methods of controlling animals cited as "noxious."…

  8. B-cell depletion using an anti-CD20 antibody augments antitumor immune responses and immunotherapy in nonhematopoetic murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Fridlender, Zvi G; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn R; Kapoor, Veena; Blouin, Aaron; Kaiser, Larry R; Albelda, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    The role played by B cells in cancer biology is complex and somewhat controversial. Previous studies using genetically engineered mice suggest that B cells may be immunosuppressive and inhibit tumor rejection. However, the effects of B-cell depletion employing an antibody in mice bearing solid tumors has not been tested owing to difficulties in making an effective antimouse CD20 antibody (similar to rituximab). Injection of a newly developed antimouse CD20 antibody was effective in depleting circulating B cells from blood and lymph nodes, although depletion was less complete in the spleen. B-cell depletion slowed the growth of new solid tumors (not expressing CD20) and retarded the growth of established tumors but did not induce tumor regression. However, when the antibody was combined with an active immunotherapy approach using an adenovirus vaccine expressing the human papilloma virus-E7 gene (Ad.E7) in mice bearing TC1 tumors (murine lung cancer cells expressing human papilloma virus-E7), we noted enhanced antitumor effects and increased numbers of tetramer+/CD8+ T cells within the spleens and activated CD8+ T cells within tumors. B-cell depletion using an anti-CD20 antibody was thus effective in retarding tumor growth in multiple solid tumor models and augmenting immunotherapy in a tumor vaccine model. These studies raise the possibility that B-cell depletion may be a useful adjunct in human immunotherapy trials.

  9. Immune evasion of mantle cell lymphoma: expression of B7-H1 leads to inhibited T-cell response to and killing of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Bao, Hanying; He, Donghua; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Li, Yi; Neelapu, Sattva; Yang, Jing; Kwak, Larry W; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    Clinical trials of immunotherapy in mantle cell lymphoma have not yet delivered desirable results, partly because of the inhibitory machinery of the tumor and its microenvironment. Here we investigated the role of B7-H1, a member of the B7 family of co-stimulatory/co-inhibitory ligands, in mantle cell lymphoma-mediated immunosuppression. Allogeneic CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were purified and co-cultured with irradiated mantle cell lymphoma cells. Mantle cell lymphoma-reactive T-cell lines from HLA-A*0201(+) healthy blood donors were generated after in vitro restimulation, and were subjected to functional tests. We found that B7-H1 expressed on mantle cell lymphoma cells was able to inhibit T-cell proliferation induced by the tumor cells, impair the generation of antigen-specific T-cell responses, and render mantle cell lymphoma cells resistant to T-cell-mediated cytolysis. Blocking or knocking down B7-H1 on mantle cell lymphoma cells enhanced T-cell responses and restored tumor-cell sensitivity to T-cell-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. Knocking down B7-H1 on mantle cell lymphoma cells primed more CD4(+) or CD8(+) memory effector T cells. Our study demonstrates for the first time that lymphoma cell-expressed B7-H1 may lead to the suppression of host anti-tumor immune responses in mantle cell lymphoma and targeting tumor cell B7-H1 may represent a novel approach to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

  10. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  11. Targeted Killings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    American territory in history. Two aircraft torpedoed into the Twin Towers in New York City at speeds of over 490mph killing 2,595 people . Shortly...bomb exploded in the World Trade Center in New York City, killing a half-dozen people and wounding over a thousand. Over the next three years Al...executed his most incredible attack killing close to 3,000 people . President Bush announced to the world that, “U.S. troops will hunt down terrorists and

  12. Cbx3/HP1γ deficiency confers enhanced tumor-killing capacity on CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Michael; Ha, Ngoc; Pham, Duc-Hung; Frederick, Megan; Sharma, Bandana; Naruse, Chie; Asano, Masahide; Pipkin, Matthew E.; George, Rani E.; Thai, To-Ha

    2017-01-01

    Cbx3/HP1γ is a histone reader whose function in the immune system is not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that in CD8+ T cells, Cbx3/HP1γ insufficiency leads to chromatin remodeling accompanied by enhanced Prf1, Gzmb and Ifng expression. In tumors obtained from Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient mice or wild type mice treated with Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient CD8+ T cells, there is an increase of CD8+ effector T cells expressing the stimulatory receptor Klrk1/NKG2D, a decrease in CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) as well as CD25+ CD4+ T cells expressing the inhibitory receptor CTLA4. Together these changes in the tumor immune environment may have mitigated tumor burden in Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient mice or wild type mice treated with Cbx3/HP1γ-insufficient CD8+ T cells. These findings suggest that targeting Cbx3/HP1γ can represent a rational therapeutic approach to control growth of solid tumors. PMID:28220815

  13. A chimeric switch-receptor targeting PD1 augments the efficacy of second generation CAR T-Cells in advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Jiang, Shuguang; Fang, Chongyun; Sun, Jing; Kim, Soyeon; Newick, Kheng; Lo, Albert; June, Carl H.; Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund K.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified adoptive T-cell therapy (ATC) has been successfully applied to the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but faces many challenges in solid tumors. One major obstacle is the immune-suppressive effects induced in both naturally-occurring and genetically-modified tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by inhibitory receptors (IRs), namely PD1. We hypothesized that interfering with PD1 signaling would augment CAR T cell activity against solid tumors. To address this possibility, we introduced a genetically-engineered switch receptor construct, comprising the truncated extracellular domain of PD1 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic signaling domains of CD28, into CAR T-cells. We tested the effect of this supplement, “PD1CD28”, on human CAR T-cells targeting aggressive models of human solid tumors expressing relevant tumor antigens. Treatment of mice bearing large, established solid tumors with PD1CD28 CAR T-cells led to significant regression in tumor volume due to enhanced CAR TIL infiltrate, decreased susceptibility to tumor-induced hypofunction, and attenuation of IR expression compared to treatments with CAR T-cells alone or PD1 antibodies. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of PD1CD28 to boost CAR T-cell activity is efficacious against solid tumors via a variety of mechanisms, prompting clinical investigation of this potentially promising treatment modality. PMID:26979791

  14. A Chimeric Switch-Receptor Targeting PD1 Augments the Efficacy of Second-Generation CAR T Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Jiang, Shuguang; Fang, Chongyun; Sun, Jing; Kim, Soyeon; Newick, Kheng; Lo, Albert; June, Carl H; Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund K

    2016-03-15

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified adoptive T-cell therapy has been successfully applied to the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but faces many challenges in solid tumors. One major obstacle is the immune-suppressive effects induced in both naturally occurring and genetically modified tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) by inhibitory receptors (IR), namely PD1. We hypothesized that interfering with PD1 signaling would augment CAR T-cell activity against solid tumors. To address this possibility, we introduced a genetically engineered switch receptor construct, comprising the truncated extracellular domain of PD1 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic signaling domains of CD28, into CAR T cells. We tested the effect of this supplement, "PD1CD28," on human CAR T cells targeting aggressive models of human solid tumors expressing relevant tumor antigens. Treatment of mice bearing large, established solid tumors with PD1CD28 CAR T cells led to significant regression in tumor volume due to enhanced CAR TIL infiltrate, decreased susceptibility to tumor-induced hypofunction, and attenuation of IR expression compared with treatments with CAR T cells alone or PD1 antibodies. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of PD1CD28 to boost CAR T-cell activity is efficacious against solid tumors via a variety of mechanisms, prompting clinical investigation of this potentially promising treatment modality. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Agnes S.; Gopinadh, Jakka; Kleber, Sascha; Wadle, Andreas; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA) family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157–165) peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment. PMID:26447882

  16. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Klar, Agnes S; Gopinadh, Jakka; Kleber, Sascha; Wadle, Andreas; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA) family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165) peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels. These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment.

  17. Imatinib Spares cKit-Expressing Prostate Neuroendocrine Tumors, whereas Kills Seminal Vesicle Epithelial-Stromal Tumors by Targeting PDGFR-β.

    PubMed

    Jachetti, Elena; Rigoni, Alice; Bongiovanni, Lucia; Arioli, Ivano; Botti, Laura; Parenza, Mariella; Cancila, Valeria; Chiodoni, Claudia; Festinese, Fabrizio; Bellone, Matteo; Tardanico, Regina; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in males worldwide. Indeed, advanced and metastatic disease characterized by androgen resistance and often associated with neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation remains incurable. Using the spontaneous prostate cancer TRAMP model, we have shown that mast cells (MCs) support in vivo the growth of prostate adenocarcinoma, whereas their genetic or pharmacologic targeting favors prostate NE cancer arousal. Aiming at simultaneously targeting prostate NE tumor cells and MCs, both expressing the cKit tyrosine kinase receptor, we have tested the therapeutic effect of imatinib in TRAMP mice. Imatinib-treated TRAMP mice experience a partial benefit against prostate adenocarcinoma, because of inhibition of supportive MCs. However, they show an unexpected outgrowth of prostate NE tumors, likely because of defective signaling pathway downstream of cKit receptor. Also unexpected but very effective was the inhibition of epithelial-stromal tumors of the seminal vesicles achieved by imatinib treatment. These tumors normally arise in the seminal vesicles of TRAMP mice, independently of the degree of prostatic glandular lesions, and resemble phyllodes tumors found in human prostate and seminal vesicles, and in breast. In both mice and in patients, these tumors are negative for cKit but express PDGFR-β, another tyrosine kinase receptor specifically inhibited by imatinib. Our results imply a possible detrimental effect of imatinib in prostate cancer patients but suggest a promising therapeutic application of imatinib in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic phyllodes tumors. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 365-75. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition kills glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor cells in part through loss of SOX2 and delays tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cathy; Fotovati, Abbas; Triscott, Joanna; Chen, James; Venugopal, Chitra; Singhal, Ash; Dunham, Christopher; Kerr, John M; Verreault, Maite; Yip, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Jones, Chris; Jayanthan, Aarthi; Narendran, Aru; Singh, Sheila K; Dunn, Sandra E

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) ranks among the deadliest types of cancer and given these new therapies are urgently needed. To identify molecular targets, we queried a microarray profiling 467 human GBMs and discovered that polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was highly expressed in these tumors and that it clustered with the proliferative subtype. Patients with PLK1-high tumors were more likely to die from their disease suggesting that current therapies are inactive against such tumors. This prompted us to examine its expression in brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) given their association with treatment failure. BTICs isolated from patients expressed 110-470 times more PLK1 than normal human astrocytes. Moreover, BTICs rely on PLK1 for survival because the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536 inhibited their growth in tumorsphere cultures. PLK1 inhibition suppressed growth, caused G(2) /M arrest, induced apoptosis, and reduced the expression of SOX2, a marker of neural stem cells, in SF188 cells. Consistent with SOX2 inhibition, the loss of PLK1 activity caused the cells to differentiate based on elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and changes in cellular morphology. We then knocked glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) down SOX2 with siRNA and showed that it too inhibited cell growth and induced cell death. Likewise, in U251 cells, PLK1 inhibition suppressed cell growth, downregulated SOX2, and induced cell death. Furthermore, BI2536 delayed tumor growth of U251 cells in an orthotopic brain tumor model, demonstrating that the drug is active against GBM. In conclusion, PLK1 level is elevated in GBM and its inhibition restricts the growth of brain cancer cells.

  19. Binocular Goggle Augmented Imaging and Navigation System provides real-time fluorescence image guidance for tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Sudlow, Gail P.; Liang, Kexian; Som, Avik; Akers, Walter J.; Fields, Ryan C.; Margenthaler, Julie; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    The inability to identify microscopic tumors and assess surgical margins in real-time during oncologic surgery leads to incomplete tumor removal, increases the chances of tumor recurrence, and necessitates costly repeat surgery. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a wearable goggle augmented imaging and navigation system (GAINS) that can provide accurate intraoperative visualization of tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in real-time without disrupting normal surgical workflow. GAINS projects both near-infrared fluorescence from tumors and the natural color images of tissue onto a head-mounted display without latency. Aided by tumor-targeted contrast agents, the system detected tumors in subcutaneous and metastatic mouse models with high accuracy (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98% ± 5% standard deviation). Human pilot studies in breast cancer and melanoma patients using a near-infrared dye show that the GAINS detected sentinel lymph nodes with 100% sensitivity. Clinical use of the GAINS to guide tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping promises to improve surgical outcomes, reduce rates of repeat surgery, and improve the accuracy of cancer staging.

  20. Binocular Goggle Augmented Imaging and Navigation System provides real-time fluorescence image guidance for tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping

    PubMed Central

    B. Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Sudlow, Gail P.; Liang, Kexian; Som, Avik; Akers, Walter J.; Fields, Ryan C.; Margenthaler, Julie; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The inability to identify microscopic tumors and assess surgical margins in real-time during oncologic surgery leads to incomplete tumor removal, increases the chances of tumor recurrence, and necessitates costly repeat surgery. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a wearable goggle augmented imaging and navigation system (GAINS) that can provide accurate intraoperative visualization of tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in real-time without disrupting normal surgical workflow. GAINS projects both near-infrared fluorescence from tumors and the natural color images of tissue onto a head-mounted display without latency. Aided by tumor-targeted contrast agents, the system detected tumors in subcutaneous and metastatic mouse models with high accuracy (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98% ± 5% standard deviation). Human pilot studies in breast cancer and melanoma patients using a near-infrared dye show that the GAINS detected sentinel lymph nodes with 100% sensitivity. Clinical use of the GAINS to guide tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping promises to improve surgical outcomes, reduce rates of repeat surgery, and improve the accuracy of cancer staging. PMID:26179014

  1. Lipophilic triphenylphosphonium derivatives enhance radiation-induced cell killing via inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Sakai, Yuri; Bo, Tomoki; Nagane, Masaki; Nishimura, Eri; Yamamori, Tohru; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Inanami, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    It has recently been reported that radiation enhances mitochondrial energy metabolism in various tumor cell lines. To examine how this radiation-induced alteration in mitochondrial function influences tumor cell viability, various lipophilic triphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) cation derivatives and related compounds such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-oxy-piperidin (Tempol) with TPP(+) (named "Mito-") were designed to inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Mito-(CH2)10-Tempol (M10T) and its derivatives, Mito-(CH2)5-Tempol (M5T), Mito-(CH2)10-Tempol-Methyl (M10T-Me), Mito-C10H21 (M10), and C10H21-Tempol (10T), were prepared. In HeLa human cervical adenocarcinoma cells and A549 human lung carcinoma cells, the fractional uptake of the compound into mitochondria was highest among the TTP(+) analogs conjugated with Tempol (M10T, M5T, and 10T). M10T, M10T-Me, and M10 exhibited strong cytotoxicity and enhanced X-irradiation-induced reproductive cell death, while 10T and M5T did not. Furthermore, M10T, M10T-Me, and M10 decreased basal mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP. M10T treatment inhibited X-ray-induced increases in ATP production. These results indicate that the TPP cation and a long hydrocarbon linker are essential for radiosensitization of tumor cells. The reduction in intracellular ATP by lipophilic TPP(+) is partly responsible for the observed radiosensitization.

  2. Preparation of Conjugated Polymer Grafted with H2O2-Sensitive Prodrug for Cell Imaging and Tumor Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Li, Shengliang; Chen, Hui; Hu, Rong; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-13

    In this work, a new conjugated polymer poly(fluorene-co-phenylene) derivative containing pendent quaternized chlormethine (PFP-Chl) was synthesized by covalent linking small molecular prodrug groups onto conjugated polymer side chains. H2O2-sensitive prodrug with an eight-member-cyclic boronate ester structure could suffer from H2O2-triggered nitrogen mustard release and further DNA cross-linking and alkylation. PFP-Chl combines therapeutic characteristic with excellent optical property of conjugated polymers. It is found that PFP-Chl could enter into cells by endocytosis to simultaneously exhibit abilities of fluorescent imaging and tumor cell inhibition.

  3. Characterization of a novel bispecific antibody that mediates Fcgamma receptor type I-dependent killing of tumor-associated glycoprotein-72-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Russoniello, C; Somasundaram, C; Schlom, J; Deo, Y M; Keler, T

    1998-09-01

    A bispecific antibody was made by chemical conjugation of Fab' fragments from humanized antibodies specific for tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and high-affinity immunoglobulin receptor, FcgammaA receptor type I (FcgammaRI). The purified anti-TAG-72 x anti-FcgammaRI (HCC49xH22) bispecific antibody had an approximate Mr of 111,000, consistent with a F(ab')2, and bound specifically to KLEB and LS174T tumor cell lines, which express the TAG-72 tumor antigen. Furthermore, HCC49x H22 was shown to simultaneously bind to KLEB cells and a soluble FcgammaRI fusion protein, demonstrating the bifunctional nature of the molecule. Using IFN-gamma-treated monocytes as effector cells, concentrations of the bispecific antibody in the range of 1-10,000 ng/ml mediated specific lysis of TAG-72-positive tumor cells. In contrast, the bispecific antibody did not promote antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of a cell line that was negative for TAG-72 antigen. Importantly, the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity of the bispecific antibody was significantly greater than that of the monoclonal antibody HCC49. These in vitro data indicate that the humanized bispecific antibody HCC49xH22 has the appropriate specificity and functional activity for further evaluation as potential immunotherapy for TAG-72-positive malignancies.

  4. Augmented Oxygen-Dependent Killing of Leishmania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    amphotericin B. Evidence for radical formation in the process of autooxidation. J Antibiot 1985; 38:753-757. 5. New RRC, Chance ML, Heath S. Antileishmanial...activity of amphotericin and other antifungal agents entrapped in liposomes . J Antimicrobial Chemother 1981; 8:371-381. 6. lkxmaih j, Wy±t: -. - r...rress, New iork, 19ab. 15 13. Urbina JA, Cohen BE, Perozo E, Cornivelli E. Spin-labeled amphotericin B: synthesis, characterization, biological and

  5. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  6. Killing fetuses and killing newborns.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2013-05-01

    The argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns is a challenge to liberal positions on abortion because it can be considered a reductio of their defence of abortion. Here I defend the liberal stance on abortion by arguing that the argument for the moral permissibility of killing newborns on ground of the social, psychological and economic burden on the parents recently put forward by Giubilini and Minerva is not valid; this is because they fail to show that newborns cannot be harmed and because there are morally relevant differences between fetuses and newborns.

  7. TRAIL(+) human plasmacytoid dendritic cells kill tumor cells in vitro: mechanisms of imiquimod- and IFN-α-mediated antitumor reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Madeleine L; Glaser, Astrid; Stary, Georg; Koszik, Frieder; Stingl, Georg

    2012-02-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) not only exhibit the unique capacity to evoke primary immune responses, but may also acquire TLR-triggered cytotoxic activity. We and others have previously shown that TLR7/8- and TLR9-stimulated plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) isolated from human peripheral blood express the effector molecule TRAIL. The exact mechanisms through which pDCs acquire and elicit their cytotoxic activity are still not clear. We now show that in the absence of costimulators, TRAIL induction on pDCs occurs with agonists to intracellular TLRs only and is accompanied by a phenotypic as well as functional maturation, as evidenced by a comparatively superior MLR stimulatory capacity. pDCs acquired TRAIL in an IFN-α/β-dependent fashion and, notably, TRAIL expression on pDCs could be induced by IFN-α stimulation alone. At a functional level, both TLR7/8- (imiquimod [IMQ]) and TLR9-stimulated (CpG2216) pDCs lysed Jurkat T cells in a TRAIL- and cell contact-dependent fashion. More importantly, IFN-α-activated pDCs acquired similar cytotoxic properties, independent of TLR stimulation and maturation. Both IMQ- and IFN-α-activated pDCs could also lyse certain melanoma cell lines in a TRAIL-dependent fashion. Interestingly, suboptimal doses of IMQ and IFN-α exhibited synergistic action, leading to optimal TRAIL expression and melanoma cell lysis by pDCs. Our data imply that tumor immunity in patients receiving adjuvant IMQ and/or IFN-α may involve the active participation of cytotoxic pDCs.

  8. Synergistic Tumor-Killing Effect of Radiation and Berberine Combined Treatment in Lung Cancer: The Contribution of Autophagic Cell Death

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Peiling; Kuo, W.-H.; Tseng, H.-C.; Chou, F.-P.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is the most efficacious strategies for lung cancer. The radiation-enhancing effects and the underlying mechanisms of berberine were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays were used to evaluate the radio-sensitivity of berberine on non-small-cell lung cancer. Electron microscopic observation of the features of cell death, flow cytometry of acidic vascular organelles formation, mitochondria membrane potential and cell-cycle progression, and Western blotting of caspase 3, PARP, and LC3 were performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the enhancing effects. Lewis lung carcinoma model in mice was conducted to evaluate the possible application of berberine in synergistic treatment with irradiation. Results: Compared with radiation alone (SF2 = 0.423; D{sub 0} = 5.29 Gy), berberine at 5 and 10 {mu}M concentrations in combination with radiation showed significant enhancement on radiation-induced clonogenic inhibition (SF2 = 0.215: D{sub 0} = 2.70 Gy and SF2 = 0.099: D{sub 0} = 1.24 Gy) on A549 cells. The cellular ultrastructure showed the presence of autophagosome and an increased proportion of acridine orange stain-positive cells, demonstrating that berberine enhanced radiosensitivity via autophagy. The process involved LC3 modification and mitochondrial disruption. The animal model verified the synergistic cytotoxic effect of berberine and irradiation resulting in a substantial shrinkage of tumor volume. Conclusion: Supplement of berberine enhanced the cytotoxicity of radiation in both in vivo and in vitro models of lung cancer. The mechanisms underlying this synergistic effect involved the induction of autophagy. It suggests that berberine could be used as adjuvant therapy to treat lung cancer.

  9. MIF-driven activation of macrophages induces killing of intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi dependent on endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cutrullis, Romina A; Petray, Patricia B; Corral, Ricardo S

    2017-02-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key player in innate immunity. MIF has been considered critical for controlling acute infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Our study aimed to analyze whether MIF could favor microbicidal activity of the macrophage, a site where T. cruzi grows and the initial effector cell against this parasite. Using murine macrophages infected in vitro, we examined the effect of MIF on their parasiticidal ability and attempted to identify inflammatory agents involved in MIF-induced protection. Our findings show that MIF is readily secreted from peritoneal macrophages upon T. cruzi infection. MIF activates both primary and J774 phagocytes boosting the endogenous production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha via mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 signaling, as well as the release of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, leading to enhanced pathogen elimination. MIF can also potentiate the effect of interferon-gamma on T. cruzi killing by J774 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, rendering these cells more competent in reducing intracellular parasite burden. The present results unveil a novel innate immune pathway that contributes to host defense and broaden our understanding of the regulation of inflammatory mediators implicated in early parasite containment that is decisive for resistance to T. cruzi infection.

  10. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  11. Blockade of Programmed Death 1 Augments the Ability of Human T Cells Engineered to Target NY-ESO-1 to Control Tumor Growth after Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Edmund K; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kim, Soyeon; Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Lo, Albert; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yangbing; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) become hypofunctional, although the mechanisms are not clear. Our goal was to generate a model of human tumor-induced TIL hypofunction to study mechanisms and to test anti-human therapeutics. We transduced human T cells with a published, optimized T-cell receptor (TCR) that is directed to a peptide within the cancer testis antigen, NY-ESO-1. After demonstrating antigen-specific in vitro activity, these cells were used to target a human lung cancer line that expressed NY-ESO-1 in the appropriate HLA context growing in immunodeficient mice. The ability of anti-PD1 antibody to augment efficacy was tested. Injection of transgenic T cells had some antitumor activity, but did not eliminate the tumors. The injected T cells became profoundly hypofunctional accompanied by upregulation of PD1, Tim3, and Lag3 with coexpression of multiple inhibitory receptors in a high percentage of cells. This model allowed us to test reagents targeted specifically to human T cells. We found that injections of an anti-PD1 antibody in combination with T cells led to decreased TIL hypofunction and augmented the efficacy of the adoptively transferred T cells. This model offers a platform for preclinical testing of adjuvant immunotherapeutics targeted to human T cells prior to transition to the bedside. Because the model employs engineering of human T cells with a TCR clone instead of a CAR, it allows for study of the biology of tumor-reactive TILs that signal through an endogenous TCR. The lessons learned from TCR-engineered TILs can thus be applied to tumor-reactive TILs. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Soluble fibrin augments platelet/tumor cell adherence in vitro and in vivo, and enhances experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Fogarty, S; Meyer, T V; Siddiqui, F; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for a relationship between hemostasis and malignancy. Since platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process and plasma levels of fibrinogen (Fg) and soluble fibrin (sFn) monomer are increased in cancer, we hypothesized that these molecules might enhance tumor-platelet interaction. We therefore studied binding of sFn monomer to tumor cells in a static microplate adhesion assay and determined the effect of pre-treating tumor cells with sFn on tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Soluble fibrin (produced by adding thrombin to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-amide (GPRP-NH2) significantly increased platelet adherence to tumor cells. This effect was primarily mediated by the integrins alphaIIb beta3 on the platelet and CD 54 (ICAM-1) on the tumor cells. Platelets adhered to untreated A375 cells (28 +/- 8 platelets/tumor cell) and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or GPRP-NH2. Although thrombin treatment increased adherence, pre-incubation of the tumor cells with sFn resulted in a further increase in platelet binding to tumor cells. In contrast to untreated tumor cells, intravenous injection of sFn-treated A 375 cells reduced the platelet count in anticoagulated mice, supporting the in vitro finding that sFn enhanced tumor cell-platelet adherence. In a more aggressive model of experimental metastasis, treating tumor cells with sFn enhanced lung seeding by 65% compared to untreated cells. Extrapolation of our data to the clinical situation suggests that coagulation activation, and subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer, may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  13. Cell Killing Mechanisms and Impact on Gene Expression by Gemcitabine and 212Pb-Trastuzumab Treatment in a Disseminated i.p. Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, combination therapy with gemcitabine and targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 212Pb-trastuzumab showed tremendous therapeutic potential in the LS-174T tumor xenograft model of disseminated intraperitoneal disease. To better understand the underlying molecular basis for the observed cell killing efficacy, gene expression profiling was performed after a 24 h exposure to 212Pb-trastuzumab upon gemcitabine (Gem) pre-treatment in this model. DNA damage response genes in tumors were quantified using a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array) covering 84 genes. The combination of Gem with α-radiation resulted in the differential expression of apoptotic genes (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, IP6K3, PCBP4, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle regulatory genes (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, FANCG, GADD45α, GTSE1, PCBP4, MAP2K6, NBN, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding and repair genes (BRCA1, BTG2, DMC1, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, FEN1, MSH2, MSH3, NBN, NTHL1, OGG1, PRKDC, RAD18, RAD21, RAD51B, SEMA4G, p73, UNG, XPC, and XRCC2). Of these genes, the expression of CHK1, GTSE1, EXO1, FANCG, RAD18, UNG and XRCC2 were specific to Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab administration. In addition, the present study demonstrates that increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab could suppress cell proliferation possibly by up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis such as p73, by down-regulating genes involved in cell cycle check point such as CHK1, and in damaged DNA repair such as RAD51 paralogs. These events may be mediated by genes such as BRCA1/MSH2, a member of BARC (BRCA-associated genome surveillance complex). The data suggest that up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis, perturbation of checkpoint genes, and a failure to correctly perform HR-mediated DSB repair and mismatch-mediated SSB repair may correlate with the previously observed inability to maintain the G2/M arrest, leading to cell death. PMID:27467592

  14. Augmentation of Chemotherapeutic Infusion Effect by TSU-68, an Oral Targeted Antiangiogenic Agent, in a Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook Choi, Seung Hong; Im, Seock-Ah; Yamasaki, Yasundo; Jun, Suryoung; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the in vivo effects of combination therapy with TSU-68 and chemotherapeutic infusion in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Methods: This study was approved by the animal care committee at our institute. Three weeks before chemotherapeutic infusion, VX2 carcinoma was implanted into the livers of 32 rabbits. One week after chemotherapeutic infusion, vehicle was administered orally for 3 weeks in the control group (n = 16), and TSU-68 was administered orally at a daily dose of 200 mg/kg for 3 weeks in the treated group (n = 16). Computed tomography (CT) was performed before and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after chemotherapeutic infusion. Tumor response was assessed according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) on CT scan. The maximum thickness of viable tumor was measured on microscopic sections. Results: According to the RECIST, stable disease was observed in 9 (56%) rabbits and progressive disease in 7 (44%) in the control group, whereas partial response was observed in 1 (6%) rabbit and stable disease in 15 (94%) in the treated group. On pathologic examination, a viable lesion was present in 12 (75%) rabbits in the control group and in 6 (38%) rabbits in the treated group (P = 0.073). The mean maximum thickness of viable tumor in the treated group was significantly smaller than that in the control group (0.74 mm vs. 3.39 mm; P = 0.02). Conclusions: Oral administration of TSU-68 augmented the effect of chemotherapeutic infusion in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model.

  15. Beyond killing

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; McNally, Luke; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea; King, Kayla C.; Popat, Roman; Domingo-Sananes, Maria R.; Allen, Judith E.; Soares, Miguel P.; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic pipeline is running dry and infectious disease remains a major threat to public health. An efficient strategy to stay ahead of rapidly adapting pathogens should include approaches that replace, complement or enhance the effect of both current and novel antimicrobial compounds. In recent years, a number of innovative approaches to manage disease without the aid of traditional antibiotics and without eliminating the pathogens directly have emerged. These include disabling pathogen virulence-factors, increasing host tissue damage control or altering the microbiota to provide colonization resistance, immune resistance or disease tolerance against pathogens. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these approaches and examine their possible consequences for pathogen evolution. To guarantee a longer half-life of these alternatives to directly killing pathogens, and to gain a full understanding of their population-level consequences, we encourage future work to incorporate evolutionary perspectives into the development of these treatments. PMID:27016341

  16. Augmented anti-tumor therapy through natural targetability of macrophages genetically engineered by NK4 plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Okasora, T; Jo, J-i; Tabata, Y

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study is to genetically engineer macrophages (Mphi) for biological activation and evaluate their anti-tumor activity in a tumor-bearing mouse model. Mouse peritoneal Mphi were incubated on the surface of a culture dish which had been coated with the complex of a cationized dextran and luciferase plasmid DNA complex plus a cell adhesion protein, Pronectin for gene transfection (reverse transfection). When compared with the conventional transfection where Mphi were transfected in the medium containing the complex, the level of gene expression by the reverse method was significantly high and the time period of gene expression was prolonged. Confocal microscopic observation revealed that the plasmid DNA was localized in the cell nucleus to a higher extent by the reverse transfection method. Following the reverse transfection of Mphi by the plasmid DNA of a hepatocyte growth factor antagonist (NK4) complexed with the cationized dextran, the NK4 protein was secreted at a higher amount for a longer time period in contrast to the conventional transfection of free plasmid DNA. The NK4-transfected Mphi exhibited a stronger inhibition activity for in vitro growth of Meth-A fibrosarcoma cells. When injected intravenously into mice carrying a mass of Meth-A tumor cells, the Mphi engineered were accumulated in the tumor tissue and showed significant anti-tumor activity. It is concluded that the Mphi injected functioned as the natural carrier of tumor targeting for anti-tumor NK4 molecules, resulting in enhanced suppression of tumor growth at a high selectivity.

  17. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  18. The augmented anticancer potential of AP9-cd loaded solid lipid nanoparticles in human leukemia Molt-4 cells and experimental tumor.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Shashi; Kakkar, Vandita; Pal, Harish Chandra; Mondhe, D M; Kaur, Indu Pal

    2016-01-25

    AP9-cd, a novel lignan composition from Cedrus deodara has significant anticancer potential, and to further enhance its activity, it was lucratively encumbered into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). These nanoparticles were formulated by micro-emulsion technique with 70% drug trap competence. AP9-cd-SLNs were regular, solid, globular particles in the range of 100-200 nm, which were confirmed by electron microscopic studies. Moreover, AP9-cd-SLNs were found to be stable for up to six months in terms of color, particle size, zeta potential, drug content and entrapment. AP9-cd-SLNs have 30-50% higher cytotoxic and apoptotic potential than the AP9-cd alone. The augmented anticancer potential of AP9-cd-SLNs was observed in cytotoxic IC50 value, apoptosis signaling cascade and in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) model. AP9-cd-SLNs induce apoptosis in Molt-4 cells via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. Moreover, the dummy nanoparticles (SLNs without AP9-cd) did not have any cytotoxic effect in cancer as well as in normal cells. Consequently, SLNs of AP9-cd significantly augment the apoptotic and antitumor potential of AP9-cd. The present study provides a podium for ornamental the remedial latent via novel delivery systems like solid lipid nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Augmented reality for image guided therapy (ARIGT) of kidney tumor during nephron sparing surgery (NSS): animal model and clinical approach].

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Tomasz; Rzepecki, Maciej; Juszczak, Kajetan; Kwiatek, Wojciech; Bielecki, Jakub; Zieliński, Krzysztof; Ruta, Andrzej; Czekierda, Łukasz; Moczulskis, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    The main problem in nephron sparing surgery (NSS) is to preserve renal tumors oncological purity during the removal of the tumor with a margin of macroscopically unchanged kidney tissue while keeping the largest possible amount of normal parenchyma of the operated kidney. The development of imaging techniques, in particular IGT (Image Guided Therapy) allows precise imaging of the surgical field and, therefore, is essential in improving the effectiveness of NSS (increase of nephron sparing with the optimal radicality). The aim of this study was to develop a method of the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the kidney tumor and its lodge in the operated kidney using 3D laser scanner during NSS procedure. Additionally, the animal model of visualization was developed. The porcine kidney model was used to test the set built up with HD cameras and linear laser scanner connected to a laptop with graphic software (David Laser Scanner, Germany) showing the surface of the kidney and the lodge after removal the chunk of renal parenchyma. Additionally, the visualization and reconstruction was performed on animal porcine model. Moreover, 5 patients (3 women, 2 men) aged from 37 to 68 years (mean 56), diagnosed with kidney tumors in CT scans with a diameter of 3.7-6.9 cm (mean 4.9) were operated in our Department this year, scanning the surface during the treatment with the kidney tumor and kidney tumor after it is removed with a margin of renal tissue. In one case, the lodge of removed tumor was scanned. Dimensions in 3D reconstruction images of laser scans in the study of animal model and the images obtained intraoperatively were compared with the dimensions evaluated during preoperative CT scans, intraoperative measurements. Three-dimensional imaging laser scanner operating field loge resected tumor and the tumor on the kidney of animal models and during NSS treatments for patients with kidney tumors is possible in real time with an accuracy of -2 mm do +9 mm (+/- 3 mm). The

  20. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  1. Robust augmented reality registration method for localization of solid organs' tumors using CT-derived virtual biomechanical model and fluorescent fiducials.

    PubMed

    Kong, Seong-Ho; Haouchine, Nazim; Soares, Renato; Klymchenko, Andrey; Andreiuk, Bohdan; Marques, Bruno; Shabat, Galyna; Piechaud, Thierry; Diana, Michele; Cotin, Stéphane; Marescaux, Jacques

    2017-07-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is the fusion of computer-generated and real-time images. AR can be used in surgery as a navigation tool, by creating a patient-specific virtual model through 3D software manipulation of DICOM imaging (e.g., CT scan). The virtual model can be superimposed to real-time images enabling transparency visualization of internal anatomy and accurate localization of tumors. However, the 3D model is rigid and does not take into account inner structures' deformations. We present a concept of automated AR registration, while the organs undergo deformation during surgical manipulation, based on finite element modeling (FEM) coupled with optical imaging of fluorescent surface fiducials. Two 10 × 1 mm wires (pseudo-tumors) and six 10 × 0.9 mm fluorescent fiducials were placed in ex vivo porcine kidneys (n = 10). Biomechanical FEM-based models were generated from CT scan. Kidneys were deformed and the shape changes were identified by tracking the fiducials, using a near-infrared optical system. The changes were registered automatically with the virtual model, which was deformed accordingly. Accuracy of prediction of pseudo-tumors' location was evaluated with a CT scan in the deformed status (ground truth). In vivo: fluorescent fiducials were inserted under ultrasound guidance in the kidney of one pig, followed by a CT scan. The FEM-based virtual model was superimposed on laparoscopic images by automatic registration of the fiducials. Biomechanical models were successfully generated and accurately superimposed on optical images. The mean measured distance between the estimated tumor by biomechanical propagation and the scanned tumor (ground truth) was 0.84 ± 0.42 mm. All fiducials were successfully placed in in vivo kidney and well visualized in near-infrared mode enabling accurate automatic registration of the virtual model on the laparoscopic images. Our preliminary experiments showed the potential of a biomechanical model with fluorescent

  2. Targeted disruption of TC-PTP in the proliferative compartment augments STAT3 and AKT signaling and skin tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Mihwa; Baek, Minwoo; Morales, Liza D.; Jang, Ik-Soon; Slaga, Thomas J.; DiGiovanni, John; Kim, Dae Joon

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is a vital mechanism that contributes to skin carcinogenesis. It is regulated by the counter-activities of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, we report the critical role of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP), encoded by Ptpn2, in chemically-induced skin carcinogenesis via the negative regulation of STAT3 and AKT signaling. Using epidermal specific TC-PTP knockout (K14Cre.Ptpn2fl/fl) mice, we demonstrate loss of TC-PTP led to a desensitization to tumor initiator 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced apoptosis both in vivo epidermis and in vitro keratinocytes. TC-PTP deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in epidermal thickness and hyperproliferation following exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Western blot analysis showed that both phosphorylated STAT3 and phosphorylated AKT expressions were significantly increased in epidermis of TC-PTP-deficient mice compared to control mice following TPA treatment. Inhibition of STAT3 or AKT reversed the effects of TC-PTP deficiency on apoptosis and proliferation. Finally, TC-PTP knockout mice showed a shortened latency of tumorigenesis and significantly increased numbers of tumors during two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Our findings reveal that TC-PTP has potential as a novel target for the prevention of skin cancer through its role in the regulation of STAT3 and AKT signaling. PMID:28322331

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor augments anti-tumor effect of gemcitabine and pegylated interferon-α on pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Shuichi; Shimada, Mitsuo; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Morine, Yuji; Imura, Satoru; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Mori, Hiroki; Hanaoka, Jun; Sugimoto, Koji; Saito, Yu

    2011-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is strongly associated with epigenetic regulation and carcinogenesis, and its inhibitor can induce the differentiation or apoptosis of cancer cells. We investigated the anticancer effects of the HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) in combination with gemcitabine (GEM), an antimetabolic, and pegylated interferon-α2b (PEG-IFN-α2b) in a human pancreatic cancer cell line using a cell proliferation assay. The gene expressions of HDAC1, MTA1, p21(Waf1), and HIF-1 were evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR. Valproic acid at 0.5 mM when used alone did not suppress cell proliferation. PEG-IFN-α2b at 10(2 )E/ml weakly suppressed cell proliferation in both the BxPC3 (by 28%) and SUIT-2 (by 17%) human pancreatic cancer cell lines. GEM at 5 nM when used alone suppressed cell proliferation by 36 and 61% in the BxPC3 and SUIT-2 cell lines, respectively. The combination treatment of GEM + PEG-IFN-α2b strongly suppressed cell proliferation in the SUIT-2 (82%) and BxPC3 (51%) cell lines, which was further reinforced by the addition of VPA up to 88 and 67%, respectively. The combination treatment of GEM + PEG-IFN-α2b enhanced the expression of p21(Waf1), which was also reinforced by VPA. VPA augmented the inhibitory effects of PEG-IFN-α2b alone or in combination with PEG-IFN-α2b and GEM on cell proliferation. Such inhibitory effects may be due to the up-regulation of p21(Waf1) expression.

  4. Cytokine induced killer cells as adoptive immunotherapy strategy to augment graft versus tumor after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sangiolo, D; Mesiano, G; Carnevale-Schianca, F; Piacibello, W; Aglietta, M; Cignetti, A

    2009-07-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is used to increase the graft versus tumor (GVT) effect after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The limited spectrum of activity and high risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD) remain major limitations of this approach. The finding of new cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy, with the ability to separate GVT from GVHD, would be useful. Here we review the main basic, preclinical and clinical research on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, highlighting the aspects of their antitumor and alloreactive potentials that might favourably affect the balance between GVT and GVHD. CIK cells are ex vivo-expanded T lymphocytes sharing NK markers and endowed with a potent MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity against haematological and solid malignancies. Studies in preclinical animal models have demonstrated their low GVHD potential when infused across MHC-barriers, and recent clinical studies seem to confirm these findings in patients with hematological malignancies relapsing after HCT. If consolidated with larger clinical trials, adoptive immunotherapy with CIK cells might represent an effective alternative to classic DLI, helping HCT to succesfully meet current challenges like the extension across major HLA-barriers and application to solid tumors.

  5. RIG-I-like helicases induce immunogenic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells and sensitize tumors toward killing by CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Duewell, P; Steger, A; Lohr, H; Bourhis, H; Hoelz, H; Kirchleitner, S V; Stieg, M R; Grassmann, S; Kobold, S; Siveke, J T; Endres, S; Schnurr, M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a microenvironment suppressing immune responses. RIG-I-like helicases (RLH) are immunoreceptors for viral RNA that induce an antiviral response program via the production of type I interferons (IFN) and apoptosis in susceptible cells. We recently identified RLH as therapeutic targets of pancreatic cancer for counteracting immunosuppressive mechanisms and apoptosis induction. Here, we investigated immunogenic consequences of RLH-induced tumor cell death. Treatment of murine pancreatic cancer cell lines with RLH ligands induced production of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, tumor cells died via intrinsic apoptosis and displayed features of immunogenic cell death, such as release of HMGB1 and translocation of calreticulin to the outer cell membrane. RLH-activated tumor cells led to activation of dendritic cells (DCs), which was mediated by tumor-derived type I IFN, whereas TLR, RAGE or inflammasome signaling was dispensable. Importantly, CD8α+ DCs effectively engulfed apoptotic tumor material and cross-presented tumor-associated antigen to naive CD8+ T cells. In comparison, tumor cell death mediated by oxaliplatin, staurosporine or mechanical disruption failed to induce DC activation and antigen presentation. Tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of RLH ligands upregulated Fas and MHC-I expression and were effectively sensitized towards Fas-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated lysis. Vaccination of mice with RLH-activated tumor cells induced protective antitumor immunity in vivo. In addition, MDA5-based immunotherapy led to effective tumor control of established pancreatic tumors. In summary, RLH ligands induce a highly immunogenic form of tumor cell death linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25012502

  6. EGFRvIII-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Migrate to and Kill Tumor Deposits Infiltrating the Brain Parenchyma in an Invasive Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D.; Suryadevara, Carter M.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J.; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E.; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E.; Bigner, Darell D.; Johnson, Laura A.; Sampson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression. PMID:24722266

  7. Development of near-infrared photoactivable phthalocyanine-loaded nanoparticles to kill tumor cells: An improved tool for photodynamic therapy of solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Serena; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Dozza, Barbara; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Cattini, Luca; Ballestri, Marco; Dambruoso, Paolo; Guerrini, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Varchi, Greta; Lucarelli, Enrico; Blanco, Jeronimo

    2016-10-01

    Conventional photodynamic therapy has shown to be beneficial in the treatment of a variety of tumors. However, one of its major limitations is the inadequate penetration depth of visible light. In order to overcome this constraint, we developed 80nm poly-methylmethacrylate core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles (FNP) loaded with the photosensitizer tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (Ptl). To demonstrate the efficacy of our Ptl@FNP we performed in vitro and in vivo studies using a human prostate tumor model. Our data reveal that Ptl@FNP are internalized by tumor cells, favour Ptl intracellular accumulation, and efficiently trigger cell death through the generation of ROS upon irradiation with 680nm light. When directly injected into tumors intramuscularly induced in SCID mice, Ptl@FNP upon irradiation significantly reduce tumor growth with higher efficiency than the bare Ptl. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the newly developed nanoparticles may be utilized as a delivery system for antitumor phototherapy in solid cancers.

  8. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  9. Bystander killing effect of DS-8201a, a novel anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 antibody-drug conjugate, in tumors with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ogitani, Yusuke; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Oitate, Masataka; Naito, Hiroyuki; Agatsuma, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates deliver anticancer agents selectively and efficiently to tumor tissue and have significant antitumor efficacy with a wide therapeutic window. DS-8201a is a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeting antibody-drug conjugate prepared using a novel linker-payload system with a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, exatecan derivative (DX-8951 derivative, DXd). It was effective against trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)-insensitive patient-derived xenograft models with both high and low HER2 expression. In this study, the bystander killing effect of DS-8201a was evaluated and compared with that of T-DM1. We confirmed that the payload of DS-8201a, DXd (1), was highly membrane-permeable whereas that of T-DM1, Lys-SMCC-DM1, had a low level of permeability. Under a coculture condition of HER2-positive KPL-4 cells and negative MDA-MB-468 cells in vitro, DS-8201a killed both cells, whereas T-DM1 and an antibody-drug conjugate with a low permeable payload, anti-HER2-DXd (2), did not. In vivo evaluation was carried out using mice inoculated with a mixture of HER2-positive NCI-N87 cells and HER2-negative MDA-MB-468-Luc cells by using an in vivo imaging system. In vivo, DS-8201a reduced the luciferase signal of the mice, indicating suppression of the MDA-MB-468-Luc population; however, T-DM1 and anti-HER2-DXd (2) did not. Furthermore, it was confirmed that DS-8201a was not effective against MDA-MB-468-Luc tumors inoculated at the opposite side of the NCI-N87 tumor, suggesting that the bystander killing effect of DS-8201a is observed only in cells neighboring HER2-positive cells, indicating low concern in terms of systemic toxicity. These results indicated that DS-8201a has a potent bystander effect due to a highly membrane-permeable payload and is beneficial in treating tumors with HER2 heterogeneity that are unresponsive to T-DM1.

  10. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurton, Lenka V.; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M.; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR+ T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19+ leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45ROnegCCR7+CD95+, phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR+ T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27849617

  11. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Hurton, Lenka V; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M; Switzer, Kirsten C; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-11-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR(+) T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19(+) leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45RO(neg)CCR7(+)CD95(+), phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR(+) T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials.

  12. Serial killing of tumor cells by cytotoxic T cells redirected with a CD19-/CD3-bispecific single-chain antibody construct.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Patrick; Hofmeister, Robert; Brischwein, Klaus; Brandl, Christian; Crommer, Sandrine; Bargou, Ralf; Itin, Christian; Prang, Nadja; Baeuerle, Patrick A

    2005-05-20

    Certain bispecific antibodies exhibit an extraordinary potency and efficacy for target cell lysis by eliciting a polyclonal T-cell response. One example is a CD19-/CD3-bispecific single-chain antibody construct (bscCD19xCD3), which at femtomolar concentrations can redirect cytotoxic T cells to eliminate human B lymphocytes, B lymphoma cell lines and patient-derived malignant B cells. Here we have further explored the basis for this high potency. Using video-assisted microscopy, bscCD19xCD3 was found to alter the motility and activity of T cells from a scanning to a killing mode. Individual T cells could eliminate multiple target cells within a 9 hr time period, resulting in nuclear fragmentation and membrane blebbing of target cells. Complete target cell elimination was observed within 24 hr at effector-to-target cell ratios as low as 1:5. Under optimal conditions, cell killing started within minutes after addition of bscCD19xCD3, suggesting that the rate of serial killing was mostly determined by T-cell movement and target cell scanning and lysis. At all times, T cells remained highly motile, and no clusters of T and target cells were induced by the bispecific antibody. Bystanding target-negative cells were not detectably affected. Repeated target cell lysis by bscCD19xCD3-activated T cells increased the proportion of CD19/CD3 double-positive T cells, which was most likely a consequence of transfer of CD19 from B to T cells during cytolytic synapse formation. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a bispecific antibody can sustain multiple rounds of target cell lysis by T cells.

  13. Anti-tumor activities of luteolin and silibinin in glioblastoma cells: overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented luteolin and silibinin to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis in glioblastoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. High systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for controlling glioblastoma. The natural flavonoids luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL) have anti-tumor activities. LUT inhibits autophagy, cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis; while SIL activates caspase-8 cascades to induce apoptosis. However, synergistic anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL in glioblastoma remain unknown. Overexpression of tumor suppressor microRNA (miR) could enhance the anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL. Here, we showed that 20 µM LUT and 50 µM SIL worked synergistically for inhibiting growth of two different human glioblastoma U87MG (wild-type p53) and T98G (mutant p53) cell lines and natural combination therapy was more effective than conventional chemotherapy (10 µM BCNU or 100 µM TMZ). Combination of LUT and SIL caused inhibition of growth of glioblastoma cells due to induction of significant amounts of apoptosis and complete inhibition of invasion and migration. Further, combination of LUT and SIL inhibited rapamycin (RAPA)-induced autophagy, a survival mechanism, with suppression of PKCα and promotion of apoptosis through down regulation of iNOS and significant increase in expression of the tumor suppressor miR-7-1-3p in glioblastoma cells. Our in vivo studies confirmed that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL in RAPA pre-treated both U87MG and T98G tumors. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrated that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented the anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis for controlling growth of different human glioblastomas in vivo.

  14. Dendritic cells pulsed with tumor cells killed by high hydrostatic pressure induce strong immune responses and display therapeutic effects both in murine TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors when combined with docetaxel chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    MIKYŠKOVÁ, ROMANA; ŠTĚPÁNEK, IVAN; INDROVÁ, MARIE; BIEBLOVÁ, JANA; ŠÍMOVÁ, JANA; TRUXOVÁ, IVA; MOSEROVÁ, IRENA; FUČÍKOVÁ, JITKA; BARTŮŇKOVÁ, JIŘINA; ŠPÍŠEK, RADEK; REINIŠ, MILAN

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been shown to induce immunogenic cell death of cancer cells, facilitating their uptake by dendritic cells (DC) and subsequent presentation of tumor antigens. In the present study, we demonstrated immunogenicity of the HHP-treated tumor cells in mice. HHP was able to induce immunogenic cell death of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumor cells, representing murine models for human papilloma virus-associated tumors and prostate cancer, respectively. HHP-treated cells induced stronger immune responses in mice immunized with these tumor cells, documented by higher spleen cell cytotoxicity and increased IFNγ production as compared to irradiated tumor cells, accompanied by suppression of tumor growth in vivo in the case of TC-1 tumors, but not TRAMP-C2 tumors. Furthermore, HHP-treated cells were used for DC-based vaccine antigen pulsing. DC co-cultured with HHP-treated tumor cells and matured by a TLR 9 agonist exhibited higher cell surface expression of maturation markers and production of IL-12 and other cytokines, as compared to the DC pulsed with irradiated tumor cells. Immunization with DC cell-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells induced high immune responses, detected by increased spleen cell cytotoxicity and elevated IFNγ production. The DC-based vaccine pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells combined with docetaxel chemotherapy significantly inhibited growth of both TC-1 and TRAMP-C2 tumors. Our results indicate that DC-based vaccines pulsed with HHP-inactivated tumor cells can be a suitable tool for chemoimmunotherapy, particularly with regard to the findings that poorly immunogenic TRAMP-C2 tumors were susceptible to this treatment modality. PMID:26718011

  15. Gemcitabine directly inhibits myeloid derived suppressor cells in BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 mammary carcinoma and augments expansion of T cells from tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Hanh K; Graham, Laura; Cha, Esther; Morales, Johanna K; Manjili, Masoud H; Bear, Harry D

    2009-07-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in 4T1 mammary carcinoma bearing mice and present a barrier to the success of adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) by suppressing T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the inhibition of MDSCs by gemcitabine (GEM), a chemotherapy agent that may have favorable immunologic effects. BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells and treated with GEM either once a week starting 5 days after tumor inoculation (EARLY GEM) or as a single dose at days 20-25 (LATE GEM). Splenic mononuclear cells were isolated, activated in vitro, expanded, and stimulated with tumor antigen. T cells were then used for AIT to treat tumor-bearing mice. EARLY GEM treatment of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice significantly inhibited tumor growth, reduced splenomegaly, and significantly decreased MDSC proportion in the spleen. Support for a direct effect was demonstrated through suppression of MDSCs in spleens, bone marrow, and blood harvested 24 and 48 h after LATE GEM treatment, despite no significant decrease in tumor burden. Interestingly, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with GEM augmented in vitro expansion of splenic T cells and boosted IFN-gamma secretion in response to stimulation by tumor antigen. However, despite GEM-mediated inhibition of MDSC suppression, splenic T cells from mice with advanced tumors were ineffective in vivo against established tumors. This study provides support for direct inhibition of MDSCs and direct reduction of tumor burden by GEM in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. GEM treatment of mice with advanced tumors improves T cell function and growth in vitro.

  16. Molecular Mechanism of MART-1+/A*0201+ Human Melanoma Resistance to Specific CTL-Killing Despite Functional Tumor-CTL Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jazirehi, Ali R.; Baritaki, Stavroula; Koya, Richard C.; Bonavida, Benjamin; Economou, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Durable responses in metastatic melanoma patients remain generally difficult to achieve. Adoptive cell therapy with ex vivo engineered lymphocytes expressing high affinity T cell receptors TCRα/β for the melanoma antigen MART-127-35/HLA A*0201 (recognized by F5 cytotoxic T lymphocytes [F5 CTLs]) has been found to benefit certain patients. However, many other patients are inherently unresponsive and/or relapse for unknown reasons. To analyze the basis for the acquired-resistance and strategies to reverse it, we established F5 CTLresistant (R) human melanoma clones from relatively sensitive parental lines under selective F5 CTL pressure. Surface MART-127-35/HLA-A*0201 in these clones was unaltered and F5 CTLs recognized and interacted with them similarly to the parental lines. Nevertheless, the R clones were resistant to F5 CTL killing, exhibited hyperactivation of the NF-κB survival pathway, and overexpression of the anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Sensitivity to F5 CTL-killing could be increased by pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, Bcl-2 family members, or the proteasome, the latter of which reduced NF-κB activity and diminished anti-apoptotic gene expression. Specific gene-silencing (by siRNA) confirmed the protective role of anti-apoptotic factors by reversing R clone resistance. Together, our findings suggest that long-term immunotherapy may impose a selection for the development of resistant cells that are unresponsive to highly avid and specific melanoma-reactive CTLs, despite maintaining expression of functional peptide:MHC complexes, due to activation of anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. Though unresponsive to CTL, our results argue that resistant cells can be re-sensitized to immunotherapy with co-administration of targeted inhibitors to anti-apoptotic survival pathways. PMID:21159666

  17. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  18. A novel single tetracycline-regulative adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax gene expression and cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian; Zhang, Lidong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Tongyu; Yin, Min; Xu, Kai; Ji, Lin; Roth, Jack A; Fang, Bingliang

    2002-07-18

    Using a binary adenoviral system, we recently showed that the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter induces tumor-specific Bax gene expression. However, the strong cytotoxicity of Bax and other pro-apoptotic genes to packaging 293 cells has so far hindered construction of the desired single adenoviral vectors expressing toxic genes. We report here the construction of a single bicistronic adenoviral vector for tumor-specific Bax expression. The vector (Ad/gBax) utilizes the Tet-Off system and expresses a GFP/Bax fusion protein for easy detection. The hTERT promoter drives the expression of tTA, a transactivator capable of binding to TRE (tetracycline-responsive element) in the absence of tetracycline, which in turn induces expression of the GFP-Bax gene. The addition of tetracycline in 293 cells blocks the binding of tTA to TRE and substantially inhibits GFP-Bax expression and toxicity, thus allowing the packaging and production of Ad/gBax. Our data show that Ad/gBax could drive the high expression of GFP-Bax in tumor cells but not in normal cells and mouse tissues. Furthermore, the expression of GFP-Bax fusion protein elicited tumor-specific apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo at a level comparable to that induced by the binary system. Thus, Ad/gBax may become a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancers.

  19. Sorafenib-irinotecan sequential therapy augmented the anti-tumor efficacy of monotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma cells HepG2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Zhao, Z; Wu, T; Song, L; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sorafenib-based combined therapy against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HepG2 cells were exposed to sorafenib, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and then subjected to MTT assay to determine chemosensitivity. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis. Levels of cleaved caspase-8, -3, and PARP were determined by Western blot. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to determine p53 expression, respectively. The efficacy of combined therapy were verified in nude mice bearing HepG2 xenografts. HepG2 cells used in the current study were sensitive to sorafenib, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin. Sorafenib arrested cell cycle in S phase and the peak effect appeared at 30 h post treatment. Sorafenib exposure for 30 h followed by irinotecan exposure for 48 h synergistically induced cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells. On the other hand, sorafenib-oxaliplatin sequential exposure for the same time only acted an additive effect in soliciting cell apoptosis. Sorafenib and irinotecan sequential treatment significantly increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -3, and PARP in HepG2 cells. Sorafenib suppressed p53 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, which might contribute to cell cycle arrest and sensitize tumor cells to irinotecan. Sorafenib and irinotecan sequential therapy was obviously superior to monotherapy in suppressing the growth of HepG2 xenografts. Sorafenib-irinotecan sequential treatment augmented the efficacy of either drug used alone in soliciting HepG2 cells apoptosis in vitro and in suppressing the growth of HepG2 xenografts in vivo. hepatocellular carcinoma, irinotecan, sorafenib, synergistic effect.

  20. PEG-PE/phosphatidylcholine mixed immunomicelles specifically deliver encapsulated taxol to tumor cells of different origin and promote their efficient killing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Lukyanov, A N; Chakilam, A R; Torchilin, V P

    2003-02-01

    Mixed micelles were prepared from poly(ethyleneglycol)-distearyl phosphoethanolamine (PEG2000-PE) and egg phosphatidylcholine. The micelles were covalently modified with the nucleosome-specific monoclonal antibody 2C5 known to recognize and bind a variety of tumor cells via their surface-bound nucleosomes. Covalent attachment of 2C5 antibody was performed via a micelle-incorporated PEG-PE with the distal terminus of the PEG block activated with p-nitrophenylcarbonyl group (pNP-PEG-PE). Micelle surface-attached 2C5 antibody maintained its specific activity. 2C5-targeted immunomicelles were able to carry more than 3 wt% of taxol. Taxol-loaded immunomicelles specifically recognized tumor cell lines of several types. The cytotoxicity of 2C5-targeted taxol-loaded immunomicelles in a cell culture model was much higher when compared with free taxol or taxol in non-targeted micelles.

  1. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  2. Specificity redirection by CAR with human VEGFR-1 affinity endows T lymphocytes with tumor-killing ability and anti-angiogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Ma, Y; Li, J; Shi, H-S; Wang, L-Q; Guo, F-C; Zhang, J; Li, D; Mo, B-H; Wen, F; Liu, T; Liu, Y-T; Wang, Y-S; Wei, Y-Q

    2013-10-01

    Immunotherapy that is based on adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes, which are genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that recognize tumor-associated antigens, has been demonstrated to be an efficient cancer therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), a vital molecule involved in tumor growth and angiogenesis, has not been targeted by CAR-modified T lymphocytes. In this study, we generated CAR-modified T lymphocytes with human VEGFR-1 specificity (V-1 CAR) by electroporation. V-1 CAR-modified T lymphocytes were demonstrated to elicit lytic cytotoxicity to target cells in a VEGFR-1-dependent manner. The adoptive transfer of V-1 CAR T lymphocytes delayed tumor growth and formation and inhibited pulmonary metastasis in xenograft models and such efficacies were enhanced by cotransfer of T lymphocytes that expressed interleukin-15 (IL-15). Moreover, V-1 CAR-modified T lymphocytes lysed primary endothelial cells and impaired tube formation, in vitro. These data demonstrated the antitumor and anti-angiogenesis ability of V-1 CAR-modified T lymphocytes. Our study provides the rationale for the clinical translation of CAR-modified T lymphocytes with VEGFR-1 specificity.

  3. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave) along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day) a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts) were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB), caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease. PMID:27196891

  4. Potentiation of cell killing by fractionated radiation and suppression of proliferative recovery in MCF-7 breast tumor cells by the Vitamin D3 analog EB 1089.

    PubMed

    DeMasters, Gerald A; Gupta, Mona S; Jones, Kara R; Cabot, Myles; Wang, Hongtao; Gennings, Chris; Park, Misook; Bratland, Ase; Ree, Anne H; Gewirtz, David A

    2004-12-01

    A senescence-like growth arrest succeeded by recovery of proliferative capacity was observed in MCF-7 breast tumor cells exposed to fractionated radiation, 5 x 2 Gy. Exposure to EB 1089, an analog of the steroid hormone 1alpha, 25 dihydroxycholecalciferol (1alpha, 25 dihydroxy Vitamin D(3); calcitriol), prior to irradiation promoted cell death and delayed both the development of a senescent phenotype and the recovery of proliferative capacity. EB 1089 also reduced clonogenic survival over and above that produced by fractionated radiation alone and further conferred susceptibility to apoptosis in MCF-7 cells exposed to radiation. In contrast, EB 1089 failed to enhance the response to radiation (or to promote apoptosis) in normal breast epithelial cells or BJ fibroblast cells. EB 1089 treatment and fractionated radiation additively promoted ceramide generation and suppressed expression of polo-like kinase 1. Taken together, these data indicate that EB 1089 (and 1alpha, 25 dihydroxycholecalciferol or its analogs) could selectively enhance breast tumor cell sensitivity to radiation through the promotion of cell death, in part through the generation of ceramide and the suppression of polo-like kinase.

  5. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  6. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Method Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. Results We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Conclusion Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  7. Multi-kinase inhibitors interact with sildenafil and ERBB1/2/4 inhibitors to kill tumor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Albers, Thomas; Roberts, Jane L; Tavallai, Mehrad; Poklepovic, Andrew; Lebedyeva, Iryna O; Dent, Paul

    2016-06-28

    We have recently demonstrated that multi-kinase inhibitors such as sorafenib and pazopanib can suppress the detection of chaperones by in situ immuno-fluorescence, which is further enhanced by phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors. Sorafenib and pazopanib inhibited the HSP90 ATPase activity with IC50 values of ~1.0 μM and ~75 nM, respectively. Pazopanib docked in silico with two possible poses into the HSP90 ATP binding pocket. Pazopanib and sildenafil combined to reduce the total protein levels of HSP1H/p105 and c-MYC and to reduce their co-localization. Sorafenib/pazopanib combined with sildenafil in a [GRP78+HSP27] -dependent fashion to: (i) profoundly activate an eIF2α/Beclin1 pathway; (ii) profoundly inactivate mTOR and increase ATG13 phosphorylation, collectively resulting in the formation of toxic autophagosomes. In a fresh PDX isolate of NSCLC combined knock down of [ERBB1+ERBB3] or use of the ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor afatinib altered cell morphology, enhanced ATG13 phosphorylation, inactivated NFκB, and further enhanced [sorafenib/pazopanib + sildenafil] lethality. Identical data to that with afatinib were obtained knocking down PI3K p110α/β or using buparlisib, copanlisib or the specific p110α inhibitor BYL719. Afatinib adapted NSCLC clones were resistant to buparlisib or copanlisib but were more sensitive than control clones to [sorafenib + sildenafil] or [pazopanib + sildenafil]. Lapatinib significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of [regorafenib + sildenafil] in vivo; afatinib and BYL719 enhanced the anti-tumor effects of [sorafenib + sildenafil] and [pazopanib] in vivo, respectively.

  8. Multi-kinase inhibitors interact with sildenafil and ERBB1/2/4 inhibitors to kill tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence; Albers, Thomas; Roberts, Jane L.; Tavallai, Mehrad; Poklepovic, Andrew; Lebedyeva, Iryna O.; Dent, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that multi-kinase inhibitors such as sorafenib and pazopanib can suppress the detection of chaperones by in situ immuno-fluorescence, which is further enhanced by phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors. Sorafenib and pazopanib inhibited the HSP90 ATPase activity with IC50 values of ~1.0 μM and ~75 nM, respectively. Pazopanib docked in silico with two possible poses into the HSP90 ATP binding pocket. Pazopanib and sildenafil combined to reduce the total protein levels of HSP1H/p105 and c-MYC and to reduce their co-localization. Sorafenib/pazopanib combined with sildenafil in a [GRP78+HSP27] –dependent fashion to: (i) profoundly activate an eIF2α/Beclin1 pathway; (ii) profoundly inactivate mTOR and increase ATG13 phosphorylation, collectively resulting in the formation of toxic autophagosomes. In a fresh PDX isolate of NSCLC combined knock down of [ERBB1+ERBB3] or use of the ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor afatinib altered cell morphology, enhanced ATG13 phosphorylation, inactivated NFκB, and further enhanced [sorafenib/pazopanib + sildenafil] lethality. Identical data to that with afatinib were obtained knocking down PI3K p110α/β or using buparlisib, copanlisib or the specific p110α inhibitor BYL719. Afatinib adapted NSCLC clones were resistant to buparlisib or copanlisib but were more sensitive than control clones to [sorafenib + sildenafil] or [pazopanib + sildenafil]. Lapatinib significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of [regorafenib + sildenafil] in vivo; afatinib and BYL719 enhanced the anti-tumor effects of [sorafenib + sildenafil] and [pazopanib] in vivo, respectively. PMID:27259258

  9. Granzyme B-based cytolytic fusion protein targeting EpCAM specifically kills triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in a subcutaneous mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Amoury, Manal; Kolberg, Katharina; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Hristodorov, Dmitrij; Mladenov, Radoslav; Di Fiore, Stefano; Helfrich, Wijnand; Kiessling, Fabian; Fischer, Rainer; Pardo, Alessa; Thepen, Theophilus; Hussain, Ahmad F; Nachreiner, Thomas; Barth, Stefan

    2016-03-28

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with poor prognosis and high prevalence among young premenopausal women. Unlike in other breast cancer subtypes, no targeted therapy is currently available. Overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in 60% of TNBC tumors correlates with poorer prognosis and is associated with cancer stem cell phenotype. Thus, selective elimination of EpCAM(+) TNBC tumor cells is of clinical importance. Therefore, we constructed a fully human targeted cytolytic fusion protein, designated GbR201K-αEpCAM(scFv), in which an EpCAM-selective single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) is genetically fused to a granzyme B (Gb) mutant with reduced sensitivity to its natural inhibitor serpin B9. In vitro studies confirmed its specific binding, internalization and cytotoxicity toward a panel of EpCAM-expressing TNBC cells. Biodistribution kinetics and tumor-targeting efficacy using MDA-MB-468 cells in a human TNBC xenograft model in mice revealed selective accumulation of GbR201K-αEpCAM(scFv) in the tumors after i.v. injection. Moreover, treatment of tumor-bearing mice demonstrated a prominent inhibition of tumor growth of up to 50 % in this proof-of-concept study. Taken together, our results indicate that GbR201K-αEpCAM(scFv) is a promising novel targeted therapeutic for the treatment of TNBC.

  10. CD3xPDL1 bi-specific T cell engager (BiTE) simultaneously activates T cells and NKT cells, kills PDL1(+) tumor cells, and extends the survival of tumor-bearing humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Horn, Lucas A; Ciavattone, Nicholas G; Atkinson, Ryan; Woldergerima, Netsanet; Wolf, Julia; Clements, Virginia K; Sinha, Pratima; Poudel, Munanchu; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2017-08-29

    Bi-specific T cell engagers (BiTEs) activate T cells through CD3 and target activated T cells to tumor-expressed antigens. BiTEs have shown therapeutic efficacy in patients with liquid tumors; however, they do not benefit all patients. Anti-tumor immunity is limited by Programmed Death 1 (PD1) pathway-mediated immune suppression, and patients who do not benefit from existing BiTES may be non-responders because their T cells are anergized via the PD1 pathway. We have designed a BiTE that activates and targets both T cells and NKT cells to PDL1(+) cells. In vitro studies demonstrate that the CD3xPDL1 BiTE simultaneously binds to both CD3 and PDL1, and activates healthy donor CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and NKT cells that are specifically cytotoxic for PDL1(+) tumor cells. Cancer patients' PBMC are also activated and cytotoxic, despite the presence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. The CD3xPDL1 BiTE significantly extends the survival time and maintains activated immune cell levels in humanized NSG mice reconstituted with human PBMC and carrying established human melanoma tumors. These studies suggest that the CD3xPDL1 BiTE may be efficacious for patients with PDL1(+) solid tumors, in combination with other immunotherapies that do not specifically neutralize PD1 pathway-mediated immune suppression.

  11. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  12. Killing tensors on tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    We show that Killing tensors on conformally flat n-dimensional tori whose conformal factor only depends on one variable, are polynomials in the metric and in the Killing vector fields. In other words, every first integral of the geodesic flow polynomial in the momenta on the sphere bundle of such a torus is linear in the momenta.

  13. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  14. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  15. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessively in the body. Normally, the body controls cell growth and division. New cells are created to replace ... room for healthy replacements. If the balance of cell growth and death is disturbed, a tumor may form. ...

  16. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    PubMed

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species.

  17. Report Bee Kills

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA uses incident report data to help inform our pesticide regulatory decisions. Information from these reports helps us identify patterns of bee kills associated with the use of specific pesticides or active ingredients. Here's how to report incidents.

  18. Assessment of Augmented Immune Surveillance and Tumor Cell Death by Cytoplasmic Stabilization of p53 as a Chemopreventive Strategy of 3 Promising Medicinal Herbs in Murine 2-Stage Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Rehan; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Lateef, Md Abdul; Maqbool, Tahir; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is the final outcome of a plethora of events. Targeting the proliferation or inducing programmed cell death in a proliferating population is a major standpoint in the cancer therapy. However, proliferation is regulated by several cellular and immunologic processes. This study reports the inhibition of proliferation by augmenting immune surveillance, silencing acute inflammation, and inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of skin cancer by 3 promising medicinal extracts. We used the well-characterized model for experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice for 32 weeks to study the chemopreventive effect of the methanolic extracts of Trigonella foenumgraecum, Eclipta alba, and Calendula officinalis. All 3 extracts reduced the number, incidence, and multiplicity of tumors, which was confirmed by the pathologic studies that showed regressed tumors. There was a significant reduction in the PCNA+ nuclei in all treatment groups 32 weeks after the initiation. Mechanistic studies revealed that proliferative population in tumors is diminished by the restoration of the endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibition of the stress-related signal-transducing element NFκB, reduction of inflammation, enhancement of immunosurveillance of the genetically mutated cells, along with silencing of the cell cycle progression signals. Finally, all 3 medicinal extracts induced stable expression of p53 within the tumors, confirmed by the CFDA-Cy3 apoptosis assay. Results of our study confirm that these extracts not only limit the rate of proliferation by inhibition of the processes integral to cancer development but also induce stable cytoplasmic expression of p53-mediated apoptosis, leading to fewer and regressed tumors in mice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Immune deficiency augments the prevalence of p53 loss of heterozygosity in spontaneous tumors but not bi-directional loss of heterozygosity in bone marrow progenitors.

    PubMed

    Shetzer, Yoav; Napchan, Yael; Kaufman, Tom; Molchadsky, Alina; Tal, Perry; Goldfinger, Naomi; Rotter, Varda

    2017-03-15

    p53 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a frequent event in tumors of somatic and Li-Fraumeni syndrome patients harboring p53 mutation. Here, we focused on resolving a possible crosstalk between the immune-system and p53 LOH. Previously, we reported that p53 heterozygous bone-marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells undergo p53 LOH in-vivo. Surprisingly, the loss of either the wild-type p53 allele or mutant p53 allele was detected with a three-to-one ratio in favor of losing the mutant allele. In this study, we examined whether the immune-system can affect the LOH directionality in bone marrow progenitors. We found that mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from immune-deficient mice exhibited the same preference of losing the mutant p53 allele as immune-competent matched cells, nevertheless, these animals showed a significantly shorter tumor-free survival, indicating the possible involvement of immune surveillance in this model. Surprisingly, spontaneous tumors of p53 heterozygous immune-deficient mice exhibited a significantly higher incidence of p53 LOH compared to that observed in tumors derived of p53 heterozygous immune-competent mice. These findings indicate that the immune-system may affect the p53 LOH prevalence in spontaneous tumors. Thus suggesting that the immune-system may recognize and clear cells that underwent p53 LOH, whereas in immune-compromised mice, those cells will form tumors with shorter latency. In individuals with a competent immune-system, p53 LOH independent pathways may induce malignant transformation which requires a longer tumor latency. Moreover, this data may imply that the current immunotherapy treatment aimed at abrogating the inhibition of cellular immune checkpoints may be beneficial for LFS patients.

  20. Isorhamnetin augments the anti-tumor effect of capeciatbine through the negative regulation of NF-κB signaling cascade in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Manu, Kanjoormana A; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Ramachandran, Lalitha; Li, Feng; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Arfuso, Frank; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-07-10

    Development of drug resistance to standard chemotherapy is a common phenomenon that leads to poor prognosis in patients. Thus, novel agents that can attenuate chemoresistance are urgently needed. Therefore, we analyzed whether isorhamnetin (IH), a 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, can enhance the potential efficacy of capecitabine in gastric cancer. The potential effect of IH on viability was analyzed by MTT assay, apoptosis by flow cytometric analysis, and NF-κB activation by DNA binding as well as Western blot assays. The in vivo effect of IH was also examined on the growth of subcutaneously implanted tumors in nude mice. IH inhibited the viability, potentiated the apoptotic effects of capecitabine, abrogated NF-κB activation, and suppressed the expression of various NF-κB regulated gene products in tumor cells. In a gastric cancer xenograft model, administration of IH alone (1 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly suppressed the tumor growth alone as well as in combination with capecitabine. IH further reduced NF-κB activation and the expression of various proliferative and oncogenic biomarkers in tumor tissues. Overall, our results demonstrate that IH can significantly enhance the anti-tumor effects of capecitabine through the negative regulation of NF-κB regulated oncogenic genes.

  1. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  2. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  3. Children Who Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1999-01-01

    Two recent books, "When Good Kids Kill," by Michael D. Kelleher, and "Lost Boys," by James Garbarino, explore how children become killers and suggest ways to reduce our high-pressure society's epidemic levels of youth violence. Physically or psychologically distant parents and unaffirmative media messages are negative…

  4. Older women and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Canetto, S S; Hollenshead, J D

    Mercy killing is usually defined as intentional killing, often by family members or friends, with the stated intent to end perceived suffering. International evidence suggests that mercy killing typically involves an older man killing his ailing wife. In this study, we examined U.S. cases of mercy killing recorded by The Hemlock Society for the period 1960-1993. We found that the typical case involved an older woman being killed by a man, often her husband, with her poor health as the justification for the killing. A firearm was often used in these incidents. These patterns of mercy killing are consistent with patterns of homicide-suicide among older adults. Future research should seek to understand why women are typically the targets, and men the agents of mercy killing.

  5. Morinda citrifolia (Noni) Juice Augments Mammary Gland Differentiation and Reduces Mammary Tumor Growth in Mice Expressing the Unactivated c-erbB2 Transgene.

    PubMed

    Clafshenkel, William P; King, Tracy L; Kotlarczyk, Mary P; Cline, J Mark; Foster, Warren G; Davis, Vicki L; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2012-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia (noni) is reported to have many beneficial properties, including on immune, inflammatory, quality of life, and cancer endpoints, but little is known about its ability to prevent or treat breast cancer. To test its anticancer potential, the effects of Tahitian Noni Juice (TNJ) on mammary carcinogenesis were examined in MMTV-neu transgenic mice. Mammary tumor latency, incidence, multiplicity, and metastatic incidence were unaffected by TNJ treatment, which suggests that it would not increase or decrease breast cancer risk in women taking TNJ for its other benefits. However, noni may be useful to enhance treatment responses in women with existing HER2/neu breast cancer since TNJ resulted in significant reductions in tumor weight and volume and in longer tumor doubling times in mice. Remarkably, its ability to inhibit the growth of this aggressive form of cancer occurred with the mouse equivalent of a recommended dose for humans (<3 oz/day). A 30-day treatment with TNJ also induced significant changes in mammary secondary ductule branching and lobuloalveolar development, serum progesterone levels, and estrous cycling. Additional studies investigating TNJ-induced tumor growth suppression and modified reproductive responses are needed to characterize its potential as a CAM therapy for women with and without HER2(+) breast cancer.

  6. Morinda citrifolia (Noni) Juice Augments Mammary Gland Differentiation and Reduces Mammary Tumor Growth in Mice Expressing the Unactivated c-erbB2 Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Clafshenkel, William P.; King, Tracy L.; Kotlarczyk, Mary P.; Cline, J. Mark; Foster, Warren G.; Davis, Vicki L.; Witt-Enderby, Paula A.

    2012-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia (noni) is reported to have many beneficial properties, including on immune, inflammatory, quality of life, and cancer endpoints, but little is known about its ability to prevent or treat breast cancer. To test its anticancer potential, the effects of Tahitian Noni Juice (TNJ) on mammary carcinogenesis were examined in MMTV-neu transgenic mice. Mammary tumor latency, incidence, multiplicity, and metastatic incidence were unaffected by TNJ treatment, which suggests that it would not increase or decrease breast cancer risk in women taking TNJ for its other benefits. However, noni may be useful to enhance treatment responses in women with existing HER2/neu breast cancer since TNJ resulted in significant reductions in tumor weight and volume and in longer tumor doubling times in mice. Remarkably, its ability to inhibit the growth of this aggressive form of cancer occurred with the mouse equivalent of a recommended dose for humans (<3 oz/day). A 30-day treatment with TNJ also induced significant changes in mammary secondary ductule branching and lobuloalveolar development, serum progesterone levels, and estrous cycling. Additional studies investigating TNJ-induced tumor growth suppression and modified reproductive responses are needed to characterize its potential as a CAM therapy for women with and without HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:22619689

  7. Tc-99m labeled anti CEA F(ab{prime}){sub 2}: Augmenting tumor uptake with anitbody:Interferon (MAb:IFN-{alpha}-2b) conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Donegan, M.; Li, J.

    1996-05-01

    Previously we have shown that IFN-{alpha}-2b, a potent biological response modifier (BRM) significantly enhanced tumor uptake of radiolabeled MAbs. Results were attributed to increased blood flow and upregulation of cell surface receptor glycoproteins. Probably because of the blood flow increase in all organs, radioactivity levels in other tissues, although to a lesser extent, were also enhanced. In order to validate our hypothesis that selective tumor targeting of IFN-{alpha}-2b (Schering-Plough, N.J.) may enhance tumor uptake and diminish uptake in normal organs, IFN-{alpha}-2b was conjugated with anti CEA MAb F-6 (IgG2a), by reacting with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluenesulfonate (CMC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) in a 1:2:50:50 ratio by weight at pH 9.2 (22{degrees}C) for 24 hr. The conjugate (30{mu}g) was administered i.v. to nude mice bearing human colorectal carcinoma LS174T, 3hr prior to the i.v. administration of 300uCi / 20ug (1.5Ci / uM) F-6F(ab{prime}){sub 2}. Animals not receiving the conjugate served as controls. The conjugation efficiency as determined using I-125-IFN-{alpha}-2b was >70% and MAb:IFN-{alpha}-2b ratio was approximately 1:1. In animals receiving IFN conjugate tumor uptake enhanced by 180% and liver uptake decreased to 56%. Radioactivity also decreased in most other tissues. Furthermore with conjugate, the tumor/muscle ratio increased by 210% (10 {plus_minus} 1.2 Vs 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.5), tumor/blood ratio by 220% (5.4 {plus_minus} 0.6 Vs 2.5 {plus_minus} 0.3), and tumor/liver ratio by 317% (0.7 {plus_minus} 0.1 Vs 0.2 {plus_minus} 0.05).

  8. Augmented expression of RUNX1 deregulates the global gene expression of U87 glioblastoma multiforme cells and inhibits tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Bogoch, Yoel; Friedlander-Malik, Gilgi; Lupu, Lior; Bondar, Ekaterina; Zohar, Nitzan; Langier, Sheila; Ram, Zvi; Nachmany, Ido; Klausner, Joseph M; Pencovich, Niv

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. A mesenchymal phenotype was associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Recently, the transcription factor RUNX1 was suggested as a driver of the glioblastoma multiforme mesenchymal gene expression signature; however, its independent role in this process is yet to be described. Here, we assessed the role of RUNX1 in U87 glioblastoma multiforme cells in correspondence to its mediated transcriptome and genome-wide occupancy pattern. Overexpression of RUNX1 led to diminished tumor growth in nude and severe combined immunodeficiency mouse xenograft tumor model. At the molecular level, RUNX1 occupied thousands of genomic regions and regulated the expression of hundreds of target genes, both directly and indirectly. RUNX1 occupied genomic regions that corresponded to genes that were shown to play a role in brain tumor progression and angiogenesis and upon overexpression led to a substantial down-regulation of their expression level. When overexpressed in U87 glioblastoma multiforme cells, RUNX1 down-regulated key pathways in glioblastoma multiforme progression including epithelial to mesenchymal transition, MTORC1 signaling, hypoxia-induced signaling, and TNFa signaling via NFkB. Moreover, master regulators of the glioblastoma multiforme mesenchymal phenotype including CEBPb, ZNF238, and FOSL2 were directly regulated by RUNX1. The data suggest a central role for RUNX1 as master regulator of gene expression in the U87 glioblastoma multiforme cell line and mark RUNX1 as a potential target for novel future therapies for glioblastoma multiforme.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors interact with melanoma differentiation associated-7/interleukin-24 to kill primary human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Hossein A; Yacoub, Adly; Park, Margaret A; Archer, Kellie; Das, Swadesh K; Sarkar, Devanand; Grant, Steven; Fisher, Paul B; Dent, Paul

    2013-08-01

    We presently demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) enhance toxicity of melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin 24 (mda-7/IL-24) in invasive primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Additionally, a method is described to augment the efficacy of adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 in these cells. HDACIs synergized with melanoma differentiation-associated (MDA)-7/IL-24 killing GBM cells. Enhanced lethality correlated with increased autophagy that was dependent on the expression of ceramide synthase 6. HDACIs interacted with MDA-7/IL-24 prolonging generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+). Quenching of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) blocked HDACI and MDA-7/IL-24 killing. In vivo MDA-7/IL-24 prolonged the survival of animals carrying orthotopic tumors, and HDACIs enhanced survival further. A serotype 5/3 adenovirus more effectively delivers mda-7/IL-24 to GBM tumors than a serotype 5 virus. Hence, we constructed a serotype 5/3 adenovirus that conditionally replicates in tumor cells expressing MDA-7/IL-24, in which the adenoviral early region 1A (E1A) gene was driven by the cancer-specific promoter progression elevated gene-3 [Ad.5/3 (INGN 241)-PEG-E1A-mda-7; also called Ad.5/3-CTV (cancer terminator virus)]. Ad.5/3-CTV increased the survival of mice carrying GBM tumors to a significantly greater extent than did a nonreplicative virus Ad.5/3-mda-7. Ad.5/3-CTV exhibited no toxicity in the brains of Syrian hamsters. Collectively our data demonstrate that HDACIs enhance MDA-7/IL-24 lethality, and adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 combined with tumor-specific viral replication is an effective preclinical GBM therapeutic.

  10. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  11. Elevated TAK1 augments tumor growth and metastatic capacities of ovarian cancer cells through activation of NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Patty C.H.; Shi, Lei; Liu, Vincent W.S.; Tang, Hermit W.M.; Liu, Iris J.; Leung, Thomas H.Y.; Chan, Karen K.L.; Yam, Judy W.P.; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Ngan, Hextan Y.S.; Chan, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1) is a serine/threonine kinase which is frequently associated with human cancer progression. However, its functional role in tumorigenesis is still controversial. Here, we report that TAK1 enhances the oncogenic capacity of ovarian cancer cells through the activation of NF-κB signaling. We found that TAK1 is frequently upregulated and significantly associated with high-grade and metastatic ovarian cancers. Mechanistic studies showed that Ser412 phosphorylation is required for TAK1 in activating NF-κB signaling and promotes aggressiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Conversely, suppression of TAK1 activity by point mutation at Ser412, RNAi mediated gene knockdown or TAK1 specific inhibitor ((5Z) -7-Oxozeaenol) remarkably impairs tumor growth and metastasis in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Our study underscores the importance of targeting TAK1 as a promising therapeutic approach to counteract the ovarian cancer progression. PMID:25277189

  12. Augmentation of apoptosis and tumor regression by flavopiridol in the presence of CPT-11 in Hct116 colon cancer monolayers and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Motwani, M; Jung, C; Sirotnak, F M; She, Y; Shah, M A; Gonen, M; Schwartz, G K

    2001-12-01

    CPT-11, a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor, has demonstrated clinical activity in colorectal cancer. Flavopiridol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is rapidly emerging as a chemotherapy modulator. To enhance the therapeutic index of CPT-11 in colon cancer, we studied the combination of these two drugs in relatively resistant human colon cancer cells, Hct116. Exposure of parental Hct116 cells to clinically achievable concentrations of SN-38 (the active metabolite of CPT-11) induces p21 and a G(2) arrest. However, these conditions fail to induce apoptosis. In contrast, Hct116 cells that are p21 deficient (p21-/- Hct116) readily undergo apoptosis after treatment with SN-38. In this study we show that the parental Hct116 cells can be sensitized to undergo apoptosis by the addition of flavopiridol after SN-38 treatment. The induction of apoptosis was greatest with sequential therapy consisting of SN-38 followed by flavopiridol. Clonogenic assays also showed greatest inhibition with this sequence. Sequential treatment with SN-38 followed by flavopiridol was associated with higher activation of caspase-3 and greater cleavage of both p21 and XIAP, an inhibitor of apoptosis, compared with other treatment schedules. CPT-11 induced some tumor regressions but no complete responses in the p21-intact Hct116 xenografts. CPT-11 with flavopiridol more than doubled tumor regression, compared with CPT-11 alone, and produced a 30% complete response rate. Our studies indicate that CPT-11 induces cell cycle arrest rather than cell death and that flavopiridol, by activating the caspase cascade, cleaves the inhibitors of apoptosis and sensitizes the cells to undergo cell death. Thus, flavopiridol combined with CPT-11 may provide a completely new therapeutic approach in the treatment of colon cancer.

  13. Medicalized killing in Auschwitz.

    PubMed

    Lifton, R J

    1982-11-01

    Since late 1977 I have been conducting a psychological study of medical behavior in Auschwitz, and of Nazi doctors in general. I have been especially interested in the relationship of doctors, SS doctors in particular, to the killing process--in the transformation from healer to killer. I am concerned with the importance of the medicalized pattern for the overall Nazi project of mass murder and have therefore tried to examine the interaction of biomedical ideology, political ideology, and individual behavior. Finally, the work raises questions of more general significance: for doctors and medicine elsewhere; for scientists, other professionals, and institutions of all kinds; for approaches to "triage" and control over life and death; and for our understanding of human nature and human values. After describing how I did the study, I will discuss what I call the Nazi "biomedical vision" and its relationship to the killing of mental patients as well as to Auschwitz. Next I will suggest features of the Auschwitz atmosphere, particularly in regard to the psychological factors, or mechanisms, that enabled the Nazi doctors to do what they did. Finally, I will turn very briefly to the more general problems raised by the study.

  14. Direct transfection of miR-137 mimics is more effective than DNA demethylation of miR-137 promoter to augment anti-tumor mechanisms of delphinidin in human glioblastoma U87MG and LN18 cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-11-15

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. Recent studies suggested that 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (AzaC) could inhibit cell cycle progression in human glioblastoma stem cells by an indirect increase in expression of the tumor suppressor microRNA-137 (miR-137). Delphinidin (DPN), a new anthocyanidin, inhibits cell growth in different cancers. We investigated inhibition of glioblastoma growth after indirect or direct overexpression of miR-137 and then DPN treatment. The highest inhibition of cell growth occurred due to treatment with combination of 10 μM AzaC and 50 μM DPN in human glioblastoma U87MG and LN18 cells. The methylation sensitive-polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) results showed that AzaC inhibited methylation of miR-137 promoter region, which was hypermethylated in both glioblastoma cell lines, to cause indirect increase in miR-137 expression. Our results also indicated the highest miR-137 expression after direct transfection of miR-137 mimics and DPN treatment. Combination of miR-137 mimics transfection and DPN treatment caused the highest inhibition of cell invasion and prevented angiogenic network formation due to the least expression of angiogenic factor (VEGF) in human glioblastoma cells in co-culture with human microvascular endothelial cells. This combination strategy most effectively inhibited survival factors (p-Akt and NF-κB), angiogenic factors (VEGF and b-FGF), growth factor receptor (EGFR), and invasive factors (MMP-9 and MMP-2). Direct overexpression of miR-137 most effectively augmented efficacy of DPN to induce apoptosis with activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. So, sequential miR-137 overexpression and DPN treatment could be a promising combination treatment to inhibit growth of human glioblastoma cells.

  15. Therapeutic Potential and Challenges of Natural Killer Cells in Treatment of Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gras Navarro, Andrea; Björklund, Andreas T.; Chekenya, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells that hold tremendous potential for effective immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers. Due to the mode of NK cell killing, requiring one-to-one target engagement and site-directed release of cytolytic granules, the therapeutic potential of NK cells has been most extensively explored in hematological malignancies. However, their ability to precisely kill antibody coated cells, cancer stem cells, and genotoxically altered cells, while maintaining tolerance to healthy cells makes them appealing therapeutic effectors for all cancer forms, including metastases. Due to their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NK cells may potently reverse the anti-inflammatory tumor microenvironment (TME) and augment adaptive immune responses by promoting differentiation, activation, and/or recruitment of accessory immune cells to sites of malignancy. Nevertheless, integrated and coordinated mechanisms of subversion of NK cell activity against the tumor and its microenvironment exist. Although our understanding of the receptor ligand interactions that regulate NK cell functionality has evolved remarkably, the diversity of ligands and receptors is complex, as is their mechanistic foundations in regulating NK cell function. In this article, we review the literature and highlight how the TME manipulates the NK cell phenotypes, genotypes, and tropism to evade tumor recognition and elimination. We discuss counter strategies that may be adopted to augment the efficacy of NK cell anti-tumor surveillance, the clinical trials that have been undertaken so far in solid malignancies, critically weighing the challenges and opportunities with this approach. PMID:25972872

  16. How to kill creativity.

    PubMed

    Amabile, T M

    1998-01-01

    In today's knowledge economy, creativity is more important than ever. But many companies unwittingly employ managerial practices that kill it. How? By crushing their employees' intrinsic motivation--the strong internal desire to do something based on interests and passions. Managers don't kill creativity on purpose. Yet in the pursuit of productivity, efficiency, and control--all worthy business imperatives--they undermine creativity. It doesn't have to be that way, says Teresa Amabile. Business imperatives can comfortably coexist with creativity. But managers will have to change their thinking first. Specifically, managers will need to understand that creativity has three parts: expertise, the ability to think flexibly and imaginatively, and motivation. Managers can influence the first two, but doing so is costly and slow. It would be far more effective to increase employees' intrinsic motivation. To that end, managers have five levers to pull: the amount of challenge they give employees, the degree of freedom they grant around process, the way they design work groups, the level of encouragement they give, and the nature of organizational support. Take challenge as an example. Intrinsic motivation is high when employees feel challenged but not overwhelmed by their work. The task for managers, therefore, becomes matching people to the right assignments. Consider also freedom. Intrinsic motivation--and thus creativity--soars when managers let people decide how to achieve goals, not what goals to achieve. Managers can make a difference when it comes to employee creativity. The result can be truly innovative companies in which creativity doesn't just survive but actually thrives.

  17. Overview of Methods for Overcoming Hindrance to Drug Delivery to Tumors, with Special Attention to Tumor Interstitial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Baronzio, Gianfranco; Parmar, Gurdev; Baronzio, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Every drug used to treat cancer (chemotherapeutics, immunological, monoclonal antibodies, nanoparticles, radionuclides) must reach the targeted cells through the tumor environment at adequate concentrations, in order to exert their cell-killing effects. For any of these agents to reach the goal cells, they must overcome a number of impediments created by the tumor microenvironment (TME), beginning with tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP), and a multifactorial increase in composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM). A primary modifier of TME is hypoxia, which increases the production of growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor. These growth factors released by both tumor cells and bone marrow recruited myeloid cells form abnormal vasculature characterized by vessels that are tortuous and more permeable. Increased leakiness combined with increased inflammatory byproducts accumulates fluid within the tumor mass (tumor interstitial fluid), ultimately creating an increased pressure (TIFP). Fibroblasts are also up-regulated by the TME, and deposit fibers that further augment the density of the ECM, thus, further worsening the TIFP. Increased TIFP with the ECM are the major obstacles to adequate drug delivery. By decreasing TIFP and ECM density, we can expect an associated rise in drug concentration within the tumor itself. In this overview, we will describe all the methods (drugs, nutraceuticals, and physical methods of treatment) able to lower TIFP and to modify ECM used for increasing drug concentration within the tumor tissue. PMID:26258072

  18. Kill operation requires thorough analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1995-05-15

    Full control of a blowout well requires a properly designed post-capping kill operation because failures in regaining well control usually occur during the kill operation, not during capping. Capping (the installation of pressure control or diverter equipment on the wellhead) is generally very reliable in gaining control of a blowout well. The following techniques are some of the viable means of killing blowout wells once the capping assemblies are in place: direct shut in of the flow; bullheading; momentum kill; volumetric control for migration of fluids or lubrication after migration ceases; and dynamic kills (friction-based dynamic kills or mass flow rate kills) The objective of most post-capping operations is to stop the flow and put the well under hydrostatic control. The means of killing a blowout once capping assemblies are in place should be chosen with care to avoid problems such as cratering, equipment failure, and underground blowouts. The particular circumstances and well integrity will dictate which kill method will be the most viable. Each of these five methods are explained.

  19. Does smoking really kill anybody?

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1995-12-01

    Statements that so many people are killed by smoking use the term "kill" in a very unusual manner which is easily misunderstood by people not expert in epidemiology. In addition, the usual calculations leave out of account the fact that smoking interacts synergistically with other risk factors, so that it is a combination of risk factors rather than any specific one that is likely to have a causal influence on mortality. Strictly speaking it is quite inappropriate to state that smoking kills anybody, if we use the term "kill" in a meaningful fashion.

  20. Loss of DNAM-1 ligand expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells renders them resistant to NK cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Darcy, Phillip K; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor natural killer (NK) cell function through aberrant expression of NK-cell-activating receptors and their ligands on tumor cells. These alterations are thought to promote formation of inhibitory NK-target cell synapses, in which killer cell degranulation is attenuated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be effective in treating AML, through restoration of NK cell lytic activity. Similarly, agents that augment NK-cell-activating signals within the immunological synapse may provide some therapeutic benefit. However, the receptor-ligand interactions that critically dictate NK cell function in AML remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CD112/CD155 expression is required for DNAM-1-dependent killing of AML cells. Indeed, the low, or absent, expression of CD112/CD155 on multiple AML cell lines resulted in failure to stimulate optimal NK cell function. Importantly, isolated clones with low CD112/155 expression were resistant to NK cell killing while those expressing abundant levels of CD112/155 were highly susceptible. Attenuated NK cell killing in the absence of CD112/CD155 originated from decreased NK-target cell conjugation. Furthermore, we reveal by time-lapse microscopy, a significant increase in NK cell 'failed killing' in the absence of DNAM-1 ligands. Consequently, NK cells preferentially lysed ligand-expressing cells within heterogeneous populations, driving clonal selection of CD112/CD155-negative blasts upon NK cell attack. Taken together, we identify reduced CD155 expression as a major NK cell escape mechanism in AML and an opportunity for targeted immunotherapy.

  1. Asymptotic symmetries on Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou

    2001-12-01

    We investigate asymptotic symmetries regularly defined on spherically symmetric Killing horizons in Einstein theory with or without the cosmological constant. These asymptotic symmetries are described by asymptotic Killing vectors, along which the Lie derivatives of perturbed metrics vanish on a Killing horizon. We derive the general form of the asymptotic Killing vectors and find that the group of asymptotic symmetries consists of rigid O(3) rotations of a horizon two-sphere and supertranslations along the null direction on the horizon, which depend arbitrarily on the null coordinate as well as the angular coordinates. By introducing the notion of asymptotic Killing horizons, we also show that local properties of Killing horizons are preserved not only under diffeomorphisms but also under nontrivial transformations generated by the asymptotic symmetry group. Although the asymptotic symmetry group contains the Diff(S1) subgroup, which results from supertranslations dependent only on the null coordinate, it is shown that the Poisson brackets algebra of the conserved charges conjugate to asymptotic Killing vectors does not acquire nontrivial central charges. Finally, by considering extended symmetries, we discuss the fact that unnatural reduction of the symmetry group is necessary in order to obtain the Virasoro algebra with nontrivial central charges, which is not justified when we respect the spherical symmetry of Killing horizons.

  2. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  3. How electroshock weapons kill!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  4. Augmented Reality in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Shingles, Luke J.

    2013-09-01

    Augmented Reality consists of merging live images with virtual layers of information. The rapid growth in the popularity of smartphones and tablets over recent years has provided a large base of potential users of Augmented Reality technology, and virtual layers of information can now be attached to a wide variety of physical objects. In this article, we explore the potential of Augmented Reality for astrophysical research with two distinct experiments: (1) Augmented Posters and (2) Augmented Articles. We demonstrate that the emerging technology of Augmented Reality can already be used and implemented without expert knowledge using currently available apps. Our experiments highlight the potential of Augmented Reality to improve the communication of scientific results in the field of astrophysics. We also present feedback gathered from the Australian astrophysics community that reveals evidence of some interest in this technology by astronomers who experimented with Augmented Posters. In addition, we discuss possible future trends for Augmented Reality applications in astrophysics, and explore the current limitations associated with the technology. This Augmented Article, the first of its kind, is designed to allow the reader to directly experiment with this technology.

  5. AKT and oxidative stress team up to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dolado, Ignacio; Nebreda, Angel R

    2008-12-09

    AKT, a protein kinase frequently hyperactivated in cancer, plays an important role in cell survival and contributes to tumor cell resistance to cytotoxic therapies. A new study in this issue of Cancer Cell shows that AKT also induces the accumulation of oxygen radicals, which can be exploited to selectively kill cancer cells containing high levels of AKT activity.

  6. Augmentation of CAR T-cell Trafficking and Antitumor Efficacy by Blocking Protein Kinase A Localization.

    PubMed

    Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Maceyko, Steven; Lo, Albert; Puré, Ellen; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Antitumor treatments based on the infusion of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) are still relatively ineffective for solid tumors, due to the presence of immunosuppressive mediators [such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and adenosine] and poor T-cell trafficking. PGE2 and adenosine activate protein kinase A (PKA), which then inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This inhibition process requires PKA to localize to the immune synapse via binding to the membrane protein ezrin. We generated CAR T cells that expressed a small peptide called the "regulatory subunit I anchoring disruptor" (RIAD) that inhibits the association of PKA with ezrin, thus blunting the negative effects of PKA on TCR activation. After exposure to PGE2 or adenosine in vitro, CAR-RIAD T cells showed increased TCR signaling, released more cytokines, and showed enhanced killing of tumor cells compared with CAR T cells. When injected into tumor-bearing mice, the antitumor efficacy of murine and human CAR-RIAD T cells was enhanced compared with that of CAR T cells, due to resistance to tumor-induced hypofunction and increased T-cell infiltration of established tumors. Subsequent in vitro assays showed that both mouse and human CAR-RIAD cells migrated more efficiently than CAR cells did in response to the chemokine CXCL10 and also had better adhesion to various matrices. Thus, the intracellular addition of the RIAD peptide to adoptively transferred CAR T cells augments their efficacy by increasing their effector function and by improving trafficking into tumor sites. This treatment strategy, therefore, shows potential clinical application for treating solid tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 541-51. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation-induced non-melanoma skin cancer in the Crl:SKH1:hr-BR hairless mouse: augmentation of tumor multiplicity by chlorophyllin and protection by indole-3-carbinol.

    PubMed

    Cope, R B; Loehr, C; Dashwood, R; Kerkvliet, N I

    2006-05-01

    Over 1 million new cases of ultraviolet radiation-induced non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) per year now occur in the USA and the incidence of these diseases continues to increase. New preventative strategies are required. The hypothesis tested was that dietary administration of the putative cancer chemopreventatives sodium-copper-chlorophyllin (Chlor) or indole-3-carbinol (I3C) would inhibit UV-induced skin carcinogenesis in the Crl:SKH1:hr-BR hairless mouse. Groups of 20 mice were pre-fed isocaloric/isonutritive 20% corn-oil AIN-76a based diets that contained either Chlor (1.52 g%), I3C (5.08 g%) or no chemopreventative (control) for 2 weeks followed by exposure of their dorsal skin to a 10 week incremental, sub-erythemal, carcinogenic simulated solar UV exposure regime. Feeding was continued for the duration of the experiment. Matched non-UV exposed dietary groups were also included in the experimental design. The diets had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on body weight, feed consumption, cutaneous methanol-extractable UV photoprotective substances or on cutaneous UV-reflective characteristics. By day 180, UV-irradiated mice fed the Chlor had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher tumor multiplicity (33.6 +/- 4.72; mean +/- SEM) than UV-irradiated control animals (22.8 +/- 4.25). UV-irradiated mice fed I3C had a significantly (p < 0.001) lower tumor multiplicity (13.0 +/- 2.42) than that of both the UV-irradiated control and UV-irradiated Chlor-fed mice. The Chlor or I3C diets did not significantly (p > 0.05) affect UV-induced systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity responses. These results demonstrate augmentation of the UV-induced cutaneous carcinogenic process by dietary chlorophyllin and protection from this carcinogenic process by indole-3-carbinol via mechanisms that do not involve changes in skin optical properties, modulation of photoimmunosuppression or caloric/nutrient effects.

  8. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  9. Subfascial gluteal augmentation.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, J Abel; Rubio, Omar V; Cano, Jacobo P; Cedillo, Mariana C; Garcés, Miriam T

    2006-07-01

    Developing the concept of gluteal augmentation through the past 17 years has been an academic adventure. During these years my coworkers and I have progressively improved surgical technique and devised an anatomical system for gluteal augmentation that includes an ideal implant design and templates to assist in evaluating patients in the preoperative period and to identify the most appropriate implant size.

  10. Equating of Augmented Subscores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Haberman, Shelby J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing level of interest in subscores for their potential diagnostic value. Haberman (2008b) suggested reporting an augmented subscore that is a linear combination of a subscore and the total score. Sinharay and Haberman (2008) and Sinharay (2010) showed that augmented subscores often lead to more accurate…

  11. Confronting an Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnerley, Danny; Bacon, Matt; Wilson, Anna; Steele, James; Hedberg, John; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2012-01-01

    How can educators make use of augmented reality technologies and practices to enhance learning and why would we want to embrace such technologies anyway? How can an augmented reality help a learner confront, interpret and ultimately comprehend reality itself ? In this article, we seek to initiate a discussion that focuses on these questions, and…

  12. The Augmentation System Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbart, Doug; Hooper, Kristina

    1986-01-01

    Augmentation systems are composed of things that will add to what the human is genetically endowed with in order to extend the net capabilities that a human or human organization can apply to the problems or goals of human society. A broad brush categorization of the components of an augmentation system includes three distinct though interacting…

  13. "Messieurs, c'est les microbes qui auront le dernier mot": Gentlemen, it is the microbes who have the last word (Louis Pasteur)-Fusobacterium nucleatum protect tumors from killing by immune cells.

    PubMed

    Gur, Chamutal; Mandelboim, Ofer; Bachrach, Gilad

    2015-09-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is present in colon cancers where it was shown to generate a proinflammatory microenvironment that supports colorectal neoplasia progression. Remarkably, alongside with proinflammatory stimulation, fusobacteria also inhibit cytotoxicity of immune cells. Thus, it appears as if tumors exploit fusobacteria to generate a favorable proinflammatory and anti-cytotoxic microenvironment.

  14. Oxidative Stress Induced by Polymyxin E Is Involved in Rapid Killing of Paenibacillus polymyxa

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuyi; Qin, Wangrong

    2017-01-01

    Historically, the colistin has been thought to kill bacteria through membrane lysis. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that colistin induces rapid Paenibacillus polymyxa death through reactive oxygen species production. This significantly augments our understanding of the mechanism of colistin action, which is critical knowledge toward the yield development of colistin in the future. PMID:28321410

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies against Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acquire an Ability To Kill Tumor Cells through Complement Activation by Mutations That Selectively Facilitate the Hexamerization of IgG on Opsonized Cells.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Annalina; Derer, Stefanie; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Rösner, Thies; Kretschmer, Anna; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Valerius, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Triggering of the complement cascade induces tumor cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and attracts and activates cytotoxic cells. It therefore represents an attractive mechanism for mAb in cancer immunotherapy development. The classical complement pathway is initiated by IgG molecules that have assembled into ordered hexamers after binding their Ag on the tumor cell surface. The requirements for CDC are further impacted by factors such as Ab epitope, valency, and affinity. Thus, mAb against well-validated solid tumor targets, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that effectively induces complement activation and CDC, are highly sought after. The potency of complement activation by IgG Abs can be increased via several strategies. We identified single-point mutations in the Fc domain (e.g., E345K or E430G) enhancing Fc:Fc interactions, hexamer formation, and CDC after Ab binds cell-surface Ag. We show that EGFR Abs directed against clinically relevant epitopes can be converted into mAb with unprecedented CDC activity. Alternative strategies rely on increasing the affinity of monomeric IgG for C1q by introduction of a quadruple mutation at the C1q binding site or via generation of an IgG1/IgG3 chimera. In this study we show that selective enhancement of C1q binding via avidity modulation is superior to the unattended increase in C1q binding via affinity approaches, particularly for target cells with reduced EGFR expression levels. Improving Fc:Fc interactions of Ag-bound IgG therefore represents a highly promising and novel approach for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of therapeutic mAb against EGFR and potentially other tumor targets.

  16. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  17. Interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α augment acidosis-induced rat articular chondrocyte apoptosis via nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent up-regulation of ASIC1a channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Dai, Bei-Bei; Xie, Ya-Ya; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Li, Yue; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Zu, Sheng-Qin; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2017-10-03

    The acute-phase proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) demonstrate high-level expression and pleiotropic biological effects, and contribute to the progression and persistence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Acid hydrarthrosis is also an important pathological characteristic of RA, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) plays a critical role in acidosis-induced chondrocyte cytotoxicity. However, the roles of IL-1β and TNF-α in acid-induced apoptosis of chondrocytes remain unclear. Rat adjuvant arthritis and primary articular chondrocytes were used as in vivo and in vitro model systems, respectively. ASIC1a expression in articular cartilage was increased and highly colocalized with nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression in vivo. IL-1β and TNF-α could upregulate ASIC1a expression. These cytokines activated mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB pathways in chondrocytes, while the respective inhibitors of these signaling pathways could partially reverse the ASIC1a upregulation induced by IL-1β and TNF-α. Dual luciferase and gel-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that IL-1β and TNF-α enhanced ASIC1a promoter activity in chondrocytes by increasing NF-κB DNA-binding activities, which was in turn prevented by the NF-κB inhibitor ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate. IL-1β and TNF-α also decreased cell viability but enhanced LDH release, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration elevation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3/9 expression, and apoptosis in acid-stimulated chondrocytes, which effects could be abrogated by the specific ASIC1a inhibitor psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX-1), ASIC1a-short hairpin RNA or calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM. These results indicate that IL-1β and TNF-α can augment acidosis-induced cytotoxicity through NF-κB-dependent up-regulation of ASIC1a channel expression in primary articular chondrocytes

  18. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed Central

    Husak, D N

    1979-01-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible. PMID:541821

  19. Killing, letting die and euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Husak, D N

    1979-12-01

    Medical ethicists debate whether or not the moral assessment of cases of euthanasia should depend on whether the patient is 'killed' or 'allowed to die'. The usual presupposition is that a clear distinction between killing and letting die can be drawn so that this substantive question is not begged. I contend that the categorisation of cases of instances of killing rather than as instances of letting die depends in part on a prior moral assessment of the case. Hence is it trivially rather than substantively true that the distinction has moral significance. But even if a morally neutral (ie non-question begging) distinction could be drawn, its application to the euthanasia controversy is problematic. I illustrate the difficulties of employing this distinction to reach moral conclusions by critically discussing Philippa Foot's recent treatment of euthanasia. I conclude that even if an act of euthanasia is an instance of killing, and there exists a prima facie moral duty not to kill, and no more stringent duty overrides this duty, one still cannot determine such an act to be morally impermissible.

  20. [Experiences with the augmentation of vocal cords].

    PubMed

    Berghaus, A

    1987-06-01

    Augmentation of a vocal fold serves to improve glottic closure and may be indicated for paresis of the recurrent nerve and after tumor resection. Methods include injection of viscous fluids (paraffin, liquid silicone, polyvinyl alcohol, gelatin, sesame oil, collagen and particularly teflon paste) and operations to tighten the vocal cord or displace it medially. The disadvantages of the former include the danger of overcorrection, tissue irritation and possible systemic absorption of the material. As an alternative, solid material such as cartilage or synthetics may be used for augmentation. Experience obtained so far has shown that chips of porous polyethylene (PHDPE) are particularly suitable: they are easy to use, show good tissue tolerance and are anchored by ingrowth of connective tissue. The value of photokymography of the larynx in the assessment of therapeutic results after vocal-fold augmentation is discussed.

  1. Augmented reality: a review.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  2. Selective killing of nonreplicating mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Ruslana; Gold, Benjamin; Venugopal, Aditya; Singh, Jasbir; Samy, Raghu; Pupek, Krzysztof; Cao, Hua; Popescu, Carmen; Gurney, Mark; Hotha, Srinivas; Cherian, Joseph; Rhee, Kyu; Ly, Lan; Converse, Paul J; Ehrt, Sabine; Vandal, Omar; Jiang, Xiuju; Schneider, Jean; Lin, Gang; Nathan, Carl

    2008-03-13

    Antibiotics are typically more effective against replicating rather than nonreplicating bacteria. However, a major need in global health is to eradicate persistent or nonreplicating subpopulations of bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Hence, identifying chemical inhibitors that selectively kill bacteria that are not replicating is of practical importance. To address this, we screened for inhibitors of dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (DlaT), an enzyme required by Mtb to cause tuberculosis in guinea pigs and used by the bacterium to resist nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates, a stress encountered in the host. Chemical screening for inhibitors of Mtb DlaT identified select rhodanines as compounds that almost exclusively kill nonreplicating mycobacteria in synergy with products of host immunity, such as nitric oxide and hypoxia, and are effective on bacteria within macrophages, a cellular reservoir for latent Mtb. Compounds that kill nonreplicating pathogens in cooperation with host immunity could complement the conventional chemotherapy of infectious disease.

  3. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells.

  4. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  5. Chin augmentation - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100009.htm Chin augmentation - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  6. Breast augmentation - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100205.htm Breast augmentation - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  7. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1) The...

  8. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  9. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  10. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  11. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  12. Can Nanomedicines Kill Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Alakhova, Daria Y.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Most tumors are heterogeneous and many cancers contain small population of highly tumorigenic and intrinsically drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Like normal stem cell, CSCs have ability to self-renew and differentiate to other tumor cell types. They are believed to be a source for drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. CSCs often overexpress drug efflux transporters, spend most of their time in non-dividing G0 cell cycle state, and therefore, can escape the conventional chemotherapies. Thus, targeting CSCs is essential for developing novel therapies to prevent cancer relapse and emerging of drug resistance. Nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (nanomedicines) have been used to achieve longer circulation times, better stability and bioavailability over current therapeutics. Recently, some groups have successfully applied nanomedicines to target CSCs to eliminate the tumor and prevent its recurrence. These approaches include 1) delivery of therapeutic agents (small molecules, siRNA, antibodies) that affect embryonic signaling pathways implicated in self-renewal and differentiation in CSCs, 2) inhibiting drug efflux transporters in an attempt to sensitize CSCs to therapy, 3) targeting metabolism in CSCs through nanoformulated chemicals and field-responsive magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, and 4) disruption of multiple pathways in drug resistant cells using combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with amphiphilic Pluronic block copolymers. Despite clear progress of these studies the challenges of targeting CSCs by nanomedicines still exist and leave plenty of room for improvement and development. This review summarizes biological processes that are related to CSCs, overviews the current state of anti-CSCs therapies, and discusses state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed to kill CSCs. PMID:24120657

  13. Augmented reality in intraventricular neuroendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Finger, T; Schaumann, A; Schulz, M; Thomale, Ulrich-W

    2017-06-01

    Individual planning of the entry point and the use of navigation has become more relevant in intraventricular neuroendoscopy. Navigated neuroendoscopic solutions are continuously improving. We describe experimentally measured accuracy and our first experience with augmented reality-enhanced navigated neuroendoscopy for intraventricular pathologies. Augmented reality-enhanced navigated endoscopy was tested for accuracy in an experimental setting. Therefore, a 3D-printed head model with a right parietal lesion was scanned with a thin-sliced computer tomography. Segmentation of the tumor lesion was performed using Scopis NovaPlan navigation software. An optical reference matrix is used to register the neuroendoscope's geometry and its field of view. The pre-planned ROI and trajectory are superimposed in the endoscopic image. The accuracy of the superimposed contour fitting on endoscopically visualized lesion was acquired by measuring the deviation of both midpoints to one another. The technique was subsequently used in 29 cases with CSF circulation pathologies. Navigation planning included defining the entry points, regions of interests and trajectories, superimposed as augmented reality on the endoscopic video screen during intervention. Patients were evaluated for postoperative imaging, reoperations, and possible complications. The experimental setup revealed a deviation of the ROI's midpoint from the real target by 1.2 ± 0.4 mm. The clinical study included 18 cyst fenestrations, ten biopsies, seven endoscopic third ventriculostomies, six stent placements, and two shunt implantations, being eventually combined in some patients. In cases of cyst fenestrations postoperatively, the cyst volume was significantly reduced in all patients by mean of 47%. In biopsies, the diagnostic yield was 100%. Reoperations during a follow-up period of 11.4 ± 10.2 months were necessary in two cases. Complications included one postoperative hygroma and one insufficient

  14. Augmenting computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

  15. Monosodium Urate Crystals Induce Upregulation of NK1.1-Dependent Killing by Macrophages and Support Tumor-Resident NK1.1+ Monocyte/Macrophage Populations in Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Stefanie; Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca; Harper, Jacquie L

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages display phenotypic and functional heterogeneity dependent on the changing inflammatory microenvironment. Under some conditions, macrophages can acquire effector functions commonly associated with NK cells. In the current study, we investigated how the endogenous danger signal monosodium urate (MSU) crystals can alter macrophage functions. We report that naive, primary peritoneal macrophages rapidly upregulate the expression of the NK cell-surface marker NK1.1 in response to MSU crystals but not in response to LPS or other urate crystals. NK1.1 upregulation by macrophages was associated with mechanisms including phagocytosis of crystals, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and autocrine proinflammatory cytokine signaling. Further analysis demonstrated that MSU crystal-activated macrophages exhibited NK cell-like cytotoxic activity against target cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of tumor hemopoietic cell populations showed that effective, MSU-mediated antitumor activity required coadministration with Mycobacterium smegmatis to induce IL-1β production and significant accumulation of monocytes and macrophages (but not granulocytes or dendritic cells) expressing elevated levels of NK1.1. Our findings provide evidence that MSU crystal-activated macrophages have the potential to develop tumoricidal NK cell-like functions that may be exploited to boost antitumor activity in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  17. Beetle Kill Wall at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

  18. Augmented Cognition Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    exercises at ATC’s Mulberry Point MOUT grounds. The troops received two days of training prior to executing data collection runs with the EEG system in...team leader (TL) led 12 soldiers on a mission to “kill or capture an HVT” whose last known location was in one of the buildings in Mulberry Point. Up

  19. Women who kill their mates.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Dominique; Gagné, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Spousal homicide perpetrators are much more likely to be men than women. Accordingly, little research has focused on delineating characteristics of women who have committed spousal homicide. A retrospective clinical review of coroners' files containing all cases of spousal homicide occurring in Quebec over a 20-year period was carried out. A total of 276 spousal homicides occurred between 1991 and 2010, with 42 homicides by female spouses and 234 homicides by male spouses. Differences between homicides committed by female offenders and male offenders are discussed, and findings on spousal homicide committed by women are compared with those of previous studies. Findings regarding offenses perpetrated by females in the context of mental illness, domestic violence, and homicide-suicide are explored. The finding that only 28% of the female offenders in the Quebec sample had previously been subjected to violence by their victim is in contrast to the popular belief and reports that indicate that most female-perpetrated spousal homicide occurs in self-defense or in reaction to long-term abuse. In fact, women rarely gave a warning before killing their mates. Most did not suffer from a mental illness, although one-fifth were acutely intoxicated at the time of the killing. In the vast majority of cases of women who killed their mates, there were very few indicators that might have signaled the risk and helped predict the violent lethal behavior. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  1. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  2. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  3. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  4. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  5. Augmentative & Alternative Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patti

    2007-01-01

    There is no definitive recipe for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) success, but its universal ingredients can be found at home. The main ones are: (1) Understanding that all children need to express themselves, however outgoing or shy they may be; (2) Willingness to embrace the technology that may help your child regardless of your…

  6. Augmented Reality Binoculars.

    PubMed

    Oskiper, Taragay; Sizintsev, Mikhail; Branzoi, Vlad; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present an augmented reality binocular system to allow long range high precision augmentation of live telescopic imagery with aerial and terrain based synthetic objects, vehicles, people and effects. The inserted objects must appear stable in the display and must not jitter and drift as the user pans around and examines the scene with the binoculars. The design of the system is based on using two different cameras with wide field of view and narrow field of view lenses enclosed in a binocular shaped shell. Using the wide field of view gives us context and enables us to recover the 3D location and orientation of the binoculars much more robustly, whereas the narrow field of view is used for the actual augmentation as well as to increase precision in tracking. We present our navigation algorithm that uses the two cameras in combination with an inertial measurement unit and global positioning system in an extended Kalman filter and provides jitter free, robust and real-time pose estimation for precise augmentation. We have demonstrated successful use of our system as part of information sharing example as well as a live simulated training system for observer training, in which fixed and rotary wing aircrafts, ground vehicles, and weapon effects are combined with real world scenes.

  7. Augmented thermal bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurity of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pump to maintain isothermality in the source.

  8. Augmented Thermal Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurality of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pumps to maintain isothermality in the source.

  9. Computer Augmented Video Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes project CAVE (Computer Augmented Video Education), an ongoing effort at the U.S. Naval Academy to present lecture material on videocassette tape, reinforced by drill and practice through an interactive computer system supported by a 12 channel closed circuit television distribution and production facility. (RAO)

  10. Computer Augmented Video Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes project CAVE (Computer Augmented Video Education), an ongoing effort at the U.S. Naval Academy to present lecture material on videocassette tape, reinforced by drill and practice through an interactive computer system supported by a 12 channel closed circuit television distribution and production facility. (RAO)

  11. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  12. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  13. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  14. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following...

  15. Killing(-Yano) tensors in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    We construct the Killing(-Yano) tensors for a large class of charged black holes in higher dimensions and study general properties of such tensors, in particular, their behavior under string dualities. Killing(-Yano) tensors encode the symmetries beyond isometries, which lead to insights into dynamics of particles and fields on a given geometry by providing a set of conserved quantities. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the Killing tensor, we provide a prescription for constructing several conserved quantities starting from a single object, and we demonstrate that Killing tensors in higher dimensions are always associated with ellipsoidal coordinates. We also determine the transformations of the Killing(-Yano) tensors under string dualities, and find the unique modification of the Killing-Yano equation consistent with these symmetries. These results are used to construct the explicit form of the Killing(-Yano) tensors for the Myers-Perry black hole in arbitrary number of dimensions and for its charged version.

  16. Intelligent Filtering for Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    1 Intelligent Filtering for Augmented Reality Sabrina Sestito*, Simon Julier, Marco Lanzagorta and Larry Rosenblum Advanced Information Technology...Technology Organisation, Melbourne, Australia) KEYWORDS: Augmented Reality , Intelligent Systems, Databases ABSTRACT: Recent developments in computing...hardware have begun to make mobile and wearable Augmented Reality (AR) systems a reality . With this new freedom, AR systems can now be used in a very wide

  17. Augmented-reality-based segmentation refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornik, Alexander; Reitinger, Bernhard; Beichel, Reinhard; Sorantin, Erich; Werkgartner, Georg

    2004-05-01

    Planning of surgical liver tumor resections based on image data from X-ray computed tomography requires correct segmentation of the liver, liver vasculature and pathological structures. Automatic liver segmentation methods frequently fail in cases where the anatomy is degenerated by lesions or other present liver diseases. On the other hand performing a manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming task. Therefore Augmented Reality based segmentation refinement tools are reported, that aid radiologists to efficiently correct incorrect segmentations in true 3D using head-mounted displays and tracked input devices. The developed methods facilitate segmentation refinement by interactively deforming a mesh data structure reconstructed from an initial segmentation. The variety of refinement methods are all accessible through the intuitive, direct 3D user interface of an Augmented Reality system.

  18. Biomechanics in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Wang, X; Zeng, Y; Wu, W

    2005-01-01

    During the past 6 years, we have treated 406 patients with classical silicone augmentation rhinoplasty. The types and incidence of complications after subcutaneous or subfascial implantation were examined. We have proposed that most complications are related to the depth of the implant and the character of the tissues. In order to improve our operation and prove our hypothesis, we performed subperiosteal augmentation rhinoplasty in 22 cases with satisfactory results. In order to determine scientifically which layer the silicone implant should be inserted into, we investigated the biomechanics of human nasal periosteum and fascia, including tensile strength, stress-strain relationship and stress relaxation characters under uniaxial tension. Although having less failure strain, the periosteum has more tensile strength than the fascia. So, in the view of biomechanics, the periosteum is thicker, tougher and stiffer than the fascia, thus is more suitable for covering silicone implants.

  19. Fish kill from underwater explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, David J.

    1962-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has used 23 different shotpoints during two seasons of field work in our seismic study of crustal structure in western United States. Without exception, it has been found that under-water shotpoints result in a more efficient conversion of explosive energy into seismic energy than do drilled-hole shotpoints. This experience, together with elimination of drilling costs, has led to the use of underwater shotpoints wherever possible. Three of the 23 shotpoints were in the Pacific Ocean, and for these we have no detailed information on the fish kill. Another six shotpoints were located in inland bodies of water. These are: * Soda Lake near Fallon, Nevada * Mono Lake near Lee Vining, California * Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada * Shasta Lake near Redding, California * C.J. Strike Reservoir near Bruneau, Idaho * Lucky Peak Reservoir near Boise, Idaho The 22 high-explosive charges, weighing a total of 95,100 pounds, that were fired in lakes containing fish life resulted in the known death of 2,413 game fish with a total weight of 759 pounds. The average mortality was 110 game fish or 34.5 pounds of game fish killed per average shot of 4,325 pounds of high-explosives.

  20. Letting die and mercy killing.

    PubMed

    Narbekovas, Andrius; Meilius, Kazimieras

    2003-01-01

    We are all called to make moral decisions, not only about preserving life and health, but also about accepting our death and dying. There are situations, when it is morally right, and indeed obligatory, to allow a dying person to die in peace and dignity. But there is a world of difference between allowing a peaceful death, and deliberately setting out to bring death of the person either by acts of commission (s.c. 'active euthanasia'), or by acts of omission (s.c. 'passive euthanasia'). The word "killing" seems proper for euthanasia, because "to kill" does mean " to intentionally cause the death of someone." It can be morally acceptable to withhold or withdraw a treatment precisely because it is reasonably judged as inefficacious (futile), or excessively burdensome for the patient. One's reason for withholding such treatment must not be a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the patient's life, but a judgement about the desirability of putting an end to the treatment, which is futile or burdensome.

  1. Euthanasia: killing as due care?

    PubMed

    Oduncu, Fuat S

    2003-01-01

    On 10 April 2001, the Netherlands was the first country to pass a law on the killing of patients at their request (euthanasia), which took effect on 1 April 2002. Belgium followed and passed a euthanasia law on 16 May 2002, which took effect on 23 September 2002 and is even more liberal than the Dutch one. Physicians will be exempted from criminal liability provided they satisfy the so-called 'due care criteria'. However, in medical history euthanasia has never been part of the medical duty of care. Instead, the goals of medicine have always been the relief of pain and suffering. The current article provides insights into the Dutch, Belgian and Oregon euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide practices and reflects upon some central medical and legal documents on the regulation of euthanasia and the provision of palliative care. Modern palliative care includes both the delivery of competent palliative skills and a virtuous attitude of compassionate caring about the terminally ill patient as an autonomous person. Here, the author rejects killing as due care and proposes a novel concept of 'RAHME' (Aramaic: compassion, love, mercy), which calls for a holistically oriented concept where physicians act as companions to the terminally ill and dying patients.

  2. Batten augmented triangular beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Louis R.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The BAT (Batten-Augmented Triangular) BEAM is characterized by battens which are buckled in the deployed state, thus preloading the truss. The preload distribution is determined, and the effects of various external loading conditions are investigated. The conceptual design of a deployer is described and loads are predicted. The influence of joint imperfections on effective member stiffness is investigated. The beam is assessed structurally.

  3. Augmented reality in surgery.

    PubMed

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the history and current knowledge of computer-augmented reality in the field of surgery and its potential goals in education, surgeon training, and patient treatment. National Library of Medicine's database and additional library searches. Only articles suited to surgical sciences with a well-defined aim of study, methodology, and precise description of outcome were included. Augmented reality is an effective tool in executing surgical procedures requiring low-performance surgical dexterity; it remains a science determined mainly by stereotactic registration and ergonomics. Strong evidence was found that it is an effective teaching tool for training residents. Weaker evidence was found to suggest a significant influence on surgical outcome, both morbidity and mortality. No evidence of cost-effectiveness was found. Augmented reality is a new approach in executing detailed surgical operations. Although its application is in a preliminary stage, further research is needed to evaluate its long-term clinical impact on patients, surgeons, and hospital administrators. Its widespread use and the universal transfer of such technology remains limited until there is a better understanding of registration and ergonomics.

  4. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  5. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  6. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  7. Timelike Killing spinors in seven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2004-12-15

    We employ the G-structure formalism to study supersymmetric solutions of minimal and SU(2) gauged supergravities in seven dimensions admitting Killing spinors with an associated timelike Killing vector. The most general such Killing spinor defines a SU(3) structure. We deduce necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a timelike Killing spinor on the bosonic fields of the theories, and find that such configurations generically preserve one out of 16 supersymmetries. Using our general supersymmetric ansatz we obtain numerous new solutions, including squashed or deformed anti-de Sitter solutions of the gauged theory, and a large class of Goedel-like solutions with closed timelike curves.

  8. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  9. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  10. Mutually Augmented Cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesdorf, Florian; Pangercic, Dejan; Bubb, Heiner; Beetz, Michael

    In mac, an ergonomic dialog-system and algorithms will be developed that enable human experts and companions to be integrated into knowledge gathering and decision making processes of highly complex cognitive systems (e.g. Assistive Household as manifested further in the paper). In this event we propose to join algorithms and methodologies coming from Ergonomics and Artificial Intelligence that: a) make cognitive systems more congenial for non-expert humans, b) facilitate their comprehension by utilizing a high-level expandable control code for human experts and c) augment representation of such cognitive system into “deep representation” obtained through an interaction with human companions.

  11. History of gluteal augmentation.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, J Abel; Rubio, Omar V; Cano, Jacobo P; Cedillo, Mariana C; Garcés, Miriam T

    2006-07-01

    The concept of female beauty has changed throughout time, but the form and size of the breasts and gluteal region have remained constant as symbols of maximum femininity. Sculptures and prints show us feminine figures that are voluminous and reflect human history's interest in fertility. The early years of gluteal augmentation saw few published reports that described the procedure technique, follow-up, or possible complications. But developments continued as surgeons began experimenting with different anatomical planes for implant placement. The most important goal in plastic surgery is meeting a patient's expectations. It is important for the surgeon to thoroughly explain to patients what can realistically be achieved with a procedure.

  12. Radiative Augmented Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    PbLFICE SY 7a NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION M.L. ENERGIA , Inc. AFOSR/NA 6r. ADDRESS (City. State. anW ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City State, and ZIPCode...27 -00 N ’fPECTED 0 6I FOREWORD This is the Final Report on research on Radiative Augmented Combustion conducted at M. L. ENERGIA , Inc. It was a...the first two annual reports prior to this one. The entire research program was performed at ENERGIA , Inc., Princeton, New Jersey, with Dr. Moshe Lavid

  13. Radiative Augmented Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-12

    86-0085 In 00I to RADIATIVE AUGMENTED COMBUSTION MOSHE LAVID M.L. ENERGIA , INC. P.O. BOX 1468 1 PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 AUGUST 1985 *.. plo...Combustion conducted at M.L. ENERGIA . It is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract No. F49620-83-C-0133, with Dr. J.M...reported. It covers the second year of the contract, from July 15, 1984 through July 14, 1985. The work was performed at ENERGIA , Princeton, New Jersey

  14. Dioscin augments HSV-tk-mediated suicide gene therapy for melanoma by promoting connexin-based intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Wu, Yingya; Liu, Xijuan; Tan, Yuhui; Du, Biaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a promising strategy against melanoma. However, the low efficiency of the gene transfer technique can limit its application. Our preliminary data showed that dioscin, a glucoside saponin, could upregulate the expression of connexins Cx26 and Cx43, major components of gap junctions, in melanoma cells. We hypothesized that dioscin may increase the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV) through increasing the formation of gap junctions. Further analysis showed that dioscin indeed could increase the gap junctional intercellular communication in B16 melanoma cells, resulting in more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in B16tk cells. By contrast, overexpression of dominant negative Cx43 impaired the cell-cell communication of B16 cells and subsequently weakened the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV gene therapy. In vivo, combination treatment with dioscin and GCV of tumor-bearing mice with 30% positive B16tk cells and 70% wild-type B16 cells caused a significant reduction in tumor volume and weight compared to treatment with GCV or dioscin alone. Taken together, these results demonstrated that dioscin could augment the bystander effect of the HSV-tk/GCV system through increasing connexin-mediated gap junction coupling. PMID:27903977

  15. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R.; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  16. [History of augmentation mammaplasty].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2005-10-01

    The history of breast augmentation started effectively after World War II. Until then, this surgery was almost irrelevant because the indications were considered very rare and technical possibilities limited. During about two decades after 1945, two types of procedures were proposed. The first ones used autologous tissue especially fat in the form of dermofatty grafts taken from the buttocks. The results were very bad and sometimes disastrous for both techniques. At the beginning of the sixties, under the impulse of the Dow Corning Company, two surgeons: Frank Gerow and Thomas Cronin from Houston (Texas, USA) proposed an implant with a sheath filled with silicone gel. This new prosthesis had an immediate success and the number of breast augmentations growed very quickly. After an optimistic period, it had to be admitted that the results were sometimes deceiving or frankly bad. The breasts were often too firm, sometimes hard and even deformed. Capsular contracture occurred around the implants. During the 70's and 80's both consistency and envelops of the implants were regularly modified. The incision and the positioning were changed. At the end of the 80's, the problem of capsular contracture seemed to be resolved with the implants used, meanwhile a controversy took place about silicone in USA. Some cases of autoimmune diseases were attributed to silicone. In spite of scientific studies that proved the contrary, silicone implants were prohibited in the United States, Canada and temporarily in France.

  17. Hearing Loss: Hearing Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Atcherson, Samuel R; Moreland, Christopher; Zazove, Philip; McKee, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Etiologies of hearing loss vary. When hearing loss is diagnosed, referral to an otology subspecialist, audiology subspecialist, or hearing aid dispenser to discuss treatment options is appropriate. Conventional hearing aids provide increased sound pressure in the ear canal for detection of sounds that might otherwise be soft or inaudible. Hearing aids can be used for sensorineural, conductive, or mixed hearing loss by patients with a wide range of hearing loss severity. The most common type of hearing loss is high-frequency, which affects audibility and perception of speech consonants, but not vowels. As the severity of hearing loss increases, the benefit of hearing aids for speech perception decreases. Implantable devices such as cochlear implants, middle ear implants, and bone-anchored implants can benefit specific patient groups. Hearing assistive technology devices provide auditory, visual, or tactile information to augment hearing and increase environmental awareness of sounds. Hearing assistive devices include wireless assistive listening device systems, closed captioning, hearing aid-compatible telephones, and other devices. For some patients, financial barriers and health insurance issues limit acquisition of hearing aids, implantable devices, and hearing assistive devices. Physicians should be aware that for some patients and families, hearing augmentation may not be desired for cultural reasons.

  18. A General Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Beltman, Joost B.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data. PMID:24739177

  19. A general functional response of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated killing of target cells.

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J

    2014-04-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells, and play a critical role in immune protection. Our knowledge of how the CTL killing efficiency varies with CTL and target cell numbers is limited. Here, we simulate a region of lymphoid tissue using a cellular Potts model to characterize the functional response of CTL killing of target cells, and find that the total killing rate saturates both with the CTL and the target cell densities. The relative saturation in CTL and target cell densities is determined by whether a CTL can kill multiple target cells at the same time, and whether a target cell can be killed by many CTLs together. We find that all the studied regimes can be well described by a double-saturation (DS) function with two different saturation constants. We show that this DS model can be mechanistically derived for the cases where target cells are killed by a single CTL. For the other cases, a biological interpretation of the parameters is still possible. Our results imply that this DS function can be used as a tool to predict the cellular interactions in cytotoxicity data.

  20. Advanced intellect-augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbart, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    User experience in applying our augmentation tools and techniques to various normal working tasks within our center is described so as to convey a subjective impression of what it is like to work in an augmented environment. It is concluded that working-support, computer-aid systems for augmenting individuals and teams, are undoubtedly going to be widely developed and used. A very special role in this development is seen for multi-access computer networks.

  1. Antitumor Effects of Chimeric Receptor Engineered Human T Cells Directed to Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunitha; Chow, Kevin KH; Mata, Melinda; Shaffer, Donald R; Song, Xiao-Tong; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Lisa L; Rowley, David R; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the principle component of the tumor-associated stroma, form a highly protumorigenic and immunosuppressive microenvironment that mediates therapeutic resistance. Co-targeting CAFs in addition to cancer cells may therefore augment the antitumor response. Fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a type 2 dipeptidyl peptidase, is expressed on CAFs in a majority of solid tumors making it an attractive immunotherapeutic target. To target FAP-positive CAFs in the tumor-associated stroma, we genetically modified T cells to express a FAP-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The resulting FAP-specific T cells recognized and killed FAP-positive target cells as determined by proinflammatory cytokine release and target cell lysis. In an established A549 lung cancer model, adoptive transfer of FAP-specific T cells significantly reduced FAP-positive stromal cells, with a concomitant decrease in tumor growth. Combining these FAP-specific T cells with T cells that targeted the EphA2 antigen on the A549 cancer cells themselves significantly enhanced overall antitumor activity and conferred a survival advantage compared to either alone. Our study underscores the value of co-targeting both CAFs and cancer cells to increase the benefits of T-cell immunotherapy for solid tumors. PMID:23732988

  2. Pilot-optimal augmentation synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    An augmentation synthesis method usable in the absence of quantitative handling qualities specifications, and yet explicitly including design objectives based on pilot-rating concepts, is presented. The algorithm involves the unique approach of simultaneously solving for the stability augmentation system (SAS) gains, pilot equalization and pilot rating prediction via optimal control techniques. Simultaneous solution is required in this case since the pilot model (gains, etc.) depends upon the augmented plant dynamics, and the augmentation is obviously not a priori known. Another special feature is the use of the pilot's objective function (from which the pilot model evolves) to design the SAS.

  3. Serum factors responsible for killing of Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Reed, W. P.; Albright, Elizabeth L.

    1974-01-01

    Eight strains of Shigella were tested for susceptibility to killing by seven normal human sera. Although there was a wide range of susceptibility between strains of bacteria, there was surprisingly little difference in the killing activity of individual sera and no relationship between antibody titres and killing capacity. Bacteriolysis required small amounts of antibody, but as little as 0.02 mg of a 19S fraction from normal serum restored full killing capacity to 1 ml of antibody depleted serum. Neither 11S IgA nor Cohn fraction II restored the bacteriolytic ability. Both the early reacting complement sequence and the alternate C3 activating pathway appeared to participate in killing as indicated by the roles of C2 and C3PA. Killing occurred, but with reduced efficiency, when either of the two substances was missing. However, serum lacking both C2 and C3PA could no longer kill Shigella. Killing also required the presence of C3, and presumably some of the later components of complement are subsequently involved. PMID:4846468

  4. Bull heading to kill live gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Oudeman, P.; Avest, D. ter; Grodal, E.O.; Asheim, H.A.; Meissner, R.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    To kill a live closed-in gas well by bull heading down the tubing, the selected pump rate should be high enough to ensure efficient displacement of the gas into the formation (i.e., to avoid the kill fluid bypassing the gas). On the other hand, the pressures that develop during bull heading at high rate must not exceed wellhead pressure rating, tubing or casing burst pressures or the formation breakdown gradient, since this will lead, at best, to a very inefficient kill job. Given these constraints, the optimum kill rate, requited hydraulic horsepower, density and type of kill fluids have to be selected. For this purpose a numerical simulator has been developed, which predicts the sequence of events during bull heading. Pressures and flow rates in the well during the kill job are calculated, taking to account slip between the gas and kill fluid, hydrostatic and friction pressure drop, wellbore gas compression and leak-off to the formation. Comparison with the results of a dedicated field test demonstrates that these parameters can be estimated accurately. Example calculations will be presented to show how the simulator can be used to identify an optimum kill scenario.

  5. Puzzling cases about killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Favor, C D

    1996-01-01

    Discussions of euthanasia often appeal to the distinction between killing people and letting them die. Favor asks whether this distinction is morally important--in particular, whether killing is worse than merely letting someone die, even when the motivations and consequences are the same. She explores our moral intuitions via a discussion of various subtly different hypothetical examples.

  6. Killing and letting die: a defensible distinction.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, W

    1996-04-01

    The distinction between killing and letting die is investigated and clarified. It is then argued that in most cases, though not in all, it is worse to kill than to let die. In euthanasia the significance of the distinction is diminished, but still important.

  7. Targeted Inhibition of the miR-199a/214 Cluster by CRISPR Interference Augments the Tumor Tropism of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells under Hypoxic Condition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehu; An, Xiuli; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    The human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) provides a breakthrough approach that helps overcoming ethical and allergenic challenges posed in application of neural stem cells (NSCs) in targeted cancer gene therapy. However, the tumor-tropic capacity of hiPSC-derived NSCs (hiPS-NSCs) still has much room to improve. Here we attempted to promote the tumor tropism of hiPS-NSCs by manipulating the activity of endogenous miR-199a/214 cluster that is involved in regulation of hypoxia-stimulated cell migration. We first developed a baculovirus-delivered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system that sterically blocked the E-box element in the promoter of the miR-199a/214 cluster with an RNA-guided catalytically dead Cas9 (dCas9). We then applied this CRISPRi system to hiPS-NSCs and successfully suppressed the expression of miR-199a-5p, miR-199a-3p, and miR-214 in the microRNA gene cluster. Meanwhile, the expression levels of their targets related to regulation of hypoxia-stimulated cell migration, such as HIF1A, MET, and MAPK1, were upregulated. Further migration assays demonstrated that the targeted inhibition of the miR-199a/214 cluster significantly enhanced the tumor tropism of hiPS-NSCs both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest a novel application of CRISPRi in NSC-based tumor-targeted gene therapy. PMID:27965712

  8. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  9. Killing, letting die, and simple conflicts.

    PubMed

    Malm, H M

    1989-01-01

    Proponents of the moral equivalence of killing and letting die argue that in cases of simple conflict, where one agent must either perform a positive act and kill one person, or not perform that act and allow another person to die, the agent's alternatives are clearly morally equivalent. Malm rejects this view in a three part essay. He argues that in cases of simple conflict, the acts of killing and letting die are morally different, and that killing is not in itself worse than letting die. Malm considers and rejects the suggestion that the agent should decide randomly between the two alternatives. He concludes that while simple conflict cases require us to recognize a morally significant difference between killing and letting die, they do not require us to recognize a morally significant difference between acting and refraining.

  10. Antibacterial surface design - Contact kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajbir; Liu, Song

    2016-08-01

    Designing antibacterial surfaces has become extremely important to minimize Healthcare Associated Infections which are a major cause of mortality worldwide. A previous biocide-releasing approach is based on leaching of encapsulated biocides such as silver and triclosan which exerts negative impacts on the environment and potentially contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. This drawback of leachable compounds led to the shift of interest towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly approach: contact-killing surfaces. Biocides that can be bound onto surfaces to give the substrates contact-active antibacterial activity include quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), quaternary phosphoniums (QPs), carbon nanotubes, antibacterial peptides, and N-chloramines. Among the above, QACs and N-chloramines are the most researched contact-active biocides. We review the engineering of contact-active surfaces using QACs or N-chloramines, the modes of actions as well as the test methods. The charge-density threshold of cationic surfaces for desired antibacterial efficacy and attempts to combine various biocides for the generation of new contact-active surfaces are discussed in detail. Surface positive charge density is identified as a key parameter to define antibacterial efficacy. We expect that this research field will continue to attract more research interest in view of the potential impact of self-disinfective surfaces on healthcare-associated infections, food safety and corrosion/fouling resistance required on industrial surfaces such as oil pipes and ship hulls.

  11. Choke and kill control system

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, R.E.

    1988-08-02

    A control system is described for a choke and kill safety valve for use in a well conduit, in which the valve indicates a housing having a bore therethrough, a sleeve telescopically movable in the housing about the bore, a valve closure member positioned in the housing and connected to the sleeve and movable between open and closed positions in the bore, a flow tube longitudinally movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means between the sleeve and the flow tube for biasing the flow tube in a direction for causing the valve closure member to move the closed position, releasable latch means between the sleeve and the flow tube initially holding the flow tube in position holding the valve closure member in the open position, a biased piston and cylinder assembly initially engaging the releasable latch and holding the latch engaged, the assembly being exposed on one side to pressure in the housing, and the housing and the sleeve including openings which when aligned by movement of the sleeve by well pressure allows fluid to be inserted into the bore from the outside of the housing.

  12. NASA Communications Augmentation network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidyar, Guy C.; Butler, Thomas E.; Laios, Straton C.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Communications (Nascom) Division of the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD) is to undertake a major initiative to develop the Nascom Augmentation (NAUG) network to achieve its long-range service objectives for operational data transport to support the Space Station Freedom Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), and other projects. The NAUG is the Nascom ground communications network being developed to accommodate the operational traffic of the mid-1990s and beyond. The NAUG network development will be based on the Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI-RM). This paper describes the NAUG network architecture, subsystems, topology, and services; addresses issues of internetworking the Nascom network with other elements of the Space Station Information System (SSIS); discusses the operations environment. This paper also notes the areas of related research and presents the current conception of how the network will provide broadband services in 1998.

  13. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  14. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past several years, efforts have been under way to design and develop an operationally flexible research facility for investigating the use of cross-field MHD accelerators as a potential thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. The baseline configuration for this high-power experimental facility utilizes a 1.5-MWe multi-gas arc-heater as a thermal driver for a 2-MWe MHD accelerator, which resides in a large-bore 2-tesla electromagnet. A preliminary design study using NaK seeded nitrogen as the working fluid led to an externally diagonalized segmented MHD channel configuration based on an expendable heat-sink design concept. The current status report includes a review of engineering/design work and performance optimization analyses and summarizes component hardware fabrication and development efforts, preliminary testing results, and recent progress toward full-up assembly and testing

  16. Augmented reality system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  17. Pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rebouças, Rafael B; Monteiro, Rodrigo C; Souza, Thiago N S de; Aragão, Augusto J de; Burity, Camila R T; Nóbrega, Júlio C de A; Oliveira, Natália S C de; Abrantes, Ramon B; Dantas Júnior, Luiz B; Cartaxo Filho, Ricardo; Negromonte, Gustavo R P; Sampaio, Rafael da C R; Britto, Cesar A

    2014-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute neuropathy that rarely compromises bladder function. Conservative management including clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy is the primary approach for hypocompliant contracted bladder. Surgical treatment may be used in refractory cases to improve bladder compliance and capacity in order to protect the upper urinary tract. We describe a case of pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty in a patient affected by Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 15-year-old female, complaining of voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infection and worsening renal function for three months. A previous history of Guillain-Barre syndrome on childhood was related. A voiding cystourethrography showed a pine-cone bladder with moderate post-void residual urine. The urodynamic demonstrated a hypocompliant bladder and small bladder capacity (190 mL) with high detrusor pressure (54 cmH2O). Nonsurgical treatments were attempted, however unsuccessfully.

  18. Augmented nonlinear differentiator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xingling; Liu, Jun; Yang, Wei; Tang, Jun; Li, Jie

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a sigmoid function based augmented nonlinear differentiator (AND) for calculating the noise-less time derivative from a noisy measurement. The prominent advantages of the present differentiation technique are: (i) compared to the existing tracking differentiators, better noise suppression ability can be achieved without appreciable delay; (ii) the enhanced noise-filtering mechanism not only can be applied to the designed differentiator, but also can be extended for improving noise-tolerance capability of the available differentiators. In addition, the convergence property and robustness performance against noises are investigated via singular perturbation theory and describing function method, respectively. Also, comparison with several classical differentiators is given to illustrate the superiority of AND in noise suppression. Finally, applications on autopilot design and displacement following for nonlinear mass spring mechanical system are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed AND technique.

  19. NAESA Augmentation Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, John J.

    1998-01-01

    This project was one project within the Native American Earth and Space Academy (NAESA). NAESA is a national initiative comprised of several organizations that support programs which focus on 1) enhancing the technological, scientific and pedagogical skills of K-14 teachers who instruct Native Americans, 2) enhancing the understanding and applications of science, technology, and engineering of college-bound Native Americans and teaching them general college "survival skills" (e.g., test taking, time management, study habits), 3) enhancing the scientific and pedagogical skills of the faculty of tribally-controllcd colleges and community colleges with large Native American enrollments, and 4) strengthening the critical relationships between students, their parents, tribal elders, and their communities. This Augmentation Pilot Project focused on the areas of community-school alliances and intemet technology use in teaching and learning and daily living addressing five major objectives.

  20. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  1. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  2. BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010892 TITLE: BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System DISTRIBUTION...component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP010865 thru. ADP010894 UNCLASSIFIED 27-1 BARS: Battlefield Augmented Reality System Simon Julier... future military operations are expected to occur overload, we have developed an intelligent filter which in urban environments. These complex, 3D

  3. Advanced Intellect-Augmentation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbart, D. C.

    This progress report covers a two-year project which is part of a program that is exploring the value of computer aids in augmenting human intellectual capability. The background and nature of the program, its resources, and the activities it has undertaken are outlined. User experience in applying augmentation tools and techniques to various…

  4. Augmented CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD56(-) cells in cytokine-induced killer cells cultured with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement from heavily pretreated patients with solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Yi, Yongxiang; Yin, Dandan; Zhou, Zhenxian; Fan, Jing; Ye, Wei; Zhao, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) were shown to be a promising tool in the quest for new therapeutic approaches in the setting of metastatic solid tumors refractory to standard treatments. However, there is a practical clinical problem of different expansion rates and cell function as individual variability exists. Stimulatory molecular 4-1BB could promote division and survival of T cells and enhance effector activity including cytokine production. This study aimed to invest the contribution of co-stimulation signal to CIKs production for exploring new strategies, which increase the expansion and reliability of CIKs generation to improve access to CIKs therapy. We studied the larger-scale expansion of CIKs cultured with engineered cells for costimulatory enhancement (ECCE) consisting of K562 cells that expressed 4-1BBL in heavily pretreated patients with solid tumor. The proliferation and cytotoxic capacity of CIKs were evaluated. Phenotypes of CIKs were analyzed using flow cytometry. Cytokine levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proliferation and cytotoxic activity of CIKs were significantly up-regulated by ECCE. The percentages of CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD56(-) CIKs were significantly increased while the percentage of CD3(+)CD56(+) CIKs was decreased. In addition, the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α by CIKs could also be enhanced significantly when ECCE were added into the culture system. This study suggests that ECCE may improve the efficacy of CIKs therapy and make CIKs therapy possible for the patients whose CIKs would be hard to be cultured using conventional methods. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  8. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two-dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  9. Structural consequences of railgun augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W. . Applied Mechanics Div. III)

    1989-01-01

    An augmented railgun can provide the same driving force on a projectile at a lower plasma arc current and thus less potential erosion and barrel damage as an unaugmented railgun. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). The mechanical load on the cores consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. Assuming no current diffusion into the conductors, the magnetic pressure distribution on the conductors is determined by solving the two dimensional magnetostatic field equations using an analogy with heat transfer. These loads are then used in a dynamic finite element structural model. The maximum rail current is found at which the unaugmented railgun can be repetitively fired without detrimental gaps forming at the bore. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations can occur. Thus successful implementation of rail gun augmentation will require improvement of the supporting structure.

  10. Killing Initial Data on spacelike conformal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Tim-Torben

    2016-08-01

    We analyze Killing Initial Data on Cauchy surfaces in conformally rescaled vacuum space-times satisfying Friedrich's conformal field equations. As an application, we derive the KID equations on a spacelike ℐ-.

  11. Acts and omissions, killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Gillon, R

    1986-01-11

    Gillon asks what, if any, moral importance resides in the distinction between killing and letting die in the context of medical care. He considers and rejects the acts and omissions doctrine, which claims that actions (killing) resulting in some undesirable end are in general morally worse than failures to act (allowing to die) that have the same result. He also refutes the argument that the moral distinction between killing and letting die is one of harming versus benefitting, and that a physician has a responsibility not to harm (kill) a patient but no duty to help (keep alive). Gillon concludes by discussing the moral claims upon which the Roman Catholic rejection of the acts and omissions doctrine is based, which are the subjects of his next British Medical Journal article on medical ethics.

  12. Augmented Likelihood Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stille, Maik; Kleine, Matthias; Hägele, Julian; Barkhausen, Jörg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2016-01-01

    The presence of high-density objects remains an open problem in medical CT imaging. Data of projections passing through objects of high density, such as metal implants, are dominated by noise and are highly affected by beam hardening and scatter. Reconstructed images become less diagnostically conclusive because of pronounced artifacts that manifest as dark and bright streaks. A new reconstruction algorithm is proposed with the aim to reduce these artifacts by incorporating information about shape and known attenuation coefficients of a metal implant. Image reconstruction is considered as a variational optimization problem. The afore-mentioned prior knowledge is introduced in terms of equality constraints. An augmented Lagrangian approach is adapted in order to minimize the associated log-likelihood function for transmission CT. During iterations, temporally appearing artifacts are reduced with a bilateral filter and new projection values are calculated, which are used later on for the reconstruction. A detailed evaluation in cooperation with radiologists is performed on software and hardware phantoms, as well as on clinically relevant patient data of subjects with various metal implants. Results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm is able to outperform contemporary metal artifact reduction methods such as normalized metal artifact reduction.

  13. Abstraction Augmented Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Caragea, Cornelia; Silvescu, Adrian; Caragea, Doina; Honavar, Vasant

    2010-12-13

    High accuracy sequence classification often requires the use of higher order Markov models (MMs). However, the number of MM parameters increases exponentially with the range of direct dependencies between sequence elements, thereby increasing the risk of overfitting when the data set is limited in size. We present abstraction augmented Markov models (AAMMs) that effectively reduce the number of numeric parameters of k(th) order MMs by successively grouping strings of length k (i.e., k-grams) into abstraction hierarchies. We evaluate AAMMs on three protein subcellular localization prediction tasks. The results of our experiments show that abstraction makes it possible to construct predictive models that use significantly smaller number of features (by one to three orders of magnitude) as compared to MMs. AAMMs are competitive with and, in some cases, significantly outperform MMs. Moreover, the results show that AAMMs often perform significantly better than variable order Markov models, such as decomposed context tree weighting, prediction by partial match, and probabilistic suffix trees.

  14. Phenobarbital Augments Hypothermic Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Barks, John D.; Liu, Yi-Qing; Shangguan, Yu; Silverstein, Faye S.

    2010-01-01

    Seizures are associated with adverse outcome in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We hypothesized that early administration of the anticonvulsant phenobarbital after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia could enhance the neuroprotective efficacy of delayed-onset hypothermia. We tested this hypothesis in a neonatal rodent model. Seven-day-old rats (n=104) underwent right carotid ligation, followed by 90 min 8%O2 exposure; 15 min later, they received injections of phenobarbital (40 mg/kg) or saline. One or 3h later, all were treated with hypothermia (30°C, 3h). Function and neuropathology were evaluated after 7 days (“early outcomes”) or 1 month (“late outcomes”). Early outcome assessment demonstrated better sensorimotor performance and less cortical damage in phenobarbital-treated groups; there were no differences between groups in which the hypothermia delay was shortened from 3h to 1h. Late outcome assessment confirmed sustained benefits of phenobarbital+hypothermia treatment; sensorimotor performance was better (persistent attenuation of contralateral forepaw placing deficits and absence of contralateral forepaw neglect); neuropathology scores were lower (medians, phenobarbital 2, saline 8.5, p<0.05), and less ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere %Damage (mean±SD, 11±17 vs. 28±22, p<0.05). These results suggest that early post-hypoxia-ischemia administration of phenobarbital may augment the neuroprotective efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20098339

  15. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  16. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    SciTech Connect

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-15

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  17. Killing vector fields and harmonic superfield theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeger, Josua

    2014-09-01

    The harmonic action functional allows a natural generalisation to semi-Riemannian supergeometry, also referred to as harmonic, which resembles the supersymmetric sigma models studied in high energy physics. We show that Killing vector fields are infinitesimal supersymmetries of this harmonic action and prove three different Noether theorems in this context. En passant, we provide a homogeneous treatment of five characterisations of Killing vector fields on semi-Riemannian supermanifolds, thus filling a gap in the literature.

  18. Is killing no worse than letting die?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, W

    1995-01-01

    Those who wish to refute the view that it is worse to kill than to let die sometimes produce examples of cases in which an agent lets someone die but would be generally agreed to be no less reprehensible than if he had killed. It is argued that the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were designed to undermine.

  19. Killing and letting die: hidden value assumptions.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G

    1983-01-01

    In this paper I argue for several related theses: first, that the distinction between killing and letting die, as it is drawn by ordinary persons in ordinary contexts, is more complex than is generally understood; second, that the key feature of this complexity lies in the presence of a hidden normative component in what appears to be a straightforwardly descriptive distinction; and, third, that this complexity renders the killing/letting die distinction an inadequate and hazardous guide for moral reasoning.

  20. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

  1. Lie algebra of conformal Killing-Yano forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Ümit

    2016-06-01

    We provide a generalization of the Lie algebra of conformal Killing vector fields to conformal Killing-Yano forms. A new Lie bracket for conformal Killing-Yano forms that corresponds to slightly modified Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket of differential forms is proposed. We show that conformal Killing-Yano forms satisfy a graded Lie algebra in constant curvature manifolds. It is also proven that normal conformal Killing-Yano forms in Einstein manifolds also satisfy a graded Lie algebra. The constructed graded Lie algebras reduce to the graded Lie algebra of Killing-Yano forms and the Lie algebras of conformal Killing and Killing vector fields in special cases.

  2. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  3. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  4. On the killing of mycobacteria by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jordao, Luisa; Bleck, Christopher K E; Mayorga, Luis; Griffiths, Gareth; Anes, Elsa

    2008-02-01

    Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacteria are internalized into macrophage phagosomes. Whereas the non-pathogenic types are invariably killed by all macrophages, the pathogens generally survive and grow. Here, we addressed the survival, production of nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and intracellular trafficking of the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, the pathogen-like, BCG and the pathogenic M. bovis in different mouse, human and bovine macrophages. The bacteriocidal effects of RNI were restricted for all bacterial species to the early stages of infection. EM analysis showed clearly that all the mycobacteria remained within phagosomes even at late times of infection. The fraction of BCG and M. bovis found in mature phagolysosomes rarely exceeded 10% of total, irrespective of whether bacteria were growing, latent or being killed, with little correlation between the extent of phagosome maturation and the degree of killing. Theoretical modelling of our data identified two different potential sets of explanations that are consistent with our results. The model we favour is one in which a small but significant fraction of BCG is killed in an early phagosome, then maturation of a small fraction of phagosomes with both live and killed bacteria, followed by extremely rapid killing and digestion of the bacteria in phago-lysosomes.

  5. Augmenter of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2012-07-09

    'Augmenter of liver regeneration' (ALR) (also known as hepatic stimulatory substance or hepatopoietin) was originally found to promote growth of hepatocytes in the regenerating or injured liver. ALR is expressed ubiquitously in all organs, and exclusively in hepatocytes in the liver. ALR, a survival factor for hepatocytes, exhibits significant homology with ERV1 (essential for respiration and viability) protein that is essential for the survival of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ALR comprises 198 to 205 amino acids (approximately 22 kDa), but is post-translationally modified to three high molecular weight species (approximately 38 to 42 kDa) found in hepatocytes. ALR is present in mitochondria, cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. Mitochondrial ALR may be involved in oxidative phosphorylation, but also functions as sulfhydryl oxidase and cytochrome c reductase, and causes Fe/S maturation of proteins. ALR, secreted by hepatocytes, stimulates synthesis of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide in Kupffer cells via a G-protein coupled receptor. While the 22 kDa rat recombinant ALR does not stimulate DNA synthesis in hepatocytes, the short form (15 kDa) of human recombinant ALR was reported to be equipotent as or even stronger than TGF-α or HGF as a mitogen for hepatocytes. Altered serum ALR levels in certain pathological conditions suggest that it may be a diagnostic marker for liver injury/disease. Although ALR appears to have multiple functions, the knowledge of its role in various organs, including the liver, is extremely inadequate, and it is not known whether different ALR species have distinct functions. Future research should provide better understanding of the expression and functions of this enigmatic molecule.

  6. Augmentation strategies: focus on anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Joffe, R T; Levitt, A J; Sokolov, S T

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 20% to 40% of patients will fail to respond to the first antidepressant used for their current major depressive episode. Furthermore, it has been suggested that a further 20% to 30% of patients will have only a partial response. There are four main options to consider in the treatment of these patients: optimization, substitution, augmentation, and combination therapy. Several combination antidepressant treatments have been used in treatment-refractory depression. Moreover, various augmentation strategies have also proved to be successful. Although the empirical data to support these treatment options are limited, augmentation treatment has several potential advantages over the other clinical options available, particularly substitution. These data are reviewed and clinical applications discussed. Particular attention is paid to the role of anxiolytics as augmentation agents in the treatment of major depression.

  7. Mersiline mesh in premaxillary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    Premaxillary retrusion may distort the aesthetic appearance of the columella, lip, and nasal tip. This defect is characteristically seen in, but not limited to, patients with cleft lip nasal deformity. This study investigated 60 patients presenting with premaxillary deficiencies in which Mersiline mesh was used to augment the premaxilla. All the cases had surgery using the external rhinoplasty technique. Two methods of augmentation with Mersiline mesh were used: the Mersiline roll technique, for the cases with central symmetric deficiencies, and the Mersiline packing technique, for the cases with asymmetric deficiencies. Premaxillary augmentation with Mersiline mesh proved to be simple technically, easy to perform, and not associated with any complications. Periodic follow-up evaluation for a mean period of 32 months (range, 12-98 months) showed that an adequate degree of premaxillary augmentation was maintained with no clinically detectable resorption of the mesh implant.

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated PD-1 disruption enhances anti-tumor efficacy of human chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Levi J; Schumann, Kathrin; Roybal, Kole T; Gate, Rachel E; Ye, Chun J; Lim, Wendell A; Marson, Alexander

    2017-04-07

    Immunotherapies with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and checkpoint inhibitors (including antibodies that antagonize programmed cell death protein 1 [PD-1]) have both opened new avenues for cancer treatment, but the clinical potential of combined disruption of inhibitory checkpoints and CAR T cell therapy remains incompletely explored. Here we show that programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on tumor cells can render human CAR T cells (anti-CD19 4-1BBζ) hypo-functional, resulting in impaired tumor clearance in a sub-cutaneous xenograft model. To overcome this suppressed anti-tumor response, we developed a protocol for combined Cas9 ribonucleoprotein (Cas9 RNP)-mediated gene editing and lentiviral transduction to generate PD-1 deficient anti-CD19 CAR T cells. Pdcd1 (PD-1) disruption augmented CAR T cell mediated killing of tumor cells in vitro and enhanced clearance of PD-L1+ tumor xenografts in vivo. This study demonstrates improved therapeutic efficacy of Cas9-edited CAR T cells and highlights the potential of precision genome engineering to enhance next-generation cell therapies.

  9. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication.

  10. The Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Introduction The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Sciences Campaign calls out the topic of Virtual /Mixed and Augmented Reality as one of the...type of virtual environment. In virtual reality (VR), the totality of the environment is computer generated. In AR, the real world is augmented by...effectively. 20 17. References Alexander T. Visualisation of geographic data in virtual environments - what is essential for virtual reality systems

  11. Ecological approaches to oral biofilms: control without killing.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Phil D; Head, David A; Devine, Deirdre A

    2015-01-01

    Humans have co-evolved with micro-organisms and have a symbiotic or mutualistic relationship with their resident microbiome. As at other body surfaces, the mouth has a diverse microbiota that grows on oral surfaces as structurally and functionally organised biofilms. The oral microbiota is natural and provides important benefits to the host, including immunological priming, down-regulation of excessive pro-inflammatory responses, regulation of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems, and colonisation by exogenous microbes. On occasions, this symbiotic relationship breaks down, and previously minor components of the microbiota outcompete beneficial bacteria, thereby increasing the risk of disease. Antimicrobial agents have been formulated into many oral care products to augment mechanical plaque control. A delicate balance is needed, however, to control the oral microbiota at levels compatible with health, without killing beneficial bacteria and losing the key benefits delivered by these resident microbes. These antimicrobial agents may achieve this by virtue of their recommended twice daily topical use, which results in pharmacokinetic profiles indicating that they are retained in the mouth for relatively long periods at sublethal levels. At these concentrations they are still able to inhibit bacterial traits implicated in disease (e.g. sugar transport/acid production; protease activity) and retard growth without eliminating beneficial species. In silico modelling studies have been performed which support the concept that either reducing the frequency of acid challenge and/or the terminal pH, or by merely slowing bacterial growth, results in maintaining a community of beneficial bacteria under conditions that might otherwise lead to disease (control without killing). 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. [Special considerations in breast cancer treatment of an augmented breast].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Kunos, Csaba; Pesthy, Pál; Bartal, Alexandra; Szabó, Eva; Kásler, Miklós

    2011-10-16

    Breast augmentation surgery involving the use of implants has been one of the most popular plastic surgical procedures for decades. As the multi-million female population who received breast implants ages, the risk of cancer is increasing rapidly, therefore the incidence of malignant disease in association with breast implants will increase as well. Although there is no relationship between tumor development and implants, these cases require special considerations in diagnostics, therapy and follow-up methods. Appropriate multidisciplinary treatment of tumors in augmented breasts corresponding with modern oncoplastic principles can only be accomplished based on adequate oncological, breast and plastic surgical knowledge. Supposing a possible increase of this condition in Hungary, too, authors provide a wide review of the literature on the special oncological and esthetic considerations, for the first time in Hungarian language.

  13. Deformation-based augmented reality for hepatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Haouchine, Nazim; Dequidt, Jérémie; Berger, Marie-Odile; Cotin, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a method for augmenting the laparoscopic view during hepatic tumor resection. Using augmented reality techniques, vessels, tumors and cutting planes computed from pre-operative data can be overlaid onto the laparoscopic video. Compared to current techniques, which are limited to a rigid registration of the pre-operative liver anatomy with the intra-operative image, we propose a real-time, physics-based, non-rigid registration. The main strength of our approach is that the deformable model can also be used to regularize the data extracted from the computer vision algorithms. We show preliminary results on a video sequence which clearly highlights the interest of using physics-based model for elastic registration.

  14. Top carnivores increase their kill rates on prey as a response to human-induced fear

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine A.; Wang, Yiwei; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The fear induced by predators on their prey is well known to cause behavioural adjustments by prey that can ripple through food webs. Little is known, however, about the analogous impacts of humans as perceived top predators on the foraging behaviour of carnivores. Here, we investigate the influence of human-induced fear on puma foraging behaviour using location and prey consumption data from 30 tagged individuals living along a gradient of human development. We observed strong behavioural responses by female pumas to human development, whereby their fidelity to kill sites and overall consumption time of prey declined with increasing housing density by 36 and 42%, respectively. Females responded to this decline in prey consumption time by increasing the number of deer they killed in high housing density areas by 36% over what they killed in areas with little residential development. The loss of food from declines in prey consumption time paired with increases in energetic costs associated with killing more prey may have consequences for puma populations, particularly with regard to reproductive success. In addition, greater carcass availability is likely to alter community dynamics by augmenting food resources for scavengers. In light of the extensive and growing impact of habitat modification, our study emphasizes that knowledge of the indirect effects of human activity on animal behaviour is a necessary component in understanding anthropogenic impacts on community dynamics and food web function. PMID:25608884

  15. Rapid Killing of Acinetobacter baumannii by Polymyxins Is Mediated by a Hydroxyl Radical Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Timothy R.; Liu, Xiang; Schroeder, Max R.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Burd, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that is a cause of clinically significant nosocomial infections. Increasingly, clinical isolates of A. baumannii are extensively resistant to numerous antibiotics, and the use of polymyxin antibiotics against these infections is often the final treatment option. Historically, the polymyxins have been thought to kill bacteria through membrane lysis. Here, we present an alternative mechanism based on data demonstrating that polymyxins induce rapid cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Supporting this notion, we found that inhibition of radical production delays the ability of polymyxins to kill A. baumannii. Notably, we demonstrate that this mechanism of killing occurs in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii and that this response is not induced in a polymyxin-resistant isolate. This study is the first to demonstrate that polymyxins induce rapid killing of A. baumannii and other Gram-negatives through hydroxyl radical production. This significantly augments our understanding of the mechanism of polymyxin action, which is critical knowledge toward the development of adjunctive therapies, particularly given the increasing necessity for treatment with these antibiotics in the clinical setting. PMID:22908157

  16. Rapid killing of Acinetobacter baumannii by polymyxins is mediated by a hydroxyl radical death pathway.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Timothy R; Liu, Xiang; Schroeder, Max R; Kraft, Colleen S; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2012-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that is a cause of clinically significant nosocomial infections. Increasingly, clinical isolates of A. baumannii are extensively resistant to numerous antibiotics, and the use of polymyxin antibiotics against these infections is often the final treatment option. Historically, the polymyxins have been thought to kill bacteria through membrane lysis. Here, we present an alternative mechanism based on data demonstrating that polymyxins induce rapid cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Supporting this notion, we found that inhibition of radical production delays the ability of polymyxins to kill A. baumannii. Notably, we demonstrate that this mechanism of killing occurs in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii and that this response is not induced in a polymyxin-resistant isolate. This study is the first to demonstrate that polymyxins induce rapid killing of A. baumannii and other Gram-negatives through hydroxyl radical production. This significantly augments our understanding of the mechanism of polymyxin action, which is critical knowledge toward the development of adjunctive therapies, particularly given the increasing necessity for treatment with these antibiotics in the clinical setting.

  17. Top carnivores increase their kill rates on prey as a response to human-induced fear.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justine A; Wang, Yiwei; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2015-03-07

    The fear induced by predators on their prey is well known to cause behavioural adjustments by prey that can ripple through food webs. Little is known, however, about the analogous impacts of humans as perceived top predators on the foraging behaviour of carnivores. Here, we investigate the influence of human-induced fear on puma foraging behaviour using location and prey consumption data from 30 tagged individuals living along a gradient of human development. We observed strong behavioural responses by female pumas to human development, whereby their fidelity to kill sites and overall consumption time of prey declined with increasing housing density by 36 and 42%, respectively. Females responded to this decline in prey consumption time by increasing the number of deer they killed in high housing density areas by 36% over what they killed in areas with little residential development. The loss of food from declines in prey consumption time paired with increases in energetic costs associated with killing more prey may have consequences for puma populations, particularly with regard to reproductive success. In addition, greater carcass availability is likely to alter community dynamics by augmenting food resources for scavengers. In light of the extensive and growing impact of habitat modification, our study emphasizes that knowledge of the indirect effects of human activity on animal behaviour is a necessary component in understanding anthropogenic impacts on community dynamics and food web function.

  18. Augmented reality laser projection device for surgery.

    PubMed

    Glossop, Neil; Wang, Zhanhe; Wedlake, Chris; Moore, John; Peters, Terry

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an augmented reality system capable of projecting preoperative plans directly onto a patient using rapidly scanned laser beams. Projected contours can typically represent cut paths, tumors or delineate boundaries of interest. The system can be used as part of, or a replacement for, conventional robotic Telesurgery systems. Because the graphics are projected, there is no degradation in surgeon's view due to optical components interposed between the surgeon's eye and the patient. This system has been designed to work with a common infrared 3D camera system used in image-guided surgery, and projects both visible and infrared beams. The IR beam enables surface digitization functions to be carried out using the camera. The clinical accuracy is in the range required by CAS procedures, around 1-2mm. The device will be particularly useful for executing precise preoperative plans and for teleconsultation applications, where planned or live consultations can be efficiently communicated to a less skilled local caregiver.

  19. Female serial killing: review and case report.

    PubMed

    Frei, Andreas; Völlm, Birgit; Graf, Marc; Dittmann, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Single homicide committed by women is rare. Serial killing is very infrequent, and the perpetrators are usually white, intelligent males with sadistic tendencies. Serial killing by women has, however, also been described. To conduct a review of published literature on female serial killers and consider its usefulness in assessing a presenting case. A literature review was conducted, after searching EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. The presenting clinical case is described in detail in the context of the literature findings. Results The literature search revealed few relevant publications. Attempts to categorize the phenomenon of female serial killing according to patterns of and motives for the homicides have been made by some authors. The most common motive identified was material gain or similar extrinsic gratification while the 'hedonistic' sadistic or sexual serial killer seems to be extremely rare in women. There is no consistent theory of serial killing by women, but psychopathic personality traits and abusive childhood experiences have consistently been observed. The authors' case did not fit the description of a 'typical' female serial killer. In such unusual circumstances as serial killing by a woman, detailed individual case formulation is required to make sense of the psychopathology in each case. Publication of cases in scientific journals should be encouraged to advance our understanding of this phenomenon. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Kill fluid for oil field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.

    1990-08-14

    This patent describes a process employing a kill fluid to substantially reduce the volumetric flow of formation fluid into a wellbore penetrating a formation containing the formation fluid below an earthen surface. It comprises: admixing components of a continuous flowing gel at the surface comprising of water-soluble carboxylate-containing polymer, a complex capable of crosslinking the polymer and formed of at least one electropositive chromium III species and at least one electronegative carboxylatespecies, and an aqueous solvent for the polymer and the complex; crosslinking the polymer and the complex to form the gel, wherein the kill fluid comprises the gel; placing a volume of the kill fluid in the wellbore sufficient to create a hydrostatic head which exerts a kill fluid pressure against the formation fluid substantially equal to or greater than the formation fluid pressure and thereby substantially reduces the volumetric flow of the formation fluid into the wellbore; performing an oil field operation after placing the volume of the kill fluid in the wellbore; and removing the gel from the wellbore to substantially restore the volumetric flow of the formation fluid into the wellbore.

  1. Secretome of tumor-associated leukocytes augment epithelial-mesenchymal transition in positive lymph node breast cancer patients via activation of EGFR/Tyr845 and NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Elghonaimy, Eslam A; Ibrahim, Sherif A; Youns, Amal; Hussein, Zeinab; Nouh, Mohamed Akram; El-Mamlouk, Tahani; El-Shinawi, Mohamed; Mostafa Mohamed, Mona

    2016-09-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential process in breast cancer metastasis. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of secretions of tumor-associated leukocytes (TALs) isolated from negative and positive lymph nodes (nLNs and pLNs, respectively) breast cancer patients in regulating EMT mechanism and the associated signaling pathways. We found an increased infiltration of TALs, which was associated with downregulation of E-cadherin and over-expression of vimentin in the breast carcinoma tissues of pLNs as compared to nLNs patients and normal breast tissues obtained from healthy volunteers during mammoplasty. Furthermore, TALs isolated from pLNs breast cancer patients secreted an elevated panel of cytokines by up to 2-5-fold when compared with those isolated from nLNs patients. Secretome of TALs of pLNs possessed higher TARC, IGF-1, IL-3, TNF-β, IL-5, G-CSF, IL-4, and IL-1α with more than a fivefold compared to those of nLNs. Using the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, we found that cytokines secreted by TALs isolated from nLNs and pLNs breast cancer patients promoted EMT via upregulation of TGF-β and vimentin and downregulation of E-cadherin at messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in both cell lines and at protein level in MCF-7. While TGF-β is over-expressed by MDA-MB-231 seeded in media conditioned by secretome of TALs isolated from nLNs and pLNs breast cancer patients. The downstream TGF-β signaling transcription factors, Snail, Slug, and Twist, known to be associated with EMT mechanism were over-expressed by MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 seeded in media conditioned by secretome of TALs isolated from nLNs and pLNs breast cancer patients. Acquisition of EMT in MCF-7 cells is mechanistically attributed to the activation of EGFR((Tyr845)) and NF-κB/p65((Ser276)) signaling which are significantly highly expressed by MCF-7 cells seeded in media conditioned by secretome of TALs isolated from pLNs compared to nLNs patients. Overall

  2. Comparison between three adjuvants for a vaccine against canine leishmaniasis: In vitro evaluation of macrophage killing ability.

    PubMed

    Trotta, T; Fasanella, A; Scaltrito, D; Gradoni, L; Mitolo, V; Brandonisio, O; Acquafredda, A; Panaro, M A

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in terms of dog macrophage killing ability in vitro, a vaccine based on Leishmania infantum promastigote soluble antigen (LSA) formulated with three different adjuvants (BCG, AdjuPrime, MPL/TDM/CWS). A significant increase of the macrophage killing ability was observed in dogs vaccinated with LSA+MPL/TDM/CWS after 1 month from vaccination. A similar increase of macrophage parasitocidal ability was present only after 5 months in dogs vaccinated with LSA+BCG or LSA+AdjuPrime. In all dogs the augmented killing percentage was still present after 12 months from vaccination. Therefore, in particular LSA+MPL/TDM/CWS vaccine seems promising for further studies in dogs.

  3. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  4. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  5. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  6. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  7. 9 CFR 113.206 - Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.206... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.206 Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus. Wart Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared...

  8. Oral administration of Chlorella vulgaris augments concomitant antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Tomita, Y; Tsuruta, M; Konishi, F; Okuda, M; Himeno, K; Nomoto, K

    1990-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, an unicellular green algae, or its acetone-extract (Ac-Ex) were administered orally to Meth A tumor bearing BALB/c or (BALB/c x DBA/2)F1 (CDF1) mice. When CDF1 mice were fed daily with 10% dried powder of Chlorella vulgaris (CVP) containing diet before and after Meth A tumor inoculation, the growth of rechallenged Meth A tumor was significantly suppressed in an antigen-specific manner. Augmentation of antitumor resistance was exhibited also by Winn assay using lymph node cells of tumor-bearing mice orally administered with CVP or Ac-Ex. Antigen-specific concomitant immunity in these mice were mediated by cytostatic T cells but not by cytotoxic T cells. Natural killer cells seemed not to contribute in antitumor resistance in this system.

  9. 'Total disability' and the wrongness of killing.

    PubMed

    Omelianchuk, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Franklin G Miller recently argued that the wrongness of killing is best explained by the harm that comes to the victim, and that 'total disability' best explains the nature of this harm. Hence, killing patients who are already totally disabled is not wrong. I maintain that their notion of total disability is ambiguous and that they beg the question with respect to whether there are abilities left over that remain relevant for the goods of personhood and human worth. If these goods remain, then something more is lost in death than in 'total disability,' and their explanation of what makes killing wrong comes up short. But if total disability is equivalent with death, then their argument is an interesting one.

  10. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  11. Bayesian Alternation during Tactile Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Goeke, Caspar M.; Planera, Serena; Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well-described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study, we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC) task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition), rotation only (native condition), and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition). Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants' responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND). Then, we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred2 = 1.67) than the Bayesian integration model (χred2 = 4.34). Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all (WTA) model (χred2 = 1.64), which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However, the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred2 = 1.09) utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  12. Bayesian Alternation during Tactile Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Goeke, Caspar M; Planera, Serena; Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies suggest that the integration of multisensory signals by humans is well-described by Bayesian principles. However, there are very few reports about cue combination between a native and an augmented sense. In particular, we asked the question whether adult participants are able to integrate an augmented sensory cue with existing native sensory information. Hence for the purpose of this study, we build a tactile augmentation device. Consequently, we compared different hypotheses of how untrained adult participants combine information from a native and an augmented sense. In a two-interval forced choice (2 IFC) task, while subjects were blindfolded and seated on a rotating platform, our sensory augmentation device translated information on whole body yaw rotation to tactile stimulation. Three conditions were realized: tactile stimulation only (augmented condition), rotation only (native condition), and both augmented and native information (bimodal condition). Participants had to choose one out of two consecutive rotations with higher angular rotation. For the analysis, we fitted the participants' responses with a probit model and calculated the just notable difference (JND). Then, we compared several models for predicting bimodal from unimodal responses. An objective Bayesian alternation model yielded a better prediction (χred(2) = 1.67) than the Bayesian integration model (χred(2) = 4.34). Slightly higher accuracy showed a non-Bayesian winner takes all (WTA) model (χred(2) = 1.64), which either used only native or only augmented values per subject for prediction. However, the performance of the Bayesian alternation model could be substantially improved (χred(2) = 1.09) utilizing subjective weights obtained by a questionnaire. As a result, the subjective Bayesian alternation model predicted bimodal performance most accurately among all tested models. These results suggest that information from augmented and existing sensory modalities in

  13. Breast Cancer after Augmentation: Oncologic and Reconstructive Considerations among Women Undergoing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugenia H; Shammas, Ronnie L; Phillips, Brett T; Greenup, Rachel A; Hwang, E Shelley; Hollenbeck, Scott T

    2017-06-01

    Breast augmentation with subglandular versus subpectoral implants may differentially impact the early detection of breast cancer and treatment recommendations. The authors assessed the impact of prior augmentation on the diagnosis and management of breast cancer in women undergoing mastectomy. Breast cancer diagnosis and management were retrospectively analyzed in all women with prior augmentation undergoing therapeutic mastectomy at the authors' institution from 1993 to 2014. Comparison was made to all women with no prior augmentation undergoing mastectomy in 2010. Subanalyses were performed according to prior implant placement. A total of 260 women with (n = 89) and without (n = 171) prior augmentation underwent mastectomy for 95 and 179 breast cancers, respectively. Prior implant placement was subglandular (n = 27) or subpectoral (n = 63) (For five breasts, the placement was unknown). Breast cancer stage at diagnosis (p = 0.19) and detection method (p = 0.48) did not differ for women with and without prior augmentation. Compared to subpectoral augmentation, subglandular augmentation was associated with the diagnosis of invasive breast cancer rather than ductal carcinoma in situ (p = 0.01) and detection by self-palpation rather than screening mammography (p = 0.03). Immediate two-stage implant reconstruction was the preferred reconstructive method in women with augmentation (p < 0.01). Breast cancer stage at diagnosis was similar for women with and without prior augmentation. Among women with augmentation, however, subglandular implants were associated with more advanced breast tumors commonly detected on palpation rather than mammography. Increased vigilance in breast cancer screening is recommended among women with subglandular augmentation. Therapeutic, III.

  14. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  15. Cytotoxic Killing and Immune Evasion by Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J. T.; Stark, Jaroslav

    2007-07-01

    The interaction between the immune system and pathogens is a complex one, with pathogens constantly developing new ways of evading destruction by the immune system. The immune system's task is made even harder when the pathogen in question is an intra-cellular one (such as a virus or certain bacteria) and it is necessary to kill the infected host cell in order to eliminate the pathogen. This causes damage to the host, and such killing therefore needs to be carefully controlled, particularly in tissues with poor regenerative potential, or those involved in the immune response itself. Host cells therefore possess repair mechanisms which can counteract killing by immune cells. These in turn can be subverted by pathogens which up-regulate the resistance of infected cells to killing. In this paper, we explore the hypothesis that this repair process plays an important role in determining the efficacy of evasion and escape from immune control. We model a situation where cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells kill pathogen-infected and tumour cells by directed secretion of preformed granules containing perforin and granzymes. Resistance to such killing can be conferred by the expression of serine protease inhibitors (serpins). These are utilized by several virally infected and tumour cells, as well as playing a role in the protection of host bystander, immune and immuneprivileged cells. We build a simple stochastic model of cytotoxic killing, where serpins can neutralize granzymes stoichiometrically by forming an irreversible complex, and the survival of the cell is determined by the balance between serpin depletion and replenishment, which in its simplest form is equivalent to the well known shot noise process. We use existing analytical results for this process, and additional simulations to analyse the effects of repair on cytotoxic killing. We then extend the model to the case of a replicating target cell population, which gives a branching process

  16. Ambiguities in 'killing' and 'letting die'.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G M

    1983-05-01

    In a recent article Carla Kary (1980) attempts to show that there can be a significant moral difference between instances of killing and letting die. I shall maintain in Section I that Kary's argument is somewhat weakened by her failure to note an important ambiguity in the notion of killing a person. I shall also argue in Section II that a similar ambiguity affects the notion of letting someone die, and that failure to note this latter ambiguity also weakens the position developed by Robert Coburn (1980) with regard to defective newborns.

  17. Microbial killing activity of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, V; Trakulsomboon, S; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Chaiprasert, A; Foongladda, S; Thipsuvan, K; Arjratanakool, W; Kunyok, R; Wasi, C; Santiprasitkul, S; Danchaivijitr, S

    2001-10-01

    In vitro killing activity of peracetic acid (Perasafe) at a concentration of 0.26 per cent w/v was tested against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Acinetobacter baumannii, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis spore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immuno-deficiency virus type I. Exposure to Peracetic acid (0.26% w/v) for 10 minutes resulted in massive killing of all the aforementioned organisms and spore.

  18. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  19. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  20. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  1. Therapeutic options for lip augmentation.

    PubMed

    Segall, Lorne; Ellis, David A F

    2007-11-01

    Aesthetic ideals vary with emerging fashion trends and within different cultures. However, over the past few decades, fuller lips have been considered a desirable trait. Many younger patients are presenting for lip augmentation to achieve the sought-after look commonly seen in many fashion magazines. In addition, as individuals age, they lose lip volume, with a thinning of the red lip, some effacement of the vermillion border, and elongation and flattening of the white portion of the lip. Rejuvenation of the lips plays a key role in restoring a more youthful appearance. As a result, lip augmentation appeals to a wide spectrum of patients who present with various different aesthetic goals and expectations. Numerous therapeutic options exist for aesthetic lip augmentation, ranging from temporary and permanent injectable fillers to implants and other surgical techniques.

  2. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets.

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a "flat" 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL-target encounter rates.

  3. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets

    PubMed Central

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a “flat” 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL–target encounter rates. PMID:28123385

  4. Augmentation-related brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self

  5. Augmented reality and cone beam CT guidance for transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen P; Richmon, Jeremy D; Sorger, Jonathan M; Azizian, Mahdi; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-09-01

    In transoral robotic surgery preoperative image data do not reflect large deformations of the operative workspace from perioperative setup. To address this challenge, in this study we explore image guidance with cone beam computed tomographic angiography to guide the dissection of critical vascular landmarks and resection of base-of-tongue neoplasms with adequate margins for transoral robotic surgery. We identify critical vascular landmarks from perioperative c-arm imaging to augment the stereoscopic view of a da Vinci si robot in addition to incorporating visual feedback from relative tool positions. Experiments resecting base-of-tongue mock tumors were conducted on a series of ex vivo and in vivo animal models comparing the proposed workflow for video augmentation to standard non-augmented practice and alternative, fluoroscopy-based image guidance. Accurate identification of registered augmented critical anatomy during controlled arterial dissection and en bloc mock tumor resection was possible with the augmented reality system. The proposed image-guided robotic system also achieved improved resection ratios of mock tumor margins (1.00) when compared to control scenarios (0.0) and alternative methods of image guidance (0.58). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed workflow and advantages of cone beam computed tomography image guidance through video augmentation of the primary stereo endoscopy as compared to control and alternative navigation methods.

  6. Augmented reality and cone beam CT guidance for transoral robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Richmon, Jeremy D.; Sorger, Jonathan M.; Azizian, Mahdi; Taylor, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    In transoral robotic surgery preoperative image data do not reflect large deformations of the operative workspace from perioperative setup. To address this challenge, in this study we explore image guidance with cone beam computed tomographic angiography to guide the dissection of critical vascular landmarks and resection of base-of-tongue neoplasms with adequate margins for transoral robotic surgery. We identify critical vascular landmarks from perioperative c-arm imaging to augment the stereoscopic view of a da Vinci si robot in addition to incorporating visual feedback from relative tool positions. Experiments resecting base-of-tongue mock tumors were conducted on a series of ex vivo and in vivo animal models comparing the proposed workflow for video augmentation to standard non-augmented practice and alternative, fluoroscopy-based image guidance. Accurate identification of registered augmented critical anatomy during controlled arterial dissection and en bloc mock tumor resection was possible with the augmented reality system. The proposed image-guided robotic system also achieved improved resection ratios of mock tumor margins (1.00) when compared to control scenarios (0.0) and alternative methods of image guidance (0.58). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed workflow and advantages of cone beam computed tomography image guidance through video augmentation of the primary stereo endoscopy as compared to control and alternative navigation methods. PMID:26531203

  7. Augmented reality for anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rhys Gethin; John, Nigel William; Delieu, John Michael

    2010-03-01

    The use of Virtual Environments has been widely reported as a method of teaching anatomy. Generally such environments only convey the shape of the anatomy to the student. We present the Bangor Augmented Reality Education Tool for Anatomy (BARETA), a system that combines Augmented Reality (AR) technology with models produced using Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology, to provide the student with stimulation for touch as well as sight. The principal aims of this work were to provide an interface more intuitive than a mouse and keyboard, and to evaluate such a system as a viable supplement to traditional cadaver based education.

  8. Combustion-augmented laser ramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Tamada, Kazunobu; Kimura, Itsuro

    2006-05-01

    A preliminary study of combustion-augmented laser-ramjets was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in combustion-augmented operation.

  9. Radiographic Local Control of Spinal Metastases with Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Vertebral Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, A N; Tomasian, A; Vaswani, D; Vyhmeister, R; Chang, R O; Jennings, J W

    2016-04-01

    Combination radiofrequency ablation and vertebral augmentation is an emerging minimally invasive therapy for patients with metastatic spine disease who have not responded to or have contraindications to radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of radiographic local control of spinal metastases treated with combination radiofrequency ablation and vertebral augmentation. We retrospectively reviewed our tumor ablation database for all patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation and vertebral augmentation of spinal metastases between April 2012 and July 2014. Tumors treated in conjunction with radiation therapy were excluded. Tumor characteristics, procedural details, and complications were recorded. Posttreatment imaging was reviewed for radiographic evidence of tumor progression. Fifty-five tumors met study inclusion criteria. Radiographic local tumor control rates were 89% (41/46) at 3 months, 74% (26/35) at 6 months, and 70% (21/30) at 1 year after treatment. Clinical follow-up was available in 93% (51/55) of cases. The median duration of clinical follow-up was 34 weeks (interquartile range, 15-89 weeks), during which no complications were reported and no patients had clinical evidence of metastatic spinal cord compression at the treated levels. Combination radiofrequency ablation and vertebral augmentation appears to be an effective treatment for achieving local control of spinal metastases. A prospective clinical trial is now needed to replicate these results. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. Selective replication of oncolytic virus M1 results in a bystander killing effect that is potentiated by Smac mimetics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Tan, Yaqian; Cavenee, Webster K; Yan, Guangmei

    2017-06-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment modality that uses native or genetically modified viruses that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells. Viruses represent a type of pathogen-associated molecular pattern and thereby induce the up-regulation of dozens of cytokines via activating the host innate immune system. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic compounds (SMCs), which antagonize the function of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and induce apoptosis, sensitize tumor cells to multiple cytokines. Therefore, we sought to determine whether SMCs sensitize tumor cells to cytokines induced by the oncolytic M1 virus, thus enhancing a bystander killing effect. Here, we report that SMCs potentiate the oncolytic effect of M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This strengthened oncolytic efficacy resulted from the enhanced bystander killing effect caused by the M1 virus via cytokine induction. Through a microarray analysis and subsequent validation using recombinant cytokines, we identified IL-8, IL-1A, and TRAIL as the key cytokines in the bystander killing effect. Furthermore, SMCs increased the replication of M1, and the accumulation of virus protein induced irreversible endoplasmic reticulum stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated apoptosis. Nevertheless, the combined treatment with M1 and SMCs had little effect on normal and human primary cells. Because SMCs selectively and significantly enhance the bystander killing effect and the replication of oncolytic virus M1 specifically in cancer cells, this combined treatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy.

  11. EGFR-targeted magnetic nanoparticle heaters kill cancer cells without a perceptible temperature rise.

    PubMed

    Creixell, Mar; Bohórquez, Ana C; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2011-09-27

    It is currently believed that magnetic nanoparticle heaters (MNHs) can kill cancer cells only when the temperature is raised above 43 °C due to energy dissipation in an alternating magnetic field. On the other hand, simple heat conduction arguments indicate that in small tumors or single cells the relative rates of energy dissipation and heat conduction result in a negligible temperature rise, thus limiting the potential of MNHs in treating small tumors and metastatic cancer. Here we demonstrate that internalized MNHs conjugated to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) do result in a significant (up to 99.9%) reduction in cell viability and clonogenic survival in a thermal heat dose dependent manner, without the need for a perceptible temperature rise. The effect appears to be cell type specific and indicates that magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions previously considered as not possible.

  12. Can Vet Schools Teach without Killing Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a protest by students at the University of Illinois (Urbana) College of Veterinary Medicine over the killing of animals that led to temporary curtailing of lethal animal experiments. Examines the conflict between animal rights groups and some faculty who are openly skeptical about the effectiveness of alternatives to the hands-on…

  13. Mass killings and detection of impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Digby J.

    1988-01-01

    Highly energetic bolide impacts occur and their flux is known. For larger bodies the energy release is greater than for any other short-term global phenomenon. Such impacts produce or release a large variety of shock induced changes including major atmospheric, sedimentologic, seismic and volcanic events. These events must necessarily leave a variety of records in the stratigraphic column, including mass killings resulting in major changes in population density and reduction or extinction of many taxonomic groups, followed by characteristic patterns of faunal and flora replacement. Of these effects, mass killings, marked by large-scale loss of biomass, are the most easily detected evidence in the field but must be manifest on a near-global scale. Such mass killings that appear to be approximately synchronous and involve disappearance of biomass at a bedding plane in many sedimentologically independent sections globally suggest a common cause and probable synchroneity. Mass killings identify an horizon which may be examined for evidence of cause. Geochemical markers may be ephemeral and absence may not be significant. There appears to be no reason why ongoing phenomena such as climate and sea-level changes are primary causes of anomolous episodic events.

  14. School Shootings; Standards Kill Students and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angert, Betsy L.

    2008-01-01

    School shootings have been in the news of late. People ponder what occurs in classrooms today. Why would a young person wish to take a life? Within educational institutions, the killings are a concern. In our dire attempt to teach the children and ensure student success, it seems many of our offspring are lost. Some students feel separate from…

  15. Can Vet Schools Teach without Killing Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a protest by students at the University of Illinois (Urbana) College of Veterinary Medicine over the killing of animals that led to temporary curtailing of lethal animal experiments. Examines the conflict between animal rights groups and some faculty who are openly skeptical about the effectiveness of alternatives to the hands-on…

  16. Nonlinear symmetries on spaces admitting Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinescu, Mihai

    2010-04-01

    Nonlinear symmetries corresponding to Killing tensors are investigated. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard supersymmetries is pointed out. The gravitational anomalies are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated with a Killing-Yano tensor. In the case of the nonlinear symmetries the dynamical algebras of the Dirac-type operators is more involved and could be organized as infinite dimensional algebras or superalgebras. The general results are applied to some concrete spaces involved in theories of modern physics. As a first example it is considered the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space and its generalizations introduced by Iwai and Katayama. One presents the infinite dimensional superalgebra of Dirac type operators on Taub-NUT space that could be seen as a graded loop superalgebra of the Kac-Moody type. The axial anomaly, interpreted as the index of the Dirac operator, is computed for the generalized Taub-NUT metrics. Finally the existence of the conformal Killing-Yano tensors is investigated for some spaces with mixed Sasakian structures.

  17. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  18. Peanut Roaster Temperatures Relative to Salmonella Kill

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ARS, Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh NC 27695 In response to the limited peanut butter contamination incident of 2006/7, studies were initiated to examine the effect of various time and temperature protocols on log kill levels for Salmonella on peanuts. The objective of the work ...

  19. The evolution of reduced microbial killing.

    PubMed

    Vriezen, Jan A C; Valliere, Michael; Riley, Margaret A

    2009-10-20

    Bacteria engage in a never-ending arms race in which they compete for limited resources and niche space. The outcome of this intense interaction is the evolution of a powerful arsenal of biological weapons. Perhaps the most studied of these are colicins, plasmid-based toxins produced by and active against Escherichia coli. The present study was designed to explore the molecular responses of a colicin-producing strain during serial transfer evolution. What evolutionary changes occur when colicins are produced with no target present? Can killing ability be maintained in the absence of a target? To address these, and other, questions, colicinogenic strains and a noncolicinogenic ancestor were evolved for 253 generations. Samples were taken throughout the experiment and tested for killing ability. By the 38th transfer, a decreased killing ability and an increase in fitness were observed in the colicin-producing strains. Surprisingly, DNA sequence determination of the colicin plasmids revealed no changes in plasmid sequences. However, a set of chromosomally encoded loci experienced changes in gene expression that were positively associated with the reduction in killing. The most significant expression changes were observed in DNA repair genes (which were downregulated in the evolved strains), Mg ion uptake genes (which were upregulated), and late prophage genes (which were upregulated). These results indicate a fine-tuned response to the evolutionary pressures of colicin production, with far more genes involved than had been anticipated.

  20. Integrating Poetry and "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Susan Arpajian

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a method of teaching "To Kill a Mockingbird" along with the study of poetry. Notes that this method allows students to consider the themes of courage and developing compassion. Concludes that teaching such a multigenre unit allows students to look for connections among fact and fiction, the past and present, their own lives and…

  1. Killing symmetry on the Finsler manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuka, Takayoshi; Yahagi, Ryoko; Ishida, Muneyuki

    2017-05-01

    Symmetry and conservation law are discussed on the Finsler manifold M. We adopt the point Finsler approach, where we consider the geometry on a point manifold M not on TM. Generalized vector fields are defined on oriented curves on M, and Finsler non-linear connections are considered on M, not on the tangent space TM. Killing vector fields K are defined as generalized vector fields as {{L}K}F=\\text{d}B , and the Killing symmetry is also reformulated simply as S{{K}\\flat}=0 by using the Killing 1-form {{K}\\flat} and the spray operator S defined by using the non-linear connection. {{K}\\flat} is related to the generalization of Killing tensors on the Finsler manifold, and our ansatz of {{K}\\flat} and S{{K}\\flat}=0 give an analytical method of finding higher derivative conserved quantities, which may be called hidden conserved quantities. We show two examples: the Carter constant on Kerr spacetime and the Runge-Lentz vectors in Newtonian gravity.

  2. A moral dilemma: killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K

    Most health care professionals believe that there is a clear difference between killing and letting die, i.e. between active and passive euthanasia. Philosophers, however, have repeatedly attacked the moral validity of their argument. This article explores various related issues and theoretical approaches to the distinction between acts and omissions.

  3. A moral dilemma: killing and letting die.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kath

    1993-06-24

    Most health care professionals believe that there is a clear difference between killing and letting die, i.e. between active and passive euthanasia. Philosophers, however, have repeatedly attacked the moral validity of their argument. This article explores various related issues and theoretical approaches to the distinction between acts and omissions.

  4. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  5. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings.

    PubMed

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings.

  6. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings

    PubMed Central

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Methods Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. Conclusions We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings. PMID:26135941

  7. Bovine polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Aydintug, M K; Widders, P R; Leid, R W

    1993-07-01

    The role of bovine antibody and complement in bovine neutrophil-mediated killing of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. No neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity was detected when Hanks' balanced salt solution, a widely utilized and weakly buffered medium, was used. This lack of neutrophil activity was evident even in the presence of specific bovine antibody and bovine complement. Moreover, the pH of the weakly buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was observed to fall from pH 7.0 to 5.8 in 4 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of T. foetus. The pH of 5.8 inhibited the bactericidal activity of bovine neutrophils for Staphylococcus epidermidis by 53.2% and may have contributed to the lack of neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity in the weakly buffered salt solution. However, T. foetus was susceptible to bovine neutrophil-mediated destruction when a HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was used (21.8% killing by neutrophils alone). Neither specific bovine immune serum nor purified immune bovine immunoglobulin G2 alone enhanced bovine neutrophil-mediated killing. When complement-sensitized trichomonads were incubated with bovine neutrophils, killing of T. foetus was observed, a result which represented the additive effects of each treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) killing of trichomonads was observed when antibody- and complement-opsonized trichomonads were exposed to bovine neutrophils (> 70% parasite destruction), an effect which reflected the additive nature of each treatment.

  8. Destruction of solid tumors by immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Álvaro G.; Seoane, Jesús M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2017-03-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. In order to investigate the fractional cell kill that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs), we present several in silico simulations and mathematical analyses. When the CTLs eradicate efficiently the tumor cells, the models predict a correlation between the morphology of the tumors and the rate at which they are lysed. However, when the effectiveness of the immune cells is decreased, the mathematical function fails to reproduce the process of lysis. This limit is thoroughly discussed and a new fractional cell kill is proposed.

  9. 75 FR 30299 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... closures to facilitate bridge rehabilitation maintenance. DATES: This deviation is effective from July 5... regulations to facilitate scheduled bridge rehabilitation maintenance. Under this temporary deviation the...

  10. Soft Tissue Augmentation with Silk Composite Graft

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Tae; Kweon, Hae Yong; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between 4-hexylresorcinol (4HR) and antibody as that affects the performance of a silk-4HR combination graft for soft tissue augmentation in an animal model. Methods: The silk graft materials consisted of four types: silk+10% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) (ST0), silk+10% TCP+1% 4HR (ST1), silk+10% TCP+3% 4HR (ST3), and silk+10% TCP+6% 4-HR (ST6). The antibody binding assay tested the 4HR effect and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) exam was done for silk grafts. The animal experiment used a subcutaneous pocket mouse model. The graft – SH0 or SH1 or SH3 or SH6 – was placed in a subcutaneous pocket. The animals were killed at one, two, and four weeks, postoperatively. The specimens were subjected to histological analysis and lysozyme assay. Results: Groups with 4HR applied showed lower antibody binding affinity to antigen compared to groups without 4HR. In the SEM examination, there was no significant difference among groups. Histological examinations revealed many foreign body giant cells in ST0 and ST1 group at four weeks postoperatively. Both ST3 and ST6 groups developed significantly lower levels of giant cell values compared to ST0 and ST1 groups (P <0.001) at four weeks postoperatively. In the lysozyme assay, the ST1 and ST3 groups showed denser signals than the other groups. Conclusion: 4HR combined silk implants resulted in high levels of vascular and connective tissue regeneration. PMID:27489833

  11. An Acidic Microenvironment Increases NK Cell Killing of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii by Enhancing Perforin Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Anowara; Li, Shu Shun; Oykhman, Paul; Timm-McCann, Martina; Huston, Shaunna M.; Stack, Danuta; Xiang, Richard F.; Kelly, Margaret M.; Mody, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans are encapsulated yeasts that can produce a solid tumor-like mass or cryptococcoma. Analogous to malignant tumors, the microenvironment deep within a cryptococcoma is acidic, which presents unique challenges to host defense. Analogous to malignant cells, NK cells kill Cryptococcus. Thus, as in tumor defense, NK cells must kill yeast cells across a gradient from physiologic pH to less than 6 in the center of the cryptococcoma. As acidic pH inhibits anti-tumor activities of NK cells, we sought to determine if there was a similar reduction in the anticryptococcal activity of NK cells. Surprisingly, we found that both primary human NK cells and the human NK cell line, YT, have preserved or even enhanced killing of Cryptococcus in acidic, compared to physiological, pH. Studies to explore the mechanism of enhanced killing revealed that acidic pH does not increase the effector to target ratio, binding of cytolytic cells to Cryptococcus, or the active perforin content in effector cells. By contrast, perforin degranulation was greater at acidic pH, and increased degranulation was preceded by enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which is essential for killing. Moreover, using a replication defective ras1 knockout strain of Cryptococcus increased degranulation occurred during more rapid replication of the organisms. Finally, NK cells were found intimately associated with C. gattii within the cryptococcoma of a fatal infection. These results suggest that NK cells have amplified signaling, degranulation, and greater killing at low pH and when the organisms are replicating quickly, which would help maintain microbicidal host defense despite an acidic microenvironment. PMID:23853583

  12. Augmented assessment as a means to augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Rigorous scientific assessment of educational technologies typically lags behind the availability of the technologies by years because of the lack of validated instruments and benchmarks. Even when the appropriate assessment instruments are available, they may not be applied because of time and monetary constraints. Work in augmented reality, instrumented mannequins, serious gaming, and similar promising educational technologies that haven't undergone timely, rigorous evaluation, highlights the need for assessment methodologies that address the limitations of traditional approaches. The most promising augmented assessment solutions incorporate elements of rapid prototyping used in the software industry, simulation-based assessment techniques modeled after methods used in bioinformatics, and object-oriented analysis methods borrowed from object oriented programming.

  13. Engineered Protease-resistant Antibodies with Selectable Cell-killing Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R.; Grugan, Katharine D.; Soring, Keri L.; Heeringa, Katharine A.; McCarthy, Stephen G.; Bannish, Gregory; Perpetua, Meredith; Lynch, Frank; Jordan, Robert E.; Strohl, William R.; Brezski, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly engineered antibodies with fit-for-purpose properties will differentiate next generation antibody therapeutics from traditional IgG1 scaffolds. One requirement for engineering the most appropriate properties for a particular therapeutic area is an understanding of the intricacies of the target microenvironment in which the antibody is expected to function. Our group and others have demonstrated that proteases secreted by invasive tumors and pathological microorganisms are capable of cleaving human IgG1, the most commonly adopted isotype among monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Specific cleavage in the lower hinge of IgG1 results in a loss of Fc-mediated cell-killing functions without a concomitant loss of antigen binding capability or circulating antibody half-life. Proteolytic cleavage in the hinge region by tumor-associated or microbial proteases is postulated as a means of evading host immune responses, and antibodies engineered with potent cell-killing functions that are also resistant to hinge proteolysis are of interest. Mutation of the lower hinge region of an IgG1 resulted in protease resistance but also resulted in a profound loss of Fc-mediated cell-killing functions. In the present study, we demonstrate that specific mutations of the CH2 domain in conjunction with lower hinge mutations can restore and sometimes enhance cell-killing functions while still retaining protease resistance. By identifying mutations that can restore either complement- or Fcγ receptor-mediated functions on a protease-resistant scaffold, we were able to generate a novel protease-resistant platform with selective cell-killing functionality. PMID:23986451

  14. Mitomycin C induces bystander killing in homogeneous and heterogeneous hepatoma cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Ratna; Sharma, Aanchal; Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide that is particularly refractory to chemotherapy. Several studies have proposed combination chemotherapy regimen for HCC treatment. However, these therapies are not effective in regressing tumor and prolonging survival of patient's suffering from HCC. Therefore, the development of more effective therapeutic tools and new strategies for the treatment of HCC are urgently needed. Over the last decade much attention has been focused on "bystander effect" as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of certain human tumors. Interest in this therapeutic approach originated from numerous reports describing the radiation induced bystander effect. However, the knowledge about chemotherapy induced bystander effect is still limited. Hence, chemotherapy induced bystander phenomenon in hepatoma cells was explored by utilizing Mitomycin C (MMC). Results MMC induced bystander killing was observed only in hepatoma cells and it did not occur in cervical cancer cells. MMC induced bystander killing was transferable via medium. It occurred in co-cultured cells indicating the involvement of secreted as well as membrane bound factors. FasL and TRAIL were detected in the conditioned medium from treated cells. In medium transfer experiment, pre-treatment with EDTA (a broad range protease inhibitor) diminished MMC induced bystander killing. Following drug exposure, expression of Fas and TRAIL receptors increased and treatment with neutralizing antibodies against FasL and TRAIL inhibited bystander killing. Conclusion Our results highlight the therapeutic importance of MMC in the treatment of HCC and implicate role of membrane bound and secreted forms of FasL and TRAIL in MMC induced bystander killing. PMID:19845939

  15. Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, M.; Gibbons, G. W.; Holten, J.-W. van; Horvathy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2014-12-15

    A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

  16. Deprivations, futures and the wrongness of killing.

    PubMed

    Marquis, D

    2001-12-01

    In my essay, Why abortion is immoral, I criticised discussions of the morality of abortion in which the crucial issue is whether fetuses are human beings or whether fetuses are persons. Both argument strategies are inadequate because they rely on indefensible assumptions. Why should being a human being or being a person make a moral difference? I argued that the correct account of the morality of abortion should be based upon a defensible account of why killing children and adults is wrong. I claimed that what makes killing us wrong is that our premature deaths deprive us of our futures of value, that is, the goods of life we would have experienced had we survived. This account of the wrongness of killing explains why killing is one of the worst of crimes and how killing greatly harms the victim. It coheres with the attitudes of those with cancer or HIV facing premature death. It explains why we believe it is wrong to kill infants (as personhood theories do not). It does not entail that it wrongs a human being to end her life if she is in persistent vegetative state or if her future must consist only of unbearable physical suffering and she wants to die (as sanctity of human life theories do not). This account of the wrongness of killing implies (with some defensible additional assumptions) that abortion is immoral because we were fetuses once and we know those fetuses had futures of value. Mark Brown claims that this potential future of value account is unsound because it implies that we have welfare rights to what we need to stay alive that most people would reject. I argue that Brown is incorrect in two ways: a welfare right to what we need to stay alive is not directly implied by my account and, in addition, most of us do believe that dependent human beings have substantial welfare rights to what they need to stay alive. Brown argues that depriving us of a future of value of which we have mental representations both is a better explanation of the wrongness of

  17. Parricide: Children Who Kill Their Parents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    adolescents who kill their parents. The research centers on who is the offender, why he or she has used parricide as a solution to an unresolvable problem...parricide. Conclusions Reached Based on the results of the literature review three conclusions were reached. First, adolescents who commit parricide have been...at the hands of their abuser. Secondly, the treatment of these adolescents by the criminal justice system varies greatly depending on the willingness

  18. 11. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF KILLING FLOOR ON LEVEL 4; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW OF KILLING FLOOR ON LEVEL 4; LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD SPLITTERS' PLATFORMS - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  19. GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  20. [Augmentation technique on the proximal humerus].

    PubMed

    Scola, A; Gebhard, F; Röderer, G

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic fractures is still a challenge. The advantages of augmentation with respect to primary in vitro stability and the clinical use for the proximal humerus are presented in this article. In this study six paired human humeri were randomized into an augmented and a non-augmented group. Osteosynthesis was performed with a PHILOS plate (Synthes®). In the augmented group the two screws finding purchase in the weakest cancellous bone were augmented. The specimens were tested in a 3-part fracture model in a varus bending test. The augmented PHILOS plates withstood significantly more load cycles until failure. The correlation to bone mineral density (BMD) showed that augmentation could partially compensate for low BMD. The augmentation of the screws in locked plating in a proximal humerus fracture model is effective in improving the primary stability in a cyclic varus bending test. The targeted augmentation of two particular screws in a region of low bone quality within the humeral head was almost as effective as four screws with twice the amount of bone cement. Screw augmentation combined with a knowledge of the local bone quality could be more effective in enhancing the primary stability of a proximal humerus locking plate because the effect of augmentation can be exploited more effectively limiting it to the degree required. The technique of augmentation is simple and can be applied in open and minimally invasive procedures. When the correct procedure is used, complications (cement leakage into the joint) can be avoided.

  1. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  2. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-01-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood. PMID:11353851

  3. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J C; Liao, C J; Lewis, K; Klibanov, A M

    2001-05-22

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 +/- 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 +/- 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  4. Designing surfaces that kill bacteria on contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, Joerg C.; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lewis, Kim; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2001-05-01

    Poly(4-vinyl-N-alkylpyridinium bromide) was covalently attached to glass slides to create a surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact. The antibacterial properties were assessed by spraying aqueous suspensions of bacterial cells on the surface, followed by air drying and counting the number of cells remaining viable (i.e., capable of growing colonies). Amino glass slides were acylated with acryloyl chloride, copolymerized with 4-vinylpyridine, and N-alkylated with different alkyl bromides (from propyl to hexadecyl). The resultant surfaces, depending on the alkyl group, were able to kill up to 94 ± 4% of Staphylococcus aureus cells sprayed on them. A surface alternatively created by attaching poly(4-vinylpyridine) to a glass slide and alkylating it with hexyl bromide killed 94 ± 3% of the deposited S. aureus cells. On surfaces modified with N-hexylated poly(4-vinylpyridine), the numbers of viable cells of another Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as of the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, dropped more than 100-fold compared with the original amino glass. In contrast, the number of viable bacterial cells did not decline significantly after spraying on such common materials as ceramics, plastics, metals, and wood.

  5. Killing, letting die, and withdrawing aid.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    One of the aims of this article is to contribute to the identification of the empirical criteria governing the use of the concepts of killing and letting die. I will not attempt a comprehensive analysis of the concepts but will limit the inquiry to certain problematic cases -- namely, cases involving the removal or withdrawal of life-supporting aid or protection. The analysis of these cases will, however, shed light on the criteria for distinguishing killing and letting die in other cases as well. My overall aims in the article are partly constructive and partly skeptical. I hope to advance our understanding of the nature of the distinction between killing and letting die. This, I believe, will enable us to defend the moral relevance of the distinction against certain objections -- in particular, objections that claim that the distinction fails to coincide with commonsense moral intuitions. Yet I will suggest that, as we get clearer about the nature of the distinction and the sources of its intuitive appeal, it may seem that the intuitions it supports are not so well grounded as one could wish.

  6. Killing spinors, twistor - spinors and Hijazi inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichnerowicz, Andre

    Let (W, g) be a spin manifold of dimension n. In terms of the Dirac operator P of (W, g), we introduce on the spinor fields a conformally covariant first-order operator D that is strictly connected with the twistor-spinors. We show that the operator (Δ - ρ) (ρ = (n/4(n - 1))R) is positive. For a compact spin manifold of dimension n ⩾ 3, the existences of harmonic spinors and twistor-spinors ≠ O are mutually exclusive, except for the parallel spinors. By means of a universal formula, we show that the Hijazi inequality [8] holds for every spinor field such that (Pψ, Pψ) = λ 2(ψ, ψ) (λ = const). In the limiting case, the manifold admits a Killing spinor which can be evaluated in terms of ψ. Using the Yamabe-Schoen theorem [15], we prove that, if the space K of the twistor-spinors of (W, g) is not reduced to zero, there is a conformal change of the metric g giving a manifold with Killing spinors ≠ 0. Interpretation of dim K in terms of these spaces of Killing spinors. If the compact spin manifold (W, g) of dimension n ⩾ 3 is not conformally isometric with the sphere, every twistor-spinor is without zero on W.

  7. Bioengineered viral vectors for targeting and killing prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-xin; Jia, William; Rennie, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    Enabling the transduction of therapeutic gene expression exclusively in diseased sites is the key to developing more effective treatments for advanced prostate cancer using viral-based therapy. While prostate cancers that express high levels of HER-2 are resistant to the killing effects of trastuzumab, they can be targeted for selective gene expression and destruction by lentiviruses with envelope proteins engineered to bind to this therapeutic antibody. More importantly, after intravenous injection, this trastuzumab-bound lentivirus is able to target castration-resistant prostate tumor xenografts, albeit with low efficiency. This proof of principle opens up multiple possibilities for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer using a viral-based therapy. However, to be safe and more effective, the viral vectors must target prostate cancer cells more selectively and efficiently. A higher degree of specificity and efficiency of cancer cell targeting can be achieved by engineering viral vectors to bind to a specific cell surface marker and by controlling the expression of the therapeutic payload at transcriptional level, with a tissue-specific promoter, and at the translational level, with a regulatory sequences inserted into either the 5'UTR or 3'UTR regions of the therapeutic gene(s). The latter would be designed to ensure that translation of this mRNA occurs exclusively in malignant cells. Furthermore, in order to obtain a potent anti-tumor effect, viral vectors would be engineered to express pro-apoptotic genes, intra-cellar antibodies/nucleotide aptamers to block critical proteins, or siRNAs to knockdown essential cellular mRNAs. Alternatively, controlled expression of an essential viral gene would restore replication competence to the virus and enable selective oncolysis of tumor cells. Successful delivery of such bioengineered viruses may provide a more effective way to treat advanced prostate cancer.

  8. Measuring patient outcomes in breast augmentation: introducing the BREAST-Q Augmentation module.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Reavey, Patrick L; Klassen, Anne F; Scott, Amie; McCarthy, Colleen; Cano, Stefan J

    2009-01-01

    The Breast-Q Augmentation module is a new and unique questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes following breast augmentation. It has undergone a rigorous development and validation process and is currently the only questionnaire for breast augmentation that meets international and federal standards for questionnaire development. The Breast-Q Augmentation module covers a comprehensive set of concerns of breast augmentation patients, including satisfaction with breasts and impact on quality of life. With its excellent psychometric properties, the Breast-Q Augmentation module can provide clinicians and researchers with a wealth of essential data to improve the field of breast augmentation from the perspectives of both surgeons and patients.

  9. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-01-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value. PMID:27165120

  10. Silicone implants in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yanjun; Wu, Weihua; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Guangshen

    2002-01-01

    During the past six years, we have treated 406 patients with classical silicon augmentation rhinoplasty. The types and incidence of complications after subcutaneous or subfascial implantation were examined and discussed. We proposed that most complications are related to the depth of the implant and the character of the tissues. In order to improve our operation and prove our hypothesis, we performed subperiosteal augmentation rhinoplasty in 22 cases with satisfactory results. At the same time, we investigated the biomechanical properties of human nasal periosteum and fascia, including tensile strength, stress-strain relationship and stress relaxation characters under uniaxial tension. Although less elastic, the periosteum has more tensile strength than fascia. So, in the view of biomechanics, the periosteum is thicker, tougher, and stiffer than fascia, thus more suitable for covering silicon implants.

  11. Silicone implant in augmentation rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yanjun; Wu, Weihua; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Guangshen

    2002-11-01

    During the past 6 years the authors have treated 406 patients with classic silicone augmentation rhinoplasty. The types and incidence of complications after subcutaneous or subfascial implantation are examined and discussed. They propose that most complications are related to the depth of the implant and the character of the tissues. To improve their operation and to prove their hypothesis, they performed subperiosteal augmentation rhinoplasty in 22 patients with satisfactory results. At the same time, they investigated the biomechanical properties of human nasal periosteum and fascia, including tensile strength, the stress-strain relationship, and stress relaxation characteristics under uniaxial tension. Although it has less failure strain, the periosteum has more tensile strength than fascia. So, in the view of biomechanics, the periosteum is thicker, tougher, and stiffer than fascia, and thus more suitable for covering silicone implants.

  12. Augmented reality building operations tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  13. Effective Augmentation of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjian; Yu, Xinghuo; Stone, Lewi

    2016-05-01

    Networks science plays an enormous role in many aspects of modern society from distributing electrical power across nations to spreading information and social networking amongst global populations. While modern networks constantly change in size, few studies have sought methods for the difficult task of optimising this growth. Here we study theoretical requirements for augmenting networks by adding source or sink nodes, without requiring additional driver-nodes to accommodate the change i.e., conserving structural controllability. Our “effective augmentation” algorithm takes advantage of clusters intrinsic to the network topology, and permits rapidly and efficient augmentation of a large number of nodes in one time-step. “Effective augmentation” is shown to work successfully on a wide range of model and real networks. The method has numerous applications (e.g. study of biological, social, power and technological networks) and potentially of significant practical and economic value.

  14. Key roles of aquaporins in tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Marios C; Saadoun, Samira

    2015-10-01

    Aquaporins are protein channels that facilitate the flow of water across plasma cell membranes in response to osmotic gradients. This review summarizes the evidence that aquaporins play key roles in tumor biology including tumor-associated edema, tumor cell migration, tumor proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Aquaporin inhibitors may thus be a novel class of anti-tumor agents. However, attempts to produce small molecule aquaporin inhibitors have been largely unsuccessful. Recently, monoclonal human IgG antibodies against extracellular aquaporin-4 domains have become available and could be engineered to kill aquaporin-4 over-expressing cells in the malignant brain tumor glioblastoma. We conclude this review by discussing future directions in aquaporin tumor research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 9 CFR 113.205 - Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.205 Newcastle Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Newcastle Disease Vaccine... Newcastle disease virus supplied by or approved by Veterinary Services and the vaccinates observed each...

  16. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  17. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  18. 9 CFR 113.212 - Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.212 Bursal Disease Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bursal Disease Vaccine... postvaccination, challenge 20 vaccinates and 10 controls by eyedrop with a virulent infectious bursal...

  19. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  20. It's not just conflict that motivates killing of orangutans.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jacqueline T; Mengersen, Kerrie; Abram, Nicola K; Ancrenaz, Marc; Wells, Jessie A; Meijaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents' active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI) and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI). These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed.

  1. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine...

  2. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper Vaccine...

  3. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  4. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  5. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  6. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  7. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  8. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  9. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  10. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  11. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  12. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green... tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.)...

  13. 7 CFR 29.1018 - Fire-killed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-killed. 29.1018 Section 29.1018 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1018 Fire-killed. Any leaf of which 5 percent or more of its surface has a set green... tobacco may be described as fire-killed. (See Rule 23.)...

  14. 78 FR 43063 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill AK Railroad Bridge across Arthur Kill, mile 11.6, between Staten Island, New York and Elizabeth,...

  15. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  16. TDRSS Augmentation System for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems(GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  17. Military Applications of Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    NOTES book chapter in Handbook of Augmented Reality, 2011. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...real ob- jects by simply not rendering graphics where they are computed to be hidden from view; this is a standard property of the depth buffer in...Adam Lederer, Jason Jerald, Erik Tomlin, Eric Burns, Donald Char- ity, Joshua Eliason, Jesus Arango, and Scott Frees. In addition, the authors would like

  18. Photon management for augmented photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Dinh, Cao Thang; Sargent, Edward H.; Sinton, David

    2016-09-01

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria are some of nature's finest examples of solar energy conversion systems, effortlessly transforming inorganic carbon into complex molecules through photosynthesis. The efficiency of energy-dense hydrocarbon production by photosynthetic organisms is determined in part by the light collected by the microorganisms. Therefore, optical engineering has the potential to increase the productivity of algae cultivation systems used for industrial-scale biofuel synthesis. Herein, we explore and report emerging and promising material science and engineering innovations for augmenting microalgal photosynthesis.

  19. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  20. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  1. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  2. Lamotrigine augmentation in unipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Fabio Lopes; Hara, Claudia

    2003-03-01

    A significant number of patients with unipolar depression fail to achieve remission after one or a series of antidepressants. We present the results of a retrospective chart review of the efficacy and tolerability of lamotrigine as an augmentation drug in treatment-resistant unipolar depression. A previous absence of a response was defined as the clinically significant presence of depressive symptomatology after 6 weeks of treatment with an antidepressant, with at least 3 weeks at the maximum dose tolerated by the patient. The patients were rated retrospectively using the Clinical Global Impression rating scale. Seventy-six percent of the patients improved. Gender, age, basal severity of the episode and degree of previous non response were not statistically significantly associated with response to lamotrigine augmentation. Comorbidity showed a tendency to be negatively related with response to lamotrigine. Three patients abandoned the treatment with lamotrigine due to side-effects. Complaints were excessive somnolence, headache, dizziness, nausea and malaise. Data suggest that lamotrigine is a promising drug for treatment-refractory unipolar depression. Double-blind studies are necessary to confirm its use as an augmentation agent.

  3. EGFR-targeted diphtheria toxin stimulates TRAIL killing of glioblastoma cells by depleting anti-apoptotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Horita, Henrick; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Frankel, Arthur E; Thorburn, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    Current treatments for Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) involve surgery, radiotherapy, and cytotoxic chemotherapy; however, these treatments are not effective and there is an urgent need for better treatments. We investigated GBM cell killing by a novel drug combination involving DT-EGF, an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-targeted bacterial toxin, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) or antibodies that activate the TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5. DT-EGF kills GBM cells by a non apoptotic mechanism whereas TRAIL kills by inducing apoptosis. GBM cells treated with DT-EGF and TRAIL were killed in a synergistic fashion in vitro and the combination was more effective than either treatment alone in vivo. Tumor cell death with the combination occurred by caspase activation and apoptosis due to DT-EGF positively regulating TRAIL killing by depleting FLIP, a selective inhibitor of TRAIL receptor-induced apoptosis. These data provide a mechanism-based rationale for combining targeted toxins and TRAIL receptor agonists to treat GBM.

  4. Preliminary study on the clinical application of augmented reality neuronavigation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, D; Cho, B; Mori, M; Kikkawa, Y; Amano, T; Nakamizo, A; Yoshimoto, K; Mizoguchi, M; Tomikawa, M; Hong, J; Hashizume, M; Sasaki, T

    2013-03-01

    To develop an augmented reality (AR) neuronavigation system with Web cameras and examine its clinical utility. The utility of the system was evaluated in three patients with brain tumors. One patient had a glioblastoma and two patients had convexity meningiomas. Our navigation system comprised the open-source software 3D Slicer (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA), the infrared optical tracking sensor Polaris (Northern Digital Inc., Waterloo, Canada), and Web cameras. We prepared two different types of Web cameras: a handheld type and a headband type. Optical markers were attached to each Web camera. We used this system for skin incision planning before the operation, during craniotomy, and after dural incision. We were able to overlay these images in all cases. In Case 1, accuracy could not be evaluated because the tumor was not on the surface, though it was generally suitable for the outline of the external ear and the skin. In Cases 2 and 3, the augmented reality error was ∼2 to 3 mm. AR technology was examined with Web cameras in neurosurgical operations. Our results suggest that this technology is clinically useful in neurosurgical procedures, particularly for brain tumors close to the brain surface. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Striae distensae after breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Basile, Filipe Volpe; Basile, Arthur Volpe; Basile, Antonio Roberto

    2012-08-01

    One known but not fully understood complication after breast augmentation is the new onset of stretch marks (striae distensae) on the surgically treated breast. To date, all publications on this subject have been case reports. No report has fully described the actual incidence, risk factors, or management of striae distensae after breast surgery. This study prospectively followed patients who underwent primary breast augmentation using silicone implants in a single group practice from 2007 to 2011. New-onset striae distensae were actively investigated. Time from surgery to the moment of striae onset, patient age, nulliparity, use of oral contraceptives, overweight, personal history of stretch marks, and other variables were evaluated. A total of 409 patients were included in the study. In 19 cases (4.6%), new-onset striae distensae after breast augmentation were observed. The population with striae distensae was significantly younger than the total population (29.56 vs 20.91 years; p=0.012). Striae distensae also were more common in nulliparous than in multiparous women (8.29 vs 0.52%; p=0.006), overweight women (17.77 vs 3.02%; p=0.016), women using oral contraceptives (7.89 vs 0.55%; p=0.008), and women with a personal history of stretch marks (8.97 vs 3.36%; p=0.031). No relation was shown regarding implant pocket type, size, or profile. Striae distensae may be a common but underreported complication after breast augmentation. In this series, striae distensae developed in 4.6% of the patients within 1 year after breast augmentation. Severity may vary from inconspicuous small marks (classifications 1 and 2) to wide red and active striae rubra (classifications 3 and 4). Nulliparity, use of oral contraceptives, overweight, personal history of stretch marks, and younger age were related to a higher incidence of striae distensae. The increased rates in these groups may be associated with their exposure to higher estrogen levels and the important role of this hormone

  6. Stepwise cytoskeletal polarization as a series of checkpoints in innate but not adaptive cytolytic killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wülfing, Christoph; Purtic, Bozidar; Klem, Jennifer; Schatzle, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Cytolytic killing is a major effector mechanism in the elimination of virally infected and tumor cells. The innate cytolytic effectors, natural killer (NK) cells, and the adaptive effectors, cytotoxic T cells (CTL), despite differential immune recognition, both use the same lytic mechanism, cytolytic granule release. Using live cell video fluorescence microscopy in various primary cell models of NK cell and CTL killing, we show here that on tight target cell contact, a majority of the NK cells established cytoskeletal polarity required for effective lytic function slowly or incompletely. In contrast, CTLs established cytoskeletal polarity rapidly. In addition, NK cell killing was uniquely sensitive to minor interference with cytoskeletal dynamics. We propose that the stepwise NK cell cytoskeletal polarization constitutes a series of checkpoints in NK cell killing. In addition, the use of more deliberate progression to effector function to compensate for inferior immune recognition specificity provides a mechanistic explanation for how the same effector function can be used in the different functional contexts of the innate and adaptive immune response.

  7. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R.; Zhang, Xiaolong; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers and the bottom one functionalized with double-stranded DNA. The results show that the top hydrogel layer was able to catch target cells with high efficiency and specificity, and that the bottom hydrogel layer could sequester doxorubicin (Dox) for sustained drug release. Importantly, the released Dox could kill 90% of the cells after 1-h residence of the cells on the hydrogel. After the cell release, this bifunctional hydrogel could be regenerated for continuous cell catching and killing. Therefore, the data presented in this study has successfully demonstrated the potential of developing a material system with the functions of attracting, catching and killing diseased cells (e.g., circulating tumor cells) or even invading microorganisms (e.g., bacteria). PMID:26396063

  8. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R; Zhang, Xiaolong; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-09-23

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers and the bottom one functionalized with double-stranded DNA. The results show that the top hydrogel layer was able to catch target cells with high efficiency and specificity, and that the bottom hydrogel layer could sequester doxorubicin (Dox) for sustained drug release. Importantly, the released Dox could kill 90% of the cells after 1-h residence of the cells on the hydrogel. After the cell release, this bifunctional hydrogel could be regenerated for continuous cell catching and killing. Therefore, the data presented in this study has successfully demonstrated the potential of developing a material system with the functions of attracting, catching and killing diseased cells (e.g., circulating tumor cells) or even invading microorganisms (e.g., bacteria).

  9. Noether versus Killing symmetry of conformally flat Friedmann metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Kara, A. H.

    2007-12-01

    In a recent study Noether symmetries of some static spacetime metrics in comparison with Killing vectors of corresponding spacetimes were studied. It was shown that Noether symmetries provide additional conservation laws that are not given by Killing vectors. In an attempt to understand how Noether symmetries compare with conformal Killing vectors, we find the Noether symmetries of the flat Friedmann cosmological model. We show that the conformally transformed flat Friedman model admits additional conservation laws not given by the Killing or conformal Killing vectors. Inter alia, these additional conserved quantities provide a mechanism to twice reduce the geodesic equations via the associated Noether symmetries.

  10. An Fc engineering approach that modulates antibody-dependent cytokine release without altering cell-killing functions.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R; Strohl, William R; Jordan, Robert E; Brezski, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often mediate target cell-killing by eliciting immune effector functions via Fc region interactions with cellular and humoral components of the immune system. Key functions include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, there has been increased appreciation that along with cell-killing functions, the induction of antibody-dependent cytokine release (ADCR) can also influence disease microenvironments and therapeutic outcomes. Historically, most Fc engineering approaches have been aimed toward modulating ADCC, ADCP, or CDC. In the present study, we describe an Fc engineering approach that, while not resulting in impaired ADCC or ADCP, profoundly affects ADCR. As such, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as effector cells against mAb-opsonized tumor cells, the described mAb variants elicit a similar profile and quantity of cytokines as IgG1. In contrast, although the variants elicit similar levels of tumor cell-killing as IgG1 with macrophage effector cells, the variants do not elicit macrophage-mediated ADCR against mAb-opsonized tumor cells. This study demonstrates that Fc engineering approaches can be employed to uncouple macrophage-mediated phagocytic and subsequent cell-killing functions from cytokine release.

  11. Impact of Soft Tissue Heterogeneity on Augmented Reality for Liver Surgery.

    PubMed

    Haouchine, Nazim; Cotin, Stephane; Peterlik, Igor; Dequidt, Jeremie; Lopez, Mario Sanz; Kerrien, Erwan; Berger, Marie-Odile

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for real-time augmented reality of internal liver structures during minimally invasive hepatic surgery. Vessels and tumors computed from pre-operative CT scans can be overlaid onto the laparoscopic view for surgery guidance. Compared to current methods, our method is able to locate the in-depth positions of the tumors based on partial three-dimensional liver tissue motion using a real-time biomechanical model. This model permits to properly handle the motion of internal structures even in the case of anisotropic or heterogeneous tissues, as it is the case for the liver and many anatomical structures. Experimentations conducted on phantom liver permits to measure the accuracy of the augmentation while real-time augmentation on in vivo human liver during real surgery shows the benefits of such an approach for minimally invasive surgery.

  12. Dynamic kill: controlling wild wells a new way

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, E.M.; Soeiinah, E.

    1981-10-01

    Dynamic kill describes a technique for terminating a blowout utilizing flowing frictional pressure to supplement the hydrostatic pressure of the kill fluid being injected through the relief well and up the blowing well. Therefore, a lighter kill fluid such as water can be implemented. The objective is to allow a blowout to be killed without breaking down the formation so the maximum amount of fluid can be circulated through the relief well by not losing fluid to a fractured formation. This allows optimum control during the kill operation and stable communication between the two wells. By allowing more fluid to be applied to the kill through one relief well, dynamic kill also increases the probability that one relief well will be sufficient. When the well is dynamically dead, the initial kill fluid, which will usually be too light to hold the well dead in a static condition, is replaced with a heavier kill mud. In fact, three weights of mud may be required to allow control during the transition from low density initial dynamic kill mud to heavy final kill mud. 5 refs.

  13. Can dendritic cells improve whole cancer cell vaccines based on immunogenically killed cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Cicchelero, Laetitia; Denies, Sofie; Devriendt, Bert; de Rooster, Hilde; Sanders, Niek N

    2015-12-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) offers interesting opportunities in cancer cell (CC) vaccine manufacture, as it increases the immunogenicity of the dead CC. Furthermore, fusion of CCs with dendritic cells (DCs) is considered a superior method for generating whole CC vaccines. Therefore, in this work, we determined in naive mice whether immunogenically killed CCs per se (CC vaccine) elicit an antitumoral immune response different from the response observed when immunogenically killed CCs are associated with DCs through fusion (fusion vaccine) or through co-incubation (co-incubation vaccine). After tumor inoculation, the type of immune response in the prophylactically vaccinated mice differed between the groups. In more detail, fusion vaccines elicited a humoral anticancer response, whereas the co-incubation and CC vaccine mainly induced a cellular response. Despite these differences, all three approaches offered a prophylactic protection against tumor development in the murine mammary carcinoma model. In summary, it can be concluded that whole CC vaccines based on immunogenically killed CCs may not necessarily require association with DCs to elicit a protective anticancer immune response. If this finding can be endorsed in other cancer models, the manufacture of CC vaccines would greatly benefit from this new insight, as production of DC-based vaccines is laborious, time-consuming and expensive.

  14. Can dendritic cells improve whole cancer cell vaccines based on immunogenically killed cancer cells?

    PubMed Central

    Cicchelero, Laetitia; Denies, Sofie; Devriendt, Bert; de Rooster, Hilde; Sanders, Niek N

    2015-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) offers interesting opportunities in cancer cell (CC) vaccine manufacture, as it increases the immunogenicity of the dead CC. Furthermore, fusion of CCs with dendritic cells (DCs) is considered a superior method for generating whole CC vaccines. Therefore, in this work, we determined in naive mice whether immunogenically killed CCs per se (CC vaccine) elicit an antitumoral immune response different from the response observed when immunogenically killed CCs are associated with DCs through fusion (fusion vaccine) or through co-incubation (co-incubation vaccine). After tumor inoculation, the type of immune response in the prophylactically vaccinated mice differed between the groups. In more detail, fusion vaccines elicited a humoral anticancer response, whereas the co-incubation and CC vaccine mainly induced a cellular response. Despite these differences, all three approaches offered a prophylactic protection against tumor development in the murine mammary carcinoma model. In summary, it can be concluded that whole CC vaccines based on immunogenically killed CCs may not necessarily require association with DCs to elicit a protective anticancer immune response. If this finding can be endorsed in other cancer models, the manufacture of CC vaccines would greatly benefit from this new insight, as production of DC-based vaccines is laborious, time-consuming and expensive. PMID:26587315

  15. Triops (Entomostraca) eggs killed only by boiling.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D B

    1968-07-19

    Temporary rainpools near Khartoum, Sudan, are inhabited by the notostracan crustacean Triops which completes its life cycle within 4 weeks. The annual rains fall in late summer, and throughout the winter and early summer the eggs of Triops remain in the dried mud or dust where they may be exposed to temperatures up to 80 degrees C. Laboratory experiments show that they can withstand temperatures up to within 1 degrees C of boiling, but are killed in partial vacuum by 70 degrees C, at atmospheric pressure by 100 degrees C, or under pressure by 105 degrees C. Exposure to high temperature seems to be necessary to break the egg diapause.

  16. The killing efficiency of soft iron shot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, R.; Longcore, J.R.

    1969-01-01

    A cooperative research effort between the ammunition industry and the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is aimed at finding a suitable non-toxic substitute for lead shot. A contract study by an independent research organization evaluated ways of coating or detoxifying lead shot or replacing it with another metal. As a result of that study, the only promising candidate is soft iron. Previous tests of hard iron shot had suggested that its killing effectiveness was poor at longer ranges due to the lower density. In addition, its hardness caused excessive damage to shotgun barrels. A unique, automated shooting facility was constructed at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to test the killing effectiveness of soft iron shot under controlled conditions. Tethered game-farm mallards were transported across a shooting point in a manner simulating free flight. A microswitch triggered a mounted shotgun so that each shot was 'perfect.' A soft iron shot, in Number 4 size, was produced by the ammunition industry and loaded in 12-gauge shells to give optimum ballistic performance. Commercial loads of lead shot in both Number 4 and Number 6 size were used for comparison. A total of 2,010 ducks were shot at ranges of 30 to 65 yards and at broadside and head-on angles in a statistically designed procedure. The following data were recorded for each duck: time until death, broken wing or leg bones, and number of embedded shot. Those ducks not killed outright were held for 10 days. From these data, ducks were categorized as 'probably bagged,' 'probably lost cripples,' or survivors. The test revealed that the killing effectiveness of this soft iron shot was superior to its anticipated performance and close to that obtained with commercial lead loads containing an equal number of pellets. Bagging a duck, in terms of rapid death or broken wing, was primarily dependent on the probability of a shot striking that vital area, and therefore a function of range. There was no indication

  17. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  18. Micro-sociology of mass rampage killings.

    PubMed

    Collins, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Spectacular but very rare violent events such as mass killings by habitual non-criminals cannot be explained by factors which are very widespread, such as possession of firearms, being a victim of bullying, an introvert, or a career failure. A stronger clue is clandestine preparation of attack by one or two individuals, against randomly chosen representatives of a hated collective identity. Mass killers develop a deep back-stage, obsessed with planning their attack, overcoming social inferiority and isolation by an emotion of clandestine excitement.

  19. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  20. Augmented-plane-wave forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, José M.; Williams, Arthur R.

    1990-11-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of a calculational method of electronic-structure theory. The method combines the power (tractable basis-set size) and flexibility (transition and first-row elements) of the augmented-plane-wave method with the computational efficiency of the Car-Parrinello method of molecular dynamics and total-energy minimization. Equilibrium geometry and vibrational frequencies in agreement with experiment are presented for Si, to demonstrate agreement with existing methods and for Cu, N2, and H2O to demonstrate the broader applicability of the approach.

  1. A small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor increases localization of inducible nitric oxide synthase to the macrophage phagosome and enhances bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Perry, Jeffrey W; Wobus, Christiane E; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Kapuria, Vaibhav; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2011-12-01

    Macrophages are key mediators of antimicrobial defense and innate immunity. Innate intracellular defense mechanisms can be rapidly regulated at the posttranslational level by the coordinated addition and removal of ubiquitin by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). While ubiquitin ligases have been extensively studied, the contribution of DUBs to macrophage innate immune function is incompletely defined. We therefore employed a small molecule DUB inhibitor, WP1130, to probe the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to bacterial infection. Treatment of activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) with WP1130 significantly augmented killing of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. WP1130 also induced killing of phagosome-restricted bacteria, implicating a bactericidal mechanism associated with the phagosome, such as the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). WP1130 had a minimal antimicrobial effect in macrophages lacking iNOS, indicating that iNOS is an effector mechanism for WP1130-mediated bacterial killing. Although overall iNOS levels were not notably different, we found that WP1130 significantly increased colocalization of iNOS with the Listeria-containing phagosome during infection. Taken together, our data indicate that the deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 increases bacterial killing in macrophages by enhancing iNOS localization to the phagosome and suggest a potential role for ubiquitin regulation in iNOS trafficking.

  2. Kill: boosting HIV-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Lydie

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that purging the latent HIV reservoir in virally suppressed individuals will require both the induction of viral replication from its latent state and the elimination of these reactivated HIV-infected cells ('Shock and Kill' strategy). Boosting potent HIV-specific CD8 T cells is a promising way to achieve an HIV cure. Recent studies provided the rationale for developing immune interventions to increase the numbers, function and location of HIV-specific CD8 T cells to purge HIV reservoirs. Multiple approaches are being evaluated including very early suppression of HIV replication in acute infection, adoptive cell transfer, therapeutic vaccination or use of immunomodulatory molecules. New assays to measure the killing and antiviral function of induced HIV-specific CD8 T cells have been developed to assess the efficacy of these new approaches. The strategies combining HIV reactivation and immunobased therapies to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells can be tested in in-vivo and in-silico models to accelerate the design of new clinical trials. New immunobased strategies are explored to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells able to purge the HIV-infected cells with the ultimate goal of achieving spontaneous control of viral replication without antiretroviral treatment.

  3. The Calabi complex and Killing sheaf cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2017-03-01

    It has recently been noticed that the degeneracies of the Poisson bracket of linearized gravity on constant curvature Lorentzian manifold can be described in terms of the cohomologies of a certain complex of differential operators. This complex was first introduced by Calabi and its cohomology is known to be isomorphic to that of the (locally constant) sheaf of Killing vectors. We review the structure of the Calabi complex in a novel way, with explicit calculations based on representation theory of GL(n) , and also some tools for studying its cohomology in terms of locally constant sheaves. We also conjecture how these tools would adapt to linearized gravity on other backgrounds and to other gauge theories. The presentation includes explicit formulas for the differential operators in the Calabi complex, arguments for its local exactness, discussion of generalized Poincaré duality, methods of computing the cohomology of locally constant sheaves, and example calculations of Killing sheaf cohomologies of some black hole and cosmological Lorentzian manifolds.

  4. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E.; Scordo, Julia M.; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Moliva, Juan I.; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage. PMID:25748325

  5. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E; Scordo, Julia M; Sasindran, Smitha J; Moliva, Juan I; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2015-09-15

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage.

  6. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  7. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of BCL6 Kills DLBCL Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchietti, L.C.; Ghetu, A.F.; Zhu, X.; Da Silva, G.F.; Zhong, S.; Matthews, M.; Bunting, K.L.; Polo, J.M.; Fares, C.; Arrowsmith, C.H.; Yang, S.N.; Garcia, M.; Coop, A.; Mackerell, A.D.; Prive, G.G.; Melnick, A.

    2010-09-22

    The BCL6 transcriptional repressor is the most frequently involved oncogene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We combined computer-aided drug design with functional assays to identify low-molecular-weight compounds that bind to the corepressor binding groove of the BCL6 BTB domain. One such compound disrupted BCL6/corepressor complexes in vitro and in vivo, and was observed by X-ray crystallography and NMR to bind the critical site within the BTB groove. This compound could induce expression of BCL6 target genes and kill BCL6-positive DLBCL cell lines. In xenotransplantation experiments, the compound was nontoxic and potently suppressed DLBCL tumors in vivo. The compound also killed primary DLBCLs from human patients.

  8. 75 FR 62469 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and Their...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Kills, and Their Tributaries, NY, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... facilitate bridge rehabilitation maintenance. DATES: This deviation is effective from October 26, 2010... scheduled bridge rehabilitation maintenance previously authorized for two six-week closures from July 5...

  9. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Gable, Thomas D.; Windels, Steve K.; Bruggink, John G.; Homkes, Austin T.

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers. PMID:27992441

  10. Where and How Wolves (Canis lupus) Kill Beavers (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Gable, Thomas D; Windels, Steve K; Bruggink, John G; Homkes, Austin T

    2016-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis) can be a significant prey item for wolves (Canis lupus) in boreal ecosystems due to their abundance and vulnerability on land. How wolves hunt beavers in these systems is largely unknown, however, because observing predation is challenging. We inferred how wolves hunt beavers by identifying kill sites using clusters of locations from GPS-collared wolves in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. We identified 22 sites where wolves from 4 different packs killed beavers. We classified these kill sites into 8 categories based on the beaver-habitat type near which each kill occurred. Seasonal variation existed in types of kill sites as 7 of 12 (58%) kills in the spring occurred at sites below dams and on shorelines, and 8 of 10 (80%) kills in the fall occurred near feeding trails and canals. From these kill sites we deduced that the typical hunting strategy has 3 components: 1) waiting near areas of high beaver use (e.g., feeding trails) until a beaver comes near shore or ashore, 2) using vegetation, the dam, or other habitat features for concealment, and 3) immediately attacking the beaver, or ambushing the beaver by cutting off access to water. By identifying kill sites and inferring hunting behavior we have provided the most complete description available of how and where wolves hunt and kill beavers.

  11. Positive and negative functions of B lymphocytes in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meng; Sun, Qian; Wang, Jian; Pan, Wei; Ren, Xiubao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicated that B lymphocytes exerted complex functions in tumor immunity. On the one hand, B lymphocytes can inhibit tumor development through antibody generation, antigen presentation, tumor tissue interaction, and direct killing. On the other hand, B lymphocytes have tumor-promoting functions. A typical type of B lymphocytes, termed regulatory B cells, is confirmed to attenuate immune response in a tumor environment. In this paper, we summarize the current understanding of B-cell functions in tumor immunology, which may shed light on potential therapeutic strategies against cancer. PMID:27331871

  12. Scheduling Chemotherapy: Catch 22 between Cell Kill and Resistance Evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Shea N.

    2000-01-01

    Dose response curves show that prolonged drug exposure at a low concentration may kill more cells than short exposures at higher drug concentrations, particularly for cell cycle phase specific drugs. Applying drugs at low concentrations for prolonged periods, however, allows cells with partial resistance to evolve higher levels of resistance through stepwise processes such as gene amplification. Models are developed for cell cycle specific (CS) and cell cycle nonspecific (CNS) drugs to identify the schedule of drug application that balances this tradeoff. The models predict that a CS drug may be applied most effectively by splitting the cumulative dose intomore » many (>40) fractions applied by long-term chemotherapy, while CNS drugs may be better applied in fewer than 10 fractions applied over a shorter term. The model suggests that administering each fraction by continuous infusion may be more effective than giving the drug as a bolus, whether the drug is CS or CNS. In addition, tumors with a low growth fraction or slow rate of cell division are predicted to be controlled more easily with CNS drugs, while those with a high proliferative fraction or fast cell division rate may respond better to CS drugs.« less

  13. Psychotherapy Augmentation through Preconscious Priming

    PubMed Central

    Borgeat, François; O’Connor, Kieron; Amado, Danielle; St-Pierre-Delorme, Marie-Ève

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that repeated preconscious (masked) priming of personalized positive cognitions could augment cognitive change and facilitate achievement of patients’ goals following a therapy. Methods: Twenty social phobic patients (13 women) completed a 36-weeks study beginning by 12 weeks of group behavioral therapy. After the therapy, they received 6 weeks of preconscious priming and 6 weeks of a control procedure in a randomized cross-over design. The Priming condition involved listening twice daily with a passive attitude to a recording of individualized formulations of appropriate cognitions and attitudes masked by music. The Control condition involved listening to an indistinguishable recording where the formulations had been replaced by random numbers. Changes in social cognitions were measured by the Social Interaction Self Statements Test (SISST). Results: Patients improved following therapy. The Priming procedure was associated with increased positive cognitions and decreased negative cognitions on the SISST while the Control procedure was not. The Priming procedure induced more cognitive change when applied immediately after the group therapy. Conclusion: An effect of priming was observed on social phobia related cognitions in the expected direction. This self administered addition to a therapy could be seen as an augmentation strategy. PMID:23508724

  14. PRP Augmentation for ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Current research is investigating new methods to enhance tissue healing to speed up recovery time and decrease the risk of failure in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Biological augmentation is one of the most exploited strategies, in particular the application of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP). Aim of the present paper is to systematically review all the preclinical and clinical papers dealing with the application of PRP as a biological enhancer during ACL reconstructive surgery. Thirty-two studies were included in the present review. The analysis of the preclinical evidence revealed that PRP was able to improve the healing potential of the tendinous graft both in terms of histological and biomechanical performance. Looking at the available clinical evidence, results were not univocal. PRP administration proved to be a safe procedure and there were some evidences that it could favor the donor site healing in case of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft and positively contribute to graft maturation over time, whereas the majority of the papers did not show beneficial effects in terms of bony tunnels/graft area integration. Furthermore, PRP augmentation did not provide superior functional results at short term evaluation. PMID:26064903

  15. Augmented reality in medical education?

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality.

  16. Mertk on tumor macrophages is a therapeutic target to prevent tumor recurrence following radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Marka R.; Baird, Jason; Friedman, David; Savage, Talicia; Uhde, Lauren; Alice, Alejandro; Cottam, Benjamin; Young, Kristina; Newell, Pippa; Nguyen, Cynthia; Bambina, Shelly; Kramer, Gwen; Akporiaye, Emmanuel; Malecka, Anna; Jackson, Andrew; Gough, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy provides a means to kill large numbers of cancer cells in a controlled location resulting in the release of tumor-specific antigens and endogenous adjuvants. However, by activating pathways involved in apoptotic cell recognition and phagocytosis, irradiated cancer cells engender suppressive phenotypes in macrophages. We demonstrate that the macrophage-specific phagocytic receptor, Mertk is upregulated in macrophages in the tumor following radiation therapy. Ligation of Mertk on macrophages results in anti-inflammatory cytokine responses via NF-kB p50 upregulation, which in turn limits tumor control following radiation therapy. We demonstrate that in immunogenic tumors, loss of Mertk is sufficient to permit tumor cure following radiation therapy. However, in poorly immunogenic tumors, TGFb inhibition is also required to result in tumor cure following radiation therapy. These data demonstrate that Mertk is a highly specific target whose absence permits tumor control in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:27602953

  17. Tools for augmented-reality-based liver resection planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitinger, Bernhard; Bornik, Alexander; Beichel, Reinhard; Werkgartner, Georg; Sorantin, Erich

    2004-05-01

    Surgical resection has evolved to an accepted and widely-used method for the treatment of liver tumors. In order to elaborate an optimal resection strategy, computer-aided planning tools are required. However, measurements based on 2D cross sectional images are difficult to perform. Moreover, resection planning with current desktopbased systems using 3D visualization is also a tedious task because of limited 3D interaction. For facilitating the planning process, different tools are presented allowing easy user interaction in an Augmented Reality environment. Methods for quantitative analysis like volume calculation and distance measurements are discussed with focus on the user interaction aspect. In addition, a tool for automatically generating anatomical resection proposals based on knowledge about tumor locations and the portal vein tree is described. The presented methods are part of an evolving liver surgery planning system which is currently evaluated by physicians.

  18. Urban Terrain Modeling for Augmented Reality Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in wearable computers have begun to make mobile augmented reality systems a reality (Feiner, 1997; Piekarski, 1999, Julier, 2000...Augmented Reality Applications 3 Figure 1. A wearable augmented reality system. The large size of the system is the result of the fact that it is...for the light to travel out to the target and back to the LIDAR is used to determine the range of the target. LIDAR operates in the ultraviolet , visible

  19. Striae distensae after subfascial breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos; Rodopoulou, Stavroula

    2008-03-01

    Striae distensae or stretch marks after breast augmentation are a rare complication. To date, 10 cases have been published. In seven of these cases, the implant was placed in a subglandular position and in the other three cases, placement was submuscular. Two cases of stretch marks in two young nulliparous women who underwent subfacial breast augmentation are presented. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of striae distensae after subfascial breast augmentation.

  20. A Tracker Alignment Framework for Augmented Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    A Tracker Alignment Framework for Augmented Reality Yohan Baillot and Simon J. Julier ITT Advanced Engineering & Sciences 2560 Huntington Ave...with as few as three measurements. 1. Introduction Almost all Augmented Reality (AR) systems use a track- ing system to capture motion of objects in...DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Tracker Alignment Framework for Augmented Reality 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT